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Sample records for epoxy vacuum impregnation

  1. Polarization of vacuum-pressure-impregnated high voltage epoxy-mica insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, E.; Jaeppinen, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the electrical behavior of modern epoxy-mica high voltage insulation is investigated with the help of two-layer insulation model. The simplified model help to understand the charging phenomenon in actual high voltage insulation. The behavior of Vacuum-Pressure-Impregnated (VPI`ed) epoxy-mica insulation is compared with Shellac-Micafolium insulation. It is illustrated that because of higher volume resistivity the rate of change of the field distribution due to charging is considerably slower in epoxy-mica insulation. This tends to result in lower polarization index (PI) value for the epoxy-mica insulation than typically obtained for Shellac-Micafolium insulations. It is also illustrated that the faster PI measurement method (ratio of the 60 seconds value to the 15 seconds value) gives clearly lower PI value than the method defined in IEEE 43 (1974) (ratio of 600 s value to 60 s value). Finally, the effect of moisture on insulation resistance and PI of VPI`ed epoxy-mica winding insulation is discussed.

  2. Managing Coil Epoxy Vacuum Impregnation Systems at the Manufacturing Floor Level To Achieve Ultimate Properties in State-of-the-Art Magnet Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Hubrig; G.H. Biallas

    2005-05-01

    Liquid epoxy resin impregnation systems remain a state-of-the-art polymer material for vacuum and vacuum/pressure impregnation applications in the manufacture of both advanced and conventional coil winding configurations. Epoxy resins inherent latitude in processing parameters accounts for their continued popularity in engineering applications, but also for the tendency to overlook or misinterpret the requisite processing parameters on the manufacturing floor. Resin system impregnation must be managed in detail in order to achieve device life cycle reliability. This closer look reveals how manufacturing floor level management of material acceptance, handling and storage, pre- and post- impregnation processing and cure can be built into a manufacturing plan to increase manufacturing yield, lower unit cost and ensure optimum life cycle performance of the coil.

  3. Interlaboratory comparison of thin section epoxy impregnation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.D.; Byrnes, A.P.

    1987-05-01

    Evidence of the ineffective blue-dye epoxy impregnation is encountered all too commonly in thin sections. A study involving ceramic disks was conducted to compare the efficiencies of a variety of epoxy impregnation procedures used by major laboratories. Disks were sent to five commercial and four major oil company thin section laboratories which then impregnated the disks and returned them for analysis. Porcelain disks were used because of their high degree of uniformity, white color, rocklike composition and pore geometry, uniform pore size, and high pore connectivity. Impregnation efficiency was determined by calculating the pore volume invaded using helium porosimetry and by determining the areas and distances of invasion based on extent of blue-dye invasion in cross-sectional cuts through the disks. Techniques which proved very highly effective are vacuum or vacuum/pressure impregnation in which the epoxy was added to the sample container subsequent to evacuation. Relatively ineffective are vacuum techniques, at room or elevated temperatures, where the sample is submerged in epoxy prior to evacuation. The key to effective impregnation is to remove air from the sample before it is covered by epoxy. Factors which have little or no influence on the effectiveness of impregnation include type of blue dye, epoxy type, and presence of fluorescent dye. High-quality thin sections can be prepared using less-effective techniques if care is taken to prepare them from the outer edge of the impregnated sample.

  4. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  5. Impregnating magnetic components with MDA free epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Domeier, L.; Gunewardena, S.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the use of {open_quotes}Formula 456{close_quotes} an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA.

  6. Pros and cons of vacuum pressure impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T.

    1981-12-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using a vacuum pressure impregnation process in the application of insulating varnishes to high voltage electric coils are discussed. The process has the advantages of providing a void free system with high dielectric strength, mechanical resilience, chemical and moisture resistance, and good thermal capabilities. The disadvantages of high cost and large tank size requirements are noted.

  7. Enhancement of the transverse stress tolerance of REBCO Roebel cables by epoxy impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, S.; Dhallé, M.; Gao, P.; Wessel, W.; Kario, A.; Kling, A.; Goldacker, W.

    2015-06-01

    REBCO Roebel cables are considered for application in high-temperature superconducting inserts for accelerator magnets because of their fully transposed geometry, high-engineering current density, and adequate bending tolerance. In these magnets the cables experience Lorentz forces leading to transverse stresses up to 100-150 MPa. Previous reports have shown bare Roebel cables to degrade under such high stresses so that additional reinforcement is required. In this work, two identical Roebel cables are vacuum impregnated with a mixture of epoxy and fused silica in order to improve their tolerance to transverse stress. After impregnation, the critical current of the cables is measured under transverse mechanical loading at T = 4.2 K, {{B}\\bot }=10.5 T. A reference cable without impregnation is tested as well. Pressures up to 350 MPa are applied to a short (30 mm) section of each cable. No degradation was observed for pressures up to 250 MPa and 170 MPa in the two impregnated cables. The critical current of the non-impregnated cable, in contrast, started to decrease at stresses as low as 40 MPa.

  8. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shown to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.

  9. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  10. Vacuum powder injector and method of impregnating fiber with powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus uniformly impregnate stranded material with dry powder such as low solubility, high melt flow polymer powder to produce, for example, composite prepregs. The stranded material is expanded in an impregnation chamber by an influx of air so that the powder, which may enter through the same inlet as the air, penetrates to the center of the stranded material. The stranded material then is contracted for holding the powder therein. The stranded material and powder may be pulled through the impregnation chamber in the same direction by vacuum. Larger particles of powder which do not fully penetrate the stranded material may be combed into the stranded material and powder which does not impregnate the stranded material may be collected and reused.

  11. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Godeke, Arno; National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL; Ye, Liyang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramicmore » sleeve.« less

  12. Thermal-mechanical Properties of Epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    Knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  13. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  14. Effect of epoxy cracking resistance on the stability of impregnated superconducting solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, H.; Moriyama, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    The stability and quench positions of superconducting test solenoids impregnated with three types of epoxy resin, with different crack resistances, have been studied. Voltage signals and acoustic emission (AE) were monitored during training tests. Premature quenches in the solenoids almost occurred at the innermost layer of windings; voltage spikes and AE appeared just prior to the premature quench initiation. This suggested that premature quenches were due to friction or debonding between ground insulation and winding. The solenoid with a release film between ground insulation and winding showed high stability and reached critical current at the second charging. From the results, the effects of epoxy cracking resistance on the stability of impregnated superconducting test solenoids are discussed.

  15. Zinc enrichment of whole potato tuber by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Erihemu; Hironaka, Kazunori; Koaze, Hiroshi; Oda, Yuji; Shimada, Kenichiro

    2015-04-01

    Zinc is a nutritionally essential truce element, and thus zinc deficiency (ZD) severely affects human health. More than 25% of the world's population is at risk of ZD. This study was initiated to examine the use of the vacuum impregnation (VI) technique for enriching zinc content of whole potatoes; the effect of vacuum time, restoration time, steam-cooking and storage at 4 °C on the zinc content of VI whole potatoes was evaluated. Whole potato tubers were immersed in a 9 g/100 g zinc (zinc gluconate) solution. Vacuum pressure of 1,000 Pa was applied for 0-120 min, and atmospheric pressure restoration for 0-4 h. Experimental results showed that the zinc content of VI potatoes increased with vacuum and restoration time. Moreover, VI-cooked unpeeled or peeled potatoes had 63-94 times and 47-75 times higher zinc contents than un-VI-cooked unpeeled or peeled potatoes, respectively. The world daily potato consumption (86 g) of the VI-cooked unpeeled and peeled potatoes provided adult men with 130-148% and 100-135% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc, respectively. Also, the daily potato consumption of the unpeeled and peeled potatoes supplied adult women with 178-203% and 137-185% of the RDA level, respectively. In addition, the VI potatoes had 40 times higher zinc contents through 30 days of storage at 4 °C, compared with un-VI-treated potatoes. This study indicated that VI treatment of whole potatoes was useful for enriching the zinc content. PMID:25829619

  16. Experimental determination of the dynamics of vacuum impregnation of apples.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, J B; Stringari, G B; Paes, S S; Carciofi, B A M

    2007-10-01

    Vacuum impregnation (VI) is a food processing method by which air and native solution are removed from porous spaces within a food and replaced by an external solution. In this study, an experimental device based on a previous design was built, including some modifications, in order to investigate the dynamics of the VI process. The device measured the net force exerted by a food sample submitted to the VI process using a load cell. The influence of the vacuum level and sample geometry was well quantified by the experimental procedure and the modified equipment using apple samples (Fuji var.) as a food model. The results indicated that the experimental device proposed in this study, together with the suggested procedure, is a useful tool to investigate the dynamics of VI processes. It is robust and versatile, and has the advantage of not requiring the determination of the water evaporated during the VI process in a separate experiment, which represents an increase in the accuracy of the results. PMID:17995607

  17. Nutritional enrichment of fresh apple (Royal Gala) by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Zhao, Y

    2003-09-01

    This study evaluates the use of vacuum impregnation (VI) for developing nutritionally fortified fresh cut apples (Royal Gala). Cut apples were immersed in diluted high fructose corn syrup (20% w/w or 50% w/w) containing calcium or zinc. A vacuum pressure of 50 mmHg was applied for 15 min following atmospheric pressure restoration for 30 min while samples remained in the VI solution. Nutraceutical content and physicochemical properties of the apples immediately after VI were determined. Storability of VI apples at 6 degrees C and 90% relative humidity was also studied based on the color and texture of apples. Results indicated that 15-20% of the Daily Reference Intake of calcium and above 40% of the Daily Reference Intake of zinc could be obtained in 200 g fresh cut apples. VI treatments in 20% w/w high fructose corn syrup solutions had little effects on the physicochemical properties of apples. Storage study showed that VI with zinc significantly improved color stability, and calcium enhanced the firmness of the apples. PMID:12907403

  18. Effects of Vacuum Impregnation with Sucrose Solution on Mango Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian; Luo, Cailian; Chen, Yulong

    2016-06-01

    The influences of vacuum impregnation (VI) on the tissue of mango cubes during atmospheric immersion in sucrose solution were investigated. Results showed that VI effectively facilitated water loss (WL) and sugar gain (SG) during the 300min immersion process, with increases of 20.59% and 31.26%, respectively. A pectin solubilization/degradation phenomenon was observed in the immersion process. The intercellular space and cross section area in the VI-treated mango tissue increased immediately after being released to atmospheric pressure. And it was noted that after experiencing shrinkage-relaxation period twice in the 300 min immersion process, the size of VI-treated mango cells recovered to the original level of fresh ones. Major variations in WL, protopectin content, water soluble pectin content, firmness and microstructure of mango cubes appeared within the first 60 min. In addition, the firmness of mango cubes was positively correlated with the protopectin content (P < 0.01), but negatively correlated with WL and the water soluble pectin content (P < 0.01), indicating that WL and degradation of protopectin contributed greatly to the loss of firmness. PMID:27100561

  19. Thermo-mechanical characterization of insulated and epoxy-impregnated Nb3Sn composites

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Imbasciati et al.

    2002-12-11

    Nb{sub 3}Sn is, at present, the best superconductor for high field accelerator magnets. Several models using Nb{sub 3}Sn are under development in many laboratories. Knowledge of the thermo-mechanical properties of the impregnated coils is of crucial importance for the design of these magnets. In fact, the performance of epoxy-impregnated coils is sensitive to the thermal conductivity value, especially in case of heating caused by hysteretic losses, which are usually relevant in Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets, and in the case of continuous heat deposition, such as in magnets near the interaction region of a collider. Thermal contraction measurements are necessary to estimate the stresses during the magnet thermal cycle. Different insulation materials have been studied at Fermilab utilizing various design approaches and fabrication methods. Thermal conductivity and thermal contraction measurements, at cryogenic temperatures, have been performed respectively at INFN-LASA and Fermilab. The results are reported and discussed in this paper.

  20. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  1. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  2. Effect of ground insulation contact on stability of epoxy-impregnated superconducting solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, H.; Sekiya, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    To clarify the effect of ground insulation contact on the stability of epoxy-impregnated superconducting solenoids, test coils with ground insulation between a winding and a metal former were fabricated. Aluminium and stainless steel were used as the former materials. The training effects of coils and the circumferential strains of former inner surfaces were measured. The training effects of aluminium former coils were larger than those of the stainless steel former coils. The strains of stainless steel formers became greater as the exciting current increased, but the strains of the aluminium formers did not change. These results show that the insulation of aluminium former coils became a floating state, the insulation of stainless steel former coils maintained a pressed state, and the floating state caused the large training effects.

  3. A Hybrid Heating Method for the HT-7U Coils during Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi-min; Wu, Song-tao; Pan, Wan-jiang; Weng, Pei-de; Wan, Yuan-xi

    2001-04-01

    The HT-7U superconducting tokamak is a full-superconducting magnetically confined fusion device, The toroidal magnet system of HT-7U is a very important part of the device. In VPI (Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation) process the magnet coils must be heated and degassed before impregnating and must be heated to the gel temperature and then the curing temperature, and keep the two kinds of temperatures for a long period of time after impregnating. Thus the heating method of VPI is critical. In this paper, a hybrid method of combining the internal and external heating for the coils is analyzed, especially the possibility of the internal heating method is proved.

  4. Preparation of serial sections of arthropods using 2,2-dimethoxypropane dehydration and epoxy resin embedding under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Pernstich, A; Krenn, H W; Pass, G

    2003-02-01

    Improved methods are described for anatomical investigation of small insects and other arthropods using serial semithin sections. The specimens were dehydrated with acidified 2,2-dimethoxypropane and embedded in ERL 4206 epoxy resin under vacuum. This procedure ensures good resin impregnation of thin, long body compartments and appendages. Furthermore, it produces excellent overall preservation of the specimen and its fragile anatomical structures. This procedure saves time and gives excellent results when sectioning difficult arthropod material. A continuous recording of serial semithin sections is possible when diamond knives are used. PMID:12713135

  5. PROPERTY CHANGES OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY INSULATION SYSTEMS CAUSED BY AN ITER-LIKE DOUBLE IMPREGNATION AND BY REACTOR IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-08

    Because of the double pancake design of the ITER TF coils the insulation will be applied in several steps. As a consequence, the conductor insulation as well as the pancake insulation will undergo multiple heat cycles in addition to the initial curing cycle. In particular the properties of the organic resin may be influenced, since its heat resistance is limited. Two identical types of sample consisting of wrapped R-glass/Kapton layers and vacuum impregnated with a cyanate ester/epoxy blend were prepared. The build-up of the reinforcement was identical for both insulation systems; however, one system was fabricated in two steps. In the first step only one half of the reinforcing layers was impregnated and cured. Afterwards the remaining layers were wrapped onto the already cured system, before the resulting system was impregnated and cured again. The mechanical properties were characterized prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of 1 and 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2}(E>0.1 MeV) in tension and interlaminar shear at 77 K. In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. The results do not show any evidence for reduced mechanical strength caused by the additional heat cycle.

  6. Property Changes of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Insulation Systems Caused by AN Iter-Like Double Impregnation and by Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-01

    Because of the double pancake design of the ITER TF coils the insulation will be applied in several steps. As a consequence, the conductor insulation as well as the pancake insulation will undergo multiple heat cycles in addition to the initial curing cycle. In particular the properties of the organic resin may be influenced, since its heat resistance is limited. Two identical types of sample consisting of wrapped R-glass/Kapton layers and vacuum impregnated with a cyanate ester/epoxy blend were prepared. The build-up of the reinforcement was identical for both insulation systems; however, one system was fabricated in two steps. In the first step only one half of the reinforcing layers was impregnated and cured. Afterwards the remaining layers were wrapped onto the already cured system, before the resulting system was impregnated and cured again. The mechanical properties were characterized prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of 1 and 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in tension and interlaminar shear at 77 K. In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. The results do not show any evidence for reduced mechanical strength caused by the additional heat cycle.

  7. Measurement of inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio Ambrosio et al.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus for the measurement, under transverse pressure, of the inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy-impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cables has been recently assembled at Fermilab. Procedures have been developed to instrument and measure samples extracted from Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. Samples were extracted from coils fabricated with the Wind-and-React and the React-and-Wind technology, both presently under development at Fermilab. A ceramic binder is used to improve the insulation and to simplify the fabrication of coils using the Wind-and-React technology. Synthetic oil is used to prevent sintering during the heat treatment of coils to be wound after reaction. In order to evaluate the effects of the ceramic binder and of the synthetic oil on the inter-strand resistance, measurements of samples extracted from coils were compared with measurements of cable stacks with varying characteristics. In this paper we describe the apparatus, the sample preparation, the measurement procedure, and the results of the first series of tests.

  8. Honey in combination with vacuum impregnation to prevent enzymatic browning of fresh-cut apples.

    PubMed

    Jeon, M; Zhao, Y

    2005-05-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidative capacity of 13 US Northwest honeys from different floral sources and their anti-browning effect on fresh-cut apples. The inhibitory effect of honey on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut apples were studied by simply immersing apple slices in 10% honey solution for 30 min or vacuum impregnating (vacuum at 75 mmHg for 15 min followed with 30 min restoration at atmospheric pressure) in the same honey solution. The 10% diluted high-fructose corn syrup solution was used as a comparison. The surface color of the apple slices was monitored during 14 days of storage at 3 degrees C and 90% relative humidity. Physicochemical properties of the apples immediately after treatment were also evaluated. Wildflower honey had the darkest color and the highest antioxidative capacity among all test honeys. Vacuum impregnation with honey was more effective in controlling browning discoloration than that of simple immersion treatment. Honey in combination with vacuum impregnating operation may have a great potential for developing high-quality fresh-cut fruits. PMID:16009631

  9. New insights into the dynamics of vacuum impregnation of plant tissues and its metabolic consequences.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Federico Gómez; Yusof, Noor Liyana

    2015-04-01

    The complex and highly interconnected intercellular air spaces of plant tissues occupied by gas or native liquid has offered the possibility for impregnation with a wide range of compounds. In food processing, the development of vacuum impregnation has allowed a controlled way to introduce these compounds to the tissue structure aiming at modifying structural, nutritional, and/or functional properties as well as improving the processability of fruits and vegetables. In the last 10 years, more than 100 research articles have been published on the topic and significant insights had been gained including improved understanding of mechanisms for mass transfer as well as the development of new, fascinating industrial applications. In the recent years, our knowledge on these aspects has increased by bringing new exploration technologies for studying the impregnation of porous materials and plant cell physiology approaches to bear on the topic. The aim of this paper is to highlight some of these exciting advances. PMID:24917465

  10. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-06-01

    The direct current (dc) characterization of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for applications, such as electric machines, superconducting magnetic energy storage and transformers. In this paper, the dc characterization of a triangular-shaped, epoxy-impregnated HTS coil wound with YBCO coated conductor intended for use in an axial-flux HTS motor is presented. Voltage was measured at several points along the coil to provide detailed information of its dc characteristics. The coil is modelled based on the H -formulation using a new three-dimensional (3D) technique that utilizes the real superconducting layer thickness, and this model allows simulation of the actual geometrical layout of the HTS coil structure. Detailed information on the critical current density’s dependence on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic flux density, Jc(B,θ), determined from experimental measurement of a short sample of the coated conductor comprising the coil is included directly in the numerical model by a two-variable direct interpolation to avoid developing complicated equations for data fitting and greatly improve the computational speed. Issues related to meshing the finite elements of the real thickness 3D model are also discussed in detail. Based on a comparison of the measurement and simulation results, it is found that non-uniformity along the length exists in the coil, which implies imperfect superconducting properties in the coated conductor, and hence, coil. By evaluating the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the experimental data, and after taking into account a more practical n value and critical current for the non-uniform region, the modelling results show good agreement with the experimental results, validating this model as an appropriate tool to estimate the dc I-V relationship of a superconducting coil. This work provides a further step towards effective and efficient 3D modelling of superconducting devices for large

  11. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils. 3. Fracture-induced premature quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Y.; Bobrov, E. S.; Tsukamoto, O.; Takaghi, T.; Fujita, H.

    The theoretical correlation between shear stress and epoxy resin fracture developed in Part 2 was verified experimentally using a series of epoxy-impregnated, thin-walled superconducting test coils. A Lorentz shear stress field was created within the winding of each coil by placing it in a constant background magnetic field and energizing it with transport current, which was increased slowly at a constant rate. Because the boundary condition at each end of the test coil critically influenced the Lorentz shear stress field, which caused epoxy resin fracture, premature quench data were measured for test coils with different combinations of end boundary conditions. In test coils with both ends rigidly clamped, cracks occurred as transport current was increased; during a training sequence the test was terminated by a premature quench. Using acoustic emission and voltage signals, each premature quench was linked directly to a crack occurring near one of the ends. Test coils which had both ends unsupported, giving the winding freedom to expand radially, did not experience epoxy fracture and showed no premature quenches: these reached critical current at the first attempt.

  13. [Preparation and characterization of activated carbon-silver composite with antibacterial behavior via vacuum impregnation method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-silver composite (Ag/AC) for antibacterial performance by controlling silver release was prepared by silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. The antibacterial activity towards E. coil and resistance of water erosion was investigated through distilled water. Surface area and porosity analyzer, Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and pore properties. The results show that Ag0 was deposited on AC symmetrically. The content of silver supported and particle size were increased by the increasing of the concentration of CH3 COOAg, while specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore size were decreased. Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% which killed 10(7) CFU/mL concentration of E. coil in 120 min exhibited the similar antibacterial activity for E. coil with that prepared by traditional impregnation method. However, the silver loss of the Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% was 37.6%, showing much higher resistance to water erosion. High antibacterial activity and control silver release can be simultaneously realized by the silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. PMID:21404679

  14. Microwave application on air drying of apple (var. Granny Smith). The influence of vacuum impregnation pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Esparza, Maria Eugenia

    Combined hot air-microwave drying has been studied on apple (var. Granny Smith), with and without vacuum impregnation (VI) pretreatment with isotonic solution, respect to kinetics, microstructural and final quality items. In order to reach this objective, a drier has been designed and built, that allows to control and to register all the variables which take place during the drying process. Thermal and dielectric properties, that are very important characteristics when studying heat and mass transfer phenomena that occur during the combined drying process, have been related to temperature and/or moisture content throughout empirical equations. It could be observed that all these properties decreased with product moisture content. Respect to dielectric properties, a relationship among water binding forms to food structure and water molecules relaxation frequency has been found. On the other hand, the effect of drying treatment conditions (air rate, drying temperature, sample thickness and incident microwave power) on the drying rate, from an empirical model based on diffusional mechanisms with two kinetic parameters (k1 and k2), both function of the incident microwave power, has been studied. Microwave application to air drying implied a notable decrease on drying time, the higher the applied power the higher the reduction. Microstructural study by Cryo-Sem revealed fast water vaporization taking place when microwaves are applied. Vacuum impregnation did not implied an additional advantage for combined drying as drying rate was similar to that of NIV samples. Finally, it has been studied the influence of process conditions on the color and mechanical properties of the dried product (IV and NIV). Vacuum impregnation implied an increase on the fracture resistance and less purity and tone angle. Microwave application induced product browning with respect to air drying (tone decreased and purity increased).

  15. Proteolysis in Manchego-type cheese salted by brine vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Pavia, M; Trujillo, A J; Guamis, B; Ferragut, V

    2000-07-01

    A new salting procedure based on the brine vacuum impregnation of porous products was tested on Manchego-type cheese and compared with conventional brine immersion. Its effect on cheese proteolysis throughout a 90-d ripening period was determined. Three cheese regions were evaluated (the rind, the middle, and the internal regions). The parameters analyzed were total N, water-soluble N, soluble N in trichloroacetic acid and soluble N in phosphotungstic acid by using the Kjeldahl method, casein profile by urea-PAGE, and peptide profile of the water soluble nitrogen extract by reverse-phase HPLC. Free amino acid formation was monitored with a spectrophotometric method by using a Cd-ninhydrin reagent. Globally, proteolysis was significantly affected by ripening stage (increasing throughout all the maturation period studied) and cheese region (rind showed a proteolysis pattern different from the middle and internal regions). The salting procedure only affected cheese proteolysis in the rind, whereas conventional brine-salted cheeses showed lower proteolysis than vacuum-impregnated cheeses. PMID:10908050

  16. Ascorbic acid enrichment of whole potato tuber by vacuum-impregnation.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, K; Kikuchi, M; Koaze, H; Sato, T; Kojima, M; Yamamoto, K; Yasuda, K; Mori, M; Tsuda, S

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of vacuum-impregnation (VI) for enriching the ascorbic acid content of whole potatoes. Whole potatoes were immersed in a 10% ascorbic acid (AA) solution. A vacuum pressure of 70cm Hg was applied for 0-60min, following atmospheric pressure restoration for 3h, while samples remained in the VI solution. AA concentrations of potatoes were measured using HPLC. The effects of cooking and storage time in subsets of the fortified samples were also evaluated. Results indicated that the AA concentration of whole potatoes increased with vacuum time (max 150mg/100g fr. wt.). In addition, a steam-cooking study showed that 100g of the 25min steam-cooked VI potatoes could provide adults with 90-100% of the recommended daily allowance of AA (100mg). The storage study showed that VI whole potatoes had a relatively high AA concentration (50mg/100gfr. wt.), even at 14days of storage at 4°C. This study indicated that VI treatment of whole potatoes was useful for enriching the AA content. PMID:25214103

  17. Applicability of Vacuum Impregnation to Modify Physico-Chemical, Sensory and Nutritive Characteristics of Plant Origin Products—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Radziejewska-Kubzdela, Elżbieta; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Kidoń, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum impregnation is a non-destructive method of introducing a solution with a specific composition to the porous matrices of fruit and vegetables. Mass transfer in this process is a result of mechanically induced differences in pressure. Vacuum impregnation makes it possible to fill large volumes of intercellular spaces in tissues of fruit and vegetables, thus modifying physico-chemical properties and sensory attributes of products. This method may be used, e.g., to reduce pH and water activity of the product, change its thermal properties, improve texture, color, taste and aroma. Additionally, bioactive compounds may be introduced together with impregnating solutions, thus improving health-promoting properties of the product or facilitating production of functional food. PMID:25244012

  18. Applicability of vacuum impregnation to modify physico-chemical, sensory and nutritive characteristics of plant origin products--a review.

    PubMed

    Radziejewska-Kubzdela, Elżbieta; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Kidoń, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum impregnation is a non-destructive method of introducing a solution with a specific composition to the porous matrices of fruit and vegetables. Mass transfer in this process is a result of mechanically induced differences in pressure. Vacuum impregnation makes it possible to fill large volumes of intercellular spaces in tissues of fruit and vegetables, thus modifying physico-chemical properties and sensory attributes of products. This method may be used, e.g., to reduce pH and water activity of the product, change its thermal properties, improve texture, color, taste and aroma. Additionally, bioactive compounds may be introduced together with impregnating solutions, thus improving health-promoting properties of the product or facilitating production of functional food. PMID:25244012

  19. Influence of vacuum impregnation and pulsed electric field on the freezing temperature and ice propagation rates of spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts are currently directed towards improving the quality of sensitive tissues of fruits and vegetables after freezing and thawing. One of the methods under investigation is the combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) with cryoprotectants and pulsed electric field (PEF) applied to the plant tiss...

  20. Antibacterial effects of the povidone-iodine vacuum impregnation technique in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Joong Seob; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Ho Jun; Bae, Sung Hee; Jang, Ji Su; Lee, Jae Jun; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-06-01

    Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) is a popular graft material for augmentation rhinoplasty. Gore-Tex and Surgiform are two types of e-PTFE; Surgiform has thicker fibrils and is more compact than Gore-Tex. We conducted an ex vivo study to evaluate the ability of povidone-iodine (PVP-I) vacuum pretreatment to prevent infection with these two types of e-PTFE. Gore-Tex and Surgiform specimens were cut into 2-mm(3) pieces, which were separated into two groups. One group for each e-PTFE was disinfected with vacuum PVP-I impregnation and the other group was not disinfected. Using the pieces of implant material, swabs were obtained from the nasal cavities of 20 healthy adults, and the specimens were incubated on agar plates and viewed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We found that PVP-I treatment significantly reduced the bacterial colony counts in both the Gore-Tex and Surgiform groups. In the SEM images, bacterial colonies were observed both inside and outside the untreated Gore-Tex; on the untreated Surgiform, they were found primarily on the surface. Few bacteria were detected in the PVP-I-treated Gore-Tex and Surgiform groups. Our findings suggest that PVP-I pretreatment can reduce the risk of infection associated with e-PTFE. PMID:27304448

  1. Expansion into vacuum of a shocked tungsten carbide-epoxy mixture.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2009-03-01

    The behavior of a shocked tungsten carbide / epoxy mixture as it expands into a vacuum has been studied through a combination of experiments and simulations. X-ray radiography of the expanding material as well as the velocity measured for a stood-off witness late are used to understand the physics of the problem. The initial shock causes vaporization of the epoxy matrix, leading to a multi-phase flow situation as the epoxy expands rapidly at around 8 km/s followed by the WC particles moving around 3 km/s. There are also small amounts of WC moving at higher velocities, apparently due to jetting in the sample. These experiments provide important data about the multi-phase flow characteristics of this material.

  2. Preparation of flat-polished specimens for SEM-backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis--importance of epoxy impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Kjellsen, K.O.; Monsoey, A.; Isachsen, K.; Detwiler, R.J

    2003-04-01

    Representative and quantitative microstructural information of cement-based materials can be obtained in the backscattered electron and X-ray modes of the scanning electron microscope (SEM). One prerequisite, of several, is to use flat specimens. Microstructures that are minimally affected by the grinding and polishing necessary to produce the flat surface can be obtained. It is essential to fill the pores of the specimen with epoxy resin prior to grinding and polishing. After hardening, the epoxy stabilizes the microstructure and enables it to withstand the stresses of grinding and polishing without alteration. In the present paper, we describe a preparation technique that we consider to have produced excellent polished specimens. The importance of epoxy impregnation is demonstrated.

  3. Application of a vacuum pressure impregnation technique for rehydrating decellularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Hashimoto, Yoshihide; Nam, Kwangoo; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kishida, Akio

    2014-09-01

    Most of the clinically available decellularized tissues are preserved in a freeze-dried state. Freeze-dried (FD) tissues can be preserved for long term, although a rehydration process is necessary before use. Currently, an immersion method is most commonly used in clinical procedures, but it is difficult for complicated and thick structure tissue rehydration. In this study, we tried to apply a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) technique for FD tissue rehydration. The water content of decellularized tissues can reach the water content of native tissues within 30 min using VPI, whereas it took 6 h to reach the same water content using the immersion method. Furthermore, heparin rehydrated aortas by VPI had more heparin release at each time point and therefore appeared more anticoagulant activity. We found that the VPI treatment promotes solution infiltration into materials, achieves complete rehydration of the decellularized tissues, and deep infiltration of heparin into the decellularized tissues, suggesting that VPI treatment could be applied as a rehydration method for biological materials. PMID:24438501

  4. Testing of machine wound second generation HTS tape Vacuum Pressure Impregnated coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaffield, D.; Lewis, C.; Eugene, J.; Ingles, M.; Peach, D.

    2014-05-01

    Delamination of second generation (2G) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) tapes has previously been reported when using resin based insulation systems for wound coils. One proposed root cause is the differential thermal contraction between the coil former and the resin encapsulated coil turns resulting in the tape c-axis tensile stress being exceeded. Importantly, delamination results in unacceptable degradation of the superconductor critical current level. To mitigate the delamination risk and prove winding, jointing and Vacuum Pressure Impregnation (VPI) processes in the production of coils for superconducting rotating machines at GE Power Conversion two scaled trial coils have been wound and extensively tested. The coils are wound from 12mm wide 2G HTS tape supplied by AMSC onto stainless steel 'racetrack' coil formers. The coils are wound in two layers which include both in-line and layer-layer joints subject to in-process test. The resin insulation system chosen is VPI and oven cured. Tests included; insulation resistance, repeat quench and recovery of the superconductor, heat runs and measurement of n-value, before and after multiple thermal cycling between ambient and 35 Kelvin. No degradation of coil performance is evidenced.

  5. Highly radiation-resistant vacuum impregnation resin systems for fusion magnet insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, P. E.; Munshi, N. A.; Denis, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Magnets built for fusion devices such as the newly proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) need to be highly reliable, especially in a high radiation environment. Insulation materials are often the weak link in the design of superconducting magnets due to their sensitivity to high radiation doses, embrittlement at cryogenic temperatures, and the limitations on their fabricability. An insulation system capable of being vacuum impregnated with desirable properties such as a long pot-life, high strength, and excellent electrical integrity and which also provides high resistance to radiation would greatly improve magnet performance and reduce the manufacturing costs. A new class of insulation materials has been developed utilizing cyanate ester chemistries combined with other known radiation-resistant resins, such as bismaleimides and polyimides. These materials have been shown to meet the demanding requirements of the next generation of devices, such as FIRE. Post-irradiation testing to levels that exceed those required for FIRE showed no degradation in mechanical properties. In addition, the cyanate ester-based systems showed excellent performance at cryogenic temperatures and possess a wide range of processing variables, which will enable cost-effective fabrication of new magnets. This paper details the processing parameters, mechanical properties at 76 K and 4 K, as well as post-irradiation testing to dose levels surpassing 108 Gy.

  6. Tryout of the vacuum impregnation procedure for the ITER PF1 coil on the VPI mold made of plastic shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S.; Rodin, I.; Tanchuk, V.; Korban, S.; Bursikov, A.; Mednikov, A.; Pugachev, A.

    2014-05-01

    The PF1 Coil as part of the ITER superconducting magnet system is intended for positioning and shaping of the magnetic poloidal field. The technical specification for the PF1 coil requires a full-scale simulation of the basic technological processes including vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). Usually, a VPI mold is made of massive stainless steel walls to get the required quality of the monolithic structure of the pancake insulation by hot-curing compound. As a result, we obtain a high-cost furnace with a considerable amount of steel inside to be heated up to the specified temperature; excessive energy consumption for the furnace heating system; problems with the vacuum tightness of the VPI mold. The impregnation procedure using a VPI "plastic" mold was proposed so as to avoid the above mentioned shortcomings associated with the use of the furnace made of stainless steel.

  7. Characterization of a graphite epoxy optical bench during thermal vacuum cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Jenkins, Teresa K.; Maag, Carl R.; Taylor, Daniel M.

    1988-01-01

    In-situ monitoring of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera, a Hubble Space Telescope science instrument, was performed in a vacuum environment to better understand the formation of ice on cooled optical detectors. Several diagnostic instruments were mounted on an access plate to view the interior of the instrument housing and the graphite epoxy optical bench. The instrumentation chosen and the rationale for choosing the instrumentation are discussed. In addition, the performance of the instrumentation during monitoring operations is discussed.

  8. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Antonucci, V.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.

    2014-05-15

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  9. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  10. A definition of the parameters that influence and control the flow of resin during vacuum impregnation of magnets and other structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfer, S. J.; Evans, D.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Morrow, D.

    2002-05-01

    After winding and termination, the final stage in the preparation of many superconducting and conventional magnets is vacuum impregnation with an epoxide resin. Given the importance of the vacuum impregnation process in the overall scheme of magnet manufacture, it is surprising that there are many factors that effect the success and economics of the process that are still not quantified. This paper defines the pressure range, outgassing rates and moisture content that are considered necessary to achieve complete resin impregnation of tightly wound or other compacted, high impedance structures.

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils. 2. Shear-stress-induced epoxy fracture as the principal source of premature quenches and training theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, E. S.; Williams, J. E. C.; Iwasa, Y.

    An epoxy-impregnated superconducting winding may be considered structurally as a unidirectional composite consisting of superconducting wires embedded in a matrix of epoxy resin. The epoxy, because of its low strength and brittleness at low temperatures, is susceptible to brittle fracture which occurs under stresses induced initially during the cooldown (by differential thermal contractions of epoxy and metal) and subsequently during the magnet charge-up (by the Lorentz forces). Various modes of matrix failure are discussed and analysed. For the composite winding represented by four principal characteristics - geometry; constituent material properties; winding boundary conditions; and microcracks which become stress concentration sites for the initiation of further cracking. It is demonstrated that the transverse shear stresses induced by Lorentz forces in windings with cylindrical symmetry are principally responsible for premature magnet quenches. It is further demonstrated that to minimize shear stresses and thus prevent epoxy fracture in the winding, the whole winding body must not be restrained by the coil form and must be free to take its natural shape as the magnet is energized. This unrestrained winding support design is called the floating coil concept. The conclusions of the analysis agree both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results reported in the next two parts of this work.

  12. A technique for embedding undecalcified bone samples for detecting alpha-emitters using vacuum impregnation with Spurr's resin.

    PubMed

    Haines, J W

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed by which large samples of mineralized bone, containing an alpha-emitter, can be embedded in Spurr's resin in a fraction of the time required by conventional methods. Bone samples were freeze-dried or fixed and dried prior to impregnation with Spurr's resin under vacuum. Sections were cut for the preparation of either alpha-track or fission-track autoradiographs using the solid state detector CR-39. This method is applicable to samples containing a mobile form of a radionuclide that may be translocated during the processes of fixation and dehydration of the specimen. PMID:1377500

  13. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  14. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  15. Surface Flashover on Epoxy-Resin Printed Circuit Boards in Vacuum under Electron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruhisa; Hasegawa, Taketoshi; Osuga, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Katsuaki

    This paper deals with the surface flashover characteristics of dielectric material in vacuum during electron beam irradiation in order to design adequately the conductive patterns on printed circuit boards used inside a spacecraft. The dielectric material, glass-fiber reinforced epoxy resin, and the electrodes printed on it were irradiated with electrons of the energy of 3-10 keV. DC high voltage was applied between the two electrodes during electron irradiation. The voltage was increased stepwise until the surface flashover occurred on the dielectric material. We obtained the results that the surface flashover voltage increased with the insulation distance between the electrodes but electron irradiation made the flashover voltage lower. The flashover voltage characteristics were obtained as parameters of the electrode distance and the energy of the electron beam.

  16. Thermal contact conductance between aligned, unidirectional carbon/epoxy resin composites under vacuum conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, M.E.; Moses, W.M. Mercer Univ., Macon, GA )

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites under vacuum conditions at discrete contact pressures. Samples with unidirectional, continuous fibers oriented at 0 and 90 degrees to the contact interface are analyzed in 0/0 and 90/90 test configurations. Experimental results are compared with analytical data obtained using theory developed for homogeneous, isotropic, metallic contacts. As with earlier experiments in air, variations in the experimental data show the importance of material anisotropy and heterogeneity in governing thermal contact conductance between composites. While metallic theory can incorporate the anisotropic influence of fiber orientation, it fails to account for the distinct contributions of both fiber and matrix to the composite contact problem. 21 refs.

  17. Combined vacuum impregnation and electron-beam irradiation treatment to extend the storage life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Yurttas, Zeynep Sevimli; Moreira, Rosana G; Castell-Perez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the application of an antibrowning solution using vacuum impregnation (VI) and then electron-beam irradiation as a means to extend the shelf life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). A preliminary study helped to determine the best antibrowning solution and VI process parameters. Mushroom slices were impregnated with 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 2 g/100 g citric acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 1 g/100 g chitosan + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at different vacuum pressures and times and atmospheric restoration times. Selection of the antibrowning solution and VI parameters was based on texture and color of the mushroom slices. Next, the slices were irradiated at 1 kGy using a 1.35-MeV e-beam accelerator. Physicochemical, sensory, and microbial quality of mushrooms was monitored for 15 d at 4 °C. The best impregnation process in this study was 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at 50 mm Hg for 5 min and an atmospheric restoration time of 5 min. The control (untreated) samples suffered structural losses throughout storage. Only the vacuum impregnated-irradiated samples had acceptable color by the end of storage. Sensory panelists consistently preferred the samples produced with VI and irradiation because exposure to ionizing radiation inhibited growth of spoilage microorganisms. PMID:24266620

  18. Ageing of organic electrical insulating materials due to radiation. Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparado, G.; Calderaro, E.; Schifani, R.; Tutone, R.; Rizzo, G.

    Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated under vacuum have been investigated. In particular dynamic-mechanical, dielectric and tensile measurements have been performed. This is a useful basis with a view to studying the ageing phenomenon of organic insulating materials due to radiation under the combined effect of environmental conditions. The results indicate that, in the dose range investigated (0-1.5 x 10 6Gy), the main effect of γ-rays under vacuum is to increase the degree of crosslinking

  19. Synthesis of Pd particle-deposited microporous silica membranes via a vacuum-impregnation method and their gas permeation behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Yu, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kew-Ho

    2008-09-15

    Pd particle-deposited microporous silica membranes were synthesized to improve hydrogen permselectivity of the microporous silica membrane and to overcome high cost of palladium and crack formation through hydrogen embrittlement. Pd particles below 400 nm in diameter were readily deposited on the microporous silica membrane via a vacuum-impregnation method by using a Pd(C(3)H(5))(C(5)H(5)) precursor. After deposition of Pd particles on the microporous silica membrane, hydrogen permselectivity over nitrogen considerably increased from 11-28 to 30-115 in a permeation temperature range of 25-350 degrees C due to plugging membrane defects and hydrogen adsorption diffusion through the interface between the Pd and silica layer. The activation energy of the Pd-deposited silica membrane (6.32 kJ mol(-1)) was higher than that of the microporous silica membrane (4.22 kJ mol(-1)). In addition, the Pd-particle deposition led to an increase in the permselectivity of He and CO(2) with little chemical affinity for the Pd particles, which indicates that Pd-particle deposition gives the effect of plugging defects such as pinholes or cracks, which could be formed during the membrane preparation. Therefore it is demonstrated that Pd-particle deposition on the silica membrane is effective for induction of the hydrogen adsorption diffusion and plugging membrane defects. PMID:18620361

  20. Properties of radiation stable, low viscosity impregnating resin for cryogenic insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Huihui; Chu, Xinxin; Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Liu, Huajun; Li, Laifeng

    2011-06-01

    Impregnating resins in fusion magnet technology are required to be radiation stable, low viscosity, long usable life and high toughness. To meet these objectives, we developed a new epoxy based composite which consists of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resin and isopropylidenebisphenol bis[(2-glycidyloxy-3-n-butoxy)-1-propylether] (IPBE). The ratio of TGPAP to IPBE can be varied to achieve desired viscosity and working time. The boron-free glass fiber reinforced composites were prepared by vacuum pressure impregnation. The radiation resistance was evaluated by 60Co γ-ray irradiation of 1 MGy at ambient temperature. The mechanical properties of the composites have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K.

  1. Surface impregnation by particle injection — laser impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinkfeldt, J. E.

    1988-02-01

    Wear resistance can be improved by laser impregnation — the surface layer of a base material is melted and hard wear resistant carbide particles are injected into the melted pool. Previously, experiments were mainly performed in a vacuum chamber at a laser power of 10 kW. In this paper, results are presented of experiments carried out with 1.5 and 2.5 kW lasers at ambient atmospheric pressure. Laser impregnated layers show increased wear resistance of the order of 20-40 times for impregnated compared to untreated aluminium, and 5-20 times for impregnated compared to hardened carbon steels.

  2. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  3. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  4. Impregnation mode in wood plastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffar Husain, M.; Khan, Mubarak A.; Azam Ali, M.; Idriss Ali, K. M.; Mustafa, A. I.

    1996-12-01

    Bulk monomer MMA was impregnated into simul, a fuel wood of Bangladesh, under vacuum and under normal temperature and pressure conditions in order to compare the mode of impregnation and its effect on various characteristic parameters of wood plastic composites. Methanol (MeOH) was used as the swelling solvent with methylmethacrylate (MMA) at MMA: MeOH = 70:30, v/v. Impregnation of the bulk monomer was very high under vacuum compared to that at normal condition; but the difference of grafting of MMA to the wood cellulose under these two impregnating conditions was much lower as compared to that of the uptakes of impregnating solution MMA + MeOH under these two modes of impregnation. Incorporation of additives to MMA + MeOH has substantially enhanced grafting, tensile strength, bending strength and compression strength of thcomposite of such an extent that there is virtually very little difference between vacuum impregnation and normal impregnation. Considering the available data it is suggested that the impregnation under normal condition is preferable beacuse different substrates of various sizes and shapes can be suitably impregnated under normal condition while vacuum impregnation has several limitations in this respect.

  5. Vacuum Sealing Drainage Treatment Combined with Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Jiulong; Zhao, Jun; Quan, Liangliang; Jia, Xunyuan; Li, Mingchao; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) and antibiotic-loaded bone cement on soft tissue defects and infection. Material/Methods This prospective non-blinded study recruited 46 patients with soft tissue defects and infection from January 2010 to May 2014 and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups (n=23). Patients in the experimental group were treated with VSD and antibiotic-loaded bone cement, while the patients in the control group were treated with VSD only. Results In the experimental group, the wound was healed in 23 cases at 4 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 12 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. No infection reoccurred in 1-year follow-up. In the control group, the wound was healed in 15 cases at 6 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 8 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 3 cases and 4 cases, respectively. In the other 8 cases the wound was healed at 8 weeks postoperatively. Infection reoccurred in 3 cases during the follow-up. The experimental group had significantly fewer VSD dressing renewals, shorter time needed until the wound was ready for surgery, shorter duration of antibiotic administration, faster wound healing, and shorter hospital stay than the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions The combination of VSD and antibiotic bone cement might be a better method for treatment of soft tissue defects and infection. PMID:27281233

  6. Vacuum Sealing Drainage Treatment Combined with Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects and Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Jiulong; Zao, Jun; Quan, Liangliang; Jia, Xunyuan; Li, Mingchao; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) and antibiotic-loaded bone cement on soft tissue defects and infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective non-blinded study recruited 46 patients with soft tissue defects and infection from January 2010 to May 2014 and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups (n=23). Patients in the experimental group were treated with VSD and antibiotic-loaded bone cement, while the patients in the control group were treated with VSD only. RESULTS In the experimental group, the wound was healed in 23 cases at 4 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 12 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. No infection reoccurred in 1-year follow-up. In the control group, the wound was healed in 15 cases at 6 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 8 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 3 cases and 4 cases, respectively. In the other 8 cases the wound was healed at 8 weeks postoperatively. Infection reoccurred in 3 cases during the follow-up. The experimental group had significantly fewer VSD dressing renewals, shorter time needed until the wound was ready for surgery, shorter duration of antibiotic administration, faster wound healing, and shorter hospital stay than the control group (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The combination of VSD and antibiotic bone cement might be a better method for treatment of soft tissue defects and infection. PMID:27281233

  7. An Improved Technique for the Preparation of Mounted or Unmounted Carbon/Epoxy Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edahl, Robert A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    As carbon/epoxy materials became more prevalent in the aerospace industry, microstructural analysis demanded specimen preparation techniques that led to better polished surfaces, achievable in a shorter time, and using fewer steps. The desire to use image analysis for material characterization also helped drive the goal for defect free surfaces. At NASA-Langley (LaRC), carbon/epoxy specimens had been historically prepared in 1 inch diameter Bakelite mounts. Carbon/epoxy specimens that were 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick were not affected by the heat and pressure required for mounting in Bakelite, however thinner specimens were crushed during mounting. A two-part room temperature curing epoxy was chosen as an alternative but sometimes voids developed between the specimen and the mounting material. This was prevented by either heating the epoxy to 140 degrees F to lower the viscosity of the epoxy or by using a vacuum impregnation apparatus. Both techniques helped facilitate flow and allowed the epoxy to penetrate crevices.

  8. Thermal expansion of epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Bridgman, C.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of three epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens was measured from 20 to 120/sup 0/C (70 to 250/sup 0/F) using a fused quartz push-rod dilatometer. Billets produced by vacuum impregnating layers of two types of fiberglass cloth with an epoxy resin were core-drilled to produce cylindrical specimens. These were used to study expansion perpendicular and parallel to the fiberglass layers. The dilatometer is held at a preselected temperature until steady-state is indicated by stable length and temperature data. Before testing the composite specimens, a reliability check of the dilatometer was performed using a copper secondary standard. This indicated thermal expansion coefficient (..cap alpha..) values within +-2% of expected values from 20 to 200/sup 0/C.

  9. Cryogenic tests of glass-epoxy based electrical insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D.; Martin, P.S.; Pripstein, M.; Green, M.A.

    1981-08-01

    A thin superconducting solenoid for the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) experiment at PEP was constructed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in 1979 and tested in 1980. A failure of the ground plane insulation damaged the coil to the point that it required rebuilding. An extensive study of this failure indicated that an iron chip embedded in the bore tube had penetrated the insulation. Before rebuilding the coil, an investigation of the insulation system was done with the goal of determining the most reliable techniques and materials for withstanding high voltages in the coil package. The experience with the TPC coil and its prototypes indicate that glass cloth vacuum-impregnated with epoxy is an excellent material for cryogenic applications from the mechanical standpoint. Further, since the LBL assembly shop had extensive experience with the epoxy formulation used in the coil, there was reluctance to change that component. Therefore, the investigation concentrated on different types of glass cloth and on composites containing glass cloth.

  10. Matrix Characterization and Development for the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, B. W.; Hubert, P.; Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Loos, A. C.; Pipes, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    The curing kinetics and viscosity of an epoxy resin system, SI-ZG-5A, have been characterized for application in the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. Impregnation of a typical carbon fiber perform provided the test bed for the characterization. Process simulations were carried out using the process model, COMPRO, to examine heat transfer and curing kinetics for a fully impregnated panel, neglecting resin flow. The predicted viscosity profile and final degree of cure were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  11. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. X.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Huang, C. J.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-01

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  12. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-27

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  13. Cryogenic evaluation of epoxy bond strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, N.; Young, W.

    The purpose of the work presented here was to determine methods of optimizing the adhesion of a particular epoxy (CTD-101K, Composite Technology Development Inc.) to a particular nickel-based alloy substrate (Incoloy ® 908, Inco Alloys International) for cryogenic applications. Initial efforts were focused on surface preparation of the substrate material via various mechanical and chemical cleaning techniques. Test samples, fabricated to simulate the conduit-to-insulation interface, were put through a mock heat treat and vacuum/pressure impregnation process. Samples were compression/shear load tested to compare the bond strengths at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resulting data indicate that acid etching creates a higher bond strength than the other tested techniques and that the bond formed is stronger at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. A description of the experiment along with the resulting data is presented here.

  14. Vacuum-bag-only processing of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shad

    Ultrasonic imaging in the C-scan mode in conjunction with the amplitude of the reflected signal was used to measure flow rates of an epoxy resin film penetrating through the thickness of single layers of woven carbon fabric. Assemblies, comprised of a single layer of fabric and film, were vacuum-bagged and ultrasonically scanned in a water tank during impregnation at 50°C, 60°C, 70°C, and 80°C. Measured flow rates were plotted versus inverse viscosity to determine the permeability in the thin film, non-saturated system. The results demonstrated that ultrasonic imaging in the C-scan mode is an effective method of measuring z-direction resin flow through a single layer of fabric. The permeability values determined in this work were consistent with permeability values reported in the literature. Capillary flow was not observed at the temperatures and times required for pressurized flow to occur. The flow rate at 65°C was predicted from the linear plot of flow rate versus inverse viscosity. The effects of fabric architecture on through-thickness flow rates during impregnation of an epoxy resin film were measured by ultrasonic imaging. Multilayered laminates comprised of woven carbon fabrics and epoxy films (prepregs) were fabricated by vacuum-bagging. Ultrasonic imaging was performed in a heated water tank (65°C) during impregnation. Impregnation rates showed a strong dependence on fabric architecture, despite similar areal densities. Impregnation rates are directly affected by inter-tow spacing and tow nesting, which depend on fabric architecture, and are indirectly affected by areal densities. A new method of predicting resin infusion rates in prepreg and resin film infusion processes was proposed. The Stokes equation was used to derive an equation to predict the impregnation rate of laminates as a function of fabric architecture. Flow rate data previously measured by ultrasound was analyzed with the new equation and the Kozeny-Carman equation. A fiber

  15. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  16. Evaluation of epoxy systems for use in SBASI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultas, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the test program was to evaluate the performance of different epoxy systems as replacements for existing epoxy systems in the SBASI. The three areas of investigation were the connector shell potting, the epoxy tape under the charge cup, and the epoxy impregnated fiberglass over the output charge. Factors considered, in addition to performance, were availability, shelf life, pot life, and effect on producibility and cost.

  17. ITER central solenoid model coil impregnation optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, J. B.; Munshi, N. A.; Smith, K. B.

    The success of the vacuum-pressure impregnation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor central solenoid is critical to success of the magnet system. Analysis of fluid flow through a fabric bed is extremely complicated, and complete analytical solutions are not available, but semiempirical methods can be adapted to model these flows. Several of these models were evaluated to predict the impregnation characteristics of a liquid resin through a mat of reinforcing glass fabric, and an experiment was performed to validate these models. The effects of applied pressure differential, glass fibre volume fraction, resin viscosity and impregnation time were examined analytically. From the results of this optimization, it is apparent that use of elevated processing temperature resin systems offer significant advantages in large scale impregnation due to their lower viscosity and longer working life, and they may be essential for large scale impregnations.

  18. Properties of multiaxial and 3-D orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bilisik, A.K.; Mohamed, M.H.

    1995-06-01

    A new three-dimensional multiaxial weaving technique was developed at NCSU. Rectangular cross-sectional preforms were fabricated. The preforms have five sets of yarn: these are warp, filling, Z-yarn and {+-}45{degree} yarns. The preforms which are made from carbon fibers were consolidated by vacuum impregnation molding at N.C. A and T State University. Epoxy/resin was used as the matrix. The unit cell of the multiaxial 3-D woven structure has been described. Mechanical tests were carried out on multiaxial 3-D woven and orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites. The tests included bending, interlaminar shear and in-plane shear. Test results for both structures were compared and are presented.

  19. Investigation of paramagnetic response of metallic epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paramagnetic properties of epoxies which were impregnated with metal ions were examined as the primary task in this research. A major conclusion was that the quality control of the epoxies was insufficient to permit reliable evaluation. Subsequently, a new set of specimens is being prepared. As an additional task, a new method is investigated for estimating heats of combustion for saturated hydrocarbons. The results of that investigation have shown that the empirical approach is a promising method for on-line measurements.

  20. Effect of Matrix Modification on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    In order to investigate the effect of the matrix variability on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass fiber reinforced composites at 77K, three kinds of modifiers were employed to diethyl toluene diamine (DETD) cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy resin system. The woven glass fiber reinforced composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). The ILSS at 77 K was studied and the results indicated that introduction of modifiers used in this study can enhance the ILSS of composite at 77 K. A maximum of 14.87% increase was obtained by addition of 10 wt% IPBE into the epoxy matrix. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture mechanism and strengthening effect.

  1. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  2. Vacuum multilayer lamination of printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkus, J. W.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment investigates vacuum multilayer lamination of rigid/flex, epoxy glass, polyimide glass, and polyimide quartz printed wiring boards. The effectiveness of the vacuum in removing entrapped air during the lamination cycle is demonstrated. The results of the experiment have also shown that vacuum lamination of epoxy glass multilayers improves the delamination resistance. Thus, epoxy glass multilayers that have been vacuum laminated will be able to withstand soldering temperatures longer without delaminating. Also, the experiment shows that vacuum multilayer lamination does not significantly change thickness, layer-to-layer registration, glass transition temperature, dielectric spacing between conductors, electrical resistance following thermal shock test, and other critical printed wiring board properties.

  3. Heat generation from epoxy cracks and bond failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, H.; Iwasa, Y.

    Energy released following cracks and bond failures were measured for an EPON epoxy near 4.2 K. Crack events were monitored with an acoustic emission sensor; the energy released by each crack or bond failure was calculated from the temperature rise measured with thermocouples. Cracking was observed to be load dependent; this may account in part for the training phenomenon observed in bringing epoxy-impregnated superconducting magnets to full design field.

  4. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  5. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  6. GRAPHITE IMPREGNATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, F.; Buttram, H.J.

    1962-04-24

    ABS>A method for impregnating a refractory material by filling its pores with a first salt having a high melting temperature is described. The salt is mixed with another, more volatile salt, giving the mixture a much lower melting temperature than that of the first salt. The material is coated with the mixture, then heated to drive off the volatile salt, leaving the first salt in place. (AEC)

  7. Epoxy resin

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  8. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb{sub 3}Sn coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-27

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  9. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  10. Analysis of two-dimensional flow of epoxy fluids through woven glass fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, J.B.; Smith, K.B.

    1997-06-01

    Fabrication of magnet coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require vacuum pressure impregnation of epoxy resin into the glass fabric of the insulation system. Flow of a fluid through a packed bed of woven glass fabric is extremely complicated, and semiempirical methods must be used to analyze these flows. The previous one-dimensional model has been modified for analysis of two-dimensional isotropic flow of epoxy resins through woven glass fabric. Several two-dimensional flow experiments were performed to validate the analysis, and to determine permeabilities of several fabric weave types. The semiempirical permeability is shown to be a characteristic of the fabric weave, and once determined, may be used to analyze flow of fluids of differing viscosities. Plain weave has a lower permeability than satin weave fabric, possibly due to the increased tortuosity of the preferential flow paths along fiber tows. A flow radius of approximately 2 meters through satin weave fabric is predicted for fluid viscosities of 0.10 Pa s (100 cps) in 20 hours, characteristic of VPI resins.

  11. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  12. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  13. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY

    DOEpatents

    Kanter, M.A.

    1958-05-20

    A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

  14. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  15. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  16. Ultrarapid vacuum-microwave histoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Kok, L P; Boon, M E

    1995-05-01

    A novel histoprocessing method for paraffin sections is presented in which the combination of vacuum and microwave exposure is the key element. By exploiting the decrease in boiling temperature under vacuum, the liquid molecules in the tissues have been successfully extracted and exchanged at relatively low temperatures during each of the steps from dehydration, clearing, and impregnation. In this vacuum-microwave method, an extremely short time suffices for the preparation of optimal-quality paraffin blocks. No xylene (but isopropanol instead) was used as the intermediate solvent. Thirty biopsies (thickness 2-4 mm) can be processed in 40 min. In addition, this approach can be used to produce large sections of giant blocks (4 x 6 x 1 cm3) which can be easily cut on a routine microtome due to the optimal paraffin impregnation. These giant blocks do not shrink during this vacuum-microwave histoprocessing. PMID:7657560

  17. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  18. Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Dhamodaran, T K; Gnanaharan, R

    2007-08-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid and borax in the ratio 1:1.5 under different treatment schedules. It was found that E. grandis wood, even in green condition, could be pressure treated to desired chemical dry salt retention (DSR) and penetration levels using 6% BAE solution. Up to a thickness of 50mm, in order to achieve a DSR of 5 kg/m(3) boron compounds, the desired DSR level as per the Indian Standard for perishable timbers for indoor use, it was found that neither the moisture content of wood nor the treatment schedule posed any problem as far as the treatability of E. grandis wood was concerned. PMID:17046244

  19. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  20. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  1. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  2. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A rapid preparation of acicular Ni impregnated anode with enhanced conductivity and operational stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingbao; Guan, Chengzhi; Lü, Zhe; Wei, Bo; Li, Yiqian; Su, Wenhui

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabricating Ni(NO3)2 solution impregnated YSZ (YSZ: Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is presented. In order to reduce the impregnation cycles and increase the reliability of the YSZ membrane, a YSZ support with a porosity of ∼60% is soaked in a saturated Ni(NO3)2 solution with an increased temperature of 80 °C. The impregnated anode is dried in a vacuum drying device without heating, resulting in a flower-like Ni(NO3)2·6H2O crystal. The formed porous structure is likely to facilitate the impregnating process and considered to be the key to success of the impregnation process with saturated solution. After heating at 700 °C, a novel needle-shaped NiO is presented, which exhibits some advantages including fast preparation, high connectivity, large specific surface area and high operational stability (i.e. high aggregation resistance). For the purpose of comparison, Ni(NO3)2 solution impregnated YSZ anodes prepared through the conventional impregnation process are also characterized under the same conditions.

  4. Void-free epoxy castings for cryogenic insulators and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the Westinghouse Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Large Coil Program (LCP) incorporates a main lead bushing which transmits heat-leak loads by conduction to the supercritical helium stream. The bushing, which consists of epoxy resin cast about a copper conductor, must be electrically insulated, vacuum tight and be capable of withstanding the stresses encountered in cryognic service. The seal design of the bushing is especially important; leakage from either the helium system or the external environment into the vacuum will cause the magnet to quench. Additionally, the epoxy-resin casting must resist mechanical loads caused by the weight of leads attached to the bushing and thermal stresses transmitted to the epoxy via the conductor. The epoxy resin is cast about the conductor in such a way as to provide the required vacuum tight seal. The technique by which this is accomplished is reviewed. Equally important is the elimination of voids in the epoxy which will act as stress-concentrating discontinuities during cooling to or warming from 4K. The types of voids that could be expected and their causes are described. The paper reviews techniques employed to eliminate voids within the cast-resin portion of the bushing.

  5. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  6. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  7. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  8. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  9. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  10. Reinforced Epoxy Nanocomposite Sheets Utilizing Large Interfacial Area from a High Surface Area Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Kazufumi; Nishino, Hidekazu; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    We employed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the available highest specific surface area (more than 1000 m2/g) that provided very large interfacial area for the matrix to fabricate epoxy composite sheets. Through mechanical redirection of the SWNT alignment to horizontal to create a laterally aligned scaffold sheet, into which epoxy resin was impregnated. The SWNT scaffold was engineered in structure to meet the these two nearly mutually exclusive demands, i.e. to have nanometer meso-pores (2-50 nm) to facilitate homogeneous impregnation of the epoxy resin and to have mechanical strength to tolerate the compaction forces generated during impregnation. Through this approach, a SWNT/epoxy composite sheet with a nearly ideal morphology was realized where long and aligned SWNTs were loaded at high weight fraction (33 percent) with an intertube distance approaching the radius of gyration for polymers. The resultant composite showed a Young's modulus of 15.0 GPa and a tensile strength of 104 MPa, thus achieving 5.4 and 2.1 times reinforcement as compared to the neat epoxy resin.

  11. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  12. FIELD STUDIES OF IMPREGNATED CONCRETE PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The follow-on study (initiated in June 1980) continued to monitor performance of 1,400 ft of impregnated concrete pipe installed in several Texas cities. The performance of concrete pipe has been compared with that of sulfur-impregnated concrete pipe; hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treat...

  13. Qualification of a cyanate ester epoxy blend supplied by Japanese industry for the ITER TF coil insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.; Knaster, J.; Savary, F.

    2012-06-01

    During the last years, two cyanate ester epoxy blends supplied by European and US industry have been successfully qualified for the ITER TF coil insulation. The results of the qualification of a third CE blend supplied by Industrial Summit Technology (IST, Japan) will be presented in this paper. Sets of test samples were fabricated exactly under the same conditions as used before. The reinforcement of the composite consists of wrapped R-glass / polyimide tapes, which are vacuum pressure impregnated with the resin. The mechanical properties of this material were characterized prior to and after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022m-2 (E>0.1 MeV), i.e. twice the ITER design fluence. Static and dynamic tensile as well as static short beam shear tests were carried out at 77 K. In addition, stress strain relations were recorded to determine the Young's modulus at room temperature and at 77 K. The results are compared in detail with the previously qualified materials from other suppliers.

  14. Continuous plasma treatment and resin impregnation of a high-strength fiber material

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1983-09-01

    A system was developed for the continuous plasma treatment of fibrous, reinforcing materials used in composites. Data are presented on the removal of moisture from Kevlar 49 Aramid by the use of argon and zero air plasma. Adhesion test results with plasma-treated, unidirectional Kevlar 49/epoxy laminates showed an improvement in adhesion ranging from 1.4 to 3.7 times, as reported by the plasma treatment effectiveness parameter. Limited tensile testing of resin-impregnated yarn showed no catastropic failure from plasma treatment.

  15. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  16. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  17. Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Tube Lined With Aluminum Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernet, Nelson J.; Kerr, Gregory K.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-fiber/epoxy composite tube lined with welded aluminum foil useful as part of lightweight heat pipe in which working fluid ammonia. Aluminum liner provides impermeability for vacuum seal, to contain ammonia in heat pipe, and to prevent flow of noncondensable gases into heat pipe. Similar composite-material tubes lined with foils also incorporated into radiators, single- and two-phase thermal buses, tanks for storage of cryogenic materials, and other plumbing required to be lightweight.

  18. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  19. Application of In Situ Fiberization for fabrication of improved strain isolation pads and graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Seibold, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying the in situ fiberization process to the fabrication of strain isolation pads (SIP) for the Space Shuttle and to the fabrication of graphite-epoxy composites was evaluated. The ISF process involves the formation of interconnected polymer fiber networks by agitation of dilute polymer solutions under controlled conditions. High temperature polymers suitable for SIP use were fiberized and a successful fiberization of polychloro trifluoroethylene, a relatively high melting polymer, was achieved. Attempts to fiberize polymers with greater thermal stability were unsuccessful, apparently due to characteristics caused by the presence of aromaticity in the backbone of such materials. Graphite-epoxy composites were fabricated by interconnecting two dimensional arrays of graphite fiber with polypropylene IS fibers with subsequent epoxy resin impregnation. Mechanical property tests were performed on laminated panels of this material to evaluate intralaminar and interlaminar shear strength, and thus fracture toughness. Test results were generally unpromising.

  20. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  1. In vitro analysis of the penetration of methylene blue dye in human radicular dentin using different methods of impregnation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ronise; Bombana, Antonio C; Sayeg, Isaac J

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verity whether different conditions of contact with a dye solution would result in different levels of the impregnation by the marker agent in human radicular dentin. The root canals of 60 upper human canines were immersed in methylene blue dye (0.5%, pH 7.0) for 24 h under six different conditions: passive immersion; pre-agitation for 10 min using an endodontic ultrasound; pre-agitation for 10 min using a cleaning ultrasound; 25-mmHg vacuum for 10 min followed by passive immersion; 30-mmHg and 650-mmHg vacuum for 24 h. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and dye impregnation was assessed by a trained and calibrated examiner, using the Q 550 IW image analyser (Leica Qwin, Cambridge, England). The measurements were analysed with anova and Tukey test. The results revealed no significant difference among the different methods for dye impregnation. In the cervical third, impregnation with 30 mmHg was significantly more effective than with endodontic ultrasound or 25 mmHg. At the apical third, no differences were observed between any of the dye impregnation methods. The comparison of different thirds revealed a statistically significant difference between the cervical and apical and the middle and apical thirds, but not between the cervical and middle thirds. PMID:19032645

  2. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  3. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  4. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  5. Epoxy resin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Limón, B.; Wetzel, G. B. J.; Olivares Pérez, A.; Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Ramos-Garcia, R.; Toxqui López, S.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2006-02-01

    We observed that a commercial epoxy resin (Comex (R) is enable to record images by means of lithography techniques. We can generate a hologram using a digital image and a computer simulation program and transferred it on our resin by microlithography techniques to get a phase hologram and increase its efficiency. The exposition to the heat produce temperature gradients and the information in the mask is transferred to the material by the refraction index changes, thus the film is recorded. At the same time the hologram is cured.

  6. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  7. Cross-sectional analysis of W-cored Ni nanoparticle via focused ion beam milling with impregnation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel bimetallic nanoparticle is synthesized by radio frequency thermal plasma process which belongs to the vapor phase condensation technology. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized particle were investigated using the conventional nanoparticle transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample. A few part of them looked like core/shell structured particle, but ambiguities were caused by either TEM sample preparation or TEM analysis. In order to clarify whether a core/shell structure is developed for the particle, various methodologies were tried to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was conducted for cold-compacted particles, dispersed particles on silicon wafer, and impregnated particles with epoxy which is compatible with electron beam. A sound cross-sectional sample was just obtained from cyanoacrylate impregnation and FIB milling procedure. A tungsten-cored nickel shell structure was precisely confirmed with aid of cross-sectional sample preparation method. PMID:25288920

  8. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  9. Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

    1986-12-17

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

  10. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  11. Air Force electrochemical impregnation process results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The status of the Air Force Electrochemical program was reviewed. The performance characteristics of the system was attributed to the use of an electrochemical impregnation process. The electrode improvements, the prototype equipment designs, and the actual construction of a production facility are discussed.

  12. What is Common in the Training of the Large Variety of Impregnated Corrector Magnets for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijspeert, Albert; Ten Kate, Herman

    2004-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be equipped with about 5000 superconducting corrector magnets of 10 different types, ranging from dipoles through quadrupoles, sextupoles and octupoles to decapoles and dodecapoles. Four wires are used with 2 copper/superconductor ratios. Magnet lengths range from 0.15 m to 1.4 m. However, the magnets are all epoxy-impregnated and wound with enameled monolithic wires. The paper highlights the features that are common in the training of all these different magnets and uses that to give some clues for the possible origin of the training.

  13. A model of the thermal-spike mechanism in graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a thermal spike on a moisture-saturated graphite/epoxy composite was studied in detail. A single thermal spike from 25 C to 132 C was found to produce damage as evidenced by a significant increase in the level of moisture saturation in the composite. Approximately half of this increase remained after a vacuum anneal at 150 C for 7 days, suggesting the presence of an irreversible damage component. Subsequent thermal spikes created less and less additional moisture absorption, with the cumulative effect being a maximum or limiting moisture capacity of the composite. These observations are explained in terms of a model previously developed to explain the reverse thermal effect of moisture absorption in epoxy and epoxy matrix composites. This model, based on the inverse temperature dependence of free volume, contributes an improved understanding of thermal-spike effects in graphite/epoxy composites.

  14. Effects of environmental exposure on fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, U.; Miller, B. )

    1990-08-01

    A microbond technique for direct determination of fiber/resin interfacial shear strength in composites (Miller et al., 1987) has been used to investigate the influence of environmental conditions on adhesive bonding in certain systems. The small dimensions involved in the method facilitate uniform exposure and short exposure times. Significant changes in both average shear strength and in shear strength distributions are observed on exposing aramid/epoxy and glass/epoxy microbond assemblies to steam or hot water. Shear strength drops to a plateau value in both cases, the reduction being more drastic with the glass fiber. Vacuum drying restores shear strength completely in aramid/epoxy microassemblies, even when the surface of the aramid fiber has been chemically modified, but there is only partial regeneration of bond strength with the glass/epoxy system. 15 refs.

  15. Instability of superconducting windings induced by cracking of impregnating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    Short, superconducting specimens simulating the structure of windings have been examined in order to investigate the instabilities of superconducting windings induced by heat generation due to wire movement, cracking or debonding of the impregnating material. The cryogenic properties of the impregnating materials were also measured. The results revealed the properties of the bobbin and the impregnation materials that are needed for stable superconducting magnets. The training behaviour of impregnated magnets was also studied. It was confirmed that the structure of the winding and the properties of the impregnating material are important factors in superconducting magnet stability.

  16. Characterization of catalyst-impregnated coal samples

    SciTech Connect

    Znaimer, S.; Gubanc, P.F.; Hulseman, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    The impregnation of sodium chloride into Illinois No. 6 bituminous HVC coal from an aqueous solution was studied. Atomic absorption, electrical conductivity, and BET surface area analyses were used to determine an effective diffusivity, partition coefficient, salt loading, and internal surface area. The diffusion data were found to fit Fick's law of diffusion for a sphere giving temperature and particle-size-dependent effective diffusivities ranging from 2 x 10/sup -8/ to 4 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 2//s. Partition coefficients averaged 1.35, which indicates that salt adsorption onto the coal surface has, at most, a minor effect on impregnation. An empirical correlation for salt loading was developed.

  17. Ion bombardment investigations of impregnated cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; Gaertner, Georg

    2003-06-01

    Ion bombardment is one of the important factors limiting the performance of impregnated cathodes (=Ba dispenser cathodes) in high end television tubes or in colour monitor tubes. Hence, when designing a new gun with, e.g. higher electron beam current density, it is important also to model the influence of ion bombardment. Therefore, relations between basic parameters as a function of temperature need to be known quantitatively. In this paper, the emission slump of impregnated cathodes has been analyzed in a diode configuration in UHV with a differentially pumped Ar ion gun. The emission degeneration during and regeneration periods after ion bombardment have been investigated as function of cathode temperature, ion current and ion energy. One of the important results is, that the degeneration time coefficient is only weakly dependent on ion energy. The data matrix obtained can be used to improve the ion bombardment model applied in new electron gun design.

  18. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  19. [Neutral and impregnated dressings and products].

    PubMed

    Nicodème, Marguerite; Rollot, Florence; Fromantin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Dressings without active ingredients are adapted to each stage of healing, depending on their degree of moisture, their absorption capacity and their non-traumatic character. Impregnated and mechanical dressings are also available. They are indicated for preventing or treating a symptom or a complication, or for "boosting" healing, in the form of a sequential treatment. Understanding their composition enables their indications to be better targeted thereby improving the efficacy of the overall wound management. PMID:26763565

  20. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

  1. Impregnated Netting Slows Infestation by Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L.; Waller, Lance A.; Richards, Jean M.; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G. Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A.; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

  2. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  3. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  4. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  5. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  6. Fabrication and Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Shape Memory Epoxy (CNFR-SME) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyang

    Shape memory polymers have a wide range of applications due to their ability to mechanically change shapes upon external stimulus, while their achievable composite counterparts prove even more versatile. An overview of literature on shape memory materials, fillers and composites was provided to pave a foundation for the materials used in the current study and their inherent benefits. This study details carbon nanofiber and composite fabrication and contrasts their material properties. In the first section, the morphology and surface chemistry of electrospun-poly(acrylonitrile)-based carbon nanofiber webs were tailored through various fabrication methods and impregnated with a shape memory epoxy. The morphologies, chemical compositions, thermal stabilities and electrical resistivities of the carbon nanofibers and composites were then characterized. In the second section, an overview of thermal, mechanical and shape memory characterization techniques for shape memory polymers and their composites was provided. Thermal and mechanical properties in addition to the kinetic and dynamic shape memory performances of neat epoxy and carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites were characterized. The various carbon nanofiber web modifications proved to have notable influence on their respective composite performances. The results from these two sections lead to an enhanced understanding of these carbon nanofiber reinforced shape memory epoxy composites and provided insight for future studies to tune these composites at will.

  7. Measuring the Electrical Properties of Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two techniques rapidly determine low-frequency resistivity of conductive epoxies and high-frequency dielectric properties of insulating epoxies. Conductive epoxy is molded in channels in plastic block. Four-point ohmmeter is used to apply current and sense voltage; it reads out resistance. Because mold has precise and stable dimensions, it produces accurate consistent measurements.

  8. New protective battle-dress impregnated against mosquito vector bites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mixing repellent and organophosphate (OP) insecticides to better control pyrethroid resistant mosquito vectors is a promising strategy developed for bed net impregnation. Here, we investigated the opportunity to adapt this strategy to personal protection in the form of impregnated clothes. Methods We compared standard permethrin impregnated uniforms with uniforms manually impregnated with the repellent KBR3023 alone and in combination with an organophosphate, Pirimiphos-Methyl (PM). Tests were carried out with Aedes aegypti, the dengue fever vector, at dusk in experimental huts. Results Results showed that the personal protection provided by repellent KBR3023-impregnated uniforms is equal to permethrin treated uniforms and that KBR3023/PM-impregnated uniforms are more protective. Conclusion The use of repellents alone or combined with OP on clothes could be promising for personal protection of military troops and travellers if residual activity of the repellents is extended and safety is verified. PMID:20809969

  9. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  10. Photovoltaic properties of PSi impregnated with eumelanin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A bulk heterojunction of porous silicon and eumelanin, where the columnar pores of porous silicon are filled with eumelanin, is proposed as a new organic-inorganic hybrid material for photovoltaic applications. The addition of eumelanin, whose absorption in the near infrared region is significantly higher than porous silicon, should greatly enhance the light absorption capabilities of the empty porous silicon matrix, which are very low in the low energy side of the visible spectral range (from about 600 nm downwards). The experimental results show that indeed the photocarrier collection efficiency at longer wavelengths in eumelanin-impregnated samples is clearly higher with respect to empty porous silicon matrices. PMID:22776626

  11. METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A POROUS MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Steele, G.N.

    1960-06-01

    A method of impregnating a porous body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the porous body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the porous body.

  12. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  13. Influence of impregnation method on metal retention of CCB-treated wood in slow pyrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Kinata, Silao Espérance; Loubar, Khaled; Bouslamti, Amine; Belloncle, Christophe; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-09-30

    In the present work, the effects of copper, chromium and boron on the pyrolysis of wood and their distribution in the pyrolysis products were investigated. For this, the wood has been impregnated with chromium-copper-boron (CCB). In addition, to describe the effects of impregnation method, vacuum-pressure and dipping methods were also conducted. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that an increase in the final residue and decrease in degradation temperature on both methods of treated wood compared to untreated wood. Then, slow pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a laboratory reactor. The mass balance of pyrolysis products is confirmed by TGA. Furthermore, the concentration of metals in the final residue is measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The results show that the final residue contains more than 45% of the initial amount of metal present in the treated wood. The phenomenon is more pronounced with vacuum-pressure treated wood. The heating values of pyrolysis products were analyzed. The heating value of charcoal obtained from treated and untreated wood is approximately same. But the heating value of tar from untreated wood is higher than the heating value of the tar from treated wood. PMID:22835770

  14. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  15. Fire-retardant epoxy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akawie, R. I.; Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms in molecular structure of epoxies make them fire-retardant without degrading their adhesive strength. Moreover, polymers are transparent, unlike compounds that contain arsenic or other inorganics. They have been used to bond polyvinylfluoride and polyether sulfone films onto polyimide glass laminates.

  16. Characterisation of pore space geometry by 14C-PMMA impregnation - development work for in-situ studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelokaski, M.; Sardini, P.; Möri, A.; Hellmuth, K.-H.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The repository safety evaluation requires going from laboratory and surface-based field work underground to the repository level. Little is known about the changes of rock transport properties during sampling and decompression. Some recent investigations imply that non-conservative errors in transport properties derived from laboratory data may reach factors of 2--3. Recently at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) progress with the in-situ resin impregnation using fluorescent dyes has been successful. During ten years time the PMMA method has been developed for characterisation of pore space geometry for low permeable granitic rocks. Rock matrices has been studied so far at laboratory circumstances. Impregnation with 14C-labelled methylmethacrylate (MMA) and autoradiography allows the investigation of the pattern of the spatial porosity distribution and quantitative measurement of mineral specific, local porosities. The quantitative petrography methods developed by University of Poitiers in combination with the PMMA method provide quantitative information on rock properties. The development of the PMMA method for in-situ to be tested at first at Grimsel Test Site and the necessary rock characterisation in the laboratory is reported here. The porosity parameters, hydraulic conductivity parameters, diffusive properties and mineralogical properties are measured with complementary methods. Highly conductive granite is impregnated with MMA using vacuum dried samples as well as water saturated ones. The intrusion pressure of MMA in water filled pores of different apertures will be the key point for the successful in-situ impregnation. Details of the development work will be given.

  17. Enhanced critical currents by high-pressure impregnation of 1-2-3 systems with normal conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortabasi, Ugur; Watson, J. H.; Black, James A.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary analytical and experimental results of a novel low temperature metal impregnation method to increase the critical currents in thick film and bulk HTSC materials. The method described results in a structurally more controllable and effective microcomposite than the ones obtained with metal- and metal-oxide precursors. The physical procedure involves the infiltration of the interstices of the porous, fully treated superconductor with low-melting point, low T superconductor under high pressure. Deep penetration of the metal into the granular superconducting matrix creates large surface areas of strong Proximity Effect. Improved intergrain coupling increases the DC Josephson current and therefore J, the critical current. Prior to the experimental work a theoretical study was conducted. Indium was chosen as the impregnation material. Computations showed.that the infiltrated system should have at least a four orders higher critical current (4.47 x 104 A/cm2) as compared to the same array with vacuum barriers of 20A thickness between the grains (0.31 A/cm2). On the experimental side, high T, porous, 1-2-3 samples impregnated with gallium exhibited very low contact resistance (2. 1 x 10-6 cm2) at 85°K, a value about two orders of magnitude better than the 1-2-3 systems containing intergranular silver. Further experiments with indium impregnated samples are planned. This new low temperature method allows the manufacture of highly flexible wires and films when used with suitable substrates.

  18. Impregnation of Fenofibrate on mesoporous silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, Abir; Masmoudi, Yasmine; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Schueller, Laurent; Badens, Elisabeth

    2016-02-29

    Low oral bioavailability can be circumvented by the formulation of the poorly water soluble drug in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS-L-7). Fenofibrate is an orally administered, poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), used clinically to lower lipid levels. Fenofibrate was loaded into silica using two methods: incipient wetness and supercritical impregnation. This study investigates the impact of loading and the impact of varying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing conditions. The objective is to enhance Fenofibrate loading into silica while reducing degree of the drug crystallinity, so as to increase the drug's dissolution rate and its bioavailability. The comparison of both impregnation processes was made in terms of impregnation yields and duration as well as physical characterization of the drug. While incipient wetness method led to a Fenofibrate loading up to 300 mgdrug/gsilica in 48 h of impregnation, the supercritical impregnation method yielded loading up to 485 mgdrug/gsilica in 120 min of impregnation duration, at 16 MPa and 308 K, with a low degree of crystallinity (about 1%) comparable to the crystallinity observed via the solvent method. In addition to the enhancement of impregnation efficiency, the supercritical route provides a solvent-free alternative for impregnation. PMID:26732521

  19. IMPREGNATION OF CONCRETE PIPE FOR CORROSION RESISTANCE AND STRENGTH IMPROVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The program was undertaken to field test concrete sewer pipe that had been impregnated with sulfur or hydrofluoric acid. This program was a follow-on to a previous laboratory study sponsored by EPA entitled, Impregnation of Concrete Pipe, 11024EQE 06/71. In a subsequent grant ext...

  20. Lessons from the experimental stage of the two-step vacuum-microwave method for histoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Bosch, M M; Wals-Paap, C H; Boon, M E

    1996-01-01

    The two-step vacuum-microwave method simplifies and shortens histoprocessing. Acting margins are small so that fine-tuning is required. Temperature, vacuum and time should be in perfect balance. If not, a "cooking" effect (too high temperature) can easily be detected in the epidermis of skin biopsies. An adverse vacuum effect (when vacuum is obtained too abruptly) produces clefts, first observed where different tissues are contiguous. When time is set too shortly, impregnation will be insufficient, which is best seen in kidney tissue. The lessons from these observations may help future users to be troubleshooters while installing their unit. PMID:9090992

  1. Reliability of mechanical properties for bulk superconductors with resin impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Murakami, M.; Katagiri, K.

    2002-10-01

    We have studied the mechanical properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O rods with and without resin impregnation using a three-point bending test. The reliability of resin impregnation was evaluated using the Weibull distribution function. The Weibull coefficient for the resin-impregnated bulk was 16.03 at 77 K. In order to obtain more reliable data, the bending strengths were converted into the tensile strengths by considering a difference in the effective volume. It was confirmed that the tensile strengths of bulk YBCO could be enhanced by more than four times with resin impregnation. It was also confirmed that resin-impregnated Y-Ba-Cu-O exhibited a high Weibull coefficient and thus a high reliability for practical engineering applications.

  2. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  3. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  4. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  5. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  6. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers. PMID:17119222

  7. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome. PMID:27147527

  8. High char imide-modified epoxy matrix resins. [for graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of a class of bis(imide-amine) curing agents for epoxy matrix resins is discussed. Glass transition temperatures and char yield data of an epoxy cured with various bis(imide-amines) are presented. The room temperature and 350 F mechanical properties, and char yields of unidirectional graphite fiber laminates prepared with conventional epoxy and imide-modified epoxy resins are presented.

  9. Nonmetallic materials handbook. Volume 1: Epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlaseck, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermochemical and other properties data is presented for the following types of epoxy materials: adhesives, coatings finishes, inks, electrical insulation, encapsulants, sealants, composite laminates, tapes, and thermal insulators.

  10. Lightweight Forms for Epoxy/Aramid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mix, E. W.; Anderson, A. N.; Bedford, Donald L., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminum mandrels easy to remove. Lightweight aluminum mandrel for shaping epoxy/aramid ducts simplifies and speeds production. In new process, glass-reinforced epoxy/aramid cloth wrapped on aluminum mandrel. Stainless-steel flanges and other hardware fitted on duct and held by simple tooling. Entire assembly placed in oven to cure epoxy. After curing, assembly placed in alkaline bath dissolves aluminum mandrel in about 4 hours. Epoxy/aramid shell ready for use as duct. Aluminum mandrel used to make ducts of various inside diameters up to 6 in. Standard aluminum forms used. Conventional tube-bending equipment produces requisite curves in mandrels.

  11. Cold-impregnated aluminium. A new source of nickel exposure.

    PubMed

    Lidén, C

    1994-07-01

    A new technique for finishing anodized aluminium was introduced during the 1980s--cold impregnation with nickel. Nickel is available on the surface of cold-impregnated aluminium, as shown by the dimethylglyoxime test. Chemical analysis with EDXA showed that nickel was in the form of NiSO4. A case of work-related allergic contact dermatitis in an engraver with nickel allergy is reported. It transpired that the patient was exposed to nickel in connection with aluminium. It is concluded that cold-impregnated aluminium is a new source of nickel exposure, probably previously unknown to dermatologists. PMID:7924288

  12. Drug loading of foldable commercial intraocular lenses using supercritical impregnation.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, A; Masmoudi, Y; Sergent, M; Trivedi, V; Meniai, A; Badens, E

    2016-03-16

    The drug delivery through intraocular lenses (IOLs) allows the combination of cataract surgery act and postoperative treatment in a single procedure. In order to prepare such systems, "clean" supercritical CO2 processes are studied for loading commercial IOLs with ophthalmic drugs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP, an antibiotic) and dexamethasone 21-phosphate disodium (DXP, an anti-inflammatory drug) were impregnated into foldable IOLs made from poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (P-HEMA). A first pre-treatment step was conducted in order to remove absorbed conditioning physiological solution. Supercritical impregnations were then performed by varying the experimental conditions. In order to obtain transparent IOLs and avoid the appearance of undesirable foaming, it was necessary to couple slow pressurization and depressurization phases during supercritical treatments. The impregnation yields were determined through drug release studies. For both drugs, release studies show deep and reproducible impregnation for different diopters. For the system P-HEMA/CIP, a series of impregnations was performed to delimit the experimental range at two pressures (80 and 200 bar) in the presence or absence of ethanol as a co-solvent for two diopters (+5.0 D and +21.0 D). Increase in pressure in the absence of a co-solvent resulted in improved CIP impregnation. The addition of ethanol (5 mol%) produced impregnation yields comparable to those obtained at 200 bar without co-solvent. A response surface methodology based on experimental designs was used to study the influence of operating conditions on impregnation of IOLs (+21.0 D) in the absence of co-solvent. Two input variables with 5 levels each were considered; the pressure (80-200 bar) and the impregnation duration (30-240 min). CIP impregnation yields ranging between 0.92 and 3.83 μg CIP/mg IOL were obtained from these experiments and response surface indicated the pressure as a key factor in the process. The DXP impregnation in P-HEMA was

  13. Sticky superhydrophobic filter paper developed by dip-coating of fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangxuan; Wen, Xiufang; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Zhuoru

    2012-09-01

    A superhydrophobic and superoleophilic coating for oil filter paper was synthesized based on waterborne bisphenol-A novolac epoxy emulsion. The benzoic acid (BA) and maleic anhydride (MA) were used as modification agents to give the epoxy resin hydrophilic groups (carboxyl) and Cdbnd C double bonds. And the fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion was prepared by free radical solution polymerization of dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) monomer. The covalent bound low free energy fluorinated chains in the monomer reduce the surface energy of solidification polymers sufficiently to give rise to superhydrophobic behavior while conserving superoleophilicity. Surfaces prepared show a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 152° for a 5 μL droplet that does not slid off even when the sample is held upside down. This synthetic emulsion is simple and convenient as impregnating agent for filter paper, which can be considered as a suitable candidate for various substrates such as cotton textiles, E-glass and artificial fiber, and so on.

  14. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  15. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brakhane, Stefan Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10{sup −8}. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10{sup −10} mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  16. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10-8. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10-10 mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  17. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric entry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of research is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Dragon spacecraft. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. In order to thoroughly understand failure in PICA, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm* (precursor of PICA), virgin and charred PICA materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the fracture toughness. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  18. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric reentry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside the thermal protection material, Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). PICA has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and was the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), that will fly in 2011. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To thoroughly understand failure in PICA, experiments were performed using FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor of PICA), virgin and furnace-charred PICA. Several small samples were tested inside an electron microscope to investigate the failure mechanisms. Micrographs were obtained before and after the failure in order to study crack initiation and growth. Videos were obtained to capture failure mechanisms in real time. Stress-strain data was obtained simultaneously for all the samples with the help of a data acquisition system, integrated to the mechanical stages. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  19. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  20. Monoethanolamine Impregnation of Titanosilicate Zeolite ETS-10.

    PubMed

    Tanchuk, Brenden; Sawada, James A; Kuznicki, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    ETS-10, a mixed octahedral/tetrahedral titanosilicate molecular sieve, has a unique architecture where its 0.8 nm pores are lined exclusively with silicon which imparts a high degree of chemical stability, yet the anionic framework can be modified by cation exchange. In this work, the hydrogen-exchanged form of ETS-10 was impregnated with monoethanolamine and the thermal stability and CO2 adsorption characteristics were analyzed. The surface area of the material was characterized by N2 physisorption, the thermal stability of the material assessed through TG-MS experiments, the CO2 capacity was measured via static volumetric adsorption experiments, and the influence of moisture as a carbamate promoter was investigated through a series of gravimetric CO2 adsorption/desorption cycling experiments. Several measurements converge on ~7 wt% monoethanolamine loading which occupies about half of the available pore volume of the sieve. The results suggest that the monoethanolamine is so effectively retained by the molecular sieve that, while the amine is effectively immobilized, under both humid and dry process streams the monoethanolamine is either chemically or sterically hindered and is unable to react measurable quantities of CO2. PMID:26413705

  1. EPOXI at Comet Hartley 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Delamere, W. Alan; Feaga, Lori M.; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; McFadden, Jessica M.; Meech, Karen J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Schultz, Peter H.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J.; Carcish, Brian T.; Collins, Steven M.; Farnham, Tony F.; Groussin, Oliver; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how comets work, i,e., what drives their activity, is crucial to using comets to study the early solar system. EPOXI flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus. taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nncleus is outgassing primarily due to CO2, which drags chnnks of ice out of the nnclens. It also shows significant differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  2. Ice adhesion on lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-11-01

    Ice accretion is an important problem and passive approaches for reducing ice-adhesion are of great interest in various systems such as aircrafts, power lines, wind turbines, and oil platforms. Here, we study the ice-adhesion properties of lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces. Force measurements show ice adhesion strength on textured surfaces impregnated with thermodynamically stable lubricant films to be higher than that on surfaces with excess lubricant. Systematic ice-adhesion measurements indicate that the ice-adhesion strength is dependent on texture and decreases with increasing texture density. Direct cryogenic SEM imaging of the fractured ice surface and the interface between ice and lubricant-impregnated textured surface reveal stress concentrators and crack initiation sites that can increase with texture density and result in lowering adhesion strength. Thus, lubricant-impregnated surfaces have to be optimized to outperform state-of-the-art icephobic treatments. PMID:24070257

  3. REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO THE HEATED CORE BOX THAT SETS THE RESIN CREATING THE HARDENED CORE SHOWN HERE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Reducing Sliding Friction with Liquid-Impregnated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid-impregnated surfaces are fabricated by infusing a lubricating liquid into the micro/nano roughness of a textured substrate, such that the surface is slippery for any deposited liquid immiscible with the lubricant. To date, liquid-impregnated surfaces have almost exclusively focused on repelling liquids by minimizing the contact angle hysteresis. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-impregnated surfaces are also capable of reducing sliding friction for solid objects. Ordered arrays of silicon micropillars were infused with lubricating liquids varying in viscosity by two orders of magnitude. Five test surfaces were used: two different micropillared surfaces with and without liquid infusion and a smooth, dry control surface. The static and kinetic coefficients of friction were measured using a polished aluminum cube as the sliding object. Compared to the smooth control surface, the sliding friction was reduced by at least a factor of two on the liquid-impregnated surfaces.

  5. Water transport into epoxy resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The processing-property relationships were established for the epoxy system of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The TGDDM-DDS epoxy system was selected for analysis as the ensuing polymer matrix is most common in high-performance fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Experiments on water transport in epoxy resins with varying compositions were performed and a relaxation-coupled transport behavior was observed in these epoxy resins. By post-curing vitrified epoxy resins, the additional free volume usually measured in them was removed and maximum water uptake was reduced. Since epoxy resins were in a quasi-equilibrium glassy state after the post-cure, Fick's law with a constant diffusion coefficient could adequately describe the water sorption behavior. A network formation model based on the branching theory was developed, taking into account the difference in reactivities of primary and secondary amines and the etherification reaction. Using this network formation model, water uptake in post-cured epoxy resins was found to be proportional to tertiary amine concentration.

  6. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    East, Anthony; Jaffe, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Catalani, Luiz H

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  7. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  8. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  9. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  10. Warping of unsymmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Warping in unsymmetric graphite/epoxy laminates was studied with particular attention given to the change of residual stresses resulting from long term environmental exposure. Square, cured prepreg sheets were measured for edge deflection with a cathetometer, then quartered and remeasured. Two postcuring durations were then used, 7.5 and one hr at 177 C; varying cooldown rates after curing were used for other samples, and one set was stored in vacuum at 75 C. Maximum deflections and weight changes were measured periodically at room temperature. Average curvatures, the effect of postcure, and the effect of long-term exposure were determined. Larger panels exhibited cylindrical warping and smaller panels underwent anticlastic warping. The deflections were related to weight changes, i.e. moisture absorption, and the lower the moisture content, the higher the deflection. Relaxation of residual stresses at 75 C was neglibible after 220 days.

  11. Fiberglass epoxy laminate fatigue properties at 300 and 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, J. M., Jr.; Bailey, W. J.; Boyce, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A subcritical liquid hydrogen orbital storage and supply experiment is being designed for flight in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) includes a liquid hydrogen tank supported in a vacuum jacket by two fiberglass epoxy composite trunnion mounts. The ability of the CFME to last for the required seven missions depends primarily on the fatigue life of the composite trunnions at cryogenic temperatures. To verify the trunnion design and test the performance of the composite material, fatigue property data at 300 and 20 K were obtained for the specific E-glass fabric/S-glass unidirectional laminate that will be used for the CFME trunnions. The fatigue life of this laminate was greater at 20 K than at 300 K, and was satisfactory for the intended application.

  12. A Model for Tow Impregnation and Consolidation for Partially Impregnated Thermoset Prepregs

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Gangloff Jr; Shatil Sinha; Suresh G. Advani

    2011-05-23

    The formation and transport of voids in composite materials remains a key research area in composite manufacturing science. Knowledge of how voids, resin, and fiber reinforcement propagate throughout a composite material continuum from green state to cured state during an automated tape layup process is key to minimizing defects induced by void-initiated stress concentrations under applied loads for a wide variety of composite applications. This paper focuses on modeling resin flow in a deforming fiber tow during an automated process of partially impregnated thermoset prepreg composite material tapes. In this work, a tow unit cell based model has been presented that determines the consolidation and impregnation of a thermoset prepreg tape under an input pressure profile. A parametric study has been performed to characterize the behavior of varying tow speed and compaction forces on the degree of consolidation. Results indicate that increased tow consolidation is achieved with slower tow speeds and higher compaction forces although the relationship is not linear. The overall modeling of this project is motivated to address optimization of the 'green state' composite properties and processing parameters to reduce or eliminate 'cured state' defects, such as porosity and de-lamination. This work is partially funded by the Department of Energy under Award number DE-EE0001367.

  13. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft. PMID:25490209

  14. Fracture Resistance of Composite Fixed Partial Dentures Reinforced with Pre-impregnated and Non-impregnated Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Torkan, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FPDs) are af-fected by fiber impregnation. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of composite fixed partialdentures reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and methods Groups (n=5) of three-unit fiber-reinforced composite FPDs (23 mm in length) from maxillary second premolar to maxillary second molar were fabricated on two abutments with pontic width of 12 mm. One group was fabricated as the control group with composite (Gradia) and the other two groups were fabricated with composite (Gradia) reinforced with pre-impregnated fiber (Fibrex ribbon) and non-impregnated fiber (Fiber braid), respectively. The specimens were stored in distilled water for one week at 37°C and then tested in a universal testing machine by means of a three-point bending test. Statistical analysis consisted of one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Scheffé’s test for the test groups (α=0.05). Results Fracture resistance (N) differed significantly between the control group and the other two groups (P<0.001), but there were no statistically significant differences between the pre-impregnated and non-impregnated groups (P=0.565). The degree of deflection measured (mm) did not differ significantly between the three groups (P=0.397), yet the mean deflection measured in pre-impregnated group was twice as that in the other two groups. Conclusion Reinforcement of composite with fiber might considerably increase the fracture resistance of FPDs; how-ever, the type of the fiber used resulted in no significant difference in fracture resistance of FPD specimens. PMID:22991628

  15. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  16. The RHIC vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R.; Hseuh, H. C.; Lee, R. C.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Smart, L.; Sondericker, J.; Weiss, D.; Welch, K.

    2003-03-01

    There are three vacuum systems in RHIC: the insulating vacuum vessels housing the superconducting magnets, the cold beam tubes surrounded by the superconducting magnets, and the warm beam tube sections at the insertion regions and the experimental regions. These systems have a cumulative length over 10 km and a total volume over 3000 m 3. Conventional ultrahigh vacuum technology was used in the design and construction of the cold and warm beam vacuum systems with great success. The long and large insulating vacuum volumes without vacuum barriers require careful management of the welding and leak checking of the numerous helium line joints. There are about 1500 vacuum gauges and pumps serial-linked to eight PLCs distributed around RHIC, which allow the monitoring and control of these devices through Ethernet networks to remote control consoles. With the exception of helium leaks through the cryogenic valve boxes into the insulating vacuum volumes, the RHIC vacuum systems have performed well beyond expectations.

  17. Synthesis & Biological, Physical, & Adhesive Properties of Epoxy Sucroses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raw sugar was converted in two steps to epoxy allyl sucroses (EAS), epoxy crotyl sucroses (ECS), and epoxy methallyl sucroses (EMS) respectively, in 82, 91, and 91.5 % overall yields. EAS, ECS, and EMS are regio and diastereo isomeric epoxy monomers that are liquids at room temperature. The averag...

  18. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  19. Mechanical behaviors of hyberbranched epoxy toughened bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins have been widely employed in cryogenic engineering fields. In this work, bisphenol F epoxy resin was modified by an aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin (HTDE-2). Mechanical behaviors of the modified epoxy resins in terms of tensile properties and impact property were studied at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the toughening mechanism was discussed by fracture surface morphology analysis. The results demonstrated that, the mechanical properties of composites initially increased until reaches the maximum value with increasing the mass content of the HTDE-2, and then decreased at both room temperature (RT) and 77K. Especially, the impact strength at 77 K was improved 40.7% compared with the pure epoxy matrix when 10 wt% HTDE-2 was introduced. The findings suggest that the HTDE-2 will be an effective toughener for the brittle bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications.

  20. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  1. Effect of nano-sized oxide particles on thermal and electrical properties of epoxy silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Choi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Polymer matrix composites were fabricated using a modified injection molding technique in which nano-sized silicon oxides, titanium oxides, and aluminium oxides were contained. Nano-sized oxides were uniformly distributed in the composites produced by modified injection molding combining vacuum degassing and curing at a moderate temperature. The thermal decomposition and evaporation of the epoxy resin matrix depended on the composition of the composites. The relative permittivity of the nano-sized silicon carbide-epoxy composites increased from 5.16 to 5.37 by adding 2.0 wt % titanium oxide. The addition of titanium oxide of up to 2.0 wt % had little influence on the permittivity. The addition of 2.0 wt % of titanium oxide to epoxy resin showed the maximum thermal properties. Both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the silicon oxide-epoxy composites tended to increase with titanium oxide content. The maximum thermal conductivity was observed in the composites with 2.0 wt % titanium oxide.

  2. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  3. Impact resistance of composite fan blades. [fiber reinforced graphite and boron epoxy blades for STOL operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premont, E. J.; Stubenrauch, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The resistance of current-design Pratt and Whitney Aircraft low aspect ratio advanced fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite fan blades to foreign object damage (FOD) at STOL operating conditions was investigated. Five graphite/epoxy and five boron/epoxy wide chord fan blades with nickel plated stainless steel leading edge sheath protection were fabricated and impact tested. The fan blades were individually tested in a vacuum whirlpit under FOD environments. The FOD environments were typical of those encountered in service operations. The impact objects were ice balls, gravel, stralings and gelatin simulated birds. Results of the damage sustained from each FOD impact are presented for both the graphite boron reinforced blades. Tests showed that the present design composite fan blades, with wrap around leading edge protection have inadequate FOD impact resistance at 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) tip speed, a possible STOL operating condition.

  4. Mechanical properties of a filament-wound aramid fiber/epoxy composite for flywheel application

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.T.; Chin, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this program was to determine the mechanical properties of a filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy composite in a simulated flywheel service environment. The temperature and vacuum chosen were 75/sup 0/C and 1 Pa, respectively. Specimens were preconditioned in the test environment for periods of 1 to 5 months before mechanical tests. The simulated service environment of 75/sup 0/C in vacuum has been found to have little effect on static and fatigue properties of the composite. The excellent retention of strength by individual fibers in the same environment provides added confidence. The composite is stable for a period of two years studied so far in the 75/sup 0/C/vacuum environment. However, the moisture desorption increases residual sresses and causes ply cracking in laminates. The composite is less sensitive to the environment than the fibers and the matrix by themselves. 53 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Optimizing process vacuum condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, J.R.; Tice, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Vacuum condensers play a critical role in supporting vacuum processing operations. Although they may appear similar to atmospheric units, vacuum condensers have their own special designs, considerations and installation needs. By adding vacuum condensers, precondensers and intercondensers, system cost efficiency can be optimized. Vacuum-condensing systems permit reclamation of high-value product by use of a precondenser, or reduce operating costs with intercondensers. A precondenser placed between the vacuum vessel and ejector system will recover valuable process vapors and reduce vapor load to an ejector system--minimizing the system`s capital and operating costs. Similarly, an intercondenser positioned between ejector stages can condense motive steam and process vapors and reduce vapor load to downstream ejectors as well as lower capital and operating costs. The paper describes vacuum condenser systems, types of vacuum condensers, shellside condensing, tubeside condensing, noncondensable gases, precondenser pressure drop, system interdependency, equipment installation, and equipment layout.

  6. Comparison of Efficacy and Cost of Iodine Impregnated Drape vs. Standard Drape in Cardiac Surgery: Study in 5100 Patients.

    PubMed

    Bejko, Jonida; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Gallo, Michele; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Comisso, Marina; Testolin, Luca; Guglielmi, Cosimo; De Franceschi, Marco; Bianco, Roberto; Gerosa, Gino; Bottio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    We sought to examine the efficacy in preventing surgical site infection (SSI) in cardiac surgery, using two different incise drapes (not iodine-impregnated and iodine-impregnated). A cost analysis was also considered. Between January 2008 and March 2015, 5100 consecutive cardiac surgery patients, who underwent surgery in our Institute, were prospectively collected. A total of 3320 patients received a standard not iodine-impregnated steri-drape (group A), and 1780 patients received Ioban(®) 2 drape (group B). We investigated, by a propensity matched analysis, whether the use of standard incise drape or iodine-impregnated drape would impact upon SSI rate. Totally, 808 patients for each group were matched for the available risk factors. Overall incidence of SSI was significantly higher in group A (6.5 versus 1.9 %) (p = 0.001). Superficial SSI incidence was significantly higher in group A (5.1 vs 1.6 %) (p = 0.002). Deep SSI resulted higher in group A (1.4 %) than in group B (0.4 %), although not significantly (p = 0.11). Consequently, the need for vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy use resulted 4.3 % in group A versus 1.2 % in group B (p = 0.001). Overall costs for groups A and B were 12.494.912 € and 11.721.417 €, respectively. The Ioban(®) 2 offered totally 773.495 € cost savings compared to standard steri-drape. Ioban 2 drape assured a significantly lower incidence of SSI. Additionally, Ioban(®) 2 drape proved to be cost-effective in cardiac surgery. PMID:26374143

  7. Sealing Materials for Use in Vacuum at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Lee Vaughn, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Sealing materials that can be applied and left in place in vacuum over a wide range of temperatures (especially temperatures of a few thousand degrees Celsius) have been conceived and investigated for potential utility in repairing thermal-protection tiles on the space shuttles in orbit before returning to Earth. These materials are also adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications that involve vacuum processing and/or repair of structures that must withstand high temperatures. These materials can be formulated to have mechanical handling characteristics ranging from almost freely flowing liquid-like consistency through paste-like consistency to stiff puttylike consistency, and to retain these characteristics in vacuum until heated to high curing temperatures. A sealing material of this type can be formulated to be used in any of several different ways for example, to be impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric patch, impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric gasket for sealing a patch, applied under a patch, or applied alone in the manner of putty or wallboard compound. The sealing material must be formulated to be compatible with, and adhere to, the structural material(s) to be repaired. In general, the material consists of a vacuum-compatible liquid containing one or more dissolved compound(s) and/or mixed with suspended solid particles. Depending on the intended application, the liquid can be chosen to be of a compound that can remain in place in vacuum for a time long enough to be useful, and/or to evaporate or decompose in a controlled way to leave a useful solid residue behind. The evaporation rate is determined by proper choice of vapor pressure, application of heat, and/or application of ultraviolet light or other optical radiation. The liquid chosen for the original space shuttle application is a commercial silicone vacuum-pump oil.

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  10. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  11. Physical aging in graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sub-Tg annealing has been found to affect the properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The network epoxy studied was based on the chemistry of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) crosslinked by 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DDS). Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal mechanical analysis, and solid-state cross-polarized magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been utilized in order to characterize this process of recovery towards thermodynamic equilibrium. The volume and enthalpy recovery as well as the 'thermoreversibility' aspects of the physical aging are discussed. This nonequilibrium and time-dependent behavior of network epoxies are considered in view of the increasingly wide applications of TGDDM-DDS epoxies as matrix materials of structural composites in the aerospace industry.

  12. Electrical properties of epoxies and film resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of hybrid microcircuits has been enhanced in recent years by the use of organic adhesives as a replacement for solder and eutectics. The epoxies have been the most effective and widely used material for this application. Methods for measuring the electrical and mechanical properties of epoxies are developed. Data are given for selected conductive adhesives at high and low frequencies. The temperature coefficients of resistance of thick film resistors are presented.

  13. Three-dimensional measurement of preform impregnation in composites manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Thomas; Chun, Jung-Hoon

    1992-12-01

    An experimental method of flow visualization during impregnation of fiber preforms has been developed. This method extends the visualization technique of making observations through transparent moulds by matching the refractive index of the fibers in the preform with that of the fluid used to simulate the resin system. Wetted portions of the preform then appear transparent while dry portions remain translucent. The desired level of fluid-fiber refractive index match was achieved using a monochromatic illumination source, thereby increasing image contrast between wet and dry regions of the preform and reducing noise within the wetted portion of the image. It has been shown that photometric data analysis can yield three-dimensional information on unsaturated flow from a single image. The technique is illustrated with results of experiments on impregnation of a preform made from unidirectional fabric. These results highlight the importance of local axial spreading of the flow front in radial impregnation of fiber tows with high fiber content.

  14. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  15. Preparation and properties of polytetrafluoroethylene impregnated with rhenium oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Easter, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of tests carried out to determine the properties of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) impregnated with rhenium oxides are presented. The tests included measurement of physical properties of the impregnated material and investigation of the effects of preparation process variables. Based on the latter tests a mechanism to describe the permeation process is postulated which identifies the rate controlling step to be diffusion of ReF6 molecules into the solid during the initial ReF6 soak. Physical property tests indicated that the electronic conductance is increased by many orders of magnitude while the desirable properties of the PTFE remain virtually unchanged.

  16. Wide-spectrum activity of a silver-impregnated fabric.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Lopez, Gerardo U; Abd-Elmaksoud, Sherif; Calabrese, Jesse; Tanner, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Fabrics, such as clothing, drapes, pillowcases, and bedsheets are potential sources of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. We found fabrics (ie, professional clothing, pillowcases, and lab coats) treated with a silver-impregnated material to be effective in significantly reducing a wide spectrum of ordinary and drug-resistant microorganisms, including Salmonella, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acnes, Trichphyton mentagrophytes, and norovirus. Fabrics impregnated with antimicrobial agents help provide an additional barrier to the transport or reservoir of pathogens in health care environments. PMID:26827093

  17. Gallocyanin-chrome alum counterstaining of Golgi-Kopsch impregnations.

    PubMed

    Tieman, S B

    1983-05-01

    A simple technique is described for counterstaining Golgi-Kopsch impregnations. The sections are first stabilized by the method of Geisert and Updyke and then stained in 0.15% gallocyanin and 5% chromium potassium sulfate for 45 minutes at 55-60 C. The sections are then rinsed, dehydrated to 70% ethanol, cleared in terpineol, mounted and coverslipped. This procedure results in a light to medium blue stain of those cells not impregnated by the silver chromate. The major advantages of this procedure over earlier methods are: (1) the counterstain does not fade and (2) since no differentiation is required, many sections may be stained simultaneously. PMID:6195778

  18. Kinetics of fatigue cracks in iron in electrolytic hydrogen impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Bilyi, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    Fatigue failure of metals is localized in the zone of plastic deformation at the tip of the developing crack. Crack development depends to a large extent upon the parameters of the deformed volume, the loading conditions, and features of the material microstructure. It may be assumed that the medium, especially a hydrogen-impregnating medium, leads to a change in the zone of plastic deformation and thereby influences the rate of fatigue crack growth. This work is devoted to a study of cyclic crack resistance and determination of the zone of plastic deformation of failure specimens of Armco iron under conditions of the action of a hydrogen-impregnating medium.

  19. Effect of space exposure of some epoxy matrix composites on their thermal expansion and mechanical properties (AO 138-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jabs, Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    The experiment objectives are: to detect a variation of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite samples; to detect an evolution of mechanical properties; to compare the behavior of two epoxy resins. The CTE is measured by interferometric method in a vacuum chamber. The following mechanical tests are achieved on the samples: interlaminar shear strength; flexural strength; flatwise tensile strength. The results are reported.

  20. The modifications of epoxy resin and their crystalline polymer particle filled epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Huei-Hsiung Wang

    1996-12-31

    The chemical linking of the modifier to the epoxy network was overcome by using Bisphenol A, 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl sulphone or benzophenone-tetracarboxylic dianhydride as a coupling agent between the PU and the epoxy oligomer. From the experimental results, it was shown that the values of fracture energy, G{sub IC} for PU-modified epoxy were dependent on the macroglycols and the coupling agents. Scanning electron microscopy and the glass transition temperature were used to assess the morphology and their compatibility of these modified epoxies. It revealed that the ether type (PTMG) of PU modified epoxy showed the present of an aggregated separated phase. However, the ester type (PBA) PU-modified epoxy resin showed a homogenous morphology. In addition, the {Beta}-relaxation of cured epoxy resin showed a more clear two-phase separation existed in Bis-A as a coupling agents. The additive of the semi-crystalline PBT powder was more efficient in fracture energies of epoxy network than that of the Nylon 6,6 powder.

  1. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  2. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  3. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  4. Simulation of the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process and the development of light-weight composite bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Marc J.

    A continued desire for increased mobility in the aftermath of natural disasters, or on the battlefield, has lead to the need for improved light-weight bridging solutions. This research investigates the development of a carbon/epoxy composite bridging system to meet the needs for light-weight bridging. The research focuses on two main topics. The first topic is that of processing composite structures and the second is the design and testing of these structures. In recent years the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process has become recognized as a low-cost manufacturing alternative for large Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite structures for civil, military, and aerospace applications. The success of the VARTM process (complete wet-out) is very sensitive to the resin injection strategy used and the proper placement of flow distribution materials and inlet and vacuum ports. Predicting the flow front pattern, the time required for infusing a part with resin, and the time required to bleed excess resin at the end of filling, is critical to ensure that the part will become completely impregnated and desired fiber volume fractions achieved prior to the resin gelling (initiation of cure). In order to eliminate costly trial and error experiments to determine the optimal infusion strategy, this research presents a simulation model which considers in-plane flow as well as flow through the thickness of the preform. In addition to resin filling, the current model is able to simulate the bleeding of resin at the end of filling to predict the required bleeding time to reach desired fiber volume fractions for the final part. In addition to processing, the second portion of the dissertation investigates the design and testing of composite bridge deck sections which also serve as short-span bridging for gaps up to 4 m in length. The research focuses on the design of a light-weight core material for bridge decking as well as proof loading of short-span bridge

  5. Noncommercial fabrication of antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Flick, A B; Herbert, J C; Goodell, J; Kristiansen, T

    1987-10-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads were fabricated by means of injections in specially designed molds to produce small and large beads. In vitro concentrates from these beads for 30 days were found to release tobramycin in an exponential function. PMID:3652588

  6. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  7. Optical Imaging of Water Condensation on Lubricant Impregnated Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We explored the condensation of water drops on a lubricant-impregnated surface, i.e., a micropillar patterned surface impregnated with a ionic liquid. Growing drops were imaged in 3D using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a temperature and humidity control. On a lubricant-impregnated hydrophobic micropillar array, different stages of condensation can be discriminated: - Nucleation on a lubricant surface. - Regular alignement between micropillars and formation of a three-phase contact line on a bottom of the substrate. - Deformation and bridging by coalescence, leading to a detachment of the drops from the bottom substrate to pillars'top faces. However, on a lubricant-impregnated hydrophilic micropillar array, the condensed water covers the micropillars by dewetting the lubricant. As a result, the surface loses its slippery property. Our results provide fundamental concepts how these solid/liquid hybrid surfaces can be applied for facile removal of condensed water, as well as necessity of the appropriate surface treatment. Financial support from ERC for the advanced grant 340391-SUPRO is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Improved method facilitates debulking and curing of phenolic impregnated asbestos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, P.

    1966-01-01

    Workpieces covered with phenolic impregnated asbestos tape and then wrapped with a specified thickness of nylon yarn under pressure, are debulked and cured in a standard oven. This method of debulking and curing is used in the fabrication of ablative chambers for the Gemini and Apollo attitude control engines.

  9. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 800 times.

  10. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  11. Vacuum leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazokas, G. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A leak detector for use with high vacuum seals as used in feedthroughs and hatch covers for manned spacecraft and vacuum systems is described. Two thermistors are used, one exposed directly to vacuum and the other exposed to a secondary chamber formed by the seal being monitored and a second auxiliary seal. Leakage into the secondary chamber causes an unbalance of an electrical bridge circuit in which the thermistors are connected.

  12. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  13. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  14. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

  15. Electrical properties of epoxies used in hybrid microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The electrical properties and basic characteristics of the structure of conductive epoxies were studied. The results of the experimental work performed to measure the electrical properties of epoxies are presented.

  16. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  17. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  18. Microwave assisted pultrusion of an epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Methven, J.M.; Abidin, A.Z.

    1995-12-01

    A 6mm diameter cylindrical profile based on E-glass fibers and a BF{sub 3}-triamine-epoxy resin system has been manufactured by Microwave Assisted Pultrusion (MAP) using a single mode resonant microwave cavity operating in a TM{sub 010} mode at 2450 MHz. Power transfer is at least 70% and pulling speeds of more than 2m/minute have been achieved for a power input of about 800W. The results are consistent with earlier MAP studies using unsaturated polyesters, epoxies urethane acrylates and vinyl esters. The results provide a sound basis for proposing the use of this type of epoxy system as a material that is suitable for a high speed gel-cure pultrusion process that uses both a microwave heating cavity and a conventional pultrusion die.

  19. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  20. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Eftekhari, A.; Shultz, W.J.; St.Clair, T.L.

    1992-09-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  1. Physical aging in graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The matrix dominated mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite was found to be affected by sub Tg annealing. Postcured + or - 45 deg 4S specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were quenched from above Tg and given a sub Tg annealing at 140 C for times up to 10 to the 5th power min. The ultimate tensile strength, strain to break, and toughness of the composite material were found to decrease as functions of sub Tg annealing time. No weight loss was observed during the sub Tg annealing. The time dependent change in mechanical behavior is explained on the basis of free volume changes that are related to the physical aging of the nonequilibrium glassy network epoxy. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  2. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  3. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  4. Effects of epoxy/hardener stoichiometry on structures and properties of a diethanolamine-cured epoxy encapsulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, M. Z.; Wu, Z.; Peng, K.; Han, C. M.; Xiang, W.; Dai, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    For the epoxy encapsulant cured by diethanolamine, optimal epoxy/hardener stoichiometry could hardly be predicted due to the complex curing mechanisms. In this paper, the influences of stoichiometry were investigated by FTIR, DMA and tensile testing. The results showed that stoichiometry has a dominating effect on both Tg and tensile properties of the cured epoxy. The largest Tg , highest crosslink density as well as excellent ductility appeared in epoxy encapsulant cured with 14 wt% diethanolmine. When the content of diethanolamine was lower than 14 wt%, epoxy encapsulants showed smaller glycidyl conversion even with long-duration post-cure. Larger tensile strength and modulus were also observed in the glycidyl-rich epoxies, which could be explained by anti-plasticization effect. The amine-rich epoxy, however, had extremely high glycidyl conversion and presented brittle tensile behavior. A diethanolamine content of 12-14 wt% for the epoxy encapsulant is suggested to obtain optimal thermal and tensile properties.

  5. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...