Science.gov

Sample records for epoch dependent dark

  1. Sub-horizon evolution of cold dark matter perturbations through dark matter-dark energy equivalence epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Piattella, O.F.; Martins, D.L.A.; Casarini, L. E-mail: denilsonluizm@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We consider a cosmological model of the late universe constituted by standard cold dark matter plus a dark energy component with constant equation of state w and constant effective speed of sound. By neglecting fluctuations in the dark energy component, we obtain an equation describing the evolution of sub-horizon cold dark matter perturbations through the epoch of dark matter-dark energy equality. We explore its analytic solutions and calculate an exact w-dependent correction for the dark matter growth function, logarithmic growth function and growth index parameter through the epoch considered. We test our analytic approximation with the numerical solution and find that the discrepancy is less than 1% for 0k = during the cosmic evolution up to a = 100.

  2. The Hubble Expansion is Isotropic in the Epoch of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The isotropy of the universal Hubble expansion is a fundamental tenet of physical cosmology, but it has not been precisely tested during the current epoch, when dark energy is dominant. Anisotropic expansion will produce a shearing velocity field, causing objects to stream toward directions of faster expansion and away from directions of slower expansion. This work tests the basic cosmological assumption of isotropic expansion and thus the isotropy of dark energy. The simplest anisotropy will manifest as a quadrupolar curl-free proper motion vector field. We derive this theoretical signature using a tri-axial expanding metric with a flat geometry (Bianchi I model), generalizing and correcting previous work. We then employ the best current data, the Titov & Lambert [1] proper motion catalog of 429 objects, to measure the isotropy of universal expansion. We demonstrate that the Hubble expansion is isotropic to 7% (1 sigma), corresponding to streaming motions of 1 microarcsecond per year, in the best-constrained directions (-19% and +17% in the least-constrained directions) and does not significantly deviate from isotropy in any direction. The Gaia mission, which is expected to obtain proper motions for 500,000 quasars, will likely constrain the anisotropy below 1%, but this is still orders of magnitude larger than the history-integrated anisotropy constraint provided by the cosmic microwave background.We acknowledge support from the NSF grant AST-1411605.[1] Titov, O. & Lambert, S. 2013, A&A, 559, A95

  3. Sterile neutrino dark matter: Weak interactions in the strong coupling epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-08-01

    We perform a detailed study of the weak interactions of standard model neutrinos with the primordial plasma and their effect on the resonant production of sterile neutrino dark matter. Motivated by issues in cosmological structure formation on small scales, and reported x-ray signals that could be due to sterile neutrino decay, we consider 7 keV-scale sterile neutrinos. Oscillation-driven production of such sterile neutrinos occurs at temperatures T ≳100 MeV , where we study two significant effects of weakly charged species in the primordial plasma: (1) the redistribution of an input lepton asymmetry; (2) the opacity for active neutrinos. We calculate the redistribution analytically above and below the quark-hadron transition, and match with lattice QCD calculations through the transition. We estimate opacities due to tree-level processes involving leptons and quarks above the quark-hadron transition, and the most important mesons below the transition. We report final sterile neutrino dark matter phase space densities that are significantly influenced by these effects, and yet relatively robust to remaining uncertainties in the nature of the quark-hadron transition. We also provide transfer functions for cosmological density fluctuations with cutoffs at k ≃10 h Mpc-1 , that are relevant to galactic structure formation.

  4. Probing dark energy through scale dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Mariele; Sawicki, Ignacy; Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We consider the consequences of having no prior knowledge of the true dark energy model for the interpretation of cosmological observations. The magnitude of redshift-space distortions and weak-lensing shear is determined by the metric on the geodesics of which galaxies and light propagate. We show that, given precise enough observations, we can use these data to completely reconstruct the metric on our past light cone and therefore to measure the scale and time dependence of the anisotropic stress and the evolution of the gravitational potentials in a model-independent manner. Since both dark matter and dark energy affect the visible sector only through the gravitational field they produce, they are inseparable without a model for dark energy: galaxy bias cannot be measured and therefore the distribution of dark matter determined; the peculiar velocity of dark matter can be identified with that of the galaxies only when the equivalence principle holds. Given these limitations, we show how one can nonetheless build tests for classes of dark energy models which depend on making measurements at multiple scales at a particular redshift. They are null tests on the model-independent observables, do not require modeling evolution in time, and do not require any parametrization of the free functions of these models—such as the sound speed. We show that one in principle could rule out or constrain the whole class of the most general scalar-tensor theories even without assuming the quasistatic limit.

  5. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: onset latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Wild, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-02-01

    Using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) we investigate the ionospheric convection response to magnetospheric substorms. Substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, and were then binned according to the magnetic latitude of their onset. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection patterns for each onset-latitude bin was then performed using radar data for the interval 60 min before onset to 90 min after. It is found that lower onset-latitude substorms are associated with generally more enhanced convection than the higher latitude substorms, although they suffer from a significant localised reduction of the flow in the midnight sector during the expansion phase. Higher-latitude substorms are associated with a significant and rapid increase in the nightside convection following substorm onset, with all onset-latitude bins showing an enhancement over onset values by ~60 min into the expansion phase. A rudimentary inspection of the concurrent auroral evolution suggests that the duration of the flow reduction following substorm onset is dependent on the strength and duration of the expansion phase aurora and its associated conductivity enhancement.

  6. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: IMF BY dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.; Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Wild, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    We present superposed epoch analyses of the average ionospheric convection response in the northern and southern hemispheres to magnetospheric substorms occurring under different orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Observations of the ionospheric convection were provided by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) and substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We find that during the substorm growth phase the expected IMF BY-dependent dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed over the entire convection pattern, but that during the expansion phase this asymmetry is retained only in the polar cap and dayside auroral zone. In the nightside auroral zone the convection is reordered according to the local substorm electrodynamics with any remaining dusk-dawn asymmetry being more closely related to the magnetic local time of substorm onset, itself only weakly governed by IMF BY. Owing to the preponderance of substorms occurring just prior to magnetic midnight, the substorm-asymmetry tends to be an azimuthal extension of the dusk convection cell across the midnight sector, a manifestation of the so-called “Harang discontinuity.” This results in the northern (southern) hemisphere nightside auroral convection during substorms generally resembling the expected pattern for negative (positive) IMF BY. When the preexisting convection pattern in the northern (southern) hemisphere is driven by positive (negative) IMF BY, the nightside auroral convection changes markedly over the course of the substorm to establish this same “Harang” configuration.

  7. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - II. Spin and concentration parameters for dark matter haloes during the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Poole, Gregory B.; Ludlow, Aaron D.; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Mutch, Simon J.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2016-06-01

    We use high-resolution N-body simulations to study the concentration and spin parameters of dark matter haloes in the mass range 108 M⊙ h-1 < M < 1011 M⊙ h-1 and redshifts 5 < z < 10, corresponding to the haloes of galaxies thought to be responsible for reionization. We build a subsample of equilibrium haloes and contrast their properties to the full population that also includes unrelaxed systems. Concentrations are calculated by fitting both NFW and Einasto profiles to the spherically averaged density profiles of individual haloes. After removing haloes that are out of equilibrium, we find a z > 5 concentration-mass (c(M)) relation that is almost flat and well described by a simple power law for both NFW and Einasto fits. The intrinsic scatter around the mean relation is Δcvir ˜ 1 (or 20 per cent) at z = 5. We also find that the analytic model proposed by Ludlow et al. reproduces the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. Our best-fitting Einasto shape parameter, α, depends on peak height, ν, in a manner that is accurately described by α = 0.0070ν2 + 0.1839. The distribution of the spin parameter, λ, has a weak dependence on equilibrium state; λ peaks at roughly ˜0.033 for our relaxed sample, and at ˜0.04 for the full population. The spin-virial mass relation has a mild negative correlation at high redshift.

  8. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: onset latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Wild, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2008-12-01

    Using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) we investigate the ionospheric convection response to magnetospheric substorms. Substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, and were then grouped according to the magnetic latitude of their onset. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection patterns for each latitude group was then performed using radar data for the interval 60 minutes before onset to 90 minutes after. It is found that lower latitude onset substorms are associated with generally more enhanced convection than the higher latitude substorms, although they suffer from the most significant localised suppression of the flow in the midnight sector during the expansion phase. On the other hand, the higher-latitude events are associated with a significant and rapid increase in the nightside convection following substorm onset. These results suggest differences in the electrodynamics associated with substorms occurring at different latitudes.

  9. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  10. Testing gravity using the environmental dependence of dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2011-08-12

    In this Letter, we investigate the environmental dependence of dark matter halos in theories which attempt to explain the accelerated expansion of the Universe by modifying general relativity (GR). Using high-resolution N-body simulations in f(R) gravity models which recover GR in dense environments by virtue of the chameleon mechanism, we find a significant difference, which depends on the environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos. This environmental dependence of the halo properties can be used as a smoking gun to test GR observationally. PMID:21902382

  11. Subwavelength optical lattices induced by position-dependent dark states

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Evers, Joerg; Kiffner, Martin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-05-15

    A method for the generation of subwavelength optical lattices based on multilevel dark states is proposed. The dark state is formed by a suitable combination of standing wave light fields, leading to position-dependent populations of the ground states. An additional field coupling dispersively to one of the ground states translates this position dependence into a subwavelength optical potential. We provide two semiclassical approaches to understand the involved physics, and demonstrate that they lead to identical results in a certain meaningful limit. Then we apply a Monte Carlo simulation technique to study the full quantum dynamics of the subwavelength trapping. Finally, we discuss the relevant time scales for the trapping, optimum conditions, and possible implementations.

  12. Bottom quark contribution to spin-dependent dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinmian; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a previously overlooked bottom quark contribution to the spin-dependent cross section for Dark Matter (DM) scattering from the nucleon. While the mechanism is relevant to any supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, for illustrative purposes we explore the consequences within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We study two cases, namely those where the DM is predominantly Gaugino or Higgsino. In both cases, there is a substantial, viable region in parameter space (mb˜ -mχ ≲ O (100) GeV) in which the bottom contribution becomes important. We show that a relatively large contribution from the bottom quark is consistent with constraints from spin-independent DM searches, as well as some incidental model dependent constraints.

  13. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales. PMID:25745164

  14. Scalar field dark energy perturbations and their scale dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Sanil; Seshadri, T. R.; Jassal, H. K.

    2008-12-15

    We estimate the amplitude of perturbation in dark energy at different length scales for a quintessence model with an exponential potential. It is shown that on length scales much smaller than Hubble radius, perturbation in dark energy is negligible in comparison to that in dark matter. However, on scales comparable to the Hubble radius ({lambda}{sub p}>1000 Mpc) the perturbation in dark energy in general cannot be neglected. As compared to the {lambda}CDM model, the large-scale matter power spectrum is suppressed in a generic quintessence dark energy model. We show that on scales {lambda}{sub p}<1000 Mpc, this suppression is primarily due to different background evolution compared to the {lambda}CDM model. However, on much larger scales perturbation in dark energy can affect the matter power spectrum significantly. Hence this analysis can act as a discriminator between the {lambda}CDM model and other generic dark energy models with w{sub de}{ne}-1.

  15. Prospects for detection of target-dependent annual modulation in direct dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Witte, Samuel J.

    2016-02-01

    Earth's rotation about the Sun produces an annual modulation in the expected scattering rate at direct dark matter detection experiments. The annual modulation as a function of the recoil energy ER imparted by the dark matter particle to a target nucleus is expected to vary depending on the detector material. However, for most interactions a change of variables from ER to vmin, the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a fixed ER to a target nucleus, produces an annual modulation independent of the target element. We recently showed that if the dark matter-nucleus cross section contains a non-factorizable target and dark matter velocity dependence, the annual modulation as a function of vmin can be target dependent. Here we examine more extensively the necessary conditions for target-dependent modulation, its observability in present-day experiments, and the extent to which putative signals could identify a dark matter-nucleus differential cross section with a non-factorizable dependence on the dark matter velocity.

  16. Limits on Momentum-Dependent Asymmetric Dark Matter with CRESST-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gorla, P.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Münster, A.; Pagliarone, C.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2016-07-01

    The usual assumption in direct dark matter searches is to consider only the spin-dependent or spin-independent scattering of dark matter particles. However, especially in models with light dark matter particles O (GeV /c2 ) , operators which carry additional powers of the momentum transfer q2 can become dominant. One such model based on asymmetric dark matter has been invoked to overcome discrepancies in helioseismology and an indication was found for a particle with a preferred mass of 3 GeV /c2 and a cross section of 10-37 cm2 . Recent data from the CRESST-II experiment, which uses cryogenic detectors based on CaWO4 to search for nuclear recoils induced by dark matter particles, are used to constrain these momentum-dependent models. The low energy threshold of 307 eV for nuclear recoils of the detector used, allows us to rule out the proposed best fit value above.

  17. Quintessence in a quandary: Prior dependence in dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    The archetypal theory of dark energy is quintessence: a minimally coupled scalar field with a canonical kinetic energy and potential. By studying random potentials, we show that quintessence imposes a restricted set of priors on the equation of state of dark energy. Focusing on the commonly used parametrization, w (a )≈w0+wa(1 -a ) , we show that there is a natural scale and direction in the (w0,wa) plane that distinguishes quintessence as a general framework. We calculate the expected information gain for a given survey and show that, because of the nontrivial prior information, it is a function of more than just the figure of merit. This allows us to make a quantitative case for novel survey strategies. We show that the scale of the prior sets target observational requirements for gaining significant information. This corresponds to a figure of merit FOM ≳200 , a requirement that future galaxy redshift surveys will meet.

  18. Extraction of activation energies from temperature dependence of dark currents of SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, E.; Vinogradov, S.; Popova, E.; Wiest, F.; Iskra, P.; Gebauer, W.; Loebner, S.; Ganka, T.; Dietzinger, C.; Fojt, R.; Hansch, W.

    2016-02-01

    Despite several advantages of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) over Photomultiplier Tubes (PMT) like the increased photon detection efficiency (PDE), the compact design and the insensitivity to magnetic fields, the dark count rate (DCR) of SiPM is still a large drawback. Decreasing of the SiPM dark count rate has become a modern task, which could lead to an enormous enhancement of the application range of this promising photo-detector. The main goal of this work is to gain initial information on the dark generation and identify the dominating contributions to dark currents. The chosen approach to fulfill this task is to extract characteristic activation energies of the contributing mechanisms from temperature dependent investigations of dark currents and DCR. Since conventional methods are not suited for a precise analysis of activation energies, a new method has to be developed. In this paper, first steps towards the development of a reliable method for the analysis of dark currents and dark events are presented.

  19. Energy dependence of direct detection cross section for asymmetric mirror dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    An Haipeng; Chen Shaolong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Nussinov, Shmuel; Zhang Yue

    2010-07-15

    In a recent paper, four of the present authors proposed a class of dark matter models where generalized parity symmetry leads to equality of dark matter abundance with baryon asymmetry of the Universe and predicts dark matter mass to be around 5 GeV. In this paper, we explore how this model can be tested in direct search experiments. In particular, we point out that if the dark matter happens to be the mirror neutron, the direct detection cross section has the unique feature that it increases at low recoil energy unlike the case of conventional weakly interacting massive particles. It is also interesting to note that the predicted spin-dependent scattering could make significant contribution to the total direct detection rate, especially for light nucleus. With this scenario, one could explain recent DAMA and CoGeNT results.

  20. Halo-independent direct detection of momentum-dependent dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, John F.; Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M. E-mail: frandsen@cp3-origins.net

    2014-10-01

    We show that the momentum dependence of dark matter interactions with nuclei can be probed in direct detection experiments without knowledge of the dark matter velocity distribution. This is one of the few properties of DM microphysics that can be determined with direct detection alone, given a signal of dark matter in multiple direct detection experiments with different targets. Long-range interactions arising from the exchange of a light mediator are one example of momentum-dependent DM. For data produced from the exchange of a massless mediator we find for example that the mediator mass can be constrained to be ∼< 10 MeV for DM in the 20-1000 GeV range in a halo-independent manner.

  1. Limits on Momentum-Dependent Asymmetric Dark Matter with CRESST-II.

    PubMed

    Angloher, G; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Defay, X; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F V; Ferreiro Iachellini, N; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J-C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Pagliarone, C; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Trinh Thi, H H; Türkoğlu, C; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2016-07-01

    The usual assumption in direct dark matter searches is to consider only the spin-dependent or spin-independent scattering of dark matter particles. However, especially in models with light dark matter particles O(GeV/c^{2}), operators which carry additional powers of the momentum transfer q^{2} can become dominant. One such model based on asymmetric dark matter has been invoked to overcome discrepancies in helioseismology and an indication was found for a particle with a preferred mass of 3  GeV/c^{2} and a cross section of 10^{-37}  cm^{2}. Recent data from the CRESST-II experiment, which uses cryogenic detectors based on CaWO_{4} to search for nuclear recoils induced by dark matter particles, are used to constrain these momentum-dependent models. The low energy threshold of 307 eV for nuclear recoils of the detector used, allows us to rule out the proposed best fit value above. PMID:27447498

  2. Supersymmetric dark matter search via spin-dependent interaction with 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, E.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.

    2005-05-01

    The potentialities of MIMAC-He3, a MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers of Helium-3, for supersymmetric dark matter search are discussed within the framework of effective MSSM models without gaugino mass unification at the GUT scale. A phenomenological study has been done to investigate the sensitivity of the MIMAC-He3 detector to neutralinos (M≳6GeV/c) via spin-dependent interaction with 3He as well as its complementarity to direct and indirect detection experiments. Comparison with other direct dark matter searches will be presented in a WIMP model-independent framework.

  3. Turning off the lights: How dark is dark matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Samuel D.; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2011-03-01

    We consider current observational constraints on the electromagnetic charge of dark matter. The velocity dependence of the scattering cross section through the photon gives rise to qualitatively different constraints than standard dark matter scattering through massive force carriers. In particular, recombination epoch observations of dark matter density perturbations require that ɛ, the ratio of the dark matter to electronic charge, is less than 10-6 for mX=1GeV, rising to ɛ<10-4 for mX=10TeV. Though naively one would expect that dark matter carrying a charge well below this constraint could still give rise to large scattering in current direct detection experiments, we show that charged dark matter particles that could be detected with upcoming experiments are expected to be evacuated from the Galactic disk by the Galactic magnetic fields and supernova shock waves and hence will not give rise to a signal. Thus dark matter with a small charge is likely not a source of a signal in current or upcoming dark matter direct detection experiments.

  4. Thermal conduction by dark matter with velocity and momentum-dependent cross-sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Aaron C.; Scott, Pat E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-04-01

    We use the formalism of Gould and Raffelt [1] to compute the dimensionless thermal conduction coefficients for scattering of dark matter particles with standard model nucleons via cross-sections that depend on the relative velocity or momentum exchanged between particles. Motivated by models invoked to reconcile various recent results in direct detection, we explicitly compute the conduction coefficients α and κ for cross-sections that go as v{sub rel}{sup 2}, v{sub rel}{sup 4}, v{sub rel}{sup −2}, q{sup 2}, q{sup 4} and q{sup −2}, where v{sub rel} is the relative DM-nucleus velocity and q is the momentum transferred in the collision. We find that a v{sub rel}{sup −2} dependence can significantly enhance energy transport from the inner solar core to the outer core. The same can true for any q-dependent coupling, if the dark matter mass lies within some specific range for each coupling. This effect can complement direct searches for dark matter; combining these results with state-of-the-art solar simulations should greatly increase sensitivity to certain DM models. It also seems possible that the so-called Solar Abundance Problem could be resolved by enhanced energy transport in the solar core due to such velocity- or momentum-dependent scatterings.

  5. Limits on spin-dependent wimp-nucleon interactions from the cryogenic dark matter search

    SciTech Connect

    Akerib, D.S.; Armel-Funkhouser, M.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Bailey, C.N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, Daniel A.; Brink, P.L.; Brusov, P.P.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; DeJongh, F.; Dixon, R.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Duong, L.; /Case Western Reserve U. /UC, Berkeley /Brown U. /Florida U. /Fermilab /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Minnesota U. /Caltech /Colorado U., Denver /LBL, Berkeley /Santa Clara U.

    2005-09-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) based on their interactions with Ge and Si nuclei. We report the results of an analysis of data from the first two runs of CDMS at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in terms of spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions on {sup 73}Ge and {sup 29}Si. These data exclude new regions of spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction parameter space, including regions relevant to spin-dependent interpretations of the annual modulation signal reported by the DAMA/NaI experiment.

  6. Pliocene geomagnetic polarity epochs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, C.S.

    1967-01-01

    A paleomagnetic and K-Ar dating study of 44 upper Miocene and Pliocene volcanic units from the western United States suggests that the frequency of reversals of the earth's magnetic field during Pliocene time may have been comparable with that of the last 3.6 m.y. Although the data are too limited to permit the formal naming of any new polarity epochs or events, four polarity transitions have been identified: the W10 R/N boundary at 3.7 ?? 0.1 m.y., the A12 N/R boundary at 4.9 ?? 0.1 m.y., the W32 N/R boundary at 9.0 ?? 0.2m.y., and the W36 R/N boundary at 10.8 ?? 0.3 - 1.0 m.y. The loss of absolute resolution of K-Ar dating in older rocks indicates that the use of well defined stratigraphic successions to identify and date polarity transitions will be important in the study of Pliocene and older reversals. ?? 1967.

  7. G-corrected holographic dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Honari-Jafarpour, M.

    2013-08-01

    Here we investigate the holographic dark energy model in the framework of FRW cosmology where the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, is varying with cosmic time. Using the complementary astronomical data which support the time dependency of G, the evolutionary treatment of EoS parameter and energy density of dark energy model are calculated in the presence of time variation of G. It has been shown that in this case, the phantom regime can be achieved at the present time. We also calculate the evolution of G-corrected deceleration parameter for holographic dark energy model and show that the dependency of G on the comic time can influence on the transition epoch from decelerated expansion to the accelerated phase. Finally we perform the statefinder analysis for G-corrected holographic model and show that this model has a shorter distance from the observational point in s- r plane compare with original holographic dark energy model.

  8. Spin-independent interferences and spin-dependent interactions with scalar dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2016-05-01

    We explore mechanisms of interferences under which the spin-independent interaction in the scattering of scalar dark matter with nucleus is suppressed in relation to the spin-dependent one. We offer a detailed derivation of the nuclear amplitudes based on the interactions with quarks in the framework of a nonuniversal U(1)' extension of the standard model. By assuming a range of parameters compatible with collider searches, electroweak observables and dark matter abundance, we find scenarios for destructive interferences with and without isospin symmetry. The model reveals solutions with mutually interfering scalar particles, canceling the effective spin-independent coupling with only scalar interactions, which requires an extra Higgs boson with mass M H > 125 GeV. The model also possesses scenarios with only vector interactions through two neutral gauge bosons, Z and Z', which do not exhibit interference effects. Due to the nonuniversality of the U(1)' symmetry, we distinguish two family structures of the quark sector with different numerical predictions. In one case, we obtain cross sections that pass all the Xenon-based detector experiments. In the other case, limits from LUX experiment enclose an exclusion region for dark matter between 9 and 800 GeV. We examine a third scenario with isospin-violating couplings where interferences between scalar and vector boson exchanges cancel the scattering. We provide solutions where interactions with Xenon-based detectors is suppressed for light dark matter, below 6 GeV, while interactions with Germanium- and Silicon-based detectors exhibit solutions up to the regions of interest for positive signals reported by CoGeNT and CDMS-Si experiments, and compatible with the observed DM relic density for DM mass in the range 8 .3-10 GeV. Spin-dependent interactions become the dominant source of scattering around the interference regions, where Maxwellian speed distribution is considered.

  9. Cosmology of atomic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris

    2013-05-01

    While, to ensure successful cosmology, dark matter (DM) must kinematically decouple from the standard model plasma very early in the history of the Universe, it can remain coupled to a bath of “dark radiation” until a relatively late epoch. One minimal theory that realizes such a scenario is the atomic dark matter model, in which two fermions oppositely charged under a new U(1) dark force are initially coupled to a thermal bath of “dark photons” but eventually recombine into neutral atomlike bound states and begin forming gravitationally bound structures. As dark atoms have (dark) atom-sized geometric cross sections, this model also provides an example of self-interacting DM with a velocity-dependent cross section. Delayed kinetic decoupling in this scenario predicts novel DM properties on small scales but retains the success of cold DM on larger scales. We calculate the atomic physics necessary to capture the thermal history of this dark sector and show significant improvements over the standard atomic hydrogen calculation are needed. We solve the Boltzmann equations that govern the evolution of cosmological fluctuations in this model and find in detail the impact of the atomic DM scenario on the matter power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This scenario imprints a new length scale, the dark-acoustic-oscillation scale, on the matter density field. This dark-acoustic-oscillation scale shapes the small-scale matter power spectrum and determines the minimal DM halo mass at late times, which may be many orders of magnitude larger than in a typical weakly interacting-massive-particle scenario. This model necessarily includes an extra dark radiation component, which may be favored by current CMB experiments, and we quantify CMB signatures that distinguish an atomic DM scenario from a standard ΛCDM model containing extra free-streaming particles. We finally discuss the impacts of atomic DM on galactic dynamics and show that these provide the

  10. The shape of dark matter haloes: dependence on mass, redshift, radius and formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allgood, Brandon; Flores, Ricardo A.; Primack, Joel R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Bullock, James S.

    2006-04-01

    Using six high-resolution dissipationless simulations with a varying box size in a flat Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe, we study the mass and redshift dependence of dark matter halo shapes for Mvir= 9.0 × 1011- 2.0 × 1014h-1Msolar, over the redshift range z= 0-3, and for two values of σ8= 0.75 and 0.9. Remarkably, we find that the redshift, mass and σ8 dependence of the mean smallest-to-largest axis ratio of haloes is well described by the simple power-law relation = (0.54 +/- 0.02)(Mvir/M*)-0.050+/-0.003, where s is measured at 0.3Rvir, and the z and σ8 dependences are governed by the characteristic non-linear mass, M*=M*(z, σ8). We find that the scatter about the mean s is well described by a Gaussian with σ~ 0.1, for all masses and redshifts. We compare our results to a variety of previous works on halo shapes and find that reported differences between studies are primarily explained by differences in their methodologies. We address the evolutionary aspects of individual halo shapes by following the shapes of the haloes through ~100 snapshots in time. We determine the formation scalefactor ac as defined by Wechsler et al. and find that it can be related to the halo shape at z= 0 and its evolution over time.

  11. Spin-dependent interpretation for possible signals of light dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Lippincott, W. Hugh

    2013-09-01

    Signals broadly compatible with light (7-10 GeV) dark matter have been reported in three direct detection experiments: CoGeNT, DAMA/LIBRA, and CDMS-II silicon. These possible signals have been interpreted in the context of spin-independent interactions between the target nuclei and dark matter, although there is tension with null results, particularly from xenon-based experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate that the CoGeNT and CDMS-II silicon results are also compatible assuming a spin-dependent neutron interaction, though this is in tension with xenon-based experiments and PICASSO. The tension with the null results from XENON100 and XENON10 is approximately the same as for the spin-independent coupling. All three experimental signals can be made compatible through a combination of spin-dependent interactions with both the proton and neutron, although such a scenario increases the conflict with the null results of other experiments.

  12. Holographic dark energy with time depend gravitational constant in the non-flat Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamohammadi, A.; Saaidi, K.; Setare, M. R.

    2011-04-01

    We study the holographic dark energy on the subject of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with a time dependent gravitational constant G( t), in the non-flat space-time. We obtain the differential equation that specify the evolution of the dark energy density parameter based on varying gravitational constant. We find out a relation for the state parameter of the dark energy equation of state to low red-shifts which containing varying G corrections in the non-flat space-time.

  13. Effects of bound states on dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haipeng; Wise, Mark B.; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact of bound state formation on dark matter annihilation rates in models where dark matter interacts via a light mediator, the dark photon. We derive the general cross section for radiative capture into all possible bound states, and point out its nontrivial dependence on the dark matter velocity and the dark photon mass. For indirect detection, our result shows that dark matter annihilation inside bound states can play an important role in enhancing signal rates over the rate for direct dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement. The effects are strongest for large dark gauge coupling and when the dark photon mass is smaller than the typical momentum of dark matter in the Galaxy. As an example, we show that for thermal dark matter the Fermi gamma ray constraint is substantially increased once bound state effects are taken into account. We also find that bound state effects are not important for dark matter annihilation during the freeze-out and recombination epochs.

  14. Is Cold Dark Matter a Vacuum Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlden, Michael A.

    Current theories about the Universe based on an FLRW model conclude that it is composed of ~4% normal matter, ~28 % dark matter and ~68% Dark Energy which is responsible for the well-established accelerated expansion: this model works extremely well. As the Universe expands the density of normal and dark matter decreases while the proportion of Dark Energy increases. This model assumes that the amount of dark matter, whose nature at present is totally unknown, has remained constant. This is a natural assumption if dark matter is a particle of some kind - WIMP, sterile neutrino, lightest supersysmmetric particle or axion, etc. - that must have emerged from the early high temperature phase of the Big Bang. This paper proposes that dark matter is not a particle such as these but a vacuum effect, and that the proportion of dark matter in the Universe is actually increasing with time. The idea that led to this suggestion was that a quantum process (possibly the Higgs mechanism) might operate in the nilpotent vacuum that Rowlands postulates is a dual space to the real space where Standard Model fundamental fermions (and we) reside. This could produce a vacuum quantum state that has mass, which interacts gravitationally, and such states would be `dark matter'. It is proposed that the rate of production of dark matter by this process might depend on local circumstances, such as the density of dark matter and/or normal matter. This proposal makes the testable prediction that the ratio of baryonic to dark matter varies with redshift and offers an explanation, within the framework of Rowlands' ideas, of the coincidence problem - why has cosmic acceleration started in the recent epoch at redshift z ~0.55 when the Dark Energy density first became equal to the matter density?. This process also offers a potential solution to the `missing baryon' problem.

  15. Picasso:. Search for Dark Matter in the Spin-Dependent Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, M.-C.

    2011-06-01

    The PICASSO project is using superheated droplets of C4F10 for the direct detection of Dark Matter candidates in the spin-dependent (SD) sector. The total setup includes 32 detectors installed in the SNOLAB underground laboratory in Sudbury (Ontario, Canada). The present level of sensitivity is at 0.16 pb on protons at 90% C.L. (MW= 24GeV/c2) following an analysis of two detectors only. A concentrated effort in detector purification and a new fabrication procedure allowed an additional background reduction of about a factor of ten. In order to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, new discrimination tools were developed to distinguish between WIMP induced nuclear recoils and alpha decay background. We report preliminary results where an alpha background rejection of 80% could be achieved in the region where WIMP induced nuclear recoils are expected.

  16. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  17. Information Epochs and Human Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Yoneji

    1982-01-01

    Mankind has experienced three societal transformations in the course of history. A new information epoch has served as a precondition for social change. The current information society is post-industrial and will lead to change in the socioeconomic structure and in social values. (KC)

  18. The quantum epoché.

    PubMed

    Pylkkänen, Paavo

    2015-12-01

    The theme of phenomenology and quantum physics is here tackled by examining some basic interpretational issues in quantum physics. One key issue in quantum theory from the very beginning has been whether it is possible to provide a quantum ontology of particles in motion in the same way as in classical physics, or whether we are restricted to stay within a more limited view of quantum systems, in terms of complementary but mutually exclusive phenomena. In phenomenological terms we could describe the situation by saying that according to the usual interpretation of quantum theory (especially Niels Bohr's), quantum phenomena require a kind of epoché (i.e. a suspension of assumptions about reality at the quantum level). However, there are other interpretations (especially David Bohm's) that seem to re-establish the possibility of a mind-independent ontology at the quantum level. We will show that even such ontological interpretations contain novel, non-classical features, which require them to give a special role to "phenomena" or "appearances", a role not encountered in classical physics. We will conclude that while ontological interpretations of quantum theory are possible, quantum theory implies the need of a certain kind of epoché even for this type of interpretations. While different from the epoché connected to phenomenological description, the "quantum epoché" nevertheless points to a potentially interesting parallel between phenomenology and quantum philosophy. PMID:26276464

  19. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Behnke, E.; Beltran, B.; Clark, K.; Dai, X.; Davour, A.; Farine, J.; Faust, R.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lawson, I.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Levy, C.; Levine, I.; MacDonald, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Nadeau, P.; Noble, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Pospisil, S.; Shepherd, T.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Storey, C.; Wichoski, U.; Zacek, V.

    2009-11-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB reports new results for spin-dependent WIMP interactions on 19F using the superheated droplet technique. A new generation of detectors and new features which enable background discrimination via the rejection of non-particle induced events are described. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV /c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.16 pb and σn = 2.60 pb respectively (90% C.L.). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  20. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, Berta; Picasso Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB uses super-heated C4F10 droplets suspended in a gel as a target sensitive to WIMP-proton spin-dependent elastic scattering. The phase II setup has been improved substantially in sensitivity by using an array of 32 detectors with an active mass of ~65 g each and largely reduced background. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.15 pb and σn = 2.45 pb respectively (90% C.L). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  1. Rotation of the Universe at different cosmological epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, L. M.

    2016-06-01

    A step-by-step foundation for the differential character of the Universe's rotation is presented. First, invoking the concept of spacetime foam with spin, it is reasonable to assume that the very early Universe can be described by the Dirac equation. Second, it is shown using the Ehrenfest theorem that, from a classical point of view, the early Universe can be described by the Papapetrou equations. Third, it is stressed that our Universe can perform only rotational motion. It is shown based on the spin part of the Papapetrou equations that the Universe's rotation depends appreciably on the physical properties of a specific cosmological epoch. The rotational angular velocity is calculated for three basic cosmological epochs: the matter-dominated epoch, the transition period (from domination of matter to domination of vacuum), and the vacuum-dominated epoch.

  2. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; HERA

    2015-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA - reionization.org) roadmap uses the unique properties of the neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line to probe our cosmic dawn: from the birth of the first stars and black holes, through the full reionization of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM). HERA is a collaboration between the Precision Array Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER - eor.berkeley.edu), the US-based Murchison Widefield Array (MWA - mwatelescope.org), and MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEOR) teams along with the South African SKA-SA, University of KwaZulu Natal and the University of Cambridge Cavendish Laborabory. HERA has recently been awarded a National Science Foundation Mid-Scale Innovation Program grant to begin the next phase.HERA leverages the operation of the PAPER and MWA telescopes to explore techniques and designs required to detect the primordial HI signal in the presence of systematics and radio continuum foreground emission some four orders of magnitude brighter. With this understanding, we are now able to remove foregrounds to the limits of our sensitivity, culminating in the first physically meaningful upper limits. A redundant calibration algorithm from MITEOR improves the sensitivity of the approach.Building on this, the next stage of HERA incorporates a 14m diameter antenna element that is optimized both for sensitivity and for minimizing foreground systematics. Arranging these elements in a compact hexagonal grid yields an array that facilitates calibration, leverages proven foreground removal techniques, and is scalable to large collecting areas. HERA will be located in the radio quiet environment of the SKA site in the Karoo region of South Africa (where PAPER is currently located). It will have a sensitivity close to two orders of magnitude better than PAPER and the MWA to ensure a robust detection. With its sensitivity and broader frequency coverage, HERA can paint an uninterrupted picture through reionization, back to the

  3. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: the crucial step occurs in the dark

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Ahmad, Margaret; Nießner, Christine; Gehring, Dennis; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The Radical Pair Model proposes that the avian magnetic compass is based on spin-chemical processes: since the ratio between the two spin states singlet and triplet of radical pairs depends on their alignment in the magnetic field, it can provide information on magnetic directions. Cryptochromes, blue light-absorbing flavoproteins, with flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore, are suggested as molecules forming the radical pairs underlying magnetoreception. When activated by light, cryptochromes undergo a redox cycle, in the course of which radical pairs are generated during photo-reduction as well as during light-independent re-oxidation. This raised the question as to which radical pair is crucial for mediating magnetic directions. Here, we present the results from behavioural experiments with intermittent light and magnetic field pulses that clearly show that magnetoreception is possible in the dark interval, pointing to the radical pair formed during flavin re-oxidation. This differs from the mechanism considered for cryptochrome signalling the presence of light and rules out most current models of an avian magnetic compass based on the radical pair generated during photo-reduction. Using the radical pair formed during re-oxidation may represent a specific adaptation of the avian magnetic compass. PMID:27146685

  4. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: the crucial step occurs in the dark.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Ahmad, Margaret; Nießner, Christine; Gehring, Dennis; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The Radical Pair Model proposes that the avian magnetic compass is based on spin-chemical processes: since the ratio between the two spin states singlet and triplet of radical pairs depends on their alignment in the magnetic field, it can provide information on magnetic directions. Cryptochromes, blue light-absorbing flavoproteins, with flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore, are suggested as molecules forming the radical pairs underlying magnetoreception. When activated by light, cryptochromes undergo a redox cycle, in the course of which radical pairs are generated during photo-reduction as well as during light-independent re-oxidation. This raised the question as to which radical pair is crucial for mediating magnetic directions. Here, we present the results from behavioural experiments with intermittent light and magnetic field pulses that clearly show that magnetoreception is possible in the dark interval, pointing to the radical pair formed during flavin re-oxidation. This differs from the mechanism considered for cryptochrome signalling the presence of light and rules out most current models of an avian magnetic compass based on the radical pair generated during photo-reduction. Using the radical pair formed during re-oxidation may represent a specific adaptation of the avian magnetic compass. PMID:27146685

  5. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  6. Nonlinear time dependence of dark current in charge-coupled devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Justin C.; Bodegom, Erik; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    It is generally assumed that charge-coupled device (CCD) imagers produce a linear response of dark current versus exposure time except near saturation. We found a large number of pixels with nonlinear dark current response to exposure time to be present in two scientific CCD imagers. These pixels are found to exhibit distinguishable behavior with other analogous pixels and therefore can be characterized in groupings. Data from two Kodak CCD sensors are presented for exposure times from a few seconds up to two hours. Linear behavior is traditionally taken for granted when carrying out dark current correction and as a result, pixels with nonlinear behavior will be corrected inaccurately.

  7. Holographic dark energy with time varying parameter c 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Zarei, R.; Honari-Jafarpour, M.

    2013-02-01

    We consider the holographic dark energy model in which the model parameter c 2 evolves slowly with time. First we calculate the evolution of EoS parameter as well as the deceleration parameter in this generalized version of holographic dark energy (GHDE). Depending on the parameter c 2, the phantom regime can be achieved earlier or later compare with original version of holographic dark energy. The evolution of energy density of GHDE model is investigated in terms of parameter c 2. We also show that the time-dependency of c 2 can effect on the transition epoch from decelerated phase to accelerated expansion. Finally, we perform the statefinder diagnostic for GHDE model and show that the evolutionary trajectories of the model in s- r plane are strongly depend on the parameter c 2.

  8. Dynamics of minimally coupled dark energy in spherical halos of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Tsizh, Maksym; Kulinich, Yurij

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the evolution of scalar field dark energy in the spherical halos of dark matter at the late stages of formation of gravitationally bound systems in the expanding Universe. The dynamics of quintessential dark energy at the center of dark matter halo strongly depends on the value of effective sound speed c_s (in units of speed of light). If c_s˜ 1 (classical scalar field) then the dark energy in the gravitationally bound systems is only slightly perturbed and its density is practically the same as in cosmological background. The dark energy with small value of sound speed (c_s<0.1), on the contrary, is important dynamical component of halo at all stages of their evolution: linear, non-linear, turnaround, collapse, virialization and later up to current epoch. These properties of dark energy can be used for constraining the value of effective sound speed c_s by comparison the theoretical predictions with observational data related to the large scale gravitationally bound systems.

  9. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  10. Unified brane gravity: Cosmological dark matter from a scale dependent Newton constant

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya; Davidson, Aharon

    2009-07-15

    We analyze, within the framework of unified brane gravity, the weak-field perturbations caused by the presence of matter on a 3-brane. Although deviating from the Randall-Sundrum approach, the masslessness of the graviton is still preserved. In particular, the four-dimensional Newton force law is recovered, but serendipitously, the corresponding Newton constant is shown to be necessarily lower than the one which governs Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. This has the potential to puzzle out cosmological dark matter. A subsequent conjecture concerning galactic dark matter follows.

  11. Spatiotemporal configuration dependent pairing of nerve events in dark-adapted human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Maarten A.

    2002-02-01

    In the model presented here, in the dark any single quantum absorption in a rod or cone produces a subliminal excitation. Subliminal excitations from both halves of a twin unit pair in the retina for the perception of light from the stimulus. A twin unit contains either two red or two green cones. The twin units are intertwined in triples of two red units and one green unit in a hexagon called a trion. P satellite rods surround each cone, P being approximately proportional to the square of eccentricity. A successful pairing for light perception represents-through the points of time and locations of the creation of its partners in the retina-a direction event with two possible polarities and with the orientation of the elongated shape of the twin unit. The polarity of the event depends on which of the two partners arrives first at the twin's pairing facility. Simultaneous events and successive events with the same polarity in adjacent units that are aligned along one of the three orientations of the hexagonal retinal mosaic pair in the cortex for the perception of edge and of movement. Inter-twin pairing products of the three differently oriented sets of aligned twins are independent of each other and sum vectorially in the cortex. This system of three sub-retinas is called the retrinet. Two one-quantum excitations in any of a twin's receptors make the percept colored. The odd blue cone produces already a blue signal for a single one-quantum excitation. Intra-receptor pairing in a rod, a red cone and a green cone is for white, red, and green respectively. Red and green cone products of a trion cross-pair in the retina and produce a yellow signal. Red and green cone products of a hexagon of adjacent trions cross-pair in the cortex and produce a white signal. This large hexagon with a total of seven trions is called a persepton. After subliminal excitations in a twin have paired successfully, further subliminal receptor excitations in neighboring and aligned twins are

  12. Simulations of time-dependent three-dimensional vortices with application to Neptune's Great Dark Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeau, Raymond Paul, Jr.

    We use the EPIC atmospheric: model, a primitive-equation, isentropic-coordinate GCM, to simulate time-dependent vortices under conditions similar to those found on Neptune. The vortices have roughly elliptical cross- sections and exhibit motions that resemble the behavior of Neptune's Great Dark Spot (GDS), including equatorward drift, nutating oscillations in aspect ratio and orientation angle, and quasi-periodic tail formation. The simulated vortices also exhibit complex, three- dimensional motions that may explain the occasional appearance of the GDS as two overlapping ellipses. We find that the meridional drift of the vortices is strongly correlated with the meridional gradient of the environmental potential vorticity, β*. This result complements related studies of hurricane motions. The correlation suggests that the drift rate of GDS-type vortices on Neptune, which can be monitored over the long term by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is diagnostic of the vorticity gradient on the planet. The best fit to the Voyager GDS drift rate in our simulations corresponds to β*/approx2×10-12/ m-1s- 1. This is about 1/3 of the value given by the zonal- wind profile of Sromovsky et al. (1993), determined by fitting a polynomial in latitude to the cloud-tracking data. We calculate new fit to the same data using Legendre polynomials (spherical harmonics), which yields a significantly lower value for β*, more in line with our vortex-drift results. We show that vortex shape oscillations occur both in cases of zero background potential-vorticity gradient, corresponding to the conditions in analytical Kida-type models of oscillating vortices, and in cases of non-zero background gradient, corresponding to conditions that have not yet been investigated analytically. While the shape oscillations are qualitatively Kida-like, in detail they are distinctly different, suggesting that existing theory may not be sufficient to describe non-uniform, three- dimensional vortices. We

  13. Seeing in the dark - I. Multi-epoch alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Eric M.; Hirata, Christopher M.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schlegel, David; Seljak, Uroš; Lupton, Robert H.

    2014-05-01

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure is an invaluable cosmological tool given that most of the energy density of the concordance cosmology is invisible. Several large ground-based imaging surveys will attempt to measure this effect over the coming decade, but reliable control of the spurious lensing signal introduced by atmospheric turbulence and telescope optics remains a challenging problem. We address this challenge with a demonstration that point spread function (PSF) effects on measured galaxy shapes in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) can be corrected with existing analysis techniques. In this work, we co-add existing SDSS imaging on the equatorial stripe in order to build a data set with the statistical power to measure cosmic shear, while using a rounding kernel method to null out the effects of the anisotropic PSF. We build a galaxy catalogue from the combined imaging, characterize its photometric properties and show that the spurious shear remaining in this catalogue after the PSF correction is negligible compared to the expected cosmic shear signal. We identify a new source of systematic error in the shear-shear autocorrelations arising from selection biases related to masking. Finally, we discuss the circumstances in which this method is expected to be useful for upcoming ground-based surveys that have lensing as one of the science goals, and identify the systematic errors that can reduce its efficacy.

  14. Temperature dependence characteristics of dark current for arsenic doped LWIR HgCdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Hu, Weida; Ye, Zhenghua; Lin, Chun; Hu, Xiaoning; Guo, Jin; Xie, Feng; Zhou, Jie; Liang, Jian; Wang, Xiaofang; Lu, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Resistance-voltage (R-V) curves of arsenic doped long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) photodiodes were measured in the temperature range of 59-92 K. The dark current characteristics of HgCdTe junction diode are presented by using a simultaneous-mode nonlinear fitting method. The observed R-V characteristics have been shown in agreement with the theoretical calculation by taking into account the contributions: (i) diffusion mechanism (Rdiff), (ii) generation-recombination mechanism (Rgr) in the depletion region, (iii) trap-assisted tunneling mechanism (Rtat), and (iv) band-to-band tunneling mechanism (Rbbt). Six characteristic parameters as function of temperature are extracted from the measured current-voltage (I-V) curves by considering the dominant current mechanisms under different bias levels. The fitted current components under different temperatures show that, as the temperature rises, the contribution to the dominant dark current component around maximum dynamic resistance range is changed from the trap-assisted tunneling and diffusion currents to the generation recombination effect. This change indicates that the dark current component may mainly be caused by the generation recombination current, which limits the performance of arsenic doped LWIR HgCdTe detectors.

  15. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  16. Temporal dependence of transient dark counts in an avalanche photodiode: A solution for power-law behavior of afterpulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, M.; Tsujino, K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper offers a theoretical explanation of the temperature and temporal dependencies of transient dark count rates (DCRs) measured for a linear-mode silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) and the dependencies of afterpulsing that were measured in Geiger-mode Si and InGaAs/InP APDs. The temporal dependencies exhibit power-law behavior, at least to some extent. For the transient DCR, the value of the DCR for a given time period increases with decreases in temperature, while the power-law behavior remains unchanged. The transient DCR is attributed to electron emissions from traps in the multiplication layer of the APD with a high electric field, and its temporal dependence is explained by a continuous change in the electron emission rate as a function of the electric field strength. The electron emission rate is calculated using a quantum model for phonon-assisted tunnel emission. We applied the theory to the temporal dependence of afterpulsing that was measured for Si and InGaAs/InP APDs. The power-law temporal dependence is attributed to the power-law function of the electron emission rate from the traps as a function of their position across the p-n junction of the APD. Deviations from the power-law temporal dependence can be derived from the upper and lower limits of the electric field strength.

  17. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  18. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  19. Archimedean-type force in a cosmic dark fluid. II. Qualitative and numerical study of a multistage universe expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Bochkarev, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-15

    In this (second) part of the work we present the results of numerical and qualitative analysis, based on a new model of the Archimedean-type interaction between dark matter and dark energy. The Archimedean-type force is linear in the four-gradient of the dark energy pressure and plays a role of self-regulator of the energy redistribution in a cosmic dark fluid. Because of the Archimedean-type interaction the cosmological evolution is shown to have a multistage character. Depending on the choice of the values of the model-guiding parameters, the Universe expansion is shown to be perpetually accelerated, periodic or quasiperiodic with a finite number of deceleration/acceleration epochs. We distinguished the models, which can be definitely characterized by the inflation in the early Universe, by the late-time accelerated expansion and nonsingular behavior in intermediate epochs, and classified them with respect to a number of transition points. Transition points appear, when the acceleration parameter changes the sign, providing the natural partition of the Universe's history into epochs of accelerated and decelerated expansion. The strategy and results of numerical calculations are advocated by the qualitative analysis of the instantaneous phase portraits of the dynamic system associated with the key equation for the dark energy pressure evolution.

  20. New Insight into the Cosmic Renaissance Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    VLT Discovers a Group of Early Inhabitants and Find Signs of Many More [1] Summary Using the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) , two astronomers from Germany and the UK [2] have discovered some of the most distant galaxies ever seen . They are located about 12,600 million light-years away. It has taken the light now recorded by the VLT about nine-tenths of the age of the Universe to traverse this huge distance. We therefore observe those galaxies as they were at a time when the Universe was very young, less than about 10% of its present age . At this time, the Universe was emerging from a long period known as the "Dark Ages" , entering the luminous "Cosmic Renaissance" epoch. Unlike previous studies which resulted in the discovery of a few, widely dispersed galaxies at this early epoch, the present study found at least six remote citizens within a small sky area, less than five per cent the size of the full moon! This allowed understanding the evolution of these galaxies and how they affect the state of the Universe in its youth. In particular, the astronomers conclude on the basis of their unique data that there were considerably fewer luminous galaxies in the Universe at this early stage than 500 million years later. There must therefore be many less luminous galaxies in the region of space that they studied, too faint to be detected in this study. It must be those still unidentified galaxies that emit the majority of the energetic photons needed to ionise the hydrogen in the Universe at that particularly epoch. PR Photo 25a/03 : Colour-composite of the sky field with the distant galaxies. PR Photo 25b/03 : Close-Up images of some of the most distant galaxies known in the Universe. PR Photo 25c/03 : Spectra of these galaxies. From the Big Bang to the Cosmic Renaissance Nowadays, the Universe is pervaded by energetic ultraviolet radiation, produced by quasars and hot stars. The short-wavelength photons liberate electrons from the hydrogen atoms that make up the

  1. Quadrature algorithms to the luminosity distance with a time-dependent dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Nan-Nan; Liu, De-Zi; Pei, Xiao-Xing; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Yang, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Fang-Fang E-mail: bingzi@mail.bnu.edu.cn E-mail: fiona-90@live.cn E-mail: zlyang@bnu.edu.cn

    2011-11-01

    In our previous work [1], we have proposed two methods for computing the luminosity distance d{sub L}{sup Λ} in ΛCDM model. In this paper, two effective quadrature algorithms, known as Romberg Integration and composite Gaussian Quadrature, are presented to calculate the luminosity distance d{sub L}{sup CPL} in the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization(CPL) model. By comparing both the efficiency and accuracy of the two algorithms, we find that the second is more promising. Moreover, we develop another strategy adapted for approximating d{sub L}{sup Λ} in flat ΛCDM universe. To some extent, our methods can make contributions to the recent numerical stimulation for the investigation of dark energy cosmology.

  2. A Robust Measure of Dark Matter Halo Ellipticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2016-08-01

    In simulations of the standard cosmological model (ΛCDM), dark matter halos are aspherical. However, so far the asphericity of an individual galaxy’s halo has never been robustly established. We use the Jeans equations to define a quantity that robustly characterizes a deviation from rotational symmetry. This quantity is essentially the gravitational torque and it roughly provides the ellipticity projected along the line of sight. We show that the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), with a single epoch of observations combined with those of the Gaia Space Telescope, can distinguish the ΛCDM value of the torque from zero for each Sculptor-like dwarf galaxy with a confidence between 0 and 5σ, depending on the orientation of each halo. With two epochs of observations, TMT will achieve a 5σ discovery of torque and thus asphericity for most such galaxies, thus providing a new and powerful test of the ΛCDM model.

  3. Constraint on the velocity dependent dark matter annihilation cross section from Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Huan-Yu; Yin, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Feng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The γ -ray observation of dwarf spheroidal satellites (dSph's) is an ideal approach for probing the dark matter (DM) annihilation signature. The latest Fermi-LAT dSph searches have set stringent constraints on the velocity independent annihilation cross section in the small DM mass range, which gives very strong constraints on the scenario to explain the AMS-02 positron excess by DM annihilation. However, the dSph constraints would change in the velocity dependent annihilation scenarios, because the velocity dispersion in the dSph's varies from that in the Milky Way. In this work, we use a likelihood map method to set constraints on the velocity dependent annihilation cross section from the Fermi-LAT observation of six dSph's. We consider three typical forms of the annihilation cross section, i.e. p-wave annihilation, Sommerfeld enhancement, and Breit-Wigner resonance. For the p-wave annihilation and Sommerfeld enhancement, the dSph limits would become much weaker and stronger compared with those for the velocity independent annihilation, respectively. For the Breit-Wigner annihilation, the dSph limits would vary depending on the model parameters. We show that the scenario to explain the AMS-02 positron excess by DM annihilation is still viable in the velocity dependent cases.

  4. Oxygen Pumping. II. Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High-Frequency CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Haiman, Zoltán; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2008-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 μm fine-structure line of O I is pumped by the ~1300 Å soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen in which metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and the cosmic epoch when the O I pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak [(δy)rms <~ 10-7 roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of ~1 nK], it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to set useful constraints on the heavy-element enrichment history of the IGM.

  5. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: Sierra Nevada II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1963-01-01

    Ten new determinations on volcanic extrusions in the Sierra Nevada with potassium-argon ages of 3.1 million years or less indicate that the remanent magnetizations fall into two groups, a normal group in which the remanent magnetization is directed downward and to the north, and a reversed group magnetized up and to the south. Thermomagnetic experiments and mineralogic studies fail to provide an explanation of the opposing polarities in terms of mineralogic control, but rather suggest that the remanent magnetization reflects reversals of the main dipole field of the earth. All available radiometric ages are consistent with this field-reversal hypothesis and indicate that the present normal polarity epoch (N1) as well as the previous reversed epoch (R1) are 0.9 to 1.0 million years long, whereas the previous normal epoch (N2) was at least 25 percent longer.

  6. Geomagnetic Polarity Epochs: Sierra Nevada II.

    PubMed

    Cox, A; Doell, R R; Dalrymple, G B

    1963-10-18

    Ten new determinations on volcanic extrusions in the Sierra Nevada with potassium-argon ages of 3.1 million years or less indicate that the remanent magnetizations fall into two groups, a normal group in which the remanent magnetization is directed downward and to the north, and a reversed group magnetized up and to the south. Thermomagnetic experiments and mineralogic studies fail to provide an explanation of the opposing polarities in terms of mineralogic control, but rather suggest that the remanent magnetization reflects reversals of the main dipole field of the earth. All available radiometric ages are consistent with this field-reversal hypothesis and indicate that the present normal polarity epoch (N1) as well as the previous reversed epoch (R1) are 0.9 to 1.0 million years long, whereas the previous normal epoch (N2) was at least 25 percent longer. PMID:17799480

  7. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  8. The Observatory for Multi-Epoch Gravitational Lens Astrophysics (OMEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Bolton, Adam J.; Booth, Jeffrey T.; Bullock, James S.; Cheng, Edward; Coe, Dan; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Heneghan, Cate; Keeton, Charles R.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Lawrence, Charles R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Metcalf, R. Benton; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Nikzad, Shouleh; Peterson, Bradley M.; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Dark matter in a universe dominated by a cosmological constant seeds the formation of structure and is the scaffolding for galaxy formation. The nature of dark matter remains one of the fundamental unsolved problems in astrophysics and physics even though it represents 85% of the mass in the universe, and nearly one quarter of its total mass-energy budget. The mass function of dark matter "substructure" on sub-galactic scales may be enormously sensitive to the mass and properties of the dark matter particle. On astrophysical scales, especially at cosmological distances, dark matter substructure may only be detected through its gravitational influence on light from distant varying sources. Specifically, these are largely active galactic nuclei (AGN), which are accreting super-massive black holes in the centers of galaxies, some of the most extreme objects ever found. With enough measurements of the flux from AGN at different wavelengths, and their variability over time, the detailed structure around AGN, and even the mass of the super-massive black hole can be measured. The Observatory for Multi-Epoch Gravitational Lens Astrophysics (OMEGA) is a mission concept for a 1.5-m near-UV through near-IR space observatory that will be dedicated to frequent imaging and spectroscopic monitoring of ~100 multiply-imaged active galactic nuclei over the whole sky. Using wavelength-tailored dichroics with extremely high transmittance, efficient imaging in six channels will be done simultaneously during each visit to each target. The separate spectroscopic mode, engaged through a flip-in mirror, uses an image slicer spectrograph. After a period of many visits to all targets, the resulting multidimensional movies can then be analyzed to a) measure the mass function of dark matter substructure; b) measure precise masses of the accreting black holes as well as the structure of their accretion disks and their environments over several decades of physical scale; and c) measure a

  9. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  10. Dynamics of dark energy in collapsing halo of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsizh, M.; Novosyadlyj, B.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the non-linear evolution of spherical density and velocity perturbations of dark matter and dark energy in the expanding Universe. For this we have used the conservation and Einstein equations to describe the evolution of gravitationally coupled inhomogeneities of dark matter, dark energy and radiation from the linear stage in the early Universe to the non-linear stage at the current epoch. A simple method of numerical integration of the system of non-linear differential equations for evolution of the central part of halo is proposed. The results are presented for the halo of cluster (k=2 Mpc^{-1}) and supercluster scales (k=0.2 Mpc^{-1}) and show that a quintessential scalar field dark energy with a low value of effective speed of sound c_s<0.1 can have a notable impact on the formation of large-scale structures in the expanding Universe.

  11. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  12. Geomagnetic reversal in brunhes normal polarity epoch.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Foster, J H

    1969-02-01

    The magnetic stratigraphly of seven cores of deep-sea sediment established the existence of a short interval of reversed polarity in the upper part of the Brunches epoch of normal polarity. The reversed zone in the cores correlates well with paleontological boundaries and is named the Blake event. Its boundaries are estimated to be 108,000 and 114,000 years ago +/- 10 percent. PMID:17750890

  13. On the importance of direct detection combined limits for spin independent and spin dependent dark matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Cristina; Peiró, Miguel; Robles, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    In this work we show how the inclusion of dark matter (DM) direct detection upper bounds in a theoretically consistent manner can affect the allowed parameter space of a DM model. Traditionally, the limits from DM direct detection experiments on the elastic scattering cross section of DM particles as a function of their mass are extracted under simplifying assumptions. Relaxing the assumptions related to the DM particle nature, such as the neutron to proton ratio of the interactions, or the possibility of having similar contributions from the spin independent (SI) and spin dependent (SD) interactions can vary significantly the upper limits. Furthermore, it is known that astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties can also affect the upper bounds. To exemplify the impact of properly including all these factors, we have analysed two well motivated and popular DM scenarios: neutralinos in the NMSSM and a Z' portal with Dirac DM. We have found that the allowed parameter space of these models is subject to important variations when one includes both the SI and SD interactions at the same time, realistic neutron to proton ratios, as well as using different self-consistent speed distributions corresponding to popular DM halo density profiles, and distinct SD structure functions. Finally, we provide all the necessary information to include the upper bounds of SuperCDMS and LUX taking into account all these subtleties in the investigation of any particle physics model. The data for each experiment and example codes are available at this site http://goo.gl/1CDFYi, and their use is detailed in the appendices of this work.

  14. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R

    2014-03-18

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  15. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R

    2012-10-23

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  16. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Miller, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  17. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DURING THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, M.; Shull, J. M.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2010-05-10

    The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z = 6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function (LF) measured at z = 5 and z = 4. We then predict the LF at z {>=} 7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z {approx_gt} 7 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the LF: {alpha}(z {approx_gt} 8) {approx_lt} -1.9 compared to {alpha} = -1.74 at z = 6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L {sub *} {approx_gt} 10{sup -4}) might provide {approx_gt}75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f {sub esc} {approx} 0.2, clumping factor C {approx} 5, top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z {approx_gt} 8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z {approx_gt} 6, but a smaller C/f {sub esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L {sub *} galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z {>=} 6 than today.

  18. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: Nunivak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, A.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1967-01-01

    New paleomagnetic and potassium-argon dating measurements have been made of basalt flows from Nunivak Island, Alaska, with the following results. (1) The best estimate of the age of the Brunhes/Matuyama polarity epoch boundary is found to be 0.694 m.y. (2) The best estimate of the age of the Gauss/Gilbert boundary is 3.32 m.y. (3) Three normally magnetized flows with ages from 0.93 to 0.88 m.y. are in accord with previous estimates of the age and duration of the Jaramillo normal event. (4) One normally magnetized flow with an age of 1.65 ?? 0.09 m.y. supplies additional evidence for the Gilsa?? normal event. (5) Two new normal events are identified within the Gilbert reversed epoch, the "Cochiti normal event" with an age of 3.7 m.y. and the "Nunivak normal event" with an age of 4.1 m.y. ?? 1967.

  19. On the Threshold of the Reionization Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Castro, S.; Stern, D.; Mahabal, A. A.

    2001-10-01

    Discovery of the cosmic reionization epoch would represent a significant milestone in cosmology. We present Keck spectroscopy of the quasar SDSS 1044-0125, at z=5.73. The spectrum shows a dramatic increase in the optical depth at observed wavelengths λ>~7550 Å, corresponding to zabs>~5.2. Only a few small, narrow transmission regions are present in the spectrum beyond that point and out to the redshifts where the quasar signal begins. We interpret this result as a signature of the trailing edge of the cosmic reionization epoch, which we estimate to occur around ~6 (as indeed confirmed by subsequent observations by Becker et al.) and extending down to z~5.2. This behavior is expected in the modern theoretical models of the reionization era, which predict a patchy and gradual onset of reionization. The remaining transmission windows we see may correspond to the individual reionization bubbles (Strömgren spheres) embedded in a still largely neutral intergalactic medium, intersected by the line of sight to the quasar. Future spectroscopic observations of quasars at comparable or larger redshifts will provide a more detailed insight into the structure and extent of the reionization era. Based on the observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy, a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. LEDDB: LOFAR Epoch of Reionization Diagnostic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rubi, O.; Veligatla, V. K.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Lampropoulos, P.; Offringa, A. R.; Jelic, V.; Yatawatta, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Zaroubi, S.

    2013-10-01

    One of the key science projects of the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) is the detection of the cosmological signal coming from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Here we present the LOFAR EoR Diagnostic Database (LEDDB) that is used in the storage, management, processing and analysis of the LOFAR EoR observations. It stores referencing information of the observations and diagnostic parameters extracted from their calibration. These stored data are used to ease the pipeline processing, monitor the performance of the telescope, and visualize the diagnostic parameters which facilitates the analysis of the several contamination effects on the signals. It is implemented with PostgreSQL and accessed through the psycopg2 Python module. We have developed a very flexible query engine, which is used by a web user interface to access the database, and a very extensive set of tools for the visualization of the diagnostic parameters through all their multiple dimensions.

  1. Modeling the Extragalactic Epoch of Reionization Foreground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Patricia A.

    The Epoch of Reionization represents a largely unexplored yet fundamental chapter of the early universe. During this period, spanning several hundred million years, the first stars and galaxies formed and the Hydrogen-dominated intergalactic medium transitioned from a predominantly neutral to ionized state. Modern efforts to study exactly when and how reionization occurred are largely focused on the distribution of neutral Hydrogen gas and its evolution in response to the increasing abundance of luminous objects and ionizing flux. The Murchison Widefield Array is a low frequency radio interferometer designed as a first generation EoR experiment. The predominant systematic difficulty in making a detection of the primordial HI signal is the overwhelmingly bright emission from the intervening foreground galaxies and quasars. This thesis presents novel survey methods used to create a highly precise and reliable catalog of discrete extragalactic sources for the purposes of both calibration and foreground removal.

  2. Orion: The Final Epoch (OrionTFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, Tom; Allen, Tom; Arce, Hector; Booker, Joseph; Calvet, Nuria; Flaherty, Kevin; Furlan, Elise; Fischer, Will; Gonzales, Beatriz; Gutermuth, Rob; Hartman, Lee; Henning, Thomas; Hora, Joe; Karnath, Nicole; Kim, Kyoung Hee; Kounkel, Marina; Mazur, Brian; Offner, Stella; Osorio, Mayra; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Pipher, Judy; Prchlik, Jakub; Rebull, Luisa; Terebey, Susan; Tobin, John; Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; Watson, Dan; Wolk, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The Orion molecular clouds are an essential laboratory for studying low mass star formation over the broad range of environments in which they form. Starting with the Spitzer survey of Orion in 2004, more than a decade of observations with Spitzer, WISE, HST and Herschel, have accumulated an unparalleled characterization of the young stellar object population in Orion. We propose a final epoch of observations divided into two separate, complementary observations: A repeat of the entire Orion molecular cloud survey to 1.) identify ejected stars from clusters, 2.) measure the bulk proper motions of groups and clusters of stars, 3.) constrain the rate of luminous, accretion driven outbursts from both protostars and pre-main sequence stars with disks and 4.) use proper motions of IR Herbig-Haro knots as a fossil record of previous accretion events. A high cadence variability survey of the L1641 cloud extending the YSOVAR variability survey of the Orion Nebula Cluster across the Orion A cloud with the goals of 1.) constraining the star formation history of Orion A, 2.) studying the evolution of mid-IR variability from the protostellar to pre-main sequence phase, 3.) searching for periodicities in (nearly) edge-on protostars and disks due to orbiting clumps and structures from orbiting planets, and 4.) assessing whether inner disk processes - as traced by variability - are affected by their birth environment. This program completes an unparalleled, > 12 year multi-epoch, mid-IR study of the nearest large molecular cloud complex with both a wide spatial coverage and a uniformity that will not be exceeded in the forseeable future. It will place unique constraints on the highly dynamic processes that control low mass star formation, serve as a pathfinder to molecular cloud surveys of WFIRST, and provide well characterized targets needed to study mass accretion and planet formation around young low mass stars with SOFIA and JWST.

  3. Towards a Lunar Epoch of Reionization Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Lazio, J.; MacDowall, R.; Weiler, K.; Burns, J.

    2007-05-01

    Low-frequency radio astronomy is recognized as one of the few areas of astronomy that would clearly benefit from lunar basing. This is particularly true for locations on the far side of the Moon, a unique location because it provides simultaneous shielding from terrestrial interference and from strong solar radio bursts (half of the time). All lunar based instruments are also free of the serious effects of Earth's ionosphere, which is opaque at frequencies below 20-30 MHz and introduces large phase errors below 100 MHz. As a first step, a relatively small radio array on the near side of the Moon (ROLSS, the Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science) has been proposed to NASA's Lunar Sortie Science Opportunity program. ROLSS will be able to image radio emission from coronal mass ejections (type II radio bursts) and fast electron streams (type III bursts), and will also produce the first high-resolution images of the sky at low frequencies. It is possible that solar observations below a few MHz may be limited by the transient lunar ionosphere; a simple experiments to monitor the lunar ionosphere with riometry (LAPS, the Lunar Array Precursor Station), has also been proposed to the Lunar Sortie Science program. Finally, the lunar far side is the best location for large radio arrays designed to produce the highest quality images of redshifted neutral Hydrogen before and during the epoch of reionization. This is an area of fundamental importance, and will require a large number of array antenna elements. One concept for this far-future array is MERIT, the Moon-based Epoch of Reionization Imaging Telescope), which is partly based on technologies to be demonstrated by ROLSS. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  5. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical property of the equation of state in dark energy literature, whose physical consequences tend to be discarded by observations. This thus distinguishes the ten above sequences from an infinity of ways to describe Universe expansion.

  6. Analysis of temperature dependence of dark current mechanisms for long-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. D.; Chen, X. S.; Yin, F.; Quan, Z. J.; Ye, Z. H.; Hu, X. N.; Li, Z. F.; Lu, W.

    2009-05-01

    Resistance-voltage curves of n-on-p Hg1-хCdxTe long-wavelength infrared photodiodes forming 128-element array are measured in the temperature range of 40-150 K. Experimentally obtained characteristics are fitted by the simultaneous-mode nonlinear fitting program. The dark current mechanisms induced by diffusion, generation recombination, trap-assisted tunneling, band-to-band tunneling, and series resistance effect are included in the physical model for R-V curve fitting. Six characteristic parameters as function of temperature are extracted from measured R-V curves. The characteristics of extracted current components at low temperatures indicate significant contributions from tunneling effects, which is the dominant leakage current mechanism for reverse bias greater than approximately 50 mV. The Hg-vacancy-induced acceptor trap tends to invert to donor type at higher temperature, typically larger than 120 K, while it can maintain stable at the temperature of 60-40 K. The stable temperature of ion-implantation-induced traps is about 90-60 K, which possibly tends to be ionized at high temperature. However, a low operation temperature can induce the frozen effects of the ion-implantation-induced donor traps. Fitting certainty analysis shows that the error of one parameter can be magnified when one of the other types of dark current mechanisms dominates the dark current and is even infinitely enlarged under large reverse bias. The different bias regions at which each fitting parameter has the largest influence to the R-V curve should be ascertained. The results of the present work demonstrate that modeling of the dynamic resistance in small voltage range or at just operation temperature are insufficient for determining the mechanism of carrier transport across the Hg1-хCdxTe junction and a detailed theoretical study of the current-voltage characteristics in wider voltage range or at various temperatures should be carried out.

  7. Cosmological evolution with interaction between dark energy and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotin, Yuri L.; Kostenko, Alexander; Lemets, Oleg A.; Yerokhin, Danylo A.

    2015-12-01

    In this review we consider in detail different theoretical topics associated with interaction in the dark sector. We study linear and nonlinear interactions which depend on the dark matter and dark energy densities. We consider a number of different models (including the holographic dark energy and dark energy in a fractal universe), with interacting dark energy and dark matter, have done a thorough analysis of these models. The main task of this review was not only to give an idea about the modern set of different models of dark energy, but to show how much can be diverse dynamics of the universe in these models. We find that the dynamics of a universe that contains interaction in the dark sector can differ significantly from the Standard Cosmological Model.

  8. Molecular hydrogen in the cosmic recombination epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2011-10-15

    The advent of precise measurements of the CMB anisotropies has motivated correspondingly precise calculations of the cosmic recombination history. Cosmic recombination proceeds far out of equilibrium because of a ''bottleneck'' at the n=2 level of hydrogen: atoms can only reach the ground state via slow processes--two-photon decay or Lyman-{alpha} resonance escape. However, even a small primordial abundance of molecules could have a large effect on the interline opacity in the recombination epoch and lead to an additional route for hydrogen recombination. Therefore, this paper computes the abundance of the H{sub 2} molecule during the cosmic recombination epoch. Hydrogen molecules in the ground electronic levels X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} can either form from the excited H{sub 2} electronic levels B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} and C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} or through the charged particles H{sub 2}{sup +}, HeH{sup +}, and H{sup -}. We follow the transitions among all of these species, resolving the rotational and vibrational sublevels. Since the energies of the X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} (Lyman band) and X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} (Werner band) transitions are near the Lyman-{alpha} energy, the distortion of the CMB spectrum caused by escaped H Lyman-line photons accelerates both the formation and the destruction of H{sub 2} due to this channel relative to the thermal rates. This causes the populations of H{sub 2} molecules in X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} energy levels to deviate from their thermal equilibrium abundances. We find that the resulting H{sub 2} abundance is 10{sup -17} at z=1200 and 10{sup -13} at z=800, which is too small to have any significant influence on the recombination history.

  9. The epoch of reionization in the Rh = ct universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The measured properties of the epoch of reionization (EoR) show that reionization probably began around z ˜ 12-15 and ended by z = 6. In addition, a careful analysis of the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background indicate a scattering optical depth τ ˜ 0.066 ± 0.012 through the EoR. In the context of Λ cold dark matter, galaxies at intermediate redshifts and dwarf galaxies at higher redshifts now appear to be the principal sources of UV ionizing radiation, but only for an inferred (ionizing) escape fraction fion ˜ 0.2, which is in tension with other observations that suggest a value as small as ˜0.05. In this paper, we examine how reionization might have progressed in the alternative Friedmann-Robertson Walker cosmology known as the Rh = ct universe, and determine the value of fion required with this different rate of expansion. We find that Rh = ct accounts quite well for the currently known properties of the EoR, as long as its fractional baryon density falls within the reasonable range 0.026 ≲ Ωb ≲ 0.037. This model can also fit the EoR data with fion ˜ 0.05, but only if the Lyman continuum photon production is highly efficient and Ωb ˜ 0.037. These results are still preliminary, however, given their reliance on a particular form of the star formation rate density, which is still uncertain at very high redshifts. It will also be helpful to reconsider the EoR in Rh = ct when complete structure formation models become available.

  10. Into the Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    first of the four 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes. A first analysis of the new observations indicates that "evolved" galaxies were already present when the Universe was only 4 billion years old. This information is of great importance to our understanding of how the matter in the early Universe condensed and the first galaxies and stars came into being. While in the nearby Universe evolved galaxies are preferentially located in denser environments such as groups and clusters of galaxies, little is currently known about the distribution in space of such objects at early cosmic epochs. In order to be able to see such obscured and/or "evolved" galaxies in the early Universe, and to look for hitherto unknown galaxies beyond the limits of "deep-field" imaging in visible spectral bands, it is necessary to employ other observing techniques. The astronomers must search for such objects on large-field, very long-exposure sky images obtained in the near-infrared (NIR, wavelength 1-2 µm) region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at even longer wavelengths (> 10 µm) in the far-IR and in the sub-mm range. Such observations are beyond the capability of the infrared cameras installed on the world's 4-m class telescopes. However, the advent of the ISAAC instrument at the 8.2-m ANTU telescope has now opened new and exciting research opportunities in this direction for European astronomers. With ISAAC , it is possible to obtain "deep" NIR images in an unprecedentedly wide field of view, covering a sky area about 7 times larger than with the best instruments previously available on very large telescopes. Such observations also benefit greatly from the very good optical quality provided by the active optics control of the VLT, as well as the excellent Paranal site. The ISAAC/ANTU observations ESO PR Photo 06a/00 ESO PR Photo 06a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 427pix - 69k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 853 pix - 195k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 942 x 1004 pix - 635k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 06a/00 displays a 4

  11. Parallax Results from Urat Epoch Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    We present 1103 trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions from the United States Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) observations taken at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) over a three-year period from 2012 April to 2015 June covering the entire sky north of about -10^\\circ decl. We selected two samples: previously suspected nearby stars from known photometric distances and stars showing a large, significant parallax signature in URAT epoch data without any prior selection criteria. All systems presented in this paper have an observed parallax ≥40 mas with no previous published trigonometric parallax. The formal errors on these weighted parallax solutions are mostly between 4 and 10 mas. This sample gives a significant (of the order of 50%) increase to the number of known systems having a trigonometric parallax to be within 25 pc of the Sun (without applying Lutz–Kelker bias corrections). A few of these are found to be within 10 pc. Many of these new nearby stars display a total proper motion of less than 200 mas yr‑1. URAT parallax results have been verified against Hipparcos and Yale data for stars in common. The publication of all signifigant parallax observations from URAT data is in preparation for CDS.

  12. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  13. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  14. Investigation of the epoch state filter. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A navigation filtering technique has been formulated using as state variables the initial or epoch position and velocity of the spacecraft. The estimate of this initial state is then improved by filtering new measurements. The current state may be obtained by a conic extrapolation of the epoch state. Results of a digital computer simulation of the epoch state filter show that this formulation of the navigational problem results in less computer run time and less computer storage space than conventional techniques. The errors produced by this technique have been demonstrated to be comparable to those obtained by conventional maximum-likelihood filtering.

  15. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema

    Joseph Silk

    2010-01-08

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  16. Dark Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Silk

    2009-09-23

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  17. Fingerprinting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin

    2009-10-15

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar-field models) which is often generically called 'dark energy'. We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  18. Energy Dissipation of Energetic Electrons in the Inhomogeneous Intergalactic Medium during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    We explore a time-dependent energy dissipation of the energetic electrons in the inhomogeneous intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of cosmic reionization. In addition to the atomic processes, we take into account the inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the electrons on the cosmic microwave background photons, which is the dominant channel of energy loss for electrons with energies above a few MeV. We show that: (1) the effect on the IGM has both local (atomic processes) and non-local (IC radiation) components; (2) the energy distribution between hydrogen and helium ionizations depends on the initial energy of an electron; (3) the local baryon overdensity significantly affects the fractions of energy distributed in each channel; and (4) the relativistic effect of the atomic cross-section becomes important during the epoch of cosmic reionization. We release our code as open source for further modification by the community.

  19. Chaotic motion and the evolution of morphological components in a time-dependent model of a barred galaxy within a dark matter halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, R. E. G.; Manos, T.

    2016-06-01

    Studies of dynamical stability (chaotic versus regular motion) in galactic dynamics often rely on static analytical models of the total gravitational potential. Potentials based upon self-consistent N-body simulations offer more realistic models, fully incorporating the time-dependent nature of the systems. Here we aim at analysing the fractions of chaotic motion within different morphological components of the galaxy. We wish to investigate how the presence of chaotic orbits evolves with time, and how their spatial distribution is associated with morphological features of the galaxy. We employ a time-dependent analytical potential model that was derived from an N-body simulation of a strongly barred galaxy. With this analytical potential, we may follow the dynamical evolution of ensembles of orbits. Using the Generalized Alignment Index (GALI) chaos detection method, we study the fraction of chaotic orbits, sampling the dynamics of both the stellar disc and of the dark matter halo. Within the stellar disc, the global trend is for chaotic motion to decrease in time, specially in the region of the bar. We scrutinized the different changes of regime during the evolution (orbits that are permanently chaotic, permanently regular, those that begin regular and end chaotic, and those that begin chaotic and end regular), tracing the types of orbits back to their common origins. Within the dark matter halo, chaotic motion also decreases globally in time. The inner halo (r < 5 kpc) is where most chaotic orbits are found and it is the only region where chaotic orbits outnumber regular orbits, in the early evolution.

  20. The effect of epoch length on estimated EEG functional connectivity and brain network organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Crobe, Alessandra; Marrosu, Francesco; Stam, Cornelis J.; Hillebrand, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Graph theory and network science tools have revealed fundamental mechanisms of functional brain organization in resting-state M/EEG analysis. Nevertheless, it is still not clearly understood how several methodological aspects may bias the topology of the reconstructed functional networks. In this context, the literature shows inconsistency in the chosen length of the selected epochs, impeding a meaningful comparison between results from different studies. Approach. The aim of this study was to provide a network approach insensitive to the effects that epoch length has on functional connectivity and network reconstruction. Two different measures, the phase lag index (PLI) and the amplitude envelope correlation (AEC) were applied to EEG resting-state recordings for a group of 18 healthy volunteers using non-overlapping epochs with variable length (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 s). Weighted clustering coefficient (CCw), weighted characteristic path length (L w) and minimum spanning tree (MST) parameters were computed to evaluate the network topology. The analysis was performed on both scalp and source-space data. Main results. Results from scalp analysis show a decrease in both mean PLI and AEC values with an increase in epoch length, with a tendency to stabilize at a length of 12 s for PLI and 6 s for AEC. Moreover, CCw and L w show very similar behaviour, with metrics based on AEC more reliable in terms of stability. In general, MST parameters stabilize at short epoch lengths, particularly for MSTs based on PLI (1–6 s versus 4–8 s for AEC). At the source-level the results were even more reliable, with stability already at 1 s duration for PLI-based MSTs. Significance. The present work suggests that both PLI and AEC depend on epoch length and that this has an impact on the reconstructed network topology, particularly at the scalp-level. Source-level MST topology is less sensitive to differences in epoch length, therefore enabling the comparison of

  1. Sub-Daily Earth Rotation During Epoch '92

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Ibanez-Meier, R.; Dickey, J. O.; Lichten, S. M.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Earth rotation data were obtained with GPS during the EPOCH '92 campaign in the summer of 1992. About 10 days of data were acquired from 25 globally distributed stations and a constellation of 17 GPS satellites.

  2. Dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  3. Dark Matter and Dark Energy Explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2006-03-01

    The standard model of the universe has many mysteries and defects requiring the use of large fudge factors such as Dark Matter and Dark Energy. We will show that Dark Matter is needed when we try to extend Newton's law of gravity (based upon observations in our solar system) to galactic distances. Dark Matter was introduced to explain the observed flat velocity rotation curves of the outer parts of spiral galaxies, as observed by Vera. Rubin. Much earlier, the (under appreciated) Fritz Zwicky introduced the need for large amounts of missing invisible matter to explain the surprising observed motion of groups of remote galaxies. In our hypothesis, the modification of Newton's laws by the addition of a linear term to the gravitational constant that increases with distance will eliminate the need for dark matter. Our hypothesis is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom, which depends upon acceleration. The Red shift observations by Hubble as a function of distance, and interpreted as ``apparent Doppler effect'' led to the unproven belief that the universe is expanding, and thus to the Big Bang. In turn the apparent acceleration of the expansion required the introduction of Dark Energy. Actually there are three additional components of the red shift that are solely due to gravity and distance and can be larger than the Doppler contribution.

  4. Observing the Epoch of Reionization with the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Christian L.

    We review the observable consequences of the epoch of reionization (EoR) on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and the resulting constraints on the EoR. We discuss how Thomson scattering with the free electrons produced during EoR equates to an optical depth for CMB photons. The optical depth measurements from the WMAP and Planck satellites, using large-scale CMB polarization power spectra, are one of the few current constraints on the timing of cosmic reionization. We also present forecasts for the precision with which the optical depth will be measured by future satellite missions. Second, we consider the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect, and how the kSZ power spectrum depends on the duration of reionization. We review current measurements of the kSZ power and forecasts for future experiments. Finally, we mention proposals to look for spectral distortions in the CMB that are related to the electron temperature at EoR, and ideas to map the variations in the optical depth across the sky.

  5. Bright, dark, and singular solitons in optical fibers with spatio-temporal dispersion and spatially dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Zerrad, Essaid; Biswas, Anjan; Belic, Milivoj

    2016-05-01

    Investigated in this work is the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with space-dependent parameters, which models the propagation of optical solitons in spatially inhomogeneous optical fiber with detuning, spatiotemporal dispersion, intermodal dispersion, and fiber gain or loss. Through the ansatz scheme, analytical bell, kink, and singular soliton solutions under certain coefficient constraints are obtained.

  6. BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT THE PRESENT EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, Tod R.; Postman, Marc; Strauss, Michael A.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Chisari, Nora E.

    2014-12-20

    We have obtained photometry and spectroscopy of 433 z ≤ 0.08 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a full-sky survey of Abell clusters to construct a BCG sample suitable for probing deviations from the local Hubble flow. The BCG Hubble diagram over 0 < z < 0.08 is consistent to within 2% of the Hubble relation specified by a Ω {sub m} = 0.3, Λ = 0.7 cosmology. This sample allows us to explore the structural and photometric properties of BCGs at the present epoch, their location in their hosting galaxy clusters, and the effects of the cluster environment on their structure and evolution. We revisit the L{sub m} -α relation for BCGs, which uses α, the log-slope of the BCG photometric curve of growth, to predict the metric luminosity in an aperture with 14.3 kpc radius, L{sub m} , for use as a distance indicator. Residuals in the relation are 0.27 mag rms. We measure central stellar velocity dispersions, σ, of the BCGs, finding the Faber-Jackson relation to flatten as the metric aperture grows to include an increasing fraction of the total BCG luminosity. A three-parameter ''metric plane'' relation using α and σ together gives the best prediction of L{sub m} , with 0.21 mag residuals. The distribution of projected spatial offsets, r{sub x} of BCGs from the X-ray-defined cluster center is a steep γ = –2.33 power law over 1 < r{sub x} < 10{sup 3} kpc. The median offset is ∼10 kpc, but ∼15% of the BCGs have r{sub x} > 100 kpc. The absolute cluster-dispersion normalized BCG peculiar velocity |ΔV {sub 1}|/σ {sub c} follows an exponential distribution with scale length 0.39 ± 0.03. Both L{sub m} and α increase with σ {sub c}. The α parameter is further moderated by both the spatial and velocity offset from the cluster center, with larger α correlated with the proximity of the BCG to the cluster mean velocity or potential center. At the same time, position in the cluster has little effect on L{sub m} . Likewise, residuals from the metric plane

  7. Cosmological viability conditions for f(T) dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N. E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir

    2012-11-01

    Recently f(T) modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of f(T) dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of f(T) dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

  8. Dark Matter Halo Models of Stellar Mass-dependent Galaxy Clustering in PRIMUS+DEEP2 at 0.2>z>1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Moustakas, John; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-07-01

    We utilize ΛCDM halo occupation models of galaxy clustering to investigate the evolving stellar mass dependent clustering of galaxies in the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and DEEP2 Redshift Survey over the past eight billion years of cosmic time, between 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2. These clustering measurements provide new constraints on the connections between dark matter halo properties and galaxy properties in the context of the evolving large-scale structure of the universe. Using both an analytic model and a set of mock galaxy catalogs, we find a strong correlation between central galaxy stellar mass and dark matter halo mass over the range {M}{halo}˜ {10}11-{10}13 {h}-1 {M}⊙ , approximately consistent with previous observations and theoretical predictions. However, the stellar-to-halo mass relation and the mass scale where star formation efficiency reaches a maximum appear to evolve more strongly than predicted by other models, including models based primarily on abundance-matching constraints. We find that the fraction of satellite galaxies in halos of a given mass decreases significantly from z˜ 0.5 to z˜ 0.9, partly due to the fact that halos at fixed mass are rarer at higher redshift and have lower abundances. We also find that the {M}1/{M}{min} ratio, a model parameter that quantifies the critical mass above which halos host at least one satellite, decreases from ≈ 20 at z˜ 0 to ≈ 13 at z˜ 0.9. Considering the evolution of the subhalo mass function vis-à-vis satellite abundances, this trend has implications for relations between satellite galaxies and halo substructures and for intracluster mass, which we argue has grown due to stripped and disrupted satellites between z˜ 0.9 and z˜ 0.5.

  9. Distinct Biological Epochs in the Reproductive Life of Female Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rogina, Blanka; Wolverton, Tom; Bross, Tyson G.; Chen, Kun; Müller, Hans-Georg; Carey, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Mating alters the physiology and behavior of female Drosophila melanogaster resulting in a surge of egg laying, a decrease in receptivity to other males, and a decrease in life span. Here, we show striking differences in patterns of Drosophila egg laying and mortality rate dependent upon mating history. Our data reveal previously unreported epochs in the reproductive life of females: optimal, vulnerable and declining-terminal. During the optimal period, mating induces females to respond with a surge in egg laying and has a reversible effect on mortality rate. In contrast, during the vulnerable period, mating does not induce females to respond with a surge in egg laying and causes an irreversible increase in mortality rate. The terminal period was always observed several days before death, irrespective of the chronological age, and is marked by sharp reductions in egg laying. The presence of these distinctive biological epochs may reflect increased female sensitivity to mating due to age-related decline. PMID:17681363

  10. COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR1–Dependent and –Independent Responses of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Transcriptome to Dark Anoxia[W

    PubMed Central

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Casero, David; Liu, Bensheng; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Happe, Thomas; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobiosis is a stress condition for aerobic organisms and requires extensive acclimation responses. We used RNA-Seq for a whole-genome view of the acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to anoxic conditions imposed simultaneously with transfer to the dark. Nearly 1.4 × 103 genes were affected by hypoxia. Comparing transcript profiles from early (hypoxic) with those from late (anoxic) time points indicated that cells activate oxidative energy generation pathways before employing fermentation. Probable substrates include amino acids and fatty acids (FAs). Lipid profiling of the C. reinhardtii cells revealed that they degraded FAs but also accumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs). In contrast with N-deprived cells, the TAGs in hypoxic cells were enriched in desaturated FAs, suggesting a distinct pathway for TAG accumulation. To distinguish transcriptional responses dependent on COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR1 (CRR1), which is also involved in hypoxic gene regulation, we compared the transcriptomes of crr1 mutants and complemented strains. In crr1 mutants, ∼40 genes were aberrantly regulated, reaffirming the importance of CRR1 for the hypoxic response, but indicating also the contribution of additional signaling strategies to account for the remaining differentially regulated transcripts. Based on transcript patterns and previous results, we conclude that nitric oxide–dependent signaling cascades operate in anoxic C. reinhardtii cells. PMID:24014546

  11. Into the Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    first of the four 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes. A first analysis of the new observations indicates that "evolved" galaxies were already present when the Universe was only 4 billion years old. This information is of great importance to our understanding of how the matter in the early Universe condensed and the first galaxies and stars came into being. While in the nearby Universe evolved galaxies are preferentially located in denser environments such as groups and clusters of galaxies, little is currently known about the distribution in space of such objects at early cosmic epochs. In order to be able to see such obscured and/or "evolved" galaxies in the early Universe, and to look for hitherto unknown galaxies beyond the limits of "deep-field" imaging in visible spectral bands, it is necessary to employ other observing techniques. The astronomers must search for such objects on large-field, very long-exposure sky images obtained in the near-infrared (NIR, wavelength 1-2 µm) region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at even longer wavelengths (> 10 µm) in the far-IR and in the sub-mm range. Such observations are beyond the capability of the infrared cameras installed on the world's 4-m class telescopes. However, the advent of the ISAAC instrument at the 8.2-m ANTU telescope has now opened new and exciting research opportunities in this direction for European astronomers. With ISAAC , it is possible to obtain "deep" NIR images in an unprecedentedly wide field of view, covering a sky area about 7 times larger than with the best instruments previously available on very large telescopes. Such observations also benefit greatly from the very good optical quality provided by the active optics control of the VLT, as well as the excellent Paranal site. The ISAAC/ANTU observations ESO PR Photo 06a/00 ESO PR Photo 06a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 427pix - 69k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 853 pix - 195k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 942 x 1004 pix - 635k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 06a/00 displays a 4

  12. Guard Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox

    2011-10-01

    The goal of the Guard Dark program is to collect WFC3/IR dark current data prior to each visit in two of the Multi-Cycle Treasury {MCT} programs in Cycle 19. By scheduling a dark current observation between the last pre-MCT observation and the first MCT visit, we will be able to measure any residual persistent signal resulting from the former which may affect the latter.

  13. Dark strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2009-09-15

    Recent astrophysical observations have motivated novel theoretical models of the dark matter sector. A class of such models predicts the existence of GeV scale cosmic strings that communicate with the standard model sector by Aharonov-Bohm interactions with electrically charged particles. We discuss the cosmology of these 'dark strings' and investigate possible observational signatures. More elaborate dark sector models are argued to contain hybrid topological defects that may also have observational signatures.

  14. Can cosmic structure form without dark matter?

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Liguori, Michele

    2006-12-01

    One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the Universe. To account for this observation, perturbations had to have grown since recombination by a factor greater than (1+z*) approximately 1180 where z* is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, and so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular, in Bekenstein's relativistic version of modified Newtonian dynamics. PMID:17280192

  15. Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Cotti, U.; De Leon, C. L.; Raya, A; Villasenor, L.

    2008-07-02

    One of the biggest scientific mysteries of our time resides in the identification of the particles that constitute a large fraction of the mass of our Universe, generically known as dark matter. We review the observations and the experimental data that imply the existence of dark matter. We briefly discuss the properties of the two best dark-matter candidate particles and the experimental techniques presently used to try to discover them. Finally, we mention a proposed project that has recently emerged within the Mexican community to look for dark matter.

  16. A Lyman Break Galaxy in the Epoch of Reionization from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel K.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Dickinson, Mark; Pirzkal, Norbert; Spinrad, Hyron; Reddy, Naveen; Dey, Arjun; Hathi, Nimish; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Peth, Michael A.; Cohen, Seth; Budavari, Tamas; Ferreras, Ignacio; Gronwall, Caryl; Haiman, Zoltan; Meurer, Gernhardt; Straughn, Amber N.

    2013-01-01

    Slitless grism spectroscopy from space offers dramatic advantages for studying high redshift galaxies: high spatial resolution to match the compact sizes of the targets, a dark and uniform sky background, and simultaneous observation over fields ranging from five square arcminutes (HST) to over 1000 square arcminutes (Euclid). Here we present observations of a galaxy at z = 6.57 the end of the reioinization epoch identified using slitless HST grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) and reconfirmed with Keck + DEIMOS. This high redshift identification is enabled by the depth of the PEARS survey. Substantially higher redshifts are precluded for PEARS data by the declining sensitivity of the ACS grism at greater than lambda 0.95 micrometers. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms.

  17. The universe could be dark, ma non troppo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    We will present new insights into the dark phenomena, i.e., the recent acceleration of the universe linked to a sort of dark energy, and to the unknown dark matter. The study is based only on Einsteins equations without cosmological constant, and on ordinary matter described as point masses. We will be limited, thereby, to the post -recombination epoch. We shall revise the outspread statement that a universe made of colission-less particles is well represented by dust, i.e; by an Einstein-de Sitter universe. Using well known results on the N-body problem expressed as a infinite series, and starting at zero order with the empty Milne universe, we shall get the aforementioned EdS universe at the first order, but at the next one we shall obtain a cosmological model whose energy density could explain the dark phenomena. No exotic dark components are necessary in principle, but we need to know the redshift of formation of the dominant particles in the present epoch, that we identify with the galaxies. Thus, assuming that redshift to be of the order of eleven, we shall get that the time evolution of the acceleration, and the supernovae luminous distance-redshift relation, are indistinguishable from the ones predicted by the ACDM model. However, if there was no realistic evolution model that could justify such an early galaxy formation epoch, then some quantity of dark energy would be necessary, ma non troppo.

  18. Dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.; Vagnozzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden (dark) sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry, the dark photon, can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength ε ˜10-9 appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on big bang nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at hydrogen recombination. We then examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. Galactic structure is considered next, focusing on spiral and irregular galaxies. For these galaxies we modeled the dark matter halo (at the current epoch) as a dissipative plasma of dark matter particles, where the energy lost due to dissipation is compensated by the energy produced from ordinary supernovae (the core-collapse energy is transferred to the hidden sector via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova core). We find that such a dynamical halo model can reproduce several observed features of disk galaxies, including the cored density profile and the Tully-Fisher relation. We also discuss how elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies could fit into this picture. Finally, these analyses are combined to set bounds on the parameter space of our model, which can serve as a guideline for future experimental searches.

  19. Temporal dark polariton solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Skryabin, Dmitry V.

    2016-04-01

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid dark and anti-dark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while anti-dark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside forbidden frequency gap of the linear system.

  20. Dark-matter halo assembly bias: Environmental dependence in the non-Markovian excursion-set theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Chung-Pei; Riotto, Antonio

    2014-02-10

    In the standard excursion-set model for the growth of structure, the statistical properties of halos are governed by the halo mass and are independent of the larger-scale environment in which the halos reside. Numerical simulations, however, have found the spatial distributions of halos to depend not only on their mass but also on the details of their assembly history and environment. Here we present a theoretical framework for incorporating this 'assembly bias' into the excursion-set model. Our derivations are based on modifications of the path-integral approach of Maggiore and Riotto that models halo formation as a non-Markovian random-walk process. The perturbed density field is assumed to evolve stochastically with the smoothing scale and exhibits correlated walks in the presence of a density barrier. We write down conditional probabilities for multiple barrier crossings and derive from them analytic expressions for descendant and progenitor halo mass functions and halo merger rates as a function of both halo mass and the linear overdensity δ {sub e} of the larger-scale environment of the halo. Our results predict a higher halo merger rate and higher progenitor halo mass function in regions of higher overdensity, consistent with the behavior seen in N-body simulations.

  1. Correlation and Characterization of 3D Morphological Dependent Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectra of Single Silver Nanoparticles Using Dark-field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy and AFM

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yujun; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Huang, Tao; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new and effective methodology to correlate optical and AFM images of single Ag nanoparticles (NPs), allowing us to study 3D-morphological dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of individual Ag NPs. We fabricated arrays of distinctive microwindows on glass coverslips using photo-lithography method, and created well-isolated individual Ag NPs with a wide variety of shapes and morphologies on the glass coverslips using a modified nanosphere lithography method (NSL). Using distinctive geometries of microwindows, we located individual Ag NPs of interest in their optical and AFM images, enabling us to correlate and characterize the LSPR spectra and 3D morphologies of the same single NPs using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS) and AFM, respectively. We found that LSPR spectra of single Ag NPs, with nearly equal volume [(8.6 ± 0.4) × 103 nm3], cross-section [(2.2 ± 0.2) × 102 nm3], and height (39.6 ± 3.6 nm), highly depend on their shapes, showing the red shift of peak wavelength to 629 nm (quasi trapezoidal cylindrical NP) from that of 506 nm (quasi circular cylindrical NP). LSPR spectra of single Ag NPs simulated using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) agree well with those measured experimentally when their shapes and morphologies can be accuractely described in both methods, but differ when they are not. Furthermore, we found location-dependent LSPR spectra on and around a single NP, offering a unique opportunity to characterize multi-mode plasmonic NPs at nanometer resolution for better understanding their plasmonic optical properties and for rational design of single NP optics. PMID:20190865

  2. Statistics of substructures in dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the amount and distribution of dark matter substructures within dark matter haloes, using a large set of high-resolution simulations ranging from group-size to cluster-size haloes, and carried out within a cosmological model consistent with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 7-year data. In particular, we study how the measured properties of subhaloes vary as a function of the parent halo mass, the physical properties of the parent halo and redshift. The fraction of halo mass in substructures increases with increasing mass: it is of the order of 5 per cent for haloes with M200˜ 1013 M⊙ and of the order of 10 per cent for the most massive haloes in our sample, with M200˜ 1015 M⊙. There is, however, a very large halo-to-halo scatter that can be explained only in part by a range of halo physical properties, e.g. concentration. At a given halo mass, less concentrated haloes contain significantly larger fractions of mass in substructures because of the reduced strength of tidal disruption. Most of the substructure mass is located at the outskirts of the parent haloes, in relatively few massive subhaloes. This mass segregation appears to become stronger at increasing redshift, and should reflect into a more significant mass segregation of the galaxy population at different cosmic epochs. When haloes are accreted on to larger structures, their mass is significantly reduced by tidal stripping. Haloes that are more massive at the time of accretion (these should host more luminous galaxies) are brought closer to the centre on shorter time-scales by dynamical friction, and therefore suffer a more significant stripping. The halo merger rate depends strongly on the environment with substructure in more massive haloes suffering more important mergers than their counterparts residing in less massive systems. This should translate into a different morphological mix for haloes of different mass.

  3. Dark matter and dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-15

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant {alpha}-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on {alpha}-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies {alpha}-circumflex < or approx. 10{sup -3} for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  4. Dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Dark energy is the name given to the unknown physics causing the current acceleration of the cosmic expansion. Whether dark energy is truly a new component of energy density or an extension of gravitational physics beyond general relativity is not yet known. From: Mattia Galiazzo Address: mattia.galiazzo@univie.ac.at Database: ast

  5. Effect of Light/Dark Cycle on Wheel Running and Responding Reinforced by the Opportunity to Run Depends on Postsession Feeding Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, T. W.; Mondona, A. R.; Conrad, K. M.; Poirier, K. F.; Pickering, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Do rats run and respond at a higher rate to run during the dark phase when they are typically more active? To answer this question, Long Evans rats were exposed to a response-initiated variable interval 30-s schedule of wheel-running reinforcement during light and dark cycles. Wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased modestly during…

  6. Estimating Asteroid Thermal Inertia from Multi-epoch Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2014-11-01

    Granular material, or regolith, is observed to be ubiquitous on asteroid surfaces. To date, two feasible mechanisms of regolith generation have been proposed: recurrent impacts and thermal fracturing. By combining thermal infrared observations and a thermophysical model (TPM), the thermal inertia of an asteroid surface can be used to infer its physical properties, including the average regolith grain size. With the regolith properties of a large population of diverse asteroids (i.e. different spectral class, size, rotation period etc.), information regarding the details of regolith generation can be inferred.Traditional thermal inertia determination methods use a TPM with a previously derived asteroid shape model and spin axis for constraining the observed surface temperature distribution. TPMs invoke the heat diffusion equation to calculate surface temperatures for a rotating asteroid. An asteroid spin axis provide the boundary condition needed to calculate the surface energy balance in a TPM. However the limited amount of objects with a shape model and thermal infrared observations inhibit the number of thermal inertias that can potentially be calculated. Here, a technique using WISE (12 & 22 μm) observations taken before or after opposition is employed to derive thermal inertias of asteroids without using a shape model. By gathering thermal infrared data at multiple viewing geometries the temperature distribution, thus thermal inertia, is constrained.We first demonstrate the validity of this method on objects with a previously determined shape model and spin axis from the DAMIT website. Our analyses show that not knowing an asteroid’s shape does not significantly affect the resulting thermal inertia estimates. Additionally, we apply our TPM to WISE multi-epoch thermal observations to place estimates for the thermal inertia for more than 100 objects. The set of objects used samples many sizes, spectral classes and rotation periods, which may be important

  7. The Reel Deal: Interpreting HST Multi-Epoch Movies of YSO Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this proposal is to bring the theoretical interpretation of Young Stellar Object jets and their environments to a new level of realism. We propose to build on the results of a successful Cycle 16 observing proposal that has obtained 3rd epoch images of HH jets. We will use Adaptive Mesh Refinement MHD simulations {developed by our team} to carry forward a detailed program of modeling and interpretation of the time-dependent behavior revealed in the new, extended multi-epoch data set. Only with the third epoch observations can we explore forces: i.e. accelerations, decelerations and structural changes to develop an accurate understanding of physical processes occurring in hypersonic, magnetized jet flows. Our studies will allow us to characterize the jets and, therefore, make the crucial link with jet central engines. We note an innovative feature of our project is its link with laboratory astrophysical experiments of jets. Our analysis of the observations will be used to determine future laboratory experiments which will explore A?clumpyA? jet propagation issues.

  8. Use of Apollo 17 Epoch Neutron Spectrum as a Benchmark in Testing LEND Collimated Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Gordon; Sagdeev, R.; Milikh, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo 17 neutron experiment LPNE provided a unique set of data on production of neutrons in the Lunar soil bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). It serves as valuable "ground-truth" in the age of orbital remote sensing. We used the neutron data attributed to Apollo 17 epoch as a benchmark for testing the LEND's collimated sensor, as introduced by the geometry of collimator and efficiency of He3 counters. The latter is defined by the size of gas counter and pressure inside it. The intensity and energy spectrum of neutrons escaping the lunar surface are dependent on incident flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) whose variability is associated with Solar Cycle and its peculiarities. We obtain first the share of neutrons entering through the field of view of collimator as a fraction of the total neutron flux by using the angular distribution of neutron exiting the Moon described by our Monte Carlo code. We computed next the count rate of the 3He sensor by using the neutron energy spectrum from McKinney et al. [JGR, 2006] and by consider geometry and gas pressure of the LEND sensor. Finally the neutron count rate obtained for the Apollo 17 epoch characterized by intermediate solar activity was adjusted to the LRO epoch characterized by low solar activity. It has been done by taking into account solar modulation potential, which affects the GCR flux, and in turn changes the neutron albedo flux.

  9. Declinations in the Almagest: accuracy, epoch, and observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, John C.; Zimmer, Peter; Jones, Patricia B.

    2014-11-01

    Almagest declinations attributed to Timocharis, Aristyllos, Hipparchus, and Ptolemy are investigated through comparisons of the reported declinations with the declinations computed from modern positions translated to the earlier epochs. Consistent results indicate an observational accuracy of ≈ 0.1° and epochs of: Timocharis, c. 298 BC; Aristyllos, c. 256 BC, and Hipparchus, c. 128 BC.The ≈ 42-year difference between Aristyllos and Timocharis is confirmed to be statistically significant. The declinations attributed to Ptolemy were likely two distinct groups—observations taken c. AD 57 and observations taken c. AD 128. The later observations could have been taken by Ptolemy himself.

  10. A simple model linking galaxy and dark matter evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, Simon; Lilly, Simon; Amara, Adam; Paranjape, Aseem; Refregier, Alexandre E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch

    2014-09-20

    We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating predefined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. The model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al., coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables, including the main sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function, and the shape of the star forming and passive mass functions. Similar to observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al., which was based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the main sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} stellar-to-halo mass relation, and the SFR – M{sub h} relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} relation is not quite peaked enough, and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star formation efficiency, which emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.

  11. A Simple Model Linking Galaxy and Dark Matter Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Simon; Lilly, Simon; Amara, Adam; Paranjape, Aseem; Refregier, Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating predefined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. The model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al., coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables, including the main sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function, and the shape of the star forming and passive mass functions. Similar to observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al., which was based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the main sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the Ms - Mh stellar-to-halo mass relation, and the SFR - Mh relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the Ms - Mh relation is not quite peaked enough, and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star formation efficiency, which emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.

  12. The Photosynthetic Dark Reactions Do Not Operate in the Dark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the common misconception persistent in high school and college level introductory biology texts that "dark reactions" of the Calvin cycle actually occur in the dark. Explains that they are indirectly dependent on the presence of light for their activity. (ASK)

  13. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  14. Dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter-a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations-from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology-a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)-fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  15. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  16. The Utility of Shorter Epochs in Direct Motion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Karen; Herrin, Jeph; Krumholz, Harlan; Irwin, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    This cross-sectional study using direct motion monitoring evaluated whether short epochs increased estimates of moderate or vigorous physical activity (MPA or VPA) and enhanced differences in daily VPA comparing overweight (OW) and nonoverweight (NOW) children. Seventy-seven children (ages 8-10 years) wore accelerometers for 7 days. We calculated…

  17. Sub-Daily Polar Motion During Epoch '92 with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibanez-Meier, R.; Freedman, A. P.; Lichten, S. M.; Lindqwister, U. J.; Gross, R. S.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Data from a worldwide Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking network spanning six days during the EPOCH '92 campaign are used to estimate variations of the Earth's pole position every 30 minutes. The resulting polar motion time series is compared with estimates derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations.

  18. Faint Blue Galaxies and the Epoch of Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Ferguson, Henry C.

    1996-02-01

    Several independent lines of reasoning, both theoretical and observational, suggest that the very faint (B ≳ 24) galaxies seen in deep images of the sky are small low-mass galaxies that experienced a short starburst at redshifts 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 1 and have since faded into low-luminosity, low surface brightness (LSB) objects. We examine this hypothesis in detail in order to determine whether a model incorporating such dwarfs can account for the observed wavelength-dependent number counts, as well as redshift, color, and size distributions. Low-mass galaxies generically arise in large numbers in hierarchical clustering scenarios with realistic initial conditions. Generally, these galaxies are expected to form at high redshifts. Babul & Rees have argued that the formation epoch of these galaxies is, in fact, delayed until z ≲ 1 due to the photoionization of the gas by the metagalactic UV radiation at high redshifts. We combine these two elements, along with simple heuristic assumptions regarding star formation histories and efficiency, to construct our bursting dwarf model. The slope and the normalization of the mass function of the dwarf galaxies are derived from the initial conditions and are not adjusted to fit the data. We further augment the model with a phenomenological prescription for the formation and evolution of the locally observed population of galaxies (E, S0, Sab, Sbc, and Sdm types). We use spectral synthesis and Monte Carlo methods to generate realistic model galaxy catalogs for comparison with observations. We find that for reasonable choices of the star formation histories for the dwarf galaxies, the model results are in very good agreement with the results of the deep galaxy surveys. Such a dwarf-dominated model is also qualitatively supported by recent studies of faint galaxy gravitational lensing and clustering, by galaxy size distributions measured with the Hubble Space Telescope, and by the evidence for very modest evolution in regular galaxy

  19. Origin of ΔNeff as a result of an interaction between dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers Bjaelde, Ole; Das, Subinoy; Moss, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and recently from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have indicated the possible existence of an extra radiation component in addition to the well known three neutrino species predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility of the apparent extra dark radiation being linked directly to the physics of cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, we consider a generic scenario where dark radiation, as a result of an interaction, is produced directly by a fraction of the dark matter density effectively decaying into dark radiation. At an early epoch when the dark matter density is negligible, as an obvious consequence, the density of dark radiation is also very small. As the Universe approaches matter radiation equality, the dark matter density starts to dominate thereby increasing the content of dark radiation and changing the expansion rate of the Universe. As this increase in dark radiation content happens naturally after Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), it can relax the possible tension with lower values of radiation degrees of freedom measured from light element abundances compared to that of the CMB. We numerically confront this scenario with WMAP+ACT and WMAP+SPT data and derive an upper limit on the allowed fraction of dark matter decaying into dark radiation.

  20. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  1. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  2. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  3. Dark Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  4. Asymmetric dark matter and effective number of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Kurosawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of the MeV-scale asymmetric dark matter annihilation on the effective number of neutrinos Neff at the epoch of the big bang nucleosynthesis. If the asymmetric dark matter χ couples more strongly to the neutrinos ν than to the photons γ and electrons e-, Γχ γ ,χ e≪Γχ ν , or Γχ γ ,χ e≫Γχ ν, the lower mass limit on the asymmetric dark matter is about 18 MeV for Neff≃3.0 .

  5. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  6. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  7. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-01

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 103517 (2009).10.1103/PhysRevD.79.103517] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 69, 123517 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.69.123517 We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  8. 21 cm line bispectrum as a method to probe cosmic dawn and epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, Hayato; Yoshiura, Shintaro; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2016-05-01

    Redshifted 21 cm signal is a promising tool to investigate the state of intergalactic medium (IGM) in the cosmic dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR). In our previous work, we studied the variance and skewness of the 21 cm fluctuations to give a clear interpretation of the 21 cm power spectrum and found that skewness is a good indicator of the epoch when X-ray heating becomes effective. Thus, the non-Gaussian feature of the spatial distribution of the 21 cm signal is expected to be useful to investigate the astrophysical effects in the CD and EoR. In this paper, in order to investigate such a non-Gaussian feature in more detail, we focus on the bispectrum of the 21 cm signal. It is expected that the 21 cm brightness temperature bispectrum is produced by non-Gaussianity due to the various astrophysical effects such as the Wouthuysen-Field effect, X-ray heating and reionization. We study the various properties of 21 cm bispectrum such as scale dependence, shape dependence and redshift evolution. And also we study the contribution from each component of 21 cm bispectrum. We find that the contribution from each component has characteristic scale-dependent feature. In particular, we find that the bulk of the 21 cm bispectrum at z = 20 comes from the matter fluctuations, while in other epochs it is mainly determined by the spin and/or neutral fraction fluctuations and it is expected that we could obtain more detailed information on the IGM in the CD and EoR by using the 21 cm bispectrum in the future experiments, combined with the power spectrum and skewness.

  9. Will nonlinear peculiar velocity and inhomogeneous reionization spoil 21 cm cosmology from the epoch of reionization?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Paul R; Mao, Yi; Iliev, Ilian T; Mellema, Garrelt; Datta, Kanan K; Ahn, Kyungjin; Koda, Jun

    2013-04-12

    The 21 cm background from the epoch of reionization is a promising cosmological probe: line-of-sight velocity fluctuations distort redshift, so brightness fluctuations in Fourier space depend upon angle, which linear theory shows can separate cosmological from astrophysical information. Nonlinear fluctuations in ionization, density, and velocity change this, however. The validity and accuracy of the separation scheme are tested here for the first time, by detailed reionization simulations. The scheme works reasonably well early in reionization (≲40% ionized), but not late (≳80% ionized). PMID:25167246

  10. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  11. Axion dark matter, solitons and the cusp-core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.; Pop, Ana-Roxana

    2015-08-01

    Self-gravitating bosonic fields can support stable and localized (solitonic) field configurations. Such solitons should be ubiquitous in models of axion dark matter, with their characteristic mass and size depending on some inverse power of the axion mass, ma. Using a scaling symmetry and the uncertainty principle, the soliton core size can be related to the central density and axion mass in a universal way. Solitons have a constant central density due to pressure support, unlike the cuspy profile of cold dark matter (CDM). Consequently, solitons composed of ultralight axions (ULAs) may resolve the `cusp-core' problem of CDM. In dark matter (DM) haloes, thermodynamics will lead to a CDM-like Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile at large radii, with a central soliton core at small radii. Using Monte Carlo techniques to explore the possible density profiles of this form, a fit to stellar kinematical data of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is performed. The data favour cores, and show no preference concerning the NFW part of the halo. In order for ULAs to resolve the cusp-core problem (without recourse to baryon feedback, or other astrophysical effects) the axion mass must satisfy ma < 1.1 × 10-22 eV at 95 per cent C.L. However, ULAs with ma ≲ 1 × 10-22 eV are in some tension with cosmological structure formation. An axion solution to the cusp-core problem thus makes novel predictions for future measurements of the epoch of reionization. On the other hand, improved measurements of structure formation could soon impose a Catch 22 on axion/scalar field DM, similar to the case of warm DM.

  12. Dark ages and cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Tirthankar Roy

    2012-03-01

    About 300,000 years after the Big Bang, the protons and the electrons combined for the first time in the Universe to form hydrogen (and helium) atoms, which is known as the recombination epoch. Following that, the Universe entered a phase called the "dark ages" where no significant radiation sources existed. The dark ages ended once the first structures collapsed and luminous sources like stars and accreting black holes started forming. The radiation from these sources then ionized hydrogen atoms in the surrounding medium, a process known as "reionization". Reionization is thus the second major change in the ionization state of hydrogen (and helium) in the Universe (the first being the recombination). The study of dark ages and cosmic reionization has acquired increasing significance over the last few years because of various reasons. On the observational front, we now have good quality data of different types at high redshifts (quasar absorption spectra, radiation backgrounds at different frequencies, number counts of galaxies, cosmic microwave background polarization, Lyα emitters and so on). Theoretically, the importance of the reionization lies in its close coupling with the formation of first cosmic structures, and there have been numerous progresses in modeling the process. In this article, we introduce the basic concepts involving the formation of first structures and evolution of the ionization history of the Universe. We also discuss the possibility of constraining the reionization history by matching theoretical models with observations.

  13. Epoch-based Entropy for Early Screening of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Houmani, N; Dreyfus, G; Vialatte, F B

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel entropy measure, termed epoch-based entropy. This measure quantifies disorder of EEG signals both at the time level and spatial level, using local density estimation by a Hidden Markov Model on inter-channel stationary epochs. The investigation is led on a multi-centric EEG database recorded from patients at an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched healthy subjects. We investigate the classification performances of this method, its robustness to noise, and its sensitivity to sampling frequency and to variations of hyperparameters. The measure is compared to two alternative complexity measures, Shannon's entropy and correlation dimension. The classification accuracies for the discrimination of AD patients from healthy subjects were estimated using a linear classifier designed on a development dataset, and subsequently tested on an independent test set. Epoch-based entropy reached a classification accuracy of 83% on the test dataset (specificity = 83.3%, sensitivity = 82.3%), outperforming the two other complexity measures. Furthermore, it was shown to be more stable to hyperparameter variations, and less sensitive to noise and sampling frequency disturbances than the other two complexity measures. PMID:26560459

  14. New limits on spin-independent and spin-dependent couplings of low-mass WIMP dark matter with a germanium detector at a threshold of 220 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S. T.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. K.; Wong, H. T.; Lin, C. W.; Lin, F. K.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, Y. R.; Wu, S. C.; Li, X.; Fang, B. B.; He, D.; Yue, Q.; Deniz, M.; Li, J.; Ruan, X. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Singh, V.; Soma, A. K.

    2009-03-15

    An energy threshold of (220{+-}10) eV was achieved at an efficiency of 50% with a four-channel ultralow-energy germanium detector, each with an active mass of 5 g. This provides a unique probe to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) dark matter with mass below 10 GeV. With a data acquisition live time of 0.338 kg-day at the Kuo-Sheng Laboratory, constraints on WIMPs in the galactic halo were derived. The limits improve over previous results on both spin-independent WIMP-nucleon and spin-dependent WIMP-neutron cross-sections for WIMP mass between 3 and 6 GeV. Sensitivities for full-scale experiments are projected. This detector technique makes the unexplored sub-keV energy window accessible for new neutrino and dark matter experiments.

  15. Propagation of Light through Composite Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvam, Audrey; Latimer, David

    2013-10-01

    A concordance of observations indicates that around 80% of the matter in the universe is some unknown dark matter. This dark matter could be comprised of a single structureless particle, but much richer theories exist. Signals from the DAMA, CoGeNT, and CDMS-II dark matter detectors along with the non-observation of dark matter by other detectors motivate theories of composite dark matter along with a ``dark'' electromagnetic sector. The composite models propose baryon-like or atom-like dark matter. If photons kinetically mix with the ``dark'' photons, then light traveling through dark matter will experience dispersion. We expect the dispersion to be approximated by the Drude-Lorentz model where the model parameters are particular to a given dark matter candidate. As light travels through the dispersive medium, it can accrue to a frequency-dependent time lag. Measurement of such a time lag can yield clues as to the nature of the dark matter. As a first application, we model hydrogenic dark atoms and use astrophysical data to constrain the mass, binding energy, and the fractional electric charge of the dark atoms.

  16. Dark energy and dark matter from hidden symmetry of gravity model with a non-Riemannian volume form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    We show that dark energy and dark matter can be described simultaneously by ordinary Einstein gravity interacting with a single scalar field provided the scalar field Lagrangian couples in a symmetric fashion to two different spacetime volume forms (covariant integration measure densities) on the spacetime manifold - one standard Riemannian given by √{-g} (square root of the determinant of the pertinent Riemannian metric) and another non-Riemannian volume form independent of the Riemannian metric, defined in terms of an auxiliary antisymmetric tensor gauge field of maximal rank. Integration of the equations of motion of the latter auxiliary gauge field produce an a priori arbitrary integration constant that plays the role of a dynamically generated cosmological constant or dark energy. Moreover, the above modified scalar field action turns out to possess a hidden Noether symmetry whose associated conserved current describes a pressureless "dust" fluid which we can identify with the dark matter completely decoupled from the dark energy. The form of both the dark energy and dark matter that results from the above class of models is insensitive to the specific form of the scalar field Lagrangian. By adding an appropriate perturbation, which breaks the above hidden symmetry and along with this couples dark matter and dark energy, we also suggest a way to obtain growing dark energy in the present universe's epoch without evolution pathologies.

  17. Temperature variation in the dark cosmic fluid in the late universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver

    2016-03-01

    A one-component dark energy fluid model of the late universe is considered (w < -1) when the fluid, initially assumed laminar, makes a transition into a turbulent state of motion. Spatial isotropy is assumed so that only the bulk viscosities are included (ζ in the laminar epoch and ζturb in the turbulent epoch). Both viscosities are assumed to be constants. We derive a formula, new as far as we know, for the time dependence of the temperature T(t) in the laminar case when viscosity is included. Assuming that the laminar/turbulent transition takes place at some time ts before the big rip is reached, we then analyze the positive temperature jump experienced by the fluid at t = t∗ if ζturb > ζ. This is just as one would expect physically. The corresponding entropy production is also considered. A special point emphasized in the paper is the analogy that exists between the cosmic fluid and a so-called Maxwell fluid in viscoelasticity.

  18. An accelerating cosmology without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Santos, R.C.; Lima, J.A.S. E-mail: cliviars@astro.iag.usp.br

    2009-06-01

    The negative pressure accompanying gravitationally-induced particle creation can lead to a cold dark matter (CDM) dominated, accelerating Universe (Lima et al. 1996 [1]) without requiring the presence of dark energy or a cosmological constant. In a recent study, Lima et al. 2008 [2] (LSS) demonstrated that particle creation driven cosmological models are capable of accounting for the SNIa observations [3] of the recent transition from a decelerating to an accelerating Universe, without the need for Dark Energy. Here we consider a class of such models where the particle creation rate is assumed to be of the form Γ = βH+γH{sub 0}, where H is the Hubble parameter and H{sub 0} is its present value. The evolution of such models is tested at low redshift by the latest SNe Ia data provided by the Union compilation [4] and at high redshift using the value of z{sub eq}, the redshift of the epoch of matter — radiation equality, inferred from the WMAP constraints on the early Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect [5]. Since the contributions of baryons and radiation were ignored in the work of LSS, we include them in our study of this class of models. The parameters of these more realistic models with continuous creation of CDM are constrained at widely-separated epochs (z{sub eq} ≈ 3000 and z ≈ 0) in the evolution of the Universe. The comparison of the parameter values, (β, γ), determined at these different epochs reveals a tension between the values favored by the high redshift CMB constraint on z{sub eq} from the ISW and those which follow from the low redshift SNIa data, posing a potential challenge to this class of models. While for β = 0 this conflict is only at ∼< 2σ, it worsens as β increases from zero.

  19. An automated sleep-state classification algorithm for quantifying sleep timing and sleep-dependent dynamics of electroencephalographic and cerebral metabolic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Michael J; Clegern, William C; Wisor, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rodent sleep research uses electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) to determine the sleep state of an animal at any given time. EEG and EMG signals, typically sampled at >100 Hz, are segmented arbitrarily into epochs of equal duration (usually 2–10 seconds), and each epoch is scored as wake, slow-wave sleep (SWS), or rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS), on the basis of visual inspection. Automated state scoring can minimize the burden associated with state and thereby facilitate the use of shorter epoch durations. Methods We developed a semiautomated state-scoring procedure that uses a combination of principal component analysis and naïve Bayes classification, with the EEG and EMG as inputs. We validated this algorithm against human-scored sleep-state scoring of data from C57BL/6J and BALB/CJ mice. We then applied a general homeostatic model to characterize the state-dependent dynamics of sleep slow-wave activity and cerebral glycolytic flux, measured as lactate concentration. Results More than 89% of epochs scored as wake or SWS by the human were scored as the same state by the machine, whether scoring in 2-second or 10-second epochs. The majority of epochs scored as REMS by the human were also scored as REMS by the machine. However, of epochs scored as REMS by the human, more than 10% were scored as SWS by the machine and 18 (10-second epochs) to 28% (2-second epochs) were scored as wake. These biases were not strain-specific, as strain differences in sleep-state timing relative to the light/dark cycle, EEG power spectral profiles, and the homeostatic dynamics of both slow waves and lactate were detected equally effectively with the automated method or the manual scoring method. Error associated with mathematical modeling of temporal dynamics of both EEG slow-wave activity and cerebral lactate either did not differ significantly when state scoring was done with automated versus visual scoring, or was reduced with automated state

  20. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  1. Dark energy from QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-30

    We review two mechanisms rooted in the infrared sector of QCD which, by exploiting the properties of the QCD ghost, as introduced by Veneziano, provide new insight on the cosmological dark energy problem, first, in the form of a Casimir-like energy from quantising QCD in a box, and second, in the form of additional, time-dependent, vacuum energy density in an expanding universe. Based on [1, 2].

  2. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  3. Dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. James E.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  4. New Release of the BSM Epoch Photometry Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Bright Star Monitor (BSM) Epoch Photometry Database (EPD) is a searchable catalog of all observations made by one of the AAVSO's five BSM systems. The newest release of this database contains some 100 million datasets, from both northern and southern hemispheres, taken over the last six years. These have been calibrated by both nightly visits to Landolt standard fields as well as through the use of the Tycho2 photometric catalog. The paper will describe how the observations were made, how to access the catalog, and the limitations to the photometric accuracy. Some examples of well-studied fields will be shown.

  5. The joint US/UK 1990 epoch world magnetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, John M.; Coleman, Rachel J.; Peck, Michael R.; Lauber, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed summary of the data used, analyses performed, modeling techniques employed, and results obtained in the course of the 1990 Epoch World Magnetic Modeling effort are given. Also, use and limitations of the GEOMAG algorithm are presented. Charts and tables related to the 1990 World Magnetic Model (WMM-90) for the Earth's main field and secular variation in Mercator and polar stereographic projections are presented along with useful tables of several magnetic field components and their secular variation on a 5-degree worldwide grid.

  6. Multi-Epoch Observations of Dust Formed around WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Asano, K.; Mori, T. I.; Onaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kozasa, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of the mid-infrared multi-epoch observations of periodically dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary WR140 with Subaru/COMICS. Based on the N- and Q-bands photometric observations, the mass evolution of dust in the expanding concentric arc structures formed during the 2001 and 2009 periastron events is investigated. Our results show that at most 1.0×10-8M⊙ of dust survives per periastron later than an orbital phase, suggesting that such WR binary systems may not be the major dust budget in the early universe unless the grain growth later on should not take place.

  7. Superposed epoch analysis of ion temperatures during CIR/HSS-driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-05-01

    Ion temperatures in the plasma sheet influence the development of the ring current. The variation of ion temperatures in the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms depends on the storm driver. While the magnitude of storms driven by corotating interaction regions and the associated high speed streams (CIR/HSS), as measured by Dst index, tends to be smaller than that for CME-driven storms, significant ion heating occurs during these storms. The TWINS Mission provides a global view of the magnetosphere with continuous temporal coverage provided by two satellites. Ion temperature images with spatial and temporal resolution can be calculated from the energetic neutral atom (ENA) data provided by the satellites. Using this technique, we have found that ion temperatures increase throughout the recovery phase of CIR/HSS-driven storms. Denton and Borovsky [2008] performed a superposed epoch analysis of CIR/HSS-driven storms and found that ion heating begins at convection onset, as measured by the midnight boundary index (MBI). We present superposed epoch analysis results of ion temperature evolution during CIR/HSS-driven storms using both the minimum in the Sym-H index and the MBI for comparison.

  8. Constraints on the Star Formation Efficiency of Galaxies During the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Furlanetto, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Reionization is thought to have occurred in the redshift range of 6 < z < 9, which is now being probed by both deep galaxy surveys and CMB observations. Using halo abundance matching over the redshift range 5 < z < 8 and assuming smooth, continuous gas accretion, we develop a model for the star formation efficiency f⋆ of dark matter halos at z > 6 that matches the measured galaxy luminosity functions at these redshifts. We find that f⋆ peaks at ˜30% at halo masses M ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, in qualitative agreement with its behavior at lower redshifts. We then investigate the cosmic star formation histories and the corresponding models of reionization for a range of extrapolations to small halo masses. We use a variety of observations to further constrain the characteristics of the galaxy populations, including the escape fraction of UV photons. Our approach provides an empirically-calibrated, physically-motivated model for the properties of star-forming galaxies sourcing the epoch of reionization. In the case where star formation in low-mass halos is maximally efficient, an average escape fraction ˜0.1 can reproduce the optical depth reported by Planck, whereas inefficient star formation in these halos requires either about twice as many UV photons to escape, or an escape fraction that increases towards higher redshifts. Our models also predict how future observations with JWST can improve our understanding of these galaxy populations.

  9. An improved model of H II bubbles during the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Choudhury, T. Roy

    2014-08-01

    The size distribution of ionized regions during the epoch of reionization - a key ingredient in understanding the H I power spectrum observable by 21 cm experiments - can be modelled analytically using the excursion set formalism of random walks in the smoothed initial density field. To date, such calculations have been based on simplifying assumptions carried forward from the earliest excursion set models of two decades ago. In particular, these models assume that the random walks have uncorrelated steps and that haloes can form at arbitrary locations in the initial density field. We extend these calculations by incorporating recent technical developments that allow us to (a) include the effect of correlations in the steps of the walks induced by a realistic smoothing filter and (b) more importantly, account for the fact that dark matter haloes preferentially form near peaks in the initial density. A comparison with previous calculations shows that including these features, particularly the peaks constraint on halo locations, has large effects on the size distribution of the H II bubbles surrounding these haloes. For example, when comparing models at the same value of the globally averaged ionized volume fraction, the typical bubble sizes predicted by our model are more than a factor of 2 larger than earlier calculations. Our results can potentially have a significant impact on estimates of the observable H I power spectrum.

  10. Constraints on the star formation efficiency of galaxies during the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Furlanetto, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    Reionization is thought to have occurred in the redshift range of 6 < z < 9, which is now being probed by both deep galaxy surveys and CMB observations. Using halo abundance matching over the redshift range 5 < z < 8 and assuming smooth, continuous gas accretion, we develop a model for the star formation efficiency f⋆ of dark matter haloes at z > 6 that matches the measured galaxy luminosity functions at these redshifts. We find that f⋆ peaks at ˜30 per cent at halo masses M ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, in qualitative agreement with its behaviour at lower redshifts. We then investigate the cosmic star formation histories and the corresponding models of reionization for a range of extrapolations to small halo masses. We use a variety of observations to further constrain the characteristics of the galaxy populations, including the escape fraction of UV photons. Our approach provides an empirically calibrated, physically motivated model for the properties of star-forming galaxies sourcing the epoch of reionization. In the case where star formation in low-mass haloes is maximally efficient, an average escape fraction ˜0.1 can reproduce the optical depth reported by Planck, whereas inefficient star formation in these haloes requires either about twice as many UV photons to escape, or an escape fraction that increases towards higher redshifts. Our models also predict how future observations with James Webb Space Telescope can improve our understanding of these galaxy populations.

  11. Gamma rays from ultracompact primordial dark matter minihalos.

    PubMed

    Scott, Pat; Sivertsson, Sofia

    2009-11-20

    Ultracompact minihalos have been proposed as a new class of dark matter structure. They would be produced by phase transitions in the early Universe or features in the inflaton potential, and constitute nonbaryonic massive compact halo objects today. We examine the prospects of detecting these minihalos in gamma rays if dark matter can self-annihilate. We compute present-day fluxes from minihalos produced in the e{+}e{-} annihilation epoch and the QCD and electroweak phase transitions. Even at a distance of 4 kpc, minihalos from the e{+}e{-} epoch would be eminently detectable today by the Fermi satellite or air Cerenkov telescopes, or even in archival EGRET data. Within 2 kpc, they would appear as extended sources to Fermi. At 4 kpc, minihalos from the QCD transition have similar predicted fluxes to dwarf spheroidal galaxies, so might also be detectable by present or upcoming experiments. PMID:20366026

  12. Detecting superlight dark matter with Fermi-degenerate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Pyle, Matt; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-08-01

    We examine in greater detail the recent proposal of using superconductors for detecting dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit of O (keV). Detection of suc light dark matter is possible if the entire kinetic energy of the dark matter is extracted in the scattering, and if the experiment is sensitive to O (meV) energy depositions. This is the case for Fermi-degenerate materials in which the Fermi velocity exceeds the dark matter velocity dispersion in the Milky Way of ˜ 10-3. We focus on a concrete experimental proposal using a superconducting target with a transition edge sensor in order to detect the small energy deposits from the dark matter scatterings. Considering a wide variety of constraints, from dark matter self-interactions to the cosmic microwave background, we show that models consistent with cosmological/astrophysical and terrestrial constraints are observable with such detectors. A wider range of viable models with dark matter mass below an MeV is available if dark matter or mediator properties (such as couplings or masses) differ at BBN epoch or in stellar interiors from those in superconductors. We also show that metal targets pay a strong in-medium suppression for kinetically mixed mediators; this suppression is alleviated with insulating targets.

  13. Physics of the Intergalactic Medium During the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidz, Adam

    A major goal of observational and theoretical cosmology is to observe the largely unexplored time period in the history of our universe when the first galaxies form, and to interpret these measurements. Early galaxies dramatically impacted the gas around them in the surrounding intergalactic medium (IGM) by photoionzing the gas during the "Epoch of Reionization" (EoR). This epoch likely spanned an extended stretch in cosmic time: ionized regions formed and grew around early generations of galaxies, gradually filling a larger and larger fraction of the volume of the universe. At some time—thus far uncertain, but within the first billion years or so after the big bang—essentially the entire volume of the universe became filled with ionized gas. The properties of the IGM provide valuable information regarding the formation time and nature of early galaxy populations, and many approaches for studying the first luminous sources are hence based on measurements of the surrounding intergalactic gas. The prospects for improved reionization-era observations of the IGM and early galaxy populations over the next decade are outstanding. Motivated by this, we review the current state of models of the IGM during reionization. We focus on a few key aspects of reionization-era phenomenology and describe: the redshift evolution of the volume-averaged ionization fraction, the properties of the sources and sinks of ionizing photons, along with models describing the spatial variations in the ionization fraction, the ultraviolet radiation field, the temperature of the IGM, and the gas density distribution.

  14. Moon-based Epoch of Reionization Imaging Telescope (MERIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Kasper, J. C.; Weiler, K. W.

    2005-05-01

    Radio observations of emission and absorption from neutral Hydrogen during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) can reveal how structure leading to the first stars, galaxies, and black holes formed in the intergalactic medium between redshifts of about 6 and at least 20. Ground-based low frequency radio arrays are under construction (LOFAR, PAST) or development (LWA, MWA) to detect and eventually image the EoR signal. The Moon-based Epoch of Reionization Imaging Telescope (MERIT) is a mission concept that is intended to extend ground-based observations of the EoR to the highest possible dynamic range and image fidelity. This can be accomplished by locating the MERIT array on the far side of the moon. The array is composed of 10-12 radial arms, each 1-2 km in length. Each arm has several hundred dipole antennas and feedlines printed on a very thin sheet of kapton with a total mass of about 300 kg. This provides a convenient way to deploy thousands of individual antennas, and a centrally condensed distribution of array baselines. The lunar farside provides shielding from terrestrial natural and technological radio interference, shielding (half the time) from strong solar radio emissions, and freedom from the corrupting influence of Earth's ionosphere. Various options for array deployment and data transmission to Earth will be described is this paper. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Multi-epoch optical velocities of bright carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnbaum, Cecilia

    1992-10-01

    Cross-correlated optical radial velocities are presented of 87 bright carbon stars, 67 with multiple epochs, as well as the velocities of atomic transitions of K I, Li I, and Mg I. The mean optical velocity variation is about 3 km/s for SR and Lb variables and 8.7 km/s for Miras. The spread in velocities among atomic lines at a given epoch is significantly greater in Miras than in SR and Lb variables. Although Li I shows significant velocity variation in Miras, K I is more stable. Thirteen of 33 carbon stars with H-alpha emission also show bright Mg I emission in a type of inverse P-Cygni profile, and each of these 13 stars shows a clear splitting of the K I resonance line. Only two stars, R For and CL Mon, show K I as P-Cygni profile. J-type carbon stars have deeper Li absorption profiles than other carbon stars in the sample.

  16. Analysis of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-05-01

    As the law of unity of opposites of the Philosophy tells us, the bright material exists, the dark matter also exists. Dark matter and dark energy should allow the law of unity of opposites. The Common attributes of the matter is radiation, then common attributes of dark matter must be absorb radiation. Only the rotation speed is lower than the speed of light radiation, can the matter radiate, since the speed of the matter is lower than the speed of light, so the matter is radiate; The rotate speed of the dark matter is faster than the light , so the dark matter doesn't radiate, it absorbs radiation. The energy that the dark matter absorb radiation produced (affect the measurement of time and space distribution of variations) is dark energy, so the dark matter produce dark energy only when it absorbs radiation. Dark matter does not radiate, two dark matters does not exist inevitably forces, and also no dark energy. Called the space-time ripples, the gravitational wave is bent radiation, radiation particles should be graviton, graviton is mainly refers to the radiation particles whose wavelength is small. Dark matter, dark energy also confirms the existence of the law of symmetry.

  17. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    SciTech Connect

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, and scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.

  18. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, andmore » scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.« less

  19. Late kinetic decoupling of light magnetic dipole dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondolo, Paolo; Kadota, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    We study the kinetic decoupling of light (lesssim 10 GeV) magnetic dipole dark matter (DM) . We find that present bounds from collider, direct DM searches, and structure formation allow magnetic dipole DM to remain in thermal equilibrium with the early universe plasma until as late as the electron-positron annihilation epoch. This late kinetic decoupling leads to a minimal mass for the earliest dark protohalos of thousands of solar masses, in contrast to the conventional weak scale DM scenario where they are of order 10‑6 solar masses.

  20. Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Liguori, Michele; /Fermilab /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-08-01

    One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was {approx} 400, 000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than (1 + z{sub *}) {approx_equal} 1180 where z{sub *} is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

  1. Massive photon and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive electrodynamics and explore the possibility whether the massive photon could provide an explanation of dark energy. The action is given by the scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravity, which is obtained by nonminimal coupling of the massive Stueckelberg QED with gravity; its cosmological consequences are studied by paying particular attention to the role of photon mass. We find that the theory allows for cosmological evolution where the radiation- and matter-dominated epochs are followed by a long period of virtually constant dark energy that closely mimics a Λ CDM model. We also find that the main source of the current acceleration is provided by the nonvanishing photon mass governed by the relation Λ ˜m2 . A detailed numerical analysis shows that the nonvanishing photon mass on the order of ˜1 0-34 eV is consistent with current observations. This magnitude is far less than the most stringent limit on the photon mass available so far, which is on the order of m ≤1 0-27 eV .

  2. Reionization and dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldengott, Isabel M.; Boriero, Daniel; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth τreio, but weaker constraints on the spectral index ns than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to Γeff < 2.9 × 10‑25/s at 95% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit of Γ < 5.3 × 10‑26/s at 95% C.L. Specifying the decay channels, we apply our result to the case of keV-mass sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates and obtain constraints on their mixing angle and mass, which are comparable to the ones from the diffuse X-ray background.

  3. Direct Dark Matter Detection Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newstead, Jayden L.

    The identity and origin of dark matter is one of the more elusive mysteries in the fields of particle physics and cosmology. In the near future, direct dark matter detectors will offer a chance at observing dark matter non-gravitationally for the first time. In this thesis, formalisms are developed to analyze direct detection experiments and to quantify the extent to which properties of the dark matter can be determined. A range of non-standard assumptions about the dark matter are considered, including inelastic scattering, isospin violation and momentum dependent scattering. Bayesian inference is applied to realistic detector configurations to evaluate parameter estimation and model selection ability. A complete set of simplified models for spin-0, spin-1/2 and spin-1 dark matter candidates are formulated. The corresponding non-relativistic operators are found, and are used to derive observational signals for the simplified models. The ability to discern these simplified models with direct detection experiments is demonstrated. In the near future direct dark matter detectors will be sensitive to coherent neutrino scattering, which will limit the discovery potential of these experiments. It was found that eleven of the fourteen non-relativistic operators considered produce signals distinct from coherent scattering, and thus the neutrino background does not greatly affect the discovery potential in these cases.

  4. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  5. The First dark microhalos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, HongSheng; Taylor, James E.; Silk, Joseph; Hooper, Dan; /Oxford U. /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    Earth-mass dark matter halos are likely to have been the first bound structures to form in the Universe. Whether such objects have survived to the present day in galaxies depends on, among other factors, the rate of encounters with normal stars. In this letter, we estimate the amount of tidal heating and mass loss in microhalos as a result of stellar encounters. We find that while microhalos are only mildly heated in dwarf galaxies of low stellar density, and they should have been completely destroyed in bulge or M32-like regions of high stellar density. In disk galaxies, such as the Milky Way, the disruption rate depends strongly on the orbital parameters of the microhalo; while stochastic radial orbits in triaxial Galactic potential are destroyed first, systems on non-planar retrograde orbits with large pericenters survive the longest. Since many microhalos lose a significant fraction of their material to unbound tidal streams, the final dark matter distribution in the solar neighborhood is better described as a superposition of microstreams rather than as a set of discrete spherical clumps in an otherwise homogeneous medium. Different morphologies of microhalos have implications for direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments.

  6. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  7. Multi-epoch Doppler tomography and polarimetry of QQ Vul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel D.; Catalán, Maria S.; Beuermann, Klaus; Metzner, André; Smith, Robert Connon; Steeghs, Danny

    2000-04-01

    We present multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy and photoelectric polarimetry of the long-period polar (AM Herculis star) QQ Vul. The blue emission lines show several distinct components, the sharpest of which can unequivocally be assigned to the illuminated hemisphere of the secondary star and used to trace its orbital motion. This narrow emission line can be used in combination with Nai absorption lines from the photosphere of the companion to build a stable long-term ephemeris for the star: inferior conjunction of the companion occurs at HJD=2448446.4710(5)+Ex0.15452011 day (11). The polarization curves are dissimilar at different epochs, thus supporting the idea of fundamental changes of the accretion geometry, e.g., between one- and two-pole accretion modes. The linear polarization pulses display a random scatter by 0.2 phase units and are not suitable for the determination of the binary period. The polarization data suggest that the magnetic (dipolar) axis has a colatitude of 23 deg, an azimuth of -50 deg, and an orbital inclination between 50 deg and 70 deg. Doppler images of blue emission and red absorption lines show a clear separation between the illuminated and non-illuminated hemispheres of the secondary star. The absorption lines on their own can be used to determine the mass ratio of the binary by Doppler tomography with an accuracy of 15-20 per cent. The narrow emission lines of different atomic species show remarkably different radial velocity amplitudes: K=85-130kms-1. Emission lines from the most highly ionized species, Heii, originate closest to the inner Lagrangian point L1. We can discern two kinematic components within the accretion stream; one is associated with the ballistic part, and the other with the magnetically threaded part of the stream. The location of the emission component associated with the ballistic accretion stream appears displaced between different epochs. Whether this displacement indicates a dislocation of the ballistic

  8. Multi-Epoch XMM Observations of NGC4258

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project was detection of variability in the X-ray absorption column of the AGN in NGC4258 through monitoring with the XMM satellite. We have accomplished this goal and submitted the results to ApJ for publication in a paper entitled, "X-ray Luminosity and Absorption Column Fluctuations in the H2O Maser Galaxy NGC4258 from Weeks to Years," by Fruscione, A., Greenhill, L.J., Filippedco, A.V., Moran, J.M., Hermstein, J.R., and Galle, E. We have received a favorable referee report and expect the article will appear in 2005. To complete the project, we reduced our four epochs of XMM data for NGC4258, one archival XMM observation, and all existing Chandra datasets for NGC4258 (with the latest calibration tables and a grid of corrections for pileup). Self-consistent reduction of all these data permitted detailed comparison that could not have been accomplished simply by taking published model fits that appear in the literature. To accumulate a broader monitoring record, we combined the Chandra and XMM results with those published for SAX and ASCA. We modeled the Chandra and XMM data self-consistently with partially absorbed, hard power-law, soft thermal plasmas, and soft power-law components. Over nine years, the photo-electric absorbing column exhibited a 40% drop between two ASCA epochs separated by 3 years and a 60% rise between two XMM epochs separated by just 5 months. In contract, uncorrelated factor of of 2-3 changes were seen in absorbed flux on te timescale of years, which suggests intrinsic variability of the central engine. The warped disk that is a known source of H2O maser emission in 4258 is believed to cross the line of sight to the central engine. We have proposed that the variations in absorbing column arise from inhomogeneities in the rotating disk, as they sweep across the line of sight. We estimate from the XMM data that the inhomogeneities are about 1E+15 cm in size at radii greater than 0.27 pc. This is consistent with the estimated

  9. Accumulation of TIP2;2 Aquaporin during Dark Adaptation Is Partially PhyA Dependent in Roots of Arabidopsis Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Uenishi, Yumi; Nakabayashi, Yukari; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Takusagawa, Mari; Hashimoto, Kayo; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Sato-Nara, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    Light regulates the expression and function of aquaporins, which are involved in water and solute transport. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mRNA levels of one of the aquaporin genes, TIP2;2, increase during dark adaptation and decrease under far-red light illumination, but the effects of light at the protein level and on the mechanism of light regulation remain unknown. Numerous studies have described the light regulation of aquaporin genes, but none have identified the regulatory mechanisms behind this regulation via specific photoreceptor signaling. In this paper, we focus on the role of phytochrome A (phyA) signaling in the regulation of the TIP2;2 protein. We generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing a TIP2;2-GFP fusion protein driven by its own promoter, and showed several differences in TIP2;2 behavior between wild type and the phyA mutant. Fluorescence of TIP2;2-GFP protein in the endodermis of roots in the wild-type seedlings increased during dark adaptation, but not in the phyA mutant. The amount of the TIP2;2-GFP protein in wild-type seedlings decreased rapidly under far-red light illumination, and a delay in reduction of TIP2;2-GFP was observed in the phyA mutant. Our results imply that phyA, cooperating with other photoreceptors, modulates the level of TIP2;2 in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:27135499

  10. Signals from the epoch of cosmological recombination (Karl Schwarzschild Award Lecture 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyaev, R. A.; Chluba, J.

    2009-07-01

    The physical ingredients to describe the epoch of cosmological recombination are amazingly simple and well-understood. This fact allows us to take into account a very large variety of physical processes, still finding potentially measurable consequences for the energy spectrum and temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In this contribution we provide a short historical overview in connection with the cosmological recombination epoch and its connection to the CMB. Also we highlight some of the detailed physics that were studied over the past few years in the context of the cosmological recombination of hydrogen and helium. The impact of these considerations is two-fold: The associated release of photons during this epoch leads to interesting and unique deviations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) energy spectrum from a perfect blackbody, which, in particular at decimeter wavelength and the Wien part of the CMB spectrum, may become observable in the near future. Despite the fact that the abundance of helium is rather small, it still contributes a sizeable amount of photons to the full recombination spectrum, leading to additional distinct spectral features. Observing the spectral distortions from the epochs of hydrogen and helium recombination, in principle would provide an additional way to determine some of the key parameters of the Universe (e.g. the specific entropy, the CMB monopole temperature and the pre-stellar abundance of helium). Also it permits us to confront our detailed understanding of the recombination process with direct observational evidence. In this contribution we illustrate how the theoretical spectral template of the cosmological recombination spectrum may be utilized for this purpose. We also show that because hydrogen and helium recombine at very different epochs it is possible to address questions related to the thermal history of our Universe. In particular the cosmological recombination radiation may

  11. ACS Internal CTE Monitor and Short Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, Sara

    2012-10-01

    This is a continuation of Program 12386 and is to be executed once a cycle for internal CTE and short darks, respectively.INTERNAL CTE MONITOR:The charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of the ACS CCD detectors will decline as damage due to on-orbit radiation exposure accumulates. This degradation will be monitored once a cycle to determine the useful lifetime of the CCDs. All the data for this program is acquired using internal targets {lamps} only, so all of the exposures should be taken during Earth occultation time {but not during SAA passages}. This program emulates the ACS pre-flight ground calibration and post-launch SMOV testing {program 8948}, so that results from each epoch can be directly compared. Extended Pixel Edge Response {EPER} data will be obtained over a range of signal levels for the Wide Field Channel {WFC}. The signal levels are 125, 500, 1620, 5000, 10000, and 60000 electrons at gain 2.Since Cycle 18, this monitoring program was reduced {compared to 11881} considering that there is also an external CTE monitoring program.SHORT DARKS:To improve the pixel-based CTE model at signals below 10 DN, short dark frames are needed to obtain a statistically useful sample of clean, warm pixel trails. This program obtains a set of dark frames for each of the following exposure times: 66 s {60 s for some subarrays} and 339 s. These short darks and the 1040 s darks obtained from the CCD Daily Monitor will sample warm and hot pixels over logarithmically increasing brightness. Subarray short darks were newly added in Cycle 19 to study CTE tails in different subarray readout modes.

  12. ACS Internal CTE Monitor and Short Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, Sara

    2013-10-01

    This is a continuation of Program 13156 and is to be executed once a cycle for internal CTE and short darks, respectively.INTERNAL CTE MONITOR:The charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of the ACS CCD detectors will decline as damage due to on-orbit radiation exposure accumulates. This degradation will be monitored once a cycle to determine the useful lifetime of the CCDs. All the data for this program is acquired using internal targets {lamps} only, so all of the exposures should be taken during Earth occultation time {but not during SAA passages}. This program emulates the ACS pre-flight ground calibration and post-launch SMOV testing {program 8948}, so that results from each epoch can be directly compared. Extended Pixel Edge Response {EPER} data will be obtained over a range of signal levels for the Wide Field Channel {WFC}. The signal levels are 125, 500, 1620, 5000, 10000, and 60000 electrons at gain 2.Since Cycle 18, this monitoring program was reduced {compared to 11881} considering that there is also an external CTE monitoring program.SHORT DARKS:To improve the pixel-based CTE model at signals below 10 DN, short dark frames are needed to obtain a statistically useful sample of clean, warm pixel trails. This program obtains a set of dark frames for each of the following exposure times: 66 s {60 s for some subarrays} and 339 s. These short darks and the 1040 s darks obtained from the CCD Daily Monitor will sample warm and hot pixels over logarithmically increasing brightness. Subarray short darks were added in Cycle 19 to study CTE tails in different subarray readout modes.

  13. Double-Disk Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Based on observational tests of large scale structure and constraints on halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant component’s interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar to those in the baryonic sector. We explore a simple model in which DDDM can cool efficiently and form a disk within galaxies, and we evaluate some of the possible observational signatures. The most prominent signal of such a scenario could be an enhanced indirect detection signature with a distinctive spatial distribution. Even though subdominant, the enhanced density at the center of the galaxy and possibly throughout the plane of the galaxy (depending on precise alignment) can lead to large boost factors, and could even explain a signature as large as the 130 GeV Fermi line. Such scenarios also predict additional dark radiation degrees of freedom that could soon be detectable and would influence the interpretation of future data, such as that from Planck and from the Gaia satellite. We consider this to be the first step toward exploring a rich array of new possibilities for dark matter dynamics.

  14. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  15. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  16. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (∼5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  17. Investigating the earliest epochs of the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Else; Starkenburg

    2016-08-01

    Resolved stellar spectroscopy can obtain knowledge about chemical enrichment processes back to the earliest times, when the oldest stars were formed. In this contribution I will review the early (chemical) evolution of the Milky Way halo from an observational perspective. In particular, I will discuss our understanding of the origin of the peculiar abundance patterns in various subclasses of extremely metal-poor stars, taking into account new data from our abundance and radial velocity monitoring programs, and their implications for our understanding of the formation and early evolution of both the Milky Way halo and the satellite dwarf galaxies therein. I conclude by presenting the ``Pristine'' survey, a program on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to study this intriguing epoch much more efficiently.

  18. Primary Effusion Lymphoma: Is Dose-Adjusted-EPOCH Worthwhile Therapy?

    PubMed

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O; Doobay, Ravi; Naous, Rana; Yu, John; Lemke, Sheila M

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare condition, which accounts for approximately 4% of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PEL has a predilection for body cavities and occurs in the pleural space, pericardium, and peritoneum. Without treatment, the median survival is approximately 2-3 months, and with chemotherapy, the median survival is approximately 6 months. We describe the case of a 47-year-old male with HIV and Kaposi's sarcoma who presented with complaints of abdominal pain and distension and was subsequently diagnosed with PEL. Despite limited clinical data being available, chemotherapy with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (EPOCH) has proven to increase survival rates in patients with this condition. PMID:27462227

  19. An ionospheric occultation inversion technique based on epoch difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Xiong, Jing; Zhu, Fuying; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    Of the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profile (EDP) retrievals, the Abel based calibrated TEC inversion (CTI) is the most widely used technique. In order to eliminate the contribution from the altitude above the RO satellite, it is necessary to utilize the calibrated TEC to retrieve the EDP, which introduces the error due to the coplanar assumption. In this paper, a new technique based on the epoch difference inversion (EDI) is firstly proposed to eliminate this error. The comparisons between CTI and EDI have been done, taking advantage of the simulated and real COSMIC data. The following conclusions can be drawn: the EDI technique can successfully retrieve the EDPs without non-occultation side measurements and shows better performance than the CTI method, especially for lower orbit mission; no matter which technique is used, the inversion results at the higher altitudes are better than those at the lower altitudes, which could be explained theoretically.

  20. Multi-Epoch Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, Robert; De Cia, Annalisa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leloudas, Giorgos; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Perley, Daniel A.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    A growing sample of intrinsically rare supernovae is being uncovered by wide-field synoptic surveys, such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). A fraction of these events have been labeled "superluminous supernovae" due to their peak luminosities, which can exceed normal supernovae by factors of 10 to 100. The power sources for these events and thus their connection to normal luminosity supernovae remains uncertain. Here we present results from 134 spectroscopic observations of 17 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I) discovered by PTF. We select our targets from the full PTF sample using only spectroscopic information; we do not employ the traditional cut in absolute magnitude (e.g. M < -21) to avoid potential bias. Using our multi-epoch observations, we identify the ion species contributing to the spectroscopic features, and we perform parametric modeling to estimate photospheric velocities. Finally we discuss the physical insights into the nature of these explosions offered by this unique dataset.

  1. Primary Effusion Lymphoma: Is Dose-Adjusted-EPOCH Worthwhile Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O.; Doobay, Ravi; Naous, Rana; Yu, John; Lemke, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare condition, which accounts for approximately 4% of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PEL has a predilection for body cavities and occurs in the pleural space, pericardium, and peritoneum. Without treatment, the median survival is approximately 2–3 months, and with chemotherapy, the median survival is approximately 6 months. We describe the case of a 47-year-old male with HIV and Kaposi's sarcoma who presented with complaints of abdominal pain and distension and was subsequently diagnosed with PEL. Despite limited clinical data being available, chemotherapy with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (EPOCH) has proven to increase survival rates in patients with this condition. PMID:27462227

  2. Doppler imaging of AR Lacertae at three epochs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Neff, James E.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Rodono, Marcello

    1988-01-01

    Observations from IUE were used to study the structure of the lower chromosphere of AR Lacertae in the light of Mg II k. Sequences of LWR/P-HI images distributed around the binary period at three epochs were obtained. Discrete plage-like regions of enhanced Mg II surface flux in this system are identified. There are temporal variations in the Mg II flux on timescales of hours as well as substantial changes in chromospheric morphology on timescales of years. Even with the limited S/N attainable with the IUE, one can map the gross structures of active stellar atmospheres. With such information, one can begin to study the true 3-D structure of the atmospheres of late-type stars.

  3. High Energy Neutrino Signals from the Epoch of Reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, F.; Murase, K.; Nagataki, S.; Serpico, P.D.

    2007-07-06

    In this paper we perform a new estimate of the high energy neutrinos expected from GRBs associated with the first generation of stars in light of new models and constraints on the epoch of reionization and a more detailed evaluation of the neutrino emission yields. We also compare the diffuse high energy neutrino background from Population III stars with the one from ''ordinary stars'' (Population II), as estimated consistently within the same cosmological and astrophysical assumptions. In disagreement with previous literature, we find that high energy neutrinos from Population III stars will not be observable with current or near future neutrino telescopes, falling below both IceCube sensitivity and atmospheric neutrino background under the most extreme assumptions for the GRB rate. This rules them out as a viable diagnostic tool for these still elusive metal-free stars.

  4. Subdaily Earth rotation during the Epoch '92 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Ibanez-Meier, R.; Herring, T. A.; Lichten, S. M.; Dickey, J. O.

    1994-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) data were used to estimate Earth rotation variations over an 11-day period during the Epoch '92 campaign in the summer of 1992. Earth orientation was measured simultaneously by several very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) networks. GPS and VLBI estimates of UT1 with 3-hour time resolution were then compared and analyzed. The high frequency behavior of both data sets is similar, although drifts between the two series of approximately 0.1 ms over 2-5 days are evident. The geodetic results were also compared with models for UT1 fluctuations at tidal periods and with estimates of atmospheric angular momentum made at 6-hour intervals. Most of the geodetic signal in the diurnal and semidiurnal frequency bands can be attributed to tidal processes, whereas UT1 variations over a few days are mostly atmospheric in origin.

  5. Sub-Daily Earth Rotation during the Epoch '92 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Ibanez-Meier, R.; Lichten, S. M.; Dickey, J. O.; Herring, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Earth rotation measurements were obtained using Global Positioning System (GPS) data for 11 days during the Epoch '92 campaign in the Summer of 1992. Earth orientation was measured simultaneously with several very long baseline interferornetry (VLBI) networks. These data were processed to yield both GPS and VLBI estimates of UT1 with 3-hour time resolution, which were then compared and analyzed. The high frequency behavior of both data sets is similar, although drifts between the two series of approx.0,1 ms over 2-5 days are evident, Models for tidally induced UT1 variations and estimates of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) at 6-hour intervals were also compared with the geodetic data, These studies indicate that most of the geodetic signal in the diurnal and semidiurnal frequency bands can be attributed to tidal processes, and that UT1 variations over a few days are mostly atmospheric in origin.

  6. Neutral Hydrogen in Galaxies at the Present Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sandhya; Briggs, Frank

    1993-12-01

    The evolution of the neutral hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of time is an important constraint on processes in galactic evolution. We present a comprehensive, statistical description of the H I content and distribution within galaxies at the present epoch and compare these statistics with the properties of H I associated with "damped Lyα" absorption systems at high redshift that are observed in the spectra of QSOs. ΩH I(z = 0), the H I mass density at the present epoch relative to the present critical mass density, is found to be (2.5±0.6) × 10-4h-175, consistent with the decreasing trend of the H I content with time deduced from QSO absorption line statistics for redshifts from about 4 to 0.5 (Lanzetta 1993). Spiral galaxies contain an overwhelming 89% of this neutral hydrogen mass. The rest is contained in irregulars, SOs, and ellipticals Spirals also offer the largest cross section to line-of-sight absorption of light from QSOs By considering nearby spirals as potential absorbers, the interception probability as a function of the H I column density, N(H I), is derived for comparison with the cross sections inferred from observations of damped Lyman-alpha systems. The comparison shows that the damped Lyα lines are created by absorbers that subtend larger cross sections than present-day spirals by a factor of 5 implying that galaxies were either larger or more numerous at z ˜ 2.5.

  7. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project: Results from Multi-Epoch Observations of the Type IIn SN 2010jl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George G.; Dessart, L.; Hoffman, J. L.; Huk, L. N.; Leonard, D. C.; Milne, P.; Smith, N.; Smith, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project is a recently formed collaboration between observers and theorists that focuses on decoding the complex, time-dependent spectropolarimetric behavior of supernovae (SNe) of all types. Using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) at the 61" Kuiper, the 90" Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes, we obtain multi-epoch observations of each target, aiming to construct the most comprehensive survey to date of supernovae in polarized light. We present results from the multi-epoch spectropolarimetric observations of the SN 2010jl. This type IIn supernova in UGC 5189A remained bright for an unusually long time allowing us to obtain 11 epochs of data over the course of 15 months. We find significant polarization in the continuum and variations in polarization across the Balmer and HeI lines. The measured polarized continuum decreased steadily over the 15 months of observations. This evolution allowed us to make a solid estimate of the interstellar polarization component thereby revealing the intrinsic supernova polarization. The polarization provides us with detailed information about the aspherical morphology of the explosion and the properties of the progenitor’s pre-explosion mass loss.

  8. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  9. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  10. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2010-01-08

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  11. Unparticle dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Stojkovic, Dejan; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-09-15

    We examine a dark energy model where a scalar unparticle degree of freedom plays the role of quintessence. In particular, we study a model where the unparticle degree of freedom has a standard kinetic term and a simple mass potential, the evolution is slowly rolling and the field value is of the order of the unparticle energy scale ({lambda}{sub u}). We study how the evolution of w depends on the parameters B (a function of unparticle scaling dimension d{sub u}), the initial value of the field {phi}{sub i} (or equivalently, {lambda}{sub u}) and the present matter density {omega}{sub m0}. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain the model parameters and find that these models are not ruled out by the observational data. From a theoretical point of view, unparticle dark energy model is very attractive, since unparticles (being bound states of fundamental fermions) are protected from radiative corrections. Further, coupling of unparticles to the standard model fields can be arbitrarily suppressed by raising the fundamental energy scale M{sub F}, making the unparticle dark energy model free of most of the problems that plague conventional scalar field quintessence models.

  12. Satellite- and Epoch Differenced Precise Point Positioning Based on a Regional Augmentation Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haojun; Chen, Junping; Wang, Jiexian; Wu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has been demonstrated as a simple and effective approach for user positioning. The key issue in PPP is how to shorten convergence time and improve positioning efficiency. Recent researches mainly focus on the ambiguity resolution by correcting residual phase errors at a single station. The success of this approach (referred to hereafter as NORM-PPP) is subject to how rapidly one can fix wide-lane and narrow-lane ambiguities to achieve the first ambiguity-fixed solution. The convergence time of NORM-PPP is receiver type dependent, and normally takes 15–20 min. Different from the general algorithm and theory by which the float ambiguities are estimated and the integer ambiguities are fixed, we concentrate on a differential PPP approach: the satellite- and epoch differenced (SDED) approach. In general, the SDED approach eliminates receiver clocks and ambiguity parameters and thus avoids the complicated residual phase modeling procedure. As a further development of the SDED approach, we use a regional augmentation network to derive tropospheric delay and remaining un-modeled errors at user sites. By adding these corrections and applying the Robust estimation, the weak mathematic properties due to the ED operation is much improved. Implementing this new approach, we need only two epochs of data to achieve PPP positioning converging to centimeter-positioning accuracy. Using seven days of GPS data at six CORS stations in Shanghai, we demonstrate the success rate, defined as the case when three directions converging to desired positioning accuracy of 10 cm, reaches 100% when the interval between the two epochs is longer than 15 min. Comparing the results of 15 min' interval to that of 10 min', it is observed that the position RMS improves from 2.47, 3.95, 5.78 cm to 2.21, 3.93, 4.90 cm in the North, East and Up directions, respectively. Combining the SDED coordinates at the starting point and the ED relative coordinates thereafter, we

  13. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  14. Epochs of intrusion-related copper mineralization in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillitoe, R. H.

    Seventy-four copper deposits and prospects related intimately to intrusive activity in the Andes have been dated radiometrically during the last 18 years by many different investigators, most of whom used the KAr method. The results are summarized and some of their local and regional implications are reviewed. A number of copper deposits, mainly of the porphyry type, were emplaced in, or near to, premineral volcanic sequences and (or) equigranular plutons. Such precursor volcanism lasted for as long as 9 Ma, and preceded mineralization by intervals of from less than 1 Ma to as much as 9 Ma. Precursor plutons were emplaced no more than 2 to 3 Ma prior to mineralization at several localities in Chile, but possibly as long as 10 to 30 Ma earlier in parts of Colombia and Peru. The time separating emplacement of progenitor stocks and hydrothermal alteration and accompanying copper mineralization, and the duration of alteration-mineralization sequences generally are both less than the analytical uncertainty of the KAr method. However, on the basis of a detailed study of the Julcani vein system in Peru and less clearcut evidence from elsewhere, it may be concluded that alteration and copper mineralization followed stock or dome emplacement by substantially less than 1 Ma and lasted for 0.5 to 2 Ma and, locally, possibly as long as 3 Ma. At several localities, post-mineral magmatic activity could not be separated by the KAr method from the preceding alteration-mineralization events. As many as nine epochs of copper mineralization, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to late Pliocene-Pleistocene, are recognizable in the central Andes of Chile, Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina, and at least four somewhat different epochs characterize the northern Andes of Colombia. Each epoch coincides with a discrete linear sub-belt, some of which extend for more than 2000 km along the length of the orogen. More than 90% of Andean copper resources, mainly as porphyry deposits, are

  15. The Latitude and Epoch for the Origin of the Astronomical Lore of Eudoxus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    2003-12-01

    The earliest presentation of the ancient Greek constellations that survives to today is the poem titled Phaenomena by Aratus which is a reasonable copy of a book of the same name by Eudoxus (c. 366 BC) which has not survived. Hipparchus' sole surviving work (his Commentaries) also gives many direct quotes from Eudoxus' book. Eudoxus reports on many astronomical lore items such as that the head of Draco skims the northern horizon and that Orion sets when Scorpius rises. Many of these lore items have their validity depend on the latitude and epoch of the observations on which the lore is based, so for example the two lore items just quoted will each yield rather fuzzy simultaneous constraints on the latitude and epoch of the observer. In all, I have found 172 useful constraints for Eudoxus' lore, and the large number can be used to greatly increase the accuracy of the final joint constraint. My results are; (1) All lore reported by Eudoxus were based on observations from the year 1130 ± 80 BC and at a latitude of 36.0 ± 0.9 degrees north. (2) My derived date and latitude correspond only to the peak of the Assyrian culture. (3) The typical accuracy of the lore is 4-8 degrees, even though 1 degree accuracy is easy to be gotten by primitive methods. (4) About half the rise/set pairs recorded in the Mesopotamian MUL.APIN tablets are also given in Eudoxus' lore. (5) The MUL.APIN tablets have been independently determined to be based on observations from roughly 1000 BC at a latitude of 36 degrees north, which is consistent within uncertainties to my results for Eudoxus. Given the close match in date/latitude/content, I conclude that both Eudoxus' lore and MUL.APIN were derived from the same old Assyrian observations. This research was made possible with the support of the Herbert C. Pollack Award from the Dudley Observatory.

  16. Interacting holographic dark energy with logarithmic correction

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, Mubasher; Farooq, M. Umar E-mail: mufarooq@yahoo.com

    2010-03-01

    The holographic dark energy (HDE) is considered to be the most promising candidate of dark energy. Its definition is motivated from the entropy-area relation which depends on the theory of gravity under consideration. Recently a new definition of HDE is proposed with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation in the setup of loop quantum cosmology. Employing this new definition, we investigate the model of interacting dark energy and derive its effective equation of state. Finally we establish a correspondence between generalized Chaplygin gas and entropy-corrected holographic dark energy.

  17. The Murchison Widefield Array 21cm Epoch of Reionization Experiment: Design, Construction, and First Season Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Adam

    The Cosmic Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) remain largely unexplored chapters in the history and evolution of the Universe. These periods hold the potential to inform our picture of the cosmos similar to what the Cosmic Microwave Background has done over the past several decades. A promising method to probe the neutral hydrogen gas between early galaxies is known as 21cm tomography, which utilizes the ubiquitous hyper-fine transition of HI to create 3D maps of the intergalactic medium. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is an instrument built with a primary science driver to detect and characterize the EoR through 21cm tomography. In this thesis we explore the challenges faced by the MWA from the layout of antennas, to a custom analysis pipeline, to bridging the gap with probes at other wavelengths. We discuss many lessons learned in the course of reducing MWA data with an extremely precise measurement in mind, and conclude with the first deep integration from array. We present a 2-σ upper limit on the EoR power spectrum of Δ^2(k)<1.25×10^4 mK^2 at cosmic scale k=0.236 h Mpc^{-1} and redshift z=6.8. Our result is a marginal improvement over previous MWA results and consistent with the best published limits from other instruments. This result is the deepest imaging power spectrum to date, and is a major step forward for this type of analysis. While our limit is dominated by systematics, we offer strategies for improvement for future analysis.

  18. The Murchison Widefield Array 21cm Epoch of Reionization Experiment: Design, Construction, and First Season Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Adam

    The Cosmic Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) remain largely unexplored chapters in the history and evolution of the Universe. These periods hold the potential to inform our picture of the cosmos similar to what the Cosmic Microwave Background has done over the past several decades. A promising method to probe the neutral hydrogen gas between early galaxies is known as 21cm tomography, which utilizes the ubiquitous hyper-fine transition of HI to create 3D maps of the intergalactic medium. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is an instrument built with a primary science driver to detect and characterize the EoR through 21cm tomography. In this thesis we explore the challenges faced by the MWA from the layout of antennas, to a custom analysis pipeline, to bridging the gap with probes at other wavelengths. We discuss many lessons learned in the course of reducing MWA data with an extremely precise measurement in mind, and conclude with the first deep integration from array. We present a 2-sigma upper limit on the EoR power spectrum of Delta2(k) < 1.25 x 104 mK2 at cosmic scale k = 0.236 h Mpc-1 and redshift z = 6.8. Our result is a marginal improvement over previous MWA results and consistent with the best published limits from other instruments. This result is the deepest imaging power spectrum to date, and is a major step forward for this type of analysis. While our limit is dominated by systematics, we offer strategies for improvement for future analysis.

  19. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  20. Constraining dark energy fluctuations with supernova correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Blomqvist, Michael; Enander, Jonas; Mörtsell, Edvard E-mail: enander@fysik.su.se

    2010-10-01

    We investigate constraints on dark energy fluctuations using type Ia supernovae. If dark energy is not in the form of a cosmological constant, that is if the equation of state w≠−1, we expect not only temporal, but also spatial variations in the energy density. Such fluctuations would cause local variations in the universal expansion rate and directional dependences in the redshift-distance relation. We present a scheme for relating a power spectrum of dark energy fluctuations to an angular covariance function of standard candle magnitude fluctuations. The predictions for a phenomenological model of dark energy fluctuations are compared to observational data in the form of the measured angular covariance of Hubble diagram magnitude residuals for type Ia supernovae in the Union2 compilation. The observational result is consistent with zero dark energy fluctuations. However, due to the limitations in statistics, current data still allow for quite general dark energy fluctuations as long as they are in the linear regime.

  1. Accelerometry to Assess Preschooler's Free-Play: Issues with Count Thresholds and Epoch Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Schofield, Grant M.; Schluter, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the utility of current accelerometer threshold definitions and epoch durations for physical activity intensity classification in preschool-aged children. Using video footage of children engaged in active play, directly observed 1-sec epoch physical activity intensity scores were derived from a modified version of the Children's…

  2. GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602: Second epoch Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Hjorth, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    We obtained a second epoch of observations of the very short GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602 (Cummings et al. GCN 17267) with Chandra. Observations began on 10 Feb 2015, 39 days after the burst, and 32 days after the first epoch of observations.

  3. Z-portal dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann; Richard, Francois

    2015-03-11

    We propose to generalize the extensions of the Standard Model where the Z boson serves as a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector χ. We show that, like in the Higgs portal case, the combined constraints from the recent direct searches restrict severely the nature of the coupling of the dark matter to the Z boson and set a limit m{sub χ}≳200 GeV (except in a very narrow region around the Z-pole region). Using complementarity between spin dependent, spin independent and FERMI limits, we predict the nature of this coupling, more specifically the axial/vectorial ratio that respects a thermal dark matter coupled through a Z-portal while not being excluded by the current observations. We also show that the next generation of experiments of the type LZ or XENON1T will test Z-portal scenario for dark matter mass up to 2 TeV. The condition of a thermal dark matter naturally predicts the spin-dependent scattering cross section on the neutron to be σ{sub χn}{sup SD}≃10{sup −40} cm{sup 2}, which then becomes a clear prediction of the model and a signature testable in the near future experiments.

  4. Transition from a matter-dominated era to a dark energy universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'Ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Štefančić, Hrvoje

    2006-10-01

    We develop a general program of the unification of a matter-dominated era with an acceleration epoch for scalar-tensor theory or a dark fluid. The general reconstruction of the scalar-tensor theory is fulfilled. The explicit form of the scalar potential for which the theory admits a matter-dominated era, a transition to an acceleration, and an (asymptotically de Sitter) acceleration epoch consistent with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data is found. The interrelation of the epochs of deceleration-acceleration transition and matter dominance-dark energy transition for dark fluids with a general equation of state (EOS) is investigated. We give several examples of such models with explicit EOS (using redshift parametrization) where matter-dark energy domination transition may precede the deceleration-acceleration transition. As a by-product, the reconstruction scheme is applied to scalar-tensor theory to define the scalar potentials which may produce the dark matter effect. The obtained modification of Newton potential may explain the rotation curves of galaxies.

  5. Revisiting big-bang nucleosynthesis constraints on dark-matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kohri, Kazunori; Moroi, Takeo; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2015-12-01

    We study the effects of dark-matter annihilation during the epoch of big-bang nucleosynthesis on the primordial abundances of light elements. We improve the calculation of the light-element abundances by taking into account the effects of anti-nucleons emitted by the annihilation of dark matter and the interconversion reactions of neutron and proton at inelastic scatterings of energetic nucleons. Comparing the theoretical prediction of the primordial light-element abundances with the latest observational constraints, we derive upper bounds on the dark-matter pair-annihilation cross section. Implication to some of particle-physics models are also discussed.

  6. A dusty, normal galaxy in the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Darach; Christensen, Lise; Knudsen, Kirsten Kraiberg; Richard, Johan; Gallazzi, Anna; Michałowski, Michał Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Candidates for the modest galaxies that formed most of the stars in the early Universe, at redshifts z > 7, have been found in large numbers with extremely deep restframe-ultraviolet imaging. But it has proved difficult for existing spectrographs to characterize them using their ultraviolet light. The detailed properties of these galaxies could be measured from dust and cool gas emission at far-infrared wavelengths if the galaxies have become sufficiently enriched in dust and metals. So far, however, the most distant galaxy discovered via its ultraviolet emission and subsequently detected in dust emission is only at z = 3.2 (ref. 5), and recent results have cast doubt on whether dust and molecules can be found in typical galaxies at z >= 7. Here we report thermal dust emission from an archetypal early Universe star-forming galaxy, A1689-zD1. We detect its stellar continuum in spectroscopy and determine its redshift to be z = 7.5 +/- 0.2 from a spectroscopic detection of the Lyman-α break. A1689-zD1 is representative of the star-forming population during the epoch of reionization, with a total star-formation rate of about 12 solar masses per year. The galaxy is highly evolved: it has a large stellar mass and is heavily enriched in dust, with a dust-to-gas ratio close to that of the Milky Way. Dusty, evolved galaxies are thus present among the fainter star-forming population at z > 7.

  7. The “Anthropocene” epoch: Scientific decision or political statement?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finney, Stanley C.; Edwards, Lucy E.

    2016-01-01

    The proposal for the “Anthropocene” epoch as a formal unit of the geologic time scale has received extensive attention in scientific and public media. However, most articles on the Anthropocene misrepresent the nature of the units of the International Chronostratigraphic Chart, which is produced by the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) and serves as the basis for the geologic time scale. The stratigraphic record of the Anthropocene is minimal, especially with its recently proposed beginning in 1945; it is that of a human lifespan, and that definition relegates considerable anthropogenic change to a “pre-Anthropocene.” The utility of the Anthropocene requires careful consideration by its various potential users. Its concept is fundamentally different from the chronostratigraphic units that are established by ICS in that the documentation and study of the human impact on the Earth system are based more on direct human observation than on a stratigraphic record. The drive to officially recognize the Anthropocene may, in fact, be political rather than scientific.

  8. Second Epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey Observations: VCS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, David; Jacobs, Christopher; Beasley, Anthony; Peck, Alison; Gaume, Ralph; Charlot, Patrick; Fey, Alan; Ma, Chopo; Titov, Oleg; Boboltz, David

    2016-06-01

    Six very successful Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) calibrator survey campaigns were run between 1994 and 2007 to build up a large list of compact radio sources with positions precise enough for use as very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) phase reference calibrators. We report on the results of a second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey campaign (VCS-II) in which 2400 VCS sources were re-observed in the X and S bands in order to improve the upcoming third realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF3) as well as to improve their usefulness as VLBI phase reference calibrators. In this survey, some 2062 previously detected sources and 324 previously undetected sources were detected and revised positions are presented. Average position uncertainties for the re-observed sources were reduced from 1.14 and 1.98 mas to 0.24 and 0.41 mas in R.A. and decl., respectively, or by nearly a factor of 5. Minimum detected flux values were approximately 15 and 28 mJy in the X and S bands, respectively, and median total fluxes are approximately 230 and 280 mJy. The vast majority of these sources are flat-spectrum sources, with ∼82% having spectral indices greater than ‑0.5.

  9. Tangled magnetic fields and CMBR signal from reionization epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Rajesh; Sethi, Shiv K.

    2005-11-15

    We compute the secondary cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) anisotropy signal from the reionization of the Universe in the presence of tangled magnetic fields. We consider the tangled-magnetic-field-induced scalar, vector, and tensor modes for our analysis. The most interesting signal for l < or approx. 100 arises from tensor perturbations. In particular, we show that the enhancement observed by Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) in the TE cross-correlation signal for l < or approx. 10 could be explained by tensor TE cross correlation from tangled magnetic fields generated during the inflationary epoch for magnetic field strength B{sub 0}{approx_equal}4.5x10{sup -9} G and magnetic field power spectrum spectral index n{approx_equal}-2.9. Alternatively, a mixture of tensor mode signal with primordial scalar modes gives weaker bounds on the value of the optical depth to the reionization surface, {tau}{sub reion}: {tau}{sub reion}=0.11{+-}0.02. This analysis can also be translated to a limit on magnetic field strength of {approx_equal}5x10{sup -9} G for wave numbers < or approx. 0.05 Mpc{sup -1}.

  10. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The Epoch of Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander; Gnedin, O. Y.; Gnedin, N. Y.; Zemp, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the ART code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for dust-based formation of molecular gas. Here, we develop and implement a new recipe for the formation of metal-free Pop III stars. We reach a spatial resolution of 2 pc at z=10 and resolve star-forming galaxies with the masses above 10^6 solar masses. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominate the energy and metal budget of the universe to be short-lived. While these stars seed their host galaxies with metals, they cannot drive significant outflows to enrich the IGM in our simulations. Feedback from pair instability supernovae causes Pop III star formation to self-terminate within their host galaxies, but is not strong enough to suppress star formation in external galaxies. Within any individual galaxy, Pop II stars overtake Pop III stars within ~50-150 Myr. A threshold of M = 3 * 10^6 solar masses separates galaxies that lose a significant fraction of their baryons due to Pop III feedback from those that do not. Understanding the nature of the transition between Pop III and Pop II star formation is of key importance for studying the dawn of galaxy formation.

  11. Observations of the first light and the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaohui

    2012-08-01

    Studying the first generation of stars, galaxies and supermassive black holes as well as the epoch of reionization is one of the fundamental questions of modern astrophysics. The last few years have witnessed the first confirmation of the discoveries of galaxies, quasars and Gamma-Ray Bursts at z > 7, with possible detections at z ~ 10. There is also mounting evidence that cosmic reionization is a prolonged process that peaks around z ~ 10 and ends at z ~ 6-7. Observations of the highest redshift intergalactic medium and the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy begin to constrain the earliest chemical enrichment processes in the Universe. These observations provide a glimpse of cosmic history over the first billion years after the Big Bang. In this review, we will present recent results on the observations of the high-redshift Universe over the past decade, highlight key challenges and uncertainties in these observations, and preview what is possible with the next generation facilities in studying the first light and mapping the history of reionization.

  12. Phase-compensated averaging for analyzing electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography epochs.

    PubMed

    Matani, Ayumu; Naruse, Yasushi; Terazono, Yasushi; Iwasaki, Taro; Fujimaki, Norio; Murata, Tsutomu

    2010-05-01

    Stimulus-locked averaging for electroencephalography and/or megnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) epochs cancels out ongoing spontaneous activities by treating them as noise. However, such spontaneous activities are the object of interest for EEG/MEG researchers who study phase-related phenomena, e.g., long-distance synchronization, phase-reset, and event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). We propose a complex-weighted averaging method, called phase-compensated averaging, to investigate phase-related phenomena. In this method, any EEG/MEG channel is used as a trigger for averaging by setting the instantaneous phases at the trigger timings to 0 so that cross-channel averages are obtained. First, we evaluated the fundamental characteristics of this method by performing simulations. The results showed that this method could selectively average ongoing spontaneous activity phase-locked in each channel; that is, it evaluates the directional phase-synchronizing relationship between channels. We then analyzed flash evoked potentials. This method clarified the directional phase-synchronizing relationship from the frontal to occipital channels and recovered another piece of information, perhaps regarding the sequence of experiments, which is lost when using only conventional averaging. This method can also be used to reconstruct EEG/MEG time series to visualize long-distance synchronization and phase-reset directly, and on the basis of the potentials, ERS/ERD can be explained as a side effect of phase-reset. PMID:20172813

  13. Exploring a Massive Starburst in the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, Daniel; Aravena, M.; Chapman, S.; De Breuck, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Hezavehe, S.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Spilker, J.; Stalder, B.; Stark, D.; Strandet, M.; Tang, M.; Vieira, J.; Weiss, A.; Welikala, N.

    2016-08-01

    We request deep multi-band imaging of a unique dusty galaxy in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), selected via its millimeter-wavelength dust emission in the 2500-square-degree South Pole Telescope survey. Spectroscopically confirmed to lie at z=6.900, this galaxy has a large dust mass and is likely one of the most rapidly star-forming objects in the EoR. Using Gemini-S, we have identified z-band emission from this object that could be UV continuum emission at z=6.9 or from a foreground lens. Interpretation of this object, and a complete understanding of its meaning for the census of star formation in the EoR, requires that we establish the presence or absence of gravitational lensing. The dust mass observed in this source is also unexpectedly large for its era, and measurements of the assembled stellar population, through the UV-continuum slope and restframe optical color, will help characterize the stellar mass and dust properties in this very early galaxy, the most spectacular galaxy yet discovered by the SPT.

  14. Stable warm tropical climate through the Eocene Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Paul N.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Nicholas, Christopher J.; Pancost, Richard D.; Schouten, Stefan; Singano, Joyce M.; Wade, Bridget S.

    2007-03-01

    Earth's climate cooled from a period of extreme warmth in the early Eocene Epoch (ca. 50 Ma) to the early Oligocene (ca. 33 Ma), when a large ice cap first appeared on Antarctica. Evidence from the planktonic foraminifer oxygen isotope record in deep-sea cores has suggested that tropical sea-surface temperatures declined by 5-10 degrees over this interval, eventually becoming much cooler than modern temperatures. Here we present paleotemperature estimates from foraminifer isotopes and the membrane lipids of marine Crenarcheota from new drill cores in Tanzania that indicate a warm and generally stable tropical climate over this period. We reinterpret the previously published isotope records in the light of comparative textural analysis of the deep-sea foraminifer shells, which shows that in contrast to the Tanzanian material, they have been diagenetically recrystallized. We suggest that increasingly severe alteration of the deep-sea plankton shells through the Eocene produced a diagenetic overprint on their oxygen isotope ratios that imparts the false appearance of a tropical sea-surface cooling trend. This implies that the long-term Eocene climatic cooling trend occurred mainly at the poles and had little effect at lower latitudes.

  15. Could the cosmological recombination spectrum help us understand annihilating dark matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, J.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential effects of dark matter (DM) annihilations on the cosmological recombination spectrum. With this example, we want to demonstrate that the cosmological recombination spectrum in principle is sensitive to details related to possible extra energy release during recombination. We restrict ourselves to DM models which produce a negligible primordial distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum (usually characterized as μ- and y-type distortions). However, since during the epoch of cosmological recombination (z ~ 1000) a large fraction of the deposited energy can directly go into ionizations and excitations of neutral atoms, both the cosmological recombination spectrum and ionization history can still be affected significantly. We compute the modifications to the cosmological recombination spectrum using our multilevel HI and HeI recombination code, showing that additional photons are created due to uncompensated loops of transitions which are induced by DM annihilations. As we illustrate here, the results depend on the detailed branching of the deposited energy into heating, ionizations and excitations. This dependence in principle should allow us to shed light on the nature of the underlying annihilating DM model (or more generally speaking, the mechanism leading to energy injection) when measuring the cosmological recombination spectrum. However, for current upper limits on the potential DM annihilation rate during recombination the cosmological recombination spectrum is only affected at the level of a few per cent. Nevertheless, we argue here that the cosmological recombination spectrum would provide another independent and very direct way of checking for the presence of sources of extra ionizing or exciting photons at high redshifts. This would open a new window to possible (non-standard) processes occurring before, during and between the three epochs of recombination.

  16. Explorations in dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozek, Brandon

    to anthropic attempts to predict our observed value of the cosmological constant by calculating the entropy created within a causal diamond. We have found that values larger than rhok = 40rho m are disfavored by more than 99.99% and a peak value at rho Λ = 7.9 x 10-123 and rho k = 4.3rhom for open universes. For universes that allow only positive curvature or both positive and negative curvature, we find a correlation between curvature and dark energy that leads to an extended region of preferred values. Our universe is found to be disfavored to an extent depending the priors on curvature. We also provide a comparison to previous anthropic constraints on open universes and discuss future directions for this work.

  17. Dark count rates in the STIS FUV MAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2015-09-01

    Dark count rates in the STIS FUV MAMA are regularly monitored. The observation sequence was altered from an earlier method to measure the rate as a function of time and temperature shortly after the instrument is turned on. The dark rate exhibits an approximately quadratic de-pendence on temperature. A recommendation for estimating the observation-specific dark rate is given.

  18. Late decaying dark matter, bulk viscosity, and the cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G. J.; Kolda, C.; Lan, N. Q.

    2008-08-15

    We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark matter begins to decay into relativistic particles at a recent epoch (z<1). We show that the large entropy production and associated bulk viscosity from such decays leads to an accelerating cosmology as required by observations. We investigate the effects of decaying cold dark matter in a {lambda}=0, flat, initially matter dominated cosmology. We show that this model satisfies the cosmological constraint from the redshift-distance relation for type Ia supernovae. The age in such models is also consistent with the constraints from the oldest stars and globular clusters. Possible candidates for this late decaying dark matter are suggested along with additional observational tests of this cosmological paradigm.

  19. Light dark matter and dark radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jae Ho; Kim, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    Light ( M ≤ 20 MeV) dark-matter particles freeze out after neutrino decoupling. If the dark-matter particle couples to a neutrino or an electromagnetic plasma, the late time entropy production from dark-matter annihilation can change the neutrino-to-photon temperature ratio, and equally the effective number of neutrinos N eff. We study the non-equilibrium effects of dark-matter annihilation on the N eff and the effects by using a thermal equilibrium approximation. Both results are constrained with Planck observations. We demonstrate that the lower bounds of the dark-matter mass and the possibilities of the existence of additional radiation particles are more strongly constrained for dark-matter annihilation process in non-equilibrium.

  20. Atlas Basemaps in Web 2.0 Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaniuk, V.; Dyshlyk, O.

    2016-06-01

    The authors have analyzed their experience of the production of various Electronic Atlases (EA) and Atlas Information Systems (AtIS) of so-called "classical type". These EA/AtIS have been implemented in the past decade in the Web 1.0 architecture (e.g., National Atlas of Ukraine, Atlas of radioactive contamination of Ukraine, and others). One of the main distinguishing features of these atlases was their static nature - the end user could not change the content of EA/AtIS. Base maps are very important element of any EA/AtIS. In classical type EA/AtIS they were static datasets, which consisted of two parts: the topographic data of a fixed scale and data of the administrative-territorial division of Ukraine. It is important to note that the technique of topographic data production was based on the use of direct channels of topographic entity observation (such as aerial photography) for the selected scale. Changes in the information technology of the past half-decade are characterized by the advent of the "Web 2.0 epoch". Due to this, in cartography appeared such phenomena as, for example, "neo-cartography" and various mapping platforms like OpenStreetMap. These changes have forced developers of EA/AtIS to use new atlas basemaps. Our approach is described in the article. The phenomenon of neo-cartography and/or Web 2.0 cartography are analysed by authors using previously developed Conceptual framework of EA/AtIS. This framework logically explains the cartographic phenomena relations of three formations: Web 1.0, Web 1.0x1.0 and Web 2.0. Atlas basemaps of the Web 2.0 epoch are integrated information systems. We use several ways to integrate separate atlas basemaps into the information system - by building: weak integrated information system, structured system and meta-system. This integrated information system consists of several basemaps and falls under the definition of "big data". In real projects it is already used the basemaps of three strata: Conceptual

  1. On the luminosity distance and the epoch of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will; Rothnie, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Standard cosmological models based on general relativity (GR) with dark energy predict that the Universe underwent a transition from decelerating to accelerating expansion at a moderate redshift zacc ˜ 0.7. Clearly, it is of great interest to directly measure this transition in a model-independent way, without the assumption that GR is the correct theory of gravity. We explore to what extent supernova (SN) luminosity distance measurements provide evidence for such a transition: we show that, contrary to intuition, the well-known `turnover' in the SN distance residuals Δμ relative to an empty (Milne) model does not give firm evidence for such a transition within the redshift range spanned by SN data. The observed turnover in that diagram is predominantly due to the negative curvature in the Milne model, not the deceleration predicted by Λ cold dark matter and relatives. We show that there are several advantages in plotting distance residuals against a flat, non-accelerating model (w = -1/3), and also remapping the z-axis to u = ln (1 + z); we outline a number of useful and intuitive properties of this presentation. We conclude that there are significant complementarities between SNe and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs): SNe offer high precision at low redshifts and give good constraints on the net amount of acceleration since z ˜ 0.7, but are weak at constraining zacc; while radial BAO measurements are probably superior for placing direct constraints on zacc.

  2. Dark before light: testing the cosmic expansion history through the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Smith, Tristan L. E-mail: tlsmith@berkeley.edu

    2011-04-01

    The cosmic expansion history proceeds in broad terms from a radiation dominated epoch to matter domination to an accelerated, dark energy dominated epoch. We investigate whether intermittent periods of acceleration (from a canonical, minimally coupled scalar field) are possible in the early universe — between Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and recombination and beyond. We establish that the standard picture is remarkably robust: anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background consistent with ΛCDM will exclude any extra period of accelerated expansion between 1 ≤ z∼<10{sup 5} (corresponding to 5 × 10{sup −4}eV ≤ T∼<25eV)

  3. Gibberellins repress photomorphogenesis in darkness.

    PubMed

    Alabadí, David; Gil, Joan; Blázquez, Miguel A; García-Martínez, José L

    2004-03-01

    Plants undergo two different developmental programs depending on whether they are growing in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) or in the presence of light (photomorphogenesis). It has been proposed that the latter is the default pathway followed by many plants after germination and before the seedling emerges from soil. The transition between the two pathways is tightly regulated. The conserved COP1-based complex is central in the light-dependent repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness. Besides this control, hormones such as brassinosteroids (BRs), cytokinins, auxins, or ethylene also have been shown to regulate, to different extents, this developmental switch. In the present work, we show that the hormone gibberellin (GA) widely participates in this regulation. Studies from Arabidopsis show that both chemical and genetic reductions of endogenous GA levels partially derepress photomorphogenesis in darkness. This is based both on morphological phenotypes, such as hypocotyl elongation and hook and cotyledon opening, and on molecular phenotypes, such as misregulation of the light-controlled genes CAB2 and RbcS. Genetic studies indicate that the GA signaling elements GAI and RGA participate in these responses. Our results also suggest that GA regulation of this response partially depends on BRs. This regulation seems to be conserved across species because lowering endogenous GA levels in pea (Pisum sativum) induces full de-etiolation in darkness, which is not reverted by BR application. Our results, therefore, attribute an important role for GAs in the establishment of etiolated growth and in repression of photomorphogenesis. PMID:14963246

  4. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 epoch when quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  5. A dusty, normal galaxy in the epoch of reionization.

    PubMed

    Watson, Darach; Christensen, Lise; Knudsen, Kirsten Kraiberg; Richard, Johan; Gallazzi, Anna; Michałowski, Michał Jerzy

    2015-03-19

    Candidates for the modest galaxies that formed most of the stars in the early Universe, at redshifts z > 7, have been found in large numbers with extremely deep restframe-ultraviolet imaging. But it has proved difficult for existing spectrographs to characterize them using their ultraviolet light. The detailed properties of these galaxies could be measured from dust and cool gas emission at far-infrared wavelengths if the galaxies have become sufficiently enriched in dust and metals. So far, however, the most distant galaxy discovered via its ultraviolet emission and subsequently detected in dust emission is only at z = 3.2 (ref. 5), and recent results have cast doubt on whether dust and molecules can be found in typical galaxies at z ≥ 7. Here we report thermal dust emission from an archetypal early Universe star-forming galaxy, A1689-zD1. We detect its stellar continuum in spectroscopy and determine its redshift to be z = 7.5 ± 0.2 from a spectroscopic detection of the Lyman-α break. A1689-zD1 is representative of the star-forming population during the epoch of reionization, with a total star-formation rate of about 12 solar masses per year. The galaxy is highly evolved: it has a large stellar mass and is heavily enriched in dust, with a dust-to-gas ratio close to that of the Milky Way. Dusty, evolved galaxies are thus present among the fainter star-forming population at z > 7. PMID:25731171

  6. On the Detection of Spectral Ripples from the Recombination Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Chluba, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Photons emitted during cosmological hydrogen (500≲ z≲ 1600) and helium recombination (1600≲ z≲ 3500 for He ii \\to He i, 5000≲ z≲ 8000 for He iii \\to He ii) are predicted to appear as broad, weak spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background. We present a feasibility study for a ground-based detection of these recombination lines, which would uniquely probe astrophysical cosmology beyond the last scattering surface and provide observational constraints on the thermal history of the universe. We find that including sufficient signal spectral structure and maximizing signal-to-noise ratio, an octave band in the 2-6 GHz window is optimal; in this band the predicted signal appears as an additive quasi-sinusoidal component with amplitude about 8 nK embedded in a sky spectrum some nine orders of magnitude brighter. We discuss algorithms to detect these tiny spectral fluctuations in the sky spectrum by foreground modeling and introduce a maximally smooth function capable of describing the foreground spectrum and distinguishing the signal of interest. We conclude that detection is in principle feasible in realistic observing times provided that radio frequency interference and instrument bandpass calibration are controlled in this band at the required level; using Bayesian tests and mock data, we show that 90% confidence detection is possible with an array of 128 radiometers observing for 255 days of effective integration time. We propose APSERa—Array of Precision Spectrometers for the Epoch of Recombination—a dedicated radio telescope to detect these recombination lines.

  7. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 ~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 epoch when quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  8. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  9. Dark radiation from modulated reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    We show that the modulated reheating mechanism can naturally account for dark radiation, whose existence is hinted by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the primordial Helium abundance. In this mechanism, the inflaton decay rate depends on a light modulus which acquires almost scale-invariant quantum fluctuations during inflation. We find that the light modulus is generically produced by the inflaton decay and therefore a prime candidate for the dark radiation. Interestingly, an almost scale-invariant power spectrum predicted in the modulated reheating mechanism gives a better fit to the observation in the presence of the extra radiation. We discuss the production mechanism of the light modulus in detail taking account of its associated isocurvature fluctuations. We also consider a case where the modulus becomes the dominant component of dark matter.

  10. Do Newton's G and Milgrom's a{sub 0} vary with cosmological epoch?

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Sagi, Eva

    2008-05-15

    In the scalar-tensor gravitational theories Newton's constant G{sub N} evolves in the expanding universe. Likewise, it has been speculated that the acceleration scale a{sub 0} in Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics is tied to the scale of the cosmos, and must thus evolve. With the advent of relativistic implementations of the modified dynamics, one can address the issue of variability of the two gravitational 'constants' with some confidence. Using TeVeS, the tensor-vector-scalar gravitational theory, as an implementation of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics, we calculate the dependence of G{sub N} and a{sub 0} on the TeVeS parameters and the coeval cosmological value of its scalar field, {phi}{sub c}. We find that G{sub N}, when expressed in atomic units, is strictly nonevolving, a result fully consistent with recent empirical limits on the variation of G{sub N}. By contrast, we find that a{sub 0} depends on {phi}{sub c} and may thus vary with cosmological epoch. However, for the brand of TeVeS which seems most promising, a{sub 0} variation occurs on a time scale much longer than Hubble's, and should be imperceptible back to redshift unity or even beyond it. This is consistent with emergent data on the rotation curves of disk galaxies at significant redshifts.

  11. How clustering dark energy affects matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, A.; Basilakos, S.; Pace, F.

    2015-09-01

    The rate of structure formation in the Universe is different in homogeneous and clustered dark energy models. The degree of dark energy clustering depends on the magnitude of its effective sound speed c2_eff and for c2_eff=0 dark energy clusters in a similar fashion to dark matter while for c2_eff=1 it stays (approximately) homogeneous. In this paper we consider two distinct equations of state for the dark energy component, wd = const and w_d=w_0+w_1(z/1+z) with c2_eff as a free parameter and we try to constrain the dark energy effective sound speed using current available data including Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background shift parameter (Planck and WMAP), Hubble parameter, big bang nucleosynthesis and the growth rate of structures fσ8(z). At first we derive the most general form of the equations governing dark matter and dark energy clustering under the assumption that c2_eff=const. Finally, performing an overall likelihood analysis we find that the likelihood function peaks at c2_eff=0; however, the dark energy sound speed is degenerate with respect to the cosmological parameters, namely Ωm and wd.

  12. Dark matter from decaying topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Kirk, Russell; West, Stephen M. E-mail: russell.kirk.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We study dark matter production by decaying topological defects, in particular cosmic strings. In topological defect or ''top-down'' (TD) scenarios, the dark matter injection rate varies as a power law with time with exponent p−4. We find a formula in closed form for the yield for all p < 3/2, which accurately reproduces the solution of the Boltzmann equation. We investigate two scenarios (p = 1, p = 7/6) motivated by cosmic strings which decay into TeV-scale states with a high branching fraction into dark matter particles. For dark matter models annihilating either by s-wave or p-wave, we find the regions of parameter space where the TD model can account for the dark matter relic density as measured by Planck. We find that topological defects can be the principal source of dark matter, even when the standard freeze-out calculation under-predicts the relic density and hence can lead to potentially large ''boost factor'' enhancements in the dark matter annihilation rate. We examine dark matter model-independent limits on this scenario arising from unitarity and discuss example model-dependent limits coming from indirect dark matter search experiments. In the four cases studied, the upper bound on Gμ for strings with an appreciable channel into TeV-scale states is significantly more stringent than the current Cosmic Microwave Background limits.

  13. Superdense cosmological dark matter clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V.; Dokuchaev, V.; Eroshenko, Yu.; Kachelriess, M.; Solberg, M. Aa.

    2010-05-15

    The formation and evolution of superdense clumps (or subhalos) is studied. Such clumps of dark matter (DM) can be produced by many mechanisms, most notably by spiky features in the spectrum of inflationary perturbations and by cosmological phase transitions. Being produced very early during the radiation-dominated epoch, superdense clumps evolve as isolated objects. They do not belong to hierarchical structures for a long time after production, and therefore they are not destroyed by tidal interactions during the formation of larger structures. For DM particles with masses close to the electroweak mass scale, superdense clumps evolve towards a power-law density profile {rho}(r){proportional_to}r{sup -1.8} with a central core. Superdense clumps cannot be composed of standard neutralinos, since their annihilations would overproduce the diffuse gamma radiation. If the clumps are constituted of superheavy DM particles and develop a sufficiently large central density, the evolution of their central part can lead to a ''gravithermal catastrophe.'' In such a case, the initial density profile turns into an isothermal profile with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -2} and a new, much smaller core in the center. Superdense clumps can be observed by gamma radiation from DM annihilations and by gravitational wave detectors, while the production of primordial black holes and cascade nucleosynthesis constrain this scenario.

  14. Constraining Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Augusta

    2010-12-01

    Future advances in cosmology will depend on the next generation of cosmological observations and how they shape our theoretical understanding of the universe. Current theoretical ideas, however, have an important role to play in guiding the design of such observational programs. The work presented in this thesis concerns the intersection of observation and theory, particularly as it relates to advancing our understanding of the accelerated expansion of the universe (or the dark energy). Chapters 2 - 4 make use of the simulated data sets developed by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) for a number of cosmological observations currently in the experimental pipeline. We use these forecast data in the analysis of four quintessence models of dark energy: the PNGB, Exponential, Albrecht-Skordis and Inverse Power Law (IPL) models. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques we examine the ability of each simulated data set to constrain the parameter space of these models. We examine the potential of the data for differentiating time-varying models from a pure cosmological constant. Additionally, we introduce an abstract parameter space to facilitate comparison between models and investigate the ability of future data to distinguish between these quintessence models. In Chapter 5 we present work towards understanding the effects of systematic errors associated with photometric redshift estimates. Due to the need to sample a vast number of deep and faint galaxies, photometric redshifts will be used in a wide range of future cosmological observations including gravitational weak lensing, baryon accoustic oscillations and type 1A supernovae observations. The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from such observations. We introduce a method for parameterizing uncertainties in modeling assumptions affecting photometric redshift calculations and for propagating these

  15. Diluted equilibrium sterile neutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Amol V.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We present a model where sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the range ˜keV to ˜MeV can be the dark matter and be consistent with all laboratory, cosmological, and large-scale structure, as well as x-ray constraints. These sterile neutrinos are assumed to freeze out of thermal and chemical equilibrium with matter and radiation in the very early Universe, prior to an epoch of prodigious entropy generation ("dilution") from out-of-equilibrium decay of heavy particles. In this work, we consider heavy, entropy-producing particles in the ˜TeV to ˜EeV rest-mass range, possibly associated with new physics at high-energy scales. The process of dilution can give the sterile neutrinos the appropriate relic densities, but it also alters their energy spectra so that they could act like cold dark matter, despite relatively low rest masses as compared to conventional dark matter candidates. Moreover, since the model does not rely on active-sterile mixing for producing the relic density, the mixing angles can be small enough to evade current x-ray or lifetime constraints. Nevertheless, we discuss how future x-ray observations, future lepton number constraints, and future observations and sophisticated simulations of large-scale structure could, in conjunction, provide evidence for this model and/or constrain and probe its parameters.

  16. Thawing quintessence from the inflationary epoch to today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Gaveshna; Rangarajan, Raghavan; Sen, Anjan A.

    2015-12-01

    Using the latest observational data we obtain a lower bound on the initial value of the quintessence field in thawing quintessence models of dark energy. For potentials of the form V (ϕ )˜ϕ±2 we find that the initial value |ϕi|>7 ×1018 GeV . We then relate ϕi to the duration of inflation by assuming that the initial value of the quintessence field is determined by quantum fluctuations of the quintessence field during inflation. From the lower bound on ϕi we obtain a lower bound on the number of e-foldings of inflation, namely, N >2 ×1011. We obtain similar bounds for other power law potentials for which too we obtain |ϕi|>O (MP).

  17. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  18. Discovery of a Giant Lya Emitter Near the Reionization Epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Egami, Eiichi; Saito, Tomoki; Oguri, Masamune; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Farrah, Duncan; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Momcheva, Ivelina; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dunlop, James S.; Mortier, Angela M.J.; Okamura, Sadanori; Hayashi, Masao; Cirasuolo, Michele; Dressler, Alan; Iye, Masanori; Jarvis, Matt.J.

    2008-08-01

    We report the discovery of a giant Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) with a Spitzer/IRAC counterpart near the reionization epoch at z = 6.595. The giant LAE is found from the extensive 1 deg{sup 2} Subaru narrow-band survey for z = 6.6 LAEs in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field, and subsequently identified by deep spectroscopy of Keck/DEIMOS and Magellan/IMACS. Among our 207 LAE candidates, this LAE is not only the brightest narrow-band object with L(Ly{alpha}) = 3.9 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in our survey volume of 10{sup 6} Mpc{sup 3}, but also a spatially extended Ly{alpha} nebula with the largest isophotal area whose major axis is at least {approx_equal} 3-inches. This object is more likely to be a large Ly{alpha} nebula with a size of {approx}> 17-kpc than to be a strongly-lensed galaxy by a foreground object. Our Keck spectrum with medium-high spectral and spatial resolutions suggests that the velocity width is v{sub FWHM} = 251 {+-} 21 km s{sup -1}, and that the line-center velocity changes by {approx_equal} 60 km s{sup -1} in a 10-kpc range. The stellar mass and star-formation rate are estimated to be 0.9-5.0 x 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} and > 34 M{sub {circle_dot}}yr{sup -1}, respectively, from the combination of deep optical to infrared images of Subaru, UKIDSS-Ultra Deep Survey, and Spitzer/IRAC. Although the nature of this object is not yet clearly understood, this could be an important object for studying cooling clouds accreting onto a massive halo, or forming-massive galaxies with significant outflows contributing to cosmic reionization and metal enrichment of inter-galactic medium.

  19. Organic Chemostratigraphic Markers Characteristic of the (Informally Designated) Anthropocene Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruge, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recognizing the tremendous collective impact of humans on the environment in the industrial age, the proposed designation of the current time period as the Anthropocene Epoch has considerable merit. One of the signature activities during this time continues to be the intensive extraction, processing, and combustion of fossil fuels. While fossil fuels themselves are naturally-occurring, they are most often millions of years old and associated with deeply buried strata. They may be found at the surface, for example, as natural oil seeps or coal seam outcrops, but these are relatively rare occurrences. Fossil fuels and their myriad by- products become the source of distinctive organic chemostratigraphic marker compounds for the Anthropocene when they occur out of their original geological context, i.e., as widespread contaminants in sediments and soils. These persistent compounds have high long-term preservation potential, particularly when deposited under low oxygen conditions. Fossil fuels can occur as environmental contaminants in raw form (e.g., crude petroleum spilled during transport) or as manufactured products (e.g., diesel oil from a leaking storage facility, coal tar from a manufactured gas plant, plastic waste in a landfill, pesticides from petroleum feedstock in agricultural soils). Distinctive assemblages of hydrocarbon marker compounds including acyclic isoprenoids, hopanes, and steranes can be readily detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of surface sediments and soils. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), along with sulfur-, oxygen-, and nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds, are also characteristic of fossil fuels and are readily detectable as well. More widespread is the airfall deposition of fossil fuel combustion products from vehicular, domestic and industrial sources. These occur in higher concentrations in large urban centers, but are also detected in remote areas. Parent (nonmethylated) PAHs such as phenanthrene

  20. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  1. Asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jason

    2014-06-24

    We review the theoretical framework underlying models of asymmetric dark matter, describe astrophysical constraints which arise from observations of neutron stars, and discuss the prospects for detecting asymmetric dark matter.

  2. DarkSide search for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Alton, D.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Beltrame, P.; Benziger, J.; Bonfini, G.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Bussino, S.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Chidzik, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Condon, C.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; De Vincenzi, M.; De Haas, E.; Derbin, A.; Di Pietro, G.; Dratchnev, I.; Durben, D.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Franco, D.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guo, C.; Guray, G.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Joliet, C.; Kayunov, A.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Klemmer, R.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Komor, M.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Li, P.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Lukyanchenko, L.; Lund, A.; Lung, K.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P.; Mohayai, T.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Nelson, A.; Nemtzow, A.; Nurakhov, N.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Perfetto, F.; Pinsky, L.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Sands, W.; Seigar, M.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvarov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Thompson, J.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wang, H.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zehfus, M.; Zhong, W.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-11-01

    The DarkSide staged program utilizes a two-phase time projection chamber (TPC) with liquid argon as the target material for the scattering of dark matter particles. Efficient background reduction is achieved using low radioactivity underground argon as well as several experimental handles such as pulse shape, ratio of ionization over scintillation signal, 3D event reconstruction, and active neutron and muon vetos. The DarkSide-10 prototype detector has proven high scintillation light yield, which is a particularly important parameter as it sets the energy threshold for the pulse shape discrimination technique. The DarkSide-50 detector system, currently in commissioning phase at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory, will reach a sensitivity to dark matter spin-independent scattering cross section of 10-45 cm2 within 3 years of operation.

  3. Quintessence interacting dark energy and a scalar dark fluid from 5D vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, L. M.; Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar

    2011-11-01

    Considering a five-dimensional (5D) spacetime empty of matter, we develop a procedure from which an interacting scalar field and its potential are induced on our 4D spacetime by the 5D geometry. We use the procedure to derive a new 4D interacting quintessence scenario, where the quintessence field, its potential and the interaction between the dark matter and dark energy components have a geometrical origin. The mass of the interacting quintessence field depends on the extra dimension, thus giving more freedom to avoid conflicts with nucleosynthesis. Then, inspired from some scalar dark matter models, we extend the geometrical formalism to derive a novel 4D late-time cosmological scenario, where the whole dark sector of the universe (scalar dark matter plus dark energy) admits a unified description by a single geometrical scalar field.

  4. The continuous tower of scalar fields as a system of interacting dark matter-dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Paulo

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to introduce a new parameterisation for the coupling Q in interacting dark matter and dark energy models by connecting said models with the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields model. Based upon the existence of a dark matter and a dark energy sectors in the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields, a simplification is considered for the evolution of a single scalar field from the tower, validated in this paper. This allows for the results obtained with the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields model to match those of an interacting dark matter-dark energy system, considering that the energy transferred from one fluid to the other is given by the energy of the scalar fields that start oscillating at a given time, rather than considering that the energy transference depends on properties of the whole fluids that are interacting.

  5. Light chiral dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U (1 ) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, S U (N ) , and a U (1 ) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and the stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimental and cosmological constraints. In a corner of the parameter space, the discrepancy of the muon g -2 between experiments and the standard model prediction can also be ameliorated due to a loop contribution of the dark photon. Smoking-gun signatures of the model include a monophoton signal from the e+e- collision into a photon and a "dark rho meson." Observation of two processes in e+e- collision—the mode into the dark photon and that into the dark rho meson—would provide strong evidence for the model.

  6. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  7. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  8. On the internal consistency of holographic dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Horvat, R

    2008-10-15

    Holographic dark energy (HDE) models, underpinned by an effective quantum field theory (QFT) with a manifest UV/IR connection, have become convincing candidates for providing an explanation of the dark energy in the universe. On the other hand, the maximum number of quantum states that a conventional QFT for a box of size L is capable of describing relates to those boxes which are on the brink of experiencing a sudden collapse to a black hole. Another restriction on the underlying QFT is that the UV cut-off, which cannot be chosen independently of the IR cut-off and therefore becomes a function of time in a cosmological setting, should stay the largest energy scale even in the standard cosmological epochs preceding a dark energy dominated one. We show that, irrespective of whether one deals with the saturated form of HDE or takes a certain degree of non-saturation in the past, the above restrictions cannot be met in a radiation dominated universe, an epoch in the history of the universe which is expected to be perfectly describable within conventional QFT.

  9. Dark spatial solitons splitting in logarithmically saturable nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Liu, Baoyuan; Lu, Keqing; Liu, Wangyun; Han, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We numerically simulate the evolution of the dark-notch-bearing optical beam in the logarithmically saturable nonlinear media based on beam propagation method (BPM). The simulation results indicate that the multiple dark spatial solitons are deep, possible in this type of nonlinear media. The number of multiple dark spatial solitons depends on the width of the dark notch, the initial conditions and the peak intensity of the initial input beam. Under the odd and even initial conditions, the odd and even number sequence of multiple dark spatial solitons can be obtained, respectively. For an input beam with fixed optical intensity, the number of dark solitons increases with the width of the initial input dark notch. The behavior of the multiple dark solitons in this type of media is similar to that in a photorefractive nonlinear crystal.

  10. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  11. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  12. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  13. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  14. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  15. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: RECALIBRATING SINGLE-EPOCH VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Bentz, Misty C.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the calibration and uncertainties of black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the single-epoch (SE) method, using homogeneous and high-quality multi-epoch spectra obtained by the Lick Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) Monitoring Project for nine local Seyfert 1 galaxies with BH masses <10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. By decomposing the spectra into their AGNs and stellar components, we study the variability of the SE H{beta} line width (full width at half-maximum intensity, FWHM{sub H{beta}} or dispersion, {sigma}{sub H{beta}}) and of the AGN continuum luminosity at 5100 A (L{sub 5100}). From the distribution of the 'virial products' ({proportional_to} FWHM{sub H{beta}}{sup 2} L{sup 0.5}{sub 5100} or {sigma}{sub H{beta}}{sup 2} L{sup 0.5}{sub 5100}) measured from SE spectra, we estimate the uncertainty due to the combined variability as {approx}0.05 dex (12%). This is subdominant with respect to the total uncertainty in SE mass estimates, which is dominated by uncertainties in the size-luminosity relation and virial coefficient, and is estimated to be {approx}0.46 dex (factor of {approx}3). By comparing the H{beta} line profile of the SE, mean, and root-mean-square (rms) spectra, we find that the H{beta} line is broader in the mean (and SE) spectra than in the rms spectra by {approx}0.1 dex (25%) for our sample with FWHM{sub H{beta}} <3000 km s{sup -1}. This result is at variance with larger mass BHs where the difference is typically found to be much less than 0.1 dex. To correct for this systematic difference of the H{beta} line profile, we introduce a line-width dependent virial factor, resulting in a recalibration of SE BH mass estimators for low-mass AGNs.

  16. Power spectrum extraction for redshifted 21-cm Epoch of Reionization experiments: the LOFAR case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Geraint; Zaroubi, Saleem; Bernardi, Gianni; Brentjens, Michiel A.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Ciardi, Benedetta; Jelić, Vibor; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Mellema, Garrelt; Offringa, André; Pandey, V. N.; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Thomas, Rajat M.; Yatawatta, Sarod

    2010-07-01

    One of the aims of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Epoch of Reionization (EoR) project is to measure the power spectrum of variations in the intensity of redshifted 21-cm radiation from the EoR. The sensitivity with which this power spectrum can be estimated depends on the level of thermal noise and sample variance, and also on the systematic errors arising from the extraction process, in particular from the subtraction of foreground contamination. We model the extraction process using realistic simulations of the cosmological signal, the foregrounds and noise, and so estimate the sensitivity of the LOFAR EoR experiment to the redshifted 21-cm power spectrum. Detection of emission from the EoR should be possible within 360 h of observation with a single station beam. Integrating for longer, and synthesizing multiple station beams within the primary (tile) beam, then enables us to extract progressively more accurate estimates of the power at a greater range of scales and redshifts. We discuss different observational strategies which compromise between depth of observation, sky coverage and frequency coverage. A plan in which lower frequencies receive a larger fraction of the time appears to be promising. We also study the nature of the bias which foreground fitting errors induce on the inferred power spectrum and discuss how to reduce and correct for this bias. The angular and line-of-sight power spectra have different merits in this respect, and we suggest considering them separately in the analysis of LOFAR data.

  17. ARE OUTFLOWS BIASING SINGLE-EPOCH C IV BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, K. D.

    2012-11-01

    We use a combination of reverberation mapping data and single-epoch (SE) spectra of the C IV emission line in a sample of both low- and high-redshift active galactic nuclei to investigate sources of the discrepancies between C IV- and H{beta}-based SE black hole (BH) mass estimates. We find that for all reverberation mapped sources, there is a component of the line profile that does not reverberate, and the velocity characteristics of this component vary from object to object. The differing strength and properties of this non-variable component are responsible for much of the scatter in C IV-based BH masses compared to H{beta} masses. The C IV mass bias introduced by this non-variable component is correlated with the shape of the C IV line, allowing us to make an empirical correction to the BH mass estimates. Using this correction and accounting for other sources of scatter, such as poor data quality and data inhomogeneity, reduces the scatter between the C IV and H{beta} masses in our sample by a factor of {approx}2, to only {approx}0.2 dex. We discuss the possibility that this non-variable C IV component originates in an orientation-dependent outflow from either the proposed broad-line region disk wind or the intermediate-line region, a high-velocity inner extension of the narrow-line region.

  18. Thermokarst, mantling and Late Amazonian Epoch periglacial-revisions in the Argyre region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, R. J.; Baoini, D.; Conway, S. J.; Dohm, J. M.; Kargel, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Thermokarst, mantling and Late Amazonian Epoch periglacial-revisions in the Argyre region, Mars R.J. Soare(1), D. Baioni(2), S.J. Conway (3), J.M. Dohm(4)and J.S. Kargel (5)(1) Geography Department, Dawson College, Montreal, Canada H3Z 1A4 rsoare@dawsoncollege.qc.ca.(2) Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra,della Vita e Ambiente, Università di Urbino "Carlo Bo", Campus SOGESTA, 61029 Urbino (PU) Italy. (3) Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, MK7 6AA. (4) The University Museum, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-, Japan.(5) Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA 85719.1.Introduction Metre to decametre-deep depressions that are rimless, relatively flat-floored, polygonised and scallop-shaped have been widely observed in Utopia Planitia (UP) [e.g. 1-5] and Malea Planum (MP) [6-8]. Although there is some debate about whether the depressions formed by means of sublimation or evaporation, it is commonly believed that the terrain in which the depressions occur is ice-rich.Moreover, most workers assume that this "ice-richness" is derived of a bi-hemispheric, latitudinally-dependent and atmospherically-precipitated mantle that is metres thick [2,4,6-10].

  19. H I absorption from the epoch of reionization and primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Sethi, Shiv K.

    2014-05-10

    We study the impact of primordial magnetic fields on the H I absorption from the epoch of reionization. The presence of these fields results in two distinct effects: (1) the heating of the halos from the decay of the magnetic fields owing to ambipolar diffusion, and (2) an increase in the number of halos owing to additional matter fluctuations induced by magnetic fields. We analyze both of these effects and show that the latter is potentially observable because the number of halos along of line of sight can increase by many orders of magnitude. While this effect is not strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength in the range 0.3-0.6 nG, it is extremely sensitive to the magnetic field power spectral index for the near scale-free models. Therefore, the detection of such absorption features could be a sensitive probe of the primordial magnetic field and its power spectrum. We discuss the detectability of these features with the ongoing and future radio interferometers. In particular, we show that LOFAR might be able to detect these absorption features at z ≅ 10 in less than 10 hr of integration if the flux of the background source is 400 mJy.

  20. Spectrotemporal receptive fields during spindling and non-spindling epochs in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-07-17

    It was often thought that synchronized rhythmic epochs of spindle waves disconnect thalamo-cortical system from incoming sensory signals. The present study addresses this issue by simultaneous extracellular action potential and local field potential (LFP) recordings from primary auditory cortex of ketamine-anesthetized cats during spindling activity. We compared cortical spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRF) obtained during spindling and non-spindling epochs. The basic spectro-temporal parameters of "spindling" and "non-spindling" STRFs were similar. However, the peak-firing rate at the best frequency was significantly enhanced during spindling epochs. This enhancement was mainly caused by the increased probability of a stimulus to evoke spikes (effectiveness of stimuli) during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Augmented LFPs associated with effective stimuli and increased single-unit pair correlations during spindling epochs suggested higher synchrony of thalamo-cortical inputs during spindling that resulted in increased effectiveness of stimuli presented during spindling activity. The neuronal firing rate, both stimulus-driven and spontaneous, was higher during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Overall, our results suggests that thalamic cells during spindling respond to incoming stimuli-related inputs and, moreover, cause more powerful stimulus-related or spontaneous activation of the cortex. PMID:18515012

  1. THIRD-EPOCH MAGELLANIC CLOUD PROPER MOTIONS. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 DATA AND ORBIT IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kallivayalil, Nitya; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Besla, Gurtina; Alcock, Charles

    2013-02-20

    We present proper motions for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on three epochs of Hubble Space Telescope data, spanning a {approx}7 yr baseline, and centered on fields with background QSOs. The first two epochs, the subject of past analyses, were obtained with ACS/HRC, and have been reanalyzed here. The new third epoch with WFC3/UVIS increases the time baseline and provides better control of systematics. The three-epoch data yield proper-motion random errors of only 1%-2% per field. For the LMC this is sufficient to constrain the internal proper-motion dynamics, as will be discussed in a separate paper. Here we focus on the implied center-of-mass proper motions: {mu} {sub W,LMC} = -1.910 {+-} 0.020 mas yr{sup -1}, {mu} {sub N,LMC} = 0.229 {+-} 0.047 mas yr{sup -1}, and {mu} {sub W,SMC} = -0.772 {+-} 0.063 mas yr{sup -1}, {mu} {sub N,SMC} = -1.117 {+-} 0.061 mas yr{sup -1}. We combine the results with a revised understanding of the solar motion in the Milky Way to derive Galactocentric velocities: v {sub tot,LMC} = 321 {+-} 24 km s{sup -1} and v {sub tot,SMC} = 217 {+-} 26 km s{sup -1}. Our proper-motion uncertainties are now dominated by limitations in our understanding of the internal kinematics and geometry of the Clouds, and our velocity uncertainties are dominated by distance errors. Orbit calculations for the Clouds around the Milky Way allow a range of orbital periods, depending on the uncertain masses of the Milky Way and LMC. Periods {approx}< 4 Gyr are ruled out, which poses a challenge for traditional Magellanic Stream models. First-infall orbits are preferred (as supported by other arguments as well) if one imposes the requirement that the LMC and SMC must have been a bound pair for at least several Gyr.

  2. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  3. The Dark Matter Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2014-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  4. EVOLUTION IN THE H I GAS CONTENT OF GALAXY GROUPS: PRE-PROCESSING AND MASS ASSEMBLY IN THE CURRENT EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Kelley M.; Wilcots, Eric M. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-11-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey α.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group ''proximity' membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

  5. Two epochs of globular cluster formation from deep field luminosity functions: implications for reionization and the Milky Way satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Harley; Ricotti, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    The ages of globular clusters in our own Milky Way are known with precision of about ±1 Gyr, hence their formation history at redshifts z ≳ 3 and their role in hierarchical cosmology and the reionization of the intergalactic medium remain relatively undetermined. Here we analyse the effect of globular cluster formation on the observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions (LFs) and UV continuum slopes of high-redshift galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Fields. We find that the majority of present-day globular clusters have formed during two distinct epochs: at redshifts z ˜ 2-3 and at redshifts z ≳ 6. The birth of proto-GC systems produces the steep, faint-end slopes of the galaxy LFs and, because the brightness of proto-GCs fades 5 Myr after their formation, their blue colours are in excellent agreement with observations. Our results suggest that: (i) the bulk of the old globular cluster population with estimated ages ≳12 Gyr (about 50 per cent of the total population) formed in the relatively massive dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ≳ 6; (ii) proto-GC formation was an important mode of star formation in those dwarf galaxies, and likely dominated the reionization process. Another consequence of this scenario is that some of the most massive Milky Way satellites may be faint and yet undiscovered because tidal stripping of a dominant GC population precedes significant stripping of the dark matter haloes of these satellites. This scenario may alleviate some remaining tensions between cold dark matter simulations and observations.

  6. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  7. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project: Results from Multi-Epoch Observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Christopher; Williams, G. G.; Smith, P. S.; Smith, N.; Milne, P.; Hoffman, J. L.; Huk, L. N.; Leonard, D. C.; Dessart, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project is a recently formed collaboration between observers and theorists that focuses on decoding the complex, time-dependent spectropolarimetric behavior of supernovae (SNe) of all types. Using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) at the 61" Kuiper, the 90" Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes, we obtain multi-epoch observations of each target, aiming to construct the most comprehensive survey to date of supernovae in polarized light. Preliminary results from the SNSPOL project provide support for the increasingly popular hypothesis that many supernovae are aspherical explosion events. Thus far, we have observed 27 different SNe, many over multiple epochs, over the course of the last three years. While the history and evolution of these events is often studied with photometric and spectroscopic information, most supernovae are not studied with the combined advantage that spectropolarimetric data provides. The use of polarimetry allows us to probe the extent of the asphericity of the explosions while the use of spectroscopy allows us to characterize this asphericity across a variety of chemical species individually and as a function of velocity. Modern 3-D model simulations favor an explosion mechanism that is often inherently asymmetric in nature. Here, we showcase some of our initial results for the nearby type-IIb SN 2011dh that demonstrate the unique information that spectropolarimetric observations provide.

  8. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas. PMID:23745856

  9. Dark Energy and Key Physical Parameters of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    We discuss the physics of clusters of galaxies embedded in the cosmic dark energy background and show that 1) the halo cut-off radius of a cluster like the Virgo cluster is practically, if not exactly, equal to the zero-gravity radius at which the dark matter gravity is balanced by the dark energy antigravity; 2) the halo averaged density is equal to two densities of dark energy; 3) the halo edge (cut-off) density is the dark energy density with a numerical factor of the unity order slightly depending on the halo profile.

  10. Linking Galaxies to Dark Matter Halos at z ~ 1 : Dependence of Galaxy Clustering on Stellar Mass and Specific Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Seong-Kook; Edge, Alastair C.; Wake, David A.; Merson, Alexander I.; Jeon, Yiseul

    2015-06-01

    We study the dependence of angular two-point correlation functions on stellar mass (M*) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of {M}*\\gt {10}10{M}ȯ galaxies at z∼ 1. The data from the UK Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey Deep eXtragalactic Survey and Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey cover 8.2 deg2 sample scales larger than 100 {h}-1 {Mpc} at z∼ 1, allowing us to investigate the correlation between clustering, M*, and star formation through halo modeling. Based on halo occupation distributions (HODs) of M* threshold samples, we derive HODs for M* binned galaxies, and then calculate the {M}*/{M}{halo} ratio. The ratio for central galaxies shows a peak at {M}{halo}∼ {10}12{h}-1{M}ȯ , and satellites predominantly contribute to the total stellar mass in cluster environments with {M}*/{M}{halo} values of 0.01–0.02. Using star-forming galaxies split by sSFR, we find that main sequence galaxies ({log} {sSFR}/{{yr}}-1∼ -9) are mainly central galaxies in ∼ {10}12.5{h}-1{M}ȯ halos with the lowest clustering amplitude, while lower sSFR galaxies consist of a mixture of both central and satellite galaxies where those with the lowest M* are predominantly satellites influenced by their environment. Considering the lowest {M}{halo} samples in each M* bin, massive central galaxies reside in more massive halos with lower sSFRs than low mass ones, indicating star-forming central galaxies evolve from a low M*–high sSFR to a high M*–low sSFR regime. We also find that the most rapidly star-forming galaxies ({log} {sSFR}/{{yr}}-1\\gt -8.5) are in more massive halos than main sequence ones, possibly implying galaxy mergers in dense environments are driving the active star formation. These results support the conclusion that the majority of star-forming galaxies follow secular evolution through the sustained but decreasing formation of stars.

  11. Vector dark matter at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider monojet searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for spin-1 dark matter that interacts with quarks through a contact operator. If the dark matter particles are produced with longitudinal polarizations, then the production matrix element is enhanced by factors of the energy. We show that this particularly effective search strategy can test models for which the energy suppression scale of the operator is as large as 105 TeV . As such, these searches can probe a large class of models for which the contact-operator approximation is valid. We find that for contact operators that permit velocity-independent dark matter-nucleon scattering, LHC monojet searches for spin-1 dark matter are competitive with or far surpass direct-detection searches depending on whether the scattering is spin independent or spin dependent, respectively.

  12. Magnetic domain walls of relic fermions as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yajnik, Urjit A.

    2005-12-02

    We show that relic fermions of the Big Bang can enter a ferromagnetic state if they possess a magnetic moment and satisfy the requirements of Stoner theory of itinerant ferromagnetism. The domain walls of this ferromagnetism can successfully simulate Dark Energy over the observable epoch spanning {approx} 10 billion years. We obtain conditions on the anomalous magnetic moment of such fermions and their masses. Known neutrinos fail to satisfy the requirements thus pointing to the possibility of a new ultralight sector in Particle Physics.

  13. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity: the 3D Bispectrum of Ly-α forest and the redshifted 21-cm signal from the post reionization epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Tapomoy Guha; Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar E-mail: dhiraj@apctp.org

    2013-04-01

    We explore possibility of using the three dimensional bispectra of the Ly-α forest and the redshifted 21-cm signal from the post-reionization epoch to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity. Both these fields map out the large scale distribution of neutral hydrogen and maybe treated as tracers of the underlying dark matter field. We first present the general formalism for the auto and cross bispectrum of two arbitrary three dimensional biased tracers and then apply it to the specific case. We have modeled the 3D Ly-α transmitted flux field as a continuous tracer sampled along 1D skewers which corresponds to quasars sight lines. For the post reionization 21-cm signal we have used a linear bias model. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to present the first prediction for bounds on f{sub NL} and the other bias parameters using the three dimensional 21-cm bispectrum and other cross bispectra. The bounds on f{sub NL} depend on the survey volume, and the various observational noises. We have considered a BOSS like Ly-α survey where the average number density of quasars n-bar = 10{sup −3}Mpc{sup −2} and the spectra are measured at a 2-σ level. For the 21-cm signal we have considered a 4000 hrs observation with a futuristic SKA like radio array. We find that bounds on f{sub NL} obtained in our analysis (6 ≤ Δf{sub NL} ≤ 65) is competitive with CMBR and galaxy surveys and may prove to be an important alternative approach towards constraining primordial physics using future data sets. Further, we have presented a hierarchy of power of the bispectrum-estimators towards detecting the f{sub NL}. Given the quality of the data sets, one may use this method to optimally choose the right estimator and thereby provide better constraints on f{sub NL}. We also find that by combining the various cross-bispectrum estimators it is possible to constrain f{sub NL} at a level Δf{sub NL} ∼ 4.7. For the equilateral and orthogonal template we obtain Δf{sub NL}{sup equ} ∼ 17 and

  14. Beam-forming Errors in Murchison Widefield Array Phased Array Antennas and their Effects on Epoch of Reionization Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Bradley, Richard F.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate antenna beam models are critical for radio observations aiming to isolate the redshifted 21 cm spectral line emission from the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization (EOR) and unlock the scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology. Past work has focused on characterizing mean antenna beam models using either satellite signals or astronomical sources as calibrators, but antenna-to-antenna variation due to imperfect instrumentation has remained unexplored. We characterize this variation for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) through laboratory measurements and simulations, finding typical deviations of the order of ±10%-20% near the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes. We consider the ramifications of these results for image- and power spectrum-based science. In particular, we simulate visibilities measured by a 100 m baseline and find that using an otherwise perfect foreground model, unmodeled beam-forming errors severely limit foreground subtraction accuracy within the region of Fourier space contaminated by foreground emission (the “wedge”). This region likely contains much of the cosmological signal, and accessing it will require measurement of per-antenna beam patterns. However, unmodeled beam-forming errors do not contaminate the Fourier space region expected to be free of foreground contamination (the “EOR window”), showing that foreground avoidance remains a viable strategy.

  15. STAR FORMATION IN ORION'S L1630 CLOUD: AN INFRARED AND MULTI-EPOCH X-RAY STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Principe, David A.; Kastner, J. H.; Richmond, Michael; Grosso, Nicolas; Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    X-ray emission is characteristic of young stellar objects (YSOs) and is known to be highly variable. We investigate, via an infrared and multi-epoch X-ray study of the L1630 dark cloud, whether and how X-ray variability in YSOs is related to protostellar evolutionary state. We have analyzed 11 Chandra X-Ray Observatory observations, obtained over the course of four years and totaling ∼240 ks exposure time, targeting the eruptive Class I YSO V1647 Ori in L1630. We used Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer data to identify and classify IR counterparts to L1630 X-ray sources and identified a total of 52 X-ray-emitting YSOs with IR counterparts, including four Class I sources and one Class 0/I source. We have detected cool (<3 MK) plasma, possibly indicative of accretion shocks, in three classical T Tauri stars. A subsample of 27 X-ray-emitting YSOs were covered by 9 of the 11 Chandra observations targeting V1647 Ori and the vicinity. For these 27 YSOs, we have constructed X-ray light curves spanning approximately four years. These light curves highlight the variable nature of pre-main-sequence X-ray-emitting young stars; many of the L1630 YSOs vary by orders of magnitude in count rate between observations. We discuss possible scenarios to explain apparent trends between various X-ray spectral properties, X-ray variance, and YSO classification.

  16. The darkness of spin-0 dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M.C. David

    2015-01-01

    We show that the scattering of a general spin-0 sector of dark radiation off the pre-recombination thermal plasma results in undetectably small spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  17. Beyond vanilla dark matter: New channels in the multifaceted search for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaylali, David E.

    Though we are extremely confident that non-baryonic dark matter exists in our universe, very little is known about its fundamental nature or its relationship with the Standard Model. Guided by theoretical motivations, a desire for generality in our experimental strategies, and a certain amount of hopeful optimism, we have established a basic framework and set of assumptions about the dark sector which we are now actively testing. After years of probing the parameter spaces of these vanilla dark-matter scenarios, through a variety of different search channels, a conclusive direct (non-gravitational) discovery of dark matter eludes us. This very well may suggest that our first-order expectations of the dark sector are too simplistic. This work describes two ways in which we can expand the experimental reach of vanilla dark-matter scenarios while maintaining the model-independent generality which is at this point still warranted. One way in which this is done is to consider coupling structures between the SM and the dark sector other than the two canonical types --- scalar and axial-vector --- leading to spin dependent and independent interactions at direct-detection experiments. The second way we generalize the vanilla scenarios is to consider multi-component dark sectors. We find that both of these generalizations lead to new and interesting phenomenology, and provide a richer complementarity structure between the different experimental probes we are using to search for dark matter.

  18. Dark Forces and Light Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Weiner, Neal; Xue, Wei

    2012-09-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the dark matter, X, is coupled to a new gauge boson, phi, with a relatively low mass (m_phi \\sim 100 MeV-3 GeV). Neither the dark matter nor the new gauge boson have tree-level couplings to the Standard Model. The dark matter in this model annihilates to phi pairs, and for a coupling of g_X \\sim 0.06 (m_X/10 GeV)^1/2 yields a thermal relic abundance consistent with the cosmological density of dark matter. The phi's produced in such annihilations decay through a small degree of kinetic mixing with the photon to combinations of Standard Model leptons and mesons. For dark matter with a mass of \\sim10 GeV, the shape of the resulting gamma-ray spectrum provides a good fit to that observed from the Galactic Center, and can also provide the very hard electron spectrum required to account for the observed synchrotron emission from the Milky Way's radio filaments. For kinetic mixing near the level naively expected from loop-suppressed operators (epsilon \\sim 10^{-4}), the dark matter is predicted to scatter elastically with protons with a cross section consistent with that required to accommodate the signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II.

  19. Can we distinguish early dark energy from a cosmological constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Difu; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-04-01

    Early dark energy (EDE) models are a class of quintessence dark energy with a dynamically evolving scalar field which display a small but non-negligible amount of dark energy at the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Compared with a cosmological constant, the presence of dark energy at early times changes the cosmic expansion history and consequently the shape of the linear theory power spectrum and potentially other observables. We constrain the cosmological parameters in the EDE cosmology using recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations. The best-fitting models favour no EDE; here we consider extreme examples which are in mild tension with current observations in order to explore the observational consequences of a maximally allowed amount of EDE. We study the non-linear evolution of cosmic structure in EDE cosmologies using large volume N-body simulations. Many large-scale structure statistics are found to be very similar between the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and EDE models. We find that EDE cosmologies predict fewer massive halos in comparison to ΛCDM, particularly at high redshifts. The most promising way to distinguish EDE from ΛCDM is to measure the power spectrum on large scales, where differences of up to 15% are expected.

  20. Can we distinguish early dark energy from a cosmological constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Difu; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-07-01

    Early dark energy (EDE) models are a class of quintessence dark energy with a dynamically evolving scalar field which display a small but non-negligible amount of dark energy at the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Compared with a cosmological constant, the presence of dark energy at early times changes the cosmic expansion history and consequently the shape of the linear theory power spectrum and potentially other observables. We constrain the cosmological parameters in the EDE cosmology using recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations. The best-fitting models favour no EDE; here we consider extreme examples which are in mild tension with current observations in order to explore the observational consequences of a maximally allowed amount of EDE. We study the non-linear evolution of cosmic structure in EDE cosmologies using large-volume N-body simulations. Many large-scale structure statistics are found to be very similar between the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and EDE models. We find that EDE cosmologies predict fewer massive haloes in comparison to ΛCDM, particularly at high redshifts. The most promising way to distinguish EDE from ΛCDM is to measure the power spectrum on large scales, where differences of up to 15 per cent are expected.

  1. Gauge Coupling Unification and Nonequilibrium Thermal Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Olive, Keith A.; Quevillon, Jérémie; Zaldívar, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    We study a new mechanism for the production of dark matter in the Universe which does not rely on thermal equilibrium. Dark matter is populated from the thermal bath subsequent to inflationary reheating via a massive mediator whose mass is above the reheating scale TRH. To this end, we consider models with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry broken at some intermediate scale (Mint≃1010-1012GeV). We show that not only does the model allow for gauge coupling unification (at a higher scale associated with grand unification) but it can provide a dark matter candidate which is a standard model singlet but charged under the extra U(1). The intermediate scale gauge boson(s) which are predicted in several E6/SO(10) constructions can be a natural mediator between dark matter and the thermal bath. We show that the dark matter abundance, while never having achieved thermal equilibrium, is fixed shortly after the reheating epoch by the relation TRH3/Mint4. As a consequence, we show that the unification of gauge couplings which determines Mint also fixes the reheating temperature, which can be as high as TRH≃1011GeV.

  2. Dark Matter Production in Non-Standard Early Universe Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehagen, Thomas Joseph

    Many dark matter candidates, including asymmetric Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and sterile neutrinos, are produced in the very early Universe, prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). We show that the relic abundance of asymmetric WIMPs and sterile neutrinos can be very sensitive to the expansion rate of the Universe prior to BBN. In particular, we find that if the production of asymmetric WIMPs occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, a larger WIMP annihilation cross section is required to produce the present dark matter density than if the WIMPs were produced during a standard, radiation dominated phase. Because of this, the present dark matter annihilation rate could be larger than that of symmetric dark matter produced in the standard cosmology. We also show that if the production of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology, consequently relaxing current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing. Finally, we examine whether low reheating temperature cosmologies are allowed by current Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. We find the allowed range of reheating temperatures using monomial and binomial inflationary potentials, and a variety of reheating models. We show that an inflationary model with a φ1 potential and canonical reheating allows the possibility that dark matter could be produced during the reheating epoch, instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated.

  3. HD100546 multi-epoch scattered light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Avenhaus, Henning; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Brittain, Sean D.; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.

    2014-07-20

    We present H, K{sub s}, and L' filter polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) data for the transitional disk around HD100546 obtained in 2013, together with an improved re-reduction of previously published 2006 data. We reveal the disk in polarized scattered light in all three filters, achieving an inner working angle of ∼0.''1. Additional, short-exposure observations in the H and K{sub s} filters probe the surroundings of the star down to ∼0.''03 (∼3 AU). HD100546 is fascinating because of its variety of sub-structures possibly related to forming planets in the disk, and PDI is currently the best technique for imaging them in the near-IR. For the first time ever, we detect a disk in L-band PDI data, and we constrain the outer radius of the inner hole to 14 ± 2 AU and its eccentricity to <0.133. A dark lane is detected between ∼0.''2-0.''6 AU in the front side of the disk, which is likely an effect of the scattering angle and the scattering function of the grains. We find a spiral arm in the northeast that has no obvious connection to spiral arms seen before by other authors further out in the disk, but winds are in the same direction (clockwise). The two bright scattering peaks along the semi-major axis are asymmetric, with the southeastern one being significantly brighter. This could be related to the inner companion candidate that is close to the brighter side of the disk at the time of the observations. The scattering color is close to gray between the H and K{sub s} filters ([H]–[K{sub s}] = 0.19 ± 0.11), but the scattering in the L' filter is significantly weaker ([H]–[L'] = –1.08 ± 0.35, [K{sub s}]–[L'] = –1.27 ± 0.35). We measure the position angle of the disk to be 138° ± 3°, consistent with previous observations, and we derive the dust scattering function in the H and K{sub s} filters between ∼35° and ∼130° at two different radii (30-50 and 80-110 AU) and show that our results are consistent with a disk that is more strongly

  4. Detecting Dark Matter with Imploding Pulsars in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-01

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent.

  5. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-01

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent. PMID:25415895

  6. The pulsar B2224+65 and its jets: a two epoch X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wang, Q. D.

    2010-10-01

    We present an X-ray morphological and spectroscopic study of the pulsar B2224+65 and its apparent jet-like X-ray features based on two epoch Chandra observations. The main X-ray feature, which shows a large directional offset from the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula (Guitar nebula), is broader in apparent width and shows evidence for spectral hardening (at 95 per cent confidence) in the second epoch compared to the first. Furthermore, the sharp leading edge of the feature is found to have a proper motion consistent with that of the pulsar (~180 mas yr-1). The combined data set also provides evidence for the presence of a counter feature, albeit substantially fainter and shorter than the main one. Additional spectral trends along the major and minor axes of the feature are only marginally detected in the two epoch data, including softening counter to the direction of proper motion. Possible explanations for the X-ray features include diffuse energetic particles being confined by an organized ambient magnetic field as well as a simple ballistic jet interpretation; however, the former may have difficulty in explaining observed spectral trends between epochs and along the feature's major axis, whereas the latter may struggle to elucidate its linearity. Given the low counting statistics available in the two epoch observations, it remains difficult to determine a physical production scenario for these enigmatic X-ray emitting features with any certainty.

  7. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  8. Generalized models of unification of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čaplar, Neven; Štefančić, Hrvoje

    2013-01-01

    A model of unification of dark matter and dark energy based on the modeling of the speed of sound as a function of the parameter of the equation of state is introduced. It is found that the model in which the speed of sound depends on the power of the parameter of the equation of state, cs2=α(-w)γ, contains the generalized Chaplygin gas models as its subclass. An effective scalar field description of the model is obtained in a parametric form which in some cases can be translated into a closed form solution for the scalar field potential. A constraint on model parameters is obtained using the observational data on the Hubble parameter at different redshifts.

  9. Dark energy crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Je-An

    2010-11-01

    In cosmology we are facing the dark energy crisis: How can we survive huge vacuum energy, meanwhile living with tiny dark energy? For the solution to this crisis, we raise several clues and hints, in particular, supersymmetry and the double hierarchy, Mp-MSM-MDE (Planck-Standard Model-dark energy scales). These two clues naturally lead to a solution with a supersymmetry-breaking brane-world. The train of thought from the clues to the solution is elucidated.

  10. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  11. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  12. Dark Matter 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Marc

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the status of the exciting and fastly evolving field of dark matter research as of summer 2013, when it was discussed at the International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC) 2013 in Rio de Janeiro. It focuses on the three main avenues to detect weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter: direct detection, indirect detection, and collider searches. The article is based on the dark matter rapporteur talk summarizing the presentations given at the conference, filling some gaps for completeness.

  13. PQ-symmetry for a small Dirac neutrino mass, dark radiation and cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Wan-Il

    2014-06-01

    We propose a supersymmetric scenario in which the small Yukawa couplings for the Dirac neutrino mass term are generated by the spontaneous-breaking of Pecci-Quinn symmetry. In this scenario, a right amount of dark matter relic density can be obtained by either right-handed sneutrino or axino LSP, and a sizable amount of axion dark radiation can be obtained. Interestingly, the decay of right-handed sneutrino NLSP to axino LSP is delayed to around the present epoch, and can leave an observable cosmological background of neutrinos at the energy scale of O(10−100) GeV.

  14. Dark energy and the return of the phoenix universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2009-03-15

    In cyclic universe models based on a single scalar field (e.g., the radion determining the distance between branes in M theory), virtually the entire Universe makes it through the ekpyrotic smoothing and flattening phase, bounces, and enters a new epoch of expansion and cooling. This stable evolution cannot occur, however, if scale-invariant curvature perturbations are produced by the entropic mechanism because it requires two scalar fields (e.g., the radion and the Calabi-Yau dilaton) evolving along an unstable classical trajectory. In fact, we show here that an overwhelming fraction of the Universe fails to make it through the ekpyrotic phase; nevertheless, a sufficient volume survives and cycling continues forever provided the dark energy phase of the cycle lasts long enough, of order a trillion years. Two consequences are a new role for dark energy and a global structure of the Universe radically different from that of eternal inflation.

  15. The scale factor in a Universe with dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, M. V.; Sazhina, O. S.

    2016-04-01

    The solution of the Friedmann cosmological equations for the scale factor in a model of the Universe containing matter having the equation of state of dust and dark energy is considered. The equation-of-state parameter of the dark energy is taken to be an arbitrary constant w = -1.006 ± 0.045, whose value is constrained by the current observational limits. An exact solution for the scale factor as a function of physical time and conformal time is obtained. Approximate solutions have been found for the entire admissible conformal time interval with an accuracy better than 1%, which exceeds the accuracy of the determined global parameters of our Universe. This is the first time an exact solution for the scale factor describing the evolution of the Universe in a unified way, beginning with the matter-dominated epoch and ending with the infinitely remote future, has been obtained.

  16. Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, M.; Ferrara, A.; Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

    2007-05-01

    Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Lyα background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed DM candidates, among which we select the three most popular ones: (i) 25-keV decaying sterile neutrinos, (ii) 10-MeV decaying light dark matter (LDM) and (iii) 10-MeV annihilating LDM. Although we find that the DM effects are considerably smaller than found by previous studies (due to a more physical description of the energy transfer from DM to the gas), we conclude that combined observations of the 21-cm background and of its gradient should be able to put constrains at least on LDM candidates. In fact, LDM decays (annihilations) induce differential brightness temperature variations with respect to the non-decaying/annihilating DM case up to ΔδTb = 8 (22) mK at about 50 (15) MHz. In principle, this signal could be detected both by current single-dish radio telescopes and future facilities as Low Frequency Array; however, this assumes that ionospheric, interference and foreground issues can be properly taken care of.

  17. Chaplygin dark star

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2005-12-15

    We study the general properties of a spherically symmetric body described through the generalized Chaplygin equation of state. We conclude that such an object, dubbed generalized Chaplygin dark star, should exist within the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model of unification of dark energy and dark matter, and derive expressions for its size and expansion velocity. A criteria for the survival of the perturbations in the GCG background that give origin to the dark star are developed, and its main features are analyzed.

  18. UVIS Long Darks Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Larry

    2010-09-01

    Darks during SMOV showed a systematically lower global dark rate as well as lower scatter when compared to the Cycle 17 darks. Those two sets of exposures differ in exposure time - 1800 sec during SMOV and 900 sec during Cycle 17. Hypothetically, the effect could be caused by short-duration stray light, say 500-sec in duration. During the latter part of Cycle 17, operation of WFC3 was changed to additionally block the light path to the detector with the CSM. This program acquires a small number of darks at the longer SMOV exposure times {1800 sec} in order to check whether the effect repeats in the new operating mode.

  19. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  20. Interacting vectorlike dark energy, the first and second cosmological coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2006-04-15

    One of the puzzles of the dark energy problem is the (first) cosmological coincidence problem, namely, why does our Universe begin the accelerated expansion recently? Why are we living in an epoch in which the dark energy density and the dust matter energy density are comparable? On the other hand, cosmological observations hint that the equation-of-state parameter (EoS) of dark energy crossed the phantom divide w{sub de}=-1 in the near past. Many dark energy models whose EoS can cross the phantom divide have been proposed. However, to our knowledge, these models with crossing the phantom divide only provide the possibility that w{sub de} can cross -1. They do not answer another question, namely, why crossing the phantom divide occurs recently? Since in many existing models whose EoS can cross the phantom divide, w{sub de} undulates around -1 randomly, why are we living in an epoch w{sub de}<-1? This can be regarded as the second cosmological coincidence problem. In this work, the cosmological evolution of the vectorlike dark energy interacting with background perfect fluid is investigated. We find that the first and second cosmological coincidence problems can be alleviated at the same time in this scenario.

  1. Asymmetric Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Martinez, Enrique Fernandez; Mena, Olga; Redondo, Javier; Serra, Paolo E-mail: enfmarti@cern.ch E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) models invoke a particle-antiparticle asymmetry, similar to the one observed in the Baryon sector, to account for the Dark Matter (DM) abundance. Both asymmetries are usually generated by the same mechanism and generally related, thus predicting DM masses around 5 GeV in order to obtain the correct density. The main challenge for successful models is to ensure efficient annihilation of the thermally produced symmetric component of such a light DM candidate without violating constraints from collider or direct searches. A common way to overcome this involves a light mediator, into which DM can efficiently annihilate and which subsequently decays into Standard Model particles. Here we explore the scenario where the light mediator decays instead into lighter degrees of freedom in the dark sector that act as radiation in the early Universe. While this assumption makes indirect DM searches challenging, it leads to signals of extra radiation at BBN and CMB. Under certain conditions, precise measurements of the number of relativistic species, such as those expected from the Planck satellite, can provide information on the structure of the dark sector. We also discuss the constraints of the interactions between DM and Dark Radiation from their imprint in the matter power spectrum.

  2. Alternatives to dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2006-04-01

    We review the underpinnings of the standard Newton Einstein theory of gravity, and identify where it could possibly go wrong. In particular, we discuss the logical independence from each other of the general covariance principle, the equivalence principle and the Einstein equations, and discuss how to constrain the matter energy momentum tensor which serves as the source of gravity. We identify the a priori assumption of the validity of standard gravity on all distance scales as the root cause of the dark matter and dark energy problems, and discuss how the freedom currently present in gravitational theory can enable us to construct candidate alternatives to the standard theory in which the dark matter and dark energy problems could then be resolved. We identify three generic aspects of these alternate approaches: that it is a universal acceleration scale which determines when a luminous Newtonian expectation is to fail to fit data, that there is a global cosmological effect on local galactic motions which can replace galactic dark matter, and that to solve the cosmological constant problem it is not necessary to quench the cosmological constant itself, but only the amount by which it gravitates.

  3. Dark matter versus Mach's principle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Borzeszkowski, H.-H.; Treder, H.-J.

    1998-02-01

    Empirical and theoretical evidence show that the astrophysical problem of dark matter might be solved by a theory of Einstein-Mayer type. In this theory up to global Lorentz rotations the reference system is determined by the motion of cosmic matter. Thus one is led to a "Riemannian space with teleparallelism" realizing a geometric version of the Mach-Einstein doctrine. The field equations of this gravitational theory contain hidden matter terms where the existence of hidden matter is inferred safely from its gravitational effects. It is argued that in the nonrelativistic mechanical approximation they provide an inertia-free mechanics where the inertial mass of a body is induced by the gravitational action of the comic masses. Interpreted form the Newtonian point of view this mechanics shows that the effective gravitational mass of astrophysical objects depends on r such that one expects the existence of dark matter.

  4. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  5. Scientists Debate Whether the Anthropocene Should Be a New Geological Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    By about 2017 or 2018, scientists probably will have determined whether or not the Earth has entered into the "Anthropocene" epoch. Although many people are convinced that we are already living in the Anthropocene, that's the estimate for when a scientific review process could culminate in officially designating this potential new epoch of the Quaternary Period (roughly the past 2.6 million years) signified by profound human alteration to geological conditions and processes. The epoch would encompass—for the time being—a sliver of geological time separate rom the Holocene (roughly 12,000 years ago to the present), starting from perhaps the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the end of World War II, or some other date determined to be a good marker to designate the beginning of the Anthropocene.

  6. Statistical properties of multi-epoch spectral variability of SDSS stripe 82 quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Mitsuru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Minezaki, Takeo; Doi, Mamoru; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Koshida, Shintaro

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the UV-optical (longward of Lyα 1216 Å) spectral variability of nearly 9000 quasars (0 < z < 4) using multi-epoch photometric data within the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The regression slope in the flux-flux space of a quasar light curve directly measures the color of the flux difference spectrum, then the spectral shape of the flux difference spectra can be derived by taking a careful look at the redshift dependence of the regression slopes. First, we confirm that the observed quasar spectrum becomes bluer when the quasar becomes brighter. We infer the spectral index of the composite difference spectrum as α{sub ν}{sup dif}∼+1/3 (in the form of f{sub ν}∝ν{sup α{sub ν}}), which is significantly bluer than that of the composite spectrum α{sub ν}{sup com}∼−0.5. We also show that the continuum variability cannot be explained by accretion disk models with varying mass accretion rates. Second, we examine the effects of broad emission line variability on the color-redshift space. The variability of the 'Small Blue Bump' is extensively discussed. We show that the low-ionization lines of Mg II and Fe II are less variable compared to Balmer emission lines and high-ionization lines, and the Balmer continuum is the dominant variable source around ∼3000 Å. These results are compared with previous studies, and the physical mechanisms of the variability of the continuum and emission lines are discussed.

  7. Spectral Calibration Requirements of Radio Interferometers for Epoch of Reionisation Science with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral features introduced by instrumental chromaticity of radio interferometers have the potential to negatively impact the ability to perform Epoch of Reionisation and Cosmic Dawn (EoR/CD) science. We describe instrument calibration choices that influence the spectral characteristics of the science data, and assess their impact on EoR/CD statistical and tomographic experiments. Principally, we consider the intrinsic spectral response of the antennas, embedded within a complete frequency-dependent primary beam response, and instrument sampling. The analysis is applied to the proposed SKA1-Low EoR/CD experiments. We provide tolerances on the smoothness of the SKA station primary beam bandpass, to meet the scientific goals of statistical and tomographic (imaging) of EoR/CD programs. Two calibration strategies are tested: (1) fitting of each fine channel independently, and (2) fitting of an nth-order polynomial for each ~ 1 MHz coarse channel with (n+1)th-order residuals (n = 2, 3, 4). Strategy (1) leads to uncorrelated power in the 2D power spectrum proportional to the thermal noise power, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity. Strategy (2) leads to correlated residuals from the fitting, and residual signal power with (n+1)th-order curvature. For the residual power to be less than the thermal noise, the fractional amplitude of a fourth-order term in the bandpass across a single coarse channel must be < 2.5% (50 MHz), < 0.5% (150 MHz), < 0.8% (200 MHz). The tomographic experiment places constraints on phase residuals in the bandpass. We find that the root-mean-square variability over all stations of the change in phase across any fine channel (4.578 kHz) should not exceed 0.2 degrees.

  8. 4. DARK CANYON SIPHON VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DARK CANYON SIPHON - VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT LOCATION OF SIPHON. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Dark Canyon Siphon, On Main Canal, 1 mile South of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  9. Dark matter annihilation and decay from non-spherical dark halos in galactic dwarf satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Sugai, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the Milky Way are the primary targets in the indirect searches for particle dark matter. To set robust constraints on candidate dark matter particles, understanding the dark halo structure of these systems is of substantial importance. In this paper, we first evaluate the astrophysical factors for dark matter annihilation and decay for 24 dSphs, taking into account a non-spherical dark halo, using generalized axisymmetric mass models based on axisymmetric Jeans equations. First, from a fitting analysis of the most recent kinematic data available, our axisymmetric mass models are a much better fit than previous spherical ones, thus, our work should be the most realistic and reliable estimator for astrophysical factors. Secondly, we find that among analysed dSphs, the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Triangulum II and Ursa Major II are the most promising but large uncertain targets for dark matter annihilation while the classical dSph Draco is the most robust and detectable target for dark matter decay. It is also found that the non-sphericity of luminous and dark components influences the estimate of astrophysical factors, even though these factors largely depend on the sample size, the prior range of parameters and the spatial extent of the dark halo. Moreover, owing to these effects, the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross-section are more conservative than those of previous spherical works. These results are important for optimizing and designing dark matter searches in current and future multi-messenger observations by space and ground-based telescopes.

  10. Biophotons Contribute to Retinal Dark Noise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehua; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of dark noise in retinal photoreceptors resulted in a long-lasting controversy over its origin and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a novel ultra-weak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) to detect biophotonic activity (emission) under dark conditions in rat and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) retinas in vitro. We found a significant temperature-dependent increase in biophotonic activity that was completely blocked either by removing intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) together or inhibiting phosphodiesterase 6. These findings suggest that the photon-like component of discrete dark noise may not be caused by a direct contribution of the thermal activation of rhodopsin, but rather by an indirect thermal induction of biophotonic activity, which then activates the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. Therefore, this study suggests a possible solution regarding the thermal activation energy barrier for discrete dark noise, which has been debated for almost half a century. PMID:27059222

  11. GRAVITATIONALLY FOCUSED DARK MATTER AROUND COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2011-12-01

    If dark matter self-annihilates then it may produce an observable signal when its density is high. The details depend on the intrinsic properties of dark matter and how it clusters in space. For example, the density profile of some dark matter candidates may rise steeply enough toward the Galactic Center that self-annihilation may produce detectable {gamma}-ray emission. Here, we discuss the possibility that an annihilation signal arises near a compact object (e.g., neutron star or black hole) even when the density of dark matter in the neighborhood of the object is uniform. Gravitational focusing produces a local enhancement of density with a profile that falls off approximately as the inverse square-root of distance from the compact star. While geometric dilution may overwhelm the annihilation signal from this local enhancement, magnetic fields tied to the compact object can increase the signal's contrast relative to the background.

  12. Lights in the dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    The nature of dark matter is still obscure. The gamma-ray large area telescope on board the Fermi satellite is playing a major role in searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay ("indirect detection"). In this dissertation I discuss theoretical work on how to use recent observations from Fermi to probe dark matter properties. First, I study how searches for monochromatic gamma rays can be exploited to put constraints on the so-called singlet scalar dark matter model. This is one of the most minimal particle setups to include a dark matter candidate, and is obtained by adding a singlet real scalar field to the Standard Model and imposing a discrete symmetry to make this new particle stable. Second, I explore a non-standard, novel way to search for dark matter: looking at dark matter-cosmic ray scatterings in Active Galactic Nuclei. These objects are believed to be embedded in extremely large densities of dark matter, and are known to be sources of very powerful jets containing electrons and protons. I show how the scattering of the electrons in the jets off of the dark matter can produce photons with a very distinct spectral feature and with a flux that Fermi could potentially measure in the near future. Last, I investigate whether a possible detection of multiple gamma-ray lines could point to a scenario where the dark sector is richer than what usually assumed and contains more than one stable dark matter particle. To probe such a scenario more valuable information is actually gained from direct detection experiments and collider searches, as I discuss in detail.

  13. Dark Energy from Interacting Dark Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Terrence; McKellar, Bruce; Alsing, Paul; Stephenson, Gerard

    2010-11-01

    Physics is rife with interacting systems that exhibit negative pressure: atomic nuclei are very well known examples. We examine the range of parameters, for neutral fermions interacting only by exchange of an extraordinarily light scalar particle, that produce a negative pressure on the scale of the Universe over time periods where Dark Energy is or may be relevant. Of known or expected neutral Majorana fermions, active neutrinos can be ruled out but sterile neutrinos would work, as well as the LSP, to describe the recent observations of Dark Energy effects. After a phase change required by the instability responsible for the negative pressure, the resulting clouds of neutral fermions will contribute to Dark Matter. Nothing requires that this can only happen once.

  14. Correlation of QSO absorption lines in universes dominated by cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J.; Hogan, C.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the redshift correlations between QSO absorption-line systems are investigated in the context of 'cold dark matter' cosmological models. Particles in 'particle-mesh' N-body simulations are interpreted as absorbing clouds at epochs corresponding to mean redshifts, z, of 0.0, 1.25, and 3.0. The velocity correlation function for absorbing clouds is found by passing lines-of-sight through the systems and computing velocity differences for those particles which lie close to the lines. It depends strongly on z and Omega but only weakly, if at all, on the number density, diameter or mass of the clouds. Two interpretations are possible: (1) the heavy element absorption systems are associated with galaxies which are an unbiased sample of the mass distribution in an Omega(0) = 0.2 universe or (2) the Lyman-alpha absorbers are an unbiased sample of the mass in an Omega(0) = 1 universe and the heavy-element absorption systems, like galaxies, are more strongly clustered than the mass.

  15. Indications of a late-time interaction in the dark sector.

    PubMed

    Salvatelli, Valentina; Said, Najla; Bruni, Marco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Wands, David

    2014-10-31

    We show that a general late-time interaction between cold dark matter and vacuum energy is favored by current cosmological data sets. We characterize the strength of the coupling by a dimensionless parameter q(V) that is free to take different values in four redshift bins from the primordial epoch up to today. This interacting scenario is in agreement with measurements of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies from the Planck satellite, supernovae Ia from Union 2.1 and redshift space distortions from a number of surveys, as well as with combinations of these different data sets. Our analysis of the 4-bin interaction shows that a nonzero interaction is likely at late times. We then focus on the case q(V)≠0 in a single low-redshift bin, obtaining a nested one parameter extension of the standard ΛCDM model. We study the Bayesian evidence, with respect to ΛCDM, of this late-time interaction model, finding moderate evidence for an interaction starting at z=0.9, dependent upon the prior range chosen for the interaction strength parameter q(V). For this case the null interaction (q(V)=0, i.e., ΛCDM) is excluded at 99% C.L. PMID:25396358

  16. CENTRAL DARK MATTER TRENDS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM STRONG LENSING, DYNAMICS, AND STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tortora, C.; Jetzer, P.; Napolitano, N. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    2010-09-20

    We analyze the correlations between central dark matter (DM) content of early-type galaxies and their sizes and ages, using a sample of intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 0.2) gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey, and by comparing them to a larger sample of z {approx} 0 galaxies. We decompose the deprojected galaxy masses into DM and stellar components using combinations of strong lensing, stellar dynamics, and stellar populations modeling. For a given stellar mass, we find that for galaxies with larger sizes, the DM fraction increases and the mean DM density decreases, consistently with the cuspy halos expected in cosmological formation scenarios. The DM fraction also decreases with stellar age, which can be partially explained by the inverse correlation between size and age. The residual trend may point to systematic dependencies on formation epoch of halo contraction or stellar initial mass functions. These results are in agreement with recent findings based on local galaxies by Napolitano et al. and suggest negligible evidence of galaxy evolution over the last {approx}2.5 Gyr other than passive stellar aging.

  17. Dark mass creation during EWPT via Dark Energy interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Casper, Steven

    2014-04-01

    We add Dark Matter-Dark Energy terms with a quintessence field interacting with a Dark Matter field to a Minimal Supersymmetry Model of the Electroweak (MSSM EW) Lagrangian previously used to calculate the magnetic field created during the Electroweak Phase Transition (EWPT). From the expectation value of the quintessence field, we estimate the Dark Matter mass for parameters used in previous work on Dark Matter-Dark Energy interactions.

  18. Dark matter, dark energy and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    Within the framework of the Generation Model (GM) of particle physics, gravity is identified with the very weak, universal and attractive residual color interactions acting between the colorless particles of ordinary matter (electrons, neutrons and protons), which are composite structures. This gravitational interaction is mediated by massless vector bosons (hypergluons), which self-interact so that the interaction has two additional features not present in Newtonian gravitation: (i) asymptotic freedom and (ii) color confinement. These two additional properties of the gravitational interaction negate the need for the notions of both dark matter and dark energy.

  19. Dark energy and key physical parameters of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Chernin, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    We study physics of clusters of galaxies embedded in the cosmic dark energy background. Under the assumption that dark energy is described by the cosmological constant, we show that the dynamical effects of dark energy are strong in clusters like the Virgo cluster. Specifically, the key physical parameters of the dark mater halos in clusters are determined by dark energy: (1) the halo cut-off radius is practically, if not exactly, equal to the zero-gravity radius at which the dark matter gravity is balanced by the dark energy antigravity; (2) the halo averaged density is equal to two densities of dark energy; (3) the halo edge (cut-off) density is the dark energy density with a numerical factor of the unity order slightly depending on the halo profile. The cluster gravitational potential well in which the particles of the dark halo (as well as galaxies and intracluster plasma) move is strongly affected by dark energy: the maximum of the potential is located at the zero-gravity radius of the cluster.

  20. Dark matter and dark energy: The critical questions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-11-19

    Stars account for only about 0.5% of the content of the Universe; the bulk of the Universe is optically dark. The dark side of the Universe is comprised of: at least 0.1% light neutrinos; 3.5% {+-} 1% baryons; 29% {+-} 4% cold dark matter; and 66% {+-} 6% dark energy. Now that we have characterized the dark side of the Universe, the challenge is to understand it. The critical questions are: (1) What form do the dark baryons take? (2) What is (are) the constituent(s) of the cold dark matter? (3) What is the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is causing the Universe to speed up.

  1. Direct dark matter searches—Test of the Big Bounce Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Vergados, J.D. E-mail: vergados@uoi.gr

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possibility of using dark matter particle's mass and its interaction cross section as a smoking gun signal of the existence of a Big Bounce at the early stage in the evolution of our currently observed universe. A study of dark matter production in the pre-bounce contraction and the post bounce expansion epochs of this universe reveals a new venue for achieving the observed relic abundance of our present universe. Specifically, it predicts a characteristic relation governing a dark matter mass and interaction cross section and a factor of 1/2 in thermally averaged cross section, as compared to the non-thermal production in standard cosmology, is needed for creating enough dark matter particle to satisfy the currently observed relic abundance because dark matter is being created during the pre-bounce contraction, in addition to the post-bounce expansion. As the production rate is lower than the Hubble expansion rate information of the bounce universe evolution is preserved. Therefore once the value of dark matter mass and interaction cross section are obtained by direct detection in laboratories, this alternative route becomes a signature prediction of the bounce universe scenario. This leads us to consider a scalar dark matter candidate, which if it is light, has important implications on dark matter searches.

  2. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  3. Dark Energy, or Worse

    ScienceCinema

    Professor Sean Carroll

    2010-01-08

    General relativity is inconsistent with cosmological observations unless we invoke components of dark matter and dark energy that dominate the universe. While it seems likely that these exotic substances really do exist, the alternative is worth considering: that Einstein's general relativity breaks down on cosmological scales. I will discuss models of modified gravity, tests in the solar system and elsewhere, and consequences for cosmology.

  4. Dark and stormy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadstone, Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The December 2009 issue of Physics World informs us on page 9 that dark energy is a force. The January 2010 issue (pp32-37) states that dark energy is a substance. The term itself clearly indicates that it is energy.

  5. Dark Energy, or Worse

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean

    2006-11-13

    General relativity is inconsistent with cosmological observations unless we invoke components of dark matter and dark energy that dominate the universe. While it seems likely that these exotic substances really do exist, the alternative is worth considering: that Einstein's general relativity breaks down on cosmological scales. I will discuss models of modified gravity, tests in the solar system and elsewhere, and consequences for cosmology.

  6. Composite millicharged dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2013-07-01

    We study a composite millicharged dark matter model. The dark matter is in the form of pionlike objects emerging from a higher scale QCD-like theory. We present two distinct possibilities with interesting phenomenological consequences based on the choice of the parameters. In the first one, the dark matter is produced nonthermally, and it could potentially account for the 130 GeV Fermi photon line via decays of the “dark pions.” We estimate the self-interaction cross section, which might play an important role both in changing the dark matter halo profile at the center of the galaxy and in making the dark matter warmer. In the second version the dark matter is produced via the freeze-in mechanism. Finally we impose all possible astrophysical, cosmological and experimental constraints. We study in detail generic constraints on millicharged dark matter that can arise from anomalous isotope searches of different elements and we show why constraints based on direct searches from underground detectors are not generally valid.

  7. Dark matter and sterility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter F.

    2014-10-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's dark-matter flow-chart "What's the matter?" (July pp30-31), which summarized the most likely candidates for galactic dark matter, and to Jon Cartwright's feature "A fourth type of neutrino" on the possibility of "sterile" neutrinos (August pp24-28).

  8. Working the Dark Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Environmentalism's wider and wilder possibilities today appear as regions of seeming darkness that bracket or frame acceptable environmental thinking. One of these barely-mentionable darknesses is outer space--the cosmos. Another is the inner and chthonic powers of the land and natural beings generally. This essay aims to bring these two kinds of…

  9. Dark matter and dark energy: approaches and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander

    We will introduce problems of Dark Matter (DM) and Dark Energy (DE), namely we will describe a development of these concepts and their present status. We will demonstrate ap-proaches to these problems. As specific issues we will discuss limits on DM concentration near the black hole at the Galactic Center and ways to solve DE problem introducing alternative theories of gravity such as f (R)-theories. The existence of dark matter (DM) at scales of few pc down to 10-5 pc around the centers of galaxies and in particular in the Galactic Center region has been considered in the literature. Under the assumption that such a DM clump, principally constituted by non-baryonic matter (like WIMPs) does exist at the center of our galaxy, the study of the γ-ray emission from the Galactic Center region allows us to constrain both the mass and the size of this DM sphere. Moreover, if a DM cusp does exist around the Galactic Center it could modify the trajectories of stars moving around it in a sensible way depending on the DM mass distribution. Here, we discuss the constraints that can be obtained with the orbit analysis of stars (as S2 and S16) moving inside the DM concentration with present and next generations of large telescopes. In particular, consideration of the S2 star apoastron shift may allow improving limits on the DM mass and size. We will describe severe constraints from Solar system data on parameters f (R) = Rn theories, where n = 1 corresponds to the standard general relativistic case. 1. A. F. Zakharov, A.A. Nucita, F. De Paolis, G. Ingrosso: Solar system constraints on Rn gravity, Phys. Rev. D 74, 107101, (2006). 2. A. F. Zakharov, A.A. Nucita, F. De Paolis, G. Ingrosso: Apoastron shift constraints on dark matter distribution at the Galactic Center, Phys. Rev. D 76, 062001, (2007). 3. A.F. Zakharov, S. Capozziello, F. De Paolis, G. Ingrosso, A.A. Nucita, The Role of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in Cosmological Models: Theoretical Overview, Space Sci. Rev. 148

  10. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EPOCH OF POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-10

    We investigate the transition from primordial Population III (Pop III) star formation to normal Pop II star formation in the first galaxies using new cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We find that while the first stars seed their host galaxies with metals, they cannot sustain significant outflows to enrich the intergalactic medium, even assuming a top-heavy initial mass function. This means that Pop III star formation could potentially continue until z Almost-Equal-To 6 in different unenriched regions of the universe, before being ultimately shut off by cosmic reionization. Within an individual galaxy, the metal production and stellar feedback from Pop II stars overtake Pop III stars in 20-200 Myr, depending on galaxy mass.

  11. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  12. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  13. Spectroscopic needs for imaging dark energy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Réza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Cheu, Elliott; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Axel; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezić, Željko; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Ménard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rahman, Mubdi; Rhodes, Jason; Ricol, Jean-Stephane; Sadeh, Iftach; Slozar, Anže; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Anthony Tyson, J.; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z's): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z's will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments.

  14. COMPARING SINGLE-EPOCH VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Liu Xin

    2012-07-10

    Single-epoch virial black hole (BH) mass estimators utilizing broad emission lines have been routinely applied to high-redshift quasars to estimate their BH masses. Depending on the redshift, different line estimators (H{alpha}, H{beta}, Mg II {lambda}2798, C IV {lambda}1549) are often used with optical/near-infrared spectroscopy. Here, we use a homogeneous sample of 60 intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 1.5-2.2) Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars with optical and near-infrared spectra covering C IV through H{alpha} to investigate the consistency between different single-epoch virial BH mass estimators. We critically compare rest-frame UV line estimators (C IV {lambda}1549, C III] {lambda}1908, and Mg II {lambda}2798) with optical estimators (H{beta} and H{alpha}) in terms of correlations between line widths and between continuum/line luminosities, for the high-luminosity regime (L{sub 5100} > 10{sup 45.4} erg s{sup -1}) probed by our sample. The continuum luminosities of L{sub 1350} and L{sub 3000}, and the broad-line luminosities are well correlated with L{sub 5100}, reflecting the homogeneity of quasar spectra in the rest-frame UV-optical, among which L{sub 1350} and the line luminosities for C IV and C III] have the largest scatter in the correlation with L{sub 5100}. We found that the Mg II FWHM correlates well with the FWHMs of the Balmer lines and that the Mg II line estimator can be calibrated to yield consistent virial mass estimates with those based on the H{beta}/H{alpha} estimators, thus extending earlier results on less luminous objects. The C IV FWHM is poorly correlated with the Balmer line FWHMs, and the scatter between the C IV and H{beta} FWHMs consists of an irreducible part ({approx}0.12 dex), and a part that correlates with the blueshift of the C IV centroid relative to that of H{beta}, similar to earlier studies comparing C IV with Mg II. The C III] FWHM is found to correlate with the C IV FWHM, and hence is also poorly correlated with the H

  15. Seeing through the Dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-03-01

    Astronomers have measured the distribution of mass inside a dark filament in a molecular cloud with an amazing level of detail and to great depth. The measurement is based on a new method that looks at the scattered near-infrared light or 'cloudshine' and was made with ESO's New Technology Telescope. Associated with the forthcoming VISTA telescope, this new technique will allow astronomers to better understand the cradles of newborn stars. ESO PR Photo 05a/08 ESO PR Photo 06/08 A Dark Filament in Scattered Light The vast expanses between stars are permeated with giant complexes of cold gas and dust opaque to visible light. Yet these are the future nurseries of stars to be. "One would like to have a detailed knowledge of the interiors of these dark clouds to better understand where and when new stars will appear," says Mika Juvela, lead author of the paper in which these results are reported. Because the dust in these clouds blocks the visible light, the distribution of matter within interstellar clouds can be examined only indirectly. One method is based on measurements of the light from stars that are located behind the cloud [1] . "This method, albeit quite useful, is limited by the fact that the level of details one can obtain depends on the distribution of background stars," says co-author Paolo Padoan. In 2006, astronomers Padoan, Juvela, and colleague Veli-Matti Pelkonen, proposed that maps of scattered light could be used as another tracer of the cloud's inner structure, a method that should yield more advantages. The idea is to estimate the amount of dust located along the line of sight by measuring the intensity of the scattered light. Dark clouds are feebly illuminated by nearby stars. This light is scattered by the dust contained in the clouds, an effect dubbed 'cloudshine' by Harvard astronomers Alyssa Goodman and Jonathan Foster. This effect is well known to sky lovers, as they create in visible light wonderful pieces of art called 'reflection nebulae

  16. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  17. SOLAR CONSTRAINTS ON ASYMMETRIC DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilidio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2012-10-01

    The dark matter content of the universe is likely to be a mixture of matter and antimatter, perhaps comparable to the measured asymmetric mixture of baryons and antibaryons. During the early stages of the universe, the dark matter particles are produced in a process similar to baryogenesis, and dark matter freezeout depends on the dark matter asymmetry and the annihilation cross section (s-wave and p-wave annihilation channels) of particles and antiparticles. In these {eta}-parameterized asymmetric dark matter ({eta}ADM) models, the dark matter particles have an annihilation cross section close to the weak interaction cross section, and a value of dark matter asymmetry {eta} close to the baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B}. Furthermore, we assume that dark matter scattering of baryons, namely, the spin-independent scattering cross section, is of the same order as the range of values suggested by several theoretical particle physics models used to explain the current unexplained events reported in the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST experiments. Here, we constrain {eta}ADM by investigating the impact of such a type of dark matter on the evolution of the Sun, namely, the flux of solar neutrinos and helioseismology. We find that dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 15 GeV, a spin-independent scattering cross section on baryons of the order of a picobarn, and an {eta}-asymmetry with a value in the interval 10{sup -12}-10{sup -10}, would induce a change in solar neutrino fluxes in disagreement with current neutrino flux measurements. This result is also confirmed by helioseismology data. A natural consequence of this model is suppressed annihilation, thereby reducing the tension between indirect and direct dark matter detection experiments, but the model also allows a greatly enhanced annihilation cross section. All the cosmological {eta}ADM scenarios that we discuss have a relic dark matter density {Omega}h {sup 2} and baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B} in agreement with

  18. Isocurvature cold dark matter fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Bond, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    According to Preskill et al. (1983), the axion field represents a particularly attractive candidate for the dark matter in the universe. In many respects it behaves like other forms of cold dark matter, such as massive gravitinos, photinos, and monopoles. It is, however, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of very low mass, and it is only because of rapid coherent oscillations of the field that it can dominate the mass density of the universe. In the present paper it is assumed that the isocurvature mode is dominant. The linear evolution calculations conducted do not depend upon specific details of particle physics. For this reason, the conducted discussion is applicable to any cold dark matter model with isocurvature perturbations. The results of the study lead to the conclusion that scale-invariant isocurvature perturbations do not seem an attractive possibility for the origin of large-scale structure. The findings strengthen the review that primordial adiabatic perturbations were the dominant fluctuations in the early stages of the Big Bang.

  19. Probing the Epoch Reionization at Redshifts 6 to 12 with MWA, PAPER and HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel; HERA Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Direct observation of cosmological hydrogen throughout cosmic time is possible via the 21cm line and is now being pursued as a new cosmological and astrophysical probe. Multiple experimental low frequency radio arrays have worked towards detection and characterization of this spectral line signal through many different epochs of cosmic time. The Epoch of Reionization (EoR), when the first stars ionized the primordial hydrogen half a billion years after the big bang, thought to occur between redshifts 6 and 12 is a period of intense interest. The Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) has placed a series of ever more sensitive limits on the 21cm power spectrum while the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) has pioneered imaging of structure in the presence of foregrounds. Here we present the latest results from these experiments and introduce the next generation Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) which will yield 20 times the sensitivity of first generation arrays and provide new constraints on the nature of the first stars, the evolution of primordial galaxies, and significant new constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters.

  20. The Influence of Epoch Length on Physical Activity Patterns Varies by Child's Activity Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettlefold, Lindsay; Naylor, P. J.; Warburton, Darren E. R.; Bredin, Shannon S. D.; Race, Douglas; McKay, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patterns of physical activity (PA) and sedentary time, including volume of bouted activity, are important health indicators. However, the effect of accelerometer epoch length on measurement of these patterns and associations with health outcomes in children remain unknown. Method: We measured activity patterns in 308 children (52% girls,…

  1. The Corporate University's Role in Managing an Epoch in Learning Organisation Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dealtry, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to set the scene for some radical epochal thinking about the approach and future strategic directions in the management of organisational learning, following the author's earlier editorial theme concerning the need for exploration and innovation in organisational learning management.…

  2. ATLAS limits on explosion epoch of SN2016bau in NGC3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    Following the discovery of SN2016bau in NGC3631 at 13Mpc by Ron Arbour (TNS Astronomical Transient Report No. 1487) and the spectroscopic confirmation of Granata et al. (ATel #8818, Asiago Transient Classification Program) as a young type Ib supernova, we report limits on the explosion epoch.

  3. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytsis, Marat; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-05-01

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this `hadrosymmetric' scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi -LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  4. Initial LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows. II. Diffuse polarized emission in the ELAIS-N1 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelić, V.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Mevius, M.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bernardi, G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Labropoulos, P.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Patil, A. H.; Thomas, R. M.; Vedantham, H. K.; Veligatla, V.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Conway, J. E.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Haverkorn, M.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: This study aims to characterise the polarized foreground emission in the ELAIS-N1 field and to address its possible implications for extracting of the cosmological 21 cm signal from the LOw-Frequency ARray - Epoch of Reionization (LOFAR-EoR) data. Methods: We used the high band antennas of LOFAR to image this region and RM-synthesis to unravel structures of polarized emission at high Galactic latitudes. Results: The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is on average ~4 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -10 to + 13 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The total polarized intensity and polarization angle show a wide range of morphological features. We have also used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. The LOFAR and WSRT images show a similar complex morphology at comparable brightness levels, but their spatial correlation is very low. The fractional polarization at 150 MHz, expressed as a percentage of the total intensity, amounts to ≈1.5%. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies Conclusions: The wide frequency range, high angular resolution, and high sensitivity make LOFAR an exquisite instrument for studying Galactic polarized emission at a resolution of ~1-2 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The different polarized patterns observed at 150 MHz and 350 MHz are consistent with different source distributions along the line of sight wring in a variety of Faraday thin regions of emission. The presence of polarized foregrounds is a serious complication for epoch of reionization experiments. To avoid the leakage of polarized emission into total intensity, which can depend on frequency, we need to calibrate the instrumental polarization across the field of view to a small fraction of 1%.

  5. Superconducting dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Harko, Tiberiu

    2015-04-01

    Based on the analogy with superconductor physics we consider a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy action is described by a gauge invariant electromagnetic type functional. By assuming that the ground state of the dark energy is in a form of a condensate with the U(1) symmetry spontaneously broken, the gauge invariant electromagnetic dark energy can be described in terms of the combination of a vector and of a scalar field (corresponding to the Goldstone boson), respectively. The gravitational field equations are obtained by also assuming the possibility of a nonminimal coupling between the cosmological mass current and the superconducting dark energy. The cosmological implications of the dark energy model are investigated for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker homogeneous and isotropic geometry for two particular choices of the electromagnetic type potential, corresponding to a pure electric type field, and to a pure magnetic field, respectively. The time evolutions of the scale factor, matter energy density and deceleration parameter are obtained for both cases, and it is shown that in the presence of the superconducting dark energy the Universe ends its evolution in an exponentially accelerating vacuum de Sitter state. By using the formalism of the irreversible thermodynamic processes for open systems we interpret the generalized conservation equations in the superconducting dark energy model as describing matter creation. The particle production rates, the creation pressure and the entropy evolution are explicitly obtained.

  6. Exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-09-15

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass {approx}few GeV and splittings {approx}5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  7. Alternative to particle dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on nonlinear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on nonlinear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultralow accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is 12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on nonlinear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

  8. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  9. Toxicity evaluation of pH dependent stable Achyranthes aspera herbal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Alok; Kumari, Sarika; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have gained substantial attention for the control of various diseases. However, any adverse effect of herbal gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) on animals including human being has not been investigated in details. The objectives of current study are to assess the cytotoxicity of HGNPs synthesized by using leaf extract of Achyranthes aspera, and long epoch stability. The protocol deals with stability of HGNPs in pH dependent manner. Visually, HGNPs formation is characterized by colour change of extract from dark brown to dark purple after adding gold chloride solution (1 mM). The 100 μg/ml HGNPs concentration has been found nontoxic to the cultured spleenocyte cells. Spectrophotometric analysis of nanoparticles solution gave a peak at 540 nm which corresponds to surface plasmon resonance absorption band. As per scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), size of HGNPs are in the range of 50-80 nm (average size 70 nm) with spherical morphology. TEM-selected area electron diffraction observation showed hexagonal texture. HGNPs showed substantial stability at higher temperature (85 °C), pH 10 and salt concentration (5 M). The zeta potential value of HGNPs is -35.9 mV at temperature 25 °C, pH 10 showing its good quality with better stability in comparison to pH 6 and pH 7. The findings advocate that the protocol for the synthesis of HGNPs is easy and quick with good quality and long epoch stability at pH 10. Moreover, non-toxic dose could be widely applicable for human health as a potential nano-medicine in the future to cure diseases.

  10. DARK SECTOR COUPLING BENDS THE SUPERCLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-01

    Galaxy clusters exhibit a noticeably anisotropic pattern in their clustering, which is vividly manifested by the presence of rich filament-like superclusters. The more anisotropic the clustering of galaxy clusters is, the more straight the rich filament-like superclusters become. Given that the degree of the anisotropy in the largest-scale clustering depends sensitively on the nature of dark energy, the supercluster straightness may play a complimentary role in testing dynamic dark energy models. Here, we focus on the coupled dark energy (cDE) models which assume the existence of dark sector coupling between scalar field dark energy and nonbaryonic dark matter. By determining the spines of the superclusters identified in the publicly available group catalogs from the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations for four different cDE models as well as for the ΛCDM model, we quantify the straightness of each supercluster as the spatial extent of its spine per member cluster, where a supercluster spine represents the main stem of the minimal spanning tree constructed out of the member clusters. It is shown that the dark sector coupling plays a role in making the supercluster less straight relative to the ΛCDM case and that in a cDE model with supergravity potential the superclusters are least straight. We also find that the difference in the degree of the supercluster straightness between the cDE and the ΛCDM cases increases with redshift. A physical interpretation of our result as well as its cosmological implication are discussed.

  11. Chilly dark sectors and asymmetric reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adshead, Peter; Cui, Yanou; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-06-01

    In a broad class of theories, the relic abundance of dark matter is determined by interactions internal to a thermalized dark sector, with no direct involvement of the Standard Model (SM). We point out that these theories raise an immediate cosmological question: how was the dark sector initially populated in the early universe? Motivated in part by the difficulty of accommodating large amounts of entropy carried in dark radiation with cosmic microwave background measurements of the effective number of relativistic species at recombination, N eff , we aim to establish which admissible cosmological histories can populate a thermal dark sector that never reaches thermal equilibrium with the SM. The minimal cosmological origin for such a dark sector is asymmetric reheating, when the same mechanism that populates the SM in the early universe also populates the dark sector at a lower temperature. Here we demonstrate that the resulting inevitable inflaton-mediated scattering between the dark sector and the SM can wash out a would-be temperature asymmetry, and establish the regions of parameter space where temperature asymmetries can be generated in minimal reheating scenarios. Thus obtaining a temperature asymmetry of a given size either restricts possible inflaton masses and couplings or necessitates a non-minimal cosmology for one or both sectors. As a side benefit, we develop techniques for evaluating collision terms in the relativistic Boltzmann equation when the full dependence on Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac phase space distributions must be retained, and present several new results on relativistic thermal averages in an appendix.

  12. Simulations of quintessential cold dark matter: beyond the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, E.; Baugh, C. M.; Angulo, R. E.; Pascoli, S.

    2010-02-01

    We study the non-linear growth of cosmic structure in different dark energy models, using large volume N-body simulations. We consider a range of quintessence models which feature both rapidly and slowly varying dark energy equations of state, and compare the growth of structure to that in a universe with a cosmological constant. We use a four-parameter equation of state for the dark energy which accurately reproduces the quintessence dynamics over a wide range of redshifts. The adoption of a quintessence model changes the expansion history of the universe, the form of the linear theory power spectrum and can alter key observables, such as the horizon scale and the distance to last scattering. We incorporate these effects into our simulations in stages to isolate the impact of each on the growth of structure. The difference in structure formation can be explained to first order by the difference in growth factor at a given epoch; this scaling also accounts for the non-linear growth at the 15 per cent level. We find that quintessence models that are different from Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) both today and at high redshifts (z ~ 1000), and which feature late (z < 2), rapid transitions in the equation of state, can have identical baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak positions to those in ΛCDM. We find that these models have higher abundances of dark matter haloes at z > 0 compared to ΛCDM and so measurements of the mass function should allow us to distinguish these quintessence models from a cosmological constant. However, we find that a second class of quintessence models, whose equation of state makes an early (z > 2) rapid transition to w = -1, cannot be distinguished from ΛCDM using measurements of the mass function or the BAO, even if these models have non-negligible amounts of dark energy at early times.

  13. Testing dark matter clustering with redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2013-04-01

    The growth rate of large scale structure can probe whether dark matter clusters at gravitational strength or deviates from this, e.g. due to self interactions. Measurement of the growth rate through redshift space distortions in galaxy redshift surveys constrains the clustering strength, and its redshift dependence. We compare such effects on growth to those from high redshift deviations (e.g. early dark energy) or modified gravity, and give a simple, highly accurate analytic prescription. Current observations can constrain the dark matter clustering strength to F{sub cl} = 0.99±0.02 of standard, if all other parameters are held fixed, but substantial covariances exist. Future galaxy redshift surveys may constrain an evolving clustering strength to 28%, marginalizing over the other parameters, or 4% if the dark energy parameters are held fixed while fitting for dark matter growth. Tighter constraints on the nature of dark matter could be obtained by combining cosmological and astrophysical probes.

  14. Constraining Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

    This thesis addresses astrophysical probes to constrain dark matter (DM) and dark energy models. Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain one of the few DM candidates within the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This thesis presents a new probe of this PBH DM, using the microlensing of the source stars monitored by the already existing Kepler satellite. With its photometric precision and the large projected cross section of the nearby stars, it is found that previous constraints on PBH DM could theoretically be extended by two orders of magnitude. Correcting a well-known microlensing formula, a limb-darkening analysis is included, and a new approximation is calculated for future star selection. A preliminary prediction is calculated for the planned Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope. A preliminary study of the first two years of publicly available Kepler data is presented. The investigation yields many new sources of background error not predicted in the theoretical calculations, such as stellar flares and comets in the field of view. Since no PBH candidates are detected, an efficiency of detection is therefore calculated by running a Monte Carlo with fake limb-darkened finite-source microlensing events. It is found that with just the first 8 quarters of data, a full order of magnitude of the PBH mass range can be already constrained. Finally, one of the astrophysical probes of dark energy is also addressed - specifically, the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurement in the gas distribution, as detected in quasar absorption lines. This unique measurement of dark energy at intermediate redshifts is being measured by current telescope surveys. The last part of this thesis therefore focuses on understanding the systematic effects in such a detection. Since the bias between the underlying dark matter distribution and the measured gas flux distribution is based on gas physics, hydrodynamic simulations are used to understand the evolution of neutral hydrogen over

  15. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  16. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  17. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  18. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model. PMID:26849584

  19. Is dark energy evolving?

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay E-mail: sanjay.jhingan@gmail.com

    2013-02-01

    We look for evidence for the evolution in dark energy density by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Distance redshift data from supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) along with WMAP7 distance priors are used to put constraints on curvature parameter Ω{sub k} and dark energy parameters. The data sets are consistent with a flat Universe. The constraints on the dark energy evolution parameters obtained from supernovae (including CMB distance priors) are consistent with a flat ΛCDM Universe. On the other hand, in the parameter estimates obtained from the addition of BAO data the second principal component, which characterize a non-constant contribution from dark energy, is non-zero at 1σ. This could be a systematic effect and future BAO data holds key to making more robust claims.

  20. Xenophobic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason; Sanford, David

    2013-07-01

    We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fn/fp≈-0.64, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.

  1. Colloquium: Annual modulation of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Lisanti, Mariangela; Savage, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Direct detection experiments, which are designed to detect the scattering of dark matter off nuclei in detectors, are a critical component in the search for the Universe’s missing matter. This Colloquium begins with a review of the physics of direct detection of dark matter, discussing the roles of both the particle physics and astrophysics in the expected signals. The count rate in these experiments should experience an annual modulation due to the relative motion of the Earth around the Sun. This modulation, not present for most known background sources, is critical for solidifying the origin of a potential signal as dark matter. The focus is on the physics of annual modulation, discussing the practical formulas needed to interpret a modulating signal. The dependence of the modulation spectrum on the particle and astrophysics models for the dark matter is illustrated. For standard assumptions, the count rate has a cosine dependence with time, with a maximum in June and a minimum in December. Well-motivated generalizations of these models, however, can affect both the phase and amplitude of the modulation. Shown is how a measurement of an annually modulating signal could teach us about the presence of substructure in the galactic halo or about the interactions between dark and baryonic matter. Although primarily a theoretical review, the current experimental situation for annual modulation and future experimental directions is briefly discussed.

  2. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Redox transformations involving electron transfer from natural organic matter (NOM) are important for the mercury (Hg) biogeochemical cycle. In the water column light drives the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), whereas in soils and sediments dark reduction of Hg(II) is of greater importance. The object...

  3. Imprints of dark energy on cosmic structure formation - I. Realistic quintessence models and the non-linear matter power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimi, J.-M.; Füzfa, A.; Boucher, V.; Rasera, Y.; Courtin, J.; Corasaniti, P.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Quintessence has been proposed to account for dark energy (DE) in the Universe. This component causes a typical modification of the background cosmic expansion, which, in addition to its clustering properties, can leave a potentially distinctive signature on large-scale structures. Many previous studies have investigated this topic, particularly in relation to the non-linear regime of structure formation. However, no careful pre-selection of viable quintessence models with high precision cosmological data was performed. Here we show that this has led to a misinterpretation (and underestimation) of the imprint of quintessence on the distribution of large-scale structures. To this purpose, we perform a likelihood analysis of the combined Supernova Ia UNION data set and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-yr data to identify realistic quintessence models. These are specified by different model parameter values, but still statistically indistinguishable from the vanilla Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM). Differences are especially manifest in the predicted amplitude and shape of the linear matter power spectrum though these remain within the uncertainties of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. We use these models as a benchmark for studying the clustering properties of dark matter haloes by performing a series of high-resolution N-body simulations. In this first paper, we specifically focus on the non-linear matter power spectrum. We find that realistic quintessence models allow for relevant differences of the dark matter distribution with respect to the ΛCDM scenario well into the non-linear regime, with deviations of up to 40 per cent in the non-linear power spectrum. Such differences are shown to depend on the nature of DE, as well as the scale and epoch considered. At small scales (k ~ 1-5hMpc-1, depending on the redshift), the structure formation process is about 20 per cent more efficient than in ΛCDM. We show that these imprints are a specific record of the cosmic

  4. The Local Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Helfer, H.L.

    2005-10-21

    The observations of the extended rotation curves of some galaxies provide important constraints upon the nature of the local dark matter present in the halos of these galaxies. Using these constraints, one can show that the halo dark matter cannot be some population of conventional astronomical objects and (most probably) cannot be a population of exotic non-interacting particles. We suggest that the halos can be regarded as large spatial fluctuations in a classic scalar field.

  5. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10-3- 1 fb range.

  6. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  7. Simulations: The dark side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics methods. Both methods are, in principle, simple. However, simple does not mean risk-free. In the literature, many of the pitfalls in the field are mentioned, but usually as a footnote --and these footnotes are scattered over many papers. The present paper focuses on the "dark side" of simulation: it is one big footnote. I should stress that "dark", in this context, has no negative moral implication. It just means: under-exposed.

  8. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  9. New Efforts to Identify Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    among them.In the early universe, small density perturbations on sub-galactic scales produce dwarf galaxies in the lambda-CDM model. But in the warm dark matter model, the longer free streaming length of the dark matter particles smooth out some of those small perturbations. This results in the formation of fewer dwarf galaxies which fits better with our current observations.Limits on Warm Dark MatterSo how can we test this alternative model? The maximum number density of dark-matter halos predicted by the warm dark matter model at a given redshift depends on the mass of the candidate dark matter particle: a larger particle mass means that more halos form. We therefore can set lower limits on the mass of dark matter particles in a two-step process:Calculate the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted by models, andCompare this to the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies at a given redshift.Another way of looking at it: for different values of the dark matter particle mass mX, this shows the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted at z = 6. The shaded areas represent the observed number density of faint galaxies at different confidence levels. [Menci et al. 2016]Recently, unprecedented new Hubble observations of ultra-faint, lensed galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields at z~6 have allowed for the discovery of more faint galaxies at this redshift than ever before. Now, a team of scientists led by Nicola Menci (INAF Rome) have used these observations to set a new limit on the lowest mass that candidate dark matter particles can have.Menci and collaborators find that these new observations constrain the particle masses to be above 2.9 keV at the 1 confidence level. These constitute the tightest constraints on the mass of candidate warm dark matter particles derived to date, and they even allow us to rule out some production mechanisms for theorized particles.Extending this analysis to other clusters with deep observations will only

  10. New Efforts to Identify Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    among them.In the early universe, small density perturbations on sub-galactic scales produce dwarf galaxies in the lambda-CDM model. But in the warm dark matter model, the longer free streaming length of the dark matter particles smooth out some of those small perturbations. This results in the formation of fewer dwarf galaxies which fits better with our current observations.Limits on Warm Dark MatterSo how can we test this alternative model? The maximum number density of dark-matter halos predicted by the warm dark matter model at a given redshift depends on the mass of the candidate dark matter particle: a larger particle mass means that more halos form. We therefore can set lower limits on the mass of dark matter particles in a two-step process:Calculate the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted by models, andCompare this to the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies at a given redshift.Another way of looking at it: for different values of the dark matter particle mass mX, this shows the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted at z = 6. The shaded areas represent the observed number density of faint galaxies at different confidence levels. [Menci et al. 2016]Recently, unprecedented new Hubble observations of ultra-faint, lensed galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields at z~6 have allowed for the discovery of more faint galaxies at this redshift than ever before. Now, a team of scientists led by Nicola Menci (INAF Rome) have used these observations to set a new limit on the lowest mass that candidate dark matter particles can have.Menci and collaborators find that these new observations constrain the particle masses to be above 2.9 keV at the 1 confidence level. These constitute the tightest constraints on the mass of candidate warm dark matter particles derived to date, and they even allow us to rule out some production mechanisms for theorized particles.Extending this analysis to other clusters with deep observations will only

  11. Dark matter: theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M S

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the "standard model" of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for "new physics." The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10(-6)-10(-4) eV), a light neutrino (20-90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV-2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. PMID:11607395

  12. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  13. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  14. Quirky composite dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Terning, John; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a new dark matter candidate, “quirky dark matter,” that is a scalar baryonic bound state of a new non-Abelian force that becomes strong below the electroweak scale. The bound state is made of chiral quirks: new fermions that transform under both the new strong force as well as in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, acquiring mass from the Higgs mechanism. Electric charge neutrality of the lightest baryon requires approximately degenerate quirk masses which also causes the charge radius of the bound state to be negligible. The abundance is determined by an asymmetry that is linked to the baryon and lepton numbers of the universe through electroweak sphalerons. Dark matter elastic scattering with nuclei proceeds through Higgs exchange as well as an electromagnetic polarizability operator which is just now being tested in direct detection experiments. A novel method to search for quirky dark matter is to look for a gamma-ray “dark line” spectroscopic feature in galaxy clusters that result from the quirky Lyman-alpha or quirky hyperfine transitions. Colliders are expected to dominantly produce quirky mesons, not quirky baryons, consequently large missing energy is not the primary collider signal of the physics associated with quirky dark matter.

  15. Accretions of dark matter and dark energy onto (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Ujjal

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

  16. The impact of the phase-space density on the indirect detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Francesc; Hunter, Daniel R.

    2013-09-01

    We study the indirect detection of dark matter when the local dark matter velocity distribution depends upon position, as expected for the Milky Way and its dwarf spheroidal satellites, and the annihilation cross-section is not purely s-wave. Using a phase-space distribution consistent with the dark matter density profile, we present estimates of cosmic and gamma-ray fluxes from dark matter annihilations. The expectations for the indirect detection of dark matter can differ significantly from the usual calculation that assumes that the velocity of the dark matter particles follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution.

  17. Dark Energy and Dark Matter in Some Cosmological Models (as remnants of visible universe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    2016-07-01

    Homogeneity and isotropy distribution of matter, have been considered in most of cosmological models. The formation possibility of clusters of galaxies in some stable models, have been studied. In the present work we are going to consider the dark energy and dark matter as the rest of the visible universe. The self-consistent model formulated in the context of the Generalized Field Theory , the standard model built in the General Theory of Relativity, and Saez and de Juan model constructed in the background of Møller Tetrad Theory of gravitation have been used. It is found these the dark matter and dark energy is related to a parameter ɛ. This parameter depends on the used model and availability of formation of condensations in it.

  18. Lattice calculation of composite dark matter form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Cheng, M.; Cohen, S. D.; Fleming, G. T.; Kiskis, J.; Lin, M. F.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Voronov, G.; Vranas, P.; Wasem, J.

    2013-07-01

    Composite dark matter candidates, which can arise from new strongly-coupled sectors, are well-motivated and phenomenologically interesting, particularly in the context of asymmetric generation of the relic density. In this work, we employ lattice calculations to study the electromagnetic form factors of electroweak-neutral dark-matter baryons for a three-color, QCD-like theory with Nf=2 and 6 degenerate fermions in the fundamental representation. We calculate the (connected) charge radius and anomalous magnetic moment, both of which can play a significant role for direct detection of composite dark matter. We find minimal Nf dependence in these quantities. We generate mass-dependent cross sections for dark matter-nucleon interactions and use them in conjunction with experimental results from XENON100, excluding dark matter candidates of this type with masses below 10 TeV.

  19. Confrontation of top-hat spherical collapse against dark halos from cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Daichi; Kitayama, Tetsu; Osato, Ken; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    The top-hat spherical collapse model (TSC) is one of the most fundamental analytical frameworks to describe the non-linear growth of cosmic structure. TSC has motivated, and been widely applied in, various investigations even in the current era of precision cosmology. While numerous studies exist to examine its validity against numerical simulations in a statistical fashion, there are few analyses which compare the TSC dynamics in an individual object-wise basis, which is what we attempt in the present paper. We extract 100 halos at z = 0 from a cosmological N-body simulation according to the conventional TSC criterion for the spherical over-density. Then we trace back their spherical counterparts at earlier epochs. Just prior to the turn-around epoch of the halos, their dynamics are well approximated by TSC, but their turn-around epochs are systematically delayed and the virial radii are larger by ˜20% on average relative to the TSC predictions. We find that this systematic deviation can mainly be ascribed to the non-uniformity/inhomogeneity of dark matter density profiles and the non-zero velocity dispersions, both of which are neglected in TSC. In particular, the inside-out collapse and shell-crossing of dark matter halos play an important role in generating the significant velocity dispersion. The implications of the present result are briefly discussed.

  20. Constraining the Evolution of the Ionizing Background and the Epoch of Reionization with z~6 Quasars II: A Sample of 19 Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Becker, R H; White, R L; Gunn, J E; Knapp, G R; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Brinkmann, J; Fukugita, M

    2006-01-05

    We study the evolution of the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the end of the reionization epoch using moderate resolution spectra of a sample of nineteen quasars at 5.74 < z{sub em} < 6.42 discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Three methods are used to trace IGM properties: (a) the evolution of the Gunn-Peterson (GP) optical depth in the Ly{alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} transitions; (b) the distribution of lengths of dark absorption gaps, and (c) the size of HII regions around luminous quasars. Using this large sample, we find that the evolution of the ionization state of the IGM accelerated at z > 5.7: the GP optical depth evolution changes from {tau}{sub GP}{sup eff} {approx} (1 + z){sup 4.3} to (1 + z){sup {approx}> 11}, and the average length of dark gaps with {tau} > 3.5 increases from < 10 to > 80 comoving Mpc. The dispersion of IGM properties along different lines of sight also increases rapidly, implying fluctuations by a factor of {approx}> 4 in the UV background at z > 6, when the mean free path of UV photons is comparable to the correlation length of the star forming galaxies that are thought to have caused reionization. The mean length of dark gaps shows the most dramatic increase at z {approx} 6, as well as the largest line-of-sight variations. We suggest using dark gap statistics as a powerful probe of the ionization state of the IGM at yet higher redshift. The sizes of HII regions around luminous quasars decrease rapidly towards higher redshift, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the IGM has increased by a factor of {approx}> 10 from z = 5.7 to 6.4, consistent with the value derived from the GP optical depth. The mass-averaged neutral fraction is 1-4% at z {approx} 6.2 based on the GP optical depth and HII region size measurements. The observations suggest that z {approx} 6 is the end of the overlapping stage of reionization, and are inconsistent with a mostly neutral IGM at z {approx} 6, as indicated by the finite

  1. Topics in cosmology: Structure formation, dark energy and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar

    density. As first approximation, voids can be considered to be ellipsoids whose axis ratio evolution depends on the cosmological parameters. This, together with the fact that the initial distribution of the axis ratios is known (because the intial density field is Gaussian) can be used to infer the equation of state of the dark energy statistically from the observation of voids at different redshifts and with different sizes. The standard method of Fisher matrices is then used to forecast how well a future survey can measure the equation of state. We find promising results with constraints coming from void ellipticity measurements comparable to those of other standard methods. Chapter (4) goes farther back in the history of the Universe. During the recombination era, when the Universe was around a thousandth of its present size, it became cool enough that free electrons got captured by free protons to make hydrogen atoms. Consequently, the Thompson scattering of photons off of free electrons dropped dramatically and the Universe became transparent to photon propagation. The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is a remnant from this epoch, consisting of photons last scattered off of a free electron. A wealth of information is contained in the statistical properties of the CMB field. However, in order to take full advantage of this probe one needs to know the recombination history, i.e. the evolution of the number density of free electrons as a function of time, to sub-percent level accuracy during this era. There are a plethora of phenomena, from radiative transfer effects to atomic and molecular ones, that have the potential to change the recombination history to this level. Our work was to calculate the effect that the formation of hydrogen molecules will have on the recombination history. Even though the abundance of hydrogen molecules is very small, they still have the potential to change the recombination history by reshuffling photons from the blue side of the Ly

  2. Directional dark matter searches with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, L. M.; Cavoto, G.; Mazzilli, D.; Polosa, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    A new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection might come from the use of large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes. We calculate the expected rate of carbon ions channeled in single-wall nanotubes once extracted by the scattering with a massive dark matter particle. Depending on its initial kinematic conditions, the ejected carbon ion may be channeled in the nanotube array or stop in the bulk. The orientation of the array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability. This provides the required anisotropic response for a directional detector.

  3. Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

  4. The Effects of Polarized Foregrounds on 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Power Spectrum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David F.; Aguirre, James E.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Pober, Jonathan C.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments aimed at detecting highly-redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) are plagued by the contamination of foreground emission. A potentially important source of contaminating foregrounds may be Faraday-rotated, polarized emission, which leaks into the estimate of the intrinsically unpolarized EoR signal. While these foregrounds' intrinsic polarization may not be problematic, the spectral structure introduced by the Faraday rotation could be. To better understand and characterize these effects, we present a simulation of the polarized sky between 120 and 180 MHz. We compute a single visibility, and estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum from that visibility using the delay spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization as an example instrument, we show the expected leakage into the unpolarized power spectrum to be several orders of magnitude above the expected 21 cm EoR signal.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF POLARIZED FOREGROUNDS ON 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION POWER SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David F.; Aguirre, James E.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Jacobs, Daniel C.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments aimed at detecting highly-redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) are plagued by the contamination of foreground emission. A potentially important source of contaminating foregrounds may be Faraday-rotated, polarized emission, which leaks into the estimate of the intrinsically unpolarized EoR signal. While these foregrounds' intrinsic polarization may not be problematic, the spectral structure introduced by the Faraday rotation could be. To better understand and characterize these effects, we present a simulation of the polarized sky between 120 and 180 MHz. We compute a single visibility, and estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum from that visibility using the delay spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization as an example instrument, we show the expected leakage into the unpolarized power spectrum to be several orders of magnitude above the expected 21 cm EoR signal.

  6. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  7. Dark energy with non-adiabatic sound speed: initial conditions and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2010-10-01

    Assuming that the universe contains a dark energy fluid with a constant linear equation of state and a constant sound speed, we study the prospects of detecting dark energy perturbations using CMB data from Planck, cross-correlated with galaxy distribution maps from a survey like LSST. We update previous estimates by carrying a full exploration of the mock data likelihood for key fiducial models. We find that it will only be possible to exclude values of the sound speed very close to zero, while Planck data alone is not powerful enough for achieving any detection, even with lensing extraction. We also discuss the issue of initial conditions for dark energy perturbations in the radiation and matter epochs, generalizing the usual adiabatic conditions to include the sound speed effect. However, for most purposes, the existence of attractor solutions renders the perturbation evolution nearly independent of these initial conditions.

  8. Dark matter as a ghost free conformal extension of Einstein theory

    SciTech Connect

    Barvinsky, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss ghost free models of the recently suggested mimetic dark matter theory. This theory is shown to be a conformal extension of Einstein general relativity. Dark matter originates from gauging out its local Weyl invariance as an extra degree of freedom which describes a potential flow of the pressureless perfect fluid. For a positive energy density of this fluid the theory is free of ghost instabilities, which gives strong preference to stable configurations with a positive scalar curvature and trace of the matter stress tensor. Instabilities caused by caustics of the geodesic flow, inherent in this model, serve as a motivation for an alternative conformal extension of Einstein theory, based on the generalized Proca vector field. A potential part of this field modifies the inflationary stage in cosmology, whereas its rotational part at the post inflationary epoch might simulate rotating flows of dark matter.

  9. The formation and evolution of dark matter halos early in cosmic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    Observational evidence points to the formation of super-massive black holes, heavy elements and halo structure much earlier in cosmic history than expected [1], and this is challenging for Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory. However, if photon scattering cross sections were less than expected it becomes possible for halos to form at earlier times and relax the tensions that exist with LCDM theory. This may indeed be the case: it has recently been shown [2,3] that photon-particle scattering cross sections vary significantly with the eigenspectral distribution of the scattering particle in deep gravity wells, an effect that depends on the degree of localization of the particle wavefunction and the proximity of the halo to thermal equilibrium. Cross sections tend to be lower the larger and deeper the gravitational well. This purely quantum effect means that accepted cross sections, as measured on Earth and used to determine the rate and timing of halo formation, may not be applicable to deep gravity wells, not only at the present epoch but throughout cosmic history.By combining reduced photon scattering cross sections with Carr’s primordial black hole mass spectrum formulation[4] calculated at the last phase transition (t = 1 s), it is possible to provide a scenario of halo formation that enables galaxies and halos to form much earlier in cosmic history, yet maintain consistency with cosmic microwave background observations and primordial nucleosynthesis. In addition this scenario provides a unified model relating globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges, enables an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, and enables prediction of dark to visible matter, based on the physical parameters of a halo. This scenario will be presented and discussed.[1] Xue-Bing Wu et al, 2015, Nature, 518,512-515 doi: 10.1038/nature14241[2] Ernest A. D., 2009, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 115207, 115208[3] Ernest A. D, 2012, in Advances in

  10. Dark Energy Found Stifling Growth in Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    WASHINGTON -- For the first time, astronomers have clearly seen the effects of "dark energy" on the most massive collapsed objects in the universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By tracking how dark energy has stifled the growth of galaxy clusters and combining this with previous studies, scientists have obtained the best clues yet about what dark energy is and what the destiny of the universe could be. This work, which took years to complete, is separate from other methods of dark energy research such as supernovas. These new X-ray results provide a crucial independent test of dark energy, long sought by scientists, which depends on how gravity competes with accelerated expansion in the growth of cosmic structures. Techniques based on distance measurements, such as supernova work, do not have this special sensitivity. Scientists think dark energy is a form of repulsive gravity that now dominates the universe, although they have no clear picture of what it actually is. Understanding the nature of dark energy is one of the biggest problems in science. Possibilities include the cosmological constant, which is equivalent to the energy of empty space. Other possibilities include a modification in general relativity on the largest scales, or a more general physical field. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space To help decide between these options, a new way of looking at dark energy is required. It is accomplished by observing how cosmic acceleration affects the growth of galaxy clusters over time. "This result could be described as 'arrested development of the universe'," said Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., who led the research. "Whatever is forcing the expansion of the universe to speed up is also forcing its

  11. Observations and Analysis of Three Field RR Lyrae Stars Selected Using Single-epoch SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, W. L., Jr.; Jameson, S. N.; De lee, N.; Wilhelm, R. J.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of our Johnson B and V observations of three RR Lyrae candidate stars that we identified as likely variable stars using SDSS data. The stars were selected based upon a single epoch of photometry and spectroscopy. The stars were observed at McDonald Observatory to obtain full light curves. We present full light curves, measured periods, and amplitudes, as well as the results of our Fourier analysis of the light curves.

  12. Galaxy formation in warm dark matter cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Fiore, F.; Lamastra, A.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate for the first time the effects of a warm dark matter (WDM) power spectrum on the statistical properties of galaxies using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The WDM spectrum we adopt as a reference case is suppressed - compared to the standard cold dark matter (CDM) case - below a cut-off scale ≈1 Mpc corresponding (for thermal relic WDM particles) to a mass mX= 0.75 keV. This ensures consistency with present bounds provided by the microwave background Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and by the comparison of hydrodynamical N-body simulations with observed Lyman-α forest. We run our fiducial semi-analytic model with such a WDM spectrum to derive galaxy luminosity functions (in B, UV and K bands) and the stellar mass distributions over a wide range of cosmic epochs, to compare with recent observations and with the results in the CDM case. The predicted colour distribution of galaxies in the WDM model is also checked against the data. When compared with the standard CDM case, the luminosity and stellar mass distributions we obtain assuming a WDM spectrum are characterized by (i) flattening of the faint-end slope and (ii) sharpening of the cut-off at the bright end for z≲ 0.8. We discuss how the former result is directly related to the smaller number of low-mass haloes collapsing in the WDM scenario, while the latter is related to the smaller number of satellite galaxies accumulating in massive haloes at a low redshift, thus suppressing the accretion of small lumps on the central, massive galaxies. These results shows how adopting a WDM power spectrum may contribute to solving two major problems of CDM galaxy formation scenarios, namely, the excess of predicted faint (low-mass) galaxies at low and - most of all - high redshifts, and the excess of bright (massive) galaxies at low redshifts.

  13. The Time Evolution of HH 1 from Four Epochs of HST Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Reipurth, B.; Esquivel, A.; Bally, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analysis of four epochs of Hα and [S ii] λλ 6716/6731 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of HH 1. For determining proper motions, we explore a new method based on the analysis of spatially degraded images obtained convolving the images with wavelet functions of chosen widths. With this procedure, we are able to generate maps of proper motion velocities along and across the outflow axis, as well as (angularly integrated) proper motion velocity distributions. From the four available epochs, we find the time evolution of the velocities, intensities, and spatial distribution of the line emission. We find that over the last two decades HH 1 shows a clear acceleration. Also, the Hα and [S ii] intensities first dropped and then recovered in the more recent (2014) images. Finally, we show a comparison between the two available HST epochs of [O iii] λ 5007 (1994 and 2014), in which we see a clear drop in the value of the [O iii]/Hα ratio.

  14. Fossil wood from the Miocene and Oligocene epoch: chemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Michel; Pournou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Fossil wood is the naturally preserved remain of the secondary xylem of plants that lived before the Holocene epoch. Typically, fossil wood is preserved as coalified or petrified and rarely as mummified tissue. The process of fossilization is very complex and it is still unknown why in the same fossil record, wood can be found in different fossilisation forms. In 2007, a fossil forest was found in the Bükkábrány open-pit coal mine in Hungary. The non-petrified forest is estimated to be 7 million years old (Miocene epoch) and its trees were found standing in an upright position. This fossil assemblage is exceptionally rare because wood has been preserved as soft waterlogged tissue. This study aimed to investigate this remarkable way of fossil wood preservation, by examining its chemistry with (13)C CPMAS NMR and its morphology with light and electron microscopy. For comparison reasons, a petrified wood trunk from the Oligocene epoch (30 Myr) found in 2001 at Porrentruy region in Switzerland and two fresh wood samples of the modern equivalents of the Miocene sample were also examined. The results obtained showed that the outstanding preservation state of the Miocene fossil is not owed to petrification or coalification. Mummification is a potential mechanism that could explain Bükkábrány trunks' condition, however this fossilisation process is not well studied and therefore this hypothesis needs to be further investigated. PMID:25294390

  15. Levitating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  16. Levitating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  17. Vectorlike sneutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) extended with one vectorlike lepton doublet L -L ¯ and one right-handed neutrino N . The neutral vecotorlike sneutrino can be a candidate of dark matter. To avoid the interaction with the nucleons by exchanging a Z boson, the mass splitting between the real part and the imaginary part of the sneutrino field is needed. Compared with the MSSM sneutrino dark matter, the mass splitting between the vectorlike sneutrino field can be more naturally acquired without large A terms and constraints on the neutralino masses. We have also calculated the relic density and the elastic scattering cross sections with the nucleons in the cases that the dark matter particles coannihilate with or without the MSSM slepton doublets. The elastic scattering cross sections with the nucleons are well below the LUX bounds. In the case that the dark matter coannihilates with all the MSSM slepton doublets, the mass of the dark matter can be as light as 370 GeV.

  18. Making beam splitters with dark soliton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Steiglitz, Ken

    2010-10-15

    We show with numerical simulations that for certain simple choices of parameters, the waveguides induced by colliding dark solitons in a Kerr medium yield a complete family of beam splitters for trapped linear waves, ranging from total transmission to total deflection. The way energy is transferred from one waveguide to another is similar to that of a directional coupler, but no special fabrication is required. Dark soliton beam splitters offer potential advantages over their bright soliton counterparts: Their transfer characteristics do not depend on the relative phase or speed of the colliding solitons; dark solitons are generally more robust than bright solitons; and the probe peaks at nulls of the pump, enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio for probe detection. The last factor is especially important for possible application to quantum information processing.

  19. Acquired scaling relations in dark matter turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, Akika; Morikawa, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Variety of scaling relations are observed in astronomical objects. We study a consistent understanding of them from a simple proposal that the collision-less dark matter fluid terns into a turbulent state, i.e. cosmic dark turbulence. This happens most likely when the density fluctuations cross the caustic surface toward the non-linear regime. Collision-less dark turbulence may not be eddy-dominant. We first derive Kolmogorov scaling laws from the gravitational Navier-Stokes equation by the method similar to the case in Smoluchowski coagulation equation. Then we apply this to several observations such as the scale-dependent velocity dispersion, mass-luminosity ratio, magnetic fields, and mass-angular momentum relation, power spectrum of density fluctuations. They all conclude a single value for a constant energy flow per mass: 0.3cm2/sec3. This value may deeply related with the speed of the hierarchical coalescence process in the cosmic structure formation.

  20. Nucleon decay into a dark sector.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2015-02-01

    A sub-GeV dark sector fermion X can have baryon-number-violating interactions induced by high-scale physics, leading to nucleon decay into X+meson and neutron→X+photon. Such processes can mimic standard search modes containing a neutrino, but have different kinematics and may have escaped detection. If a dark force mediated by a light vector Z(d) acts on X, depending on parameters, neutron→X+Z(d) can be important. In typical scenarios, Z(d) decays into ℓ(+)ℓ(-), where ℓ=e,μ, with an order unity branching fraction. Nucleon decay searches can potentially uncover new dark states that are otherwise inaccessible, due to their negligible coupling to ordinary matter or cosmological abundance. PMID:25699434

  1. Analysis of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    Fitting the model ''A'' to dark matter direct detection data, when the model that underlies the data is ''B'', introduces a theoretical bias in the fit. We perform a quantitative study of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection, with a focus on assumptions regarding the dark matter interactions, and velocity distribution. We address this problem within the effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle. We analyze 24 benchmark points in the parameter space of the theory, using frequentist and Bayesian statistical methods. First, we simulate the data of future direct detection experiments assuming a momentum/velocity dependent dark matter-nucleon interaction, and an anisotropic dark matter velocity distribution. Then, we fit a constant scattering cross section, and an isotropic Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution to the simulated data, thereby introducing a bias in the analysis. The best fit values of the dark matter particle mass differ from their benchmark values up to 2 standard deviations. The best fit values of the dark matter-nucleon coupling constant differ from their benchmark values up to several standard deviations. We conclude that common assumptions in dark matter direct detection are a source of potentially significant bias.

  2. Dynamics of Dark-Fly Genome Under Environmental Selections

    PubMed Central

    Izutsu, Minako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu; Fuse, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Environmental adaptation is one of the most fundamental features of organisms. Modern genome science has identified some genes associated with adaptive traits of organisms, and has provided insights into environmental adaptation and evolution. However, how genes contribute to adaptive traits and how traits are selected under an environment in the course of evolution remain mostly unclear. To approach these issues, we utilize “Dark-fly”, a Drosophila melanogaster line maintained in constant dark conditions for more than 60 years. Our previous analysis identified 220,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Dark-fly genome, but did not clarify which SNPs of Dark-fly are truly adaptive for living in the dark. We found here that Dark-fly dominated over the wild-type fly in a mixed population under dark conditions, and based on this domination we designed an experiment for genome reselection to identify adaptive genes of Dark-fly. For this experiment, large mixed populations of Dark-fly and the wild-type fly were maintained in light conditions or in dark conditions, and the frequencies of Dark-fly SNPs were compared between these populations across the whole genome. We thereby detected condition-dependent selections toward approximately 6% of the genome. In addition, we observed the time-course trajectory of SNP frequency in the mixed populations through generations 0, 22, and 49, which resulted in notable categorization of the selected SNPs into three types with different combinations of positive and negative selections. Our data provided a list of about 100 strong candidate genes associated with the adaptive traits of Dark-fly. PMID:26637434

  3. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-01-01

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models, supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed, and several benchmarkmore » models are described. General features of nonrelativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.« less

  4. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-12

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed and several benchmark models are described. General features of non-relativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.

  5. Dark Energy. What the ...?

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, Risa

    2007-10-30

    What is the Universe made of? This question has been asked as long as humans have been questioning, and astronomers and physicists are finally converging on an answer. The picture which has emerged from numerous complementary observations over the past decade is a surprising one: most of the matter in the Universe isn't visible, and most of the Universe isn't even made of matter. In this talk, I will explain what the rest of this stuff, known as 'Dark Energy' is, how it is related to the so-called 'Dark Matter', how it impacts the evolution of the Universe, and how we can study the dark universe using observations of light from current and future telescopes.

  6. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.; Collaboration: ADMX Collaboration; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  7. Axion dark matter searches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axionsmore » at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.« less

  8. Dark matter candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The types of particles which may provide the nonluminous mass required by big-bang cosmological models are listed and briefly characterized. The observational evidence for the existence of dark matter (outweighing the luminous component by at least a factor of 10) is reviewed; the theoretical arguments favoring mainly nonbaryonic dark matter are summarized; and particular attention is given to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) remaining as relics from the early universe. The WIMPs are classified as thermal relics (heavy stable neutrinos and lighter neutralinos), asymmetric relics (including baryons), nonthermal relics (superheavy magnetic monopoles, axions, and soliton stars), and truly exotic relics (relativistic debris or vacuum energy). Explanations for the current apparent baryon/exotica ratio of about 0.1 in different theoretical scenarios are considered, and the problems of experimental and/or observational dark-matter detection are examined.

  9. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-09

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  10. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  11. Dark matter possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin

    2015-04-01

    In my research I observe signals that penetrate dense matter and I hypothesize that they are due to waves in dark matter. Since they readily penetrate thick matter I hypothesize that they are due to small dark matter particles instead of the usual hypothesized Wimps. For example I observed signals that penetrate my local hill at near 77 m/s. In addition the solar cycle appears to be due to to dark matter oscillating in the sun producing standing waves that have to due with planet placement and stability of the solar system. Dozens of experiments, over the past 20 years, confirm the penetrating waves. Examples of the experiments are presented on my website darkmatterwaves.com and US patent number 8,669,917 B1.

  12. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  13. Tunguska dark matter ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 antitop quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  14. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-12-05

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  15. Dark chocolate exacerbates acne.

    PubMed

    Vongraviopap, Saivaree; Asawanonda, Pravit

    2016-05-01

    The effects of chocolate on acne exacerbations have recently been reevaluated. For so many years, it was thought that it had no role in worsening acne. To investigate whether 99% dark chocolate, when consumed in regular daily amounts, would cause acne to worsen in acne-prone male subjects, twenty-five acne prone male subjects were asked to consume 25 g of 99% dark chocolate daily for 4 weeks. Assessments which included Leeds revised acne scores as well as lesion counts took place weekly. Food frequency questionnaire was used, and daily activities were recorded. Statistically significant changes of acne scores and numbers of comedones and inflammatory papules were detected as early as 2 weeks into the study. At 4 weeks, the changes remained statistically significant compared to baseline. Dark chocolate when consumed in normal amounts for 4 weeks can exacerbate acne in male subjects with acne-prone skin. PMID:26711092

  16. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Spyrou, N. K.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. In fact, polytropic processes in a DM fluid have been most successfully used in modeling dark galactic haloes, thus significantly improving the velocity dispersion profiles of galaxies. Motivated by such results, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluidlike properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, together with all the other physical characteristics, we also take the energy of this fluid's internal motions into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy, needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total energy density parameter is exactly unity. The polytropic cosmological model, depends on only one free parameter, the corresponding (polytropic) exponent, Γ. We find this model particularly interesting, because for Γ ≤ 0.541, without the need for either any exotic DE or the cosmological constant, the conventional pressure becomes negative enough so that the Universe accelerates its expansion at cosmological redshifts below a transition value. In fact, several physical reasons, e.g., the cosmological requirement for cold DM (CDM) and a positive velocity-of-sound square, impose further constraints on the value of Γ, which is eventually settled down to the range -0.089 < Γ ≤ 0. This cosmological model does not suffer either from the age problem or from the

  17. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  18. Dark-Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1. Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2. Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3. Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4. Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5. Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The presentation will provide an update, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  19. The First Billion Years project: the escape fraction of ionizing photons in the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Khochfar, Sadegh; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    Protogalaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionizing photons needed to reionize the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionizing photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form, by computing escape fractions in more than 75 000 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the First Billion Years project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the gas column density in a radius of 10 pc around the stellar populations, causing a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with M200 ≲ 108 M⊙ results in low column densities that can be penetrated by radiation from young stars (age <5 Myr). In haloes with M200 ≳ 108 M⊙ supernova feedback is important, but only ˜30 per cent of the haloes in this mass range have an escape fraction higher than 1 per cent. We find a large range of escape fractions in haloes with similar properties, caused by different distributions of the dense gas in the halo. This makes it very hard to predict the escape fraction on the basis of halo properties and results in a highly anisotropic escape fraction. The strong mass dependence, the large spread and the large anisotropy of the escape fraction may strongly affect the topology of reionization and is something current models of cosmic reionization should strive to take into account.

  20. Dark Energy and The Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Francesca

    2004-11-17

    Two mechanisms by which the quintessence scalar could enhance the relic abundance of dark matter particles are discussed. These effects can have an impact on supersymmetric candidates for dark matter.

  1. Voids of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourish; Maor, Irit

    2007-03-15

    We investigate the clustering properties of a dynamical dark energy component. In a cosmic mix of a pressureless fluid and a light scalar field, we follow the linear evolution of spherical matter perturbations. We find that the scalar field tends to form underdensities in response to the gravitationally collapsing matter. We thoroughly investigate these voids for a variety of initial conditions, explain the physics behind their formation, and consider possible observational implications. Detection of dark energy voids will clearly rule out the cosmological constant as the main source of the present acceleration.

  2. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  3. The Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, Brenna; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Dark Energy is the dominant constituent of the universe and they have little understanding of it. They describe a new project aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx} 5%, with four separate techniques. The survey will image 5000 deg{sup 2} in the southern sky and collect 300 million galaxies, 30,000 galaxy clusters, and 2000 Type Ia supernovae. The survey will be carried out using a new 3 deg{sup 2} mosaic camera mounted at the prime focus of the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO.

  4. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-15

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  5. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-01

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  6. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Vaishali Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-31

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  7. Models for SIMP dark matter and dark photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Min; Seo, Min-Seok

    2016-06-01

    We give a review on the SIMP paradigm and discuss a consistent model for SIMP dark mesons in the context of a dark QCD with flavor symmetry. The Z'-portal interaction is introduced being compatible with stable dark mesons and is responsible for making the SIMP dark mesons remain in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during the freeze-out process. The SIMP parameter space of the Z' gauge boson can be probed by future collider and direct detection experiments.

  8. Asymmetric dark matter annihilation as a test of non-standard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Rehagen, Thomas E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2013-08-01

    We show that the relic abundance of the minority component of asymmetric dark matter can be very sensitive to the expansion rate of the Universe and the temperature of transition between a non-standard pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmological phase and the standard radiation dominated phase, if chemical decoupling happens before this transition. In particular, because the annihilation cross section of asymmetric dark matter is typically larger than that of symmetric dark matter in the standard cosmology, the decrease in relic density of the minority component in non-standard cosmologies with respect to the majority component may be compensated by the increase in annihilation cross section, so that the annihilation rate at present of asymmetric dark matter, contrary to general belief, could be larger than that of symmetric dark matter in the standard cosmology. Thus, if the annihilation cross section of the asymmetric dark matter candidate is known, the annihilation rate at present, if detectable, could be used to test the Universe before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, an epoch from which we do not yet have any data.

  9. σCDM coupled to radiation: Dark energy and Universe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.; Müller, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the Chiral Cosmological Model (CCM) coupled to cold dark matter (CDM) has been investigated as σCDM model to study the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Dark sector fields (as Dark Energy content) coupled to cosmic dust were considered as the source of Einstein gravity in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Such model had a beginning at the matter-dominated era. The purposes of our present investigation are two-fold: To extend “life” of the σCDM for earlier times to radiation-dominated era and to take into account variation of the exponential potential V = V0exp -λ φ MP + V0exp -λ χ MP via variation of the interaction parameter λ. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to investigate possible values of initial conditions constrained by the measured amount of the dark matter, dark energy and radiation component today. Our analysis includes dark energy contribution to critical density, the ratio of the kinetic and potential energies, deceleration parameter, effective equation of state (EoS) and evolution of DE EoS with variation of coupling constant λ. A comparison with the ΛCDM model was performed. A new feature of the model is the existence of some values of potential coupling constant, leading to a σCDM solution without transition into accelerated expansion epoch.

  10. Dark matter from spacetime nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravani, Mehdi; Aslanbeigi, Siavash

    2015-11-01

    We propose that dark matter is not yet another new particle in nature, but that it is a remnant of quantum gravitational effects on known fields. We arrive at this possibility in an indirect and surprising manner: by considering retarded, nonlocal, and Lorentzian evolution for quantum fields. This is inspired by recent developments in causal set theory, where such an evolution shows up as the continuum limit of scalar field propagation on a background causal set. Concretely, we study the quantum theory of a massless scalar field whose evolution is given not by the the d'Alembertian □, but by an operator □˜ which is Lorentz invariant, reduces to □ at low energies, and defines an explicitly retarded evolution: (□˜ϕ )(x ) only depends on ϕ (y ), where y is in the causal past of x . This modification results in the existence of a continuum of massive particles, in addition to the usual massless ones, in the free theory. When interactions are introduced, these massive or off-shell quanta can be produced by the scattering of massless particles, but once produced, they no longer interact, which makes them a natural candidate for dark matter.

  11. The Search for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John

    2013-11-20

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  12. The Search for Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Orrell, John

    2014-07-24

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  13. Inflatable Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2015-07-30

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUT or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.

  14. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  15. Inflatable Dark Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUTmore » or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.« less

  16. Dark Barchan Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows north polar sand dunes in the summertime. During winter and early spring, north polar dunes are covered with bright frost. When the frost sublimes away, the dunes appear darker than their surroundings. To a geologist, sand has a very specific meaning. A sand grain is defined independently of its composition; it is a particle with a size between 62.5 and 2000 microns. Two thousand microns equals 2 millimeters. The dunes are dark because they are composed of sand grains made of dark minerals and/or rock fragments. Usually, dark grains indicate the presence of unoxidized iron, for example, the dark volcanic rocks of Hawaii, Iceland, and elsewhere. This dune field is located near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Dune slip faces indicate winds that blow from the upper left toward lower right. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  17. Inflatable dark matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel

    2016-01-22

    Here, we describe a general scenario, dubbed “inflatable dark matter,” in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levelsmore » without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.« less

  18. FOS Dark Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the instrumental background (dark) will be obtained as internal observations with the FOS. The exposures will be performed in pairs: the first of each pair with REJLIM set to default (no rejection) and the other with REJLIM set at a specified value. This will allow determination of pulse-height distribution of background particle-induced events.

  19. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature. The frequency has been reduced from bi-weekly to once every six weeks to stay within a reasonable orbit count.

  20. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature.

  1. Little Higgs dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Birkedal, Andreas; Noble, Andrew; Perelstein, Maxim; Spray, Andrew

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of T parity dramatically improves the consistency of little Higgs models with precision electroweak data, and renders the lightest T-odd particle (LTP) stable. In the littlest Higgs model with T parity, the LTP is typically the T-odd heavy photon, which is weakly interacting and can play the role of dark matter. We analyze the relic abundance of the heavy photon, including its coannihilations with other T-odd particles, and map out the regions of the parameter space where it can account for the observed dark matter. We evaluate the prospects for direct and indirect discovery of the heavy photon dark matter. The direct detection rates are quite low and a substantial improvement in experimental sensitivity would be required for observation. A substantial flux of energetic gamma rays is produced in the annihilation of the heavy photons in the galactic halo. This flux can be observed by the GLAST telescope, and, if the distribution of dark matter in the halo is favorable, by ground-based telescope arrays such as VERITAS and HESS.

  2. Dark matter on top

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, M.A.; Jackson, C.B.; Shaughnessy, G. E-mail: chris@uta.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider a simplified model of fermionic dark matter which couples exclusively to the right-handed top quark via a renormalizable interaction with a color-charged scalar. We first compute the relic abundance of this type of dark matter and investigate constraints placed on the model parameter space by the latest direct detection data. We also perform a detailed analysis for the production of dark matter at the LHC for this model. We find several kinematic variables that allow for a clean signal extraction and we show that the parameter space of this model will be well probed during LHC Run-II. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting this type of dark matter via its annihilations into gamma rays. We compute the continuum and the line emission (which includes a possible ''Higgs in Space!'' line) and its possible discovery by future gamma-ray telescopes. We find that the annihilation spectrum has distinctive features which may distinguish it from other models.

  3. Aging and dark adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G R; Owsley, C; McGwin, G

    1999-11-01

    Older adults have serious difficulty seeing under low illumination and at night, even in the absence of ocular disease. Optical changes in the aged eye, such as pupillary miosis and increased lens density, cannot account for the severity of this problem, and little is known about its neural basis. Dark adaptation functions were measured on 94 adults ranging in age from the 20s to the 80s to assess the rate of rod-mediated sensitivity recovery after exposure to a 98% bleach. Fundus photography and a grading scale were used to characterize macular health in subjects over age 49 in order to control for macular disease. Thresholds for each subject were corrected for lens density based on individual estimates, and pupil diameter was controlled. Results indicated that during human aging there is a dramatic slowing in rod-mediated dark adaptation that can be attributed to delayed rhodopsin regeneration. During the second component of the rod-mediated phase of dark adaptation, the rate of sensitivity recovery decreased 0.02 log unit/min per decade, and the time constant of rhodopsin regeneration increased 8.4 s/decade. The amount of time to reach within 0.3 log units of baseline scotopic sensitivity increased 2.76 min/decade. These aging-related changes in rod-mediated dark adaptation may contribute to night vision problems commonly experienced by the elderly. PMID:10748929

  4. Redshift-space distortion of the 21-cm background from the epoch of reionization - I. Methodology re-examined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Shapiro, Paul R.; Mellema, Garrelt; Iliev, Ilian T.; Koda, Jun; Ahn, Kyungjin

    2012-05-01

    The peculiar velocity of the intergalactic gas responsible for the cosmic 21-cm background from the epoch of reionization and beyond introduces an anisotropy in the three-dimensional power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations. Measurement of this anisotropy by future 21-cm surveys is a promising tool for separating cosmology from 21-cm astrophysics. However, previous attempts to model the signal have often neglected peculiar velocity or only approximated it crudely. This paper re-examines the effects of peculiar velocity on the 21-cm signal in detail, improving upon past treatment and addressing several issues for the first time. (1) We show that even the angle-averaged power spectrum, P(k), is affected significantly by the peculiar velocity. (2) We re-derive the brightness temperature dependence on atomic hydrogen density, spin temperature, peculiar velocity and its gradient and redshift to clarify the roles of thermal versus velocity broadening and finite optical depth. (3) We show that properly accounting for finite optical depth eliminates the unphysical divergence of the 21-cm brightness temperature in overdense regions of the intergalactic medium found by previous work that employed the usual optically thin approximation. (4) We find that the approximation made previously to circumvent the diverging brightness temperature problem by capping the velocity gradient can misestimate the power spectrum on all scales. (5) We further show that the observed power spectrum in redshift space remains finite even in the optically thin approximation if one properly accounts for the redshift-space distortion. However, results that take full account of finite optical depth show that this approximation is only accurate in the limit of high spin temperature. (6) We also show that the linear theory for redshift-space distortion widely employed to predict the 21-cm power spectrum results in a ˜30 per cent error in the observationally relevant wavenumber range k˜ 0

  5. The CHASE laboratory search for chameleon dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    A scalar field is a favorite candidate for the particle responsible for dark energy. However, few theoretical means exist that can simultaneously explain the observed acceleration of the Universe and evade tests of gravity. The chameleon mechanism, whereby the properties of a particle depend upon the local environment, is one possible avenue. We present the results of the Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE) experiment, a laboratory probe for chameleon dark energy. CHASE marks a significant improvement other searches for chameleons both in terms of its sensitivity to the photon/chameleon coupling as well as its sensitivity to the classes of chameleon dark energy models and standard power-law models. Since chameleon dark energy is virtually indistinguishable from a cosmological constant, CHASE tests dark energy models in a manner not accessible to astronomical surveys.

  6. Simulating Gravity: Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jes; Stang, Jared; Anderson, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the universe but very little of a standard introductory physics curriculum. Here we present our construction and use of a spandex sheet-style gravity simulator to qualitatively demonstrate two aspects of modern physics related to dark matter. First, we describe an activity in which students explore the dependence of orbital velocities on the central mass of a system, in a demonstration of how scientists first discovered dark matter. Second, we discuss the use of the gravity simulator as a visualization of gravitational lensing, a current astronomical technique for mapping dark matter in the sky. After providing the necessary background for the phenomena of interest, we describe our construction of the gravity simulator and detail our facilitation of these two activities. Together, these activities provide a conceptual visualization of gravitational phenomena related to indirect detection techniques for studying dark matter.

  7. Dark radiation from particle decay: cosmological constraints and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenkamp, Jasper; Kersten, Jörn E-mail: Joern.Kersten@desy.de

    2013-08-01

    We study particle decay as the origin of dark radiation. After elaborating general properties and useful parametrisations we provide model-independent and easy-to-use constraints from nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background and structure formation. Bounds on branching ratios and mass hierarchies depend in a unique way on the time of decay. We demonstrate their power to exclude well-motivated scenarios taking the example of the lightest ordinary sparticle decaying into the gravitino. We point out signatures and opportunities in cosmological observations and structure formation. For example, if there are two dark decay modes, dark radiation and the observed dark matter with adjustable free-streaming can originate from the same decaying particle, solving small-scale problems of structure formation. Hot dark matter mimicking a neutrino mass scale as deduced from cosmological observations can arise and possibly be distinguished after a discovery. Our results can be used as a guideline for model building.

  8. Dark energy from modified gravity with Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Matsumoto, Jiro; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2010-09-01

    We study scalar-tensor theory, k-essence and modified gravity with Lagrange multiplier constraint which role is to reduce the number of degrees of freedom. Dark Energy cosmology of different types (ΛCDM, unified inflation with DE, smooth non-phantom/phantom transition epoch) is reconstructed in such models. It is demonstrated that presence of Lagrange multiplier simplifies the reconstruction scenario. It is shown that mathematical equivalence between scalar theory and F(R) gravity is broken due to presence of constraint. The cosmological evolution is defined by the second F(R) function dictated by the constraint. The convenient F(R) gravity sector is relevant for local tests. This opens the possibility to make originally non-realistic theory to be viable by adding the corresponding constraint. A general discussion on the role of Lagrange multipliers to make higher-derivative gravity canonical is developed.

  9. Calibration requirements for detecting the 21 cm epoch of reionization power spectrum and implications for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, N.; Hazelton, B.; Sullivan, I.; Morales, M. F.; Pober, J. C.

    2016-09-01

    21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) observations promise to transform our understanding of galaxy formation, but these observations are impossible without unprecedented levels of instrument calibration. We present end-to-end simulations of a full EoR power spectrum (PS) analysis including all of the major components of a real data processing pipeline: models of astrophysical foregrounds and EoR signal, frequency-dependent instrument effects, sky-based antenna calibration, and the full PS analysis. This study reveals that traditional sky-based per-frequency antenna calibration can only be implemented in EoR measurement analyses if the calibration model is unrealistically accurate. For reasonable levels of catalogue completeness, the calibration introduces contamination in otherwise foreground-free PS modes, precluding a PS measurement. We explore the origin of this contamination and potential mitigation techniques. We show that there is a strong joint constraint on the precision of the calibration catalogue and the inherent spectral smoothness of antennas, and that this has significant implications for the instrumental design of the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and other future EoR observatories.

  10. Calibration Requirements for Detecting the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Power Spectrum and Implications for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, N.; Hazelton, B.; Sullivan, I.; Morales, M. F.; Pober, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    21 cm Epoch of Reionization observations promise to transform our understanding of galaxy formation, but these observations are impossible without unprecedented levels of instrument calibration. We present end-to-end simulations of a full EoR power spectrum analysis including all of the major components of a real data processing pipeline: models of astrophysical foregrounds and EoR signal, frequency-dependent instrument effects, sky-based antenna calibration, and the full PS analysis. This study reveals that traditional sky-based per-frequency antenna calibration can only be implemented in EoR measurement analyses if the calibration model is unrealistically accurate. For reasonable levels of catalogue completeness, the calibration introduces contamination in otherwise foreground-free power spectrum modes, precluding a PS measurement. We explore the origin of this contamination and potential mitigation techniques. We show that there is a strong joint constraint on the precision of the calibration catalogue and the inherent spectral smoothness of antennae, and that this has significant implications for the instrumental design of the SKA and other future EoR observatories.

  11. Heliospheric three-dimensional global simulation of multiple interacting coronal mass ejections during the Halloween 2003 epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Liou, K.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Fry, C. D.; Plunkett, S.

    2012-05-01

    There were nineteen flare associated coronal mass ejection (CME) events that were reported during the Halloween 2003 epoch from 19 October to 20 November [1]. Ten of these CMEs were associated with class X flares, 8 CMEs were associated with class M flares, and one CME was associated with a class C flare. Using a well-developed hybrid code, HAFv2+3DMHD, the evolution and interactions of 16 out of 19 interplanetary CMEs from 21 October to 17 November 2003 were simulated and investigated. The HAFv2+3DMHD model combines two physical base simulation codes: the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry code (HAFv2) and a fully three-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic code. We compared simulated solar wind velocity, number density, temperature, and magnetic fields with those observed by the ACE spacecraft. We have demonstrated that our global three-dimensional (3-D) simulation model is capable of simulating the evolution and interaction of multiple CMEs in a realistic and continually changing complicated solar wind structure during uniquely severe space weather conditions at Earth. This study clearly demonstrates that the HAFv2+3DMHD model can be a useful tool for space weather operations.

  12. Dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 years after its first postulation in modern form, the existence and distribution of dark matter in our Universe is well established. Dark matter is the gravitational glue that holds together galaxies, galaxy clusters and structures on the largest cosmological scales, and an essential component to explain the observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Yet its existence is inferred indirectly, through its gravitational influence on luminous matter, and its nature is not known. A viable hypothesis is that dark matter is made of new, elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths spanning a wide range. Two well-motivated classes of candidates are axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and experimental efforts have now reached sensitivities that allow them to test this hypothesis. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, can be detected by exploiting their predicted couplings to photons and electrons. WIMPs can be detected directly by looking for their collisions with atomic nuclei ultra-low background detectors, or indirectly, through the observation of their annihilation products such as neutrinos, gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons over the astrophysical background. A complementary method is the production of dark matter particles at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, where they could be observed indirectly via missing transverse energy, or via associated particle production. I will review the main experimental efforts to search for dark matter particles, and the existing constraints on the interaction cross sections. I will also discuss future experiments, their complementarity and their ability to measure the properties of these particles.

  13. The DarkSide Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Agnes, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Catalanotti, S.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guan, M. Y.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Kendziora, C.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P. X.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meyers, P. D.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Musico, P.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Papp, L.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Segreto, E.; Shields, E.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    DarkSide-50 at Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), Italy, is a direct dark matter search experiment based on a liquid argon TPC. DS-50 has completed its first dark matter run using atmospheric argon as target. The detector performances and the results of the first physics run are presented in this proceeding.

  14. Theories of the dark side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    Dark matter and dark energy represent serious challenges to our understanding of the cosmos but, as Jeff Forshaw explains, the next few years promise to be exciting ones for theorists and experimentalists alike as we begin to uncover the nature of the dark sector.

  15. How dark chocolate is processed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column will continue the theme of “How Is It Processed?” The column will focus on dark chocolate. The botanical name for the cacao tree is Theobroma cacao, which literally means “food of the Gods.” Dark chocolate is both delicious and nutritious. Production of dark chocolate will be des...

  16. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  17. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag II: Numerical computation of current-epoch thermal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jason W.; Matzner, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The LARES satellite is a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect. LARES consists of a solid tungsten alloy sphere, into which 92 fused-silica Cube Corner Reflectors (CCRs) are set in colatitude circles ("rows"). During its first four months in orbit it was observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of approximately -0.4 pm/s2 (pm: = picometer). The first paper in this series (Eur. Phys. J. Plus 130, 206 (2015) - Paper I) computed the thermally induced along-track "thermal drag" on the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results there suggest that the IR absorbance α and emissivity ɛ of the CCRs equal 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. Paper I computed an average thermal drag acceleration of -0.36 pm/s2 for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the thermal drag for specific days. The satellite is heated from two sources: sunlight and Earth's infrared (IR) radiation. Paper I worked in the fast-spin regime, where CCRs with the same colatitude can be taken to have the same temperature. Further, since all temperature variations (temporal or spatial) were small in this regime, Paper I linearized the Stefan-Boltzmann law and performed a Fourier series analysis. However, the spin rate of the satellite is expected currently ( ≈ day 1500) to be slow, of order ≈ 5 /orbit, so the "fast-spin equal-temperatures in a row" assumption is suspect. In this paper, which considers epochs up to 1580 days after launch, we do not linearize and we use direct numerical integration instead of Fourier methods. In addition to the along-track drag, this code

  18. The vacuum's dark particles behave like dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John

    2015-04-01

    Building on the governing hypothesis that self-information is equal to action, I solve for the time step of the vacuum. The resulting equations (both quantum diffusion and Friedmann's equations) argue that a dark particle, or special black hole, exists at hbar or twice the reduced Planck mass where the Hawking temperature breaks down. It is hypothesized that if neutral hydrogen is nearby the dark particles are able to couple with the background field and thus have a density that looks like dark matter. If hydrogen is not around, the dark particles become frozen leading to a constant density of black body radiation similar to dark energy. If the Universe's dark particles (away from neutral hydrogen) became frozen during the re-ionization of the Universe's history, its BBR density is well within confidence ranges for the cosmological constant. This hypothesis can also explain the recent observations that dark matter decays into dark energy.

  19. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primulando, Reinard; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-07-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M T2 variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  20. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichoski, Ubi

    2011-12-01

    The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin-dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB, Sudbury—ON, Canada since 2002. The detection principle is based on the superheated droplet technique; the detectors consist of a gel matrix with millions of liquid droplets of superheated fluorocarbon (C4F10) dispersed in it. Recently, a new setup has been built and installed in the Ladder Lab area at SNOLAB. In the present phase of the experiment the Collaboration is running 4.5-litre detector modules with approximately 85 g of active mass per module. Here, we give an overview of the experiment and discuss the progress in background mitigation, in particular background discrimination in the PICASSO detectors.

  1. Dark energy in hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Kim, Seongcheol

    2007-03-15

    The situation that a scalar field provides the source of the accelerated expansion of the Universe while rolling down its potential is common in both the simple models of the primordial inflation and the quintessence-based dark energy models. Motivated by this point, we address the possibility of causing the current acceleration via the primordial inflation using a simple model based on hybrid inflation. We trigger the onset of the motion of the quintessence field via the waterfall field, and find that the fate of the Universe depends on the true vacuum energy determined by choosing the parameters. We also briefly discuss the variation of the equation of state and the possible implementation of our scenario in supersymmetric theories.

  2. Experimental challenge to nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae - Very early epoch of type II SNe -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Chen, A.; Cherubini, S.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; He, J. J.; Khiem, Le H.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Wanajo, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosynthesis is one of the keys in studying the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, which is an interesting challenge for modern science. The νp-process, which is similar to an explosive hydrogen burning process, has been proposed as the most probable process in the very early epoch of type II supernovae. Here, we discuss our experimental efforts for the νp-process, the first extensive direct measurements of the (α,p) reactions on bottle-neck proto-rich nuclei in light mass regions. Other challenges for the νp-process study are also discussed.

  3. Joint US/UK Epoch World Magnetic Model 1995. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Coleman, R.J.; Shiel, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains a detailed summary of the data used, analyses performed, modeling techniques employed, and results obtained during the course of the 1995 Epoch World Magnetic Modeling effort. This report also contains the GEOMAG algorithm and describes its uses and limitations. Charts derived from the WMM-95 model and the GEOMAG algorithm for both the main geomagnetic field components and their secular variations are presented on Mercator and polar stereographic projections. Additionally, the numerical values of the main geomagnetic field components and their secular variations are tabulated on a 5-degree worldwide grid.

  4. Lithographed spectrometers for tomographic line mapping of the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brient, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Crites, A.; Duan, R.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hunacek, J.; LeDuc, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Staniszewski, Z.; Turner, A.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-08-01

    The Tomographic Ionized carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) is a multi-phased experiment that will topographically map [CII] emission from the Epoch of Reionization. We are developing lithographed spectrometers that couple to TES bolometers in anticipation of the second generation instrument. Our design intentionally mirrors many features of the parallel SuperSpec project, inductively coupling power from a trunk-line microstrip onto half-wave resonators. The resonators couple to a rat-race hybrids that feeds TES bolometers. Our 25 channel prototype shows spectrally positioned lines roughly matching design with a receiver optical efficiency of 15-20%, a level that is dominated by loss in components outside the spectrometer.

  5. The First Billion Years: The Growth of Galaxies in the Reionization Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2015-08-01

    Detection and measurement of the earliest galaxies in the first billion years only became possible after the Hubble Space Telescope was updated in 2009 with the infrared WFC3/IR camera during Shuttle servicing mission SM4. The first billion years is a fascinating epoch, not just because of the earliest galaxies known from about 450 Myr after the Big Bang, but also because it encompasses the reionization epoch that peaked around z~9, as Planck has recently shown, and ended around redshift z~6 at 900 Myr. Before 2009 just a handful of galaxies were known in the reionization epoch at z>6. But within the last 5 years, with the first HUDF09 survey, the HUDF12, CANDELS and numerous other surveys on the GOODS and CANDELS fields, as well as detections from the cluster lensing programs like CLASH and the Frontier Fields, the number of galaxies at redshifts 7-10 has exploded, with some 700 galaxies being found and characterized. The first billion years was a period of extraordinary growth in the galaxy population with rapid growth in the star formation rate density and global mass density in galaxies. Spitzer observations in the infrared of these Hubble fields are establishing masses as well as giving insights into the nature and timescales of star formation from the very powerful emission lines being revealed by the Spitzer IRAC data. I will discuss what we understand about the growth of galaxies in this epoch from the insights gained from remarkable deep fields like the XDF, as well as the wide-area GOODS/CANDELS fields, the detection of unexpectedly luminous galaxies at redshifts 8-10, the impact of early galaxies on reionization, confirmation of a number of galaxies at z~7-8 from ground-based spectroscopic measurements, and the indications of a change in the growth of the star formation rate around 500 Myr. The first billion years was a time of dramatic growth and change in the early galaxy population.

  6. Simulating matched filter detection of ionized bubble around a quasar in the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Suman; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Choudhury, Tirthankar Roy

    2012-12-01

    The recent discovery of the z = 7.085 quasar has opened up a new window to peep into the inter galactic medium during the epoch of reionization (EoR). The detection of the ionized region around such a high redshift quasar is in principle capable of constraining the neutral fraction of the IGM and the quasar's age. Here we present the possibility of detection of such an ionized region around a quasar at z = 8 using redshifted 21-cm observations of the neutral hydrogen and possible ways to constrain IGM neutral fraction and quasar's age through this detection.

  7. The epoch state navigation filter. [for maximum likelihood estimates of position and velocity vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Croopnick, S. R.; Edwards, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The formulation of a recursive maximum likelihood navigation system employing reference position and velocity vectors as state variables is presented. Convenient forms of the required variational equations of motion are developed together with an explicit form of the associated state transition matrix needed to refer measurement data from the measurement time to the epoch time. Computational advantages accrue from this design in that the usual forward extrapolation of the covariance matrix of estimation errors can be avoided without incurring unacceptable system errors. Simulation data for earth orbiting satellites are provided to substantiate this assertion.

  8. Probing light dark matter via evaporation from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Dark matter particles can be captured by the Sun with rates that depend on the dark matter mass and the DM-nucleon cross section. However, for masses below ˜3.3 GeV , the captured dark matter particles evaporate, leading to an equilibrium where the rate of captured particles is equal to the rate of evaporating ones. Unlike dark matter particles from the halo, the evaporating dark matter particles have velocities that are not limited to values below the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Despite the fact that high velocities are exponentially suppressed, I demonstrate here that current underground detectors have the possibility to probe/constrain low dark matter parameter space by (not)-observing the high energy tail of the evaporating dark matter particles from the Sun. I also show that the functional form of the differential rate of counts with respect to the recoil energy in Earth-based detectors can identify precisely the mass and the cross section of the dark matter particle in this case.

  9. Probing a dark matter density spike at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Thomas; BÅ`hm, Céline; Silk, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The dark matter halo profile in the inner Galaxy is very uncertain. Yet its radial dependence toward the Galactic Center is of crucial importance for the determination of the gamma-ray and radio fluxes originating from dark matter annihilations. Here we use synchrotron emission to probe the dark matter energy distribution in the inner Galaxy. We first solve the problem of the cosmic ray diffusion on very small scales, typically smaller than 103 pc, by using a Green's function approach and use this technique to quantify the effect of a spiky profile [ρ(r)∝r-7/3] on the morphology and intensity of the synchrotron emission expected from dark matter. We illustrate our results using 10 and 800 GeV candidate weakly interacting dark matter particles annihilating directly into e+e-. Our most critical assumptions are that the dark matter is heavier than a few GeV and directly produces a reasonable amount of electrons and positrons in the Galaxy. We conclude that dark matter indirect detection techniques (including the Planck experiment) could be used to shed light on the dark matter halo profile on scales that lie beyond the capability of any current numerical simulations.

  10. Dark Matter Decays from Nonminimal Coupling to Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catà, Oscar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ingenhütt, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We consider the standard model extended with a dark matter particle in curved spacetime, motivated by the fact that the only current evidence for dark matter is through its gravitational interactions, and we investigate the impact on the dark matter stability of terms in the Lagrangian linear in the dark matter field and proportional to the Ricci scalar. We show that this "gravity portal" induces decay even if the dark matter particle only has gravitational interactions, and that the decay branching ratios into standard model particles only depend on one free parameter: the dark matter mass. We study in detail the case of a singlet scalar as a dark matter candidate, which is assumed to be absolutely stable in flat spacetime due to a discrete Z2 symmetry, but which may decay in curved spacetimes due to a Z2-breaking nonminimal coupling to gravity. We calculate the dark matter decay widths and we set conservative limits on the nonminimal coupling parameter from experiments. The limits are very stringent and suggest that there must exist an additional mechanism protecting the singlet scalar from decaying via this gravity portal.

  11. Properties of resonantly produced sterile neutrino dark matter subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bozek, Brandon; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Onorbe, Jose

    2016-03-01

    The anomalous 3.55 keV X-ray line recently detected towards a number of massive dark matter objects may be interpreted as the radiative decays of 7.1 keV mass sterile neutrino dark matter. Depending on its parameters, the sterile neutrino can range from cold to warm dark matter with small-scale suppression that differs in form from commonly adopted thermal warm dark matter. Here, we numerically investigate the subhalo properties for 7.1 keV sterile neutrino dark matter produced via the resonant Shi-Fuller mechanism. Using accurate matter power spectra, we run cosmological zoom-in simulations of a Milky Way-sized halo and explore the abundance of massive subhaloes, their radial distributions, and their internal structure. We also simulate the halo with thermal 2.0 keV warm dark matter for comparison and discuss quantitative differences. We find that the resonantly produced sterile neutrino model for the 3.55 keV line provides a good description of structures in the Local Group, including the number of satellite dwarf galaxies and their radial distribution, and largely mitigates the too-big-to-fail problem. Future searches for satellite galaxies by deep surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, will be a strong direct test of warm dark matter scenarios.

  12. Dark Matter Decays from Nonminimal Coupling to Gravity.

    PubMed

    Catà, Oscar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ingenhütt, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We consider the standard model extended with a dark matter particle in curved spacetime, motivated by the fact that the only current evidence for dark matter is through its gravitational interactions, and we investigate the impact on the dark matter stability of terms in the Lagrangian linear in the dark matter field and proportional to the Ricci scalar. We show that this "gravity portal" induces decay even if the dark matter particle only has gravitational interactions, and that the decay branching ratios into standard model particles only depend on one free parameter: the dark matter mass. We study in detail the case of a singlet scalar as a dark matter candidate, which is assumed to be absolutely stable in flat spacetime due to a discrete Z_{2} symmetry, but which may decay in curved spacetimes due to a Z_{2}-breaking nonminimal coupling to gravity. We calculate the dark matter decay widths and we set conservative limits on the nonminimal coupling parameter from experiments. The limits are very stringent and suggest that there must exist an additional mechanism protecting the singlet scalar from decaying via this gravity portal. PMID:27447497

  13. Fingerprinting dark energy. III. Distinctive marks of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapone, Domenico; Majerotto, Elisabetta

    2012-06-01

    The characterization of dark energy is one of the primary goals in cosmology especially now that many new experiments are being planned with the aim of reaching a high sensitivity on cosmological parameters. It is known that if we move away from the simple cosmological constant model then we need to consider perturbations in the dark energy fluid. This means that dark energy has two extra degrees of freedom: the sound speed cs2 and the anisotropic stress σ. If dark energy is inhomogenous at the scales of interest then the gravitational potentials are modified and the evolution of the dark matter perturbations is also directly affected. In this paper we add an anisotropic component to the dark energy perturbations. Following the idea introduced in D. Sapone and M. Kunz, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 80, 083519 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.80.083519, we solve analytically the equations of perturbations in the dark sector, finding simple and accurate approximated solutions. We also find that the evolution of the density perturbations is governed by an effective sound speed that depends on both the sound speed and the anisotropic stress parameter. We then use these solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background.

  14. Warm and cold fermionic dark matter via freeze-in

    SciTech Connect

    Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E. E-mail: carlos.yaguna@uni-muenster.de

    2013-11-01

    The freeze-in mechanism of dark matter production provides a simple and intriguing alternative to the WIMP paradigm. In this paper, we analyze whether freeze-in can be used to account for the dark matter in the so-called singlet fermionic model. In it, the SM is extended with only two additional fields, a singlet scalar that mixes with the Higgs boson, and the dark matter particle, a fermion assumed to be odd under a Z{sub 2} symmetry. After numerically studying the generation of dark matter, we analyze the dependence of the relic density with respect to all the free parameters of the model. These results are then used to obtain the regions of the parameter space that are compatible with the dark matter constraint. We demonstrate that the observed dark matter abundance can be explained via freeze-in over a wide range of masses extending down to the keV range. As a result, warm and cold dark matter can be obtained in this model. It is also possible to have dark matter masses well above the unitarity bound for WIMPs.

  15. Reionization in a cold dark matter universe: The feedback of galaxy formation on the intergalactic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1994-01-01

    We study the coupled evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the emerging structure in the universe in the context of the cold dark matter (CDM) model, with a special focus on the consequences of imposing reionization and the Gunn-Peterson constraint as a boundary condition on the model. We have calculated the time-varying density of the IGM by coupling our detailed, numerical calculations of the thermal and ionization balance and radiative transfer in a uniform, spatially averaged IGM of H and He, including the mean opacity of an evolving distribution of gas clumps which correspond to quasar absorption line clouds, to the linearized equations for the growth of density fluctuations in both the gaseous and dark matter components in a CDM universe. We use the linear growth equations to identify the fraction of the gas which must have collapsed out at each epoch, an approach similar in spirit to the so-called Press-Schechter formalism. We identify the IGM density with the uncollapsed baryon fraction. The collapsed fraction is postulated to be a source of energy injection into the IGM, by radiation or bulk hydrodynamical heating (e.g., via shocks) or both, at a rate which is marginally enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint at z less than 5. Our results include the following: (1) We find that the IGM in a CDM model must have contained a substantial fraction of the total baryon density of the universe both during and after its reionization epoch. (2) As a result, our previous conclusion that the observed Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) at high redshift are not sufficient to ionize the IGM enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint is confirmed. (3) We predict a detectable He II Gunn-Peterson effect at 304(1 + z) A in the spectra of quasars at a range of redshift z greater than or approx. 3, depending on the nature of the sources of IGM reionization. (4) We find, moreover, that a CDM model with high bias parameter b (i.e., b greater than or approx. 2

  16. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  17. Dark antiatoms can explain DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallemacq, Quentin; Cudell, Jean-René

    2015-02-01

    We show that the existence of a sub-dominant form of dark matter, made of dark "antiatoms" of mass m~ 1 TeV and size dot a0~ 3 fm, can explain the results of direct detection experiments, with a positive signal in DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA and no signal in other experiments. The signal comes from the binding of the dark antiatoms to thallium, a dopant in DAMA, and is not present for the constituent atoms of other experiments. The dark antiatoms are made of two particles oppositely charged under a dark U(1) symmetry and can bind to terrestrial atoms because of a kinetic mixing between the photon and the massless dark photon, such that the dark particles acquire an electric millicharge ~ ± 5.10-4e. This millicharge enables them to bind to high-Z atoms via radiative capture, after they thermalize in terrestrial matter through elastic collisions.

  18. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  19. The GMRT Epoch of Reionization experiment: a new upper limit on the neutral hydrogen power spectrum at z≈ 8.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciga, Gregory; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Gupta, Yashwant; Nityanada, Rajaram; Odegova, Julia; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Roy, Jayanta; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-05-01

    We present a new upper limit to the 21-cm power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) which constrains reionization models with an unheated IGM. The GMRT-EoR experiment is an ongoing effort to make a statistical detection of the power spectrum of 21-cm neutral hydrogen emission at redshift z˜ 9. Data from this redshift constrain models of the EoR, the end of the Dark Ages arising from the formation of the first bright UV sources, probably stars or mini-quasars. We present results from approximately 50 h of observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in India from 2007 December. We describe radio-frequency interference (RFI) localization schemes which allow bright sources on the ground to be identified and physically removed in addition to automated flagging. Singular-value decomposition is used to remove the remaining broad-band RFI by identifying ground sources with large eigenvalues. Foregrounds are modelled using a piecewise linear filter and the power spectrum is measured using cross-correlations of foreground-subtracted images.

  20. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Skyllberg, Ulf; Wei, Shiqiang; Wang, Dingyong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Zhenmao; Flanagan, Dennis C.

    2015-04-01

    Dark reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in deep waters, soils and sediments accounts for a large part of legacy Hg recycling back to the atmosphere. Natural organic matter (NOM) plays a dual role in the process, acting as an electron donor and complexation agent of Hg(II). Experimental determination of rates of dark Hg(II) reduction is complicated by the simultaneously ongoing kinetics of Hg(II) rearrangement from the abundant, relatively weakly bonding RO/N (carboxyl, amino) groups in NOM to the much stronger bonding RSH (thiol) group. In this study, kinetics of the rearrangement are accounted for and we report rates of dark Hg(II) reduction for two molecular structures in presence of humic acids (HA) extracted from three different sources. Values on the pseudo first-order rate constant for the proposed structure Hg(OR)2 (kredHg(OR)2) were 0.18, 0.22 and 0.35 h-1 for Peat, Coal and Soil HA, respectively, and values on the constant for the proposed structure RSHgOR (kred RSHgOR) were 0.003 and 0.006 h-1 for Peat and Soil HA, respectively. The Hg(SR)2 structure is the thermodynamically most stable, but the limited time of the experiment (53 h) did not allow for a determination of the rate of the very slow reduction of Hg(II) in this structure. For two out of three HA samples the concentration of RSH groups optimized by the kinetic model (0.6 × 10-3 RSH groups per C atoms) was in good agreement with independent estimates provided by sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (S XANES). Experiments conducted at varying concentrations of Hg(II) and HA demonstrated a positive relationship between Hg(II) reduction and concentrations of specific Hg(II) structures and electron donor groups, suggesting first order in each of these two components. The limitation of the Hg(II) reduction by electron donating groups of HA, as represented by the native reducing capacity (NRC), was demonstrated for the Coal HA sample. Normalization to NRC resulted in pseudo second-order rate