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Sample records for epstein-barr virus ebv

  1. About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Providers Laboratory Testing References & Resources About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Page Symptoms Transmission Diagnosis Prevention & Treatment Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is ...

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Associated Haemophagocytic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torti, Lorenza; Larocca, Luigi M.; Massini, Giuseppina; Cuccaro, Annarosa; Maiolo, Elena; Santangelo, Rosaria; Bianchi, Maria; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Hohaus, Stefan; Teofili, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17- year old female who developed fatal haemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) one month following acute infection caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Despite initiation of treatment and reduction of EBV load, laboratory signs of HPS as severe cytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, hyperferritinemia and hypertriglyceridemia persisted, and the patient died of multiorgan failure. HPS is a rare, but life-threatening complication of EBV infection. PMID:22348190

  3. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ). ... specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little ...

  4. Interpreting the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) epigenome using high-throughput data.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Aaron; Tempera, Italo; Lieberman, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) double-stranded DNA genome is subject to extensive epigenetic regulation. Large consortiums and individual labs have generated a vast number of genome-wide data sets on human lymphoblastoid and other cell lines latently infected with EBV. Analysis of these data sets reveals important new information on the properties of the host and viral chromosome structure organization and epigenetic modifications. We discuss the mapping of these data sets and the subsequent insights into the chromatin structure and transcription factor binding patterns on latent EBV genomes. Colocalization of multiple histone modifications and transcription factors at regulatory loci are considered in the context of the biology and regulation of EBV. PMID:23549386

  5. Epstein-Barr virus test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003513.htm Epstein-Barr virus antibody test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect ...

  6. Interaction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with human B-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, George; Klein, Eva; Kashuba, Elena

    2010-05-21

    Epstein-Barr virus, EBV, and humans have a common history that reaches back to our primate ancestors. The virus co-evolved with man and has established a largely harmless and highly complex co-existence. It is carried as silent infection by almost all human adults. A serendipitous discovery established that it is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis. Still, EBV became known first in 1964, in a rare, geographically prevalent malignant lymphoma of B-cell origin, Burkitt lymphoma BL. Its association with a malignancy prompted intensive studies and its capacity to immortalize B-lymphocytes in vitro was soon demonstrated. Consequently EBV was classified therefore as a potentially tumorigenic virus. Despite of this property however, the virus carrier state itself does not lead to malignancies because the transformed cells are recognized by the immune response. Consequently the EBV induced proliferation of EBV carrying B-lymphocytes is manifested only under immunosuppressive conditions. The expression of EBV encoded genes is regulated by the cell phenotype. The virus genome can be found in malignancies originating from cell types other than the B-lymphocyte. Even in the EBV infected B-cell, the direct transforming capacity is restricted to a defined window of differentiation. A complex interaction between virally encoded proteins and B-cell specific cellular proteins constitute the proliferation inducing program. In this short review we touch upon aspects which are the subject of our present work. We describe the mechanisms of some of the functional interactions between EBV encoded and cellular proteins that determine the phenotype of latently infected B-cells. The growth promoting EBV encoded genes are not expressed in the virus carrying BL cells. Still, EBV seems to contribute to the etiology of this tumor by modifying events that influence cell survival and proliferation. We describe a possible growth promoting mechanism in the genesis of Burkitt lymphoma

  7. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  8. Methylation of Epstein-Barr virus Rta promoter in EBV primary infection, reactivation and lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Germi, Raphaële; Guigue, Nicolas; Lupo, Julien; Semenova, Touyana; Grossi, Laurence; Vermeulen, Odile; Epaulard, Olivier; de Fraipont, Florence; Morand, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    During Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency, the EBV genome is largely silenced by methylation. This silencing is overturned during the switch to the lytic cycle. A key event is the production of the viral protein Zta which binds to three Zta-response elements (ZRE) from the Rta promoter (Rp), two of which (ZRE2 and ZRE3) include three CpG motifs methylated in the latent genome. The bisulphite pyrosequencing reaction was used to quantify the methylation of ZRE2, ZRE3a, and ZRE3b in EBV-positive cell lines and in ex vivo samples of EBV-related diseases, in order to assess whether the level of methylation in these ZREs could provide additional information to viral DNA load and serology in the characterization of EBV-associated diseases. In PBMC from two patients with infectious mononucleosis, over time Rp became increasingly methylated whereas EBV load decreased. In tonsil from patients with chronic tonsillitis, the methylation was less than in EBV-associated tumors, regardless of the viral load. This was even more striking when only the ZRE3a and ZRE3b were considered since some samples presented unbalanced profiles on ZRE2. EBV reactivation in cell culture showed that the reduction in the overall level of methylation was closely related to the production of unmethylated virions. Thus, an assessment of the level of methylation may help to better characterize EBV replication in PBMC and in biopsies with high EBV load, during infectious mononucleosis and EBV-associated cancers. J. Med. Virol. 88:1814-1820, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990870

  9. Changing patterns in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)and Hodgkin lymphoma association in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dhiab, Myriam Ben; Ziadi, Sonia; Saad, Hanene; Louhichi, Teheni; Trimeche, Mounir

    2016-09-01

    We compared the features of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) association in Tunisia in two periods of time, 1991-2001 (111 cases) and 2002-2012 (122 cases). The investigation of the EBV status by EBER in situ hybridization showed a significant decrease in the prevalence of EBV-positive HL from 69.3 % for the period 1991-2001 to 40.1 % for the 2002-2012 period (p = 0.00001). EBV positivity has decreased in all age groups but was more pronounced among young patients, in the 15-24-year age group (46.1 vs 10.3 %, p = 0.003), in the 25-34-year age group (56.2 vs 25 %, p = 0.04), and among children (88.4 vs 59.2 %, p = 0.01). This decrease in EBV-positive HL over time contrasted with a remarkable increase in EBV-negative HL in young adults aged 15-34 years (51.2 vs 83 %; p = 0.001), especially among women (59.1 vs 91.2 %; p = 0.01). The decrease in EBV-positive HL over time concerns particularly the nodular sclerosis histological subtype (69.2 vs 31.6 %, p = 0.000001). These results indicate that the epidemiology of HL and its association with EBV are changing over time, with a trend toward a Western profile, and point toward the emergence of other environmental causative factors, especially among young women, which remain to be identified. PMID:27378019

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in plasma is not encapsidated in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Julie L; Fan, Hongxin; Swinnen, Lode J; Schichman, Steven A; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Covington, Mary; Elmore, Sandra; Gulley, Margaret L

    2004-06-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gamma herpes virus, infects more than 95% of the human population before adulthood. Life-long persistence, usually without adverse health consequences, relies on a balance between viral latency, viral replication, and host immune response. Patients with EBV-related disease often have high levels of EBV DNA in their plasma. This study addresses whether this circulating, cell-free EBV DNA is encapsidated in virions or exists as naked genomes. First, an assay was developed, combining DNase I and quantitative real-time PCR, to discriminate encapsidated from naked EBV DNA. EBV DNA was almost always naked in the plasma of AIDS-related lymphoma patients (n = 11) and immunosuppressed/posttransplantation patients (n = 8). In contrast, infectious mononucleosis patients (n = 30) often had a mixture of encapsidated and naked EBV DNA. These findings may be important in understanding how viral load relates to disease status and in predicting response to nucleoside analogs and other antiviral therapies. PMID:15167006

  11. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in T Cell and NK Cell Lymphomas: Time for a Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Gru, A. A.; Haverkos, B. H.; Freud, A. G.; Hastings, J.; Nowacki, N. B.; Barrionuevo, C.; Vigil, C. E.; Rochford, R.; Natkunam, Y.; Baiocchi, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    While Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was initially discovered and characterized as an oncogenic virus in B cell neoplasms, it also plays a complex and multifaceted role in T/NK cell lymphomas. In B cell lymphomas, EBV-encoded proteins have been shown to directly promote immortalization and proliferation through stimulation of the NF-κB pathway and increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes. In the context of mature T/NK lymphomas (MTNKL), with the possible exception on extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL), the virus likely plays a more diverse and nuanced role. EBV has been shown to shape the tumor microenvironment by promoting Th2-skewed T cell responses and by increasing the expression of the immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1. The type of cell infected, the amount of plasma EBV DNA, and the degree of viral lytic replication have all been proposed to have prognostic value in T/NK cell lymphomas. Latency patterns of EBV infection have been defined using EBV-infected B cell models and have not been definitively established in T/NK cell lymphomas. Identifying the expression profile of EBV lytic proteins could allow for individualized therapy with the use of antiviral medications. More work needs to be done to determine whether EBV-associated MTNKL have distinct biological and clinical features, which can be leveraged for risk stratification, disease monitoring, and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26449716

  12. Latent Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I TAP Inhibitor, BNLF2a, in EBV-Positive Gastric Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Michael J.; Laskow, Thomas; Nakhoul, Hani; Blanchard, Eugene; Liu, Yaozhong; Wang, Xia; Baddoo, Melody; Lin, Zhen; Yin, Qinyan

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF2a gene product provides immune evasion properties to infected cells through inhibition of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-mediated transport of antigen peptides. Although BNLF2a is considered to be a lytic gene, we demonstrate that it is expressed in nearly half of the EBV-associated gastric carcinomas analyzed. Further, we show that BNLF2a expression is dissociated from lytic gene expression. BNLF2a is therefore expressed in this latency setting, potentially helping protect the infected tumor cells from immunosurveillance. PMID:26178981

  13. NIH scientists outline steps toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects nine out of ten people worldwide at some point during their lifetimes. Infections in early childhood often cause no disease symptoms, but people infected during adolescence or young adulthood may develop infectious mononuc

  14. Prognostic impact of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA copy number at diagnosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin-Hua; Gao, Rui; Xia, Yi; Gale, Robert Peter; Chen, Rui-Ze; Yang, Yu-Qiong; Wang, Li; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Cao, Lei; Hong, Min; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yan; Fan, Lei; Chen, Yao-Yu; Hu, Zhi-Bin; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-12

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA is detected in the blood of some persons with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at diagnosis. Whether this is important in the development or progression of CLL is controversial. We interrogated associations between blood EBV-DNA copy number and biological and clinical variables in 243 new-diagnosed consecutive subjects with CLL. Quantification of EBV-DNA copies was done by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). All subjects had serological evidence of prior EBV-infection. However, only 24 subjects (10%) had a EBV-DNA-positive test at diagnosis. EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis had lower hemoglobin concentrations and platelet levels, higher thymidine kinase-1 and serum ferritin levels, un-mutated IGHV genes and a greater risk of Richter transformation compared with EBV-DNA-negative subjects. Percent CD20-, CD148- and ZAP70-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of each cluster designation were also increased in EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis. EBV-DNA test positivity was associated with a briefer time-to-treatment interval (HR 1.85; [95% confidence interval, 1.13, 3.03]; P=0.014) and worse survival (HR 2.77; [1.18, 6.49]; P=0.019). Reduction in EBV copies was significantly associated with therapy-response. A positive blood EBV-DNA test at diagnosis and sequential testing of EBV copies during therapy were significantly associated with biological and clinical variables, time-to-treatment, therapy-response and survival. If validated these data may be added to CLL prognostic scoring systems. PMID:26539641

  15. Prognostic impact of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA copy number at diagnosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yi; Gale, Robert Peter; Chen, Rui-Ze; Yang, Yu-Qiong; Wang, Li; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Cao, Lei; Hong, Min; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yan; Fan, Lei; Chen, Yao-Yu; Hu, Zhi-Bin; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA is detected in the blood of some persons with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at diagnosis. Whether this is important in the development or progression of CLL is controversial. We interrogated associations between blood EBV-DNA copy number and biological and clinical variables in 243 new-diagnosed consecutive subjects with CLL. Quantification of EBV-DNA copies was done by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). All subjects had serological evidence of prior EBV-infection. However, only 24 subjects (10%) had a EBV-DNA-positive test at diagnosis. EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis had lower hemoglobin concentrations and platelet levels, higher thymidine kinase-1 and serum ferritin levels, un-mutated IGHV genes and a greater risk of Richter transformation compared with EBV-DNA-negative subjects. Percent CD20-, CD148- and ZAP70-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of each cluster designation were also increased in EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis. EBV-DNA test positivity was associated with a briefer time-to-treatment interval (HR 1.85; [95% confidence interval, 1.13, 3.03]; P=0.014) and worse survival (HR 2.77; [1.18, 6.49]; P=0.019). Reduction in EBV copies was significantly associated with therapy-response. A positive blood EBV-DNA test at diagnosis and sequential testing of EBV copies during therapy were significantly associated with biological and clinical variables, time-to-treatment, therapy-response and survival. If validated these data may be added to CLL prognostic scoring systems. PMID:26539641

  16. Chronic Physical Stress Does Not Interact with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Dutpase to Alter the Sickness Response

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John; Nelson, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is thought to contribute to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome. Stress is known to influence the immune system and can exacerbate the sickness response. Although a role for psychological stress in the sickness response, particularly in combination with EBV-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) has been established, and the role of physical stressors in these interactions remains unspecified. In this study, we seek to determine the interaction of chronic physical (swim) stress and EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. We hypothesize that a chronic physical stressor will exacerbate the sickness response following EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. To test this hypothesis mice receive daily injections of EBV-encoded dUTPase or vehicle and are subjected to 15 min of swim stress each day for 14 days or left unmanipulated. On the final evening of injections mice undergo behavioral testing. EBV-encoded dUTPase injection alone produces some sickness behaviors. The physical swimming stress does not alter the sickness response. PMID:27175311

  17. Identification of target antigens for the human cytotoxic T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV): implications for the immune control of EBV-positive malignancies.

    PubMed

    Murray, R J; Kurilla, M G; Brooks, J M; Thomas, W A; Rowe, M; Kieff, E; Rickinson, A B

    1992-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human herpes virus with oncogenic potential, persists in B lymphoid tissues and is controlled by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) surveillance. On reactivation in vitro, these CTLs recognize EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) in an HLA class I antigen-restricted fashion, but the viral antigens providing target epitopes for such recognition remain largely undefined. Here we have tested EBV-induced polyclonal CTL preparations from 16 virus-immune donors on appropriate fibroblast targets in which the eight EBV latent proteins normally found in LCLs (Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen [EBNA] 1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, leader protein [LP], and latent membrane protein [LMP] 1 and 2) have been expressed individually from recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. Most donors gave multicomponent responses with two or more separate reactivities against different viral antigens. Although precise target antigen choice was clearly influenced by the donor's HLA class I type, a subset of latent proteins, namely EBNA 3A, 3B, and 3C, provided the dominant targets on a range of HLA backgrounds; thus, 15 of 16 donors gave CTL responses that contained reactivities to one or more proteins of this subset. Examples of responses to other latent proteins, namely LMP 2 and EBNA 2, were detected through specific HLA determinants, but we did not observe reactivities to EBNA 1, EBNA LP, or LMP 1. The bulk polyclonal CTL response in one donor, and components of that response in others, did not map to any of the known latent proteins, suggesting that other viral target antigens remain to be identified. This work has important implications for CTL control over EBV-positive malignancies where virus gene expression is often limited to specific subsets of latent proteins. PMID:1319456

  18. Lytic Replication of Epstein-Barr Virus During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Cellular immunity, which is decreased during and after space flight, is responsible for controlling EBV replication in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of short-term space flight on latent EBV reactivation.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces expression of B-cell activation markers on in vitro infection of EBV-negative B-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calender, A; Billaud, M; Aubry, J P; Banchereau, J; Vuillaume, M; Lenoir, G M

    1987-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation markers, including the EBV/C3d receptor [complement receptor type 2 (CR2) (CD21)], the 45-kDa lymphoblastoid cell-associated (Blast-2) antigen (CD23), and the B-cell restricted activation (Bac-1) antigen (which was recently identified as a potential B-cell growth factor receptor) can be turned on by infecting lymphoma cells that are genome negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the B95-8 immortalizing strain of the virus. The nonimmortalizing EBV variant, strain P3HR-1, which possesses a deletion within the BamHI WYH region of the genome containing the coding sequence for the EBV-determined nuclear antigen 2, does not induce expression of these markers. Other lymphoblastoid cell-associated antigen markers can be activated by infection with either immortalizing or nonimmortalizing viruses. These results suggest that the immortalizing potential of EBV is correlated with its ability to induce expression of B-cell activation markers, which are suspected to play a major role in the physiological pathway leading to lymphoid cell proliferation. The viral genomic region deleted in the nonimmortalizing strain of EBV seems to be required for activation of some of these markers. Human lymphoma cell lines, such as those used in this study, can thus help identify the specific EBV genes involved in lymphoid B-cell proliferation and the mechanism of action of these genes. PMID:2825176

  20. Human pathogenic Mycoplasma species induced cytokine gene expression in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schäffner, E; Opitz, O; Pietsch, K; Bauer, G; Ehlers, S; Jacobs, E

    1998-04-01

    We addressed the question whether the in vitro interaction of two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-genome-positive B cell lines (EB-3 and HilB-gamma) with either Mycoplasma pneumoniae or M. hominis, with the mycoplasma species (M. fermentans, M. fermentans subsp. incognitus, M. penetrans, M. genitalium) or with mycoplasma species known to be mere commensals of the respiratory tract (M. orale and M. salivarium) would result in expression of mRNAs for IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4 and IL-6 as determined by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR after 4 and 24 h of cocultivation. The pattern of cytokine gene expression observed depended on (i) the origin of the transformed cell line, (ii) the pathogenicity of the Mycoplasma species, and (iii) the length of cocultivation. The EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell line HilB-gamma showed mRNA expression for IL-2, IL-2-receptor, IL-4 and IL-6 peaking 24 h after stimulation with M. pneumoniae and all AIDS-related mycoplasma species tested. The Burkitt lymphoma cell line EB-3 showed a distinct and isolated strong II-2/IL-2 R-mRNA expression within 4 h after contact with the pathogenic and all of the AIDS related mycoplasma species. In neither EBV-containing cell line cytokine was gene expression detectable after stimulation with the commensal mycoplasma species, M. orale and M. salivarium, indicating species differences in the ability of mycoplasmas to interact with and stimulate B-cell lines. Our data suggest that some mcyoplasma species may act as immunomodulatory cofactors by eliciting inappropriate cytokine gene expression in B cells latently infected with EBV. Therefore, this cultivation model may prove useful in evaluating the pathogenetic potential of novel isolated mycoplasma species. PMID:9533897

  1. Multiple Epstein-Barr virus infections in healthy individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walling, Dennis M.; Brown, Abigail L.; Etienne, Wiguins; Keitel, Wendy A.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We employed a newly developed genotyping technique with direct representational detection of LMP-1 gene sequences to study the molecular epidemiology of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in healthy individuals. Infections with up to five different EBV genotypes were found in two of nine individuals studied. These results support the hypothesis that multiple EBV infections of healthy individuals are common. The implications for the development of an EBV vaccine are discussed.

  2. Identification of Novel Small Organic Compounds with Diverse Structures for the Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic Cycle in EBV-Positive Epithelial Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chung King; Ho, Dona N.; Hui, Kwai Fung; Kao, Richard Y.; Chiang, Alan K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Phorbol esters, which are protein kinase C (PKC) activators, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which cause enhanced acetylation of cellular proteins, are the main classes of chemical inducers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle in latently EBV-infected cells acting through the PKC pathway. Chemical inducers which induce EBV lytic cycle through alternative cellular pathways may aid in defining the mechanisms leading to lytic cycle reactivation and improve cells’ responsiveness towards lytic induction. We performed a phenotypic screening on a chemical library of 50,240 novel small organic compounds to identify novel class(es) of strong inducer(s) of EBV lytic cycle in gastric carcinoma (GC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. Five hit compounds were selected after three successive rounds of increasingly stringent screening. All five compounds are structurally diverse from each other and distinct from phorbol esters or HDAC inhibitors. They neither cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins nor significant PKC activation at their working concentrations, suggesting that their biological mode of action are distinct from that of the known chemical inducers. Two of the five compounds with rapid lytic-inducing action were further studied for their mechanisms of induction of EBV lytic cycle. Unlike HDAC inhibitors, lytic induction by both compounds was not inhibited by rottlerin, a specific inhibitor of PKCδ. Interestingly, both compounds could cooperate with HDAC inhibitors to enhance EBV lytic cycle induction in EBV-positive epithelial cancer cells, paving way for the development of strategies to increase cells’ responsiveness towards lytic reactivation. One of the two compounds bears structural resemblance to iron chelators and the other strongly activates the MAPK pathways. These structurally diverse novel organic compounds may represent potential new classes of chemicals that can be used to investigate any alternative mechanism(s) leading to EBV

  3. Human Antibody Titers to Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) gp350 Correlate with Neutralization of Infectivity Better than Antibody Titers to EBV gp42 Using a Rapid Flow Cytometry-Based EBV Neutralization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sashihara, Junji; Burbelo, Peter D.; Savoldo, Barbara; Pierson, Theodore C.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of neutralizing antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is important for evaluation of candidate vaccines. The current neutralization assay is based on antibody inhibition of EBV transformation of B cells and requires 6 weeks to perform. We developed a rapid, quantitative flow cytometry assay and show that neutralizing antibody titers measured by the new assay strongly correlate with antibody titers in the standard transformation-based assay. Antibodies to EBV gp350 and gp42 have been shown to block infection of B cells by EBV. Using new assays to quantify antibodies to these glycoproteins, we show for the first time that that human plasma contains high titers of antibody to gp42; these titers correlate with neutralization of EBV infectivity or transformation. Furthermore, we show that antibody titers to EBV gp350 correlate more strongly with neutralization than antibody titers to gp42. These assays should be useful in accessing antibody responses to candidate EBV vaccines. PMID:19584018

  4. EBER in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lawrence M; Chen, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr encoding region (EBER) in situ hybridization is the methodology of choice for the detection of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tissue sections. Because of the large numbers of copies of EBERs present in latently infected cells, non-isotopic methods can be used. Positive studies show staining in the nuclei of the EBV-infected cells, accentuating the chromatin and often excluding the nucleolus. False-negative results are most often the result of RNA degradation in the tissues, a finding that may be detected through the use of a polyT probe as a control for RNA preservation. PMID:23666702

  5. Epstein-Barr Viruses (EBVs) Deficient in EBV-Encoded RNAs Have Higher Levels of Latent Membrane Protein 2 RNA Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines and Efficiently Establish Persistent Infections in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregorovic, Goran; Boulden, Elizabeth A.; Bosshard, Rachel; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Skalsky, Rebecca; Cullen, Bryan R.; Gujer, Cornelia; Rämer, Patrick; Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Functions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBERs) were tested in lymphoblastoid cell lines containing EBER mutants of EBV. Binding of EBER1 to ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) was confirmed. Deletion of EBER1 or EBER2 correlated with increased levels of cytoplasmic EBV LMP2 RNA and with small effects on specific cellular microRNA (miRNA) levels, but protein levels of LMP1 and LMP2A were not affected. Wild-type EBV and EBER deletion EBV had approximately equal abilities to infect immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human hematopoietic system. PMID:26339045

  6. Epstein-Barr Viruses (EBVs) Deficient in EBV-Encoded RNAs Have Higher Levels of Latent Membrane Protein 2 RNA Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines and Efficiently Establish Persistent Infections in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Gregorovic, Goran; Boulden, Elizabeth A; Bosshard, Rachel; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Skalsky, Rebecca; Cullen, Bryan R; Gujer, Cornelia; Rämer, Patrick; Münz, Christian; Farrell, Paul J

    2015-11-01

    Functions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBERs) were tested in lymphoblastoid cell lines containing EBER mutants of EBV. Binding of EBER1 to ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) was confirmed. Deletion of EBER1 or EBER2 correlated with increased levels of cytoplasmic EBV LMP2 RNA and with small effects on specific cellular microRNA (miRNA) levels, but protein levels of LMP1 and LMP2A were not affected. Wild-type EBV and EBER deletion EBV had approximately equal abilities to infect immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human hematopoietic system. PMID:26339045

  7. Descending Mediastinitis in Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Driel, E. M.; Janssen, M. J. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our case report describes a previously healthy 34-year-old male who develops a descending mediastinitis as a complication of an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The mediastinitis was suspected to have developed by a breakthrough of a peritonsillar abscess through the space between the alar and prevertebral space. PMID:25740774

  8. c-myc activation renders proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cells independent of EBV nuclear antigen 2 and latent membrane protein 1.

    PubMed Central

    Polack, A; Hörtnagel, K; Pajic, A; Christoph, B; Baier, B; Falk, M; Mautner, J; Geltinger, C; Bornkamm, G W; Kempkes, B

    1996-01-01

    Two genetic events contribute to the development of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) infection of B lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the activation of the protooncogene c-myc through chromosomal translocation. The viral genes EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) and latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) are essential for transformation of primary human B cells by EBV in vitro; however, these genes are not expressed in BL cells in vivo. To address the question whether c-myc activation might abrogate the requirement of the EBNA2 and LMP1 function, we have introduced an activated c-myc gene into an EBV-transformed cell line in which EBNA2 was rendered estrogen-dependent through fusion with the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor. The c-myc gene was placed under the control of regulatory elements of the immunoglobulin kappa locus composed a matrix attachment region, the intron enhancer, and the 3' enhancer. We show here that transfection of a c-myc expression plasmid followed by selection for high MYC expression is capable of inducing continuous proliferation of these cells in the absence of functional EBNA2 and LMP1. c-myc-induced hormone-independent proliferation was associated with a dramatic change in the growth behavior as well as cell surface marker expression of these cells. The typical lymphoblastoid morphology and phenotype of EBV-transformed cells completely changed into that of BL cells in vivo. We conclude that the phenotype of BL cells reflects the expression pattern of viral and cellular genes rather than its germinal center origin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816814

  9. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 subtypes in EBV-associated lymphomas from Brazil and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, J; Gray, D; Pinto-Paes, R; Barrezueta, L F; Armstrong, A A; Alexander, F A; McGeoch, D J; Jarrett, R F

    1999-10-01

    EBNA-1 is the only viral protein consistently expressed in all cells latently infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). There is a high frequency of sequence variation within functionally important domains of EBNA-1, with five subtypes identified. Individuals may be infected with multiple EBV strains (classified according to EBNA-1 subtype), but Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) tumours carry a single subtype and exhibit some subtype preference. Subtype variation has also been related to geographical location. In the present study EBNA-1 polymorphisms were examined in a series of haematological malignancies from two distinct geographical regions, Brazil and the United Kingdom. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the carboxy-terminal region of EBNA-1 in 34 cases revealed six distinct sequences, some of which are novel. A new subtype, named V-Ala, was identified. EBNA-1 subtype in tumours differed markedly according to geographical location. In contrast to previous studies, we found evidence of EBNA-1 sequence variation within individual BL tumour samples. PMID:10573169

  10. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  11. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  12. An Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded Inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Is an Important Determinant for Acute and Persistent EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Makoto; Fogg, Mark H.; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV), naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1). Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection. PMID:23300447

  13. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, M.; Land, C. E.; Uemura, Y.; Tokudome, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sato, E.

    1993-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be related to lymphoid tumors and some types of epithelial tumors, including lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma with marked lymphocytic stroma. In this study, prevalence of EBV involvement in gastric cancer, and characteristics of tumors with such involvement, were investigated by EBV-encoded RNA 1 in situ hybridization applied to paraffin sections, including the tumor and adjacent gastric tissue, from 999 gastric carcinomas observed in 970 consecutive cases from a large Japanese hospital. EBV involvement occurred in 6.9 percent of lesions, a significantly lower proportion than has been observed in a North American series. Involvement was significantly more frequent among males, in tumors in the upper part of the stomach, and in adenocarcinomas of the moderately differentiated tubular and poorly differentiated solid or medullary types. Almost all carcinomas with marked lymphoid stroma were EBV-positive. Positive lesions were characterized by the presence of uniform hybridized signals in almost all carcinoma cells and by their absence from adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:8238241

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae preceding Lemierre's syndrome due to Fusobacterium nucleatum complicated by acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectious mononucleosis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Klein, Natalie C; Petelin, Andrew; Cunha, Burke A

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Lemierre's syndrome due to a rare species of Fusobacterium, that is, Fusobacterium nucleatum preceded by Mycoplasma pneumoniae pharyngitis and followed later by Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. PMID:22464641

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  17. Mapping regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB) important for fusion function with gH/gL

    SciTech Connect

    Plate, Aileen E.; Reimer, Jessica J.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-04-25

    Glycoproteins gB and gH/gL are required for entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into cells, but the role of each glycoprotein and how they function together to mediate fusion is unclear. Analysis of the functional homology of gB from the closely related primate gammaherpesvirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus (Rh-LCV), showed that EBV gB could not complement Rh gB due to a species-specific dependence between gB and gL. To map domains of gB required for this interaction, we constructed a panel of EBV/Rh gB chimeric proteins. Analysis showed that insertion of Rh gB from residues 456 to 807 restored fusion function of EBV gB with Rh gH/gL, suggesting this region of gB is important for interaction with gH/gL. Split YFP bimolecular complementation (BiFC) provided evidence of an interaction between EBV gB and gH/gL. Together, our results suggest the importance of a gB-gH/gL interaction in EBV-mediated fusion with B cells requiring the region of EBV gB from 456 to 807.

  18. The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus and the immune system: a rationale for adoptive cell therapy of EBV-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Anna; Turrini, Riccardo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Martorelli, Debora; Muraro, Elena; Comoli, Patrizia; Rosato, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade immune system recognition and to establish latent infection in memory B cells, where the virus resides lifelong without any consequence in the majority of individuals. However, some imbalances in the equilibrium between the inherent virus transforming properties and the host immune system can lead to the development of different tumors, such as lymphoproliferative disorders, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The expression of viral antigens in malignant cells makes them suitable targets for immunotherapeutic approaches, which are mainly based on the ex vivo expansion of EBV-specific T cells. Indeed, the infusion of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has proved not only to be safe and effective, but also capable of restoring or inducing a protective anti-virus immunity, which is lacking, albeit to a different extent, in every EBV-driven malignancy. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of adoptive immunotherapy approaches for EBV-related malignancies, with particular emphasis on the immunological and virological aspects linked to the clinical responses obtained. Data collected confirm the clinical relevance of the use of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the field of adoptive immunotherapy and suggest the increasing importance of this approach also against other tumors, concurrent with the increasing knowledge of the intimate and continuous interplay between the virus and the host immune system. PMID:20421267

  19. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are present in fractions related to exosomes released by EBV-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Waqar; Philip, Pretty S; Tariq, Saeed; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with a number of human malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin. However, the mechanism of oncogenesis is unclear. A number of viral products, including EBV latent proteins and non-protein coding RNAs have been implicated. Recently it was reported that EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are released from EBV infected cells and they can induce biological changes in cells via signaling from toll-like receptor 3. Here, we investigated if these abundantly expressed non-protein coding EBV RNAs (EBER-1 and EBER-2) are excreted from infected cells in exosomal fractions. Using differential ultracentrifugation we isolated exosomes from three EBV positive cell lines (B95-8, EBV-LCL, BL30-B95-8), one EBER-1 transfected cell line (293T-pHEBo-E1) and two EBV-negative cell lines (BL30, 293T-pHEBo). The identity of purified exosomes was determined by electron microscopy and western blotting for CD63. The presence of EBERs in cells, culture supernatants and purified exosomal fractions was determined using RT-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. Purified exosomal fractions were also tested for the presence of the EBER-1-binding protein La, using western blotting. Both EBER-1 and EBER-2 were found to be present not only in the culture supernatants, but also in the purified exosome fractions of all EBV-infected cell lines. EBER-1 could also be detected in exosomal fractions from EBER-1 transfected 293T cells whilst the fractions from vector only transfectants were clearly negative. Furthermore, purified exosomal fractions also contained the EBER-binding protein (La), supporting the notion that EBERs are most probably released from EBV infected cells in the form of EBER-La complex in exosomes. PMID:24896633

  1. Constitutive activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 gene transcription by IRF1 and IRF2 during restricted EBV latency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, B C; Paulson, E; Strominger, J L; Speck, S H

    1997-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 gene promoter active in the type I program of restricted viral latency was recently identified and shown to reside in the viral BamHI Q fragment. This promoter, Qp, is active in a wide variety of cell lines and has an architecture reminiscent of eukaryotic housekeeping gene promoters (B. C. Schaefer, J. L. Strominger, and S. H. Speck, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:10565-10569, 1995; B. C. Schaefer, J. L. Strominger, and S. H. Speck, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:364-377, 1997). Here we demonstrate by deletion analysis that the important cis-acting elements regulating Qp are clustered in a relatively small region (ca. 80 bp) surrounding the site of transcription initiation. Immediately upstream of the site of initiation is a region which is protected from DNase I digestion by crude nuclear extracts. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses (EMSA) employing probes spanning this region demonstrated the presence of two major protein complexes. Deletion analysis of Qp demonstrated that at least one of these complexes plays an important role in Qp activity. Evidence that interferon response factor 2 (IRF2) is a major constituent of the most prominent EMSA complex and that IRF1 may be a minor component of this complex is presented. Transfections into IRF1-/-, IRF2-/-, and IRF1,2-/- fibroblasts demonstrated that absence of both IRF1 and IRF2 reduced Qp activity to approximately the same extent as mutation of the IRF-binding site in Qp, strongly implicating IRF2, and perhaps IRF1, in the regulation of Qp activity. Notably, transcription from Qp was not inducible by either alpha or gamma interferon in EBV-negative B cells but rather was shown to be constitutively activated by IRF1 and IRF2. This observation suggests that IRF1 and IRF2 have a previously unrecognized role as constitutive activators of specific genes. Additionally, data presented indicate that a protein complex containing the nonhistone architectural protein HMG-I(Y) binds to the region

  2. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression. PMID:25950714

  3. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in leucoreduced blood products.

    PubMed

    Trottier, H; Delage, G; Hu, J; Robitaille, N; Buteau, C; Tucci, M; Lacroix, J; Alfieri, C

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the prevalence of three human herpesviruses (HHV), namely HHV-4 (Epstein-Barr virus/EBV), HHV-6b and HHV-7 in leucoreduced blood products obtained from the Sainte-Justine Hospital blood bank. A total of 100 specimens, including 34 red blood cell concentrates, 33 platelet bags and 33 plasma units, were collected and screened by a sensitive PCR assay using virus-specific primers. Positive units were then retested by quantitative PCR. Of the 100 specimens, one platelet unit tested positive for EBV. PMID:26383177

  4. Phase I Clinical Trial of 4-1BB-based Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Choi, Beom K.; Lee, Youngjoo; Lee, Hyewon; Yun, Tak; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Je-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy using Ag-specific T cells has been tested successfully in the clinic, the production of these T cells has been challenging. By applying our simple and practical 4-1BB-based method for the generation of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, here we determined the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile, immunologic responses, and clinical efficacy of autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/LMP2A-specific CD8+ T cells (EBV-induced Natural T cell; EBViNT) in patients with relapsed/refractory EBV-positive tumors. This was a single-center, phase I, dose-escalation trial study evaluating 4 escalating dosing schedules of single injected EBViNT. CD8+ T-cell responses against different LMP2A peptides in each patient were determined, and the most effective peptides were used to produce EBViNT. The produced autologous EBViNTs were single infused to patients with EBV-associated malignancy who had failed to standard treatments and were of HLA-A02 or A24 type. Of 11 patients enrolled, 8 patients received a single infusion of EBViNT: 4 with nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 1 with Hodgkin lymphoma, 2 with extranodal NK/T lymphomas, and 1 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Single infusion of EBViNT was well tolerated by all the patients and generated objective antitumor responses in 3 of them. EBViNT infusion induced 2 waves of interferon-γ response: 1 approximately 1 week and the other 4–8 weeks after the treatment. The strength of the second wave was related to the efficacy of the treatment. The current trial shows that EBViNT therapy is safe and may provide a new option for treating EBV-positive recurrent cancer patients resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:26938947

  5. Phase I Clinical Trial of 4-1BB-based Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Choi, Beom K; Lee, Youngjoo; Lee, Hyewon; Yun, Tak; Kim, Young H; Lee, Je-Jung; Kwon, Byoung S

    2016-04-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy using Ag-specific T cells has been tested successfully in the clinic, the production of these T cells has been challenging. By applying our simple and practical 4-1BB-based method for the generation of Ag-specific CD8 T cells, here we determined the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile, immunologic responses, and clinical efficacy of autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/LMP2A-specific CD8 T cells (EBV-induced Natural T cell; EBViNT) in patients with relapsed/refractory EBV-positive tumors. This was a single-center, phase I, dose-escalation trial study evaluating 4 escalating dosing schedules of single injected EBViNT. CD8 T-cell responses against different LMP2A peptides in each patient were determined, and the most effective peptides were used to produce EBViNT. The produced autologous EBViNTs were single infused to patients with EBV-associated malignancy who had failed to standard treatments and were of HLA-A02 or A24 type. Of 11 patients enrolled, 8 patients received a single infusion of EBViNT: 4 with nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 1 with Hodgkin lymphoma, 2 with extranodal NK/T lymphomas, and 1 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Single infusion of EBViNT was well tolerated by all the patients and generated objective antitumor responses in 3 of them. EBViNT infusion induced 2 waves of interferon-γ response: 1 approximately 1 week and the other 4-8 weeks after the treatment. The strength of the second wave was related to the efficacy of the treatment. The current trial shows that EBViNT therapy is safe and may provide a new option for treating EBV-positive recurrent cancer patients resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:26938947

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMIAN, Somayh; ASHRAFZADEH, Farah; AKHONDIAN, Javad; BEIRAGHI TOOSI, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Many neurologic manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection have been documented, including encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, transverse myelitis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. These manifestations can occur alone or coincidentally with the clinical picture of infectious mononucleosis. EBV encephalitis is rare and is indicated as a wide range of clinical manifestations. We report a 10-year-old girl presented with fever, gait disturbance, and bizarre behavior for one week. The results of the physical examination were unremarkable. The diagnosis of EBV encephalitis was made by changes in titers of EBV specific antibodies and MRI findings. A cranial MRI demonstrated abnormal high signal intensities in the basal ganglia and the striatal body, especially in the putamen and caudate nucleus. EBV infection should be considered when lesions are localized to the basal ganglia. PMID:25767548

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ahlee; Moon, Jin Soo; Chang, Ju Young; Ko, Jae Sung

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated stones. AAC is frequently associated with severe systemic inflammation. However, the exact etiology and pathogenesis of AAC still remain unclear. Acute infection with Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in childhood is usually aymptomatic, whereas it often presents as typical infectious mononucleosis symptoms such as fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. AAC may occur during the course of acute EBV infection, which is rarely encountered in the pediatric population. AAC complicating the course of a primary EBV infection is usually associated with a favorable outcome. Most of the patients recover without any surgical treatment. Therefore, the detection of EBV in AAC would be important for prediction of better prognosis. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child who presented with AAC during the course of primary EBV infection, the first in Korea, and review the relevant literature. PMID:24749090

  8. Epstein-barr virus infection with acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ahlee; Yang, Hye Ran; Moon, Jin Soo; Chang, Ju Young; Ko, Jae Sung

    2014-03-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated stones. AAC is frequently associated with severe systemic inflammation. However, the exact etiology and pathogenesis of AAC still remain unclear. Acute infection with Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in childhood is usually aymptomatic, whereas it often presents as typical infectious mononucleosis symptoms such as fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. AAC may occur during the course of acute EBV infection, which is rarely encountered in the pediatric population. AAC complicating the course of a primary EBV infection is usually associated with a favorable outcome. Most of the patients recover without any surgical treatment. Therefore, the detection of EBV in AAC would be important for prediction of better prognosis. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child who presented with AAC during the course of primary EBV infection, the first in Korea, and review the relevant literature. PMID:24749090

  9. Investigation of the function of the putative self-association site of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein 42 (gp42)

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Matsuura, Hisae; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-07-05

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein 42 (gp42) is a type II membrane protein essential for entry into B cells but inhibits entry into epithelial cells. X-ray crystallography suggests that gp42 may form dimers when bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II receptor (Mullen et al., 2002) or multimerize when not bound to HLA class II (Kirschner et al., 2009). We investigated this self-association of gp42 using several different approaches. We generated soluble mutants of gp42 containing mutations within the self-association site and found that these mutants have a defect in fusion. The gp42 mutants bound to gH/gL and HLA class II, but were unable to bind wild-type gp42 or a cleavage mutant of gp42. Using purified gp42, gH/gL, and HLA, we found these proteins associate 1:1:1 by gel filtration suggesting that gp42 dimerization or multimerization does not occur or is a transient event undetectable by our methods.

  10. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  11. Commutability of the Epstein-Barr virus WHO international standard across two quantitative PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Abeynayake, Janaki; Johnson, Ryan; Libiran, Paolo; Sahoo, Malaya K; Cao, Hongbin; Bowen, Raffick; Chan, K C Allen; Le, Quynh-Thu; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2014-10-01

    The commutability of international reference standards is critical for ensuring quantitative agreement across different viral load assays. Here, we demonstrate the commutability of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) WHO international standard for the BamHI-W and artus EBV assays. PMID:25078918

  12. Emotional Disclosure through Writing or Speaking Modulates Latent Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Titers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esterling, Brian A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Healthy Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seropositive undergraduates (n=57) completed personality inventory, provided blood samples, and were randomly assigned to write/talk about stressful events, or to write about trivial events. Those assigned to verbal/stressful condition had significantly lower EBV antibody titers (suggesting better cellular immune…

  13. The Epstein-Barr Virus EBNA1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a widespread human herpes virus that immortalizes cells as part of its latent infection and is a causative agent in the development of several types of lymphomas and carcinomas. Replication and stable persistence of the EBV genomes in latent infection require the viral EBNA1 protein, which binds specific DNA sequences in the viral DNA. While the roles of EBNA1 were initially thought to be limited to effects on the viral genomes, more recently EBNA1 has been found to have multiple effects on cellular proteins and pathways that may also be important for viral persistence. In addition, a role for EBNA1 in lytic infection has been recently identified. The multiple roles of EBNA1 in EBV infection are the subject of this paper. PMID:24278697

  14. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes. PMID:25066775

  15. Effect of Pinus massoniana Lamb. bark extract on lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhang, Shimin; Wang, Xuedong; Gao, Yaqian; Qin, Xing; Wu, Kun

    2012-10-01

    Pinus massoniana bark extract (PMBE) at a concentration of 60 microg/mL or more inhibits the expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic proteins, such as Rta, Zta, and EA-D. EBV lytic cycle was blocked by inhibiting the transcription of immediate-early genes. The results suggest that the PMBE has anti-EBV activity. Thus, the extract is potentially useful in preventing the lytic development of EBV in vitro. PMID:23214264

  16. Epstein-Barr virus provides a survival factor to Burkitt's lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Gregory; Komano, Jun; Sugden, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been causally associated with at least five human malignancies. The exact contributions made by EBV to these cancers remain unknown. We demonstrate that one viral protein found in all EBV-associated malignancies, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), is required for survival of one of these cancers, EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma. Inhibition of EBNA-1 decreases survival of these tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. Expression of EBNA-1 in uninfected cells also can inhibit apoptosis induced by expression of p53 in the absence of the EBV genome. Our findings demonstrate that EBNA-1 is critical for the continued survival of EBV-associated Burkitt's lymphoma, and, by extension, for the other B cell tumors with which EBV is associated. Efficient inhibitors of EBNA-1's functions would likely prove useful in the therapy of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:14603034

  17. Infection of human thymocytes by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Watry, D; Hedrick, J A; Siervo, S; Rhodes, G; Lamberti, J J; Lambris, J D; Tsoukas, C D

    1991-04-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, and has been strongly associated with certain human cancers. The virus is thought to exclusively bind to B lymphocytes and epithelial cells via receptors (CR2/CD21) that also interact with fragments of the third component of complement (C3). Recent evidence, however, has challenged this belief. We have used two-color immunofluorescence analysis using biotin-conjugated EBV and streptavidin-phycoerythrin along with fluorescein-conjugated anti-T cell antibodies and demonstrated that CD1-positive, CD3-dull (immature) human thymocytes express functional EBV receptors. In four replicate experiments, the binding of EBV to thymocytes ranged between 8 and 18%. This interaction is specific as evidenced by inhibition with nonconjugated virus, anti-CR2 antibodies, aggregated C3, and an antibody to the gp350 viral glycoprotein that the virus uses to bind to CR2. EBV can infect the thymocytes as evaluated by the presence of episomal EBV-DNA in thymocytes that had been incubated with the virus as short as 12 days or as long as 6 weeks. Episomal DNA analysis was performed by Southern blotting with a EBV-DNA probe that hybridizes to the first internal reiteration of the viral DNA. The presence of the EBV genome is also supported by the detection of EBV nuclear antigen 1 in infected thymocytes, assessed by Western blotting with EBV-immune sera. The EBV infection is specific as determined by blocking experiments using anti-CR2 and anti-gp350 antibodies. Finally, virus infection of thymocytes can act synergistically along with interleukin 2 and induce a lymphokine-dependent cellular proliferation. In view of previously reported cases of EBV-positive human T cell lymphomas, the possibility is raised that EBV may be involved in cancers of T lymphocytes that have not been previously appreciated. PMID:1706754

  18. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) association and latency profile in pediatric Burkitt's lymphoma: experience of a single institution in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lara, Julia; Cohen, Melina; De Matteo, Elena; Aversa, Luis; Preciado, Maria Victoria; Chabay, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize EBV expression and latency pattern in pediatric Burkitt's lymphoma in a single institution in Argentina. EBV-encoded RNA or protein was analyzed in 27 patients. EBERs was expressed in 37% of patients (29% of immunocompetent and 100% of immunosuppressed patients). EBV-positive cases were observed exclusively in patients younger than 5 years old. EBV association with immunocompetent patients exhibits the sporadic pattern in region under study, while its presence in patients infected with HIV was higher than described previously. EBV latency I profile was present in most of the patients, except for two immunosuppressed patients who displayed LMP1 expression. PMID:24027016

  19. Epstein-Barr virus in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Duus, Karen; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are a group of connective tissue diseases with diverse, yet overlapping, symptoms and autoantibody development. The etiology behind SADs is not fully elucidated, but a number of genetic and environmental factors are known to influence the incidence of SADs. Recent findings link dysregulation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with SAD development. EBV causes a persistent infection with a tight latency programme in memory B-cells, which enables evasion of the immune defence. A number of immune escape mechanisms and immune-modulating proteins have been described for EBV. These immune modulating functions make EBV a good candidate for initiation of autoimmune diseases and exacerbation of disease progression. This review focuses on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and sum up the existing data linking EBV with these diseases including elevated titres of EBV antibodies, reduced T-cell defence against EBV, and elevated EBV viral load. Together, these data suggest that uncontrolled EBV infection can develop diverse autoreactivities in genetic susceptible individuals with different manifestations depending on the genetic background and the site of reactivation. PMID:24062777

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Induced Epigenetic Alterations Following Transient Infection

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Krista J.; Shi, Mingxia; Zhang, Fangfang; Cvek, Urska; Scott, Rona S.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a known tumor virus associated with an increasing array of malignancies; however, the association of the virus with certain malignancies is often erratic. To determine EBV’s contributions to tumorigenesis in a setting of incomplete association, a transient model of infection was established where a clonal CCL185 carcinoma cell line infected with recombinant EBV was allowed to lose viral genomes by withdrawal of selection pressure. Global gene expression comparing EBV-negative, transiently infected clones to uninfected controls identified expression changes in over 1000 genes. Among downregulated genes, several genes known to be DNA methylated in cancer were identified including E-cadherin and PYCARD. A cadherin switch, increased motility and enhanced cellular invasiveness present in EBV-positive cells were retained following viral loss indicating an epigenetic effect. Repression of PYCARD expression was due to increased promoter CpG methylation, whereas loss of E-cadherin expression after transient EBV infection did not correlate with increased DNA methylation of the E-cadherin promoter. Rather, repression of E-cadherin was consistent with formation of a repressive chromatin state. Decreased histone 3 or 4 acetylation at the promoter and 5’ end of the E-cadherin gene was observed in an EBV-negative, transiently infected clone relative to the uninfected controls. These results suggest that EBV can stably alter gene expression in a heritable fashion in formerly infected cells, while its own contribution to the oncogenic process is masked. PMID:23047626

  1. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) Target Proteins by Proteome Analysis: Activation of EBNA2 in Conditionally Immortalized B Cells Reflects Early Events after Infection of Primary B Cells by EBV

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Martin; Krug, Tanja; Gires, Olivier; Zeidler, Reinhard; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Laux, Gerhard; Sauer, Guido; Lovric, Josip; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic herpesvirus associated with several malignant tumors, e.g., Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and is able to efficiently immortalize primary B lymphocytes in vitro. The growth program of infected B cells is initiated and maintained by the viral transcription factor EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), which regulates viral and cellular genes, including the proto-oncogene c-myc. In our study, patterns of protein expression in B cells with and without EBNA2 were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we used a conditional immortalization system for EBV, a B cell line (EREB2-5) that expresses an estrogen receptor-EBNA2 fusion protein. In order to discriminate downstream targets of c-Myc from c-Myc-independent EBNA2 targets, we used an EREB2-5-derived cell line, P493-6, in which c-Myc is expressed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Of 20 identified EBNA2 target proteins, 11 were c-Myc dependent and therefore most probably associated with proliferation, and one of these proteins was a posttranslationally modified protein, i.e., hypusinylated eIF5a. Finally, to estimate the relevance of EBNA2 targets during early EBV infection, we analyzed the proteomes of primary B cells before and after infection with EBV. The protein expression pattern induced upon EBV infection was similar to that following EBNA2 activation. These findings underscore the value of EREB2-5 cells as an appropriate model system for the analysis of early events in the process of EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. PMID:15047810

  2. Cordycepin enhances Epstein-Barr virus lytic infection and Epstein-Barr virus-positive tumor treatment efficacy by doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinping; Yu, Jieshi; Du, Li; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The consistent latent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tumor cells offers potential for virus-targeted therapies. The switch from the latent form of EBV to the lytic form in tumor cells can lead to tumor cell lysis. In this study, we report that a natural small molecule compound, cordycepin, can induce lytic EBV infection in tumor cells. Subsequently, we demonstrate that cordycepin can enhance EBV reactivating capacity and EBV-positive tumor cell killing ability of low dose doxorubicin. The combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin phosphorylates CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) through protein kinase C (PKC)-p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway, and C/EBPβ is required for the activation of lytic EBV infection. Most importantly, an in vivo experiment demonstrates that the combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin is more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in SCID mice than is doxorubicin alone. Our findings establish that cordycepin can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy for treatment of EBV-positive tumors. PMID:27063964

  3. The Epigenetic Life Cycle of Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) more than 50 years ago, this virus has been studied for its capacity to readily establish a latent infection, which is the prominent hallmark of this member of the herpesvirus family. EBV has become an important model for many aspects of herpesviral latency, but the molecular steps and mechanisms that lead to and promote viral latency have only emerged recently. It now appears that the virus exploits diverse facets of epigenetic gene regulation in the cellular host to establish a latent infection. Most viral genes are transcriptionally repressed, and viral chromatin is densely compacted during EBV's latent phase, but latent infection is not a dead end. In order to escape from this phase, epigenetic silencing must be reverted efficiently and quickly. It appears that EBV has perfected a clever strategy to overcome transcriptional repression of its many lytic genes to initiate virus de novo synthesis within a few hours after induction of its lytic cycle. This review tries to summarize the known molecular mechanisms, the current models, concepts, and ideas underlying this viral strategy. This review also attempts to identify and address gaps in our current understanding of EBV's epigenetic mechanisms within the infected cellular host. PMID:26424645

  4. Biology and disease associations of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, D H

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus which infects almost all of the world's population subclinically during childhood and thereafter remains in the body for life. The virus colonizes antibody-producing (B) cells, which, as relatively long-lived resting cells, are an ideal site for long-term residence. Here EBV evades recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T cells. EBV is passed to naive hosts in saliva, but how the virus gains access to this route of transmission is not entirely clear. EBV carries a set of latent genes that, when expressed in resting B cells, induce cell proliferation and thereby increase the chances of successful virus colonization of the B-cell system during primary infection and the establishment of persistence. However, if this cell proliferation is not controlled, or if it is accompanied by additional genetic events within the infected cell, it can lead to malignancy. Thus EBV acts as a step in the evolution of an ever-increasing list of malignancies which are broadly of lymphoid or epithelial cell origin. In some of these, such as B-lymphoproliferative disease in the immunocompromised host, the role of the virus is central and well defined; in others, such as Burkitt's lymphoma, essential cofactors have been identified which act in concert with EBV in the evolution of the malignant clone. However, in several diseases in which the presence of EBV has more recently been discovered, the role of the virus is unclear. This review describes recent views on the EBV life cycle and its interlinks with normal B-cell biology, and discusses how this interrelationship may be upset and result in EBV-associated disease. PMID:11313005

  5. Fine specificity of the antibody response to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2 and other Epstein-Barr virus proteins in patients with clinically isolated syndrome: A peptide microarray-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Schlemm, Ludwig; Giess, René Markus; Rasche, Ludwig; Pfuhl, Catherina; Wakonig, Katharina; Behrens, Janina Ruth; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Reimer, Ulf; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2016-08-15

    We analyzed the fine specificity of antibodies to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2 (EBNA-2) and other Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins in 29 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, the first clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis [MS]) and 29 controls with a peptide microarray containing 117 overlapping peptides representing the full-length EBNA-2 protein and 71 peptides from 8 further EBV proteins. While EBV peptide antibodies were elevated in CIS, suggesting that EBV contributes to MS early during disease development, they discriminated groups only slightly better than EBNA-1 antibodies. Thus, the additional value of EBV peptide antibodies as diagnostic biomarkers for CIS appears moderate. PMID:27397076

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Shedding by Astronauts During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5 to 14 d duration. Samples were collected on a similar schedule from control subjects. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected during flight and 16% of those collected after flight. The mean number of copies of EBV DNA from samples taken during the flights was 417 plus or minus 31, significantly greater (p less than 0.05) than the number of copies from the preflight (40 plus or minus 2) and postflight (44 plus or minus 5) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and a mean number of EBV DNA copies of 40 plus or minus 2 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p less than 0.05) greater than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary levels of cortisol and catecholamines, and plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides, were increased over their preflight values. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with the occurrence of EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus shedding by astronauts during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T. M.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5-14 days duration. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies from samples taken during the flights was 417 per mL, significantly greater (p<.05) than the number of viral copies from the preflight (40) and postflight (44) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean number of EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p<.05) greater than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary levels of cortisol and catecholamines were greater than their preflight values. In a limited study (n=5), plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides were also greater on landing day. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  8. The other side of the coin: Leveraging Epstein-Barr virus in research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fenggang; Tan, Wei Jian; Lu, Yanan; MacAry, Paul A; Loh, Kwok Seng

    2016-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is (EBV) a ubiquitous virus prevalent in 90% of the human population. Transmitted through infected saliva, EBV is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and is further implicated in malignancies of lymphoid and epithelial origins. In the past few decades, research efforts primarily focused on dissecting the mechanism of EBV-induced oncogenesis. Here, we present an alternate facet of the oncovirus EBV, on its applications in research and therapy. Finally, discussions on the prospective utilization of EBV in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) diagnosis and therapy will also be presented. PMID:27531881

  9. Clinical aspects on Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, J P

    1991-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infection (EBV) was discovered 25 years ago in tumour cells from Burkitt's lymphoma. Extensive virological studies have relieved that EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal cancer. Atypical courses of the primary infection may induce meningoencephalitis or hepatitis and are attracting increasing attention. Antiviral treatment with acyclovir has been administered for 7 days, intravenously or orally, in the early stages of infectious mononucleosis, in 2 placebo controlled trials. An inhibition of oropharyngeal EBV replication was verified but minimal effects on clinical symptoms was observed. A combination of intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment for 10 days was therefore tried in 15 patients with fulminant mononucleosis in a pilot study. A transient cessation of virus shedding was noticed in all patients, and a substantial clinical effect on pharyngeal symptoms and on fever was seen in 12/15 patients within 3 days. Treatment with chemotherapy or irradiation is recommended in EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas seen in immunosuppressed, transplanted, or human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. No effect of acyclovir has been reported, but such therapy may be considered in the early stage when EBV induces a polyclonal B cell activation. Acyclovir treatment is effective in the EBV-genome positive hairy leukoplakia noticed in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. However, no effect of any antiviral therapy has been reported in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome affecting in particular 2-7 year old boys. Prophylactic use of immunoglobulin or acyclovir has been suggested in susceptible children. These results indicate that the variety of clinical manifestations induced by EBV at least partly depend on the immune response elicited in the host and not of virus replication per se. Therefore, treatment of these various disorders cannot be

  10. Radiculoplexopathy with conduction block caused by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Palmer, William; Cros, Didier

    2005-02-01

    The authors report a case of cervicobrachial radiculoplexopathy with proximal conduction block (CB), associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The patient presented with pain, paresthesias, and monomelic weakness in the left C7-8, and T1 myotomes. The illness was monophasic with rapid recovery. Neurophysiologic studies demonstrated CB in the proximal left median and ulnar nerve segments. The authors conclude that this syndrome resulted from a postinfectious process following acute EBV infection. PMID:15699388

  11. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, E.E.; Long, W.K.

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs.

  12. Understanding the interplay between host immunity and Epstein-Barr virus in NPC patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong; Zhang, Suzhan; Sun, Ren; Wu, Tingting; Qian, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been used as a paradigm for studying host–virus interactions, not only because of its importance as a human oncogenic virus associated with several malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) but also owing to its sophisticated strategies to subvert the host antiviral responses. An understanding of the interplay between EBV and NPC is critical for the development of EBV-targeted immunotherapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the host immune responses and EBV immune evasion mechanisms in the context of NPC. PMID:26038769

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Smooth Muscle Tumor.

    PubMed

    Dekate, Jyoti; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-07-01

    Immunodeficient individuals are prone to develop a number of opportunistic infections and unique neoplasms. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor is an uncommon neoplasm associated with immunodeficiency. It has been described in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, in the posttransplant setting, and in those with congenital immunodeficiency. Different anatomic sites can be involved by Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor, and even multiple locations can contain these unique lesions within the same patient. The presence of variable numbers of intratumoral lymphocytes and primitive round cell areas are the unique defining features for this tumor. Histopathologic features may vary considerably in terms of cellular atypia, mitotic activity, and necrosis, with no correlation to the clinical behavior. Demonstration of Epstein-Barr virus infection by in situ hybridization within tumor cell remains critical for the diagnosis. The mechanism for Epstein-Barr virus infection of progenitor cells and neoplastic transformation has been an area of interest and conjecture. Different treatment strategies are proposed according to underlying disease status. This paper reviews the clinicopathologic features of this uncommon neoplasm with detailed discussion of the role of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis. PMID:27362573

  14. Characteristics of Epstein-Barr Virus Envelope Protein gp42

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Pamela L.; Kirschner, Austin N.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein 42 (gp42) is a membrane protein essential for fusion and entry of EBV into host B-lymphocytes. Gp42 is a member of the protein fold family C-type lectin or lectin-like domains (CLECT or CTLD) and specifically is classified as a natural-killer receptor (NKR)- like CLECT. Literature review and phylogenetic comparison show that EBV gp42 shares a common structure with other NKR-like CLECTs and possibly with many viral CTLDs, but does not appear to exhibit some common binding characteristics of many CTLDs, such as features required for calcium binding. The flexible N-terminal region adjacent to the CTLD fold is important for binding to other EBV glycoproteins and for a cleavage site that is necessary for infection of host cells. From structural studies of gp42 unbound and bound to receptor and extensive mutational analysis, a general model of how gp42 triggers membrane fusion utilizing both the flexible N-terminal region and the CTLD domain has emerged. PMID:20162447

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Chronically Inflamed Periapical Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kosuke; Takeichi, Osamu; Hatori, Keisuke; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2015-01-01

    Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32). EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1%) by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10); the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001). Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER)-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas. PMID:25884725

  16. Multifunctional non-coding Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNAs (EBERs) contribute to viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is known as an oncogenic herpesvirus implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies. It has been reported that EBV non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) including EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) and EBV-miRNAs contribute to viral pathogenesis. EBERs that are expressed abundantly in latently EBV-infected cells have been reported to play significant roles in tumorigenesis by EBV. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the modulation of host innate immune signals by EBERs contributes to EBV-mediated pathogenesis including oncogenesis. Recently it was demonstrated that EBERs are secreted via exosomes by EBV-infected cells. It was also demonstrated that exosomes contain a number of EBV-encoded miRNAs. Various mRNAs have been identified as targets for regulation by EBV-miRNAs in host cells, therefore, EBERs and EBV-miRNAs might function through the transfer of exosomes. PMID:26292159

  17. Valpromide Inhibits Lytic Cycle Reactivation of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; McInerney, Grace E.; Lyons, Danielle E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency into the lytic phase of its life cycle allows the virus to spread among cells and between hosts. Valproic acid (VPA) inhibits initiation of the lytic cycle in EBV-infected B lymphoma cells. While VPA blocks viral lytic gene expression, it induces expression of many cellular genes, because it is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Here we show, using derivatives of VPA, that blockade of EBV reactivation is separable from HDAC inhibition. Valpromide (VPM), an amide derivative of valproic acid that is not an HDAC inhibitor, prevented expression of two EBV genes, BZLF1 and BRLF1, that mediate lytic reactivation. VPM also inhibited expression of a viral late gene, but not early genes, when BZLF1 was exogenously expressed. Unlike VPA, VPM did not activate lytic expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Expression of cellular immediate-early genes, such as FOS and EGR1, is kinetically upstream of the EBV lytic cycle. VPM did not activate expression of these cellular immediate-early genes but decreased their level of expression when induced by butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor. VPM did not alter expression of several other cellular immediate-early genes, including STAT3, which were induced by the HDAC inhibitors in cells refractory to lytic induction. Therefore, VPM selectively inhibits both viral and cellular gene expression. VPA and VPM represent a new class of antiviral agents. The mechanism by which VPA and VPM block EBV reactivation may be related to their anticonvulsant activity. PMID:26933051

  18. Progress and Problems in Understanding and Managing Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Odumade, Oludare A.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Balfour, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpesvirus that infects a large fraction of the human population. Primary infection is often asymptomatic but results in lifelong infection, which is kept in check by the host immune system. In some cases, primary infection can result in infectious mononucleosis. Furthermore, when host-virus balance is not achieved, the virus can drive potentially lethal lymphoproliferation and lymphomagenesis. In this review, we describe the biology of EBV and the host immune response. We review the diagnosis of EBV infection and discuss the characteristics and pathogenesis of infectious mononucleosis. These topics are approached in the context of developing therapeutic and preventative strategies. PMID:21233512

  19. Computational discovery of Epstein-Barr virus targeted human genes and signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays important roles in the origin and the progression of human carcinomas, e.g. diffuse large B cell tumors, T cell lymphomas, etc. Discovering EBV targeted human genes and signaling pathways is vital to understand EBV tumorigenesis. In this study we propose a noise-tolerant homolog knowledge transfer method to reconstruct functional protein-protein interactions (PPI) networks between Epstein-Barr virus and Homo sapiens. The training set is augmented via homolog instances and the homolog noise is counteracted by support vector machine (SVM). Additionally we propose two methods to define subcellular co-localization (i.e. stringent and relaxed), based on which to further derive physical PPI networks. Computational results show that the proposed method achieves sound performance of cross validation and independent test. In the space of 648,672 EBV-human protein pairs, we obtain 51,485 functional interactions (7.94%), 869 stringent physical PPIs and 46,050 relaxed physical PPIs. Fifty-eight evidences are found from the latest database and recent literature to validate the model. This study reveals that Epstein-Barr virus interferes with normal human cell life, such as cholesterol homeostasis, blood coagulation, EGFR binding, p53 binding, Notch signaling, Hedgehog signaling, etc. The proteome-wide predictions are provided in the supplementary file for further biomedical research. PMID:27470517

  20. Computational discovery of Epstein-Barr virus targeted human genes and signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays important roles in the origin and the progression of human carcinomas, e.g. diffuse large B cell tumors, T cell lymphomas, etc. Discovering EBV targeted human genes and signaling pathways is vital to understand EBV tumorigenesis. In this study we propose a noise-tolerant homolog knowledge transfer method to reconstruct functional protein-protein interactions (PPI) networks between Epstein-Barr virus and Homo sapiens. The training set is augmented via homolog instances and the homolog noise is counteracted by support vector machine (SVM). Additionally we propose two methods to define subcellular co-localization (i.e. stringent and relaxed), based on which to further derive physical PPI networks. Computational results show that the proposed method achieves sound performance of cross validation and independent test. In the space of 648,672 EBV-human protein pairs, we obtain 51,485 functional interactions (7.94%), 869 stringent physical PPIs and 46,050 relaxed physical PPIs. Fifty-eight evidences are found from the latest database and recent literature to validate the model. This study reveals that Epstein-Barr virus interferes with normal human cell life, such as cholesterol homeostasis, blood coagulation, EGFR binding, p53 binding, Notch signaling, Hedgehog signaling, etc. The proteome-wide predictions are provided in the supplementary file for further biomedical research. PMID:27470517

  1. Impact of Plasmodium falciparum Coinfection on Longitudinal Epstein-Barr Virus Kinetics in Kenyan Children.

    PubMed

    Reynaldi, Arnold; Schlub, Timothy E; Chelimo, Kiprotich; Sumba, Peter Odada; Piriou, Erwan; Ogolla, Sidney; Moormann, Ann M; Rochford, Rosemary; Davenport, Miles P

    2016-03-15

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Plasmodium falciparum coinfection, although how P. falciparum exposure affects the dynamics of EBV infection is unclear. We have used a modeling approach to study EBV infection kinetics in a longitudinal cohort of children living in regions of high and low malaria transmission in Kenya. Residence in an area of high malaria transmission was associated with a higher rate of EBV expansion during primary EBV infection in infants and during subsequent episodes of EBV DNA detection, as well as with longer episodes of EBV DNA detection and shorter intervals between subsequent episodes of EBV DNA detection. In addition, we found that concurrent P. falciparum parasitemia also increases the likelihood of the first and subsequent peaks of EBV in peripheral blood. This suggests that P. falciparum infection is associated with increased EBV growth and contributes to endemic Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis. PMID:26531246

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and thrombocytopenia following Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Dabbagh, Omar; Al-Muhaizae, Muhammad; Dhalaan, Hesham; Chedrawi, Aziza

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes a broad spectrum of disease in humans with several clinical syndromes and is ubiquitous, infecting more than 95% of the world's population. Central Nervous System (CNS) disease alone associated with Epstein-Barr virus rarely occurs in previously healthy individuals. Systemic viral illness in children and complications are rare, but may occur. In few cases, it is associated with a variety of CNS and hematological complications like acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, transverse myelitis, neuropsychiatric syndrome, GBS, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia and they usually respond to immunotherapy. We report previously healthy boy, who presented with left sided weakness, headache and thrombocytopenia following EBV infection. The thrombocytopenia was resistant to intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone but responded well to Rituximab. PMID:25518779

  3. Update on Epstein-Barr virus and gastric cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is a distinct subtype that accounts for nearly 10% of gastric carcinomas. EBVaGC is defined by monoclonal proliferation of carcinoma cells with latent EBV infection, as demonstrated by EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization. EBVaGC has characteristic clinicopathological features, including predominance among males, a proximal location in the stomach, lymphoepithelioma-like histology and a favorable prognosis. EBVaGC belongs to latency type I or II, in which EBERs, EBNA-1, BARTs, LMP-2A and BART miRNAs are expressed. Previous studies have shown that some EBV latent genes have oncogenic properties. Recent advances in genome-wide and comprehensive molecular analyses have demonstrated that both genetic and epigenetic changes contribute to EBVaGC carcinogenesis. Genetic changes that are characteristic of EBVaGC include frequent mutations in PIK3CA and ARID1A and amplification of JAK2 and PD-L1/L2. Global CpG island hypermethylation, which induces epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, is also a unique feature of EBVaGC and is considered to be crucial for its carcinogenesis. Furthermore, post-transcriptional gene expression regulation by cellular and/or EBV-derived microRNAs has attracted considerable attention. These abnormalities result in significant alterations in gene expression related to cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and immune signaling pathways. In the present review we highlight the latest findings on EBVaGC from clinicopathological and molecular perspectives to provide a better understanding of EBV involvement in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:25633561

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and telomerase: from cell immortalization to therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming cellular senescence is strictly required for virus-driven tumors, including those associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This critical step is successfully accomplished by EBV through TERT expression and telomerase activation in infected cells. We herein review the complex interplay between EBV and TERT/telomerase in EBV-driven tumorigenesis. Evidence accumulated so far clearly indicates that elucidation of this issue may offer promising opportunities for the design of innovative treatment modalities for EBV-associated malignancies. Indeed, several therapeutic strategies for telomerase inhibition have been developed and are being investigated in clinical trials. In this respect, our recent finding that TERT inhibition sensitizes EBV+ lymphoma cells to antivirals through activation of EBV lytic replication is particularly promising and provides a rationale for the activation of clinical studies aimed at assessing the effects of combination therapies with TERT inhibitors and antivirals for the treatment of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:24572088

  5. [Hydrops of the gallbladder associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection].

    PubMed

    Gómez de la Torre, R; Claros González, I J; Rubio Barbón, S; Triviño López, A

    2000-01-01

    A 50-year-old male developed Hydrops of Gallbladder during the course of Epstein-Barr virus infection. The patient had a history of acute encephalitis one month prior to admission. Physical examination revealed jaundice and hepatomegaly. Liver function tests were abnormal and the white blood count was normal with 15% of atypical lymphocytes. Ultrasonography revealed a distended gall-bladder without wall thickening or cholelithiasis. The diagnoses of primary Epstein-Barr infection was made by positivity from EBV VCA IgM serological study. Two weeks later, total clinical, biochemical and ultrasonography resolution were observed. We comment this exceptionally presentation of EBV infection. The great variability of clinical pictures of Infectious Mononucleosis was emphasized. PMID:10730404

  6. Macroautophagy Proteins Assist Epstein Barr Virus Production and Get Incorporated Into the Virus Particles

    PubMed Central

    Nowag, Heike; Guhl, Bruno; Thriene, Kerstin; Romao, Susana; Ziegler, Urs; Dengjel, Joern; Münz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) persists as a latent herpes virus infection in the majority of the adult human population. The virus can reactivate from this latent infection into lytic replication for virus particle production. Here, we report that autophagic membranes, which engulf cytoplasmic constituents during macroautophagy and transport them to lysosomal degradation, are stabilized by lytic EBV replication in infected epithelial and B cells. Inhibition of autophagic membrane formation compromises infectious particle production and leads to the accumulation of viral DNA in the cytosol. Vice versa, pharmacological stimulation of autophagic membrane formation enhances infectious virus production. Atg8/LC3, an essential macroautophagy protein and substrate anchor on autophagic membranes, was found in virus preparations, suggesting that EBV recruits Atg8/LC3 coupled membranes to its envelope in the cytosol. Our data indicate that EBV subverts macroautophagy and uses autophagic membranes for efficient envelope acquisition during lytic infection. PMID:26137519

  7. Depression correlated with cellular immunity in systemic immunodeficient Epstein-Barr virus syndrome (SIDES).

    PubMed

    Allen, A D; Tilkian, S M

    1986-03-01

    We conducted studies on the peripheral blood of 12 depressed patients with previous diagnoses of mood and/or personality disorders. These patients, and other depressives we observed informally, were resistant to infectious mononucleosis during an epidemic of that illness. All 12 had serologic evidence of a chronic or recrudescent viremia caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the infectious agent in infectious mononucleosis. Additional evidence that EBV viremia may be causally related to depression was provided by a strong correlation between the intensity of depressive symptoms and the cellular immune response to the EBV infection. PMID:3005245

  8. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  9. The Epstein-Barr Virus BDLF4 Gene Is Required for Efficient Expression of Viral Late Lytic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Narita, Yohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpesvirus, associated with infectious mononucleosis and various types of malignancy. We focused here on the BDLF4 gene of EBV and identified it as a lytic gene, expressed with early kinetics. Viral late gene expression of the BDLF4 knockout strain was severely restricted; this could be restored by an exogenous supply of BDLF4. These results indicate that BDLF4 is important for the EBV lytic replication cycle, especially in late gene expression. PMID:26202235

  10. Antibody-independent activation of the classical pathway of complement by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; McConnell, I; Gorick, B; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1987-03-01

    A purified preparation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to activate the classical complement pathway by direct interaction with the first component of complement, C1, without the intervention of antibody. No evidence was found for activation of the alternative pathway. Following classical pathway activation the specific affinity of EBV for B cells can be presumed to be lost since the virus will become opsonized for clearance by phagocytic cells bearing complement receptors, CR1 and CR3. This activation is further evidence that complement plays a role in defence mechanisms independently of antibody activity. PMID:3038440

  11. Epstein-Barr virus in a CD8-positive T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Richel, D. J.; Lepoutre, J. M.; Kapsenberg, J. G.; Ooms, E. C.; Boom, W. R.; Boucher, C. A.; Kluin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to its role in B-lymphomagenesis, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) only incidentally has been associated with T-cell lymphomas. In the present report we describe a fourth patient with EBV-related T-cell lymphoma. The patient presented with an angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy (AILD)-like T-cell lymphoma. Serology was compatible with chronic Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection. After a 1-year period of waxing and waning lymphadenopathy, this lymphoma evolved to an aggressive CD8+ Immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. A relationship with the chronic EBV infection was indicated by the finding of EBV genome in the tumor tissue by Southern blot analysis. Moreover, EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) was detected in situ within individually defined CD8+ tumor cells by two-color immunofluorescence. Two alternative possibilities, namely that EBV primarily played a role in lymphomagenesis of the AILD-like T-cell lymphoma or that the virus was an additional oncogenic event in the final process of tumor progression to the immunoblastic lymphoma, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:2161617

  12. Space Flight-Induced Reactivation of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, Raymond P.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Decreased cellular immune function has been reported both during and after space flight. Preliminary studies have demonstrated increased EBV shedding in saliva as well as increased antibody titers to EBV lytic proteins. We hypothesize that the combined effects of microgravity along with associated physical and psychological stress will decrease EBV-specific T-cell immunity and reactivate latent EBV in infected B-lymphocytes. If increased virus production and clonal expansion of infected B-lymphocytes are detected, then pharmacological measures can be developed and instituted prior to onset of overt clinical disease. More importantly, we will begin to understand the basic mechanisms involved in stress-induced reactivation of EBV in circulating B-lymphocytes.

  13. Incidence of Epstein-Barr Virus in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Deborah A.; Mehta, Satish K.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1998-01-01

    Astronauts experience psychological and physical stresses that may result in re-activation of latent viruses during spaceflight, potentially increasing the risk of disease among crew members. The shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the saliva of astronauts will increase during spaceflight. A total of 534 saliva specimens were collected from 11 EBV-seropositive astronauts before, during, and after four space shuttle missions. The presence of EBV DNA in saliva, assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was used to determine shedding patterns before, during, and after spaceflight. EBV DNA was detected more frequently before flight than during (p less than 0.001) or after (p less than 0.01) flight. No significant difference between the in-flight and postflight periods was detected in the frequency of occurrence of EBV DNA. The increased frequency of shedding of EBV before flight suggests that stress levels may be greater before launch than during or after spaceflight.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Jennifer E. Fewell, Claire Yin, Qinyan McBride, Jane Wang Xia Lin Zhen

    2008-12-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers.

  15. Epstein Barr virus: a prime candidate of breast cancer aetiology in Sudanese patients.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Zeinab A; Adam, Ameera Am; Elgizouli, Magdeldin; Hussein, Ayman; Masri, Mai A; Kamal, Mayada; Mohamed, Hiba S; Alzaki, Kamal; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Hamad, Kamal; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in Sudanese women. Reported genetic alterations in the form of mutations in tumor suppressors are low in frequencies and could not explain the peculiarities of the diseases including its focal nature. Potential contributors disease aetiology include oncogenic viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an established culprit of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, one of the most frequent cancers in Sudan.In this study, DNA was extracted from malignant tissue samples and healthy tumour-free tissue from the same breast. Polymerase chain Reaction (PCR) was used to amplify two genes encoding for EBV viral proteins. The presence of Epstein-Barr virus and its cellular localization was confirmed by in situ hybridization (ISH) for Epstein-Barr encoded small RNAs (EBERs). Given the reported low frequency of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Sudanese breast cancer patients, the methylation status of six tumor suppressor genes was investigated using methylation specific PCR. EBV genome was detected in 55.5% (n = 90) of breast cancer tissues as compared to 23% in control tissue samples (p = 0.0001). Using ISH, EBV signal was detected in all 18 breast cancer biopsies examined while all five normal breast tissue biopsies tested were negative for EBV. Of six tumour suppressor genes investigated BRCA1, BRCA2, and p14 appeared to be under strong epigenetic silencing.In conclusion, we present evidence of a strong association between EBV and breast carcinoma in Sudanese patients, and considerable epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressors that may likely be an outcome or an association with viral oncogenesis. PMID:24607238

  16. Barr humbug: acute cerebellar ataxia due to Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Davies, Benjamin; Machin, Nicholas; Lavin, Timothy; Ul Haq, Mian Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with neurological sequellae, but rarely there is acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) in an adult. We present a novel case of a 26-year-old man, who presented with ACA. He had normal MRI and CSF analysis. Serum testing confirmed active EBV. A course of oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 4 weeks, with a subsequent taper was started. He made a full recovery within 3 weeks of presentation. PMID:27558189

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-derived EBNA2 regulates STAT3 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Togi, Sumihito; Kamitani, Shinya; Fujimuro, Masahiro; Harada, Shizuko; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2009-01-16

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latency protein EBNA2 is a nuclear transcriptional activator that is essential for EBV-induced cellular transformation. Here, we show that EBNA2 interacts with STAT3, a signal transducer for an interleukin-6 family cytokine, and enhances the transcriptional activity of STAT3 by influencing its DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, EBNA2 cooperatively acts on STAT3 activation with LMP1. These data demonstrate that EBNA2 acts as a transcriptional coactivator of STAT3.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus episome-based promoter function in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, C A; Getty, R R; Tykocinski, M L

    1989-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episomal replicons offer an expeditious means for amplifying transfected genes in human cells. A panel of EBV episomes was constructed to assess the relative utility of five distinct eukaryotic promoter elements for high level and inducible gene expression in stably transfected human myeloid leukemia cells. The Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) was most highly suited for EBV episome-based gene expression, whereas the lymphopapilloma virus and the SV40 early regulatory elements exhibited substantially lower activities. Chemically responsive promoter elements, such as the SV40 early, human metallothionein IIA and rat GRP78 gene promoters, retained their inducibility when EBV episome-based. Differences in gene expression obtained with the episomes reflected differential promoter activity rather than significant variations in episome copy numbers per cell. These observations provide guidelines for the optimal design of EBV episomal expression vectors for human expression work. Images PMID:2538801

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein-1 Down-Regulates Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) Receptor-1 and Confers Resistance to TNF-α-Induced Apoptosis in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Huai-Chia; Lay, Jong-Ding; Chuang, Shuang-En; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Yao; Su, Ih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    The infection of T cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may result in hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) through enhanced cytokine secretion, particularly tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), by EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1). One bewildering observation of HPS patients is relapsing disease or progression to T-cell lymphoma. This finding raises the question whether EBV LMP-1-expressing T cells may survive and proliferate in the cytokine milieu of HPS. To explore this possibility, we tested the sensitivity of LMP-1-expressing T cells to apoptosis in the presence of TNF-α. LMP-1 up-regulated TNF-α through TRAF2,5 and nuclear factor-κB pathway in T cells. The LMP-1-expressing T cells then became resistant to TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, the expression of TNFR1 was remarkably down-regulated by LMP-1 in T cells. Furthermore, the TNF-α/TNFR1 downstream death signal TNFR1-associated death domain protein was constitutively recruited by LMP-1, and the activities of apoptotic caspases 3, 8, and 9 were suppressed. Reconstitution of TNFR1 successfully reversed the TNF-α-induced apoptotic cascades. Therefore, EBV LMP-1 not only activates T cells to proliferate but also confers resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis via down-regulation of TNFR1 in the cytokine milieu of HPS. This finding provides a potential mechanism to explain the disease persistence or progression to T-cell lymphoma in HPS patients. PMID:17456766

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B lymphocytes produce natural antibodies to histones.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, C; Incaprera, M; Bazzichi, A; Manunta, M; Rognini, F; Falcone, G

    1994-03-01

    To study the mechanism(s) responsible for the appearance of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced anti-histone autoantibodies, peripheral blood B lymphocytes from healthy donors were infected with EBV and the resulting lymphoblastoid cell lines were tested for secretion of antibodies reacting with histones. It was found that EBV-transformed cells produce IgM antibody reactive with histones and that the frequency of EBV-inducible circulating B lymphocytes that produce antibodies to histones is at least 10(-5). Moreover, in cultures of tonsillar lymphoid cells, the enrichment in CD5+ B lymphocytes increases the percentage of EBV-transformed cultures making anti-histone IgM antibodies. EBV may therefore, also in vivo, induce natural anti-histone antibody by polyclonal B-cell activation without any requirement of antigen to trigger antibody response. PMID:7518420

  1. Advances in Understanding the Pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Nishida, Naonori; Zhao, Xiaodong; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago  from an african Burkitt lymphoma cell line. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) are life- threatening diseases, especially in children. In this article, we review EBV-associated LPDs, especially in the area of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). We searched PubMed for publications with key words including EBV infection, lymphoma, LPDs and PID, and selected the manuscripts written in English that we judged to be relevant to the topic of this review.On the basis of the data in the literature, we grouped the EBV-associated LPDs into four categories: nonmalignant disease, malignant disease, acquired immunodeficiency disease and PID. Each category has its own risk factor for LPD development. EBV-associated LPD is a complex disease, creating new challenges for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26742434

  2. A unique presentation of Epstein-Barr virus-associated Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Heather; Huyett, Phillip; Laver, Nora; Wein, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder. The association of human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) and human immunodeficiency virus infections with CD is well established however the role of Epstein-Barr Virus in CD is less well understood. We present a unique case of Castleman's disease in a patient with concomitant EBV infection, which mimicked the clinical presentation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) versus lymphoma. After a delayed diagnosis, the patient underwent a left superficial parotidectomy and neck dissection and has had no recurrence of disease. PMID:23394816

  3. The labyrinth of interactions of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Waqar; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human malignancies. However, the mechanism by which EBV leads to malignant transformation is not clear. A number of viral latent gene products, including non-protein coding small RNAs, are believed to be involved. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA 1 (EBER1) and EBER2 are two such RNA molecules that are abundantly expressed (up to 10(7) copies) in all EBV-infected cells, but their function remains poorly understood. These polymerase III transcripts have extensive secondary structure and exist as ribonucleoproteins. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that EBERs play an important role, directly or indirectly, in EBV-induced oncogenesis. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the complex interactions of EBERs with various cellular factors and the potential pathways by which these small RNAs are able to influence EBV-infected cells to proliferate and to induce tumorigenesis. The exosome pathway is probably involved in the cellular excretion of EBERs and facilitating some of their biological effects. PMID:24105992

  4. Epstein-Barr virus latency type and spontaneous reactivation predict lytic induction levels.

    PubMed

    Phan, An T; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Keck, Kristin M; Miranda, Jj L

    2016-05-20

    The human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) evades the immune system by entering a transcriptionally latent phase in B cells. EBV in tumor cells expresses distinct patterns of genes referred to as latency types. Viruses in tumor cells also display varying levels of lytic transcription resulting from spontaneous reactivation out of latency. We measured this dynamic range of lytic transcription with RNA deep sequencing and observed no correlation with EBV latency types among genetically different viruses, but type I cell lines reveal more spontaneous reactivation than isogenic type III cultures. We further determined that latency type and spontaneous reactivation levels predict the relative amount of induced reactivation generated by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs. Our work has potential implications for personalizing medicine against EBV-transformed malignancies. Identifying latency type or measuring spontaneous reactivation may provide predictive power in treatment contexts where viral production should be either avoided or coerced. PMID:27091426

  5. Chronic fatigue syndrome. A critical appraisal of the role of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Koo, D

    1989-01-01

    The symptom complex currently designated the chronic fatigue syndrome was previously termed the chronic or chronic active Epstein-Barr virus syndrome or the chronic mononucleosis syndrome, prematurely assuming an etiologic role for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This presumption derived from the fact that some patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome have very high or very low titers of certain antibodies to EBV. A review of seroepidemiologic patterns of response to EBV and of studies of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome shows that these antibody titers overlap considerably both with those of controls or other healthy persons and with those of patients with other illnesses. Given the high prevalence of exposure to EBV, it would be difficult to determine whether the virus caused the syndrome or whether the antibody elevations resulted from the illness, even if distinct differences in titers existed. Other methodologic issues of control selection, laboratory test comparability, and differing case definitions pose problems in studying this syndrome. The recently published working case definition should facilitate the continuing search for causes. PMID:2545048

  6. ASSOCIATION OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS (EBV) BUT NOT HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) WITH GINGIVITIS AND/OR PERIODONTITIS IN TRANSPLANTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    BAEZ, Camila Freze; SAVASSI-RIBAS, Flavia; da ROCHA, Wilker Menezes; ALMEIDA, Stéphanie G. S.; GONÇALVES, Marianna T. V.; GUIMARÃES, Maria Angelica A. M.; CAVALCANTI, Silvia Maria B.; VARELLA, Rafael B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to investigate the association of EBV and HPV with gingivitis and/or periodontitis according to the immunologic status. To this end, 74 oral biopsies from transplanted and non-transplanted individuals with the abovementioned oral manifestations were submitted to a screening by PCR for both viruses. According to the results, EBV was strongly associated with gingivitis and/or periodontitis in transplanted individuals (p = 0.011) but not HPV (p = 0.766). EBV-HPV co-detections did not enhance the presence of tissue injury as well. Although a causal relationship was not investigated in this study, the higher frequency of these two oncoviruses in lesion tissues must be investigated in follow-up studies, especially among immunocompromised individuals. PMID:27410918

  7. ASSOCIATION OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS (EBV) BUT NOT HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) WITH GINGIVITIS AND/OR PERIODONTITIS IN TRANSPLANTED INDIVIDUALS.

    PubMed

    Baez, Camila Freze; Savassi-Ribas, Flavia; Rocha, Wilker Menezes da; Almeida, Stéphanie G S; Gonçalves, Marianna T V; Guimarães, Maria Angelica A M; Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria B; Varella, Rafael B

    2016-07-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of EBV and HPV with gingivitis and/or periodontitis according to the immunologic status. To this end, 74 oral biopsies from transplanted and non-transplanted individuals with the abovementioned oral manifestations were submitted to a screening by PCR for both viruses. According to the results, EBV was strongly associated with gingivitis and/or periodontitis in transplanted individuals (p = 0.011) but not HPV (p = 0.766). EBV-HPV co-detections did not enhance the presence of tissue injury as well. Although a causal relationship was not investigated in this study, the higher frequency of these two oncoviruses in lesion tissues must be investigated in follow-up studies, especially among immunocompromised individuals. PMID:27410918

  8. Identification of a glucocorticoid-responsive element in Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, S R; Summers, W C

    1990-01-01

    Immortalization of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is complex and poorly understood. However, some evidence suggests that glucocorticoids influence this process. We identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in the BamHI C fragment of EBV which we call ES-1. In glucocorticoid-treated cells, ES-1 enhanced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, as well as the EBV Bam-C promoter, from which several latent viral gene products are transcribed. By Northern blot analysis, glucocorticoid treatment enhanced transcription from the Bam-C promoter in Jijoye cells, a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line. In addition, the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor bound specifically to the ES-1 region. These glucocorticoid effects on the Bam-C promoter region may provide some insight into the process of EBV immortalization. Images PMID:2157866

  9. [Epstein-Barr virus infection - life cycle, methods of diagnosis, associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Bocian, Joanna; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that infects about 90–95% of the adult population. EBV establishes life-long latent persistence. The virus is found to be the major cause of infectious mononucleosis but it has also been associated with development of endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma. Result of EBV infection is the most common complication in patients after transplantation which is a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Strong associations between EBV infection and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma and carcinomas derived from smooth muscle tissue also exist. There is a hypothesis that there is an association between EBV infection and autoimmune and allergic diseases. EBV is a Herpesvirus family member; its genetic material has dsDNA form. There are two strains of EBV: A and B. The only host for EBV is human with target cells: B cells and epithelial cells. The life cycle of EBV consists of lytic and latent phases. In the latent phase three different patterns of gene expression are possible. Due to some circumstances EBV can undergo reactivation, which is an important issue in transplantology. The main methods of diagnosis of EBV infections are serological methods that detect certain specific antibodies and recently more popular molecular biological methods such as PCR or in situ hybridization. PMID:21677354

  10. Transient induction of a nuclear antigen unrelated to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen in cells of two human B-lymphoma lines converted by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fresen, K O; zur Hausen, H

    1977-01-01

    Infection of cells of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human B-lymphoma lines BJAB and Ramos with EBV preparations from P3HR-1 or B 95-8 cells converted these cells to EBV genome carriers expressing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) in almost 100% of these cells. Induction of these cells as well as of clones from P3HR-1 EBV-converted BJAB cells with iododeoxyuridine, aminopterin, and hypoxanthine resulted in the appearance of a nuclear antigen in about 1-6% of the cells 1-4 days after induction. The antigen is different from known EBV-induced antigens like EBNA, viral capsid antigen (VCA) or the D- and R-subspecificities of the early antigen (EA) complex. It is demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and inactivated after acetone fixation. The antigen was not detectable after induction of uninfected BJAB and Ramos cells nor has it been found in noninduced or induced P3HR-1 and Raji cells. Thus, it appears that EBV-infection mediates the expression of this antigen, for which the name TINA (transiently induced nuclear antigen) is suggested. Sera reacting against TINA generally contained high antibody titers against EBV-induced EA. Only a limited number of highly EA-reactive sera, however, were also positive for TINA. Among 200 sera tested thus far, TINA reactivity was most frequently observed in sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (7 out of 28), in sera of the only two patients with immunoblastoma tested and occasionally in sera from patients with Hodgkin's disease and chronic lymphatic leukemia. Among 70 sera from nontumor patients, TINA reactivity was observed three times: two patients suffered from "chronic" infectious mononucleosis, the other revealed persistent splenomegaly. PMID:189313

  11. Burkitt lymphoma and the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    The chance germinal encounter with the first lecture outside Africa on Burkitt lymphoma is described together with the hypothesis of a viral cause. Repeated virological investigations on lymphoma biopsies proved negative, leading to the idea that a latent virus might be activated if lymphoma cells could be cultured, although no human lymphoid cell had at that time ever been maintained in vitro. A chance event reminding of the need for suspension culture with mouse lymphomas led to success. The cultured cells carried a morphologically unequivocal, strangely inert, herpesvirus shown later to be immunologically, biologically and biochemically unique. How this new agent acquired its name, Epstein-Barr virus, is explained. PMID:22233499

  12. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Maria; Couto, Cristiana; Coelho, Maria D.; Laranjeira, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy. PMID:26753086

  13. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus sequences in Hodgkin's disease by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. F.; Reid, A. H.; Tsai, M. M.; Ventre, K. M.; Murari, P. J.; Frizzera, G.; O'Leary, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined paraffin-embedded lymph node biopsies from 65 cases of Hodgkin's disease for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA, using the highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction technique. Overall 40% of the cases were positive for EBV DNA; there were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of EBV positivity among the different subtypes of Hodgkin's disease. These results are in agreement with those of previous studies that employed less sensitive detection techniques and suggest that EBV either is present in pathologic tissues only in some phases of the evolution of Hodgkin's disease or is a pathogenetic factor involved in only a portion of cases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1651058

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-induced autoimmune responses. I. Immunoglobulin M autoantibodies to proteins mimicking and not mimicking Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J H; Valbracht, J R; Nguyen, M D; Handley, H H; Smith, R S; Patrick, K; Rhodes, G H

    1995-03-01

    In previous studies of infectious mononucleosis, we found IgM autoantibodies which react with hematopoietic cell antigens. Many of these were inhibited by synthetic glycine/alanine peptides representing the glycine/alanine repeat of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1. We have cloned and expressed fragments of genes encoding two of these autoantigens. One gene (p542) encodes a protein containing a glycine-rich 28-mer, which is its chief autoantigenic epitope and which represents a newly identified class of evolutionarily conserved autoepitopes. The other gene (p554) encodes a protein that is not demonstrably cross-reactive with Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 or with any other EBV protein, but forms complexes with other proteins. Immunoaffinity-purified anti-p542 and anti-p554 have relatively high binding affinities, as evidenced by inhibition at 10(6)-10(8) M-1, and neither autoantibody showed polyreactivity with other common antigens. The data thus suggest that neither autoantibody is simply an expression of polyclonal B cell activation. We conclude that the two autoantigens stimulate autoantibody synthesis by different mechanisms. One autoantigen shares homology to a viral protein which generates cross-reacting antibodies to the autoantigenic epitope. The other has no recognizable cross-reaction with the infecting pathogen and may become immunogenic through complexing with other proteins. PMID:7533788

  15. Quantitative PCR for Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Loads in Cancer Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loghavi, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and HIV-related lymphomas. It infects nearly all humans and then persists for the life of the host in a small proportion of benign B lymphocytes. EBV reactivation, usually in the setting of immunosuppression, is the main risk factor for development of EBV-associated malignancies. EBV reactivation can be detected in tissue specimens using EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization (ISH), which is routinely used for diagnosis of PTLD and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, EBER ISH cannot be routinely used for screening asymptomatic or monitoring posttreatment outcome due to difficulty in obtaining tissue specimens for testing and the nonquantitative nature of the assay. Recent studies have shown that EBV genomic DNA can be detected in blood of patients with EBV-associated diseases, and that monitoring of EBV viral load in blood could be an effective method of distinguishing disease-associated EBV reactivation from incidental EBV present in benign B lymphocytes, and could be used for diagnostic screening and monitoring of EBV-associated diseases. In this chapter we discuss a protocol for quantitative plasma EBV DNA analysis. PMID:26843046

  16. Western thymomas lack Epstein-Barr virus by Southern blotting analysis and by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Chilosi, M.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated 16 western thymomas, 9 from the United States and 7 from Europe, for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA sequences by both Southern blot hybridization analysis and polymerase chain reaction using EBV-specific DNA probes that detect the long internal repeat and terminal repeat regions and the EBNA-1 gene. None of the 16 thymomas contained evidence of the EBV genome, even though we could detect EBV by Southern blotting when EBV DNA represents less than or equal to 1% of the total DNA and by polymerase chain reaction when a single EBV-positive cell is present among 10(5) EBV-negative cells. These results fail to demonstrate EBV genome in western thymomas and stand in contrast to those of McGuire et al (Am J Pathol 1988, 131:385) who previously reported that the EBV genome is present in thymomas occurring in southern Chinese patients. Therefore EBV does not appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of all thymomas. The presence of EBV in eastern thymomas, regions where EBV is endemic may be due to epidemiologic factors and/or genetic predispositions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2162629

  17. Identifying gp85-regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus binding to B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Vega, Erika; Patino, Helena; Garcia, Javier; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Guzman, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-06-18

    Epstein-Barr virus lacking glycoprotein gp85 cannot infect B-cells and epithelial cells. The gp85 belongs to the molecular complex required for virus invasion of B-lymphocyte or epithelial cells. Moreover, there is evidence that gp85 is necessary for virus attachment to epithelial cells. Thirty-six peptides from the entire gp85-sequence were tested in epithelial and lymphoblastoid cell line binding assays to identify gp85-regions involved in virus-cell interaction. Five of these peptides presented high binding activity to Raji, Ramos, P3HR-1, and HeLa cells, but not to erythrocytes; Raji-cell affinity constants were between 80 and 140nM. Of these five peptides, 11435 ((181)TYKRVTEKGDEHVLSLVFGK(200)), 11436 ((201)TKDLPDLRGPFSYPSLTSAQ(220)), and 11438 ((241)YFVPNLKDMFSRAVTMTAAS(260)) bound to a 65kDa protein on Raji-cell surface. These peptides and antibodies induced by them (recognising live EBV-infected cells) inhibited Epstein-Barr virus interaction with cord blood lymphocytes. It is thus probable that gp85-regions defined by peptides 11435, 11436, and 11438 are involved in EBV invasion of B-lymphocytes. PMID:15158465

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Khammissa, Razia Abdool Gafaar; Fourie, Jeanine; Chandran, Rakesh; Lemmer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised subjects, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of terminally differentiated oral keratinocytes may result in subclinical productive infection of the virus in the stratum spinosum and in the stratum granulosum with shedding of infectious virions into the oral fluid in the desquamating cells. In a minority of cases this productive infection with dysregulation of the cell cycle of terminally differentiated epithelial cells may manifest as oral hairy leukoplakia. This is a white, hyperkeratotic, benign lesion of low morbidity, affecting primarily the lateral border of the tongue. Factors that determine whether productive EBV replication within the oral epithelium will cause oral hairy leukoplakia include the fitness of local immune responses, the profile of EBV gene expression, and local environmental factors. PMID:27047546

  19. Rare Presentations of Epstein-Barr Virus--Associated Smooth Muscle Tumor in Children.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Schafernak, Kristian T

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has oncogenic potential and has been implicated in the etiology of a wide range of malignancies. Certain EBV-driven neoplasms, such as smooth muscle tumors (SMTs), manifest typically in immunocompromised patients. In children, these neoplasms have been encountered in the setting of primary immune disorders, specifically severe combined and common variable immunodeficiency syndromes. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and posttransplant immunosuppression, in particular liver and kidney transplantation, likewise increase the risk in the pediatric population. The location of these neoplasms appears related to the type of immunodeficiency: in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome they are frequently located intracranially or intraspinally, whereas after transplant they usually involve the liver or lung. We report 2 distinct cases of EBV-related SMT, unique through their coassociated immunosuppressive state or location: the 1st occurred in a patient with immunodeficiency secondary to NEMO gene mutation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; the 2nd developed in the orbit after heart transplant. PMID:26230054

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, Razia Abdool Gafaar; Fourie, Jeanine; Chandran, Rakesh; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised subjects, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of terminally differentiated oral keratinocytes may result in subclinical productive infection of the virus in the stratum spinosum and in the stratum granulosum with shedding of infectious virions into the oral fluid in the desquamating cells. In a minority of cases this productive infection with dysregulation of the cell cycle of terminally differentiated epithelial cells may manifest as oral hairy leukoplakia. This is a white, hyperkeratotic, benign lesion of low morbidity, affecting primarily the lateral border of the tongue. Factors that determine whether productive EBV replication within the oral epithelium will cause oral hairy leukoplakia include the fitness of local immune responses, the profile of EBV gene expression, and local environmental factors. PMID:27047546

  1. Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus during early infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Kingsley, L A; Atchison, R W; Belle, S; Breinig, M C; Ho, M; Rinaldo, C R

    1991-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated in 49 homosexual men who seroconverted to HIV (cases) as compared with 49 matched controls who remained seronegative to HIV during a longitudinal study. EBV infection was reactivated in cases 6 months, but not 12 months, prior to HIV seroconversion as compared with controls and remained reactivated during 18 months of follow-up after HIV seroconversion, as shown by increases in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody titers to EBV early antigen. Antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen did not differ between cases and controls prior to the time of seroconversion to HIV but were significantly increased among cases by the first seropositive study visit and remained elevated during the 18 months after HIV seroconversion. Total serum IgG levels were increased in cases at the visit of seroconversion, and during 18 months of follow-up, but did not correlate with enhanced IgG production specific for EBV antigens. Significant decreases in numbers of CD4+ cells and increases in numbers of CD8+ cells during this early phase of HIV infection were not associated with changes in patterns of EBV antibody responses. Reactivation of EBV beginning 6 months before HIV seroconversion may have implications regarding the role of this herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:1650790

  2. Epstein-Barr virus stimulates torque teno virus replication: a possible relationship to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Borkosky, Silvia S; Whitley, Corinna; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; zur Hausen, Harald; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele

    2012-01-01

    Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has frequently been investigated as a possible candidate and torque teno virus (TTV) has also been discussed in this context. Nevertheless, mechanistic aspects remain unresolved. We report viral replication, as measured by genome amplification, as well as quantitative PCR of two TTV-HD14 isolates isolated from multiple sclerosis brain in a series of EBV-positive and -negative lymphoblastoid and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Our results demonstrate the replication of both transfected TTV genomes up to day 21 post transfection in all the evaluated cell lines. Quantitative amplification indicates statistically significant enhanced TTV replication in the EBV-positive cell lines, including the EBV-converted BJAB line, in comparison to the EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB. This suggests a helper effect of EBV infections in the replication of TTV. The present study provides information on a possible interaction of EBV and TTV in the etiology and progression of multiple sclerosis. PMID:22384166

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus Stimulates Torque Teno Virus Replication: A Possible Relationship to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Borkosky, Silvia S.; Whitley, Corinna; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; zur Hausen, Harald; deVilliers, Ethel-Michele

    2012-01-01

    Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has frequently been investigated as a possible candidate and torque teno virus (TTV) has also been discussed in this context. Nevertheless, mechanistic aspects remain unresolved. We report viral replication, as measured by genome amplification, as well as quantitative PCR of two TTV-HD14 isolates isolated from multiple sclerosis brain in a series of EBV-positive and -negative lymphoblastoid and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Our results demonstrate the replication of both transfected TTV genomes up to day 21 post transfection in all the evaluated cell lines. Quantitative amplification indicates statistically significant enhanced TTV replication in the EBV-positive cell lines, including the EBV-converted BJAB line, in comparison to the EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB. This suggests a helper effect of EBV infections in the replication of TTV. The present study provides information on a possible interaction of EBV and TTV in the etiology and progression of multiple sclerosis. PMID:22384166

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  5. Viral involvement in Hodgkin's disease: detection of clonal type A Epstein-Barr virus genomes in tumour samples.

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, S.; Gallagher, A.; Jones, D. B.; Krajewski, A. S.; Alexander, F. E.; Klee, E.; Wright, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Onions, D. E.; Jarrett, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-five cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) were analysed for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA. EBV genomes were detected in 11/35 cases while none of the cases was positive for HHV-6. Ten of the EBV-positive cases were subsequently analysed using a probe for the terminal region of the virus; the results suggested that the EBV-infected cells were clonally expanded. EBV subtypes specific DNA amplification was used to demonstrate that EBV subtype A, and not subtype B was present in the EBV-positive cases. The age distribution of the EBV-positive cases indicated a statistically significant trend for an increase in positivity with increasing age. This is the first indication that EBV is significantly associated with any subset of HD patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:1654072

  6. [History of resaerch on Epstein-Barr virus--target cells of infection, and disease].

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2014-01-01

    Half a century has passed since Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) particles were isolated from the cultured lymphoblasts of Burkitt lymphoma. During the period, molecular biology, hematology/immunology, and transplantation medicine made amazing progress, that clarified the mode of infection and pathophysiology of the virus in human diseases. Research strategies on the relationship between EBV and human have expanded to the epidemiology, structures and functions of both genomes, regulatory genes including microRNA, and the nature of epigenetics. Although no animal models of EBV infection long hampered the completion of in vivo experiments, humanized mice have broken through a barrier of in vitro study on EBV-infected cell lines. Our understanding of the life cycle of EBV has continued to deepen about the infection via the CD21 receptor expressed on B cells, the latency, reactivation/reinfection, and transformation, and also the dynamics of T-cell immune response and the intracellular immunosurveillance beyond acquired and innate immunity. On the other hand, the disease entity of life-threatening lymphoproliferative disease of EBV-infected T cells or NK cells is on controversial. The other parts of this special issue include the recent topics of the basic and clinical researches of EBV as the oncogenic virus. Then, we herewith overview the research history of EBV with special reference to the infected cells and host immune responses in EBV-associated diseases. PMID:25765982

  7. [Functional activity of lymphoblastoid cells infected by human adenovirus type 2 and Epstein-Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Povnitsa, O Iu; Diachenko, N S; Nosach, L N; Olevinskaia, Z M; Zhovnovataia, V L; Polishchuk, V N; Spivak, N Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the influence of the adenovirus (Ad) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on functional activity of lymphocytes, in particular, the production of alpha- and gamma-interferons, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in conditions of mono- or double infection of B- and T-phenotype (CEM) lymphoblastoid cells. It is shown, that Ad, EBV or both viruses induce high enough levels of interferon on both lines of cells and in control epithelial cells. The lymphoblastoid cells infected by viruses deep ability to synthesize alpha- and gamma-interferons under the influence of the corresponding inducers (Newcastle disease virus and hemagglutinine). Nevertheless, the levels of their formation are not high. Rather high parameters of activity of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were revealed during a day in the initial B95-8 cells and superinfected Ad after the effect of LPS of E. coli. Their activity in CEM cells also did not depend on the infection type. PMID:16018208

  8. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M M; Matthews, David A; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  9. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M. M.; Matthews, David A.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-associated inflammatory pseudotumor presenting as a colonic mass.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shunyou; Auer, Iwona; Duggal, Rajan; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) commonly involves spleen and liver and has only rarely been reported in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The spindle cells may express myofibroblastic or follicular dendritic cell markers. We report a challenging case of EBV-positive IPT arising in the ascending colon. The lesion was composed of spindle cells positive for smooth muscle actin but negative for all follicular dendritic cell markers tested and was associated with an exuberant lymphoid proliferation containing reactive follicles, abundant plasma cells, and small lymphocytes. We further discuss pitfalls for possible misdiagnosis as ALK-positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, IgG4-related disease, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Our case represents the first EBV-positive inflammatory pseudotumor of the GI tract in the Western literature. Awareness of this rare entity in GI tract is essential for correct diagnosis and appropriate patient management. PMID:26477709

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus oncoprotein super-enhancers control B cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hufeng; Schmidt, Stefanie CS; Jiang, Sizun; Willox, Bradford; Bernhardt, Katharina; Liang, Jun; Johannsen, Eric C; Kharchenko, Peter; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Super-enhancers are clusters of gene-regulatory sites bound by multiple transcription factors that govern cell transcription, development, phenotype, and oncogenesis. By examining Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we identified four EBV oncoproteins and five EBV-activated NF-κB subunits co-occupying ~1800 enhancer sites. Of these, 187 had markedly higher and broader histone H3K27ac signals characteristic of super-enhancers, and were designated “EBV super-enhancers”. EBV super-enhancer-associated genes included the MYC and BCL2 oncogenes, enabling LCL proliferation and survival. EBV super-enhancers were enriched for B cell transcription factor motifs and had a high co-occupancy of the transcription factors STAT5 and NFAT. EBV super-enhancer-associated genes were more highly expressed than other LCL genes. Disrupting EBV super-enhancers by the bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1 or conditionally inactivating an EBV oncoprotein or NF-κB decreased MYC or BCL2 expression and arrested LCL growth. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of EBV-induced lymphoproliferation and identify potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25639793

  12. Epstein-Barr virus oncoprotein super-enhancers control B cell growth.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hufeng; Schmidt, Stefanie C S; Jiang, Sizun; Willox, Bradford; Bernhardt, Katharina; Liang, Jun; Johannsen, Eric C; Kharchenko, Peter; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2015-02-11

    Super-enhancers are clusters of gene-regulatory sites bound by multiple transcription factors that govern cell transcription, development, phenotype, and oncogenesis. By examining Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we identified four EBV oncoproteins and five EBV-activated NF-κB subunits co-occupying ∼1,800 enhancer sites. Of these, 187 had markedly higher and broader histone H3K27ac signals, characteristic of super-enhancers, and were designated "EBV super-enhancers." EBV super-enhancer-associated genes included the MYC and BCL2 oncogenes, which enable LCL proliferation and survival. EBV super-enhancers were enriched for B cell transcription factor motifs and had high co-occupancy of STAT5 and NFAT transcription factors (TFs). EBV super-enhancer-associated genes were more highly expressed than other LCL genes. Disrupting EBV super-enhancers by the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 or conditionally inactivating an EBV oncoprotein or NF-κB decreased MYC or BCL2 expression and arrested LCL growth. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of EBV-induced lymphoproliferation and identify potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25639793

  13. The immunology of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, D J; Burrows, S R; Silins, S L; Misko, I; Khanna, R

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a classic example of a persistent human virus that has caught the imagination of immunologists, virologists and oncologists because of the juxtaposition of a number of important properties. First, the ability of the virus to immortalize B lymphocytes in vitro has provided an antigen presenting cell in which all the latent antigens of the virus are displayed and are available for systematic study. Second, the virus presents an ideal system for studying the immune parameters that maintain latency and the consequences of disturbing this cell-virus relationship. Third, this wealth of immunological background has provided a platform for elucidating the role of the immune system in protection from viral-associated malignancies of B cell and epithelial cell origin. Finally, attention is now being directed towards the development of vaccine formulations which might have broad application in the control of human malignancies. PMID:11313006

  14. Sodium arsenite induces apoptosis and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zebboudj, Abderezak; Maroui, Mohamed Ali; Dutrieux, Jacques; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia; Bourouba, Mehdi; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K; Nisole, Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including carcinomas, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphomas, such as Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. The Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) is the major oncogene protein of EBV as its expression is responsible for the induction of cell transformation, immortalization and proliferation. Arsenic trioxide was shown to induce a cytotoxic effect on nasopharyngeal cancer cells associated with LMP1 down-regulation. However, the effect of arsenic on EBV-associated lymphoproliferative malignancies has been less studied. We investigated the effect of two different arsenical compounds, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) and sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on the induction of cell death in P3HR1 cells, an Epstein-Barr virus-positive Burkitt lymphoma derived cell line. Both compounds inhibited cell growth and induced cell death. By flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis, we provide evidence that NaAsO2 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis whereas As2O3 triggered autophagic cell death. Furthermore, we show that NaAsO2 treatment led to a dramatic decrease of the expression level of LMP1 and the cellular protein PML. Importantly, this down-regulation was associated with a reactivation of EBV lytic cycle through the induction of immediate-early proteins Zta and Rta. These results are in agreement with a model in which LMP1 maintains EBV in a latent state by stabilizing PML expression. Altogether, our results suggest that NaAsO2 would represent a better therapeutic candidate than As2O3 in EBV-induced B lymphoma for its capacity to promote viral reactivation. PMID:25241256

  15. Molecular signature of Epstein Barr virus-positive Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder suggest different roles for Epstein Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Mohsen; Fuligni, Fabio; Laginestra, Maria A.; Etebari, Maryam; Ambrosio, Maria R.; Sapienza, Maria R.; Rossi, Maura; De Falco, Giulia; Gibellini, Davide; Tripodo, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano A.; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier P.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection is commonly associated with human cancer and, in particular, with lymphoid malignancies. Although the precise role of the virus in the pathogenesis of different lymphomas is largely unknown, it is well recognized that the expression of viral latent proteins and miRNA can contribute to its pathogenetic role. In this study, we compared the gene and miRNA expression profile of two EBV-associated aggressive B non-Hodgkin lymphomas known to be characterized by differential expression of the viral latent proteins aiming to dissect the possible different contribution of such proteins and EBV-encoded miRNAs. By applying extensive bioinformatic inferring and an experimental model, we found that EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma presented with significant over-expression of EBV-encoded miRNAs that were likely to contribute to its global molecular profile. On the other hand, EBV+ post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas presented a significant enrichment in genes regulated by the viral latent proteins. Based on these different viral and cellular gene expression patterns, a clear distinction between EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas was made. In this regard, the different viral and cellular expression patterns seemed to depend on each other, at least partially, and the latency type most probably played a significant role in their regulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that EBV influence over B-cell malignant clones may act through different mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and suggest that potentially different pathogenetic mechanisms may depend upon the conditions of the interaction between EBV and the host that finally determine the latency pattern. PMID:25566237

  16. The Interplay Between Epstein Barr Virus and B Lymphocytes: Implications for Infection, Immunity, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Olivia L.; Arnold-Harris, Aleishia; Schaffert, Steven; Krams, Sheri M.; Martinez, Olivia M.

    2014-01-01

    Human B cells are the primary targets of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. In most cases EBV infection is asymptomatic because of a highly effective host immune response but some individuals develop self-limiting infectious mononucleosis, while others develop EBV-associated lymphoid or epithelial malignancies. The viral and immune factors that determine the outcome of infection are not understood. The EBV life cycle includes a lytic phase, culminating in the production of new viral particles, and a latent phase, during which the virus remains largely silent for the lifetime of the host in memory B cells. Thus, in healthy individuals there is a tightly orchestrated interplay between EBV and the host that allows the virus to persist. To promote viral persistence EBV has evolved a variety of strategies to modulate the host immune response including inhibition of immune cell function, blunting of apoptotic pathways, and interfering with antigen processing and presentation pathways. In this article we focus on mechanisms by which dysregulation of the host B cell, and immune modulation, by the virus can contribute to development of EBV+ B cell lymphomas. PMID:24619311

  17. The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus and B lymphocytes: implications for infection, immunity, and disease.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Olivia L; Harris-Arnold, Aleishia; Schaffert, Steven; Krams, Sheri M; Martinez, Olivia M

    2014-05-01

    Human B cells are the primary targets of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In most cases, EBV infection is asymptomatic because of a highly effective host immune response, but some individuals develop self-limiting infectious mononucleosis, while others develop EBV-associated lymphoid or epithelial malignancies. The viral and immune factors that determine the outcome of infection are not understood. The EBV life cycle includes a lytic phase, culminating in the production of new viral particles, and a latent phase, during which the virus remains largely silent for the lifetime of the host in memory B cells. Thus, in healthy individuals, there is a tightly orchestrated interplay between EBV and the host that allows the virus to persist. To promote viral persistence, EBV has evolved a variety of strategies to modulate the host immune response including inhibition of immune cell function, blunting of apoptotic pathways, and interfering with antigen processing and presentation pathways. In this article, we focus on mechanisms by which dysregulation of the host B cell and immune modulation by the virus can contribute to development of EBV+ B cell lymphomas. PMID:24619311

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded RNAs: Key Molecules in Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known as an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies. EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are non-coding RNAs expressed abundantly in latently EBV-infected cells. Herein, I summarize the current understanding of the functions of EBERs, including the interactions with cellular factors through which EBERs contribute to EBV-mediated pathogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that EBERs are responsible for malignant phenotypes in lymphoid cells, and can induce several cytokines that can promote the growth of various EBV-infected cancer cells. EBERs were also found to bind retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and thus activate its downstream signaling. Furthermore, EBERs induce interleukin-10, an autocrine growth factor for Burkitt's lymphoma cells, by activating RIG-I/interferon regulatory factor 3 pathway, suggesting that EBER-mediated innate immune signaling modulation contributes to EBV-mediated oncogenesis. Recently, EBV-infected cells were reported to secret EBERs, which were then recognized by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), leading to the induction of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines, and subsequent immune activation. Furthermore, EBER1 was detected in the sera of patients with active EBV-infectious diseases, suggesting that EBER1-meidated TLR3 signaling activation could account for the pathogenesis of active EBV-infectious diseases. PMID:25101570

  19. Immunotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Straathof, Karin C M; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E

    2003-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with several malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). The presence of EBV antigens in these tumors provides a target for immunotherapy approaches, and immunotherapy with EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) has proved effective in post-transplant LPDs, which are highly immunogenic tumors expressing type III latency. The malignant cells in Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma express type II latency and hence a more restricted pattern of EBV antigens. Trials with autologous EBV-specific CTL responses are under way in both of these diseases, and while some activity has been seen, no patient has yet been cured. This reduced CTL efficacy may reflect either downregulation of immunodominant EBV proteins, which are major CTL targets, or the ability of these tumors to evade the immune response by secreting inhibitory cytokines. Further improvement of EBV-specific CTL therapy for these type II latency tumors will require improved methods to activate and expand CTLs specific for the subdominant EBV genes expressed and to genetically modify the expanded CTLs to render them resistant to inhibitory cytokines. If these strategies to improve the therapeutic potential of immunotherapy for EBV-associated tumors prove successful, this type of treatment may be adapted to other tumors expressing known (viral) antigens. PMID:12604735

  20. Possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, N; Saito, I; Haruta, J

    1994-08-01

    We examined the possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome (SS) using B cell lines (BCLs) spontaneously established from the peripheral blood. These BCLs were positive for EBNA and produced a large amount of infecting EBV in culture, a feature unique to SS-BCLs. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EBV with a B95-8-like U2 region was dominant in SS-BCLs. The nucleotide sequences of the U2 region of SS-EBV obtained so far have shown high homology to those of B95-8 EBV. However, there was a substantial amount of deletion and substitution of nucleotides within the U2 region of SS-EBV when compared with B95-8 EBV. This might enable SS-BCLs to escape immune recognition by cytotoxic T cells specific to EBNA-2. In addition, SS-EBV contains the sequence that spans the B95-8-deleted region. Furthermore, transfer of SS-BCLs to SCID mice induced monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders that resembled those arising in SS. These data further support the motion that reactivation of EBV is deeply involved in polyclonal B cell activation and the development of B cell malignancies in SS. PMID:8050188

  1. [Possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haruta, J; Saito, I

    1995-10-01

    Research into the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of SS has been a focus of interest for the past decade. The use of EBV as a probe for cellular and humoral immune responses has contributed to our current understanding of SS. However, it is still difficult to assign a role to EBV in the pathogenesis of SS. We have already demonstrated a) increased excretion of EBV in the saliva of SS, increased levels of EBV DNA in salivary gland biopsies of SS patients and spontaneous and massive production of transforming EBV in B cell lines established from SS patients. These data suggest that the reactivation of EBV might be deeply involved in disease perpetuation, polyclonal B cell activation and B cell malignancy in SS, even if it is not the primary cause. Recently, we examined the nucleotide sequence of the U2 region in EBV obtained from SS patients. The U2 region contains genes encoding EBNA-2, which plays an important role in B cell transformation and activation. In addition, studies on the breakdown of self-tolerance, and intriguing evidence supporting a potential role for infectious agents such as EBV and retroviruses also offer novel views of inflammation of salivary gland. This review will discuss recent advances in these subjects. PMID:8531359

  2. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus in nasal lymphomas contains multiple ongoing mutations in the EBNA-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M I; Spangler, G; Kingma, D; Raffeld, M; Guerrero, I; Misad, O; Jaffe, E S; Magrath, I T; Bhatia, K

    1998-07-15

    We have described 5 major subtypes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) based on variations in EBNA-1 sequences. These include P-ala (identical to the prototype B95.8 virus), P-thr, V-pro, V-leu, and V-val. Normal individuals often carry multiple EBV subtypes, the most common being P-ala, whereas EBV-associated tumors examined to date always contain a single subtype, which only on rare occasion is P-ala. The primary hypotheses that these observations generate are as follows: (1) Each of these EBV subtypes are naturally occurring, and in normal individuals the multiplicity of subtypes results from multiple infections. (2) EBV subtypes in normal individuals are generated in vivo from a single infecting virus subtype by mutations in EBNA-1. The second hypothesis essentially excludes the possibilities that the nonrandom association of certain subtypes with lymphomas is secondary to the geographic distribution of EBV subtypes and, if proven correct, could provide strong support for a direct role of EBV in tumorigenesis. In this report, we provide evidence for the latter hypothesis. We show that the P-ala EBV subtype present in most nasal lymphomas undergoes and accumulates multiple mutations consistent with the generation of variant species of EBNA-1 in vivo. This phenomenon is similar to the generation of quasispecies in RNA viruses and is the first description of in vivo generation of subtypes in DNA viruses. In RNA-based viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, the emergence of quasispecies is linked to replication infidelity and significantly influences disease processes through its effect on viral tropism, the emergence of viruses resistant to the host defenses or to therapy, and pathogenicity. The present data thus raise important questions relating to the mechanisms whereby these mutations are generated in EBV and their relevance to the pathogenicity of EBV-associated lymphomas. PMID:9657761

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) confers resistance to apoptosis in EBV-positive B-lymphoma cells through up-regulation of survivin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jie; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C.; Cai Qiliang; Haldar, Sabyasachi; Kaul, Rajeev; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Middeldorp, Jaap; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-02-05

    Resistance to apoptosis is an important component of the overall mechanism which drives the tumorigenic process. EBV is a ubiquitous human gamma-herpesvirus which preferentially establishes latent infection in viral infected B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is typically expressed in most forms of EBV-positive malignancies and is important for replication of the latent episome in concert with replication of the host cells. Here, we investigate the effects of EBNA1 on survivin up-regulation in EBV-infected human B-lymphoma cells. We present evidence which demonstrates that EBNA1 forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to their cis-element at the survivin promoter. This enhances the activity of the complex and up-regulates survivin. Knockdown of survivin and EBNA1 showed enhanced apoptosis in infected cells and thus supports a role for EBNA1 in suppressing apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Here, we suggest that EBV encoded EBNA1 can contribute to the oncogenic process by up-regulating the apoptosis suppressor protein, survivin in EBV-associated B-lymphoma cells.

  5. [A Case of Severe Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Aplastic Anemia and Hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja In; Lee, Sung Won; Han, Nam Ik; Ro, Sang Mi; Noh, Yong-Sun; Jang, Jeong Won; Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-01-25

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes various acute and chronic diseases. Chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) is characterized by infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms that persist for more than 6 months with high viral loads in peripheral blood and/or an unusual pattern of anti-EBV antibodies. Severe CAEBV is associated with poor prognosis with severe symptoms, an extremely high EBV-related antibody titer, and hematologic complications that often include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. However, CAEBV which led to the development of aplastic anemia (AA) has not been reported yet. A 73-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with intermittent fever, general weakness and elevated liver enzymes. In the serologic test, EBV-related antibody titer was elevated, and real-time quantitative-PCR in peripheral blood showed viral loads exceeding 10(4) copies/μg DNA. Liver biopsy showed characteristic histopathological changes of EBV hepatitis and in situ hybridization with EBV-encoded RNA-1 was positive for EBV. Pancytopenia was detected in peripheral blood, and the bone marrow aspiration biopsy showed hypocellularity with replacement by adipocytes. AA progressed and the patient was treated with prednisolone but deceased 8 months after the diagnosis due to multiple organ failure and opportunistic infection. Herein, we report a rare case of severe CAEBV in an adult patient accompanied by AA and persistent hepatitis. PMID:26809631

  6. [Investigation of Epstein-Barr virus DNA and RNA in tissues of patients with lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Zeytinoğlu, Ayşin; Hekimgil, Mine; Erensoy, Selda; Aydemir, Söhret; Berber, Sahir; Cağirgan, Seçkin; Soydan, Saliha; Bilgiç, Altinay

    2005-10-01

    Relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and nasopharyngeal carsinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and lymphomas in immunosupressed patients have been shown previously in different studies. The same relationship was also shown in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by some researchers. The aim of this study was to demonstrate EBV nucleic acids in tissue sections of adult patients with lymphoma. The presence of EBV encoded RNA (EBER) were investigated with in situ hybridization and EBV-DNA with PCR method in 29 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections (19 lymph nodes, the others being gastric, orbital, skin, salivary gland, testicle, small intestinal, tongue root, bone marrow and gingival tissues) of 8 patients with HL and 21 patients with NHL who were followed-up in Haematology Clinics of our university hospital. EBER and EBV-DNA positivity rates were found as follows respectively; 50% (n: 4) and 37.5% (n: 3) of 8 HL patients, and 23.8% (n: 5) and 47.6% (n: 10) of 21 NHL patients. In total evaluation EBER and/or EBV-DNA were positive in 5 of 8 (62.5%) HL, and 12 of 21 (57.1%) NHL tissue sections. There was no significant difference in EBER and EBV-DNA positivity between HL and NHL groups. As a result, our study emphasize a possible EBV related aetiology in HL and NHL. PMID:16544549

  7. Determinants of Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: an international pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M C; Murphy, G; Koriyama, C; Pfeiffer, R M; Kim, W H; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Corvalan, A H; Carrascal, E; Abdirad, A; Anwar, M; Hao, Z; Kattoor, J; Yoshiwara-Wakabayashi, E; Eizuru, Y; Rabkin, C S; Akiba, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Meta-analyses of the published literature indicate that about 9% of gastric cancers contain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), with consistent and significant differences by sex and anatomic subsite. This study aimed to identify additional determinants of EBV positivity and their joint effects. Methods: From 15 international populations with consistent laboratory testing for EBV, we pooled individual-level data for 5081 gastric cancer cases including information on age, sex, subsite, histologic type, diagnostic stage, geographic region, and period of diagnosis. First, we combined population-specific EBV prevalence estimates using random effects meta-analysis. We then aggregated individual-level data to estimate odds ratios of EBV positivity in relation to all variables, accounting for within-population clustering. Results: In unadjusted analyses, EBV positivity was significantly higher in males, young subjects, non-antral subsites, diffuse-type histology, and in studies from the Americas. Multivariable analyses confirmed significant associations with histology and region. Sex interacted with age (P=0.003) and subsite (P=0.002) such that male predominance decreased with age for both subsites. The positivity of EBV was not significantly associated with either stage or time period. Conclusion: Aggregating individual-level data provides additional information over meta-analyses. Distinguishing histologic and geographic features as well as interactions among age, sex, and subsite further support classification of EBV-associated gastric cancer as a distinct aetiologic entity. PMID:21654677

  8. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  9. Elevated stress hormone levels relate to Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress and spaceflight on levels of neuroendocrine hormones and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibodies in astronauts. METHODS: Antiviral antibody titers and stress hormones were measured in plasma samples collected from 28 astronauts at their annual medical exam (baseline), 10 days before launch (L-10), landing day (R+0), and 3 days after landing (R+3). Urinary stress hormones were also measured at L-10 and R+0. RESULTS: Significant increases (p <.01) in EBV virus capsid antigen antibodies were found at all three time points (L-10, R+0, and R+3) as compared with baseline samples. Anti-EBV nuclear antigen antibodies were significantly decreased at L-10 (p <.05) and continued to decrease after spaceflight (R+0 and R+3, p <.01). No changes were found in antibodies to the nonlatent measles virus. The 11 astronauts who showed evidence of EBV reactivation had significant increases in urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine as compared with astronauts without EBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that physical and psychological stresses associated with spaceflight resulted in decreased virus-specific T-cell immunity and reactivation of EBV.

  10. Induction of epstein-barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle in vitro causes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage in lymphoblastoid B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the oxidative modifications of lipids, proteins and DNA, potential molecular targets of oxidative stress, in two lymphoblastoid cell lines: B95-8 and Raji, after EBV lytic cycle induction. Conjugated dienes level was measured as biomarker of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde adduct and protein carbonyl levels, as well as protein thiol levels were measured as biomarkers of protein oxidation. DNA fragmentation was evaluated as biomarker of DNA oxidation. Results After 48 h (peak of lytic cycle), a significant increase in conjugated dienes level was observed in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.019 respectively). Malondialdehyde adduct, protein carbonyl levels were increased in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls (MDA-adduct: p = 0.008 and p = 0.006 respectively; Carbonyl: p = 0.003 and p = 0.0039 respectively). Proteins thiol levels were decreased by induction in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.046; p = 0.002 respectively). DNA fragmentation was also detected in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the presence of increased combined oxidative modifications in lipids, proteins in B95-8 and Raji cells lines after EBV lytic cycle induction. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA fragmentation are generally induced during EBV lytic cycle induction and probably contribute to the cytopathic effect of EBV. PMID:21722381

  11. NK Cell Influence on the Outcome of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Obinna; Landtwing, Vanessa; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered as the first human candidate tumor virus in Burkitt's lymphoma more than 50 years ago. Despite its strong growth transforming capacity, more than 90% of the human adult population carries this virus asymptomatically under near perfect immune control. The mode of primary EBV infection is in part responsible for EBV-associated diseases, including Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is, therefore, important to understand which circumstances lead to symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis (IM). Innate immune control of lytic viral replication by early-differentiated natural killer (NK) cells was found to attenuate IM symptoms and continuous loss of the respective NK cell subset during the first decade of life might predispose for IM during adolescence. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NK cells are involved in the immune control of EBV, mechanisms by which they might detect and control lytic EBV replication, and compare NK cell subpopulations that expand during different human herpesvirus infections. PMID:27621731

  12. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Connolly, Sarah A.; Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus: the hematologic and oncologic consequences of virus-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Giller, R H; Grose, C

    1989-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are two of the human herpesviruses. The others include herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, HSV type 2, and cytomegalovirus (CMV). In a series of two articles, we review the clinical diseases caused by VZV and EBV infections; we pay particular attention to the manifestations of these two viral infections in immunosuppressed and immunocompromised patients. In addition to the clinical reviews, each of the two articles begins with a brief discussion of the molecular aspects of VZV and EBV, respectively; this introduction describes features of the genome and immunogenic viral proteins which have clinical relevance. A model for pathogenesis is included. The first review concerns VZV infections. Recent data about the DNA sequence of the entire VZV genome are included, as well as a review of the VZV glycoproteins. Primary VZV infection (chickenpox) and VZV reactivation (zoster) are described in detail in both healthy individuals and people with cancer. The decade-long VZV vaccine trials in children with leukemia receive special emphasis because they have engendered considerable interest and debate. The second review (published here) covers EBV infections. This virus has been implicated in the causation of a wide variety of human hematological and oncological disorders, besides classical infectious mononucleosis. In particular, Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphoproliferative disorders are strongly associated with EBV infection of the transformed cells. In addition, immunologically mediated cytopenias occasionally follow EBV infection. Finally, treatment regimens with antiviral chemotherapy and other agents are discussed for both VZV and EBV infections. PMID:2545365

  14. Exhausted Cytotoxic Control of Epstein-Barr Virus in Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Martin; Sauce, Delphine; Deback, Claire; Arnaud, Laurent; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Boutolleau, David; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) pathology has long been associated with an increased Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) seropositivity, viremia and cross-reactive serum antibodies specific for both virus and self. It has therefore been postulated that EBV triggers SLE immunopathology, although the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigate whether frequent peaks of EBV viral load in SLE patients are a consequence of dysfunctional anti-EBV CD8+ T cell responses. Both inactive and active SLE patients (n = 76 and 42, respectively), have significantly elevated EBV viral loads (P = 0.003 and 0.002, respectively) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 29). Interestingly, less EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are able to secrete multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and MIP-1β) in inactive and active SLE patients compared to controls (P = 0.0003 and 0.0084, respectively). Moreover, EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are also less cytotoxic in SLE patients than in controls (CD107a expression: P = 0.0009, Granzyme B release: P = 0.0001). Importantly, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific responses were not found significantly altered in SLE patients. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBV-specific CD8+ T cell impairment is a consequence of their Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor up-regulation, as blocking this pathway reverses the dysfunctional phenotype. Finally, prospective monitoring of lupus patients revealed that disease flares precede EBV reactivation. In conclusion, EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in SLE patients are functionally impaired, but EBV reactivation appears to be an aggravating consequence rather than a cause of SLE immunopathology. We therefore propose that autoimmune B cell activation during flares drives frequent EBV reactivation, which contributes in a vicious circle to the perpetuation of immune activation in SLE patients. PMID:22028659

  15. Exhausted cytotoxic control of Epstein-Barr virus in human lupus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Martin; Sauce, Delphine; Deback, Claire; Arnaud, Laurent; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Boutolleau, David; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-10-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) pathology has long been associated with an increased Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) seropositivity, viremia and cross-reactive serum antibodies specific for both virus and self. It has therefore been postulated that EBV triggers SLE immunopathology, although the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigate whether frequent peaks of EBV viral load in SLE patients are a consequence of dysfunctional anti-EBV CD8+ T cell responses. Both inactive and active SLE patients (n = 76 and 42, respectively), have significantly elevated EBV viral loads (P = 0.003 and 0.002, respectively) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 29). Interestingly, less EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are able to secrete multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and MIP-1β) in inactive and active SLE patients compared to controls (P = 0.0003 and 0.0084, respectively). Moreover, EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are also less cytotoxic in SLE patients than in controls (CD107a expression: P = 0.0009, Granzyme B release: P = 0.0001). Importantly, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific responses were not found significantly altered in SLE patients. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBV-specific CD8+ T cell impairment is a consequence of their Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor up-regulation, as blocking this pathway reverses the dysfunctional phenotype. Finally, prospective monitoring of lupus patients revealed that disease flares precede EBV reactivation. In conclusion, EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in SLE patients are functionally impaired, but EBV reactivation appears to be an aggravating consequence rather than a cause of SLE immunopathology. We therefore propose that autoimmune B cell activation during flares drives frequent EBV reactivation, which contributes in a vicious circle to the perpetuation of immune activation in SLE patients. PMID:22028659

  16. Suppressor T cell clones from patients with acute Epstein-Barr virus-induced infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F; Blaese, R M; Zoon, K C; Tosato, G

    1987-01-01

    Suppression and/or cytotoxicity are believed to play an important role in the defense against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To analyze the role of suppressor T cells in relation to EBV, we sought to clone and study these T cells. Analysis of 152 T cell clones derived from the peripheral blood of two patients with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis (IM) yielded 11 highly suppressive clones that had no cytotoxic activity for the natural killer sensitive K562 cell line, an autologous EBV-infected cell line, or an allogeneic EBV-infected B cell line. Four of six suppressor T cell clones also profoundly inhibited EBV-induced immunoglobulin production, and five of five clones delayed the outgrowth of immortalized cells. These results indicate that during acute IM, suppressor T cells capable of inhibiting B cell activation in the absence of cytotoxicity can be identified, and may play a key role in the control of EBV infection. Images PMID:3025263

  17. Opportunistic DNA Recombination With Epstein-Barr Virus at Sites of Control Region Rearrangements Mediating JC Virus Neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Margaret J; Lundberg, Patric S; Dagdanova, Ayuna V; Venkataraman, Pranav; Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2016-05-01

    We document a unique DNA recombination between polyomavirus JC (JC virus [JCV]) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at sequences of JCV found infecting the brain. Archetype JCV is present in bone marrow and uroepithelial cells of most adults. During immunosuppression, JCV can infect the brain, causing a demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Rearrangements in the archetype noncoding control region are necessary for neurovirulence. Two NCCR deletions and a duplication occur at sequences of homology with EBV, present latently in B cells, which may be coinfected with both viruses. Recombination between JCV and EBV occurs in B lymphoblasts at a sequence essential for JCV neurovirulence and in cerebrospinal fluid of immunosuppressed patients with multiple sclerosis, those susceptible to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Interviral recombination is a model for conferring advantages on JCV in the brain. It can alter a critical noncoding control region sequence and potentially facilitate use of EBV DNA abilities to transfer among different cell types. PMID:26690342

  18. Assembly of Epstein-Barr Virus Capsid in Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Chang, Li-Kwan; Hung, Chen-Chia; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsid contains a major capsid protein, VCA; two minor capsid proteins, BDLF1 and BORF1; and a small capsid protein, BFRF3. During the lytic cycle, these capsid proteins are synthesized and imported into the host nucleus for capsid assembly. This study finds that EBV capsid proteins colocalize with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) in P3HR1 cells during the viral lytic cycle, appearing as nuclear speckles under a confocal laser scanning microscope. In a glutathione S-transferase pulldown study, we show that BORF1 interacts with PML-NBs in vitro. BORF1 also colocalizes with PML-NBs in EBV-negative Akata cells after transfection and is responsible for bringing VCA and the VCA-BFRF3 complex from the cytoplasm to PML-NBs in the nucleus. Furthermore, BDLF1 is dispersed throughout the cell when expressed alone but colocalizes with PML-NBs when BORF1 is also present in the cell. In addition, this study finds that knockdown of PML expression by short hairpin RNA does not influence the intracellular levels of capsid proteins but reduces the number of viral particles produced by P3HR1 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that BORF1 plays a critical role in bringing capsid proteins to PML-NBs, which may likely be the assembly sites of EBV capsids. The mechanisms elucidated in this study are critical to understanding the process of EBV capsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Capsid assembly is an important event during the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle, as this process is required for the production of virions. In this study, confocal microscopy revealed that the EBV capsid protein BORF1 interacts with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) in the host nucleus and is responsible for transporting the other EBV capsid proteins, including VCA, BDLF1, and BFRF3, to these subnuclear locations prior to initiation of capsid assembly. This study also found that knockdown of PML expression by short hairpin RNA

  19. Epstein-Barr virus uses HLA class II as a cofactor for infection of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q; Spriggs, M K; Kovats, S; Turk, S M; Comeau, M R; Nepom, B; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1997-01-01

    Infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) requires attachment of virus via binding of viral glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on the cell surface. Penetration of the cell membrane additionally involves a complex of three glycoproteins, gH, gL, and gp42. Glycoprotein gp42 binds to HLA-DR. Interference with this interaction with a soluble form of gp42, with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to gp42, or with a MAb to HLA-DR inhibited virus infection. It was not possible to superinfect cells that failed to express HLA-DR unless expression was restored by transfection or creation of hybrid cell lines with complementing deficiencies in expression of HLA class II. HLA class II molecules thus serve as cofactors for infection of human B cells. PMID:9151859

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  2. Stress-induced reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2000-01-01

    Herpesviruses are leading causes of infectious blindness and death in immunocompromised individuals. Impaired cellular immunity, which is known to result in increased frequency and severity of herpesvirus infections, has been demonstrated both during and after spaceflight. Therefore, we examined whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a well-characterized latent herpesvirus, undergoes reactivation in astronauts. Sera from Shuttle astronauts, taken before and after spaceflight, were examined for evidence of EBV reactivation. The geometric mean antibody titer to EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) was significantly increased prior to flight compared to baseline (p = 0. 0001). After spaceflight, evidence of acute lytic replication was found in which 8- to 64-fold increases in EBV early antigen (EA) antibodies occurred without significant increases in antibodies to measles virus. Additionally, stress-induced shifts in circulating leukocytes and elevated levels of urinary cortisol and epinephrine were found. Overall, significant increases in EA or high VCA/EA antibody titers were found in 8 of 23 (35%) male astronauts and 3 of 5 (60%) female astronauts. These results indicate that stress reactivates EBV prior to flight and suggest that acute lytic replication of EBV occurs during spaceflight. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human papillomavirus DNA was only found in two oral warts and was identified as HPV type 32. Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected in 16 biopsy specimens, including the 12 HLs, 2 cases of candidiasis, and 2 samples of normal epithelium. Epstein-Barr virus positivity in HL could be confirmed by Southern blot analysis and DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated DNA probes (bio-DISH). Epstein-Barr virus bio-DISH was also positive in one sample of normal epithelium from a patient with HL. The results indicate that HL is strongly associated with EBV and not with any of the common HPV types that react with general HPV primers in the PCR. However the detection of EBV in normal oral epithelium by PCR and bio-DISH suggests that the presence of this virus is not exclusively related to HL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2169191

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and the lacrimal gland pathology of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pflugfelder, S. C.; Crouse, C. A.; Monroy, D.; Yen, M.; Rowe, M.; Atherton, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    The lacrimal gland (LG) immunopathology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) consists of a proliferation of B and CD4 lymphocytes surrounding epithelial structures (Pepose JS, et al: Ophthalmology 1990, 97:1599-1605). Based on the detection of EBV genomes in a greater percentage of SS than normal LG biopsies, we previously postulated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a risk factor for LG lymphoproliferation in SS (Pflugfelder SC, et al: Ophthalmology 1990, 97:976-984). The purpose of this study was to determine the cellular site(s) of infection, virus type, and antigen expression of EBV infecting normal and SS LGs. EBV DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in intraductal epithelia in 13-33% of lobules in 21% of normal LGs and in cells in areas of B lymphoproliferation as well as the majority of epithelia in 86% of SS LGs. EBV genomic sequences were amplified from 36% of normal and 88% of SS LG biopsies by polymerase chain reaction. Only type 1 EBV sequences were amplified in SS LGs; in contrast EBV nuclear antigen 2-deleted but not type 1 sequences were amplified in normal LGs. Immunohistochemistry with EBV-specific monoclonal antibodies was performed on normal and SS LGs. No EBV antigens were detected in normal LGs. In contrast, latent antigens (latent membrane protein, EBV nuclear antigen 2) were detected in lymphocytes in areas of B lymphoproliferation, and early and late lytic cycle antigens were observed in epithelia in SS LGs. These studies suggest that EBV may play a role in the LG B lymphoproliferation and epithelial pathologic changes observed in SS. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8391219

  5. Infektion mit Epstein-Barr-Virus und Tumor-Entstehung beim Menschen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, H.

    1981-08-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is the only infectious agent for which a close association with human malignant tumors has been clearly demonstrated. These tumors are one type of nasopharyngeal carcinoma which is frequent in parts of East Asia and the Burkitt lymphoma which predominantly occurs in parts of Africa and New Guinea. Nonetheless, the EBV is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a benign, self-limiting lymphoproliferative disease of adolescents. The major difference between the countries in which the EBV-induced tumors occur and those in which IM occurs is the late primary EBV infection in the latter, whereas primary infection with EBV occurs in the first year of life in the former. All theories of viral carcinogenesis have to explain the long latency period between primary infection and tumor growth and how an ubiquitous virus may be oncogenic. Thus, invariably, one has to assume a role of cofactors, which may be of cytogenetic nature or may be represented by additional infections or by chemical agents. Since most modern theories of carcinogenesis consider a multi-step development of tumors, the theory that infection with an ubiquitous virus at the right time of life represents one step to carcinogenesis seems to be tenable.

  6. Epstein- Barr Virus: Clinical and Epidemiological Revisits and Genetic Basis of Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdelwahid Saeed; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Al-Hakami, Ahmed Musa; Jones, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is classified as a member in the order herpesvirales, family herpesviridae, subfamily gammaherpesvirinae and the genus lymphocytovirus. The virus is an exclusively human pathogen and thus also termed as human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4). It was the first oncogenic virus recognized and has been incriminated in the causation of tumors of both lymphatic and epithelial nature. It was reported in some previous studies that 95% of the population worldwide are serologically positive to the virus. Clinically, EBV primary infection is almost silent, persisting as a life-long asymptomatic latent infection in B cells although it may be responsible for a transient clinical syndrome called infectious mononucleosis. Following reactivation of the virus from latency due to immunocompromised status, EBV was found to be associated with several tumors. EBV linked to oncogenesis as detected in lymphoid tumors such as Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and T-cell lymphomas (e.g. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas; PTCL and Anaplastic large cell lymphomas; ALCL). It is also linked to epithelial tumors such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinomas and oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL). In vitro, EBV many studies have demonstrated its ability to transform B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Despite these malignancies showing different clinical and epidemiological patterns when studied, genetic studies have suggested that these EBV- associated transformations were characterized generally by low level of virus gene expression with only the latent virus proteins (LVPs) upregulated in both tumors and LCLs. In this review, we summarize some clinical and epidemiological features of EBV- associated tumors. We also discuss how EBV latent genes may lead to oncogenesis in the different clinical malignancies PMID:26862355

  7. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation: time to adopt monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus?

    PubMed

    Biller, P; Michaux, L; Pauw, L De; Camboni, A; Mourad, M; Kanaan, N

    2015-06-01

    Although post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a classical complication encountered after kidney transplantation, its diagnosis can still be challenging and its outcome life-threatening. Most cases are related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and occur mainly in the first year post-transplant, favoured by the seronegative EBV status of the recipient transplanted with a kidney from a seropositive donor, and strong immunosuppression. We report the case of a young kidney-pancreas transplant recipient who developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) early after transplantation, with a rapid fatal issue. We review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of PTLD with a focus on prevention. PMID:25541210

  8. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  9. Detection of a Specific Biomarker for Epstein-Barr Virus Using a Polymer-Based Genosensor

    PubMed Central

    Balvedi, Renata P. A.; Castro, Ana C. H.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes methodology for direct and indirect detections of a specific oligonucleotide for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using electrochemical techniques. The sequence of oligonucleotide probe (EBV1) revealed a high sequence identity (100%) with the EBV genome. For the development of the genosensor, EBV1 was grafted to the platform sensitized with poly(4-aminothiophenol). After that, the hybridization reaction was carried out with the complementary target (EBV2) on the modified electrode surface using ethidium bromide as DNA intercalator. The oxidation peak currents of ethidium bromide increased linearly with the values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 3.78 to 756 μmol·L−1. In nonstringent experimental conditions, this genosensor can detect 17.32 nmol·L−1 (three independent experiments) of oligonucleotide target, discriminating between complementary and non-complementary oligonucleotides, as well as differentiating one-base mismatch, as required for detection of genetic diseases caused by point mutations. The biosensor also displayed high specificity to the EBV target with elimination of interference from mix (alanine, glucose, uric acid, ascorbic acid, bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamate and glycine) and good stability (120 days). In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces through atomic force microscopy. PMID:24853286

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor of the tonsil.

    PubMed

    Suwansirikul, Songkiet; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Sittitrai, Pichit; Suwiwat, Supaporn; Khunamornpong, Surapan

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle tumors of the tonsil are rare. Recently, the occurrence of Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor (EBV-SMT) has been increasingly recognized in immunocompromised patients, mainly post-transplantation and AIDS patients. The clinicopathologic features of EBV-SMT are different from conventional smooth muscle tumors. To the best of our knowledge, EBV-SMT involving the tonsil in an AIDS patient has not been reported. A 27-year-old man presented with a 2.2cm right tonsillar mass six months after AIDS diagnosis. The tumor was composed of a cellular proliferation of oval to spindle-shaped cells with mitotic count up to 10 in 10 high-power fields. The diagnosis of EBV-SMT was confirmed by in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) transcripts. Synchronous lesions were also detected in the liver and peritoneum by an abdominal computed tomographic scan. EBV-SMT should be included in the differential diagnoses of a mesenchymal tumor in immunocompromised patients, and in the differential diagnoses of a smooth muscle tumor occurring in uncommon sites including the tonsil. PMID:21885224

  11. Rescue of “crippled” germinal center B cells from apoptosis by Epstein-Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Mancao, Christoph; Altmann, Markus; Jungnickel, Berit; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and post-transplantation lymphoma, which originate from clonal germinal center (GC) B cells. During the process of somatic hypermutation, GC B cells can acquire deleterious or nonsense mutations in the heavy and light immunoglobulin genes. Such mutations abrogate the cell surface expression of the B-cell receptor (BCR), which results in the elimination of these nonfunctional B cells by immediate apoptosis. EBV encodes several latent genes, among them latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A, which are regularly expressed in EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma and posttransplantation lymphomas. Since LMP1 and LMP2A mimic the function of 2 key receptors on B cells, CD40 and BCR, respectively, we wanted to learn whether EBV infection can rescue proapoptotic GC B cells with crippling mutations in the heavy chain immunoglobulin locus from apoptosis. We show here that BCR-negative GC B cells readily enter the cell cycle upon infection with EBV in vitro and yield clonal lymphoblastoid cell lines that are incapable of expressing a functional BCR because the rearranged and formerly functional heavy chain immunoglobulin alleles carry deleterious mutations. Our findings imply an important role for EBV in the process of lymphomagenesis in certain cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and posttransplantation lymphomas. PMID:16076866

  12. Different Epstein-Barr virus expression in lymphomas from immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed Central

    Borisch-Chappuis, B.; Nezelof, C.; Müller, H.; Müller-Hermelink, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Eighteen tissue samples from lymphoproliferative lesions and lymphomas in immunodeficiency states were investigated for their content of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome by dot blotting and for the distribution of EBV in tissue sections by in situ hybridization. Fourteen lymphomas from AIDS patients and four children with disorders of the immune system were available. For control reasons, six cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and eight Burkitt's lymphomas (BL) from malaria-free regions of Africa were included in the study. Two different patterns of EBV distribution are described: 1) heterogeneous scattered EBV-positive cells, as originally seen in IM and therefore called the IM-type pattern, 2) and a BL-type pattern seen in endemic Burkitt's lymphoma with homogeneous EBV-positive cells all over the tumor. In lymphomas in patients with inborn immunodeficiencies, an IM-type pattern was found. In lymphomas from AIDS patients, the two different patterns were found. There were lymphomas with the IM-type pattern as well as some with the BL-type pattern. In some AIDS-associated lymphomas, both patterns occurred in one tumor. The findings suggest that it is not the disease process that is the distinguishing feature between the two patterns of EBV infection but rather the patient's underlying disease and the extent of this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1691592

  13. Investigation of Epstein-Barr virus in breast carcinomas in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hachana, Mohamed; Amara, Khaled; Ziadi, Sonia; Romdhane, Essia; Gacem, Riadh Ben; Trimeche, Mounir

    2011-11-15

    Breast carcinoma is a major cause of death among women, and the potential implication of viruses in its pathogenesis remains worth a hypothesis. The potential role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in its pathogenesis is still a subject of continued discussion and investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of EBV in sporadic breast cancers in Tunisia, and to determine the clinicopathological characteristics of virus-positive cases. Viral presence has been evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry investigated on tumor tissues and their corresponding normal breast tissues collected from 123 Tunisian women with sporadic breast carcinomas. Viral status in tumors was then correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. Using specific PCR assays, EBV DNA was found in 33 (27%) out of 123 breast carcinoma cases. EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) in situ hybridization was negative in the neoplastic cells, but stomal lymphocytes were positive in 4 cases. Immunohistochemistry for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was negative in all cases. None of the normal breast tissues showed positive results for EBV using PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. A correlation was found between EBV DNA presence and the negativity of estrogen receptor (P=0.008). However, no significant correlation was found for the other parameters investigated, including patient age, Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) histological grade, tumor size, and histological node involvement. With regard to survival data, overall and disease-free survivals were shorter in EBV-positive breast carcinoma cases than in EBV-negative ones, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Our study indicates the presence of EBV DNA in a significant proportion of breast cancer in Tunisia. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of this virus in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:22024152

  14. Rituximab treatment for Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia after alternative-donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coppoletta, Stefania; Tedone, Elisabetta; Galano, Barbara; Soracco, Monica; Raiola, Anna Maria; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Bregante, Stefania; Ibatici, Adalberto; di Grazia, Carmen; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Bruno, Barbara; Frassoni, Francesco; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    We report 55 patients undergoing an alternative-donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) who developed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAemia, with >1000 EBV copies/10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and were treated with rituximab (375 mg/m(2)). The median patient age was 47 years (range, 20-65 years), and graft sources were mismatched family members (n = 4), unrelated donors (n = 46), and unrelated cord blood (n = 5). The conditioning regimen included antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in all patients. The median time to development of EBV DNAemia was day 27 post-HSCT (range, day 5 to day 242), with a median of 60 EBV copies/10(5) PBMCs (range, 1-5770 copies/10(5) PBMCs). The number of EBV copies was reduced to <1000/10(5) PBMCs on day +7 after initiation of rituximab therapy in 51% of the patients, on day +14 in 73% of the patients, and on +21 in 92% of the patients. Overall, 50 of 55 patients (91%) cleared EBV after one dose (n = 25) or more than one dose (n = 25) of rituximab. Factors predicting transplantation-related mortality (TRM) in multivariate analysis were a reduction to <1000 EBV copies/10(5) PBMCs by day +7 of treatment (relative risk [RR], 0.2; P = .01) and disease phase in remission (RR, 0.3; P = .05). TRM was 23% in the 40 patients with none or one of the negative predictors and 60% in the 15 patients with both negative predictors (P = .001). Of these latter 15 patients, 3 developed clinical posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). All 3 of these patients had a high EBV load on day +7 of rituximab therapy. This study confirms the effectiveness of rituximab in controlling EBV DNAemia in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Patients with increasing EBV copies despite rituximab therapy are at high risk for EBV PTLD and may be considered for alternative therapies. PMID:20950702

  15. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Wang, Anqi; Makielski, Kathleen; Lee, Denis; Ma, Shidong; Barlow, Elizabeth; Reusch, Jessica; Jiang, Ru; Wille, Coral K.; Greenspan, Deborah; Greenspan, John S.; Mertz, Janet E.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey; Johannsen, Eric C.; Lambert, Paul F.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s) that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1) promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells. PMID:26431332

  16. A molecular link between malaria and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Chêne, Arnaud; Donati, Daria; Guerreiro-Cacais, André Ortlieb; Levitsky, Victor; Chen, Qijun; Falk, Kerstin I; Orem, Jackson; Kironde, Fred; Wahlgren, Mats; Bejarano, Maria Teresa

    2007-06-01

    Although malaria and Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection are recognized cofactors in the genesis of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), their relative contribution is not understood. BL, the most common paediatric cancer in equatorial Africa, is a high-grade B cell lymphoma characterized by c-myc translocation. EBV is a ubiquitous B lymphotropic virus that persists in a latent state after primary infection, and in Africa, most children have sero-converted by 3 y of age. Malaria infection profoundly affects the B cell compartment, inducing polyclonal activation and hyper-gammaglobulinemia. We recently identified the cystein-rich inter-domain region 1alpha (CIDR1alpha) of the Plasmodium falciparum membrane protein 1 as a polyclonal B cell activator that preferentially activates the memory compartment, where EBV is known to persist. Here, we have addressed the mechanisms of interaction between CIDR1alpha and EBV in the context of B cells. We show that CIDR1alpha binds to the EBV-positive B cell line Akata and increases the number of cells switching to the viral lytic cycle as measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression driven by a lytic promoter. The virus production in CIDR1alpha-exposed cultures was directly proportional to the number of GFP-positive Akata cells (lytic EBV) and to the increased expression of the EBV lytic promoter BZLF1. Furthermore, CIDR1alpha stimulated the production of EBV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from healthy donors and children with BL. Our results suggest that P. falciparum antigens such as CIDR1alpha can directly induce EBV reactivation during malaria infection that may increase the risk of BL development for children living in malaria-endemic areas. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that a microbial protein can drive a latently infected B cell into EBV replication. PMID:17559303

  17. Translation Elongation Rate Measurement of Epstein-Barr Virus Strain GD1

    PubMed Central

    Motalleb, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) has a great co relationship with human malignancies such as gastric carcinoma. Synonymous codon investigations in viruses could help designing vaccine, to generate immunity. Codon Adaptation Index (CAI) has measured translation elongation rate, among the highly expressed genes. The aim of this study was: usage of “CAI” to measure translation efficiency to know how fast EBV-GD1 could produce its proteins. Methods The complete genomic sequences of human herpes virus 4 strain GD1 have retrieved from (GenBank accession no. AY961628) to extract all protein-coding genes. The sequences have analyzed with DAMBE software. Results The results have shown that CAI values for the EBV-GD1 genes were 0.76356 ± 0.02957. The highest and lowest CAI values were 0.82233 and 0.68321 respectively. The results have shown that highly expressed genes mostly had more codon usage bias than low expressed genes. Conclusion The results provide and introduce not only a system, but also the principles in order to understand the pathogenesis and evolution of EBV-GD1, to open a window, in order to make a better product or vaccine to challenge with the virus. PMID:25250137

  18. Malignant Lymphoma in Cottontop Marmosets after Inoculation with Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Thomas; Dechairo, Douglas; Miller, George

    1973-01-01

    Neoplasia resembling human malignant lymphoma, reticulum cell sarcoma type, occurred in cottontop marmosets inoculated with materials containing Epstein-Barr virus. One of four monkeys that received autologous cells transformed in vitro by Epstein-Barr virus developed lymphoma in mesenteric lymph nodes 7.5 months after inoculation. Three of four marmosets inoculated with cell-free Epstein-Barr virus developed lymphoma. The latent period for detectable tumor formation after addition of virus was 31-46 days. Immunosuppressive drugs given with the virus accelerated the course of disease. Nevertheless, malignant lymphoma occurred in an animal given only cell-free virus. Six of eight marmosets inoculated with the virus demonstrated antibodies to the virus. Four marmosets not exposed to the virus, including two that received immunosuppressive drugs, developed neither tumors nor antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. Virus antigen detectable by immunofluorescence was found in 5% of cells shed from one tumor maintained in organ culture. These results imply that Epstein-Barr virus is capable of inducing malignant lymphoma in at least one primate species. Additional evidence is required before its oncogenic capacity in this host can be accepted without reservation. Images PMID:4354852

  19. EVIDENCE OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Soorebettu R; Wilson, David F

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is ubiquitous: over 90% of the adult population is infected with this virus. EBV is capable of infecting both B lymphocytes and epithelial cells throughout the body including the head and neck region. Transmission occurs mainly by exchange of saliva. The infection is asymptomatic or mild in children but, in adolescents and young adults, it causes infectious mononucleosis, a self-limiting disease characterized by lethargy, sore throat, fever and lymphadenopathy. Once established, the virus often remains latent and people become lifelong carriers without experiencing disease. However, in some people, the latent virus is capable of causing malignant tumours, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and various B- and T-cell lymphomas, at sites including the head, neck and oropharyngeal region. As lymphoma is the second-most common malignant disease of the head, neck and oral region after squamous cell carcinoma, oral health care workers including dentists and specialists have a responsibility to carry out a thorough clinical examination of this anatomical region with a view to identifying and diagnosing lesions that may represent lymphomas. Early detection allows early treatment resulting in better prognosis. The focus of this review is on the morphology, transmission and carcinogenic properties of EBV and clinical and diagnostic aspects of a range of EBV-associated malignancies occurring in the head, neck and oral region. As carcinogenic agents, viruses contribute to a significant proportion of the global cancer burden: approximately 15% of all human cancers, worldwide, are attributable to viruses.1,2 Serologic and epidemiologic studies are providing mounting evidence of an etiologic association between viruses and head and neck malignancies.3 To update oral and maxillofacial surgeons and oral medicine specialists and raise awareness of this association, we recently reviewed the evidence of the etiologic role of human papillomavirus in oral disease.4

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus-Related Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Hematologic Emergency in the Critical Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Sadraei, Neda; Vejpongsa, Pimprapa; Baljevic, Muhamed; Chen, Lei; Idowu, Modupe

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare and potential life-threatening clinical syndrome that results from uncontrolled activation of the immune system. Secondary HLH, more commonly observed in adult patients, is seen in the context of underlying triggering conditions. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been recognized as the leading infectious cause and is associated with a poor outcome. As clinical and laboratory features of HLH could overlap with septic shock syndrome in most patients, the diagnosis of HLH, especially in adults, is the most challenging aspect of the disease that results in delayed recognition and treatment of rapidly progressive multiorgan system failure. We report a case of Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in a patient who presented with signs of septic shock syndrome and we review the literature on the topic. PMID:25755898

  1. Dynamic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression on the path to B-cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander M; Luftig, Micah A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae subfamily that contains a 170-180kb double-stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B-cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state, leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome and structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady-state viral gene expression within EBV-immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection, EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency-associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation and delayed responses in the known latency genes. This chapter summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, the inhibition of apoptosis, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24373315

  2. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  3. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  4. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-02-23

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  5. Epstein-Barr virus transformation induces B lymphocytes to produce human interleukin 10.

    PubMed

    Burdin, N; Péronne, C; Banchereau, J; Rousset, F

    1993-02-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic factor that enhances proliferation of activated human B lymphocytes and induces them to secrete high amounts of immunoglobulins. Here we show that several human B cell lines were able to constitutively secrete human (h)IL-10. Whereas none of the pre-B nor the plasmocytic cell lines tested produced hIL-10, 25 of the 36 tested mature B cell lines (lymphoblastoid and Burkitt lymphoma cell lines) secreted hIL-10. Moreover, 24 of these 25 hIL-10-producing B cell lines contained the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome, suggesting a relationship between hIL-10 production by human B cell lines and EBV expression. Accordingly, whereas polyclonal activation via triggering of surface immunoglobulins or CD40 antigen induced highly purified normal human B lymphocytes to produce only low (0.3-0.4 ng/ml) but significant amounts of hIL-10, EBV infection induced them to secrete high amounts of hIL-10 (4-9 ng/ml). Furthermore, addition of exogenous hIL-10, simultaneously to EBV infection, potentiated cell proliferation, whereas a blocking anti-IL-10 antiserum inhibited it. Thus, hIL-10 produced by infected human B lymphocytes appears to be involved in the mechanisms of EBV-induced B cell proliferation. PMID:8381152

  6. Epstein-Barr virus and HIV play no direct role in persistent generalized lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M J; Sculley, T B; Cooper, D A; Turner, J J; Penny, R; Sewell, W A

    1992-03-01

    Persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL) and polyclonal B cell activation are features of infection with HIV. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and HIV are known to activate B cells in vitro, but whether they are important B cell activators in patients infected with HIV is less clear. In this study, lymph node tissue was obtained from 10 patients with PGL and assessed for evidence of EBV and HIV gene sequences. DNA was extracted and specific viral gene sequences identified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). EBV sequences were difficult to detect in the PGL tissue, with a signal intensity similar to that of other benign and malignant lymphoid conditions not associated with EBV. HIV sequences were also rare in the PGL tissue, consistent with HIV infection of the small number of peripheral blood cells and nodal T cells likely to be present in such a sample. These findings suggest that the polyclonal B cell activation typical of HIV is not driven by direct EBV or HIV infection of B cells. PMID:1311993

  7. Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Dehghanian, Paria; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic proliferation of unknown etiology. It is characterized by granuloma-like proliferation of Langerhans-type dendritic cells and mainly affects young children. Although multiple investigators have suggested the possible role of viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the pathogenesis of LCH, it remains, however, debated. Objectives: The EBV infection is reported to be associated with LCH. Nevertheless, no report could be found about involved Iranian children in English medical literature. In this study, we investigated the presence of EBV in Iranian children with LCH. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, in which we investigated the prevalence of presence of EBV DNA in LCH, using paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 30 patients with LCH and 30 age and tissue-matched controls, who were operated for reasons other than infectious diseases (between the years 2002 and 2012), by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, in the department of pediatric pathology. No ethical issues arose in the study, because only the pathology reports were reviewed, retrospectively, and the patients were anonymous. Results: There was a significant difference in prevalence of EBV presence between patients and controls. The EBV was found by RT-PCR in 19 (63.33%) out of 30 patients and only in eight (26.7%) of 30 control samples. The P = 0.004, was calculated using chi-square test (OR: 4.75; 95% CI: 1.58 ‒ 14.25). Conclusions: Our study is the first investigation performed on patients with LCH and its possible association with EBV in Iran. Considering the P = 0.004, which is statistically significant, the findings do support the hypothesis of a possible role for EBV in the pathogenesis of LCH. These results are in accordance with several previous investigations, with positive findings. PMID:26870310

  8. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes in different cell types after microinjection of viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Graessmann, A; Wolf, H; Bornkamm, G W

    1980-01-01

    Gene expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was studied after microinjection of viral DNA into different types of cells. Raji TK- cells, known to express viral gene functions after superinfection with the EBV-P3HR-1 virus strain, were attached to plastic dishes by using anti-lymphocyte IgG, phytohemagglutinin, or concanavalin A as a ligand. It was difficult to inject DNA into the small and fragile Raji cells. After formation of polykaryons by cell fusion, microinjection became more efficient. At 24 hr after injection of P3HR-1 virus DNA, 90-100% of the injected cells expressed the early antigen complex as observed by immunofluorescence staining; 70-80% of the cells simultaneously incorported [3H]thymidine, indicating that thymidine kinase is expressed after injection of viral DNA. Additionally, synthesis of the virus capsid antigen was demonstrated in 20-30% of the recipient Raji cells. Human diploid fibroblasts, African green monkey kidney cells, and rat fibroblasts, which do not represent natural target cells for EBV, could also be induced to synthesis of early antigen complex by injection of P3HR-1 virus DNA. Images PMID:6244558

  9. Acute Retinal Necrosis Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus in a Patient Undergoing Immunosuppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Chiaki; Hiraoka, Miki; Tanaka, Sachie; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressive and severe retinitis resulting in a poor visual outcome. Infections caused by herpes viruses such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 or the varicella zoster virus (VZV) are known to be implicated in the development of ARN. In the present study, an 80-year-old female with ARN was examined. She had been affected with rheumatoid arthritis and had taken methotrexate for over 10 years. Her right eye showed clinical features of ARN, and her left eye showed mild retinitis. The genomic DNA in the aqueous humor and vitreous fluid from her right eye were analyzed by a comprehensive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen infectious pathogens including viruses. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected from both specimens, but neither HSV or VZV nor cytomegalovirus was detected. She underwent intraocular surgery following systemic corticosteroid and acyclovir applications. However, although the retinitis of her right eye was extinguished, the final visual outcome was blindness due to optic nerve atrophy. There are few reports indicating that EBV is associated with ARN development. The present findings suggest that EBV alone can be the causative agent of ARN. PMID:27194989

  10. Identification of cytotoxic T cell epitopes within Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1): evidence for HLA A2 supertype-restricted immune recognition of EBV-infected cells by LMP1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Khanna, R; Burrows, S R; Nicholls, J; Poulsen, L M

    1998-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and latent membrane proteins (LMP) are the only antigens consistently expressed in malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and Hodgkin's disease (HD). Since EBNA1 is not recognized by EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), there is increasing interest in the identification of the potential target epitopes within LMP1. Although LMP1-specific CTL have been isolated from seropositive individuals, earlier attempts to identify the peptide epitopes recognized by these T cells have been unsuccessful. In the present report we used a novel protocol to identify CTL epitopes within LMP1 which can be recognized by both polyclonal and clonal CTL. Firstly, a computer-based program was employed to identify the potential HLA-binding peptides within LMP1. Polyclonal CD8+ CTL were then isolated from seropositive donors that recognized the peptide epitopes YLLEMLWRL and YLQQNWWTL from LMP1 in association with HLA A2. Limiting dilution analysis of the memory CTL response revealed that the LMP1-specific CTL response constitutes a minor component of the CTL response in healthy virus carriers. Interestingly, analysis of YLLEMLWRL-specific CTL revealed that these CTL were able to lyse EBV-infected B cells expressing different HLA A2 supertype alleles including A*0201, A*0202, A*0203, A*0204, A*0206, A*6802 and A*6901. These data strongly support the notion that HLA class I supertype-restricted CTL may be of significant use in the development of peptide-based immunotherapeutics against EBV-associated malignancies in different ethnic populations. PMID:9521052

  11. Cell surface markers on epithelial-Burkitt hybrid cells superinfected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R; Lenoir, G; Ferrone, S; Pellegrino, M A; de-Thé, G

    1977-07-01

    Attempts were made to superinfect two epithelial-Burkitt hybrid cell lines, designated D98/HR-1 and D98/Raji, with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and to investigate the expression of some cell surfacr markers including histocompatibility antigens, and the presence of B-cell markers, such as receptors for the third complement component and for monkey red blood cells. Successful superinfection of D98/HR-1 cells with EBV was made evident by the expression of early antigen and, to a lesser extent, virus capsid antigen. Only a rare D98/Raji cell was found to be positive for early antigen. The histocompatibility antigens of the parental cell lines D98, HR-1, and Raji were expressed on the surfaces of the hybrid cells. Receptors for third complement components b and d were not detected on the hybrid cells or on the D98P OR HR-1 cell lines; they were found, however, on the Raji cells, indicating that EBV receptors and complement receptors can be separated. The significance of the infection of the hybrid cells with EBV and the expression of cell surface markers is described. PMID:193641

  12. Splenic infarction caused by a rare coinfection of Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Pattan, Vishwanath; Syed, Beena; Islam, Mohammed; Yousif, Abdalla

    2014-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are common pathogens of respiratory infection among children and young adults. Although single infection of 1 of these pathogens is common enough, their coinfection has been rarely reported. A 19-year-old woman presented with severe upper abdominal pain for 5 hours as well as flu-like symptoms and jaundice for 2 to 3 weeks. Initial tests found pancytopenia, abnormal liver functions, and presence of atypical lymphocytes in blood smear; the computed tomography of the abdomen revealed para-aortic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and a wedge-shaped focal hypodensity lesion at the periphery of the spleen that was later diagnosed as splenic infarction. Her presentation raised suspicion of infectious mononucleosis. Nevertheless, monospot test, human immunodeficiency virus screening, and hepatitis viral serology were all negative, except that her M pneumoniae immunoglobulin M was found positive. Azithromycin was promptly given, but her fever and abdominal pain persisted. A strong suspicion of mononucleosis led to serological tests for EBV and CMV, which confirmed coinfection of EBV and CMV. By hospital day 7, her fever and abdominal pain had subsided and her liver function became normal. This case exemplifies the challenges in the diagnosis of coinfection of multiple respiratory pathogens and its associated complications. Greater awareness among clinicians would ensure an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of coinfection of EBV/CMV with other respiratory pathogen(s). PMID:25186505

  13. The presence of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in male Chinese lichen sclerosus patients: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumeng; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in male lichen sclerosus patients. We extracted DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded foreskin tissue blocks of 47 male LS patients and 30 healthy men and performed real-time PCR test to detect HPV and EBV. None of the 47 LS patients and 30 healthy men had detectable HPV infection. EBV was detected in 18 LS patients (38.3%) and four healthy men (13.3%), the difference is significant (P < 0.05). Tissue blocks with significant inflammatory reaction tend to have higher EBV load. HPV has no significant relationship with LS. Male LS patients have higher EBV infection rate, but the role of EBV in the pathogenesis of LS needs further investigate. PMID:26289401

  14. Indole-3-carbinol induces cMYC and IAP-family downmodulation and promotes apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive but not of EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chacon, Gema; de Los Rios, Cristobal; Zapata, Juan M

    2014-11-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a natural product found in broadly consumed plants of the Brassica genus, such as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower, which exhibits anti-tumor effects through poorly defined mechanisms. I3C can be orally administered and clinical trials have demonstrated that I3C and derivatives are safe in humans. In this study we show that I3C efficiently induces apoptosis in cell lines derived from EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphomas (virus latency I/II), while it does not have any cytotoxic activity against EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphomas and immortalized EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (virus latency III). The effect of I3C in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma is very specific, since only I3C and its C6-methylated derivative, but not other 3-substituted indoles, have an effect on cell viability. I3C treatment caused apoptosis characterized by loss of mitochondria membrane potential and caspase activation. I3C alters the expression of proteins involved in the control of apoptosis and transcription regulation in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Among those, cMYC, cIAP1/2 and XIAP downmodulation at mRNA and protein level precede apoptosis induction, thus suggesting a role in I3C cytotoxicity. We also showed that I3C and, more particularly, its condensation dimer 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) prolonged survival and reduced tumor burden of mice xenotransplanted with EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells. In summary these results, together with previous reports from clinical trials indicating the lack of toxicity in humans of I3C and derivatives, support the use of these compounds as a new therapeutic approach for treating patients with endemic (EBV-positive) Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:25180456

  15. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into the Tropism of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Möhl, Britta S.; Chen, Jia; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the prototypical γ-herpesvirus and an obligate human pathogen that infects mainly epithelial cells and B cells, which can result in malignancies. EBV infects these target cells by fusing with the viral and cellular lipid bilayer membranes using multiple viral factors and host receptor(s) thus exhibiting a unique complexity in its entry machinery. To enter epithelial cells, EBV requires minimally the conserved core fusion machinery comprised of the glycoproteins gH/gL acting as the receptor-binding complex and gB as the fusogen. EBV can enter B cells using gp42, which binds tightly to gH/gL and interacts with host HLA class II, activating fusion. Previously, we published the individual crystal structures of EBV entry factors, such as gH/gL and gp42, the EBV/host receptor complex, gp42/HLA-DR1, and the fusion protein EBV gB in a postfusion conformation, which allowed us to identify structural determinants and regions critical for receptor-binding and membrane fusion. Recently, we reported different low resolution models of the EBV B cell entry triggering complex (gHgL/gp42/HLA class II) in “open” and “closed” states based on negative-stain single particle electron microscopy, which provide further mechanistic insights. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these key players in EBV entry and how their structures impact receptor-binding and the triggering of gB-mediated fusion. PMID:27094060

  16. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  17. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  18. Dynamic Epstein-Barr Virus Gene Expression on the Path to B-Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alexander M.; Luftig, Micah A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae sub-family that contains a 170–180 kb double stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome as well as structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady state viral gene expression within EBV immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation as well as delayed responses in the known latency genes. This review summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, inhibition of apoptosis, and control of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24373315

  19. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Co-prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus and high-risk human papillomaviruses in Syrian women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Antary, Noor; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Akil, Nizar; Batist, Gerald; Yasmeen, Amber

    2016-07-01

    ABSTRAT We recently performed 2 studies viewing the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) types 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in human breast cancer in the Syrian population. Herein, we report that EBV and high-risk HPVs are co-present in breast cancer in Syrian women. Therefore, and based on our previous studies and present data, we reveal that 35 (32%) of 108 cancer samples are positive for both EBV and high-risk HPVs and their co-presence is associated with high grade invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) with at least one positive lymph nodes, in comparison with EBV and high-risk HPVs-positive samples, which are low to intermediate grade IDCs, respectively. Future studies are needed to confirm the co-presence and the cooperation effect of these onco-viruses in human breast carcinogenesis and metastasis. PMID:27082145

  1. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  2. A new Epstein-Barr virus transactivator, R, induces expression of a cytoplasmic early antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J M; Lieberman, P M; Hayward, S D

    1988-01-01

    Several Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early promoters respond to a new EBV transactivator encoded by BRLF1, designated R. Transactivation was measured in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays on Raji, BHK, and Vero cells that were cotransfected with the transactivator and target promoters linked to the cat gene. The divergent promoter of BamHI-H was particularly responsive to R transactivation. This large promoter region consists of a leftward TATA box for the NotI repeat gene (BHLF1) and a probable rightward TATA box for the EA-R gene (BHRF1) separated by 940 base pairs of unusual sequence complexity. Sequences within this divergent promoter region appear to confer inducibility by EBV transactivators R and Z (BZLF1). The Z transactivator stimulated expression in both the leftward and rightward directions, and R stimulated expression primarily in the rightward direction, but the MS transactivator (BMLF1) had no activity in either direction. The adenovirus E3 promoter also responded to the R transactivator, but several other herpesvirus and human promoters were nonresponsive. When the divergent promoter was linked to the EA-R gene as it is in the EBV genome, the R and Z transactivators also induced the expression of EA-R in cotransfected cells. This cytoplasmic early antigen is encoded by BHRF1 and may be anchored in intracellular membranes by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane region. Images PMID:2836611

  3. Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with old organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Ohta, Masaru; Ohshima, Koichi; Niino, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Okada, Yosuke; Nakashima, Shinji

    2012-06-01

    This report describes a case of an immunocompetent 77-year-old male with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with calcified chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). On the day prior to consultation in our outpatient clinic, the patient fell from his bed, striking his frontal head on the floor. Magnetic resonance imaging showed ill-defined lesions in the right frontal-temporal subdural regions. At surgery, a hard and thickened outer membrane of a CSH and muddy organized subdural hematoma were observed. However, macroscopic neoplastic lesions were not apparent. Histologically, there were atypical lymphoid cells scattered or conglomerated in some areas of the thick outer membrane of the CSH. They were composed of occasional large atypical lymphoid cells. The lesions were accompanied by necrosis. Atypical lymphoid cells were immunopositive for B-cell markers but not for T-cell markers. EBNA2 was seen in the nuclei of tumor cells. Atypical lymphoid cells showed positive signals for EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) on in situ hybridization. These findings were consistent with EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with CSH. These results also suggested that EBV and the inflammatory reaction found in the CSH could be the etiological factors in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:22612510

  4. Latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus coordinately regulates proliferation with control of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Kilger, Ellen; Schultheiss, Ute; Briseño, Cinthia; Gires, Olivier; Kieser, Arnd; Eick, Dirk; Sugden, Bill; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), an oncoprotein encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), is an integral membrane protein, which acts like a constitutively active receptor. LMP1 is critical for some facet of EBV's induction and maintenance of proliferation of infected B cells. It, in part, mimics signaling by the CD40 receptor and has been implicated in regulating proliferation, survival, or both properties of EBV-infected cells. We established a conditional LMP1 allele in the context of the intact EBV genome to define the immediate-early cellular target genes regulated by LMP1 in order to assess its contributions to infected human B cells. The functional analysis of this conditional system indicated that LMP1 specifically induces mitogenic B-cell activation through c-myc and Jun/AP1 family members and confirms its direct role in upregulating expression of multiple genes with opposing activities involved in cell survival. LMP1's signals were found to be essential for the G1/S transition in human B cells; cells lacking LMP1's signals are cell cycle arrested and survive quiescently. LMP1's activities are therefore not required to maintain survival in nonproliferating cells. LMP1 does induce both pro- and antiapoptotic genes whose balance seems to permit survival during LMP1's induction and maintenance of proliferation. PMID:15674340

  5. Role of RNF4 in the ubiquitination of Rta of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Yoshikai, Yushi; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Saitoh, Hisato; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2013-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes a transcription factor, Rta, which is required to activate the transcription of EBV lytic genes. This study demonstrates that treating P3HR1 cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, causes the accumulation of SUMO-Rta and promotes the expression of EA-D. GST pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation studies reveal that RNF4, a RING-domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, interacts with Rta. RNF4 also targets SUMO-2-conjugated Rta and promotes its ubiquitination in vitro. Additionally, SUMO interaction motifs in RNF4 are important to the ubiquitination of Rta because the RNF4 mutant with a mutation at the motifs eliminates ubiquitination. The mutation of four lysine residues on Rta that abrogated SUMO-3 conjugation to Rta also decreases the enhancement of the ubiquitination of Rta by RNF4. This finding demonstrates that RNF4 is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase of Rta. Finally, knockdown of RNF4 enhances the expression of Rta and EA-D, subsequently promoting EBV lytic replication and virions production. Results of this study significantly contribute to efforts to elucidate a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates Rta ubiquitination to influence the lytic development of EBV. PMID:23504328

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Provides a New Paradigm: A Requirement for the Immediate Inhibition of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    DNA viruses such as herpesviruses are known to encode homologs of cellular antiapoptotic viral Bcl-2 proteins (vBcl-2s), which protect the virus from apoptosis in its host cell during virus synthesis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human tumor virus and a prominent member of γ-herpesviruses, infects primary resting B lymphocytes to establish a latent infection and yield proliferating, growth-transformed B cells in vitro. In these cells, 11 viral genes that contribute to cellular transformation are consistently expressed. EBV also encodes two vBcl-2 genes whose roles are unclear. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of both vBcl-2 genes disabled EBV's ability to transform primary resting B lymphocytes. Primary B cells infected with a vBcl-2-negative virus did not enter the cell cycle and died of immediate apoptosis. Apoptosis was abrogated in infected cells in which vBcl-2 genes were maximally expressed within the first 24 h postinfection. During latent infection, however, the expression of vBcl-2 genes became undetectable. Thus, both vBcl-2 homologs are essential for initial cellular transformation but become dispensable once a latent infection is established. Because long-lived, latently infected memory B cells and EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas are derived from EBV-infected proapoptotic germinal center B cells, we conclude that vBcl-2 genes are essential for the initial evasion of apoptosis in cells in vivo in which the virus establishes a latent infection or causes cellular transformation or both. PMID:16277553

  7. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded proteins in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fåhraeus, R; Fu, H L; Ernberg, I; Finke, J; Rowe, M; Klein, G; Falk, K; Nilsson, E; Yadav, M; Busson, P

    1988-09-15

    Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded nuclear antigens (EBNA 1 to 6) and membrane-associated protein (LMP) was investigated by immunoblotting in 83 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and 25 other tumor and normal tissue specimens from the head and neck region. Fifty-eight of the 83 NPC biopsies were large enough to yield parallel data on virus DNA and viral expression. All 16 cases of clinically diagnosed and histologically confirmed NPCs from North Africa contained EBV DNA and expressed EBNA-1. Of 31 clinically diagnosed NPCs from China, 29 contained EBV DNA and 25 of these expressed EBNA-1. One control tissue biopsy from the oropharynx of NPC patients contained EBV DNA, but none expressed EBNA-1. The latent membrane protein (LMP) was detected in 22/31 of the Chinese and in 10/16 of the North African NPC biopsies. None of the NPC biopsies or control tissues expressed detectable amounts of EBNA 2 or any of the other 4 nuclear antigens which are invariably expressed in EBV-transformed B cells. A smaller number of tumors from Malaysia and East Africa exhibited a similar pattern of expression. EBV was rescued from a nude-mouse-passaged North African NPC tumor by co-cultivation of the tumor cells with umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The tumor expressed EBNA 1 and LMP, but not EBNA 2 or the other 4 EBNAs. The resulting LCLs expressed all 6 nuclear antigens, EBNA 1 to 6 and LMP. Our data suggest that expression of the EBV genome is regulated in a tissue-specific fashion. PMID:2843473

  8. Natural History of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Children of Mothers Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jenson, Hal; McIntosh, Kenneth; Pitt, Jane; Husak, Scott; Tan, Ming; Bryson, Yvonne; Easley, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in 556 infants born to 517 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1–infected mothers was studied in a prospective, multicenter, cohort study. HIV-1–infected children had a cumulative EBV infection rate similar to HIV-1–uninfected children at age 3 years (77.8% vs. 84.9%) but had more frequent oropharyngeal EBV shedding (50.4% vs. 28.2%; P < .001). The probability of shedding decreased with longer time from EBV seroconversion and was similar to that of HIV-1–uninfected children 3 years after seroconversion. HIV-1–infected children identified as rapid progressors shed EBV more frequently than nonrapid progressors (69.4% vs.41.0%; P = .01). HIV-1–infected children with EBV infection had higher mean CD8 cell counts. EBV infection did not have an independent effect on mean CD4 cell counts, percent CD4, IgG levels, HIV-1 RNA levels, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, or splenomegaly. Early EBV infection is common in children born to HIV-1–infected mothers. Children with rapidly progressive HIV-1 disease have more frequent EBV shedding. PMID:10228060

  9. Comparison of Epstein-Barr virus strains of different origin by analysis of the viral DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Bornkamm, G W; Delius, H; Zimber, U; Hudewentz, J; Epstein, M A

    1980-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) originating from Burkitt's lymphoma (P3HR-1 and CC34-5), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (M-ABA), transfusion mononucleosis (B95-8), and a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia (QIMR-WIL) was isolated from virus-carrying lymphoid cell lines after induction with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Viral DNA was analyzed by partial denaturation mapping and by use of the restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HindIII, and SalI and separation of fragments in 0.4% agarose. By using the restriction enzyme data of B95-8 (EBV) and W91 (EBV) obtained by Given and Kieff (D. Given and E. Kieff, J. Virol. 28:524-542, 1978), maps were established for the other virus strains. Comigrating fragments were assumed to be identical or closely related among the different strains. Fragments of different strains migrating differently were isolated, purified, radioactively labeled, and mapped by hybridization against blots of separated viral fragments. The results were as follows. (i) All strains studied were closely related. (ii) The number of internal repeats was variable among and within viral strains. (iii) B95-8 (EBV) was the only strain with a large deletion of about 12,000 base pairs at the right-hand side of the molecule. At the same site, small deletions of about 400 to 500 base pairs were observed in P3HR-1 (EBV) and M-ABA (EBV) DNA. (iv) P3HR-1 (EBV), the only nontransforming EBV strain, had a deletion of about 3,000 to 4,000 base pairs in the long unique region adjacent to the internal repeats carrying a HindIII site. (v) Small inserted sequences of 150 to 400 base pairs were observed in M-ABA (EBV) and B95-8 (EBV) at identical sites in the middle of the long unique region. (vi) Near this site, an insertion of about 1,000 base pairs was found in P3HR-1 (EBV) DNA. (vii) The cleavage patterns of P3HR-1 virus DNA and the results of blot hybridizations with P3HR-1 virus fragments are not conclusive and point to the possibility that in addition

  10. Epstein-Barr virus and its role in the pathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma: an unresolved issue.

    PubMed

    Bornkamm, Georg W

    2009-12-01

    For several reasons Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) has become a paradigm in cancer research: for its particular geographical distribution, the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the cases in high incidence areas, and for the activation of the proto-oncogene c-myc by chromosomal translocation in one of the immunoglobulin gene loci. As c-MYC activates both, proliferation and apoptosis, at least two events have to cooperate in lymphomagenesis: activation of c-MYC and a shift in the balance from apoptosis towards survival. Antigenic and/or polyclonal stimulation of the B cell receptor, genetic instability imposed by activation induced deaminase (AID), as well as the viral gene products EBNA1 and several small non-coding non-polyadenylated RNAs are the main factors suspected to play an important role in the pathogenesis of BL. Despite intensive research, the role of the virus has remained largely elusive in the past decades, but the discovery of two viral microRNA clusters that are expressed in EBV associated tumors including BL has raised new hopes and expectations that EBV is going to reveal its mystery. This review focuses on the interplay between cellular and viral factors and puts special emphasis on mouse models and experimental cell culture systems that address these points. PMID:19619654

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on 18F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up 18F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  12. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on (18)F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  13. BZLF1 governs CpG-methylated chromatin of Epstein-Barr Virus reversing epigenetic repression.

    PubMed

    Woellmer, Anne; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for the regulation of all genes in mammalian cells but transcriptional repression including DNA methylation are also major epigenetic mechanisms of defense inactivating potentially harmful pathogens. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), however, has evolved to take advantage of CpG methylated DNA to regulate its own biphasic life cycle. We show here that latent EBV DNA has an extreme composition of methylated CpG dinucleotides with a bimodal distribution of unmethylated or fully methylated DNA at active latent genes or completely repressed lytic promoters, respectively. We find this scenario confirmed in primary EBV-infected memory B cells in vivo. Extensive CpG methylation of EBV's DNA argues for a very restricted gene expression during latency. Above-average nucleosomal occupancy, repressive histone marks, and Polycomb-mediated epigenetic silencing further shield early lytic promoters from activation during latency. The very tight repression of viral lytic genes must be overcome when latent EBV enters its lytic phase and supports de novo virus synthesis in infected cells. The EBV-encoded and AP-1 related transcription factor BZLF1 overturns latency and initiates virus synthesis in latently infected cells. Paradoxically, BZLF1 preferentially binds to CpG-methylated motifs in key viral promoters for their activation. Upon BZLF1 binding, we find nucleosomes removed, Polycomb repression lost, and RNA polymerase II recruited to the activated early promoters promoting efficient lytic viral gene expression. Surprisingly, DNA methylation is maintained throughout this phase of viral reactivation and is no hindrance to active transcription of extensively CpG methylated viral genes as thought previously. Thus, we identify BZLF1 as a pioneer factor that reverses epigenetic silencing of viral DNA to allow escape from latency and report on a new paradigm of gene regulation. PMID:22969425

  14. EBNA-2 transactivates a lymphoid-specific enhancer in the BamHI C promoter of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, N S; Kenney, S; Gutsch, D; Pagano, J S

    1991-01-01

    Among the few Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genes expressed during latency are the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigens (EBNAs), at least one of which contributes to the ability of the virus to transform B lymphocytes. We have analyzed a promoter located in the BamHI-C fragment of EBV which is responsible for the expression of EBNA-1 in some cell lines. Deletion analysis of a 1.4-kb region 5' of the RNA start site has identified a 700-bp fragment that is required for optimal promoter activity in latently infected B lymphocytes, as shown by promoter constructs linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. This fragment is also able to enhance activity, in an orientation-independent manner, of the simian virus 40 early promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. The enhancer element has some constitutive activity in EBV-negative lymphoid cells, which is increased in the presence of the EBNA-2 gene product. Further deletions have shown that the EBNA-2-responsive region requires a 98-bp region that contains a degenerate octamer-binding motif. In epithelial cells there was no enhancer activity regardless of the presence of EBNA-2. These results demonstrate that BamHI-C promoter activity may be dependent not on an enhancer contained in the ori-P, as was previously assumed, but rather on EBNA-2 transactivation of this more proximal enhancer located in the upstream region of the BamHI C promoter itself. Images PMID:1850003

  15. Increased presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in ocular fluid samples from HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Ongkosuwito, J.; Van der Lelij, A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Doorn, M. W.; Feron, E.; Hoyng, C.; de Keizer, R. J W; Klok, A.; Kijlstra, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate whether routine testing for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is necessary in the examination of a patient with uveitis.
METHODS—Intraocular EBV DNA was determined in 183 ocular fluid samples taken from patients with AIDS and uveitis, HIV negative immunocompromised uveitis, acute retinal necrosis, toxoplasma chorioretinitis, intraocular lymphoma, anterior uveitis, and miscellaneous uveitis of unknown cause. In 82 samples from this group of patients paired serum/ocular fluid analysis was performed to detect local antibody production against EBV. Controls (n=46) included ocular fluid samples taken during surgery for diabetic retinopathy, macular pucker, or cataract.
RESULTS—Serum antibody titres to EBV capsid antigen proved to be significantly increased in HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis (p<0.01) compared with controls. Local antibody production revealed only three positive cases out of 82 patients tested, two results were borderline positive and one patient had uveitis caused by VZV. EBV DNA was detected in three out of 46 control ocular fluid samples. In the different uveitis groups EBV DNA was noted, but was not significantly higher than in the controls, except in six out of 11 HIV negative immunocompromised patients (p=0.0008). In four out of these six cases another infectious agent (VZV, HSV, CMV, or Toxoplasma gondii) had previously been identified as the cause of the uveitis.
CONCLUSIONS—When comparing various groups of uveitis patients, EBV DNA was found more often in HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis. Testing for EBV does not have to be included in the routine management of patients with uveitis, since indications for an important role of this virus were not found in the pathogenesis of intraocular inflammation.

 Keywords: Epstein-Barr virus; intraocular fluid; polymerase chain reaction; uveitis PMID:9602620

  16. Comparison of Three Automated Immunoassay Methods for the Determination of Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific Immunoglobulin M ▿

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Mario; Bosmans, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    In this study we compared the performances of three commercially available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immunoglobulin M (IgM) assays on highly automated immunoassay platforms: BioPlex 2200 (Bio-Rad Laboratories), Immulite 2000 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics), and Liaison (DiaSorin). As a confirmatory method, immunoblotting was performed. The specificity of the three EBV IgM assays was evaluated by testing 293 selected sera from patients with various infectious and noninfectious diseases. After the exclusion of 30 samples, the specificities were 96.2% for Liaison, 98.1% for Immulite, and 97.0% for BioPlex. For evaluation of the sensitivity, samples from 70 consecutive patients with a positive heterophile antibody test were examined, irrespective of clinical or biological findings. After the exclusion of six samples, the sensitivities were 89.1% for Liaison, 84.4% for Immulite, and 89.1% for BioPlex. Finally, in a prospective study performed with 500 samples obtained from consecutive patients and sent in by general practitioners, we also determined Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen IgG and viral capsid antigen IgG in a two-phase approach. Concordance of the EBV serologic status was 96.2% between Liaison and Immulite, 96.4% between Immulite and BioPlex, and 97.8% between BioPlex and Liaison. The three EBV IgM immunoassays that we evaluated have acceptable and comparable performances. PMID:20147496

  17. IRF-7, a new interferon regulatory factor associated with Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Pagano, J S

    1997-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI Q promoter (Qp) is the only promoter used for the transcription of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) mRNA in cells in the most restricted (type I) latent infection state. However, Qp is inactive in type III latency. With the use of the yeast one-hybrid system, a new cellular gene has been identified that encodes proteins which bind to sequence in Qp. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene has significant homology to the interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). This new gene and products including two splicing variants are designated IRF-7A, IRF-7B, and IRF-7C. The expression of IRF-7 is predominantly in spleen, thymus, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). IRF-7 proteins were identified in primary PBL with specific antiserum against IRF-7B protein. IRF-7s can bind to interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) sequence and repress transcriptional activation by both interferon and IRF-1. Additionally, a functional viral ISRE sequence, 5'-GCGAAAACGAAAGT-3', has been identified in Qp. Finally, the expression of IRF-7 is consistently high in type III latency cells and almost undetectable in type I latency, corresponding to the activity of endogenous Qp in these latency states and the ability of the IRF-7 proteins to repress Qp-reporter constructs. The identification of a functional viral ISRE and association of IRF-7 with type III latency may be relevant to the mechanism of regulation of Qp. PMID:9315633

  18. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  19. T Cell Epitope Clustering in the Highly Immunogenic BZLF1 Antigen of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Melissa J.; Neller, Michelle A.; Burrows, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polymorphism in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci ensures that the CD8+ T cell response to viruses is directed against a diverse range of antigenic epitopes, thereby minimizing the impact of virus escape mutation across the population. The BZLF1 antigen of Epstein-Barr virus is an immunodominant target for CD8+ T cells, but the response has been characterized only in the context of a limited number of HLA molecules due to incomplete epitope mapping. We have now greatly expanded the number of defined CD8+ T cell epitopes from BZLF1, allowing the response to be evaluated in a much larger proportion of the population. Some regions of the antigen fail to be recognized by CD8+ T cells, while others include clusters of overlapping epitopes presented by different HLA molecules. These highly immunogenic regions of BZLF1 include polymorphic sequences, such that up to four overlapping epitopes are impacted by a single amino acid variation common in different regions of the world. This focusing of the immune response to limited regions of the viral protein could be due to sequence similarity to human proteins creating “immune blind spots” through self-tolerance. This study significantly enhances the understanding of the immune response to BZLF1, and the precisely mapped T cell epitopes may be directly exploited in vaccine development and adoptive immunotherapy. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen, associated with several malignancies, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. T lymphocytes are critical for virus control, and clinical trials aimed at manipulating this arm of the immune system have demonstrated efficacy in treating these EBV-associated diseases. These trials have utilized information on the precise location of viral epitopes for T cell recognition, for either measuring or enhancing responses. In this study, we have characterized the T cell response to the highly immunogenic BZLF1 antigen of EBV by

  20. Comparison of Commercial Real-Time PCR Assays for Quantification of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Guillermo; Peña, Pilar; de Ory, Fernando; Echevarría, Juan Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research suggests a role for viral load measurement in predicting and monitoring Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the recently commercially available quantitative assays for EBV based on real-time PCR: the RealArt EBV LC PCR kit and the LightCycler EBV quantification kit. A total of 87 samples were analyzed: 67 samples were obtained from transplant recipients and patients with EBV-associated diseases, 8 samples were obtained from the Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics 2002 EBV Proficiency Program, and 12 negative qualitative nested PCR samples were used as negative controls. Inter- and intra-assay variabilities were determined by running replicates of two samples. All samples were run in a LightCycler instrument. The differences between positive and negative results were not considered statistically significant (P = 0.5355). There were no false-positive results using either method for nested PCR negative-control samples. The difference in viral load values using the two different methods was considered statistically significant (P < 0.01). The logarithmic linear correlation for both assays was low (r = 0.449) but significant (P < 0.01). The LightCycler EBV quantification kit showed a wider dispersal in results but produced substantially more-accurate melting temperature profile curves. The bias towards lower measurements was considerable in comparison with higher viral load. The differences in PCR efficiency and the presence of mutations could explain the disparity between the two methods. It was concluded that confidence intervals would be required to report the results rather than plain absolute values of viral load for patient monitoring. PMID:15872221

  1. Close relationship between immunoglobulin secreting-cells and Epstein-Barr virus reservoir in patients infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Tuaillon, Edouard; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Bollore, Karine; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV have higher circulating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load compared to healthy carriers. This study investigated whether level of spontaneous immunoglobulin secreting cells, one of the major hallmarks of HIV infection, is associated with an increase of EBV DNA load in PBMCs and the spontaneous EBV lytic cycle ex vivo in patients infected with HIV. Spontaneous virus production by cells infected with EBV and EBV DNA loads in PBMCs from which CD8(+) T-cells were removed were measured in 20 HIV-aviremic and 14 HIV-viremic patients. The number of circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells (Ig-SCs) and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte activation were also investigated. Patients with detectable HIV RNA in plasma exhibited higher spontaneous ex vivo EBV secretion and higher levels of EBV DNA in PBMCs than their aviremic counterparts. In the two groups observed, a positive correlation was found between PBMCs EBV DNA viral load and Ig-SCs, CD38(bright) expression on CD8(+) T-cells and EBV DNA load in cell culture supernatants. These findings suggest that B-cell polyclonal activation and B-cell terminal differentiation into Ig-SCs may fuel EBV DNA reservoir and promote EBV production ex vivo in patients infected with HIV. PMID:24114930

  2. Global Bidirectional Transcription of the Epstein-Barr Virus Genome during Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Tina; Cao, Subing; Strong, Michael J.; Concha, Monica; Wang, Xia; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Adams, Marie; Baddoo, Melody; Srivastav, Sudesh K.; Lin, Zhen; Fewell, Claire; Yin, Qinyan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation involves the ordered induction of approximately 90 viral genes that participate in the generation of infectious virions. Using strand-specific RNA-seq to assess the EBV transcriptome during reactivation, we found extensive bidirectional transcription extending across nearly the entire genome. In contrast, only 4% of the EBV genome is currently bidirectionally annotated. Most of the newly identified transcribed regions show little evidence of coding potential, supporting noncoding roles for most of these RNAs. Based on previous cellular long noncoding RNA size calculations, we estimate that there are likely hundreds more EBV genes expressed during reactivation than was previously known. Limited 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) experiments and findings of novel splicing events by RNA-seq suggest that the complexity of the viral genome during reactivation may be even greater. Further analysis of antisense transcripts at some of the EBV latency gene loci showed that they are “late” genes, they are nuclear, and they tend to localize in areas of the nucleus where others find newly synthesized viral genomes. This raises the possibility that these transcripts perform functions such as new genome processing, stabilization, organization, etc. The finding of a significantly more complex EBV transcriptome during reactivation changes our view of the viral production process from one that is facilitated and regulated almost entirely by previously identified viral proteins to a process that also involves the contribution of a wide array of virus encoded noncoding RNAs. IMPORTANCE PMID:24257595

  3. microRNA profiling in Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Imig, Jochen; Motsch, Natalie; Zhu, Jia Yun; Barth, Stephanie; Okoniewski, Michal; Reineke, Tanja; Tinguely, Marianne; Faggioni, Alberto; Trivedi, Pankaj; Meister, Gunter; Renner, Christoph; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2011-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human Herpes virus found in ∼15% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). EBV encodes miRNAs and induces changes in the cellular miRNA profile of infected cells. MiRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs of ∼19-26 nt which suppress protein synthesis by inducing translational arrest or mRNA degradation. Here, we report a comprehensive miRNA-profiling study and show that hsa-miR-424, -223, -199a-3p, -199a-5p, -27b, -378, -26b, -23a, -23b were upregulated and hsa-miR-155, -20b, -221, -151-3p, -222, -29b/c, -106a were downregulated more than 2-fold due to EBV-infection of DLBCL. All known EBV miRNAs with the exception of the BHRF1 cluster as well as EBV-miR-BART15 and -20 were present. A computational analysis indicated potential targets such as c-MYB, LATS2, c-SKI and SIAH1. We show that c-MYB is targeted by miR-155 and miR-424, that the tumor suppressor SIAH1 is targeted by miR-424, and that c-SKI is potentially regulated by miR-155. Downregulation of SIAH1 protein in DLBCL was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The inhibition of SIAH1 is in line with the notion that EBV impedes various pro-apoptotic pathways during tumorigenesis. The down-modulation of the oncogenic c-MYB protein, although counter-intuitive, might be explained by its tight regulation in developmental processes. PMID:21062812

  4. Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Therapy for Epstein-Barr Virus+ Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bollard, Catherine M.; Aguilar, Laura; Straathof, Karin C.; Gahn, Benedikt; Huls, M. Helen; Rousseau, Alexandra; Sixbey, John; Gresik, M. Victoria; Carrum, George; Hudson, Melissa; Dilloo, Dagmar; Gee, Adrian; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2004-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)+ Hodgkin's disease (HD) expresses clearly identified tumor antigens derived from the virus and could, in principle, be a target for adoptive immunotherapy with viral antigen–specific T cells. However, like most tumor-associated antigens in immunocompetent hosts, these potential targets are only weakly immunogenic, consisting primarily of the latent membrane protein (LMP)1 and LMP2 antigens. Moreover, Hodgkin tumors possess a range of tumor evasion strategies. Therefore, the likely value of immunotherapy with EBV-specific cytotoxic effector cells has been questioned. We have now used a combination of gene marking, tetramer, and functional analyses to track the fate and assess the activity of EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines administered to 14 patients treated for relapsed EBV+ HD. Gene marking studies showed that infused effector cells could further expand by several logs in vivo, contribute to the memory pool (persisting up to 12 mo), and traffic to tumor sites. Tetramer and functional analyses showed that T cells reactive with the tumor-associated antigen LMP2 were present in the infused lines, expanded in peripheral blood after infusion, and also entered tumor. Viral load decreased, demonstrating the biologic activity of the infused CTLs. Clinically, EBV CTLs were well tolerated, could control type B symptoms (fever, night sweats, and weight loss), and had antitumor activity. After CTL infusion, five patients were in complete remission at up to 40 mo, two of whom had clearly measurable tumor at the time of treatment. One additional patient had a partial response, and five had stable disease. The performance and fate of these human tumor antigen–specific T cells in vivo suggests that they might be of value for the treatment of EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15611290

  5. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  6. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF-4) Targets IRF-5 to Regulate Epstein-Barr Virus Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongsheng; Meyer, Florencia; Ehlers, Erica; Blasnitz, Laura; Zhang, Luwen

    2011-01-01

    The cellular interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF-4), which is a member of IRF family, is involved in the development of multiple myeloma and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-mediated transformation of B lymphocytes. However, the molecular mechanism of IRF-4 in cellular transformation is unknown. We have found that knockdown of IRF-4 leads to high expression of IRF-5, a pro-apoptotic member in the IRF family. Overexpression of IRF-4 represses IRF-5 expression. Reduction of IRF-4 leads to growth inhibition, and the restoration of IRF-4 by exogenous plasmids correlates with the growth recovery and reduces IRF-5 expression. In addition, IRF-4 negatively regulates IRF-5 promoter reporter activities and binds to IRF-5 promoters in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of IRF-5 rescues IRF-4 knockdown-mediated growth inhibition, and IRF-5 overexpression alone is sufficient to induce cellular growth inhibition of EBV-transformed cells. Therefore, IRF-5 is one of the targets of IRF-4, and IRF-4 regulates the growth of EBV-transformed cells partially through IRF-5. This work provides insight on how IRFs interact with one another to participate in viral pathogenesis and transformation. PMID:21454650

  7. Fatal cytotoxic T-cell proliferation in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection in childhood.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Atsuko; Ito, Masafumi; Saga, Shinsuke

    2002-02-01

    Histopathologic features of 5 cases (4 boys and 1 girl; 4-9 years old) with severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are discussed. All patients died within 3 years after disease onset without developing hematolymphoid malignant neoplasms. The pathology specimens (autopsy, 2 cases; multiple organs and tissues obtained by surgery or biopsy, 3 cases) showed polymorphic lymphocytic proliferation in the lymph nodes (4/5) and spleen (3/3), and systemic lymphocytic infiltration of the liver (4/4), lung (2/2), bone marrow (3/4), and kidney (2/2). Skin lesions were noted clinically in 3 of 5 cases. Two cases had coronary artery aneurysm due to lymphocytic vasculitis. The lymphocytes had a characteristic phenotype of cytotoxic T cells expressing CD3, CD8, and cytotoxic molecules, and were negative for CD4. EBV-encoded small nonpolyadenylated RNAs were detected in the nuclei of the lymphocytes, but latent membrane protein 1 and EBNA2 were not seen. In 4 of 4 cases, an oligoclonal growth pattern of EBV was determined after detecting terminal repetitive sequences by Southern blot. In 3 of 3 cases, the lymphocytes did not have T-cell receptor beta or J(H) gene rearrangement. PMID:11863225

  8. Latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in the peripheral blood of astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Raymond P; Kozlova, Elena V; Sams, Clarence F; Pierson, Duane L; Walling, Dennis M

    2011-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent and replicative gene transcription was analyzed in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes from astronauts who flew on short-duration (∼11 days) Shuttle missions and long-duration (∼180 days) International Space Station (ISS) missions. Latent, immediate-early, and early gene replicative viral transcripts were detected in samples from six astronauts who flew on short-duration Shuttle missions, whereas viral gene transcription was mostly absent in samples from 24 healthy donors. Samples from six astronauts who flew on long-duration ISS missions were characterized by expanded expression of latent, immediate-early, and early gene transcripts and new onset expression of late replicative transcription upon return to Earth. These data indicate that EBV-infected cells are no longer expressing the restricted set of viral genes that characterize latency but are expressing latent and lytic gene transcripts. These data also suggest the possibility of EBV-related complications in future long-duration missions, in particular interplanetary travel. PMID:21503923

  9. Enhancement of transactivation activity of Rta of Epstein-Barr virus by RanBPM.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2008-05-30

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses the immediate-early protein Rta to activate the transcription of EBV lytic genes and the lytic cycle. We show that RanBPM acts as a binding partner of Rta in yeast two-hybrid analysis. The binding was confirmed by glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment and confocal microscopy revealed that RanBPM and Rta interact in vivo and colocalize in the nucleus. The interaction appears to involve the SPRY domain in RanBPM and the region between amino acid residues 416 to 476 in Rta. The interaction promotes the transactivation activity of Rta in activating the transcription of BMLF1 and p21 in transient transfection assays. Additionally, RanBPM interacts with SUMO-E2 (Ubc9) to promote sumoylation of Rta by SUMO-1. This fact explains why the expression of RanBPM enhances the transactivation activity of Rta. Taken together, the present results indicate a new role of RanBPM in regulating a viral protein that is critical to EBV lytic activation. PMID:18455188

  10. Combinatorial epigenetic deregulation by Helicobacter pylori and Epstein-Barr virus infections in gastric tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, William Kk; Yu, Jun; Chan, Matthew Tv; To, Ka F; Cheng, Alfred Sl

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodelling and microRNAs, convert environmental signals to transcriptional outputs but are commonly hijacked by pathogenic microorganisms. Recent advances in cancer epigenomics have shed new light on the importance of epigenetic deregulation in Helicobacter pylori- and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven gastric tumourigenesis. Moreover, it is becoming apparent that epigenetic mechanisms interact through crosstalk and feedback loops, which modify global gene expression patterns. The SWI/SNF remodelling complexes are commonly involved in gastric cancers associated with H. pylori or EBV through different mechanisms, including microRNA-mediated deregulation and genetic mutations. While H. pylori causes epigenetic silencing of tumour-suppressor genes to deregulate cellular pathways, EBV-positive tumours exhibit a widespread and distinctive DNA hypermethylation profile. Given the early successes of epigenetic drugs in haematological malignancies, further studies are mandated to enrich and translate our understanding of combinatorial epigenetic deregulation in gastric cancers into interventional strategies in the clinic. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27102722

  11. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis with substantia nigra involvement

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Tamer; Çelik, Ümit; Tolunay, Orkun; Kömür, Mustafa; Başpınar, Hüseyin; Yılmaz, Cengiz; Mert, Gülen; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer

    2015-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis due to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a usually benign systemic viral illness common in children. Many studies described nervous system manifestations of infectious mononucleosis with a wide spectrum of neurologic deficits. Neurologic complications of EBV are seen in both acute and reactivate infection. Herein, we describe a patient diagnosed by acute EBV encephalitis with substantia nigra involvement and excellent clinical recovery. PMID:26962357

  12. Epstein-Barr virus associated modulation of Wnt pathway is not dependent on latent membrane protein-1.

    PubMed

    Webb, Natasha; Connolly, Geoff; Tellam, Judy; Yap, Alpha S; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can modulate the Wnt pathway in virus-infected cells and this effect is mediated by EBV-encoded oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). Here we have reassessed the role of LMP1 in regulating the expression of various mediators of the canonical Wnt cascade. Contradicting the previous finding, we found that the levels of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3ss (GSK3beta), axin and alpha-catenin were not affected by the expression of LMP1 sequences from normal B cells or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Moreover, we also show that LMP1 expression had no detectable effect on the E-cadherin and beta-catenin interaction and did not induce transcriptional activation of beta-catenin. Taken together these studies demonstrate that EBV-mediated activation of Wnt pathway is not dependent on the expression of LMP1. PMID:18806872

  13. Elaboration of optical immunosensors based on the surface plasmon resonance for detecting specific antibodies and antigens of Epstein-Barr virus and human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, N V; Nosach, L M; Zagorodnya, S D; Povnitsa, O Y; Boltovets, P M; Baranova, G V; Golovan, A V

    2008-01-01

    The study of antigen-antibody interaction on the model of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and second type adenovirus (Ad2) based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was carried out. Kinetic and concentration dependences between virus antigens and specific antisera to them at different pH were determined. Experimental samples of biosensors for the detection by SPR method of virus (EBV and Ad2) antigens using monospecific antibodies, immobilized on the surface of gold, and also for detection of specific antibodies in the blood sera of patients with EBV or adenovirus infection were elaborated PMID:19351051

  14. Three Rwandan Children With Massive Splenomegaly and Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Case Presentations and the Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Klabanoff, DeAnna; Ball, Allison; Rutare, Samuel; McCall, Natalie; Blackall, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes 3 Rwandan children with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia who underwent splenectomy. Each was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV LPD) based on lymphocyte morphology, lymphocyte immunophenotype, and the results of EBV in situ hybridization studies. The differential diagnosis of splenomegaly, with a special emphasis on the sub-Saharan African context, is discussed along with EBV and associated disorders. These cases serve as a call to consider EBV LPD in the differential diagnosis of splenomegaly in children in whom common causes have been ruled out. PMID:27352192

  15. A rare case of acute pancreatitis and life-threatening hemolytic anemia associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in a young healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common infection that affects 95% of adults worldwide at some point during life. It is usually asymptomatic or causes a self-limiting clinical syndrome known as infectious mononucleosis. It rarely causes complications. Here, we present a case of a healthy 21-year-old female college student who suffered from severe pancreatitis and life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia in association with EBV infection, and we also discuss the common presentation of EBV infection and the diagnosis and treatment of simple and complicated EBV infection. PMID:26190854

  16. Physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels (as an indirect marker of cell-mediated immunity, CMI). This study made use of a 14-year longitudinal study with a representative sample of adolescents in the US. A total of 3361 participants (42.1% male) aged 11 to 21years at baseline who completed Wave I (1994-1995), Wave III (2001-2002), and Wave IV (2008) surveys of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were analyzed. Physical activity and sedentary behaviors at Waves I and III were assessed using interviewer-administered questionnaire. EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody levels at Wave IV were analyzed from dried blood spot assays. Adjusted for confounders, among males, one additional day spent per week on strenuous sports at Wave III were associated with a decrease of 4.09AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.012), while one additional hour spent per week viewing videos at Wave I was associated with an increase of 0.83AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.026). Among females, one additional day spent per week on individual sports at Wave III were associated with a decrease of 4.63AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.014), while sedentary behaviors were not associated with EBV antibody levels. To conclude, physical activity and sedentary behaviors were associated with CMI among males and physical activity was associated with CMI among females. PMID:27342426

  17. Whole-genome sequencing of the Akata and Mutu Epstein-Barr virus strains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhen; Wang, Xia; Strong, Michael J; Concha, Monica; Baddoo, Melody; Xu, Guorong; Baribault, Carl; Fewell, Claire; Hulme, William; Hedges, Dale; Taylor, Christopher M; Flemington, Erik K

    2013-01-01

    Using a simple viral genome enrichment approach, we report the de novo assembly of the Akata and Mutu Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes from a single lane of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads. The Akata and Mutu viral genomes are type I EBV strains of approximately 171 kb in length. Evidence for genome heterogeneity was found for the Akata but not for the Mutu strain. A comparative analysis of Akata with another four completely sequenced EBV strains, B95-8/Raji, AG876, Mutu, and GD1, demonstrated that the Akata strain is most closely related to the GD1 strain and exhibits the greatest divergence from the type II strain, AG876. A global comparison of latent and lytic gene sequences showed that the four latency genes, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C, are uniquely defining of type I and type II strain differences. Within type I strains, LMP1, the latency gene, is among the most divergent of all EBV genes, with three insertion or deletion loci in its CTAR2 and CTAR3 signaling domains. Analysis of the BHLF1 and LF3 genes showed that the reading frames identified in the B95-8/Raji genome are not conserved in Akata (or Mutu, for BHLF1), suggesting a primarily non-protein-coding function in EBV's life cycle. The Akata and Mutu viral-genome sequences should be a useful resource for homology-based functional prediction and for molecular studies, such as PCR, RNA-seq, recombineering, and transcriptome studies. As an illustration, we identified novel RNA-editing events in ebv-miR-BART6 antisense transcripts using the Akata and Mutu reference genomes. PMID:23152513

  18. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  19. Virus and Cell RNAs Expressed during Epstein-Barr Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-01-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was ∼5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-κB responsive genes including IκBα and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication. PMID:16474161

  20. Eradication of Epstein-Barr virus by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: implications for sites of viral latency.

    PubMed Central

    Gratama, J W; Oosterveer, M A; Zwaan, F E; Lepoutre, J; Klein, G; Ernberg, I

    1988-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can be distinguished on the basis of variations in the molecular weight of virus-encoded, growth transformation-associated proteins. This approach was used to study the persistence of EBV in two seropositive recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants. The first patient received marrow from her EBV-seronegative brother, became EBV seronegative after grafting, and remained so for greater than 1200 days. Subsequently, she became infected with a new EBV strain that differed from her pretransplant strain but was indistinguishable from the virus isolated from her husband. The second patient received marrow from his EBV-seropositive brother. This patient showed only a transient decrease in IgG antibodies to EBV capsid antigen. His pretransplant strain differed from the virus of his donor. On days 252 and 915 after transplantation, lymphoblastoid cell lines were grown from the peripheral blood of the patient and were found to carry exclusively the virus of the donor. These results suggest that the latently EBV-infected host cells reside in a cellular compartment that can be destroyed by graft-versus-host reactivity, irradiation, or cytotoxic drugs. Hemopoietic tissue is the most likely candidate. Images PMID:2847171

  1. The interplay of host genetic factors and Epstein-Barr virus in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Maria Li; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Lung, Hong Lok; Cheng, Yue; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between host cell genetics and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection contributes to the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Understanding the host genetic and epigenetic alterations and the influence of EBV on cell signaling and host gene regulation will aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of NPC and provide useful biomarkers and targets for diagnosis and therapy. In this review, we provide an update of the oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes associated with NPC, as well as genes associated with NPC risk including those involved in carcinogen detoxification and DNA repair. We also describe the importance of host genetics that govern the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex and immune responses, and we describe the impact of EBV infection on host cell signaling changes and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. High-power genomic sequencing approaches are needed to elucidate the genetic basis for inherited susceptibility to NPC and to identify the genes and pathways driving its molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25367335

  2. Epstein-Barr virus infection induces bone resorption in apical periodontitis via increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Miletic, Maja; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Milasin, Jelena

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes in periapical tissues caused by etiological agents of endodontic origin lead to apical periodontitis. Apart from bacteria, two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are recognized as putative pathogens in apical periodontitis. Although previous reports suggest the involvement of EBV in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis, its exact role in periapical bone resorption has not yet been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that EBV infection in apical periodontitis is capable of inducing periapical bone resorption via stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Increased levels of ROS induce expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). RANKL binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) present on the surface of preosteoclasts induces their maturation and activation which consequently leads to bone resorption. The potential benefit of antiviral and antioxidant-based therapies in periapical bone resorption treatment remains to be assessed. PMID:27515196

  3. Transcriptional expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes and proto-oncogenes in north African nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Djennaoui, D; Belaoui, H; Bouguermouh, A; Decaussin, G; Ooka, T

    1996-05-01

    Cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from North Africa show an unusual bimodal age distribution. As elsewhere, the tumor is closely associated with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The expression of EBV genes and c-onc genes was studied in biopsy specimens from tumors at different clinical stages from 11 young (10 to 30-year-old) and 11 adult (30 to 65-year-old) patients. It was found that the two age groups do not differ in their pattern of gene expression, that there is a tendency for later stage biopsies to express more viral and c-onc transcripts, and that samples expressing larger numbers of EBV genes also tend to express many different c-onc specificities. PMID:8732865

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphomagenesis in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Petrara, Maria R; Freguja, Riccardo; Gianesin, Ketty; Zanchetta, Marisa; De Rossi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human γ-herpes virus which establishes a life-long asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent hosts. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients, the impaired immunosurveillance against EBV may favor the development of EBV-related diseases, ranging from lymphoproliferative disorders to B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly modified the natural course of HIV-1 infection, resulting in decreased HIV-1 plasmaviremia, increased CD4 lymphocytes, and decreased opportunistic infections, indicating a restoration of immune functions. However, the impact of ART appears to be less favorable on EBV-related malignancies than on other AIDS-defining tumors, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, and NHL remains the most common cancer during the ART era. EBV-driven tumors are associated with selective expression of latent oncogenic proteins, but uncontrolled lytic cycle with virus replication and/or reactivation may favor cell transformation, at least in the early phases. Several host's factors may promote EBV reactivation and replication; besides immunodepression, inflammation/chronic immune stimulation may play an important role. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, through Toll-like receptors, activate the immune system and may promote EBV reactivation and/or polyclonal expansion of EBV-infected cells. A body of evidence suggests that chronic immune stimulation is a hallmark of HIV-1 pathogenesis and may persist even in ART-treated patients. This review focuses on lymphomagenesis driven by EBV both in the context of the natural history of HIV-1 infection and in ART-treated patients. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the expansion of EBV-infected cells is a premise for the identification of prognostic markers of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:24151490

  5. Modulation of the cell growth regulator mTOR by Epstein-Barr virus-encoded LMP2A.

    PubMed

    Moody, Cary A; Scott, Rona S; Amirghahari, Nazanin; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Young, Lawrence S; Dawson, Chris W; Sixbey, John W

    2005-05-01

    Control of translation initiation is one means by which cells regulate growth and proliferation, with components of the protein-synthesizing machinery having oncogenic potential. Expression of latency protein LMP2A by the human tumor virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt located upstream of an essential mediator of growth signals, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). We show that mTOR is activated by expression of LMP2A in carcinoma cells, leading to wortmannin- and rapamycin-sensitive inhibition of the negative regulator of translation, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and increased c-Myc protein translation. Intervention by this DNA tumor virus in cellular translational controls is likely to be an integral component of EBV tumorigenesis. PMID:15827164

  6. Immunoglobulin-secreting cells in cord blood: effects of Epstein-Barr virus and interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, K O; Thorsteinsson, L; Gudmundsson, S; Haraldsson, A

    1999-07-01

    The contribution of cord blood B lymphocytes to the immune response has been under considerable investigation. Cord blood B cells produce almost no antibodies except of the immunoglobulin (Ig)M isotype, indicating immaturity of the cells or the environment they reside in. The aim of this study was to investigate the number of circulating IgA-, IgM-, IgG-, and IgE-producing cells in cord blood in comparison to adult peripheral blood using the ELISPOT method. Moreover, we studied the effect of transformation with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on the proportion of cells producing different isotypes with or without interleukin (IL)-4. Cord blood had IgM-producing cells circulating predominantly, but also some IgA- and IgG-producing cells, whereas adult peripheral blood contained high amounts of circulating IgA-producing cells and some IgM- and IgG-producing cells. No circulating IgE-producing cells were found in either group. Transformation by EBV caused significant expansion of IgA-, IgM-, and IgG-producing cells in adult peripheral blood, but almost only of IgM-producing cells in cord blood. A low but detectable expansion of IgA- and IgG-producing cells was found. Cells producing IgE were still not found, even after EBV transformation. However, EBV transformation in the presence of IL-4 increased the numbers of IgE-producing cells significantly both in cord blood and adult peripheral blood. These findings indicate that cord blood contains some circulating IgA- and IgG-producing cells that are expanded to some extent after EBV infection. They also indicate that cord blood B cells have a similar capacity for IgE production to adult peripheral blood B cells when appropriately stimulated. PMID:10404047

  7. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics through Phosphorylation on Stathmin by Epstein-Barr Virus Kinase BGLF4*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Wen; Lin, Sue-Jane; Tsai, Shu-Chun; Lin, Jiun-Han; Chen, Mei-Ru; Wang, Jiin-Tarng; Lee, Chung-Pei; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Stathmin is an important microtubule (MT)-destabilizing protein, and its activity is differently attenuated by phosphorylation at one or more of its four phosphorylatable serine residues (Ser-16, Ser-25, Ser-38, and Ser-63). This phosphorylation of stathmin plays important roles in mitotic spindle formation. We observed increasing levels of phosphorylated stathmin in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-harboring lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines during the EBV lytic cycle. These suggest that EBV lytic products may be involved in the regulation of stathmin phosphorylation. BGLF4 is an EBV-encoded kinase and has similar kinase activity to cdc2, an important kinase that phosphorylates serine residues 25 and 38 of stathmin during mitosis. Using an siRNA approach, we demonstrated that BGLF4 contributes to the phosphorylation of stathmin in EBV-harboring NPC. Moreover, we confirmed that BGLF4 interacts with and phosphorylates stathmin using an in vitro kinase assay and an in vivo two-dimensional electrophoresis assay. Interestingly, unlike cdc2, BGLF4 was shown to phosphorylate non-proline directed serine residues of stathmin (Ser-16) and it mediated phosphorylation of stathmin predominantly at serines 16, 25, and 38, indicating that BGLF4 can down-regulate the activity of stathmin. Finally, we demonstrated that the pattern of MT organization was changed in BGLF4-expressing cells, possibly through phosphorylation of stathmin. In conclusion, we have shown that a viral Ser/Thr kinase can directly modulate the activity of stathmin and this contributes to alteration of cellular MT dynamics and then may modulate the associated cellular processes. PMID:20110360

  8. Longitudinal observation of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in athletes during a competitive season.

    PubMed

    Pottgiesser, Torben; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Wolfarth, Bernd; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Bauer, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology continues to be the first diagnostic test when infectious mononucleosis is suspected. Due to possible mild immunosuppression in competitive athletes, EBV reactivation determined by increases in salivary viral load have been identified as one possible cause in recurrent respiratory infections. The long-term variation in EBV antibody levels in athletes compared to a control group remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate the time course of changes in concentration of EBV antibodies in athletes with special emphasis on antibodies against early antigens (EAs) and avidity determination. During a competition season of approximately 12 months, the serological status of 15 biathletes (age 27 ± 3 years, 7 female, 8 male, international to Olympic level) was compared with 11 controls (age 23 ± 1 years; 1 female 10 male) at multiple time points. In addition, 43 healthy swimmers (age 22 ± 4 years, 18 female, 25 male, national to international level) were tested to validate the results with only two time points interspersed by approximately 6 months of intensive physical exercise. Analysis of quantitative antibody intensity bands revealed stable values during a competition season. In particular, IgG-antibodies against EAs may persist and were found in 15% of past infections in swimmers exhibiting fluctuations in concentration after 6 months. These results provide evidence that positive Anti-EA-IgG may persist in healthy athletes and thus, should not be used to diagnose EBV reactivations or to identify a compromised immune function. PMID:22825820

  9. Intrafollicular Epstein-Barr virus-positive large B cell lymphoma. A variant of "germinotropic" lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Luisa; Lonardi, Silvia; Essatari, Murad H M; Pellegrini, Vilma; Fisogni, Simona; Gazzola, Anna; Agostinelli, Claudio; Vermi, William; Rossi, Giuseppe; Massarelli, Giovannino; Pileri, Stefano A; Facchetti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Germinotropic lymphoproliferative disorders were previously described as localized disorders associated with coinfection by human herpes virus 8 and Epstein-Barr virus and characterized by good clinical outcome. We report the clinical, morphological, phenotypical, and molecular features of three cases of a hitherto unreported variant of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive, human herpes virus 8 (HHV8)-negative large B cell lymphoma with exclusive intrafollicular localization. All cases occurred in elderly individuals (63, 77, and 65 years old; one male, two females) without obvious immunedeficiency, who presented with high stage disease. Lymph nodes showed an effaced nodular architecture with abnormal B follicles colonized by EBV+ large, pleomorphic atypical cells, including Reed-Sternberg-like cells, showing an activated B cell phenotype (CD10-FOXP1-Bcl6-IRF4+ or CD10-FOXP1+Bcl6+IRF4+) and intense expression of CD30. No monoclonal light-chain restriction was detected by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization, and IGH rearrangement was polyclonal; notably, EBV clonality was detectable in one case. Lymphoma cells in all cases showed diffuse expression of the c-Myc protein, while Bcl2 was dim or negative; moreover, the strong expression of phosphorylated-STAT3 in tumor cell nuclei suggested activation of the JAK-STAT pathway. FISH analysis was performed in two cases and showed no translocations of BCL2, BCL6, MYC, and PAX5 genes. Response to treatment was poor in 2/3 patients: one died after 18 months, one is alive with disease after 12 months. The intrafollicular EBV-positive large B cell lymphoma expands the spectrum of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:26762526

  10. Epstein-Barr virus as a paradigm in nasopharyngeal cancer: from lab to clinic.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Radha; Hui, Edwin Pun; Chan, Anthony Tak Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) of the undifferentiated subtype remains endemic in southern China, with a peak incidence in this region approaching 30 cases per 100,000 population per year. Despite advances in chemotherapy and radiation delivery techniques in localized disease, distant metastasis is still common and NPC remains the seventh leading cause of cancer death in the region. There is great need for early diagnosis, developing novel therapies, and identifying patients with localized disease at higher risk of future recurrence or metastasis to appropriately tailor their treatment and improve outcomes. Knowledge of the integral involvement of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of undifferentiated NPC has been of seminal importance in developing strategies to optimize disease management. The close association with EBV is being evaluated in multiple settings including screening of at-risk populations, disease prognostication, development of targeted therapies, optimizing adjuvant treatment, and early recurrence detection. These translational studies are likely to have an enormous effect on management of undifferentiated NPC and significantly improve the landscape of the disease in years to come. PMID:24857071