Sample records for equatorial plasma bubbles

  1. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  2. Periodicity in the occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y.; Lee, W.

    2013-12-01

    The observations of equatorial plasma bubbles by low-inclination orbit satellites show periodic occurrence of bubbles along satellite orbits. The periodicity in the bubble occurrence provides a useful tool for identifying the role of gravity waves in the creation of bubbles. In this study, we investigate the variability of the periodicity in the bubble occurrence by analyzing the observations of Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) and the first Republic of China satellite (ROCSAT-1). Here the periodicity indicates spatial periodicity and is derived by applying a Fourier analysis to the electron densities projected onto the magnetic apex height. Our preliminary results show an occurrence of significant amplitudes of periodicity peaks on the spatial scale range of 50-1000 km. The periodicity on small scales may be associated with the bifurcation of bubbles or to the creation of multiple bubbles for one wave seeding. The periodicity on larger scales is considered to be related with the scale size of a seeding mechanism. We present statistics of the periodicity and the coincident satellite observations of periodic bubbles with ground observations.

  3. GPS Observations of Plasma Bubbles and Scintillations over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Valladares, C. E.; Semala, G. K.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Damtie, B.; D'Ujanga Mutonyi, F.; Ndeda, J. D.; Baki, P.; Obrou, O. K.; Okere, B.; Tsidu, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Sponsored in part by the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program, Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and several universities in Africa have collaborated to deploy a network of GPS receivers throughout equatorial Africa, a region which has been largely devoid of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments. High date-rate GPS receivers capable of measuring Total Electron Content (TEC) and GPS scintillations were installed at Abidjan, Ivory Coast (5.3°N, 4.0°W, dip 3.5°S); Addis Ababa (9.0°N, 38.8°E, dip 0.1°N ); Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (26.1°N, 50.6°E, dip 20.1°N); Cape Verde (16.6°S, 22.9°W, dip 4.9°N); Ilorin, Nigeria (8.4°S, 4.7°E, dip 1.9°S); Kampala, Uganda (0.3°S, 32.6°E, dip 9.2°S); Lagos, Nigeria (6.5°N, 3.4°E, dip 3.1°S); Nairobi, Kenya (1.3°S, 36.8°W, dip 10.7°S); Nsukka, Nigeria (6.8°S, 7.4°W, dip 3.0°S); and Zanzibar, Tanzania (6.2°S, 39.2°E, dip 15.9°S). In this paper we report on the longitudinal, local time and seasonal occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over equatorial Africa in 2009 and 2010, as a first step toward establishing the climatology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa. The scintillation intensity is obtained by measuring the standard deviation of normalized GPS signal power. The plasma bubbles are detected using an automated technique, whereby the GPS TEC is detrended to remove the diurnal variation and excursions exceeding a particular threshold are extracted for further analysis. A harmonic analysis (FFT) of these extracted events is performed to exclude wavelike features indicative of gravity waves or traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the remaining events are identified as plasma bubbles. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over Africa are well correlated, but that some discrepancies in their morphologies are evident. While plasma bubbles and scintillations are generally observed during equinoctial periods, there are some longitudinal differences in their local time and seasonal occurrence statistics.

  4. Numerical simulation of equatorial plasma bubbles over Cachimbo: COPEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, A. J.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in onset of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using data from the 2002 COPEX observational campaign in Brazil and numerical modeling. The observational results show that for values of virtual height of the F layer base less than 355 km at around 18:35 LT, and for the prereversal peak enhancement of the vertical plasma drift (Vp) less than 30 m/s, the spread-F (ESF) was absent on four nights over Cachimbo (9.5°S, 54.8°W, dip latitude = -2.1°). In this work we analyze the geophysical conditions for the generation of the irregularities by comparing the nights with and without the ESF. In the comparison a numerical code is used to simulate plasma irregularity development in an extended altitude range from the bottom of the equatorial F layer. The code uses the flux corrected transport method with Boris-Book’s flux limiter for the spatial integration and a predictor-corrector method for the direct time integration of the continuity equation for O+ and the SOR (Successive-Over-Relaxation) method for electric potential equation. The code is tested with different evening eastward electric fields (or vertical drifts Vp < 30 m/s and Vp > 30 m/s) in order to study the influence of the prereversal enhancement in the zonal electric field on plasma bubble formation and development. The code also takes into account the zonal wind, the vertical electric field and the collision frequency of ions with neutrals and the amplitude of initial perturbation. The simulation shows a good agreement with the observational results of the ESF. The results of the code suggest that the instability can grow at the F layer bottomside by the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism only when the Vp > 30 m/s. In the analyzed cases we have considered the competition of other geophysical parameters in the generation of plasma structures.

  5. Plasma bubbles and irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. McClure; W.B. Hanson; J. H. Hoffman

    1977-01-01

    Using the Atmosphere Explorer satellite AE-C, we observe large-scale (10- to >200-km) irregular biteouts of up to three orders of magnitude in the ion concentration N⁠in the nighttime equatorial F region associated with small-scale inhomogeneities in Nâ. Similar phenomena were reported by Hanson and Sanatani but without the more complete plasma diagnostics present on AE. Simultaneous plasma velocity observations

  6. Combined analysis of equatorial plasma bubbles using a multi-platform approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S.

    2013-12-01

    Owing to their impacts on geo-positioning and communications systems, understanding the formation and evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles and associated scintillations remains an important challenge for ionospheric physics. Significant prior efforts such as the C/NOFS mission have brought together a combination of ground- and space-based plasma observations to study these processes. The new missions ICON and GOLD will provide very different, primarily optical observations of the nighttime ionosphere and thermosphere that will allow for a new view of equatorial plasma bubbles. However, combining the data from these two spacecraft, along with existing and future ground-based observations, will require a fundamentally different approach than that used for C/NOFS. Here, the new approach required will be described and the new capabilities for such a coordinated effort to address new, as well as long-outstanding science questions related to equatorial plasma bubbles will be addressed.

  7. Spatial relationship of 1-m equatorial spread F irregularities and plasma bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    A radar experiment was conducted on August 18, 1978, at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, to investigate the spatial relationship of 1-m equatorial spread F irregularities to plasma bubbles (localized depletions in F layer plasma density). East-west scans were made with Altair, an incoherent scatter radar, to spatially map (1) the backscatter produced by field-aligned irregularities and (2) the electron density distribution of the background F layer. Plasma bubbles were spatially mapped for the first time with an incoherent scatter radar. By assuming invariance along the magnetic field lines (over distances of less than 100 km) we show that 1-m field-aligned irregularities are directly related to plasma bubbles.

  8. Equatorial plasma bubbles: vertically elongated wedges from the bottomside F layer. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, R.T.; Livingston, R.C.

    1981-04-01

    We address the question regarding the two-dimensional shape of equatorial plasma bubbles in the plane transverse to the geomagnetic field. By comparing the east-west spatial relationship of ion-density depletions measured insitu by the Atmospheric Explorer-E (AE-E) satellite to backscatter plumes measured by the ALTAIR radar, we show that plasma bubbles are vertically elongated depletions that extend upward from the bottomside of the F layer, in the form of wedges, rather than more isotropically shaped but isolated structures. The shape of plasma bubbles is inferred from (1) ion-density depletions that exceeded 99 percent in the 'neck' regions of plumes, and (2) the eastward drift velocities of the plumes. The expected electrodynamics of vertically elongated plasma bubbles are consistant with the observations of large eastward drift velocities of plumes that are comparable to the F-region plasma drift measurements made at Jicamarca and to F-region neutral wind measurements made at Kwajalein. The results also reveal that the west wall of large-scale altitude modulations of the bottomside F layer that produces the primary plumes and bubbles becomes structured, and evolves with the generation of secondary plumes and bubbles.

  9. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. L. Aggson; N. C. Maynard; W.B. Hanson; Jack L. Saba

    1992-01-01

    The authors present here results from the double floating probe experiment carried on the San Marco D satellite, with emphasis on the observations of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. This study concentrates on isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F region and divides these observed bubble encounters into

  10. Decay of 3-m-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with a plasma bubble observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susumu Saito; Shoichiro Fukao; Mamoru Yamamoto; Yuichi Otsuka; Takashi Maruyama

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the decay processes of 3-m-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with plasma bubbles by multi-instrument observations. The observations were made using the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), a 630-nm airglow imager, and ionosondes. The EAR's electronic beam steering capability allowed us to see the temporal evolution of 3-m-scale irregularities associated with plasma bubbles in two-dimensional views. Around midnight on 28 and

  11. Three-dimensional morphology of equatorial plasma bubbles deduced from measurements onboard CHAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lühr, H.; Noja, M.

    2015-01-01

    Total electron content (TEC) between Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) satellites and the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites can be used to constrain the three-dimensional morphology of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). In this study we investigate TEC measured onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) from 2001 to 2005. We only use TEC data obtained when CHAMP passed through EPBs: that is, when in situ plasma density measurements at CHAMP altitude also show EPB signatures. The observed TEC gradient along the CHAMP track is strongest when the corresponding GNSS satellite is located equatorward and westward of CHAMP with elevation angles of about 40-60°. These elevation and azimuth angles are in agreement with the angles expected from the morphology of the plasma depletion shell proposed by Kil et al.(2009).

  12. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-03-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  13. Equatorial plasma bubbles in the ionosphere over Eritrea: occurrence and drift speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R. H.; Ledvina, B. M.; Kintner, P. M.; Afewerki, M.; Mulugheta, Z.

    2006-07-01

    An all-sky imager was installed in Asmara, Eritrea (15.4° N, 38.9° E, 7° N dip) and used to monitor the OI 630-nm nightglow. Nine months of data were studied between September 2001 and May 2002, a time including the recent maximum in the solar activity cycle. Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were recorded on 63% of nights with adequate viewing conditions. The station location within view of the equatorial ionization anomaly and with a magnetic declination near zero makes it an excellent test case for comparison with satellite studies of the seasonal variation of EPBs with longitude. The imager was accompanied by two Cornell GPS scintillation monitors, and the amplitude scintillation data are compared to the all-sky data. GPS scintillations indicate the beginning of EPBs, but die out sooner in the post-midnight period than the larger scale EPBs. Both phenomena exhibit clear occurrence maxima around the equinoxes. Ionospheric zonal drift speeds have been deduced from EPB and GPS scintillation pattern movement. Average near-midnight EPB drift speeds are between 100 and 120 m/s most months, with the GPS scintillation speeds being about the same. A winter drift speed maximum is evident in both EPB and GPS scintillation monthly means.

  14. Morphology of the equatorial anomaly and equatorial plasma bubbles using image subspace analysis of Global Ultraviolet Imager data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. B. Henderson; C. M. Swenson; A. B. Christensen; L. J. Paxton

    2005-01-01

    The equatorial anomaly (EA) is host to the highest ionospheric densities on Earth. Disturbances within the EA result in plasma density depletions and large density gradients. This paper presents observations of global quiet time morphology of the EA as measured by images of nighttime ionospheric 135.6 nm radiation taken by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) on NASA's Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and

  15. Equatorial plasma bubbles observed by DMSP satellites during a full solar cycle: Toward a global climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Burke, W. J.; Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Sultan, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    We have examined more than 75,000 latitudinal profiles of plasma densities measured by ion detectors on five Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites in the evening local time (LT) sector between 1989 and 2001. This survey established detection frequencies of equatorial bubbles (EPBs) at 840 km over the recent solar cycle. The annual rate of EPB detections decreased by more than an order of magnitude from >1000 during solar maximum to <100 during solar minimum years. EPB data were divided into 24 longitude sectors to determine seasonal and solar cycle variability in rates of encounter by DMSP. During the ascending and descending portions of the solar cycle, each longitude sector showed repeatable seasonal variations. The envelope of seasonally averaged rates of EPB encounters resembles the solar cycle variability for similar averages of the F10.7 index. On both global and longitude sector scale sizes, annual rates of EPB encounters correlate with the yearly averages of F10.7. We also find that throughout the solar cycle the EPB detections were overrepresented during times of high geomagnetic activity signified by Kp ? 5. During solar minimum years, about one third of the EPBs occurred when traces of the Dst index had significant negative slopes (dDst/dt ? -5 nT/hr). This suggests that electric field penetration of the inner magnetosphere is responsible for driving many EPBs. Comparisons of plasma and neutral density profiles in the evening sector, calculated using the Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) and MSIS-86 Model, indicate that the height of the bottomside of the F layer is >100 km lower during solar minimum than solar maximum. However, the overall effect is to increase the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at solar maximum in the bottomside F layer only by about a factor of 2. We suggest that the variability of electric fields in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere is the source of the observed discrepancy between EPB detections under solar maximum/minimum conditions.

  16. The day-to-day occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles measured from Vanimo, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Francis, M.; Terkildsen, M. B.; Marshall, R. A.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2013-12-01

    An analysis of the occurrence of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) detected using a ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver located at Vanimo in South-east Asia will be presented. The 3-year (2000-2002) dataset employed shows that the EPB occurrence maximizes (minimizes) during the equinoxes (solstices), in good agreement with previous findings. The low-latitude ionosonde station at Vanimo is used in conjunction with the GPS receiver in an analysis of the day-to-day EPB occurrence variability during the equinox period. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionosonde data reveals that the height, and the change in height, of the F layer is 1 standard deviation (1?) larger on the days for which EPBs were detected, compared to non-EPB days. These results are interpreted using the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) plasma instability growth rate, for which stronger upward drift of the lower-altitude F-layer plasma promotes faster growth of EPBs after sunset. These results are then compared to the results of the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIEGCM), which surprisingly show strong similarities to the observations, despite only using geomagnetic and solar activity inputs. The TIEGCM is also used to directly calculate the hourly flux-tube integrated R-T growth rate. A superposed epoch analysis reveals that the modeled R-T growth rate is a little less than 1? higher on average for EPB days compared to non-EPB days. The implication of this result is that the TIEGCM generates almost enough day-to-day variability in order to account for the day-to-day EPB occurrence observed during the equinox. This result isn't necessarily expected due to the model's limited altitude coverage of 100-700 km (depending on solar activity) and the lack of ionospheric observation inputs. It is thought that the remaining variability could originate from either lower altitudes (e.g. atmospheric gravity waves from the troposphere) or from higher altitudes (resulting from coupling with the magnetosphere and solar wind), or potentially both. It is concluded that the continuing advancement of numerical modeling of the thermosphere and ionosphere, coupled with altitudes above and below, is required to better understand the day-to-day EPB occurrence.

  17. Distributions of TEC Fluctuations and Losses of Lock Associated with Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, H.; Kikuchi, H.; Tsugawa, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Takano, T.; Shimakura, S.; Shiokawa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are local depletions of the electron density in the ionosphere. Due to field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) with various spatial scales, EPBs affect wide-band radio waves and cause scintillations in GPS navigation system. Strong scintillation can cause a GPS receiver to lose lock on GPS signals because of rapid variations of signal amplitude and phase, and limit the availability of carrier phase measurements. Since the scintillation is caused by Fresnel diffraction, the spatial scale of FAIs that causes the scintillation of GPS signals is about 2-300 m. Therefore, loss of phase lock (LOL) on GPS signals is a reference of hundred-meter-scale FAIs. As EPBs are also associated with fluctuations of the total electron content (TEC), the enhancement of Rate of TEC change index (ROTI) occurs around EPBs. Assuming that the altitude of the ionosphere is about 400 km, the velocity of the pierce point of the GPS radio wave at the ionospheric altitude is approximately 70 m/s around the zenith. Thus, ROTI averaged during 5 minutes is a reference of ten-kilometer-scale fluctuations. In this study, we analyzed LOL and 5-min. ROTI associated with EPBs to examine the spatial and temporal scales of electron density disturbances associated with EPBs. We selected 11 EPBs from 630-nm airglow images obtained by all-sky imager at Sata, Japan, in 2001. LOL and ROTI are obtained from GPS data from GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) of Japan, which consists of more than 1000 GPS receivers. As a result, it is shown that both LOL and the enhancement of ROTI are observed in 8 events out of 11 events. The distributions of LOL are approximately consistent with the areas in which the ionospheric electron density is depleted. The enhancements of ROTI are observed in the vicinities of EPBs. The enhancement of ROTI expands especially in the west side of EPBs. After the EPBs pass through, therefore, LOLs are vanished but the enhancements of ROTI last a while. This result shows that the hundred-meter-scale irregularities are distributed within EPBs while the ten-kilometer-scale disturbances are located around EPBs. Such huge EPBs as to be observed in Japan will appear in solar maximum periods. Therefore it is important to prepare against the next solar maximum by examining characteristics of the EPBs. Fortunately, LOL and the enhancement of ROTI are treated as indicators of these huge EPBs since most of the EPBs are associated with them. Examinations of these EPBs must be progressed further.

  18. The postsunset vertical plasma drift and its effects on the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles observed by the C/NOFS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Hairston, Marc R.

    2015-03-01

    The prereversal enhancement (PRE) of the vertical plasma drift in the postsunset sector is an important factor that controls the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles. In this study, we use the measurements of the ion velocity meter on board the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite during 2008-2014 to identify the PRE and its effects on the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The seasonal and longitudinal distributions of the PRE are derived at different solar flux levels. Large PRE occurs at 240-360° longitudes in equinoctial months and December solstice, and small or downward PRE occurs around ±60° in June solstice. The seasonal and longitudinal distributions of large-amplitude equatorial spread F (ESF) (?N > 5 × 1010 m-3) are similar to that of the PRE, while the occurrence probability of ESF including smaller-amplitude perturbations (?N > 1 × 1010 m-3) can be quite high at any longitude in any season. A quantitative relationship between the PRE and the ESF occurrence probability is derived and well characterized by the cumulative distribution function of a continuous probability distribution. Such a distribution implies that the occurrence of ESF is a probability event. The ESF occurrence probability is small when the PRE is zero or downward and becomes larger than 80% when the PRE is greater than 40 m s-1. Both the ESF occurrence probability and the amplitude increase with the solar radio flux.

  19. Occurrence probability and amplitude of equatorial ionospheric irregularities associated with plasma bubbles during low and moderate solar activities (2008-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; La Beaujardiere, O.; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Liu, J. Y.; Chen, S. P.

    2014-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence probability of equatorial spread F irregularities measured by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite during 2008-2012. We use different criteria (plasma density perturbations, ?N, and relative density perturbations, ?N/N0) to identify the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the occurrence probability of irregularities is the same for different criteria, whether the patterns of irregularity occurrence vary with solar activity and with local time, and how the patterns of irregularity occurrence are correlated with ionospheric scintillation. It is found that the occurrence probability of irregularities and its variation with local time are significantly different when different identification criteria are used. The occurrence probability based on plasma density perturbations is high in the evening sector and becomes much lower after midnight. In contrast, the occurrence probability based on relative density perturbations is low in the evening sector but becomes very high after midnight in the June solstice. We have also compared the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities with scintillation. The occurrence pattern of the S4 index and its variation with local time are in good agreement with the irregularity occurrence based on plasma density perturbations but are significantly different from those based on relative density perturbations. This study reveals that the occurrence pattern of equatorial ionospheric irregularities varies with local time and that only the occurrence probability of irregularities based on plasma density perturbations is consistent with the occurrence of scintillation at all local times.

  20. Characteristics of Electromagnetic Modes in Nighttime Equatorial Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, B.

    2004-05-01

    Unequal electron and ion flow velocities, which can result from the presence of gravity and/or electric field in collisional plasma, give rise to a net current density that provides excitation energy for plasma instabilities. In the presence of density gradient, the instability is of collisional interchange type. The generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRTI) is an example of such instability and is believed to be responsible for the generation of the so-called bubbles (regions of depleted density) in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. Scintillation caused by the bubbles can degrade and disrupt the communication and navigation systems that depend on trans-ionospheric radio links. The GRTI has so far been studied only in the electrostatic limit, making the ad hoc assumption that the magnetic field fluctuations are negligible. However, magnetic field data from CHAMP satellite seem to indicate the presence of measurable magnetic fluctuations associated with the bubbles. The magnetometer on C/NOFS satellite will also be sensitive enough to detect any magnetic fluctuation. This prompted us to extend our linear stability analysis of GRTI to include the magnetic fluctuations. The eigenvalue equation for electromagnetic modes driven by the combined effects of the gravity and an eastward electric field has been derived. Analysis of the equation using realistic ionospheric plasma parameters will be presented. In particular, the growth rates and the spectral characteristics of the modes, together with the estimate of the strength of the magnetic field fluctuation relative to that of the electric field fluctuation, will be discussed.

  1. Plasma turbulence in the equatorial ionospheric F region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rickey Dale McDaniel

    1998-01-01

    Equatorial spread F is a spectacular phenomenon in which the equatorial region ionosphere is reshaped after sunset. The plasma instabilities responsible for equatorial spread F are fascinating since they occur on time scales ranging from seconds to hours and length scales from centimeters to tens of kilometers. The plasma irregularities that occur in the F region also influence the performance

  2. Evidence of the consistent influence of neutral winds on nighttime equatorial plasma irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, E. V.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Classically, the bottom-side F region is thought to be unstable due to gravitational Rayleigh Taylor instability that result from divergences in zonal gravity-driven current. Bubbles purely driven by gravity result in zonal polarization electric fields. However, more often than not, electric fields associated with plasma irregularities are observed as tilted by C/NOFS' Vector Electric Field instrument; that is polarization electric fields are observed to have both vertical and zonal components. Statistically, the angle between polarization electric fields and the zonal direction are around 45°-65°. This suggest that equatorial bubbles are not purely influenced by gravity, but that these bubbles are also consistently influenced by a divergence of vertical currents. Three-dimensional simulations of vertical polarization electric effects that result from zonal neutral winds suggest that there may be a consistent influence of neutral winds on nighttime equatorial plasma irregularities.

  3. Plasma bubble detection in the DEMETER micro-satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, T.; Nguyen, C.-T.; Berthelier, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of plasma bubbles is the most important phenomenon that affects the night time equatorial ionosphere resulting in strong and localized drops of the plasma density with often very sharp boundaries. Besides its own interest for ionospheric physics this phenomenon is also of significant practical importance since it disrupts HF communication and GPS signal reception. In the frame of a French ANR funded project to model the rise and development of plasma bubbles we have searched for specific disturbances of the low latitude ionosphere that might be considered as "precursors" of plasma bubbles, possibly leading, under favourable conditions, to an instable ionosphere. To this aim, we have manually selected and classified typical events observed on data from two instruments on board the DEMETER satellite, IAP (Plasma analyzer) and ISL (Langmuir probe experiment). We present in this poster the various types of events and show that one of them appears to be associated with the later occurrence of plasma bubbles. From the first list of events recorded during an ~ 18 month period we will discuss in detail the plasma disturbances and present initial results of a statistical study.

  4. Plasma formation in underwater gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, B. S.; Foster, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    The generation of plasma in underwater gas bubbles offers the potential to produce large volume plasma in water while minimizing electrode erosion. Such attributes are desirable for the design of plasma-based water purification systems. In this work, gas bubbles of diameter 0.4-0.7 mm were trapped in the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic standing wave and pulsed with voltages in the range 10-14 kV. Plasma formation in trapped, isolated bubbles was observed to occur through two separate pathways: (1) plasma generated in the bubble through impact by a liquid streamer and (2) plasma generated in the bubble due solely to the applied electric field. The former case demonstrates the mechanism of so-called streamer hopping in which the discharge transitions from a water streamer to a gaseous surface streamer. Perturbations of the bubble's fluid boundary due to the streamer are also discussed.

  5. Three-dimensional high-resolution plasma bubble modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Jin, Hidekatsu

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPB from a space weather point of view. The development of EPB is known as a evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical modelings of the instability on the equatorial two-dimensional plane have been conducted since the late 1970's, and the nonlinear evolution of the instability has been clearly presented. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) modelings became popular tools for further understanding of the development of EPB such as 3D structure of EPB, meridional wind effects and gravity wave seeding. One of the biggest advantages of the 3D model is that the off-equatorial E region which is coupled with the equatorial F region can be included in the model. It is known from observations that the conductance of the off-equatorial E region controls the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, that is, sudden decrease of the E-region conductance around the sunset accelerates the evolution of the instability. We have developed a new 3D high-resolution model for EPB, and studied internal structure of EPB and the contribution of the off-equatorial E region. As it is necessary to use high-order numerical schemes to capture sharp plasma density gradient of EPB, we adopted the CIP scheme which can keep the third-order accuracy in time and space. The simulated EPB has asymmetrical density gradients at east and west walls, and the growth rate changes significantly depending on the condition of the off-equatorial E region. In the future, we will integrate the high-resolution model into whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model (GAIA) to study the growth of EPB under the realistic background conditions.

  6. Oscillating plasma bubbles. II. Pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Time-dependent phenomena have been investigated in plasma bubbles which are created by inserting spherical grids into an ambient plasma and letting electrons and ions form a plasma of different parameters than the ambient one. There are no plasma sources inside the bubble. The grid bias controls the particle flux. There are sheaths on both sides of the grid, each of which passes particle flows in both directions. The inner sheath or plasma potential develops self consistently to establish charge neutrality and divergence free charge and mass flows. When the electron supply is restricted, the inner sheath exhibits oscillations near the ion plasma frequency. When all electrons are excluded, a virtual anode forms on the inside sheath, reflects all ions such that the bubble is empty. By pulsing the ambient plasma, the lifetime of the bubble plasma has been measured. In an afterglow, plasma electrons are trapped inside the bubble and the bubble decays as slow as the ambient plasma. Pulsing the grid voltage yields the time scale for filling and emptying the bubble. Probes have been shown to modify the plasma potential. Using pulsed probes, transient ringing on the time scale of ion transit times through the bubble has been observed. The start of sheath oscillations has been investigated. The instability mechanism has been qualitatively explained. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on electrons in the sheath has been clarified.

  7. Topside Ionosphere Plasma Bubbles Seen in He+ Density: Results and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Larisa; Filippov, Sergey

    He (+) density depletions, considered as fossil equatorial plasma bubble signatures, were involved in this study. They are usually detected in the topside ionosphere (approx. 1000 km) deeply inside the plasmasphere (L=1.3-3). a) The question about an opportunity to detect the topside plasma bubbles of equatorial origin in their separate plasma component (He (+) ) is investigated. There are the indications [Sidorova, ASR, 2004, 2007; Sidorova and Filippov, JASTP, 2012] that there is genetic connection between the He (+) density depletions and the equatorial plasma bubbles. For validation of this idea the characteristic times of the main photochemical and electro-dynamical processes, in which the plasma bubbles and their minor ion component (He (+) ) are involved, have been calculated and compared. The model estimations, obtained in SAMIS3 (3D model of equatorial spread F) and kindly presented by J. Huba (USA), are also used for the investigation. It was revealed that the plasma bubbles, reaching the “ceiling” heights, can exist within 2-3 days and that there is principal opportunity to observe them in the separate plasma component (He (+) ). (b) The longitudinal statistics of the He (+) density depletions (P), calculated for all seasons and both hemispheres (20-50(°) INVLAT), were obtained. It was revealed that the most of the P plots have “wave-like” structure with well-defining four peaks. The peaks are the most pronounced in the NH during March equinox/December solstice and in the SH during March equinox/June solstice. Similar wave number 4 longitudinal structure has recently been found in the low-latitude ionosphere density distribution [Immel et al., GRL, 2006; England et al., GRL, 2006; Jin et al., JGR, 2008]. It is assumed that the longitudinal plasma density variations appear due to the modulated vertical ?×? drift. It is supposed that solar thermal tides excited in the troposphere induce zonal perturbation electric fields, which are added to the background F-region dynamo field, modulating the ionosphere fountain process. If the hypothesis about an equatorial origin of He (+) density depletions is true, we can suppose that such 4-peaked structure projected to the topside ionosphere are reflected in their longitudinal statistics. Perhaps this idea can be very useful for explanation of the obtained results. The results of this pioneer study suggest new investigation questions, based mainly on data lacking.

  8. Broad plasma depletions detected in the bottomside of the equatorial F region: Simultaneous ROCSAT-1 and JULIA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Kwak, Young-Sil; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Oh, Seung-Jun; Milla, Marco; Galkin, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the association of broad plasma depletions (BPDs) with plasma bubbles and ionospheric uplift in the equatorial F region using the coincident satellite and radar observations over Jicamarca in Peru. BPDs were detected by the first Republic of China satellite (ROCSAT-1) on the nights of 21 and 22 December 2002 during the period of moderate geomagnetic activity. The observations of the Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere radar and an ionosonde showed that the F peak height was lifted above the ROCSAT-1 altitude (600 km) at the times of the BPD detection. The fraction of NO+ was substantial at the locations of BPDs. These observations support the association of the BPDs with the ionospheric uplift. However, the absence of large backscatter plumes at the times of the BPD detection indicates that the BPDs were not produced by a single large bubble or a merger of bubbles.

  9. Mesospheric gravity waves and ionospheric plasma bubbles observed during the COPEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, I.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A. F.; Wrasse, C. M.; Buriti, R. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Gobbi, D.

    2011-07-01

    During the Conjugate Point Experiment (COPEX) campaign performed at Boa Vista (2.80?N;60.70?W, dip angle21.7?N) from October to December 2002, 15 medium-scale gravity waves in the OHNIR airglow images were observed. Using a Keogram image analysis, we estimate their parameters. Most of the waves propagate to Northwest, indicating that their main sources are Southeast of Boa Vista. Quasi-simultaneous plasma bubble activities in the OI 630 nm images were observed in seven cases. The distances between the bubble depletions have a linear relationship with the wavelengths of the gravity waves observed in the mesosphere, which suggests a direct contribution of the mesospheric medium-scale gravity waves in seeding the equatorial plasma bubbles.

  10. Equatorial broad plasma depletions associated with the enhanced fountain effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo Kyoung; Kil, Hyosub; Kwak, Young-Sil; Paxton, Larry J.; Zhang, Yongliang; Galkin, Ivan; Batista, Inez S.

    2014-01-01

    plasma depletions (BPDs), plasma depletions whose longitudinal width is over several hundred kilometers, have been detected in the equatorial F region by low-earth-orbit satellites during both magnetically quiet and magnetically disturbed periods. A few hypotheses were suggested to explain the creation of BPDs, but the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is still under debate. We investigate the origin of BPDs by analyzing the simultaneous in situ and optical observations of the ionosphere on 30 May 2003 (Kp = 8+), 24 April 2012 (Kp = 7-), and 31 October 2012 (Kp = 0+). BPDs on 30 May 2003 were detected by the Republic of China Satellite-1 at an altitude of 600 km, and BPDs on the other days were detected by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite near an altitude of 400 km. Our results show that the detection of BPDs is closely associated with background ionospheric morphology; BPDs are detected on the days when the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) is intense and the crests of the EIA have moved poleward. Measurements of upward plasma motion support the existence of ionospheric uplift at BPD locations. These observations and the detection of BPDs near the magnetic equator lead to the interpretation that the satellite detection of BPDs during those 3 days is likely related to the uplift of the F peak height above the satellite orbits.

  11. Ionospheric Plasma Bubbles observed at 29 degree south

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. O. Goulart; E. A. Grellmann; C. M. Wrasse; K. Makita; H. Takahashi; N. J. Schuch

    2006-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma bubbles have been observed by airglow OI6300 imaging technique at the Southern Space Observatory San Martino da Serra 29 S 54 W Brazil since 2004 The bubbles plasma depletion along the magnetic field line are frequently observed in a period from September to March during the southern spring equinox to autumn equinox seasons The frequency of occurrence avarege

  12. Cluster and Double Star multipoint observations of a plasma bubble

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Walsh; A. N. Fazakerley; A. D. Lahiff; M. Volwerk; A. Grocott; M. W. Dunlop; A. T. Y. Lui; L. M. Kistler; M. Lester; C. Mouikis; Z. Pu; C. Shen; J. Shi; M. G. G. T. Taylor; E. Lucek; T. L. Zhang; I. Dandouras

    2009-01-01

    Depleted flux tubes, or plasma bubbles, are one possible explanation of bursty bulk flows, which are transient high speed flows thought to be responsible for a large proportion of flux transport in the magnetotail. Here we report observations of one such plasma bubble, made by the four Cluster spacecraft and Double Star TC-2 around 14:00 UT on 21 September 2005,

  13. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Stolle, C.; Fejer, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76-608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000-2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010). Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  14. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    E-print Network

    Steven R. Spangler

    2008-06-05

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter $$ than is observed for other pulsars, consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as much expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter $$ is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of ``arcs'' in ``secondary spectra'' of pulsars.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Model of Equatorial Plasma Torus in Planetary Nebulae

    E-print Network

    K. H. Tsui

    2008-03-04

    Some basic structures in planetary nebulae are modeled as self-organized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma configurations with radial flow. These configurations are described by time self-similar dynamics, where space and time dependences of each physical variable are in separable form. Axisymmetric toroidal MHD plasma configuration is solved under the gravitational field of a central star of mass $M$. With an azimuthal magnetic field, this self-similar MHD model provides an equatorial structure in the form of an axisymmetric torus with nested and closed toroidal magnetic field lines. In the absence of an azimuthal magnetic field, this formulation models the basic features of bipolar planetary nebulae. The evolution function, which accounts for the time evolution of the system, has a bounded and an unbounded evolution track governed respectively by a negative and positive energy density constant $H$.

  16. Stabilizing effect of plasma discharge on bubbling fluidized granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Dang, Sai-Chao; Ma, Qiang; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-07-01

    Fluidized beds have been widely used for processing granular materials. In this paper, we study the effect of plasma on the fluidization behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed with an atmospheric pressure plasma discharger. Experiment results show that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with the discharge of plasma. When the discharge current reaches a minimum stabilization current Cms, air bubbles in the bed will disappear and the surface fluctuation is completely suppressed. A simplified model is proposed to consider the effect of electric Coulomb force generated by the plasma. It is found that the Coulomb force will propel the particles to move towards the void area, so that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with a high enough plasma discharge. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005 and 11034010).

  17. Plasma Source and Equatorial Characteristic Dependencies of The Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Prototype during Large Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, T.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Euripides, P.; Giersch, L.

    2002-11-01

    Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) that will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with efficient propellant utilization and power requirements. For successful inflation of the magnetic bubble a beta of unity must be achieved along the imposed dipole field. This is dependent on the plasma parameters that can be achieved with plasma sources that provide continuous operation at the desired power levels. Investigations of a 1.5 cm radius Helicon plasma source to generate plasma along an imposed dipole magnetic field have been conducted in a new 3800 liter vacuum chamber at the University of Washington. Steady state plasma generation has been accomplished while maintaining a very low neutral gas pressure (< 10-5 Torr) in the chamber allowing for magnetized plasma to be inserted along the dipole field. Measurements of plasma characteristics have been made using swept asymmetric double Langmuir probes for several different experimental configurations. Results show a building of plasma density in the outer equatorial region of the dipole with a peaked profile that is highly dependent on source and dipole magnet geometry.

  18. Ionospheric Plasma Bubbles observed at 29 degree south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, H. O.; Grellmann, E. A.; Wrasse, C. M.; Makita, K.; Takahashi, H.; Schuch, N. J.

    Ionospheric plasma bubbles have been observed by airglow OI6300 imaging technique at the Southern Space Observatory San Martino da Serra 29 S 54 W Brazil since 2004 The bubbles plasma depletion along the magnetic field line are frequently observed in a period from September to March during the southern spring equinox to autumn equinox seasons The frequency of occurrence avarege of eight bobbles for the period and its seasonal dependency are presented and compared to the observations of other locations

  19. Plasma core at the center of a sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    Bemani, F; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2013-01-01

    Considering high temperature and pressure during single bubble sonoluminescence collapse, a hot plasma core is generated at the center of the bubble. In this paper a statistical mechanics approach is used to calculate the core pressure and temperature. A hydrochemical model alongside a plasma core is used to study the bubble dynamics in two host liquids of water and sulfuric acid 85 wt % containing Ar atoms. Calculation shows that the extreme pressure and temperature in the plasma core are mainly due to the interaction of the ionized Ar atoms and electrons, which is one step forward to sonofusion. The thermal bremsstrahlung mechanism of radiation is used to analyze the emitted optical energy per flash of the bubble core. PMID:23410423

  20. Plasma core at the center of a sonoluminescing bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemani, F.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Considering high temperature and pressure during single bubble sonoluminescence collapse, a hot plasma core is generated at the center of the bubble. In this paper a statistical mechanics approach is used to calculate the core pressure and temperature. A hydrochemical model alongside a plasma core is used to study the bubble dynamics in two host liquids of water and sulfuric acid 85 wt % containing Ar atoms. Calculation shows that the extreme pressure and temperature in the plasma core are mainly due to the interaction of the ionized Ar atoms and electrons, which is one step forward to sonofusion. The thermal bremsstrahlung mechanism of radiation is used to analyze the emitted optical energy per flash of the bubble core.

  1. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  2. Laboratory Experiments on Propagating Plasma Bubbles into Vacuum, Vacuum Magnetic Field, and Background Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the dynamics of plasma ``bubbles'' as they propagate through a variety of background media. These bubbles are formed by a pulsed coaxial gun with an externally applied magnetic field. Bubble parameters are typically ne ~1020 m-3, Te ~ 5 - 10 eV, and Ti ~ 10 - 15 eV. The structure of the bubbles can range from unmagnetized jet-like structures to spheromak-like structures with complex magnetic flux surfaces. Some of the background media the bubbles interact with are vacuum, vacuum with magnetic field, and other magnetized plasmas. These bubbles exhibit different qualitative behavior depending on coaxial gun parameters such as gas species, gun current, and gun bias magnetic field. Their behavior also depends on the parameters of the background they propagate through. Multi-frame fast camera imaging and magnetic probe data are used to characterize the bubble evolution under various conditions.

  3. Propagation of plasma bubbles observed in Brazil from GPS and airglow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Dautermann, T.; Taylor, Michael J.; Chapagain, N.; Calais, E.; Pautet, D.

    2011-05-01

    Equatorial spread-F is a common occurrence in the equatorial ionosphere that is associated with large variations in plasma density that often cause scintillation and interference in communication signals. These events are known to result from Rayleigh-Taylor instability, but the day-to-day variability of their occurrence is not well understood. The triggering mechanism of plasma depletions is still a matter of debate, but may be linked to gravity waves that under favorable conditions propagate to the middle atmosphere. Understanding the triggering of ESF was the focus of the SpreadFEx campaign near Brasilia, Brazil in 2005. The campaign provided co-located airglow and GPS observations to study the onset of plasma depletions and their evolution as they traversed the region. Comparisons between the 630.0 nm airglow data and GPS data demonstrate the ability of the compact dual frequency GPS array to detect the plasma bubbles and retrieve reliable propagation characteristics of the depletions. In this case study, a plasma depletion was detected and moved over the array at velocities of 85-110 m/s, slowing as it moved towards the east. Correlation of consecutive airglow images gives consistent estimates of the eastward drift over the same time period. Mapping the airglow data to the GPS line-of-sight geometry allows direct comparison and reveals a resolvable westward tilt of the plasma depletion that may be due to vertical shear. The uniqueness of this study is the ability to resolve locally the characteristics of the plasma depletion without relying on assumptions about the mapping of the depletion along magnetic field lines to large latitudinal distances. It presents new information for understanding ESF development and the development of depletions strong enough to produce scintillation.

  4. A method for determining the drift velocity of plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere using far-ultraviolet spacecraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; England, S. L.; Immel, T. J.; Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.

    2007-11-01

    The Far-Ultraviolet Imager (IMAGE-FUV) on board the NASA IMAGE satellite has been used to observe plasma depletions in the nightside equatorial ionosphere. Observations from periods around spacecraft apogee, during which equatorial regions are visible for several hours, have allowed the velocity of these plasma depletions to be determined. A new method for determining the velocity of these depletions using an image analysis technique, Tracking Of Airglow Depletions (TOAD), has been developed. TOAD allows the objective identification and tracking of depletions. The automation of this process has also allowed for the tracking of a greater number of depletions than previously achieved without requiring any human input, which shows that TOAD is suitable for use with large data sets and for future routine monitoring of the ionosphere from space. Furthermore, this automation allows the drift velocities of each bubble to be determined as a function of magnetic latitude, which will give us the capability of retrieving geophysically important parameters such as the electric field, which are believed to vary rapidly with magnetic latitude.

  5. Temperature structure of plasma bubbles in the low latitude ionosphere around 600 km altitude

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-I. Oyama; K. Schlegel; S. Watanabe

    1988-01-01

    The electron temperature inside plasma bubbles at a height of 600 km was first measured by means of Japan's seventh scientific satellite Hinotori which is an equator orbiting satellite with an inclination of 31 deg. During the period between June 1981 and February 1982, 724 plasma bubbles were detected and studied. The electron temperature inside the plasma bubbles is either

  6. Occurrence characteristics of plasma bubble derived from global ground-based GPS receiver networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Nishioka; A. Saito; T. Tsugawa

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence characteristic of plasma bubble was studied using ground-based GPS receiver networks. The occurrence rate of plasma bubble derived from the global GPS network has higher spatial and temporal resolution than that derived from the other observational techniques because of its wide coverage of the observation. The physical characteristics of plasma bubble occurrence were studied in detail with this novel

  7. Direct comparison of nonmigrating tidal signatures in the electrojet, vertical plasma drift and equatorial ionization anomaly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Lühr; M. Rother; K. Häusler; B. Fejer; P. Alken

    This paper presents for the first time a full decomposition of tidal signatures in three important ionospheric quantities, the equatorial electrojet (EEJ), vertical plasma drift and the crest-to-trough ratio (CTR) of the equatorial ionization anomaly. Data sources are the EEJM-2 model, ROCSAT-1 data and CHAMP electron density measurements. The analysis is based on data sampled around the solar maximum 23

  8. Equatorial F-Region Zonal Plasma Drifts Over Jicamarca During Quiet and Disturbed Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Fejer; J. de Souza; A. S. Santos; E. Costa Pereira

    2004-01-01

    F-region zonal plasma drifts are important low latitude ionospheric parameters. We use extensive incoherent scatter observations obtained at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory between 1970 and 2003 to study the characteristics of equatorial zonal plasma drifts near the F-region peak. We present initially the results of a local time, season, and solar flux dependent quiet zonal drift model which uses Bernstein

  9. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Flannigan; Kenneth S. Suslick

    2005-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL1-5) results from the extreme\\u000a temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression;\\u000a calculations have predicted(6,7) the existence of a hot, optically\\u000a opaque plasma core(8) with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation(9,10).\\u000a Recent controversial reports(11,12) claim the observation of neutrons\\u000a from deuterium - deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation(11,12.)\\u000a However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for\\u000a the existence of a

  10. Relation between the occurrence rate of ESF and the equatorial vertical plasma drift velocity at sunset derived from global observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Stolle; H. Lühr

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate two global climatological data sets; the occurrence rate of Equatorial Spread-F (ESF), associated with equatorial plasma irregularities, at ~400 km altitude obtained from CHAMP observations, and the evening equatorial vertical plasma drift, vz, from ROCSAT-1 measurements. First, as retrieved for a solar flux level of F10.7=150, the longitudinal variation of the two independently derived quantities

  11. A method for determining the drift velocity of plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere using far-ultraviolet spacecraft observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Park; S. L. England; T. J. Immel; H. U. Frey; S. B. Mende

    2007-01-01

    The Far-Ultraviolet Imager (IMAGE-FUV) on board the NASA IMAGE satellite has been used to observe plasma depletions in the nightside equatorial ionosphere. Observations from periods around spacecraft apogee, during which equatorial regions are visible for several hours, have allowed the velocity of these plasma depletions to be determined. A new method for determining the velocity of these depletions using an

  12. Assessing the Plasma-Liquid Interface Using Single Bubble Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John; Sagadevan, Athena; Gucker, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Interaction physics and chemistry between a plasma in contact with liquid water occurs at the interface. Energy transport as well as radical species production occurs in this region. An understanding of the physical processes occurring in this region is key to elucidating the effect that plasma has on water chemistry well beyond the interface. Such an understanding has implications in application areas such as plasma medicine and water purification. Here, we present preliminary results from a 2-D system aimed at elucidating the plasma-liquid interface through the study of the interfacial response under the influence of plasma produced in a single, trapped bubble. The spatial extent and associated reactivity of this active layer associated with the interface region is interrogated with chemical probes and optical imaging. Results from these studies are presented. This work is supported by NSF CBET 1336375.

  13. Simulated wave number 4 structure in equatorial F-region vertical plasma drifts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhipeng Ren; Weixing Wan; Jiangang Xiong; Libo Liu

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the wave number 4 longitudinal structure in equatorial vertical E × B plasma drifts (V$\\\\perp$), using the Theoretical Ionospheric Dynamo Model, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Version II model and the DE3 tide wind from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED)\\/TIMED Doppler interferometer (TIDI) observations. We simulate this longitudinal structure and

  14. Dependence of electron trapping on bubble geometry in laser-plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q., E-mail: qkong@fudan.edu.cn [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gu, Y. J. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Kawata, S. [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yohtoh, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of bubble shape in laser-plasma electron acceleration was investigated. We showed the general existence of an ellipsoid bubble. The electromagnetic field in this bubble and its dependence on bubble shape were determined through theory. The electron-trapping cross-section for different bubble aspect ratios was studied in detail. When the shape of the bubble was close to spherical, the trapping cross-section reached to the maximum. When the bubble deviated from a spherical shape, the cross-section decreased until electron injection no longer occurred. These results were confirmed by particle-in-cell simulation.

  15. The Study of the origin of broad plasma depletions in the equatorial F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S.; Lee, W.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y.; Paxton, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Broad plasma depletions (BPDs), plasma depletions broader than regular plasma bubbles, are occasionally detected by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. The BPD phenomenon is understood in association with either plasma bubbles or modulation of the F region height. This study presents the BPD events that are considered to be associated with the latter. The coincident observations of the ionosphere from space (C/NOFS and the first Republic of China satellite) and on the ground (radars and ionosondes) showed that significant fountain process or uplift of the ionosphere occurred in the regions where BPDs were detected. The coincident ionosonde observations in the American sector showed the rapid increase of the F region height and, eventually, the disappearance of the ionosphere at the time of the BPD detection. Some BPDs showed the association with large scale wave structures and storm-induced electric fields. Our observation results indicate that the satellite detection of BPDs can be understood in terms of the uplift of the F region height above the satellite altitude. The coincidence of bubbles often with BPDs is explained by the promotion of the bubble activity by the uplift of the ionosphere.

  16. Fast magnetic reconnection in laser-produced plasma bubbles.

    PubMed

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Germaschewski, K

    2011-05-27

    Recent experiments have observed magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasma bubbles, with reconnection rates observed to be much higher than can be explained by classical theory. Based on fully kinetic particle simulations we find that fast reconnection in these strongly driven systems can be explained by magnetic flux pileup at the shoulder of the current sheet and subsequent fast reconnection via two-fluid, collisionless mechanisms. In the strong drive regime with two-fluid effects, we find that the ultimate reconnection time is insensitive to the nominal system Alfvén time. PMID:21699307

  17. Morphology of the postsunset vortex in the equatorial ionospheric plasma drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo Kyoung; Kil, Hyosub; Kwak, Young-Sil; Paxton, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    postsunset vortex in the equatorial ionosphere exhibits clockwise plasma motions after sunset in longitude (time) and altitude coordinates when the equatorial ionosphere is viewed looking northward. We describe the typical morphology of the postsunset vortex using incoherent scatter radar observations at Jicamarca in Peru during the previous solar maximum (2000-2002). A pronounced vortical plasma motion appears around 1700 LT along with the onset of the prereversal enhancement (PRE). The center of this vortex is located near an altitude of 270 km. A smaller-scale vortex also appears about 0.5 ~ 1 h later at higher altitudes. However, the morphology and occurrence time of this small vortex depend on the characteristics of the coherent backscatter region. We find that the earlier vortex is the major feature of the postsunset vortices because it is repeatable, associated with the PRE, and independent to the occurrence of the coherent backscatter region.

  18. Micro Dynamics of Pulsed Laser Induced Bubbles in Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.-W.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-P.; I Lin [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhungli, Taiwan 32001 (China)

    2008-09-07

    We experimentally study the micro dynamics of the laser induced plasma bubble in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dust particles suspended in a low pressure rf Ar glow discharge. The plume from the ablation of the suspended dust particles pushes away dust particle and generates a dust-free plasma bubble. It then travels downward. The spatio-temporal evolution of the dust density fluctuation surrounding the bubble is monitored by directly tracking dust motion through optical video microscopy. The micro dynamics of the bubble associated dust acoustic type solitary oscillation in the wake field is investigated and discussed.

  19. Plasma Line Emission during Single-Bubble Cavitation David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Plasma Line Emission during Single-Bubble Cavitation David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick-bubble cavitation in sulfuric acid are reported. The excited states responsible for these emission lines range 8.3 e the plasma generated during cavitation is comprised of highly energetic particles. DOI: 10.1103/Phys

  20. Plasma Wave Irregularities in the Equatorial Upper E Region at Twilight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ILMA, R.; Hysell, D.

    2013-12-01

    A new class of plasma irregularities in the postsunset equatorial upper E region has been detected by radar experiments over Jicamarca, Peru [Chau and Hysell , 2004]. In comparison with daytime plasma irregularities, nighttime large-scale plasma waves are not well understood. These waves has been detected with the JULIA (Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Atmosphere) operation mode at Jicamarca. Despite the fact that observations of this new class of irregularities were made, there has been a lack of interest into the characterization of them. As stated by the work of Hysell and Chau [2002] and Chau and Hysell [2004], the source of these irregularities is related to gradient-drift (or interchange) instability process. This instability was firstly investigated for laboratory plasmas by Simon [1963]. It arises in the presence of an ionization gradient perpendicular to the current flow in a plasma [Sudan et al., 1973]. In the equatorial upper E region, the passage of the solar terminator generates an steep horizontal conductivity gradients which induce an upward current in the upper E region which is known to be present in the vicinity of the evening solar terminator and it is linked directly with the F-region overhead. This work focus on show experimental evidence, numerical simulation results and a theoretical discussion which attempts to describe the origin of these irregularities.

  1. KINETIC THEORY OF EQUILIBRIUM AXISYMMETRIC COLLISIONLESS PLASMAS IN OFF-EQUATORIAL TORI AROUND COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Ková?, Ji?í; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zden?k [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezru?ovo nám.13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic); Karas, Vladimír [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Bo?ní II, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  2. Coordinated airborne and satellite measurements of equatorial plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Brinton, H.C.; Buchau, J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in December 1979 to investigate the structure of plasma depletions in the low latitude, nightime ionosphere. The measurements included all sky imaging photometer (ASIP), ionosonde and amplitude scintillation observations from the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory (AIO), and in situ ion density measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E) Bennett Ion Mass Spectrometer (BIMS). The AIO performed two flights along the Ascension Island (-18/sup 0/ MLAT) magnetic meridian: one in the southern hemisphere and one near the Ascension conjugate point in the northern hemisphere. During these flights, measurements from the AE-E satellite at 434 km altitude are compared with simultaneous remote ionospheric measurements from the AIO. Density biteouts of approximately one order of magnitude in the dominant ion O/sup +/, were mapped to lower altitudes along magnetic field lines for comparison with 6300-A and 7774-A O I airglow depletions. Because of the different airglow production mechanisms (dissociative recombination of O/sup +//sub 2/ for 6300 A and radiative recombination of O/sup +/ for 7774 A) the 6300-A depletions reflect plasma depletions near the bottomside of the F layer, while those at 7774 A are located near the peak of the layer. The O/sup +/ biteouts map directly into the 7774-A airglow depletions in the same hemisphere and also when traced into the opposite hemisphere, which indicates magnetic flux tube alignment over north-south distances of approx.2220 km. The 6300-A (bottomside) depletions are wider in longitude than the 7774-A (F-peak) depletions near the equatorward edge of the Appleton anomaly. This difference in topside and bottomside structure is used to infer large-scale structure near the anomaly and to relate this to structure, commonly observed near the magnetic equator by the ALTAIR radar.

  3. Analytic model of electromagnetic fields around a plasma bubble in the blow-out regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    An analytic model of the electric and magnetic fields surrounding the nonlinear plasma 'bubble' formed around the high-current electron bunch in a plasma wakefield accelerator is developed. The model, justified by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, accurately captures the thin high-density plasma sheath and extended return current layer surrounding the bubble. The resulting global fields inside and outside the bubble are used to investigate electron self-injection in a plasma with a smooth density gradient. It is shown that accurate description of the current/density sheaths is crucial for quantitative description of self-injection.

  4. Plasmas sustained in bubbles in water: optical emission and excitation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Tachibana, Kunhide; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-02-01

    Plasmas in bubbles in water are being investigated for their ability to produce chemically reactive species for water purification and medical treatment. The gas forming the bubble is potentially a design parameter for water purification as the type and rate of production of active species may be controllable by the type of gas in the bubble. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the dynamics of plasmas in bubbles in water sustained in different gases. Images, optical spectra and plasma properties are discussed for plasmas in bubbles of N2, Ar and He in water, and compared to experiments. The differences in plasma dynamics and spatial distribution of the plasma (e.g., volume discharge or surface hugging) when using different gases depend in large part on the electron energy relaxation length, and the rate of diffusion of water vapour into the interior of the bubble. Electron impact dissociative excitation of water vapour, electron impact excitation of dissociation products and excitation transfer from the plasma excited injected bubble gases to water vapour all contribute to plasma emission. Variations in the contributions of these processes are responsible for differences in the observed optical spectra and differences in radical production.

  5. Simulations of Images and Optical Spectra of Plasmas Sustained in Bubbles in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Plasmas in bubbles in water are being investigated for their ability to produce chemically reactive species for water purification and medical treatment. The gas in the bubbles is important to the production of these active species. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the dynamics of plasmas in bubbles in water. These simulations were performed using nonPDPSIM, in which Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, and electron temperature are integrated in 2-dimensions on an unstructured mesh. Bubbles of specified composition and size ( 3 mm diameter) in water at atmospheric pressure are placed at the tip of the powered electrode and water vapor is allowed to diffuse into the bubble from the vapor-water boundary. Voltage pulses (15-30 kV) produce plasma streamers in the bubble which typically hug the vapor-water boundary. Images, optical spectra and plasma properties will be discussed for bubbles of N2, Ar and He, and compared to experiments [1]. The differences in plasma dynamics and appearance (e.g., volume discharge or surface hugging) depend in large part on the electron energy relaxation length, and the rate of diffusion of water vapor into the interior. Electron impact dissociative excitation of water vapor and excitation transfer processes from injected bubble gases to the water vapor are responsible for differences in the optical spectra and, by inference, differences in radical production. [4pt] [1] K. Tachibana, et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20, 034005 (2011).

  6. Equatorial Post-Sunset Plasma Irregularities As Seen from the Swarm Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, C.; Park, J.; Xiong, C.; Luhr, H.; Fejer, B. G.; Rauberg, J.; Michaelis, I.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial plasma irregularities are highly dynamic features in the post-sunset ionosphere. They include a modulation of many different ionospheric parameters at the same time, such as plasma density, neutral density, electric field, and magnetic field (electric currents). Variations in plasma temperatures are also expected. So far, these parameters have been sensed by different instruments deployed during different campaigns. The newly launched satellite mission Swarm will provide observations of all these parameters onboard the same spacecraft simultaneously, with a sampling frequency of 1 Hz or higher. In addition, the Swarm constellation mission with 3 satellites, two flying side-by-side at about 470km altitude and with a local time difference of about 4min, and another satellite flying at 510km altitude provides excellent opportunity, e.g., to derive the spatial persistence of structures at different scales lengths. This paper will show first results from Swarm satellite observations of post-sunset equatorial plasma irregularities. The occurrence frequency is compared to previously known results and with respect to expected variations in solar flux level and sensing altitude, correlation lengths for small and large scale structures are discussed and the simultaneous observations are used to estimate the drift speed and/or inclination of the irregularities. Given the actual state of the different Swarm data, it is tested whether and to which level irregularity magnetic signatures can be predicted by means of the remaining parameters that are sensed onboard the satellites.

  7. Investigation of the plasma bubble and blob connection in the low latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Miller, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The creation mechanism of plasma bubbles in the low latitude ionosphere is still under debate. Model simulations showed the creation of blobs off the magnetic equator as a consequence of the generation of bubbles. A recent study showed the co-existence of bubbles and blobs and supported the model simulation results. However, the frequent detection of blobs far beyond the bubble apex height and during solar minimum is difficult to explain by the bubble-blob connection hypothesis. In this study, we investigate the causal relationship between bubbles and blobs by analyzing the coincident C/NOFS and radar observations. The optical observations from space by the DMSP/SSUSI will also be used to identify the existence of bubbles at the time of the blob detection.

  8. THEMIS observations of plasma bubbles associated with energetic electron acceleration in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations, we study the plasma bubbles associated with a transient increase of the magnetic field Bz component in the inner magnetosphere during the substorm expansion phase. Except small electric field, the main characteristics of these plasma bubbles are similar with those associated with dipolarization front (DF) in the mid-tail and near-Earth tail. Based on the different dipolarization of the magnetic field, we defined the plasma bubble with no dipolarization phenomenon as "no dipolarization bubble" (NDB), the plasma bubble with dipolarization phenomenon as "dipolarization bubble" (DB). We find that these plasma bubbles in the inner magnetosphere accompany the energetic electron acceleration. Some pancake-type distributions of energetic electrons inside the NDB in the inner magnetosphere are caused by drift betatron acceleration, other pancake-type distributions of energetic electrons inside the NDB are caused by gyrobetatron acceleration. For the DB in the inner magnetosphere, the cigar-type distributions of energetic electrons are attributed to Fermi acceleration. Our observations suggest that the inner magnetosphere may be a very important source region for energetic electrons, except for a reconnection site in the mid-tail and the plasma sheet in the near-Earth tail.

  9. Research on plasma and bubble behavior of pulsed corona discharge in salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yao-Hong Sun; Ping Yan

    2004-01-01

    Summary form only given. This paper describes a pulse corona discharge in salt water with large gap between electrodes. The process of discharge and bubble behavior is investigated by means of high-speed photography. The results show that the plasma produced by discharge only exists around the tip of the electrodes, the bubble shape being approximately spherical, no throughout arc channel

  10. Characteristics of the plasma distribution in Mercury's equatorial magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M.; Slavin, James A.; Purucker, Michael E.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Localized reductions in the magnetic field associated with plasma pressure in Mercury's magnetospheric cusp and nightside plasma sheet have been routinely observed by the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. We present a statistical analysis of near-equatorial magnetic depressions to derive the structure of Mercury's plasma sheet pressure. Because the plasma pressure in the magnetosphere correlates with solar wind density, the pressures were normalized to a Mercury heliocentric distance of 0.39 AU. A model magnetic field was used to map observations obtained on the ascending and descending orbit nodes to the magnetic equator and revealed the presence of plasma in a toroidal section extending on the nightside from dusk to dawn. Mapping the data to invariant magnetic latitude shows that the pressure is symmetric about the magnetic equator. The average pressure normalized for heliocentric distance is 1.45 nPa and exhibits a weak, 0.05 nPa/h, dusk-to-dawn gradient with local time. The plasma sheet pressure can vary between successive orbits by an order of magnitude. Unlike the predictions of some global simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere, the plasma enhancements do not form a closed distribution around the planet. This difference may arise from the idealized solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions used in the simulations, which maximize the size and stability of the magnetosphere, thus promoting the formation of drift paths that close around the planet. For typical plasma sheet energies, 5 keV, the first adiabatic invariant for protons fails to be conserved even within 500 km altitude at midnight, implying that stochastic processes must be considered in plasma sheet transport.

  11. Scintillations, plasma drifts, and neutral winds in the equatorial ionosphere after sunset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Kudeki, E.; Basu, Su.; Valladares, C. E.; Weber, E. J.; Zengingonul, H. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Sheehan, R.; Meriwether, J. W.; Biondi, M. A.; Kuenzler, H.; Espinoza, J.

    1996-12-01

    An equatorial campaign was conducted during September 25 to October 7, 1994, to investigate the neutral and plasma dynamics in the equatorial ionosphere after sunset in relation to the day-to-day variability of the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF). The campaign was organized under the auspices of National Science Foundation's Multi-Instrumented Studies of the Equatorial Thermosphere Aeronomy program (MISETA), which included the Jicamarca radar, spaced-antenna satellite scintillation, digisonde, all-sky imager, and Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) measurements near the magnetic equator in Peru. During a part of the period, September 27 to October 3, the Geophysics Directorate of Phillips Laboratory performed measurements away from the magnetic equator at Aguaverde, Chile (magnetic latitude: 11°S) located 800 km to the east of the Jicamarca meridian using geostationary and GPS satellite scintillation, digisonde and all-sky imager systems. The incoherent scatter radar results indicate that the postsunset enhancement of upward plasma drift, even though of the order of only 20ms-1 during the solar minimum period, is a necessary condition for the generation of ESF. In view of the extreme difficulty of determining the neutral wind speed during the early evening hours by the FPI due to low airglow intensity, it was not possible to unequivocally associate the observed postsunset enhancements with strong eastward neutral winds. However, considering a few observations contiguous to the campaign period, it appears that such a causal relationship may exist. The scintillation drift measurements in Peru and Chile indicated that the zonal irregularity drift was smaller away from the magnetic equator implying a variation of neutral wind with latitude. This is reproduced in the altitude variation of zonal drift observed by the Jicamarca radar. During a magnetic storm, scintillation measurements indicated that eastward drifts near the magnetic equator are accompanied by westward drifts near the anomaly peak which is consistent with the effects of a disturbance dynamo. The campaign results indicate that in order to resolve the variability of ESF, a careful probing of neutral dynamics as a function of latitude needs to be undertaken during the postsunset period.

  12. Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment (COPEX) campaign in Brazil: Electrodynamics highlights on spread F development conditions and day-to-day variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Abdu; I. S. Batista; B. W. Reinisch; J. R. de Souza; J. H. A. Sobral; T. R. Pedersen; A. F. Medeiros; N. J. Schuch; E. R. de Paula; K. M. Groves

    2009-01-01

    A Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment (COPEX) campaign was conducted during the October–December 2002 period in Brazil, with the objective to investigate the equatorial spread F\\/plasma bubble irregularity (ESF) development conditions in terms of the electrodynamical state of the ionosphere along the magnetic flux tubes in which they occur. A network of instruments, including Digisondes, optical imagers, and GPS receivers, was

  13. Equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.

    1990-12-01

    The development of research in E and F regions of the ionosphere in India since about 1950 is briefly described. The various geomagnetic factors controlling the F region at low latitudes during quiet, disturbed days, on different ages of the moon are described. The equatorial electrojet current, its association with general Sq currents, geomagnetic disturbance and solar disturbance are shown due to changes of the electric fields at the equator. The phenomenon of spread-F at low latitudes is shown to be associated with the regeneration of equatorial plasma fountain during the post sunset hours similar to the daytime plasma fountain associated with equatorial ionization anomaly. The narrow belt of ionosphere, the magnetic equator, is shown to be very sensitive to electric field of local origin or even to electric field generated at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind on the earth's magnetosphere.

  14. A simulation study on the impact of altitudinal dependent vertical plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere in the evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Lei, Jiuhou; Wang, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    We carry out a simulation study on the impact of altitudinal dependent plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere in the evening, under geomagnetically quiet conditions. Our study used the vertical plasma drift velocity data measured by an incoherent scatter radar at Jicamarca (11.95°S, 76.87°W). The data covered the local sunset period on 15 and 16 November 2004. The plasma drift had significant altitudinal variations in the vertical component, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field. We employed SAMI2 (SAMI2 is another model of the ionosphere) to evaluate the effect of the altitude-dependent ion drift on the equatorial ionosphere. Three types of plasma drift velocity inputs were used in our simulations. The first input is calculated from an empirical model, the second is a height-averaged drift obtained from the observed drift velocity, and the third one corresponds to the observed altitudinal dependent drift data. A strong equatorial ionization anomaly occurred in the results of all numerical experiments. Additional layers (F3 layers) in electron densities over the equatorial F region and "arch" latitudinal structures extending to lower middle latitudes were seen in the simulations driven by the observed altitudinal dependent drift. We further show that neutral winds do not have a significant effect on the simulated F3 layers. The results of our numerical experiments suggest that the simulated additional ionospheric layers and arch structures are associated with the altitudinal gradients in the vertical plasma drift velocity.

  15. Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experimental Investigation Using a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    The poster will first discuss the construction and improved design of a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of magnetic bubble expansion into a lower pressure background plasma, which as a model for extragalactic radio lobes and solar coronal mass ejections. In this experiment, the plasma bubble's density, electron temperature, and propagation speed are measured by using a multiple-tipped langmuir probe. Also a three axis B-dot probe array is used to measure the magnetic field in three dimensions during the expansion process. In this poster experiment setup and data will be provided. Finally the comparison with the simulation result will be made.

  16. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  17. Field-reversed bubble in deep plasma channels for high-quality electron acceleration.

    PubMed

    Pukhov, A; Jansen, O; Tueckmantel, T; Thomas, J; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2014-12-12

    We study hollow plasma channels with smooth boundaries for laser-driven electron acceleration in the bubble regime. Contrary to the uniform plasma case, the laser forms no optical shock and no etching at the front. This increases the effective bubble phase velocity and energy gain. The longitudinal field has a plateau that allows for monoenergetic acceleration. We observe as low as 10?³ rms relative witness beam energy uncertainty in each cross section and 0.3% total energy spread. By varying the plasma density profile inside a deep channel, the bubble fields can be adjusted to balance the laser depletion and dephasing lengths. Bubble scaling laws for the deep channel are derived. Ultrashort pancakelike laser pulses lead to the highest energies of accelerated electrons per Joule of laser pulse energy. PMID:25541776

  18. Bubble Bubble

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mercer Mayer

    2009-11-11

    With magic bubble solution, a boy discovers that he can blow any kind of bubble imaginable: a kangaroo, a bird, a car, or a boat. Mercer Mayer's colorful illustrations enliven this engaging tale of mysterious bubbles.

  19. Space weather phenomena in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Archana

    2013-03-01

    Our increasing dependence on space-based technological systems requires that we understand the factors that determine "space weather", which affects the operation of satellites as well as space-based communication and navigation systems. The latter are particularly vulnerable to conditions in the dip equatorial ionosphere where geometry of the geomagnetic field creates conditions for the growth of certain plasma instabilities, which produce sub-kilometer scale structure in the ionospheric plasma that are capable of scattering VHF and higher frequency radio waves. The phenomenon of the equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) that occurs in the postsunset equatorial and low latitude ionosphere is therefore an important component of space weather in this region. Forecasting of this space weather phenomenon involves not only the identification of ambient conditions responsible for the day-to-day variation in its occurrence and spatial structure during magnetically quiet periods but also understanding the influence of solar variability on these conditions. This paper discusses briefly our present understanding of the role played by certain parameters of the equatorial ionosphere in the development of EPBs and the influence of solar activity on the equatorial ionosphere, in the context of its role in the generation of ionospheric irregularities that may be detrimental to the operation of space-based communication and navigation systems.

  20. An empirical model of the drift velocity of equatorial plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S. L.; Immel, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Far-Ultraviolet Imager on the IMAGE spacecraft (IMAGE-FUV) has been used to observe O+plasma depletions in the post-sunset equatorial ionosphere. Small-scale density irregularities associated with such depletions are believed to adversely affect trans-ionospheric radio signals such as GPS. Prediction of the motion of these plasma depletions is a necessary component of the ability to forecast the occurrence of such radio signal interference. An automated method has recently been developed to identify and track the position and zonal drift velocity of these depletions. Here we use this method to create a large database of the zonal drift velocities of these depletions. We present an empirical model based on these observations that describes the observed drift velocities as a function of both local time and magnetic latitude, which is essential to represent their behavior. A comparison of the observed drift velocities with zonal winds from both an empirical model (Horizontal Wind Model; HWM07) and a first-principles model (the TIEGCM) reveals that the plasma depletions' drift velocities have a latitudinal gradient that cannot be explained solely by the F-region dynamo in the post-sunset period, at least by these climatological models. This suggests that these plasma depletions may not simply drift with the background F-region plasma. It has previously been suggested that vertical polarization electric fields associated with the plasma depletions are responsible for their zonal drifts exceeding the background flow, which may explain the previously-observed discrepancy in the drift velocities and the discrepancy in their gradients reported here.

  1. Variation of type 1 plasma wave phase velocity with electron drift velocity in the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Sudha; Reddy, C. A.

    1993-12-01

    Using a 54.95-MHz coherent backscatter radar at Thumba (8.5 deg N, 77 deg E; 0.5 deg N dip angle), the phase velocity variations of type 1 plasma waves generated by the modified two-stream instability process in the equatorial electrojet have been measured on several occasions of large and rapid electric field flunctuations associated with geomagnetic substorms and storms. The measurements show a clear linear variation of type 1 wave phase velocity (VIp) over a considerable range with the simultaneously measured phase velocity (VIIp) of gradient drift instability-generated type 2 plasma waves. Since VIIp is porportional to the drift velocity of electrons, the observed variations of VIp with VIIp mean that VIp varies in step with the variations of the electron drift velocity Vey. The observed variation of VIp with Vey is consistent with the current theoretical understanding that the plasma wave-associated electric fields cause anomalous electron diffusion and heating which result in the stabilization of the type 1 wave phase velocity near the increased value of the ion-acoustic velocity. The enhanced electron temperatures estimated from the largest values of the observed VIp are found to be 2.0 - 2.4 times the ambient value in the absence of waves.

  2. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  3. Remote sensing of possible plasma density bubbles in the inner Jovian dayside magnetosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Farrell; M. L. Kaiser; W. S. Kurth; M. D. Desch; D. A. Gurnett; G. B. Hospodarsky; R. J. MacDowall

    2004-01-01

    During the 2001 Cassini encounter with Jupiter, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument detected fine spectral and temporal structure with broadband kilometric radiation. Applying known electron cyclotron harmonic radiation models, this microstructure is interpreted as originating from a plasma density depletion or bubble at the edge of the Io torus. The microstructure became very complicated at the event

  4. Electron self-injection into an evolving plasma bubble: Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration in the blowout regimea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Beck, A.; Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V. N.; Downer, M. C.; Lefebvre, E.; Shadwick, B. A.; Umstadter, D. P.

    2011-05-01

    An electron density bubble driven in a rarefied uniform plasma by a slowly evolving laser pulse goes through periods of adiabatically slow expansions and contractions. Bubble expansion causes robust self-injection of initially quiescent plasma electrons, whereas stabilization and contraction terminate self-injection thus limiting injected charge; concomitant phase space rotation reduces the bunch energy spread. In regimes relevant to experiments with hundred terawatt- to petawatt-class lasers, bubble dynamics and, hence, the self-injection process are governed primarily by the driver evolution. Collective transverse fields of the trapped electron bunch reduce the accelerating gradient and slow down phase space rotation. Bubble expansion followed by stabilization and contraction suppresses the low-energy background and creates a collimated quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch long before dephasing. Nonlinear evolution of the laser pulse (spot size oscillations, self-compression, and front steepening) can also cause continuous self-injection, resulting in a large dark current, degrading the electron beam quality.

  5. Electron self-injection into an evolving plasma bubble: Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration in the blowout regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Shadwick, B. A.; Umstadter, D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Beck, A.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V. N.; Downer, M. C. [Department of Physics, C1500, niversity of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    An electron density bubble driven in a rarefied uniform plasma by a slowly evolving laser pulse goes through periods of adiabatically slow expansions and contractions. Bubble expansion causes robust self-injection of initially quiescent plasma electrons, whereas stabilization and contraction terminate self-injection thus limiting injected charge; concomitant phase space rotation reduces the bunch energy spread. In regimes relevant to experiments with hundred terawatt- to petawatt-class lasers, bubble dynamics and, hence, the self-injection process are governed primarily by the driver evolution. Collective transverse fields of the trapped electron bunch reduce the accelerating gradient and slow down phase space rotation. Bubble expansion followed by stabilization and contraction suppresses the low-energy background and creates a collimated quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch long before dephasing. Nonlinear evolution of the laser pulse (spot size oscillations, self-compression, and front steepening) can also cause continuous self-injection, resulting in a large dark current, degrading the electron beam quality.

  6. Topside ionosphere bubbles, seen as He+ density depletions: connection with ESF, vertical plasma drift, thermosphere wind and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Larissa

    He+ density depletions, considered as originating from equatorial plasma bubbles (PB), or as possible fossil bubble signatures, were involved in this study. He+ density depletions were observed during a high solar activity (1978-79, F10.7 200) at the topside ionosphere altitudes deeply inside the plasmasphere (L 1.3-3) (Karpachev and Sidorova, ASR, 2002; Sidorova, ASR, 2004, 2007). It is suggested that the equatorial F region irregularities, their post sunset development, evolution, and decay processes are controlled by the sunset electrodynamics of the equatorial region. The He+ density depletion peculiarities were considered in connection with equatorial F-spread (ESF) and vertical plasma drift. The depletion values as function of local time (evening-night hours) were compared with the vertical plasma drift velocity variations, obtained for the same periods (1978-79, F10.7 200; AE-E, IS radar, Jicamarca). Striking similarity in development dynamics was revealed for the different seasons. The monthly mean PB occurrence probability, plotted in local time versus month, was compared with the similar plots for global ESF occurrence probability, derived from ISS-b data (1978-79). Good seasonal correlation (R=0.6) was obtained. Moreover, the comparison of the regional maps, derived from ground-based ionograms, obtained over Brazilian regions (Abdu et al., ASR, 2000) for period with the similar solar activity (1980-81, F10.7 230), shows very well correlation (R=0.67). It is also suggested, that the PBs, produced by Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability at the bottomside of ionosphere and transported up to the topside ionosphere/plasmasphere, could be strong affected by meridional wind during a generation due to inhibiting the growth of R-T instability and flux tube integrated conductivity. For better understanding competing/complementary roles of thermospheric winds in the development of PBs, seen as He+ density depletions, the evaluation of the possible influence of the thermosphere meridional winds was done. The diurnal PB statistics, averaged for the periods around the solstices and equinoxes, was compared with the model velocity variations of the meridional thermosphere wind. The wind model calculation was taken from (Maruyama, JGR, 1996). The best amplitude correlation was found for the longitudes of 270-360° (Brazilia, Atlantic regions), where declination angle is near 20?. It was obtained that the topside PBs, seen as He+ density depletions, are strong enough affected by meridional wind. The modulation effect has a seasonal dependence and the best correlation in equinox (R=0.87). He+ density depletion occurrence in dependence on solar activity was also under consideration. It was revealed that there are many cases of the He+ density depletions in solar maxima on the OGO-4 (1968, 20th cycle), OGO-6 (1969, 20th cycle) and DE-2 (1981, 21th cycle) data. It was concluded that the topside PBs, seen as He+ density depletions, are rather typical phenomena for the topside ionosphere for high solar activity epoch. The possible reasons of topside PB occurrence as function of solar activity are discussed.

  7. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yasuoka, K.

    2012-02-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  8. Quenching Cluster Cooling Flows with Recurrent Hot Plasma Bubbles

    E-print Network

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Richard Bower; Tom Theuns; Michael Balogh; Pasquale Mazzotta; Carlos S. Frenk

    2004-09-07

    The observed cooling rate of hot gas in clusters is much lower than that inferred from the gas density profiles. This suggests that the gas is being heated by some source. We use an adaptive-mesh refinement code (FLASH) to simulate the effect of multiple, randomly positioned, injections of thermal energy within 50 kpc of the centre of an initially isothermal cluster with mass M_200=3x10^(14) Msol and kT=3.1 keV. We have performed eight simulations with spherical bubbles of energy generated every 10^8 years, over a total of 1.5 Gyr. Each bubble is created by injecting thermal energy steadily for 10^7 years; the total energy of each bubble ranges from 0.1--3x10^(60) erg, depending on the simulation. We find that 2x10^(60) erg per bubble (corresponding to a average power of 6.3x10^(44) erg/s) effectively balances energy loss in the cluster and prevents the accumulation of gas below kT=1 keV from exceeding the observational limits of 30 Msol/yr. This injection rate is comparable to the radiated luminosity of the cluster, and the required energy and periodic timescale of events are consistent with observations of bubbles produced by central AGN in clusters. The effectiveness of this process depends primarily on the total amount of injected energy and the initial location of the bubbles, but is relatively insensitive to the exact duty cycle of events.

  9. A method for determining the drift velocity of plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere using far-ultraviolet spacecraft observations: initial results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. England; T. J. Immel; S. H. Park; H. U. Frey; S. B. Mende

    2007-01-01

    The Far-Ultraviolet Imager (IMAGE-FUV) on-board the NASA IMAGE satellite has been used to observe plasma depletions in the nightside equatorial ionosphere. Observations from periods around spacecraft apogee, during which equatorial regions are visible for several hours, have allowed the velocity of these plasma depletions to be determined. A new method for determining the velocity of these depletions using an image

  10. Synergistic Laser-Wakefield and Direct-Laser Acceleration in the Plasma-Bubble Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-05-01

    The concept of a hybrid laser plasma accelerator is proposed. Relativistic electrons undergoing resonant betatron oscillations inside the plasma bubble created by a laser pulse are accelerated by gaining energy directly from the laser pulse and from its plasma wake. The resulting phase space of self-injected plasma electrons is split into two, containing a subpopulation that experiences wakefield acceleration beyond the standard dephasing limit because of the multidimensional nature of its motion that reduces the phase slippage between the electrons and the wake.

  11. Synergistic laser-wakefield and direct-laser acceleration in the plasma-bubble regime.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir N; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-05-01

    The concept of a hybrid laser plasma accelerator is proposed. Relativistic electrons undergoing resonant betatron oscillations inside the plasma bubble created by a laser pulse are accelerated by gaining energy directly from the laser pulse and from its plasma wake. The resulting phase space of self-injected plasma electrons is split into two, containing a subpopulation that experiences wakefield acceleration beyond the standard dephasing limit because of the multidimensional nature of its motion that reduces the phase slippage between the electrons and the wake. PMID:26001005

  12. Global bubble distribution seen from ROCSAT-1 and its association with the evening prereversal enhancement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyosub Kil; Larry J. Paxton; Seung-Jun Oh

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence statistics of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) obtained from low-inclination orbit satellites are significantly affected by the way the data are sampled and the way that the EPBs are counted. To resolve the discrepancy between the EPB occurrence frequency determined by ground-based observations and in situ sampling of plasma density from spacecraft, we have developed a new EPB detection

  13. Simulation with power circuit by modeling of plasmas within bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obo, Hayato; Takeuchi, Nozomi; Yasuoka, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Plasma is used in water treatments such as the decomposition of persistent compounds and the generation of chemically active species. We have developed a new plasma reactor with 21 treatment holes and successfully achieved the decomposition of organofluoric compounds by generating 21 plasmas in water. The equivalent circuit model of plasma within bubbles in water consists of plasma and water resistance. A typical plasma model consists of a Zener diode and cannot be used to express the transient state of plasma. In the Zener diode model, therefore, plasma cannot be simulated with a power circuit. In this work, we have developed a new equivalent circuit that consists of an ideal switch, a diode, and water resistance to model the plasma. With the circuit elements used in our model, it is possible to perform simulation of plasmas by modeling the generation as well as the extinction of plasma with a high voltage power circuit. We confirmed that the simulated voltage and current waveforms of the reactor were coincident with the experimental result by applying the variation of a plasma parameter in the plasma model.

  14. The equatorial ionosphere over Brazilian region from ground based and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Abdu, Mangalathayil Ali; Vogel Ely, Claudia

    The equatorial ionosphere is characterized by various phenomena such as the instability pro-cesses that originate the equatorial electrojet, the equatorial ionization anomaly and the iono-spheric irregularities and plasma bubbles that can cause severe interference in the trans-ionospheric propagation of electromagnetic waves. Over the Brazilian region a set of ground based diagnose equipments has being providing data for more than three decades, that allowed a fairly good understanding of the climatology and of the main characteristics and peculiarities of the ionospheric phenomena over the region. Recent satellite missions, such as the Formosat 3/COSMIC, have provided a significant database that can be explored to give a more com-plete picture of the equatorial ionosphere. In this work we discuss the importance of these two datasets for the ionospheric studies over the equatorial region and present some results for the Brazilian region.

  15. Analytic model of electron self-injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator in the strongly nonlinear bubble regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Self-injection of background electrons in plasma wakefield accelerators in the highly nonlinear bubble regime is analyzed using particle-in-cell and semi-analytic modeling. It is shown that the return current in the bubble sheath layer is crucial for accurate determination of the trapped particle trajectories.

  16. Design of a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun for Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan G.; Hsu, Scott C.; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    We will discuss the design of a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun and its associated hardware systems in detail. The plasma gun will be used for experimental studies of magnetic bubble expansion into a lower pressure background plasma, as a model for extragalactic radio lobes. The gun is powered by an ignitron-switched capacitor bank. High-pressure gas will be puffed into an annular gap between inner and outer coaxial electrodes. An applied high voltage ionizes the gas and creates a radial current sheet. The 100kA discharge current generates toroidal flux; poloidal flux is provided by using an external bias magnet. The axial JxB force ejects plasma out of the gun. If the JxB force exceeds the magnetic tension of the poloidal flux by a sufficient amount then a detached magnetized plasma will be formed. The poster will discuss the plasma bubble formation system including the power system, gas valve control system, bias flux power system, and the magnetic probe diagnostic in detail. Experimental data will be provided.

  17. HF Radar for Long-Range Monitoring of Ionospheric Irregularities in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, T. R.; Parris, R. T.; Dao, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric instabilities associated with plasma bubbles in the equatorial region are one of the major space weather impacts, creating scintillation that affects satellite communications and navigation as well as spread-F and propagation effects on lower frequency systems. Coherent scatter radars can be used to detect the presence of irregularities at a scale size corresponding to half the wavelength of the radar when the raypaths are perpendicular to the magnetic field. A number of vertical incidence radars operating in the VHF range near the magnetic equator use this effect to map out vertical irregularity structure in bubbles, while at high latitudes in both the northern and more recently southern hemisphere, HF radars in the SuperDARN network have successfully used refraction along near-horizontal paths to reach perpendicularity with the near-vertical magnetic field and map out ionospheric convection and irregularity structure over fields of view thousands of km across. In the equatorial region, perpendicularity can be obtained anywhere within a near-vertical plane even without refraction, although refraction can be used to achieve long ranges after one or more reflections from the earth's surface and bottomside ionosphere. This potentially provides a means of detecting and monitoring equatorial plasma bubbles over the oceans from long ranges using a small number of ground-based sites. We discuss the possible echoes that could be detected by such a system, the likely propagation modes and characteristics, and means of obtaining and utilizing elevation angle information to correctly locate distant plasma bubbles.

  18. Bubble phenomenon in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, L.

    There are the indications that plasma bubbles produced by Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the bottomside of ionosphere could rise up to the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere Maryama and Matuura 1984 using ISS-b satellite data high solar activity period 1978-79 have seen the plasma bubbles in Ne density over equator at 1100 km altitudes in 46 cases in 1700 passes That is sim 3 only However there is distinctly another picture in He density depletions subtroughs According to ISS-b data He density subtroughs occur in the topside ionosphere over equatorial and low-latitudinal regions L sim 1 3-3 in 11 of the cases Karpachev Sidorova 2002 Sidorova 2004 The detailed statistical study of the He density subtrough peculiarities was done The subtrough depth depletion value as function of local time evening--night hours was compared with the vertical plasma drift velocity variations obtained for the same periods from AE-E satellite and IS radar Jicamarca data Striking similarity in development dynamics was revealed for the different seasons It was noted also that the He density subtroughs are mostly observed in the evening-night sector 18-05 LT from October till May It was like to the peculiarities of the equatorial spread-F ESF usually associated with plasma bubble The monthly mean He density subtrough occurrence probability plotted in local time versus month was compared with the similar plots for ESF occurrence probability derived by Abdu and colleagues 2000 from

  19. Airglow-imaging observation of plasma bubble disappearance at geomagnetically conjugate points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Lynn, K. J. W.; Wilkinson, P. W.; Tsugawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first observation of the disappearance of plasma bubbles overgeomagnetically conjugate points. It was observed by airglow imagers at Darwin,Australia (magnetic latitude: -22N) and Sata, Japan (21N) on 8 August 2002. Theplasma bubble was observed in 630-nm airglow images from 1530 UT (0030 LT) to1800 UT (0300 LT) and disappeared equatorward at 1800-1900 UT (0300-0400 LT) inthe field of view. The ionograms at Darwin and Yamagawa (20 km north of Sata)show strong spread-F signatures at ~16-21 UT. At Darwin, the F-layer virtualheight suddenly increased from ~200 km to ~260 km at the time of bubbledisappearance. However a similar F-layer height increase was not observed overthe conjugate point at Yamagawa, indicating that this F-layer rise was causednot by an eastward electric field but by enhancement of the equatorwardthermospheric wind over Darwin. We think that this enhancement of theequatorward neutral wind was caused by an equatorward-propagating large-scaletraveling ionospheric disturbance, which was identified in the north-southkeogram of 630-nm airglow images. We suggest that either F-region dynamoor polarization electric field associated with this equatorward neutral winddrive plasma drift across the magnetic field line to cause the observed bubbledisappearance.

  20. Coordinated in situ measurements of plasma irregularities and ground based scintillation observations at the crest of equatorial anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Shivalika; Gwal, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    First comparison of in situ density fluctuations measured by the DEMETER satellite with ground based GPS receiver measurements at the equatorial anomaly station Bhopal (geographic coordinates (23.2°N, 77.6°E); geomagnetic coordinates (14.29°N, 151.12°E) for the low solar activity year 2005, are presented in this paper. Calculation of the diurnal maximum of the strength of the equatorial electrojet, which can serve as precursor to ionospheric scintillations in the anomaly region is also done. The Langmuir Probe experiment and Plasma Analyzer onboard DEMETER measure the electron and ion densities respectively. Irregularities in electron density distribution cause scintillations on transionospheric links and there exists a close relationship between an irregularity and scintillation. In 40% of the cases, DEMETER detects the irregularity structures (dNe/Ne ? 5% and dNi/Ni (O+) ? 5%) and GPS L band scintillations (S4 ? 0.2) are also observed around the same time, for the low solar activity period. It is found that maximum irregularity intensity is obtained in the geomagnetic latitude range of 10-20° for both electron density and ion density. As the GPS signals pass through this irregularity structure, scintillations are recorded by the GPS receiver installed at the equatorial anomaly station, Bhopal it is interesting to note that in situ density fluctuations observed on magnetic flux tubes that pass over Bhopal can be used as indicator of ionospheric scintillations at that site. Many cases of density fluctuations and associated scintillations have been observed during the descending low solar activity period. The percentage occurrence of density irregularities and scintillations shows good correspondence with diurnal maximum of the strength of electrojet, however this varies with different seasons with maximum correspondence in summer (up to 66%) followed by equinox (up to 50%) and winter (up to 46%). Also, there is a threshold value of EEJ strength to produce density irregularities ((dNe/Ne)max ? 5%) and for moderate to strong scintillations (S4 ? 0.3) to occur. For winter this value is found to be ?40 nT whereas for equinox and summer it is around 50 nT.

  1. Longitudinal and seasonal dependence of nighttime equatorial plasma density irregularities during solar minimum detected on the C/NOFS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, E.; Kelley, M. C.; Roddy, P.; Retterer, J.; Ballenthin, J. O.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Su, Y.-J.

    2011-05-01

    During the night in the F region about the equator, plasma density depletions form, causing scintillation. In April 2008, the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory was launched to predict ionospheric scintillation. Using its Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP), C/NOFS is capable of measuring in situ ion density within the F region over the equator. Plasma irregularities are found regularly during the night. We examine how these irregularities depend on longitude, latitude, and season. The most significant observations from this study are longitudinal structures in which these irregularities most frequently occur. Since similar structure has been found in diurnal tides, we conclude that lower atmospheric tides may play a strong role in determining the amplitude of equatorial irregularities, at least during low solar minimum conditions when the presented observations were made. We propose that this link is likely related to the generation of zonal electric fields by the E-region dynamo.

  2. Equatorial nighttime vertical f-region plasma drifts during disturbed-time in the african sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. S. Oyekola; A. Ojo; J. Akinrimisi

    2006-01-01

    The terrestrial ionosphere deals with the basic structure and variability of plasma within the upper atmosphere of the Earth Furthermore the ionosphere comprises less than one percent of the mass of the upper atmosphere yet it has a significant influence on advanced communication and navigation systems both have important economic consequences As society beings to rely on more complex technologies

  3. Longitudinal dependence of equatorial F region vertical plasma drifts in the dusk sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hanumath Sastri

    1996-01-01

    The effect of solar activity on the postsunset peak of F region vertical plasma drift at Kodikaal (77ø28'E, dip 3øN) is determined as a function of season and for two levels of magnetic activity using extensive HF phase path observations and compared with that at Jicamaxca (75øW, dip 2øN) reported in the literature. The postsunset peak vertical velocity V, at

  4. Longitudinal dependence of equatorial F region vertical plasma drifts in the dusk sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hanumath Sastri

    1996-01-01

    The effect of solar activity on the postsunset peak of F region vertical plasma drift at Kodaikanal (77°28'E, dip 3°N) is determined as a function of season and for two levels of magnetic activity using extensive HF phase path observations and compared with that at Jicamarca (75°W, dip 2°N) reported in the literature. The postsunset peak vertical velocity Vzp at

  5. Observations and Simulations of Formation of Broad Plasma Depletions Through Merging Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Retterer, J. M.; Beaujardiere, O. De La; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D.E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Broad plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere near dawn are region in which the plasma density is reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude over thousands of kilometers in longitude. This phenomenon is observed repeatedly by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during deep solar minimum. The plasma flow inside the depletion region can be strongly upward. The possible causal mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions is that the broad depletions result from merging of multiple equatorial plasma bubbles. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the merging mechanism with new observations and simulations. We present C/NOFS observations for two cases. A series of plasma bubbles is first detected by C/NOFS over a longitudinal range of 3300-3800 km around midnight. Each of the individual bubbles has a typical width of approx 100 km in longitude, and the upward ion drift velocity inside the bubbles is 200-400 m/s. The plasma bubbles rotate with the Earth to the dawn sector and become broad plasma depletions. The observations clearly show the evolution from multiple plasma bubbles to broad depletions. Large upward plasma flow occurs inside the depletion region over 3800 km in longitude and exists for approx 5 h. We also present the numerical simulations of bubble merging with the physics-based low-latitude ionospheric model. It is found that two separate plasma bubbles join together and form a single, wider bubble. The simulations show that the merging process of plasma bubbles can indeed occur in incompressible ionospheric plasma. The simulation results support the merging mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions.

  6. Assimilative modeling of observed postmidnight equatorial plasma depletions in June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.-J.; Retterer, J. M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Roddy, P. A.; de La Beaujardière, O.; Ballenthin, J. O.

    2011-09-01

    The Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite observed large-scale density depletions at postmidnight and early morning local times in the Northern Hemisphere summer during solar minimum conditions. Using electric field data obtained from the vector electric field instrument (VEFI) as input, the assimilative physics-based model (PBMOD) qualitatively reproduced more than 70% of the large-scale density depletions observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) onboard C/NOFS. In contrast, the use of a climatological specification of plasma drifts in the model produces no plasma depletions at night. Results from a one-month statistical study, we found that the large-scale depletion structures most often occur near longitudes of 60°, 140°, and 330°, suggesting that these depletions may be associated with nonmigrating atmospheric tides, although the generation mechanisms of eastward electric fields at postmidnight local times are still uncertain. In this paper, densities obtained from both assimilation and climatology for the entire month of June 2008 are compared with PLP data from C/NOFS and the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), as well as special sensor ionospheric plasma drift/scintillation meter (SSIES) measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. Our statistical study has shown that, on average, the densities obtained by the PBMOD when it assimilates VEFI electric fields agree better with observed background densities than when PBMOD uses climatological electric fields.

  7. Diagnostics of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere by TEC mapping over Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Costa, S.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Monico, J. F. G.; Paula, E.; Nogueira, P.; Denardini, C. M.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Wrasse, C. M.; Ivo, A. S.; Gomes, V. C. F.; Gargarela, W.; Sant'Anna, N.; Gatto, R.

    2014-08-01

    The total electron content (TEC) in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere over Brazil was monitored in two dimensions by using 2011 data from the ground-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver network operated by the Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics. It was possible to monitor the spatial and temporal variations in TEC over Brazil continuously during both day and night with a temporal interval of 10 min and a spatial resolution of about 400 km. The daytime equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and post-sunset plasma enhancement (PS-EIA) were monitored over an area corresponding to a longitudinal extension of 4000 km in South America. Considerable day-to-day variation was observed in EIA and PS-EIA. A large latitudinal and longitudinal gradient of TEC indicated a significant ionospheric range error in application of the GNSS positioning system. Large-scale plasma bubbles after sunset were also mapped over a wide range. Depletions with longitudinally separated by more than 800 km were observed. They were extended by more than 2000 km along the magnetic field lines and drifted eastward. It is expected that 2-dimensional TEC mapping can serve as a useful tool for diagnosing ionospheric weather, such as temporal and spatial variation in the equatorial plasma trough and crest, and particularly for monitoring the dynamics of plasma bubbles.

  8. [Equatorial Guinea].

    PubMed

    The capital of Equatorial Guinea is Malabo. As of 1995, Equatorial Guinea had a population of 400,000 governed by a presidential regime. 1994 gross national product and per capita income were, respectively, $167 million and $430. Per capita income grew at 1.6% per year over the period 1985-94. In 1994, Equatorial Guinea owed $290.6 million, then being serviced at $22.3 million. For the same year, Equatorial Guinea exported $66.1 million in goods and services and imported $85.6 million. As of 1995, the population was growing in size by 2.55% annually. In 1992-93, life expectancy at birth was 48 years and the infant mortality rate was 117 per 1000 births. Other data are presented on the country's topography, climate and vegetation, demographics, principal cities, population distribution, religions, political structure, economics and finances, foreign commerce, and transportation and communications. PMID:12347093

  9. Thermodynamic and Spectral Properties of the Dfb/Bubble Plasma Population in the Near-Earth Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gabrielse, C.; Liu, J.; Turner, D. L.; Zhou, X.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies involving space-born and ground-based observations as well as simulations have suggested that a few Earth's radii-wide narrow channels of fast plasma flow carrying a dipolarized magnetic field play the key role in the magnetic flux, plasma, and energy transport in the magnetotail and toward the inner magnetosphere. These structures were theoretically described as ``plasma bubbles''. Recently, the term ``dipolairizing flux bundle'' (DFB) has been introduced to describe the plasma bubble-like structure on the basis of local spacecraft measurements. We present statistical analysis of DFB observations by THEMIS probes during 2008 and 2009 tail-science seasons. The goal of this study is to understand how the DFB plasma is energized and how its thermodynamic (density, temperature, specific entropy, and bulk velocity) and spectral properties depend on the geocentric distance. To achieve this goal, 271 events observed at radial distances from ~7 to 25 RE downtail were selected. We compare i) the thermodynamic parameters and energy spectra inside DFBs with those in the ambient plasma sheet and ii) the thermodynamic parameters and the spectra inside DFBs observed at different geocentric distances.

  10. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A M; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-04-22

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 10(18) cm(-3)). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron-photon source can be ideal for pump-probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  11. A method for determining the drift velocity of plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere using far-ultraviolet spacecraft observations: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S. L.; Immel, T. J.; Park, S. H.; Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    The Far-Ultraviolet Imager (IMAGE-FUV) on-board the NASA IMAGE satellite has been used to observe plasma depletions in the nightside equatorial ionosphere. Observations from periods around spacecraft apogee, during which equatorial regions are visible for several hours, have allowed the velocity of these plasma depletions to be determined. A new method for determining the velocity of these depletions using an image analysis technique, Tracking Of Airglow Depletions (TOAD), has been developed. TOAD allows the objective identification and tracking of depletions. The automation of this process has also allowed for the tracking of a greater number of depletions than previously achieved without requiring any human input, which shows that TOAD is suitable for use with large data sets and for future routine monitoring of the ionosphere from space. Furthermore, this allows the drift velocities of each depletion to be determined as a function of magnetic latitude as well as local time. Previous ground-based airglow observations from a small number of locations have indicated that the drift velocities of depletions may vary rapidly with magnetic latitude. Here we shall present the first results from TOAD of this shear in drift velocities from our global sample of depletion drift velocities.

  12. Equatorial Sundial

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    McDonald Observatory

    2008-01-01

    In this activity, learners make an equatorial sundial, which is simple to construct and teaches fundamental astronomical concepts. Learners use the provided template and a straw to build the sundial. Then, learners take the sundial outside on a sunny day and measure the time at least fours time in one day. They also compare these measurements to the "clock" time. Learners can experiment with their sundials during different months as well. This lesson guide includes background information about Nabta, an Egyptian Stonehenge.

  13. A modelling study of the latitudinal variations in the nighttime plasma temperatures of the equatorial topside ionosphere during northern winter at solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, G. J.; Denton, M. H.; Heelis, R. A.; Venkatraman, S.

    2000-11-01

    Latitudinal variations in the nighttime plasma temperatures of the equatorial topside ionosphere during northern winter at solar maximum have been examined by using values modelled by SUPIM (Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model) and observations made by the DMSP F10 satellite at 21.00 LT near 800 km altitude. The modelled values confirm that the crests observed near 15° latitude in the winter hemisphere are due to adiabatic heating and the troughs observed near the magnetic equator are due to adiabatic cooling as plasma is transported along the magnetic field lines from the summer hemisphere to the winter hemisphere. The modelled values also confirm that the interhemispheric plasma transport needed to produce the required adiabatic heating/cooling can be induced by F-region neutral winds. It is shown that the longitudinal variations in the observed troughs and crests arise mainly from the longitudinal variations in the magnetic meridional wind. At longitudes where the magnetic declination angle is positive the eastward geographic zonal wind combines with the northward (summer hemisphere to winter hemisphere) geographic meridional wind to enhance the northward magnetic meridional wind. This leads to deeper troughs and enhanced crests. At longitudes where the magnetic declination angle is negative the eastward geographic zonal wind opposes the northward geographic meridional wind and the trough depth and crest values are reduced. The characteristic features of the troughs and crests depend, in a complicated manner, on the field-aligned flow of plasma, thermal conduction, and inter-gas heat transfer. At the latitudes of the troughs/crests, the low/high plasma temperatures lead to increased/decreased plasma concentrations.

  14. Global characteristics of the cold plasma in the equatorial plasmapause region as deduced from the GEOS 1 mutual impedance probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. E. Décréau; C. Beghin; M. Parrot

    1982-01-01

    Thermal plasma parameters are derived by the mutual impedance experiment on GEOS. The investigation covers the plasmasphere, an intermediate region of ionospheric refilling, and the plasma trough. The intermediate region is always present in the day sector where the ionospheric source plays a leading part, and where the plasma parameters exhibit electron densities of 2 to 20 cu cm and

  15. Plasma Quenching by Air during Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    ) and spectral profiles at a critical acoustic pressure (Pc) for solutions of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) containing potential of He compared to Ar. Introduction Under certain conditions,1 a single bubble acoustically levitated in a liquid can undergo nonlinear oscillations in sync with the applied sound field and emit

  16. Correlation analysis between the occurrence of ionospheric scintillation at the magnetic equator and at the southern peak of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G. R. T.; Stephany, S.; Paula, E. R.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.; Rezende, L. F. C.; Aquino, M. G. S.; Dutra, A. P. S.

    2014-06-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to amplitude and phase fluctuations in radio signals due to electron density irregularities associated to structures named ionospheric plasma bubbles. The phenomenon is more pronounced around the magnetic equator where, after sunset, plasma bubbles of varying sizes and density depletions are generated by plasma instability mechanisms. The bubble depletions are aligned along Earth's magnetic field lines, and they develop vertically upward over the magnetic equator so that their extremities extend in latitude to north and south of the dip equator. Over Brazil, developing bubbles can extend to the southern peak of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly, where high levels of ionospheric scintillation are common. Scintillation may seriously affect satellite navigation systems, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems. However, its effects may be mitigated by using a predictive model derived from a collection of extended databases on scintillation and its associated variables. This work proposes the use of a classification and regression decision tree to perform a study on the correlation between the occurrence of scintillation at the magnetic equator and that at the southern peak of the equatorial anomaly. Due to limited size of the original database, a novel resampling heuristic was applied to generate new training instances from the original ones in order to improve the accuracy of the decision tree. The correlation analysis presented in this work may serve as a starting point for the eventual development of a predictive model suitable for operational use.

  17. Comparing Different Models for Fast Earthward Flows in the Magnetotail: Moving Flux Ropes, Unsteady Reconnection, Pressure-Depleted Plasma Bubbles, and Atypical Currents Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Runov, A. V.; Ohtani, S.

    2007-12-01

    The physics of fast earthward flows or BBFs, a major mechanism of bursty transfer of the plasma and magnetic flux in the terrestrial magnetotail, remains uncertain and controversial. A part of observations can be explained as signatures of earthward moving flux ropes or secondary plasmoids dragged by the earthward part a larger-scale reconnection region [Slavin et al., 2003]. The statistics of variations of the z-component of the magnetospheric magnetic field in the central plasma sheet [Ohtani et al., 2004] suggest no changes of the magnetic field topology for another group of BBFs. These observations can be explained as signatures of either unsteady reconnection, which remains located tailward of the spacecraft, or other phenomena that are connected but not identical to reconnection in its active phase. These are the plasma bubbles, flux tubes with the reduced specific entropy that may move earthward faster than the neighboring flux tubes due to the buoyancy force. However, the original model of bubbles arising from local reductions of the plasma pressure [Pontius and Wolf, 1990] also explains only a part of observations. Another part [Angelopoulos et al., 1992] reveals no reduction of the plasma pressure in BBFs. One more model, which explains both missing magnetic topology changes and no reduction of the plasma pressure [Sitnov et al., 2005] describes the bubble as a seam in the body of the tail plasma, which appears after the formation and tailward retreat of a small plasmoid, and which is composed of atypical, embedded and bifurcated thin current sheets. Signatures of such atypical current sheets have been convincingly demonstrated recently in CLUSTER observations [Runov et al., 2003]. In this presentation we elaborate the BBF models and compare them with 2001 and 2002 tail CLUSTER observations in the central plasma sheet. These include full-particle simulations of the secondary plasmoid formation in tail-like systems, two- and three- dimensional features and dynamical properties of atypical current sheets that constitute plasma bubbles. Comparison with data is focused on the distinction between plasma flows moving in the earthward part of a neutral line (which may be both stable and moving earthward or tailward) and similar motions of plasma and magnetic field structures associated with plasma bubbles.

  18. An axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic model for the Crab pulsar wind bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1992-01-01

    We extend Kennel and Coroniti's (1984) spherical magnetohydrodynamic models for the Crab Nebula to include the pinching effect of the toroidal magnetic field. Since the bulk nebular flow is likely to be very submagnetosonic, a quasi-static treatment is possible. We show that the pinching effect can be responsible for the observed elongation of the pulsar wind bubble, as indicated by the surface brightness contours of optical synchrotron radiation. From the observed elongation we estimate a value for sigma, the ratio of Poynting flux to plasma kinetic energy flux in the free pulsar wind, which is consistent with previous results from spherical models. Using the inferred magnetic field configuration inside the pulsar wind bubble, combined with the observed dimensions of the X-ray nebula, we are able to constrain the particle distribution function. We conclude that, for a power-law injection function, the maximum energy has to be much larger in the pulsar equatorial region than in the polar region.

  19. Climatology of plasma density depletions observed by DMSP in the dawn sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Gentile; W. J. Burke; P. A. Roddy; J. M. Retterer; R. T. Tsunoda

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the launch of the Communication\\/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C\\/NOFS) satellite, equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were regarded as postsunset phenomena. However, during this recent solar minimum the planar Langmuir probe (PLP) on the C\\/NOFS satellite has detected very few EPBs after sunset; most plasma density depletions have been observed between local midnight and dawn. We take advantage of the

  20. Observations of day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to equatorial F-region plasma depletions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Fagundes; Y. Sahai; I. S. Batista; M. A. Abdu; J. A. Bittencourt; H. Takahashi

    1999-01-01

    In December 1995, a campaign was carried out to study the day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma irregularities, using optical diagnostic techniques, near the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Three instruments were operated simultaneously: (a) an all-sky (180° field of view) imaging system for observing the OI 630 nm nightglow emission at Alcântara (2.5°S, 44.4°W);

  1. C\\/NOFS Observations of Plasma Density and Electric Field Responses to High Speed Streams in the Solar Wind

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Gentile; W. J. Burke; O. de La Beaujardiere; D. E. Hunton; P. A. Roddy; R. F. Pfaff; M. Crown

    2009-01-01

    C\\/NOFS plasma density and electric field measurements for 10 - 20 June 2008 indicate significant changes in geomagnetic conditions as a high speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind passed Earth. During the HSS passage C\\/NOFS encountered moderate to strong post-midnight equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) activity. As the corotating interaction region (CIR) at the leading edge of the HSS passed,

  2. Buoyant Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    2009-01-01

    What keeps bubbles and other things, like airplanes, floating or flying in the air? In this activity, learners blow bubbles and wave 3x5 cards above, below and on different sides of the bubbles to keep them afloat as long as possible. The Did You Know section explains the Bernoulli principle: how waving cards above the bubbles helps keep them afloat because faster moving air exerts less pressure to push the bubbles down. The activity can be extended by having learners wave their bubbles through an obstacle course they design themselves.

  3. Bubble — bubbles — boiling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes Straub

    2005-01-01

    A short overview of boiling research in microgravity performed during the past two decades is subject of this presentation.\\u000a The research was concentrated on pool boiling without applying any external forces. The objective of this research was to\\u000a answer the questions: Is boiling an appropriate mechanism of heat transfer in space applications, and how do heat transfer\\u000a and bubble dynamics

  4. Bubble dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Bliss, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical principles related to bubble dielectrophoresis are examined, taking into account the polarization force, aspects of bubble deformation, the electrostatic bubble levitation theorem, and the equation of motion. The measurement of the dielectrophoretic force on static and dynamic bubbles represents a convenient experimental method for the study of the general problem of dielectrophoresis. The experiments reported include static-force measurements, static-levitation experiments, and dynamic-force measurements.

  5. SWARM observations of equatorial electron densities and topside GPS track losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Stephan; Zangerl, Franz; Sust, Manfred; André, Mats; Eriksson, Anders; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Opgenoorth, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    The SWARM satellites have both upward looking GPS receivers and Langmuir probes. The receivers repeatedly lost track of the L1 band signal in January-February 2014 at postsunset hours, when SWARM was at nearly 500 km altitude. This indicates that the signal was disturbed by ionospheric irregularities at this height and above. The track losses occurred right at density gradients associated with equatorial plasma bubbles and predominantly where the measured background density was highest. The signal showed strong phase scintillations rather than in amplitude, indicating that SWARM might be in the near field of an ionospheric phase screen. Density biteouts, depletions between steep gradients, were up to almost 3 orders of magnitude deep in the background of a more shallow trough centered at the magnetic equator. Comparison between satellites shows that the biteout structure strongly varied in longitude over ˜100 km and has in north-south steep walls.

  6. The Coudé Equatorials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2011-11-01

    Between 1884 and 1892, no fewer than seven coudé equatorials were installed in France, Algeria and Austria. Invented by Maurice Loewy, these equatorials allowed the observer to sit comfortably in a closed room, with all the controls and readings at hand. However they were expensive, they required two flat mirrors, which were a source of concern because of their thermal distortion, and their mechanics was complex and delicate, so that they did not succeed in replacing the conventional equatorials in spite of their advantages. Only two are preserved, in Lyons and in Algiers. We describe in detail these instruments, their history and their use.

  7. Bubble Suspension

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2011-10-11

    In this activity, learners observe as soap bubbles float on a cushion of carbon dioxide gas. Learners blow bubbles into an aquarium filled with a slab of dry ice. Learners will be amazed as the bubbles hover on the denser layer of carbon dioxide gas, then begin to expand and sink before freezing on the dry ice. Use this activity to discuss sublimation, density, and osmosis as well as principles of buoyancy, semipermeability, and interference.

  8. Big Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    2010-01-01

    How do you measure a bubble when it's floating? You can't really, but in this activity, learners can measure the diameter of the ring of suds a bubble leaves on a flat surface. The fun is blowing up the bubbles as big as possible with a straw. Then comes the measuring. This activity can be used to connect science and math, and makes a great rainy day or indoor lunch activity.

  9. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  10. An average image of proton plasma pressure and of current systems in the equatorial plane derived from AMPTE\\/CCE-CHEM measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paola De Michelis; Ioannis A. Daglis; Giuseppe Consolini

    1999-01-01

    The present study attempts to visualize the global equatorial current systems and the proton pressure in the near-Earth magnetosphere based on AMPTE\\/CCE-CHEM measured proton distributions, which were sorted by the AE index (``quiet'': AE<100nT, ``active'': 100nT

  11. Bubble Tray

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners use simple materials to create giant bubbles. Learners will explore what gives bubbles their shape, what makes them break or last, what causes the colors and patterns in the soap film, and why do they change? Use this activity to introduce the concepts of surface tension and interference.

  12. Bubble Trouble

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Chemical Society

    2011-01-01

    In this activity on page 15 of the PDF, learners measure the amount of bubbles that they make using a detergent. Learners investigate whether adding Epsom salt to the solution affects its "sudsiness"--an important attribute of soap, since sudsy bubbles help soap clean greasy dirt. Use this activity to explore how chemicals can change a material's properties and how substances dissolve.

  13. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  14. Forecasting Equatorial Scintillation Activity in Real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmon, R.; Anderson, D.; Caton, R. G.; Bullett, T. W.

    2008-12-01

    It is well-known that the generation of equatorial, F-region plasma density irregularities, via the Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism is critically dependent on the magnitude of the pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) in upward ExB drift velocity after sunset. These plasma density "bubbles" that are generated after sunset lead to the "scintillation" of trans-ionospheric radio wave signals that pass through these bubbles and is commonly referred to as "scintillation activity". Communication and Navigation systems can be severely disrupted by these plasma density irregularities. A measure of scintillation activity is given by the "S4 Index" and a network of Air Force, ground-based UHF and L-band receivers measuring the S4 Index is called the SCIntillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) network. This paper describes a technique for automatically forecasting, in real-time, the occurrence or non-occurrence of scintillation activity that relies on real-time data from a ground-based ionospheric sounder at or near the geomagnetic equator. After sunset, the height-rise with time of the bottom-side of the F-layer reflects the magnitude of the upward ExB drift velocity. The value of the ionospheric parameter, h'f (the virtual height of the bottom-side F-layer) at 1930 LT reflects the integrated ExB drift effect on lifting the F-layer to an altitude where the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism becomes important. Incorporating observed h'f values from the Jicamarca, Peru digital sounder at 1930 LT and relating these values to the Total Hourly S4 Index (THS4) observed by the UHF receiver at the Ancon, Peru SCINDA site, it is found that a "threshold" in h'f exists below which, THS4 < 1 (no scintillation activity) and above which THS4 > 1 (scintillation activity). Examples of Jicamarca sounder observations and h'f values prior to the onset of scintillation activity are given. We present results that describe how the threshold value of h'f changes with solar cycle activity and how these results have been incorporated into a real-time capability for automatically forecasting scintillation activity that is available on Google Earth to all interested parties.

  15. Nutty Bubbles

    E-print Network

    A. M. Ghezelbash; R. B. Mann

    2002-07-12

    We investigate the various time-dependent bubble spacetimes that can be obtained from double analytic continuation of asymptotically locally flat/AdS spacetimes with NUT charge. We find different time-dependent explicit solutions of general relativity from double analytic continuations of Taub-Nut(-AdS) and Kerr-Nut(-AdS) spacetimes. One solution in particular has Milne-like evolution throughout, and another is a NUT-charged generalization of the AdS soliton. These solutions are all four dimensional. In certain situations the NUT charge induces an ergoregion into the bubble spacetime and in other situations it quantitatively modifies the evolution of the bubble, as when rotation is present. In dimensions greater than four, no consistent bubble solutions are found that have only one timelike direction.

  16. Exploring Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Geary, Melissa A.

    Bubbles provide an enjoyable and festive medium through which to teach many concepts within the science topics of light, color, chemistry, force, air pressure, electricity, buoyancy, floating, density, among many others. In order to determine the nature of children's engagement within a museum setting and the learning opportunities of playing with bubbles, I went to a children's interactive museum located in a metropolitan city in the Northeastern part of the United States.

  17. Interstellar bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. I. Castor; R. McCray; R. Weaver

    1975-01-01

    Early-type stars blow bubbles in the interstellar medium. The radii of the bubbles are typically 30 pc. Typical conditions in their interiors are temperatures of about 1 million K and densities of about 0.01 per cu cm. The dense shell of swept-up interstellar gas that surrounds them is likely to trap the ionization front and may also have an outer

  18. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Mammini, Beth M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  19. Equatorial westward electrojet impacting equatorial ionization anomaly development during the 6 April 2000 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2013-11-01

    investigate the forward plasma fountain and the equatorial ionosphere in the topside region during the 6 April 2000 superstorm in the Australian sector at ~0900 LT. Space- and ground-based multi-instrument measurements, Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (CTIPe) simulations, and field-aligned observations comprise our results. These reveal an unusual storm development during which the eastward prompt penetration electric (E) field (PPEF) developed and operated under the continuous effects of the westward disturbance dynamo E-field (DDEF) while large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) traveled equatorward and generated strong equatorward wind surges. We have identified the eastward PPEF by the superfountain effect causing the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA)'s development with crests situated at ~±28°N (geomagnetic) in the topside ionosphere at ~840 km altitude. The westward DDEF's occurrence is confirmed by mapping the "anti-Sq" current system wherein the equatorial westward current created a weak long-lasting westward electrojet event. Line plots of vertical drift data tracked large-scale TIDs. Four scenarios, covering ~3.5 h in universal time, demonstrate that the westward DDEF became superimposed on the eastward PPEF. As these E-fields of different origins became mapped into the F region, they could interact. Consequently, the eastward PPEF-related equatorial upward E × B drift became locally reduced by up to 75 m/s near the dip equator by the westward DDEF-related equatorial downward E × B drift. Meanwhile, the EIA displayed a better development as equatorial wind surges, reproduced by CTIPe, increased from 501 to 629 m/s, demonstrating the crucial role of mechanical wind effects keeping plasma density high.

  20. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Camacho-Lopez, S. [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Carratera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Zona Playitas, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, B. C. Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, {lambda}=532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 {mu}J, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  1. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 27 JUNE 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1701 Inertially confined plasma in an imploding bubble

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    observation of noble-gas ion emission lines (for example, Xe+ , Kr+ and Ar+ ) provided definitive evidence-3 --comparable to the densities produced in laser-driven fusion experiments7 --with effective plasma

  2. Tiny Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Glenn Dolphin

    In this activity, which can be performed as a demonstration by the teacher or by the students themselves, carbon dioxide is generated in a fish tank using sodium bicarbonate and vinegar. The students can observe as the accumulating carbon dioxide extinguishes candles of different heights, marking rising levels of CO2 in the tank. They can also blow soap bubbles (which contain air) into the tank and observe them floating on the denser CO2 at first, then sinking as the gas diffuses through the soap film that forms the bubbles.

  3. Magnetic Dipole Inflation with Cascaded ARC and Applications to Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, L.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.

    2003-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks to create a plasma-inflated magnetic bubble capable of intercepting significant thrust from the solar wind for the purposes of high speed, high efficiency spacecraft propulsion. Previous laboratory experiments into the M2P2 concept have primarily used helicon plasma sources to inflate the dipole magnetic field. The work presented here uses an alternative plasma source, the cascaded arc, in a geometry similar to that used in previous helicon experiments. Time resolved measurements of the equatorial plasma density have been conducted and the results are discussed. The equatorial plasma density transitions from an initially asymmetric configuration early in the shot to a quasisymmetric configuration during plasma production, and then returns to an asymmetric configuration when the source is shut off. The exact reasons for these changes in configuration are unknown, but convection of the loaded flux tube is suspected. The diffusion time was found to be an order of magnitude longer than the Bohm diffusion time for the period of time after the plasma source was shut off. The data collected indicate the plasma has an electron temperature of approximately 11 eV, an order of magnitude hotter than plasmas generated by cascaded arcs operating under different conditions. In addition, indirect evidence suggests that the plasma has a beta of order unity in the source region.

  4. Equatorial Electrojet Observations in the African Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Damtie, B.; Pfaff, R.; Zesta, E.

    2008-12-01

    Although Satellite observations in the African sector show unique equatorial ionospheric structures that can severely impact navigation and communication systems, the study of ionospheric disturbances in this region is difficult due to the lack of ground-based instruments. This has created a gap in global understanding of the physics behind the evolution and formation of plasma irregularities in the equatorial region, which imposes limitations on ionospheric density modeling efforts. Therefore, in order to have a more complete global understanding of equatorial ionosphere motion, the international space science community has begun to develop an observational infrastructure in the African sector. This includes the deployment of a number of arrays of small instruments, including the AMBER magnetometer array, through the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) cooperative program with the United Nations Basic Space Science (UNBSS) program. Two AMBER magnetometers have been deployed successfully at Adigrat (~6°N magnetic) in Ethiopia and at Medea in Algeria (28°N magnetic), and became fully operational on 03 August 2008. The remaining two AMBER magnetometers will be deployed soon in Cameroon and Namibia. One of the prime scientific objectives of AMBER is to understand the processes governing electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere as a function of latitude, local time, magnetic activity, and season in the African region. The most credible driving mechanism of ionospheric plasma (E × B drift) can be estimated using two magnetometers, one right at the equator and the other about 6 off the equator. Therefore, using the AMBER magnetometer at Adigrat and the INTERMAGNET magnetometer located at Addis Ababa (0.9°N magnetic) in Ethiopia, the equatorial electrojet (E × B drift) activities in that longitudinal sector of the African continent is estimated. The paper also presents the comparison between the estimated vertical drift and the drift values obtained from the vector electric field instrument observation onboard the C/NOFS satellite. The evolution of equatorial ionospheric irregularities will also be presented using data from the growing number of ground- and space-based (on Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) satellites) GPS receivers in the African region.

  5. Solar prominences: 'double, double ... boil and bubble'

    E-print Network

    Keppens, Rony

    2015-01-01

    Observations revealed rich dynamics within prominences, the cool 10,000 K, macroscopic (sizes of order 100 Mm) "clouds" in the million degree solar corona. Even quiescent prominences are continuously perturbed by hot, rising bubbles. Since prominence matter is hundredfold denser than coronal plasma, this bubbling is related to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Here we report on true macroscopic simulations well into this bubbling phase, adopting a magnetohydrodynamic description from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. Our virtual prominences rapidly establish fully non-linear (magneto)convective motions where hot bubbles interplay with falling pillars, with dynamical details including upwelling pillars forming within bubbles. Our simulations show impacting Rayleigh-Taylor fingers reflecting on transition region plasma, ensuring that cool, dense chromospheric material gets mixed with prominence matter up to very large heights. This offers an explanation for the return mass cycle mystery for prominence mater...

  6. Equatorial oceanography. [review of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.; Sarachik, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    United States progress in equatorial oceanography is reviewed, focusing on the low frequency response of upper equatorial oceans to forcing by the wind. Variations of thermocline depth, midocean currents, and boundary currents are discussed. The factors which determine sea surface temperature (SST) variability in equatorial oceans are reviewed, and the status of understanding of the most spectacular manifestation of SST variability, the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon, is discussed. The problem of observing surface winds, regarded as a fundamental factor limiting understanding of the equatorial oceans, is addressed. Finally, an attempt is made to identify those current trends which are expected to bear fruit in the near and distant future.

  7. Jupiter Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photographic mosaic of images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft covers an area of 34,000 kilometers by 22,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 13,600 miles) in Jupiter's equatorial region. The dark region near the center of the mosaic is an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the Galileo Probe parachuted into Jupiter's atmosphere in December 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where heat from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright oval in the upper right of the mosaic as well as the other smaller bright features are examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging camera system aboard Galileo.

    North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes 1 to 19 degrees and is centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  8. Equatorial radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rukao, S.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Kato, S.

    1989-01-01

    A large clear air radar with the sensitivity of an incoherent scatter radar for observing the whole equatorial atmosphere up to 1000 km altitude is now being designed in Japan. The radar, called the Equatorial Radar, will be built in Pontianak, Kalimantan Island, Indonesia (0.03 N, 109.3 E). The system is a 47 MHz monostatic Doppler radar with an active phased array configuration similar to that of the MU radar in Japan, which has been in successful operation since 1983. It will have a PA product of more than 5 x 10(9) sq. Wm (P = average transmitter power, A = effective antenna aperture) with sensitivity more than 10 times that of the MU radar. This system configuration enables pulse-to-pulse beam steering within 25 deg from the zenith. As is the case of the MU radar, a variety of sophisticated operations will be made feasible under the supervision of the radar controller. A brief description of the system configuration is presented.

  9. COSI's Bubble Recipe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    Everybody loves bubbles, and this is the best bubble recipe ever! Included as part of one of COSI's Family Science Quests, this COSI favorite invites learners to make bubbles and suggests a variety of ways to explore and experiment.

  10. On the Geometrical Aspects of GPS Scintillations during the Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment (copex) Campaign in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Valladares, C. E.; Groves, K.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the geometrical aspects of GPS scintillations at three locations in Brazil during the Oct-Dec 2002 Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment (COPEX): Boa Vista (2.85N, 60.70°W, dip 12.60°N); Alta Floresta (9.87°S, 56.1°W, dip 0.75°S); and Campo Grande (20.47°S, 54.66°W, dip 10.77°S). Previous authors [Muella et al., 2008; de Paula et al., 2010] have established the association between the GPS scintillations during the campaign and equatorial plasma bubbles generated by plasma interchange instabilities after sunset. Our aim is to demonstrate the effect of satellite motion and the direction of signal propagation with respect to the magnetic field on the depth and rate of signal fading, both of which affect the probability of scintillation-induced loss of lock on the GPS signals and degrade GPS positioning accuracy [Humphreys et al., 2010; Carrano et al., 2010]. We report on the behavior of the scintillation intensity index (S4) and the intensity decorrelation time (?) as a function of dip latitude, local time, and the speed and direction at which the line of sight scans through the drifting plasma irregularities. We remove the geometrical effects using weak scatter diffraction theory to estimate the turbulent intensity and spatial decorrelation length in the magnetic west-east direction. From these parameters, it is possible to infer the depth and rate of signal fading for any propagation geometry in the region, a capability which is needed for modeling GPS scintillation impacts on GPS positioning accuracy.

  11. Observations of pre-midnight 5-m irregularities in the equatorial F region over São Luís, Brazil: Solar-flux dependence and seasonal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, E. R.; Alam Kherani, E.; Cueva, R. Y. C.; Camargo, L. A. P.

    2011-07-01

    The statistics of pre-midnight 5-m irregularities in the equatorial F region over São Luís is presented. The data set ranges from October 2001 to December 2008 and covers maximum solar-flux-to-minimum solar flux epoch. The variabilities in irregularity parameters, namely, height and time of their appearance in the radar echoes, with solar-flux variation are presented. The seasonal variations (combined over all years, irrespective of solar-flux) of occurrence of irregularities, occurrence of bottom-type layer (or bottom-side irregularities without plume) and bottom-side/topside plume (or bottom-side irregularities with plume) are presented. The largest occurrences of bottom-side irregularities without plume and with plume are found on April (equinox) and December (summer) months respectively. The ambient ionospheric conditions namely prereversal evening vertical drift, bottom-side density gradient and off-equatorial E region conductivity are inferred using digisonde measurements during April 2002 and December 2002. Based on these conditions and recent studies on gravity wave climatology over Brazil, it is suggested that shear in zonal plasma drift and low gravity wave activity may account for less occurrence of plume during April as compared to December months. This suggestion is quantified using numerical simulation model of collisional-interchange instability (CII) and plasma bubble.

  12. Lightning over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These two images were taken 9 seconds apart as the STS-97 Space Shuttle flew over equatorial Africa east of Lake Volta on December 11, 2000. The top of the large thunderstorm, roughly 20 km across, is illuminated by a full moon and frequent bursts of lightning. Because the Space Shuttle travels at about 7 km/sec, the astronaut perspectives on this storm system becomes more oblique over the 9-second interval between photographs. The images were taken with a Nikon 35 mm camera equipped with a 400 mm lens and high-speed (800 ISO) color negative film. Images are STS097-351-9 and STS097-351-12, provided and archived by the Earth Science and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth at http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/

  13. Characterization of breakdown and sustaining of a discharge in a gas bubble in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ceccato; A. Rousseau

    2008-01-01

    Breakdown mechanism in water are not well understood. In the present study, we focus both on the ignition and propagation of the plasma in a bubble\\/water bi-phasic medium, as well as on the sustaining of DC plasmas in a gas bubble. Two geometries are studied : either the bubble is localized in a water filled capillary, or it is surrounded

  14. Unique Capabilities of the Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI) Mission Concept to Study the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Minow, J. I.; Gallagher, D. L.; Hoegy, W. R.; Coffey, V. N.; Willis, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present an overview of a mission concept named Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI) with a special focus here on low-latitude ionospheric plasma turbulence measurements relevant to equatorial spread-F. SASSI is a suite of sensors that improves Space Situational Awareness for the ISS local space environment, as well as unique ionospheric measurements and support active plasma experiments on the ISS. As such, the mission concept has both operational and basic research objectives. We will describe two compelling measurement techniques enabled by SASSI's unique mission architecture. That is, SASSI provides new abilities to 1) measure space plasma potentials in low Earth orbit over ~100 m relative to a common potential, and 2) to investigate multi-scale ionospheric plasma turbulence morphology simultaneously of both ~ 1 cm and ~ 10 m scale lengths. The first measurement technique will aid in the distinction of vertical drifts within equatorial plasma bubbles from the vertical motions of the bulk of the layer due to zonal electric fields. The second will aid in understanding ionospheric plasma turbulence cascading in scale sizes that affect over the horizon radar. During many years of ISS operation, we have conducted effective (but not perfect) human and robotic extravehicular activities within the space plasma environment surrounding the ISS structure. However, because of the complexity of the interaction between the ISS and the space environment, there remain important sources of unpredictable environmental situations that affect operations. Examples of affected systems include EVA safety, solar panel efficiency, and scientific instrument integrity. Models and heuristically-derived best practices are well-suited for routine operations, but when it comes to unusual or anomalous events or situations, there is no substitute for real-time monitoring. SASSI is being designed to deploy and operate a suite of low-cost, medium/high-TRL plasma sensors on the ISS Express Logistics Carrier for long-term observations and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System for short-term focused campaigns. The presentation will include a description of the instrument complement and an overview of the operations concept.

  15. Development of equatorial visible\\/infrared wide angle viewing system and radial neutron camera for ITER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophie Salasca; Basilio Esposito; Yann Corre; Maryline Davi; Christian Dechelle; Florian Pasdeloup; Roger Reichle; Jean-Marcel Travère; Giorgio Brolatti; Daniele Marocco; Fabio Moro; Luigino Petrizzi; Tonio Pinna; Marco Riva; Rosaria Villari; Eduardo De La Cal; Carlos Hidalgo; Ana Manzanares; Jose Luis De Pablos; Rafael Vila; Gabor Hordosy; Daniel Nagy; Sandor Recsei; Szilveszter Tulipan; Andre Neto; Carlos Silva; Luciano Bertalot; Chris Walker; Christian Ingesson; Yuri Kaschuck

    2009-01-01

    The exploitation of ITER tokamak will require diagnostics for machine protection, inputs to plasma control systems, evaluation and analysis of plasma parameters and performances.The equatorial visible\\/infrared wide angle viewing system and the radial neutron camera are the two main diagnostics of Procurement Package 11 (PP11), one of the diagnostic procurements under the responsibility of Europe, which also contains Equatorial Port

  16. Observations of convectively coupled equatorial waves

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Science #12;Convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) · Kelvin waves · Equatorial Rossby waves · Mixed Rossby-gravity waves · Inertia-gravity waves #12;Convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) · Kelvin waves · Equatorial Rossby waves · Mixed Rossby-gravity waves · Inertia-gravity waves · Tropical

  17. Studies on equatorial shock formation during plasmaspheric refilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations based on small-scale simulations of microprocesses occurring when a magnetic flux tube refills with a cold plasma are summarized. Results of these investigations are reported in the following attached papers: (1) 'Numerical Simulation of Filling a Magnetic Flux Tube with a Cold Plasma: The Role of Ion Beam-Driven Instabilities'; and (2) 'Numerical Simulation of Filling a Magnetic Flux Tube with a Cold Plasma: Effects of Magnetically Trapped Hot Plasma'. Other papers included are: 'Interaction of Field-Aligned Cold Plasma Flows with an Equatorially-Trapped Hot Plasma: Electrostatic Shock Formation'; and 'Comparison of Hydrodynamic and Semikinetic Treatments for a Plasma Flow along Closed Field Lines'. A proposal for further research is included.

  18. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  19. Callisto's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic covers part of the equatorial region of Jupiter's moon, Callisto. The mosaic combines six separate image frames obtained by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its ninth orbit around Jupiter. North is to the top of the picture. The mosaic shows several new features and characteristics of the surface revealed by Galileo. These include deposits that may represent landslides in the southern and southwestern floors of many craters. Two such deposits are seen in a 12 kilometer (7.3 mile) crater in the west-central part of the image, and in a 23 kilometer (14 mile) crater just north of the center of the image. Also notable are several sinuous valleys emanating from the southern rims of 10 to 15 kilometer (6.2 to 9.3 mile) irregular craters in the west-central part of the image. The pervasive local smoothing of Callisto's surface is well represented in the plains between the craters in the southeastern part of the image. Possible oblique impacts are suggested by the elongated craters in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the image.

    The mosaic, centered at 7.4 degrees south latitude and 6.6 degrees west longitude, covers an area of approximately 315 by 215 kilometers (192 by 131 miles). The sun illuminates the scene from the west (left). The smallest features that can be seen are about 300 meters (993 feet) across. The images were obtained on June 25, 1997, when the spacecraft was at a range of 15,200 kilometers (8,207 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  20. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) is conducting laboratory experiments to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. Experimental data from plasma bubble injection into a background plasma, particularly magnetic probe measurements, will be discussed. [4pt] [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008).

  1. Gravity Wave Initiation of Equatorial Spread F: A Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Kelley; M. F. Larsen; C. LaHoz; J. P. McClure

    1981-01-01

    Jicamarca radar backscatter maps 1980), and nonlinear simulations (Ossakow et al., were made during four consecutive nights in March 1979) confirm the basic concept that plasma 1979. Two of these maps displayed single depletions or bubbles are colocated with radar towering plumes extending to nearly 1000-kin backscatter plumes and that they originate on the altitude. On a third night, discussed

  2. Soap Bubbles and Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Shellie-helane; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces questions and activities involving soap bubbles which provide students with experiences in prediction and logic. Examines commonly held false conceptions related to the shapes that bubbles take and provides correct explanations for the phenomenon. (ML)

  3. Bubbles and Market Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Youssefmir; Bernardo A. Huberman; Tad Hogg

    1998-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of asset price bubbles that exhibits the appearance of bubbles and their subsequent crashes. We show that when speculative trends dominate over fundamental beliefs, bubbles form, leading to the growth of asset prices away from their fundamental value. This growth makes the system increasingly susceptible to any exogenous shock, thus eventually precipitating a crash. We

  4. Bubbles and Market Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Youssefmir; Bernardo A. Huberman; Tad Hogg

    1994-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of asset price bubbles that exhibits the appearance of bubbles and their subsequent crashes. We show that when speculative trends dominate over fundamental beliefs, bubbles form, leading to the growth of asset prices away from their fundamental value. This growth makes the system increasingly susceptible to any exogenous shock, thus eventually precipitating a crash. We

  5. Study of zonal large scale wave structure (LSWS) and equatorial scintillation with low-latitude GRBR network over Southeast Asia and African sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Sudarsanam, Tulasi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Tsunoda, Roland

    2012-07-01

    The day-to-day variability of Equatorial Spread-F, when and where the equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) may initiate, were the challenging problems that puzzling the space weather researchers for several decades. The zonal large scale wave structure (LSWS) at the base of F-layer is the earliest manifestation of seed perturbation for the evolution of EPBs by R-T instability processes, hence, found to play deterministic role on the development of ESF. Yet, only a little is known about LSWS with lack of sufficient observations, primarily because of inability to detect the LSWS with the currently existing instruments except with steerable incoherent scatter radar such as ALTAIR radar. This situation, however, was recently changed with launch of C/NOFS in a unique low-inclination (13 ^{o}) orbit. With the availability of CERTO beacon transmissions from C/NOFS in a near equatorial orbit, it is now possible to detect and resolve the roles by LSWS on a regular basis. A ground based low-latitude GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) Network has been recently established that provide coverage of Southeast Asia, Pacific and African low-latitude regions. Recent observations suggest that these wave structures with zonal wave lengths varying between 200 and 800 km can be earliest detected even before E-region sunset and found to grow significantly after sunset, probably, aided by the polarization electric fields. Further, these zonal structures consistently found to be aligned with field lines for several hundreds of kilometers and EPBs were found to grow from the westward walls of upwellings. The characteristic differences on the strength of LSWS between the Asian and African longitudes were identified during the recent increasing solar activity and discussed in this paper.

  6. Radio Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Robert J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with GHz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ''ghost bubbles'', i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10MHz and 10GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 {approx}< k/f {approx}< 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t{sub cool} {approx}< 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T{sub centre}/T{sub outer} < 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  7. Studies on equatorial shock formation during plasmaspheric refilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    During the grant period starting August 1, 1992, our major effort has been on examining the presence of equatorially trapped hot plasma on plasmaspheric refilling. We performed one-dimensional PIC simulations of cold plasmas expanding into a hot plasma, consisting of hot anisotropic ions and warm isotropic electrons, trapped in a region of minimum magnetic field. Simulations showed that the electric potential barrier built up by the anisotropy of the hot ion population facilitates in the formation of electrostatic shocks when the cold ion beams begin to come into contact with the hot plasma. The shock formation occurs even when the cold ion beams are highly supersonic with respect to the ion-acoustic speed. This finding is interesting because equatorial shock formation during the early stage of plasmaspheric refilling has been debated over about two decades. In the past ion-ion instability has been invoked as the main mechanism for the coupling between the cold ion beams approaching the equator from the conjugate ionspheres. This coupling occurs when the beams are sufficiently slow; the beam velocity being less than three times the ion-acoustic speed. In the presence of hot plasma, the beams slow down by the potential barrier. The slowing down and the reflection process lead to the formation of the electrostatic shock even for highly supersonic ion beams. The mixing of hot and cold plasma was also studied.

  8. Magnetic shaping of planetary nebulae and other stellar wind bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Luo, Ding

    1994-01-01

    As in the case of the solar wind, the magnetic field in the wind from a magnetized, rotating star becomes increasingly toroidal with distance from the star. The strength of the magnetic field can be characterized by sigma, the ratio of toroidal magnetic energy density to kinetic energy density in the equatorial plane of the wind. A fast wind shocks against the external medium and creates a bubble whose volume is dominated by shocked gas. The toroidal magnetic field increases in the shocked bubble and can dominate the thermal pressure. Because of the low velocities in the bubble, hydrostatic equilibrium is a good approximation and allows the calculation of the thermal and magnetic pressure in the bubble, as in the model of Begelman and Li (1992) for the Crab Nebula. The structure, which is axisymmetric and extended in the polar direction, depends on two parameters: sigma nu(sub w)/w(sub 0), where nu(sub w) is the wind velocity and w(sub 0) is the shell velocity in the polar direction, and lambda = nu(sub a)/w(sub 0), where nu(sub a) is the velocity of the slow wind. For small values of lambda, there is a cusp in the shell in the equatorial plane, i.e., there is an equatorial ring. For larger values of lambda, the maximum of the surface density moves away from the equator i.e., a double ring structure. Our models should apply to planetary nebulae, if their central stars are sufficiently magnetized; the calculated shapes do resemble the observed shapes of planetaries. In all cases, our model predicts that X-ray emission from the bubble is concentrated toward the polar axis. Finally, we briefly discuss the asymmetry of the Crab Nebula and 3C 58.

  9. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  10. A Vlasov equation for pressure wave propagation in bubbly fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smereka, Peter

    2002-03-01

    The derivation of effective equations for pressure wave propagation in a bubbly fluid at very low void fractions is examined. A Vlasov-type equation is derived for the probability distribution of the bubbles in phase space instead of computing effective equations in terms of averaged quantities. This provides a more general description of the bubble mixture and contains previously derived effective equations as a special case. This Vlasov equation allows for the possibility that locally bubbles may oscillate with different phases or amplitudes or may have different sizes. The linearization of this equation recovers the dispersion relation derived by Carstensen & Foldy. The initial value problem is examined for both ideal bubbly flows and situations where the bubble dynamics have damping mechanisms. In the ideal case, it is found that the pressure waves will damp to zero whereas the bubbles continue to oscillate but with the oscillations becoming incoherent. This damping mechanism is similar to Landau damping in plasmas. Nonlinear effects are considered by using the Hamiltonian structure. It is proven that there is a damping mechanism due to the nonlinearity of single-bubble motion. The Vlasov equation is modified to include effects of liquid viscosity and heat transfer. It is shown that the pressure waves have two damping mechanisms, one from the effects of size distribution and the other from single-bubble damping effects. Consequently, the pressure waves can damp faster than bubble oscillations.

  11. Role of equatorial ionization anomaly in the initiation of equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavarao, R.; Nageswararao, M.; Sastri, J.H.; Vyas, G.D.; Sriramarao, M.

    1988-06-01

    A comparative study is made of the changes in the latitudinal structure of the F region electron density at fixed altitudes in the Indian equatorial region on days with and without postsunset onset of equatorial spread F, using (N-h) profile data of Ahmedabad (dip latitude 18.6/sup 0/N), Waltair (Dip latitude 10.6/sup 0/N), and Kodaikanal (dip latitude 1.5/sup 0/N). It is found that on spread F days the ratio of the electron density in the altitude region 370--300 km between Ahmedabad and Waltair showed a sudden enhancement starting at 1700 LT by a factor of 8 to 30 (at 1900 LT) from a near-constant value of about 2 during the daytime. No such enhancement of the density ratio was evidenced on days without spread F. The enhancement of the electron density ratio prior to the onset of spread F is interpreted as an intensification of the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly, with the ionization in the bottomside F region as far north as 9/sup 0/ from the dip equator participating in the crest intensification process. The rapid intensification of the ionization anomaly engenders a similar augmentation of the neutral anomaly around sunset hours. This in turn creates a localized cell of altitude dependent equatorward neutral wind that aids further intensification of the crests of both the anomalies and augmentation of ionization in the magnetic field line tube passing through the height of maximum plasma density of the F/sub 2/ layer over the equator. The net result of these coupling processes is a weakening of the ambient transequatorial wind (particularly during northern winter months) and reduction of the north-south asymmetry of the ionization anomaly crest, a condition favorable for the onset of spread F (Maruyama and Matuura, 1984).

  12. Solar Prominences: "Double, Double... Boil and Bubble"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Porth, O.

    2015-06-01

    Observations revealed rich dynamics within prominences, the cool (104 K), macroscopic (sizes of order 100 Mm) “clouds” in the million degree solar corona. Even quiescent prominences are continuously perturbed by hot, rising bubbles. Since prominence matter is hundredfold denser than coronal plasma, this bubbling is related to Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities. Here we report on true macroscopic simulations well into this bubbling phase, adopting an MHD description from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. Our virtual prominences rapidly establish fully nonlinear (magneto)convective motions where hot bubbles interplay with falling pillars, with dynamical details including upwelling pillars forming within bubbles. Our simulations show impacting Rayleigh–Taylor fingers reflecting on transition region plasma, ensuring that cool, dense chromospheric material gets mixed with prominence matter up to very large heights. This offers an explanation for the return mass cycle mystery for prominence material. Synthetic views at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths show remarkable agreement with observations, with clear indications of shear-flow induced fragmentations.

  13. The Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smereka, Peter Stenberg

    In an effort to understand acoustic cavitation noise the dynamics of periodically driven single bubbles and bubble clouds are examined. The single bubble equations are written as a perturbation of a Hamiltonian system and the conditions for resonances to occur are found, these can interact with the nonresonant orbit to produce jump and period-doubling bifurcations. To study the chaotic behavior a map which approximates the Poincare map in the resonant band is derived. The Poincare map is computed numerically which shows the formation of strange attractors which suddenly disappear leaving behind Smale horseshoe maps. The bubble cloud is studied using an averaged two-fluid model for bubbly flow with periodic driving at the boundary. The equations are examined both analytically and numerically. Local and global existence of solutions is proved and the existence of an absorbing set is established. An analysis of the linearized equations combined with estimates on the nonlinearity is used to prove the existence of nonlinear periodic orbit. This periodic orbit is a fixed point of the Poincare map and its stability is determined by finding the spectrum of the linearized Poincare map. This calculation combined with the absorbing set proves that the long term dynamics of the bubble cloud is finite dimensional. Numerical computations show the important attractors are a periodic -two orbit and a quasi-periodic orbit.

  14. Soap and Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brieske, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    The first Web site, from The Soap and Detergent Association, is called Soaps and Detergents (1). Visitors learn about the chemistry of soap and detergent, their history, how they're manufactured, and more. The easily read text and fun illustrations make this site a great place to start for this topic. The next site, called Bubble Engineering (2), is provided by Bubble Town. The page describes the physics of a cone-shaped bubble blowing device and how its shape reduces the velocity of air being blown through but not the volume of air moving through it. Other links on the site describe what the contents of the best bubble soap mixture. The third site is provided by Kevin Dunn of Hampden-Sydney College Department of Chemistry called Lye Soap (3). The site describes how soap was invented, the chemistry of lye and soap, how to make your own lye, and more. The fourth site highlighted is part of LessonPlansPage.com called Looking at Bubbles (4). The site, which is a lesson plan, is geared towards students between grades 6 and 8. The main objective of the chemistry activity is to explore what things can be added to soap to make the bubbles last longer. All procedures are provided to view online or to print. The Art and Science of Bubbles (5) Web site is maintained by the Soap and Detergent Association. Many great features can be found on this and other pages within the site, including washing hands with soap, the history and chemistry of soaps and detergents, the environmentally smart way of using and disposing of cleaning products, and more. The sixth site related to soap is entitled Bubble Games (6), which is maintained by bubbles.org. Three free games are offered here including Tic-Tac-Bubble, Bubblechase, and Bubble Wrap, which counts how many bubbles you can pop in twenty seconds. Next, from the Homeschooling page of About.com comes the Soap Power (7) activity. This unique lesson plan details how to power a model boat using soap as a result of its surface tension. Lastly, the Bubble Hydrodynamics (8) Web site is maintained by bubbleology.com. Visitors get an introduction to bubble hydrodynamics and also learn about the relationship between temperature and bubbles, surfactants and bubbles, and even oscillations and bubbles.

  15. Dynamics of elliptical magnetic bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Wanas

    1973-01-01

    Domain-wall anisotropy forces cylindrical domains (magnetic bubbles) to deviate from circular to elliptical geometry. Dynamics of elliptical bubbles are considered. It is found that the magnitude of the damping and coercive forces experienced by a moving eliptical bubble depends upon the direction of bubble motion. Bubbles suffer less damping and less coercion if moved along the wall-preferred direction.

  16. Microfluidic bubble logic.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Manu; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate universal computation in an all-fluidic two-phase microfluidic system. Nonlinearity is introduced into an otherwise linear, reversible, low-Reynolds number flow via bubble-to-bubble hydrodynamic interactions. A bubble traveling in a channel represents a bit, providing us with the capability to simultaneously transport materials and perform logical control operations. We demonstrate bubble logic AND/OR/NOT gates, a toggle flip-flop, a ripple counter, timing restoration, a ring oscillator, and an electro-bubble modulator. These show the nonlinearity, gain, bistability, synchronization, cascadability, feedback, and programmability required for scalable universal computation. With increasing complexity in large-scale microfluidic processors, bubble logic provides an on-chip process control mechanism integrating chemistry and computation. PMID:17289994

  17. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  18. Interplay Between the Equatorial Geophysical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.

    2006-11-01

    r_sridharanspl@yahoo.com With the sun as the main driving force, the Equatorial Ionosphere- thermosphere system supports a variety of Geophysical phenomena, essentially controlled by the neutral dynamical and electro dynamical processes that are peculiar to this region. All the neutral atmospheric parameters and the ionospheric parameters show a large variability like the diurnal, seasonal semi annual, annual, solar activity and those that are geomagnetic activity dependent. In addition, there is interplay between the ionized and the neutral atmospheric constituents. They manifest themselves as the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ), Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), Equatorial Spread F (ESF), Equatorial Temperature and Wind Anomaly (ETWA). Recent studies have revealed that these phenomena, though apparently might show up as independent ones, are in reality interlinked. The interplay between these equatorial processes forms the theme for the present talk.

  19. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  20. The Fermi bubbles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-zhi; Aharonian, Felix; Crocker, Roland

    2014-07-01

    We analyze 60 months of all-sky data from the Fermi-LAT. The Fermi bubble structures discovered previously are clearly revealed by our analysis. With more data, hence better statistics, we can now divide each bubble into constant longitude slices to investigate their gross ?-ray spectral morphology. While the detailed spectral behavior of each slice derived in our analysis is somewhat dependent on the assumed background model, we find, robustly, a relative deficit in the flux at low energies (i.e., hardening) toward the top of the south bubble. In neither bubble does the spectrum soften with longitude. The morphology of the Fermi bubbles is also revealed to be energy-dependent: at high energies they are more extended. We conclude from the gamma-ray spectrum at high latitudes that a low energy break in the parent cosmic ray population is required in both leptonic and hadronic models. We briefly discuss possible leptonic and hadronic interpretations of this phenomenology.

  1. Breakdown Voltage Scaling in Gas Bubbles Immersed in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah; Sommers, Bradley; Foster, John

    2013-09-01

    Radicals produced by the interaction of plasma with liquid water have the capacity to rapidly oxidize organic contaminants. This interaction is currently being investigated as a means to purify water. Direct plasma creation in water typically requires very high voltages to achieve breakdown. Igniting plasma in individual gas bubbles in liquid water on the other hand requires much less voltage. Furthermore, the use of an electrode-less plasma initiation in such bubbles is attractive in that it eliminates electrode erosion thereby circumventing the contamination issue. The breakdown physics of isolated bubbles in liquid water is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the relationship between applied voltage for breakdown and the associated pd. This is achieved by locating the breakdown voltage over a range of bubble sizes. This approach allows for the generation of a Paschen-type breakdown curve for isolated bubbles. Such a relationship yields insight into breakdown mechanics and even streamer propagation through water. Radicals produced by the interaction of plasma with liquid water have the capacity to rapidly oxidize organic contaminants. This interaction is currently being investigated as a means to purify water. Direct plasma creation in water typically requires very high voltages to achieve breakdown. Igniting plasma in individual gas bubbles in liquid water on the other hand requires much less voltage. Furthermore, the use of an electrode-less plasma initiation in such bubbles is attractive in that it eliminates electrode erosion thereby circumventing the contamination issue. The breakdown physics of isolated bubbles in liquid water is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the relationship between applied voltage for breakdown and the associated pd. This is achieved by locating the breakdown voltage over a range of bubble sizes. This approach allows for the generation of a Paschen-type breakdown curve for isolated bubbles. Such a relationship yields insight into breakdown mechanics and even streamer propagation through water. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET 1033141) and the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 0718128.

  2. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  3. Westward tilt of low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lühr, Hermann; Michaelis, Ingo; Stolle, Claudia; Rauberg, Jan; Buchert, Stephan; Gill, Reine; Merayo, Jose M. G.; Brauer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study we investigate the three-dimensional structure of low-latitude plasma blobs using multi-instrument and multisatellite observations of the Swarm constellation. During the early commissioning phase the Swarm satellites were flying at the same altitude with zonal separation of about 0.5? in geographic longitude. Electron density data from the three satellites constrain the blob morphology projected onto the horizontal plane. Magnetic field deflections around blobs, which originate from field-aligned currents near the irregularity boundaries, constrain the blob structure projected onto the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. As the two constraints are given for two noncoplanar surfaces, we can get information on the three-dimensional structure of blobs. Combined observation results suggest that blobs are contained within tilted shells of geomagnetic flux tubes, which are similar to the shell structure of equatorial plasma bubbles suggested by previous studies.

  4. Tribonucleation of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for "writing with bubbles," i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  5. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Burrows; T. S. G. Sastry; S. Sampath; J. D. Stolarik; M. J. Usher

    1976-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed and the large field depression, at the flight time, must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic

  6. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Burrows; T. S. G. Sastry; S. Sampath; J. D. Stolarik; M. J. Usher

    1977-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed, and the large field depression at the flight time must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic

  7. Shape Oscillations of Rising Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Knud Lunde; Richard J. Perkins

    1997-01-01

    The paper details results from an experimental study on bubbles rising in still tap water. Shape and motion parameters of the bubbles were measured using a combination of high speed cinematography and digital image processing. The Reynolds numbers of the bubbles studied ranged from about 700 to 1300, with the bubbles exhibiting all the familiar shape and motion characteristics: oblate

  8. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  9. Variations of equatorial electrodynamics during sudden stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Michael E.

    We have used plasma drift and magnetic field measurements during the 2000-2012 December solstices to study, for the first time, the longitudinal dependence of equatorial ionospheric electrodynamic perturbations during sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). Jicamarca radar measurements during these events show large dayside downward drift (westward electric field) perturbations followed by large morning upward and afternoon downward drifts that systematically shift to later local times. Ground-based magnetometer measurements in the American, Indian, and Pacific equatorial regions show strongly enhanced electro jet currents in the morning sector and large reversed currents (i.e., counterelectro jets) in the afternoon sector with onsets near new and full moons during northern winter warming periods. CHAMP satellite and ground-based magnetic field observations indicate the onset of these equatorial afternoon counterelectrojets is longitude dependent. Our results indicate these large electrodynamic perturbations during SSW periods are due to strongly enhanced semidiurnal wave effects. We have also studied variations in plasma drifts and the magnetic field during the September 2002 equinox and July 2010 June solstice warming events. Plasma drift variations during these events indicate a strong effect due to enhanced multi-day oscillations. Lunar semidiurnal variations are shown to be highly dependent on season, with the strongest enhancements of the lunar tide around the December solstice and the weakest around the June solstice. The results of our study can be used for forecasting the occurrence and evolution of these electrodynamic perturbations during warming events. We also present average patterns of largely enhanced lunar semidiurnal equatorial vertical plasma drift perturbations during arctic winter low- and high-solar flux SSW events. These perturbations play a dominant role in the electrodynamic response of the low-latitude ionosphere during SSWs. Our models indicate the amplitudes of the enhanced lunar semidiurnal drifts are strongly local time and solar flux dependent, with the largest values during early morning low solar flux SSW periods. These results suggest ionospheric conductance strongly modulate low-latitude ionospheric changes during SSWs. They also indicate lunar semidiurnal effects need to be taken into account by global ionospheric models for their improved forecasting of the low-latitude ionospheric response to SSW events, especially for low-solar flux conditions.

  10. The equatorial ionosphere measured by C/NOFS and COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneback, R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Ion Velocity Meter (IVM) onboard the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) performs in-situ measurements of thermal plasma properties and ion drifts in three dimensions. The FormoSat-3 satellites (COSMIC) perform GPS Radio Occultation measurements which may be used to infer altitude profiles of electron density. Results from these independent measurement techniques should be correlated in the equatorial ionosphere due to the influence of the vertical ion drift at the geomagnetic equator upon the distribution of density. We present a data based model that combines measurements from both platforms based upon this physical connection using Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOFs).

  11. Effects of Plasma Instabilities on Tungsten Divertor Plate

    E-print Network

    (HEIGHTS Package) · Plasma-Target Interaction · Plasma particles energy deposition (ions + electrons · Plasma energy deposition in debris · Debris hydrodynamic evolution · Debris/vapor magneto radiation · Plasma-Melt Layer Interaction · Splashing due to bubble formation and evaporation · Splashing

  12. First incoherent-scatter measurements of the equatorial E layer obtained with the ALTAIR radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland T. Tsunoda

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first incoherent-scatter (IS) radar measurements made of the daytime E layer at equatorial latitudes. Using ALTAIR, a steerable IS radar located in the Kwajalein Atoll, we not only show that the E-layer profiles are consistent with those obtained in situ by rockets, we present the first direct evidence of a latitudinal gradient in plasma density in the

  13. Global characterization of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly with data from the global ultraviolet imager

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sidney B. Henderson II

    2006-01-01

    The Equatorial Anomaly (EA) is host to the highest ionospheric densities in the Earth's atmosphere. Disturbances within the EA result in plasma density depletions and large density gradients. In this dissertation we present a method for measuring EA morphology using nighttime 135.6 nm radiance observed by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) on-board the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED)

  14. Equatorial F-region electron densities over a solar cycle: Comparisons between observations and numerical models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda P. Creamer

    1992-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations at Jicamarca, Peru, from 1964 to the present, are used to study the seasonal and solar cycle variations in the daily equatorial ionospheric plasma density profiles for select hours. The peak density, peak layer heights, and layer thickness are dependent on solar activity which is determined by F10.7 cm flux. There are large variations in the

  15. Time dependent response of equatorial ionospheric electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludger Scherliess

    1995-01-01

    We use extensive radar measurements of F region vertical plasma drifts and auroral electrojet indices to determine the storm time dependence of equatorial zonal electric fields. These disturbance drifts result from the prompt penetration of high latitude electric fields and from the dynamo action of storm time winds which produce largest perturbations a few hours after the onset of magnetic

  16. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  17. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  18. Sonoluminescing Gas Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Scott; H.-Th. Elze; T. Kodama; J. Rafelski

    1998-01-01

    We draw attention to the fact that the popular but unproven hypothesis of shock-driven sonoluminescence is incompatible with the reported synchronicity of the single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) phenomenon. Moreover, it is not a necessary requirement, since we show that the sub-shock dynamic heating in gas bubble cavitation can lead to conditions required to generate intense 100ps light pulses. To wit

  19. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  20. DNS of Separation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildings, Casper; Henningson, Dan

    1996-11-01

    Separation bubbles in laminar flow over a flat plate have been investigated using a modified version of the spectral DNS-code developed at FFA/KTH. By prescribing the velocity at the free-stream boundary, a varying pressure gradient was introduced, sufficiently strong to form a separation bubble. The numerical method chosen uses the so called ``fringe region'' technique to damp outflowing disturbances and return the flow to a prescribed inlet state. A detailed investigation of the efficiency of the disturbance damping has been made, since separation bubbles amplify disturbances several orders of magnitude. If these disturbances are not adequately damped they may reenter at the inflow and corrupt the computation. Guidelines to find the most efficient fringe are presented. Initially the 2D separation bubble investigated by Rist and Maucher (Rist, U., Maucher, U. AGARD-Symposium, 1994, Chania, Crete.) was calculated in order to verify the code. The characteristics of this bubble, including length and height as well as the growth rate of small disturbances compare well with those of Rist and Maucher. Presently a corresponding experimental study of separation bubbles is made at KTH. Comparisons between the ongoing numerical work and the experiments will be presented.

  1. THEMIS analysis of observed equatorial electron distributions responsible for the chorus excitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Li; R. M. Thorne; Y. Nishimura; J. Bortnik; V. Angelopoulos; J. P. McFadden; D. E. Larson; J. W. Bonnell; O. Le Contel; A. Roux; U. Auster

    2010-01-01

    A statistical survey of plasma densities and electron distributions (0.5–100 keV) is performed using data obtained from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms spacecraft in near-equatorial orbits from 1 July 2007 to 1 May 2009 in order to investigate optimum conditions for whistler mode chorus excitation. The plasma density calculated from the spacecraft potential, together with

  2. On the hierarchy of processes contributing to equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Hysell, D.L,.

    1992-01-01

    Unstable plasma stratification in the twilight equatorial F region ionosphere is subject to plasma instabilities known collectively as equatorial spread F. Small-scale irregularities in electron density give rise to coherent VHF and UHF radio scatter during spread F while in situ spacecraft detect intermediate- and large-scale plasma structures. The authors present data from observations made over three years at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and from the summer 1990 CRRES/EQUIS campaign which involved the Cornell 50 MHz radar interferometer (CUPRI) and the Altair UHF radar at Kwajalein, MI. Radar findings are correlated with spread F data from sounding rockets launched during the EQUIS project and from the Atmospheric Explorer E satellite. A review of fundamental fluid theory for the ionospheric interchange instability emphasizes dissipative and non-local effects that restrict linear instability to intermediate-scale wavelengths. A nonlinear fluid theory incorporating three wave interactions extends the range of instability to transitional and small scales, and renormalization group analysis offers a way to evaluate enhanced transport due to these nonlinearly excited modes. At large scales, circumstantial evidence suggests that internal gravity waves seed plasma upwellings and initiate topside spread F. Density and electric field spectra measured by the spread F sounding rockets exhibit inertial-convective and inertial-diffusive subranges. A model of quasi one-dimensional plasma turbulence reproduces the spectral indices and breaking scales observed by the rockets. Density power spectra from 30 AE-E orbits also possess convective and diffusive subranges, but their characteristic scale sizes are about 10 times larger than the rocket's. One-dimensional rocket and satellite power spectra combine to form a two-dimensional spectral model of F region irregularities which predicts VHF radar scattering cross-sections.

  3. Swarm SCARF equatorial electric field inversion chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, Patrick; Maus, Stefan; Vigneron, Pierre; Sirol, Olivier; Hulot, Gauthier

    2013-11-01

    The day-time eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the ionospheric E-region plays a crucial role in equatorial ionospheric dynamics. It is responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) current system, equatorial vertical ion drifts, and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). Due to its importance, there is much interest in accurately measuring and modeling the EEF for both climatological and near real-time studies. The Swarm satellite mission offers a unique opportunity to estimate the equatorial electric field from measurements of the geomagnetic field. Due to the near-polar orbits of each satellite, the on-board magnetometers record a full profile in latitude of the ionospheric current signatures at satellite altitude. These latitudinal magnetic profiles are then modeled using a first principles approach with empirical climatological inputs specifying the state of the ionosphere. Since the EEF is the primary driver of the low-latitude ionospheric current system, the observed magnetic measurements can then be inverted for the EEF. This paper details the algorithm for recovering the EEF from Swarm geomagnetic field measurements. The equatorial electric field estimates are an official Swarm level-2 product developed within the Swarm SCARF (Satellite Constellation Application Research Facility). They will be made freely available by ESA after the commissioning phase.

  4. Study of Sun-Earth interactions using equatorial VHF scintillation in the Indian region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sridhar Banola

    2010-01-01

    Plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere (associated with ESF, plasma bubbles and Spo-radic E layers) cause scintillations in various frequency ranges. VHF radio wave scintillation technique is extensively used to study plasma density irregularities of sub-kilometre size . Ef-fects of magnetic and solar activity on ionospheric irregularities are studied so as to ascertain their role in the space weather of

  5. Study of electron trapping by a transversely ellipsoidal bubble in the laser wake-field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Myung-Hoon [School of Natural Science, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Natural Science, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We present electron trapping in an ellipsoidal bubble which is not well explained by the spherical bubble model by [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175003 (2009)]. The formation of an ellipsoidal bubble, which is elongated transversely, frequently occurs when the spot size of the laser pulse is large compared to the plasma wavelength. First, we introduce the relation between the bubble size and the field slope inside the bubble in longitudinal and transverse directions. Then, we provide an ellipsoidal model of the bubble potential and investigate the electron trapping condition by numerical integration of the equations of motion. We found that the ellipsoidal model gives a significantly less restrictive trapping condition than that of the spherical bubble model. The trapping condition is compared with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and the electron trajectory in test potential simulations.

  6. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  7. Statistical equilibrium of bubble oscillations in dilute bubbly flows.

    PubMed

    Colonius, Tim; Hagmeijer, Rob; Ando, Keita; Brennen, Christopher E

    2008-04-01

    The problem of predicting the moments of the distribution of bubble radius in bubbly flows is considered. The particular case where bubble oscillations occur due to a rapid (impulsive or step change) change in pressure is analyzed, and it is mathematically shown that in this case, inviscid bubble oscillations reach a stationary statistical equilibrium, whereby phase cancellations among bubbles with different sizes lead to time-invariant values of the statistics. It is also shown that at statistical equilibrium, moments of the bubble radius may be computed using the period-averaged bubble radius in place of the instantaneous one. For sufficiently broad distributions of bubble equilibrium (or initial) radius, it is demonstrated that bubble statistics reach equilibrium on a time scale that is fast compared to physical damping of bubble oscillations due to viscosity, heat transfer, and liquid compressibility. The period-averaged bubble radius may then be used to predict the slow changes in the moments caused by the damping. A benefit is that period averaging gives a much smoother integrand, and accurate statistics can be obtained by tracking as few as five bubbles from the broad distribution. The period-averaged formula may therefore prove useful in reducing computational effort in models of dilute bubbly flow wherein bubbles are forced by shock waves or other rapid pressure changes, for which, at present, the strong effects caused by a distribution in bubble size can only be accurately predicted by tracking thousands of bubbles. Some challenges associated with extending the results to more general (nonimpulsive) forcing and strong two-way coupled bubbly flows are briefly discussed. PMID:19547725

  8. Altair: an incoherent scatter radar for equatorial spread F studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. T. Tsunoda; M. J. Baron; J. Owen; D. M. Towle

    1979-01-01

    We report preliminary results on l-m equatorial spread F irregularities obtained with a high-power VHF backscatter radar located at equatorial latitudes. The field experiment was conducted at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, during August 1977. The examples, which include both incoherent scatter measurements and backscatter from equatorial spread F irregularities, illustrate the usefulness of a fully steerable radar for equatorial spread

  9. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  10. Observations of discrete harmonics emerging from equatorial noise.

    PubMed

    Balikhin, Michael A; Shprits, Yuri Y; Walker, Simon N; Chen, Lunjin; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Dandouras, Iannis; Santolik, Ondrej; Carr, Christopher; Yearby, Keith H; Weiss, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    A number of modes of oscillations of particles and fields can exist in space plasmas. Since the early 1970s, space missions have observed noise-like plasma waves near the geomagnetic equator known as 'equatorial noise'. Several theories were suggested, but clear observational evidence supported by realistic modelling has not been provided. Here we report on observations by the Cluster mission that clearly show the highly structured and periodic pattern of these waves. Very narrow-banded emissions at frequencies corresponding to exact multiples of the proton gyrofrequency (frequency of gyration around the field line) from the 17th up to the 30th harmonic are observed, indicating that these waves are generated by the proton distributions. Simultaneously with these coherent periodic structures in waves, the Cluster spacecraft observes 'ring' distributions of protons in velocity space that provide the free energy for the waves. Calculated wave growth based on ion distributions shows a very similar pattern to the observations. PMID:26169360

  11. Decadal changes in the equatorial Pacific circulation 

    E-print Network

    Urizar, S. Cristina

    2002-01-01

    An ocean general circulation model with data assimilation is used to analyze the decadal changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean circulation. Results indicate that the variability in the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and subtropical cells (STC) have...

  12. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  13. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  14. First incoherent-scatter measurements of the equatorial E layer obtained with the ALTAIR radar

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, R.T. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The author describes the first coherent-scatter (IS) radar measurements made of the daytime E layer at equatorial latitudes. Using ALTAIR, a steerable IS radar located in the Kwajalein Atoll, the author is not only able to show that the E-layer profiles are consistent with those obtained in situ by rockets, but presents the first direct evidence of a latitudinal gradient in plasma density in the bottomside E layer that extended from 3{degrees}N dip latitude to beyond 6{degrees}N. The author suggests that the gradient involves the electrodynamic transport of metallic ions, e.g., the gradient could be produced by the equatorial metallic-ion fountain or possibly by the dumping of metallic ions at the base of the E layer by the wind-shear mechanism for sporadic E. This article is closed with a brief discussion of the implications of such a gradient on the equatorial electrojet. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A possible origin of gamma rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2014-11-01

    One of the most exciting discoveries of recent years is a pair of gigantic gamma-ray emission regions, the so-called Fermi bubbles, above and below the Galactic center. The bubbles, discovered by the Fermi space telescope, extend up to ?50° in Galactic latitude and are ?40° wide in Galactic longitude. The gamma-ray emission is also found to correlate with radio, microwave and X-rays emission. The origin of the bubbles and the associated non-thermal emissions are still not clearly understood. Possible explanations for the non-thermal emission include cosmic-ray injection from the Galactic center by high speed Galactic winds/jets, acceleration by multiple shocks or plasma turbulence present inside the bubbles, and acceleration by strong shock waves associated with the expansion of the bubbles. In this paper, I will discuss the possibility that the gamma-ray emission is produced by the injection of Galactic cosmic-rays mainly protons during their diffusive propagation through the Galaxy. The protons interact with the bubble plasma producing ?°-decay gamma rays, while at the same time, radio and microwave synchrotron emissions are produced by the secondary electrons/positrons resulting from the ?± decays.

  16. Small-Scale Irregularities in Equatorial Spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Equatorial Spread-F is a spectacular plasma phenomenon that reshapes the nighttime ionosphere and disrupts GPS navigation and radio communication. Current computer models simulate the evolution of large-scale spread-F phenomena (1000km-to-kilometer), but they do not explain what causes the meter-scale irregularities observed by radars and space-borne instruments. Our recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of weakly collisional plasma have demonstrated that large-scale plasma density gradients and related electric fields may drive local plasma instabilities, although only for a limited set of parameters. Motivated by these PIC simulations, we have revisited the linear theory of this instability, employing a novel and sophisticated eigenmode analysis. This method identified eigenmode wave structures in regions having strong plasma density gradients. These wave structures are not linearly unstable, but are not damped either. This means that small-scale fluctuations provided by an external source (e.g., by a nonlinear spectral cascade from longer-wavelength spread-F turbulence) can be resonantly amplified and may explain radar observations without invoking linear instability. Work supported by NASA LWS Grant 10-LWSTRT10-0078.

  17. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S., E-mail: SJafari@guilan.ac.ir; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  18. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S.; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-01

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  19. Layers in the equatorial mesosphere, motions and aerosol: rocket and radar measurements during EQUIS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmacher, G. A.; Croskey, C. L.; Mitchell, J. D.; Friedrich, M.; Torkar, K.; Lübken, F.-J.; Rapp, M.; Kudeki, E.

    2005-08-01

    The NASA EQUIS II (Equatorial Ionosphere Studies) campaign was conducted in August/September 2004 at U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll/Reagan Test Site on Roi-Namur, Marshall Islands (9°N, 168°E). The LEMMA (Layers in the Equatorial Mesosphere, Motions and Aerosol) program was devoted to neutral and plasma density fluctuations in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere. One objective was to detect layers of small scale structures that might be related to mesospheric VHF radar echoes observed regularly at equatorial and low latitudes. The payload carried multiple instruments from U.S. and European investigators, including an ionization gauge for the first in situ measurements of neutral turbulence fluctuations in the equatorial mesosphere. One sounding rocket and three falling spheres were launched successfully on September 20, 2004, supported by a large, steerable 422 MHz UHF radar receiving incoherent backscatter from ~85-700 km. We give an overview of the investigation and present some results including the comparison of in situ and ground based electron density measurements, neutral temperature and wind structure, and observations of neutral and electron density fluctuations.

  20. Seismo-ionospheric coupling appearing as equatorial electron density enhancements observed via DEMETER electron density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, K.; Lee, E.; Chae, J. S.; Parrot, M.; Pulinets, S.

    2014-10-01

    We report the processes and results of statistical analysis on the ionospheric electron density data measured by the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite over a period of 6 years (2005-2010), in order to investigate the correlation between seismic activity and equatorial plasma density variations. To simplify the analysis, three equatorial regions with frequent earthquakes were selected and then one-dimensional time series analysis between the daily seismic activity indices and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) intensity indices, which represent relative equatorial electron density increase, were performed for each region. The statistically significant values of the lagged cross-correlation function, particularly in the region with minimal effects of longitudinal asymmetry, indicate that some of the very large earthquakes with M > 5.0 in the low-latitude region can accompany observable precursory and concurrent EIA enhancements, even though the seismic activity is not the most significant driver of the equatorial ionospheric evolution. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling is consistent with our observation, and the possibility of earthquake prediction using the EIA intensity variation is discussed.

  1. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  2. Acoustically Bound Microfluidic Bubble Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaud, David; Thibault, Pierre; Mathieu, Mylène; Marmottant, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Bubbles confined in microchannels self-organize without directly contacting one another when excited by an external acoustic field. The bubbles tend to form periodic “crystal”-like lattices with a finite interbubble distance. This equilibrium distance can be adjusted by simply tuning the acoustic frequency. This new type of crystal is purely mediated by acoustic surface waves emitted by the pulsating bubbles. Because these waves are reflected at the channel boundaries, the bubbles interact with their own images across the boundary.

  3. Stability of magnetic equilibria in radio bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    Current-carrying flows, in the laboratory and in astrophysical jets, can form remarkably stable magnetic structures. Decades of experience show that such flows often build equilibria that reverse field directions, evolving to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Taylor state, which has remarkable stability properties. We model jets and the magnetic bubbles they build as reversed-field pinch equilibria by assuming the driver current to be stiff in the MHD sense. Taking the jet current as rigid and a fixed function of position, we prove a theorem: that the same, simple MHD stability conditions guarantee stability, even after the jet turns off. This means that magnetic structures harbouring a massive inventory of magnetic energy can persist long after the building jet current has died away. These may be the relic radio `fossils', `ghost bubbles' or `magnetic balloons' found in clusters. These equilibria, which are under magnetic tension, will evolve, retaining the stability properties from that state. The remaining fossil is not a disordered ball of magnetic fields, but a stable structure under tension, able to respond to the slings and arrows of outside forces. Typically their Alfvén speeds greatly exceed the cluster sound speed, and so they can keep out hot cluster plasma, leading to X-ray ghosts. Passing shocks cannot easily destroy them, but can energize and light them up anew at radio frequencies. Bubbles can rise in the hot cluster plasma, perhaps detaching from the parent radio galaxy but stable against Rayleigh-Taylor and other modes.

  4. Bubble size measurement in electroflotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Evans; S. W. Donne

    2010-01-01

    A feature of electroflotation is the ability to create very fine bubbles, which are known to improve flotation performance of fine particles. This study was aimed at determining the hydrogen bubble size generated as a function ofcurrent density and electrode geometry. Experiments were performed in a viewing cell that allowed direct visualization of hydrogen bubbles being generated and transported away

  5. Bubbles in Real Estate Markets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Herring; Susan Wachter

    2002-01-01

    Real estate bubbles may occur without banking crises. And banking crises may occur without real estate bubbles. But the two phenomena are correlated in a remarkable number of instances. This paper provides a conceptual framework explaining why the banking sector’s importance and link to the real estate sector not only amplifies the real estate bubble but also can have major

  6. Evidence of Medium Scale (~50 km) Undulations Observed at Sunset in the Equatorial Ionosphere by Electric Field and Plasma Density Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite Below the F-Peak in Conjunction with Larger Scale (~500 km) Depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Electric field and plasma density observations gathered on the C/NOFS satellite are presented in cases where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the satellite perigee of 400 km near sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite frequently show evidence of "medium scale" (40-80 km) undulations in conjunction with, yet distinct from, series of periodic, larger scale (200-800 km) density depletions. The observations suggest that a second category of wavelike variations of the bottomside plasma density may be important for the subsequent development of the larger scale density depletions and their associated "spread-F" irregularities. The electric fields associated with the medium scale undulations are typically a few mV/m with density variations of a few percent in which upwards E x B drifts are associated with their depletions. The undulations are observed both before and after local sunset and are typically observed, in the satellite frame as it journeys from west to east, prior to the onset of the larger scale depletions. We present examples of these medium scale undulations and discuss their implications for driving the larger scale depletions, possibly in a manner similar to that discussed by Hysell and Kudeki [2004], Kudeki et al. [2007], and others.

  7. Laboratory testing of the Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Ziemba, T.; Slough, J.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.

    2001-02-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a magnetic wall or bubble (i.e., a magnetosphere) attached to a spacecraft that will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with little expenditure of propellant. Results from a laboratory prototype that demonstrate the basic formation and expansion of a mini-magnetosphere are presented. The prototype uses a helicon source embedded asymmetrically in a dipole-like magnetic field. Breakdown of the plasma can be produced at neutral pressures of between about 0.25 to 1 mTorr to produce plasma densities of the order of 1011-1012 cm-3 with a temperature of a few eV. The plasma pressure is sufficient to cause the outward expansion or inflation of the mini-magnetosphere. The motion of both open and closed field lines within the vacuum chamber is demonstrated through the optical emissions from the helicon plasma. Inflation of the magnetosphere to several feet away from the magnetic coil and the equatorial confinement of the plasma are demonstrated. In space, inflation to about 15-20 km would be expected for the same configuration, which would potentially lead to the acceleration a 70-140 kg payload to speeds of about 50-80 km/s over a 3-month acceleration period. At this speed, missions to the heliopause and beyond can be achieved in under 10 yrs. .

  8. COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF COMPLEX PHENOMENA IN BUBBLE DYNAMICS: VORTEX SHEDDING AND BUBBLE SWARMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heikki Haario; Zhanna Korotkaya; Pasi Luukka; Anton Smolianski

    2004-01-01

    We consider the direct numerical simulation of gas bubbles in viscous uid ows. The behaviour of single bubbles and bubble swarms is studied with the particu- lar emphasis on the bubble coalescence and breakage phenomena. For single bubbles, we are able to simulate the bubble dynamics in all relevant ow regimes, including the von Karman type vortex shedding and wobbling-bubble

  9. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  10. What's in the Bubbles?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about particles during a change in state. The probe is designed to find out if students recognize that the bubbles formed when water boils are the result of liquid water changing into water vapor. This free selection also includes the Table of Contents, Foreword, Preface, and Index.

  11. Bubble Chamber Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This substantial site features a large number of photos of bubble chamber (BC) tracks, many with a discussion of the physics. There is a description of how the BC works and also useful tutorial on reading BC pictures. The high quality of the images and the explanations of the events that are shown make this site especially valuable.

  12. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  13. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  14. Multiscale equatorial electrojet turbulence:Baseline 2-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ehab; Horton, W.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Hatch, D. R.; Litt, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of the turbulent plasma density, electric fields, and ion drift in ionospheric E region are studied using a new set of nonlinear plasma fluid equations. The fluid model combines both Farley-Buneman (Type-I) and Gradient-Drift (Type-II) plasma instabilities in the equatorial electrojet. In our unified model of the plasma instabilities, we include the ion viscosity in the ion momentum equation and electron inertia in the electron momentum equation. These two terms play an important role in stabilizing the growing modes in the linear regime and in driving the Farley-Buneman instability into the saturation state. The simulation results show good agreements with a number of features of rocket and radar observations, such as (1) saturation of plasma density perturbations depends on the solar condition and reaches 7-15% relative to the background, (2) fluctuation of the horizontal secondary electric field reaches 8-15 mV/m, (3) stabilization of the phase velocity of the perturbed density wave around the value of the ion-acoustic speed inside the electrojet, (4) "up-down" asymmetry in the vertical fluxes of the plasma density, (5) "east-west" asymmetry of the plasma zonal drifts, and (6) generation of small scale of the order of meter scale lengths irregularities embedded in large-scale structures. Spectral analysis of the density fluctuations reveals the energy cascade due to the nonlinear coupling between structures of different scales. The break-up of the large-scale structures into small-scale structures explains the disappearance of Type-II echoes in the presence of Type-I instabilities.

  15. Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N?mec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbá?ková, Z.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic wave events at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic line structure characteristic of the proton cyclotron frequency in the source region. However, they were generally believed to be continuous in time. We investigate more than 2000 EN events observed by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations and Wide-Band Data Plasma Wave investigation instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we show that this is not always the case. A clear quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity is present in more than 5% of events. We perform a systematic analysis of these EN events with QP modulation of the wave intensity. Such events occur usually in the noon-to-dawn magnetic local time sector. Their occurrence seems to be related to the increased geomagnetic activity, and it is associated with the time intervals of enhanced solar wind flow speeds. The modulation period of these events is on the order of minutes. Compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations with periods about double the modulation periods of EN wave intensity and magnitudes on the order of a few tenths of nanotesla were identified in about 46% of events. We suggest that these compressional magnetic field pulsations might be responsible for the observed QP modulation of EN wave intensity, in analogy to formerly reported VLF whistler mode QP events.

  16. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since centrifugal force has to be balanced by a lift-like force. She then re-traces her path and injects air into the vortex from her blowhole. She can even make a ring reconnect from the helix. In the second technique, demonstrated a few times, she again swims in a curved path, releases a cloud or group of bubbles from her blowhole and turns sharply away (Which presumably strengthens the vortex). As the bubbles encounter the vortex, they travel to the center of the vortex, merge and, in a flash, elongate along the core of the vortex. In all the three types, the air-water interface is shiny smooth and stable because the pressure gradient in the vortex flow around the bubble stabilizes it. A lot of the interesting physics still remains to be explored.

  17. Equatorial superrotation on tidally locked exoplanets

    E-print Network

    Showman, Adam P

    2011-01-01

    The increasing richness of exoplanet observations has motivated a variety of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of these planets. Under strongly irradiated conditions, models of tidally locked, short-period planets (both hot Jupiters and terrestrial planets) tend to exhibit a circulation dominated by a fast eastward, or "superrotating," jet stream at the equator. Under appropriate conditions, this phenomenon can cause the hottest regions to be displaced eastward from the substellar point by tens of degrees longitude. Such an offset has been observed on HD 189733b, supporting the possibility of equatorial jets on short-period exoplanets. Despite its relevance, however, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for generating the equatorial superrotation in such models have not been identified. Here, we show that the equatorial jet results from the interaction of the mean flow with standing, planetary-scale Rossby and Kelvin waves induced by the day-night thermal forcing. The Rossby waves develop phase...

  18. Time and Space Dependent Stochastic Acceleration Model for the Fermi Bubbles

    E-print Network

    Sasaki, K; Terasawa, T

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT reveals two huge gamma-ray bubbles existing in the Galactic Center, called 'Fermi Bubbles'. The existence of two microwave bubbles at the same region are also reported by the observation by WMAP, dubbed 'WMAP haze'. In order to explain these components, It has been argued that the gamma-rays arise from Inverse-Compton scattering of relativistic electrons accelerated by plasma turbulence, and the microwaves are radiated by synchrotron radiation. But no previous research reproduces both the Fermi Bubbles and WMAP haze under typical magnetic fields in the galaxy. We assume that shocks present in the bubbles and the efficiency of the acceleration by plasma turbulence, 'stochastic acceleration', changes with the distance from the shock front. The distance from the shock front increases with time, accordingly the efficiency of the acceleration changes with time. We also consider the time development of the electrons escape from the turbulence by diffusive loss. Our model succeed to reproduce both the obse...

  19. Equatorial waves in the stratosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, David P.; Magalhaes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of radio occultation data from Voyager 2 have led to the discovery and characterization of an equatorial wave in the Uranus stratosphere. The observed quasi-periodic vertical atmospheric density variations are in close agreement with theoretical predictions for a wave that propagates vertically through the observed background structure of the stratosphere. Quantitative comparisons between measurements obtained at immersion and at emersion yielded constraints on the meridional and zonal structure of the wave; the fact that the two sets of measurements are correlated suggests a wave of planetary scale. Two equatorial wave models are proposed for the wave.

  20. High-resolution neutron imaging of laser fusion targets using bubble detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. K.; Stephens, R. B.; Disdier, L.; Bourgade, J. L.; Rouyer, A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Lerche, R. A.; Izumi, N.

    2002-05-01

    The results of proof-of-principle neutron imaging experiments using bubble detectors are reported. Bubble detectors, which detect neutrons with a spatial resolution as small as 5 ?, were used to image the neutrons from laser-driven compressed deuterium-tritium target plasmas in OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The results demonstrate that bubble detectors should revolutionize the design of coded aperture neutron imaging systems. Prospects for imaging target plasmas in the National Ignition Facility [Kilkenny et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 288 (1995)] with 5 ? spatial resolution in the target plane appear excellent.

  1. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of equatorial spread F: Results and observations in the Pacific sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.; Caton, R. G.; Groves, K. M.; Klenzing, J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma density irregularities in the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) is described. The simulation evolves under realistic background conditions including bottomside plasma shear flow and vertical current. It also incorporates C/NOFS satellite data which partially specify the forcing. A combination of generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRT) and collisional shear instability (CSI) produces growing waveforms with key features that agree with C/NOFS satellite and ALTAIR radar observations in the Pacific sector, including features such as gross morphology and rates of development. The transient response of CSI is consistent with the observation of bottomside waves with wavelengths close to 30 km, whereas the steady state behavior of the combined instability can account for the 100+ km wavelength waves that predominate in the F region.

  2. Polarizing bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bart?omiej; Larjo, Klaus; Levi, Thomas S.; Sigurdson, Kris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kleban, Matthew, E-mail: czech@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: mk161@nyu.edu, E-mail: larjo@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: tslevi@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: krs@phas.ubc.ca [CCPP, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    We predict the polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons that results from a cosmic bubble collision. The polarization is purely E-mode, symmetric around the axis pointing towards the collision bubble, and has several salient features in its radial dependence that can help distinguish it from a more conventional explanation for unusually cold or hot features in the CMB sky. The anomalous ''cold spot'' detected by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite is a candidate for a feature produced by such a collision, and the Planck satellite and other proposed surveys will measure the polarization on it in the near future. The detection of such a collision would provide compelling evidence for the string theory landscape.

  3. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2009-05-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) has begun laboratory experiments and coordinated nonlinear MHD simulations to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Experimental parameters can be adjusted so that important dimensionless parameters are relevant to the astrophysical context. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. First experimental data from plasma bubble injection into a background plasma, including magnetic probe measurements and high-speed camera imaging, will be presented. [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008). Supported by NSF-AST/DOE grant AST-0613577 and LANL LDRD.

  4. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  5. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brou?ková, Zuzana; Trávní?ek, Zden?k; Šafa?ík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  6. Giant bubble-pinchoff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Bergmann; Devaraj van der Meer; Mark Stijnman; Marijn Sandtke; Andrea Prosperetti; Detlef Lohse

    2006-01-01

    Self-similarity has been the paradigmatic picture for the pinch-off of a drop. Here we will show through high-speed imaging and boundary integral simulations that the inverse problem, the pinch-off of an air bubble in water, does not obey self-similarity (of the first kind): A disk is quickly pulled through a water surface, leading to a giant, cylindrical void, which at

  7. plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. Y.; Jin, C. G.; Yang, Y.; Ye, C.; Zhuge, L. J.; Wu, X. M.

    2014-12-01

    As-deposited HfO2 films were modified by CHF3, C4F8, and mixed C4F8/O2 plasmas in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber driven by radio frequency generators of 60 MHz as the high frequency (HF) source and 2 MHz as the low frequency source (60/2 MHz). The influences of various surface plasma treatments under CHF3, C4F8, and C4F8/O2 were investigated in order to understand the chemical and structural changes in thin-film systems, as well as their influence on the electrical properties. Fluorine atoms were incorporated into the HfO2 films by either CHF3 or C4F8 plasma treatment; meanwhile, the C/F films were formed on the surface of the HfO2 films. The formation of C/F layers decreased the k value of the gate stacks because of its low dielectric constant. However, the addition of O2 gas in the discharge gases suppressed the formation of C/F layers. After thermal annealing, tetragonal HfO2 phase was investigated in both samples treated with CHF3 and C4F8 plasmas. However, the samples treated with O-rich plasmas showed monoclinic phase, which indicated that the addition of O plasmas could influence the Hf/O ratio of the HfO2 films. The mechanism of the t-HfO2 formation was attributed to oxygen insufficiency generated by the incorporation of F atoms. The capacitors treated with C4F8/O2 plasmas displayed the highest k value, which ascribed that the C/F layers were suppressed and the tetragonal phase of HfO2 was formed. Good electrical properties, especially on the hysteresis voltage and frequency dispersion, were obtained because the bulk traps were passivated by the incorporation of F atoms. However, the H-related traps were generated during the CHF3 plasma treatments, which caused the performance degradation. All the treated samples showed lower leakage current density than the as-deposited HfO2 films at negative bias due to the reduced trap-assisted tunneling by the incorporation of F to block the electrons transferring from metal electrode to the trap level.

  8. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  9. Acoustic Measurements Bubbles in Biological Tiessure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georges L. CHAHINE; Michel TANGUAY; Greg LORAINE

    2009-01-01

    An acoustic based instrument, the ABS Acoustic Bubble Spectrometer®© (ABS), was investigated for the detection and quantification of bubbles in biological media. These include viscoelastic media (blood), materials of varying density (bone in tissue), non-homogenous distribution of bubbles (intravenous bubbly flow), and bubbles migrating in tissue (decompression sickness, DCS). The performance of the ABS was demonstrated in a series of

  10. Precessing AGN Jets, Bubbles and Cooling Flows

    E-print Network

    Falceta-Goncalves, D; Abraham, Z; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Teixeira, D M

    2011-01-01

    Several galaxy clusters are known to present multiple and misaligned pairs of cavities seen in X-rays, as well as twisted kiloparsec-scale jets at radio wavelengths. It suggests that the AGN precessing jets play a role in the formation of the misaligned bubbles. Also, X-ray spectra reveal that typically these systems are also able to supress cooling flows, predicted theoretically. The absence of cooling flows in galaxy clusters has been a mistery for many years since numerical simulations and analytical studies suggest that AGN jets are highly energetic, but are unable to redistribute it at all directions. We performed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction between a precessing AGN jet and the warm intracluster medium plasma, which dynamics is coupled to a NFW dark matter gravitational potential. Radiative cooling has been taken into account and the cooling flow problem was studied. We found that precession is responsible for multiple pairs of bubbles, as observed. The misaligned bubbles rise up to ...

  11. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Secan; R. M. Bussey; E. J. Fremouw; Sa. Basu

    1995-01-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over

  12. 8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations

    E-print Network

    Lott, Francois

    oscillation #12;3 Kelvin wave Index for entrance in the low stratosphere based on T at 21km filtred) a) Observations: Equatorial waves and quasi biennal oscillation #12;6 Index de l'OQB Moyenne du vent oscillation b) Quasi-Biennal Oscillation explained in terms of gravity waves mean flow interactions c

  13. Pliocene equatorial temperature: Lessons from atmospheric superrotation

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Brian F.

    2009. [1] There is proxy evidence that the pronounced east-west temperature difference observed today observed east-west temperature difference across the equatorial Pacific Ocean may not have existed reduced east-west temperature gradient state requires, of course, a substantially different physical

  14. Interplay Between the Equatorial Geophysical Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Sridharan

    2006-01-01

    r_sridharanspl@yahoo.com With the sun as the main driving force, the Equatorial Ionosphere- thermosphere system supports a variety of Geophysical phenomena, essentially controlled by the neutral dynamical and electro dynamical processes that are peculiar to this region. All the neutral atmospheric parameters and the ionospheric parameters show a large variability like the diurnal, seasonal semi annual, annual, solar activity and those

  15. Mobility of fission gas bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Nichols; C. Ronchi

    1985-01-01

    The importance of bubble migration in fuel swelling and fission-product release remains a controversial topic in spite of a great deal of research. For steady-state analyses some authors ignore bubble motion totally, whereas others employ mobilities (based on out-of-pile measurements) which are far below the theoretical diffusion-control predictions. Under transient conditions some continue to employ zero or low bubble mobilities,

  16. C/NOFS Observations of Plasma Density and Electric Field Responses to High Speed Streams in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Hunton, D. E.; Roddy, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Crown, M.

    2009-12-01

    C/NOFS plasma density and electric field measurements for 10 - 20 June 2008 indicate significant changes in geomagnetic conditions as a high speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind passed Earth. During the HSS passage C/NOFS encountered moderate to strong post-midnight equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) activity. As the corotating interaction region (CIR) at the leading edge of the HSS passed, the interplanetary magnetic field intensified and rotated, and the Bz component turned southward. C/NOFS observed a rapid transition to a strongly disturbed equatorial ionosphere that lasted for several hours. Eastward polarization electric fields intensified within locally depleted flux tubes, and SCINDA stations observed scintillation activity. Similar conditions were observed in mid March and early April 2009 as the coronal hole source regions for the HSSs returned to geoeffective positions with solar rotation. We compare these observations with events on 20-25 July 2009 when the northern hemisphere coronal hole source region was polar-connected. We then discuss relative contributions of gravity-driven currents, overshielding electric fields and disturbance dynamos as drivers of post-midnight depletions.

  17. Domain Walls and Double Bubbles

    E-print Network

    Mike Gillard; Paul Sutcliffe

    2009-03-30

    We study configurations of intersecting domain walls in a Wess-Zumino model with three vacua. We introduce a volume-preserving flow and show that its static solutions are configurations of intersecting domain walls that form double bubbles, that is, minimal area surfaces which enclose and separate two prescribed volumes. To illustrate this field theory approach to double bubbles, we use domain walls to reconstruct the phase diagram for double bubbles in the flat square two-torus and also construct all known examples of double bubbles in the flat cubic three-torus.

  18. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Juslin, Niklas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  19. Dynamic Bubble Behaviour during Microscale Subcooled Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Peng, Xiao-Feng; David, Christopher M.

    2005-11-01

    Bubble cycles, including initiation, growth and departure, are the physical basis of nucleate boiling. The present investigation, however, reveals unusual bubble motions during subcooled nucleate boiling on microwires 25 or 100 ?m in diameter. Two types of bubble motions, bubble sweeping and bubble return, are observed in the experiments. Bubble sweeping describes a bubble moving back and forth along the wire, which is motion parallel to the wire. Bubble return is the bubble moving back to the wire after it has detached or leaping above the wire. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the driving mechanisms for both bubble sweeping and return. Marangoni flow from warm to cool regions along the bubble interface is found to produce the shear stresses needed to drive these unusual bubble movements.

  20. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:12942960

  1. A bubbling bolt

    E-print Network

    Guillaume Bossard; Stefanos Katmadas

    2014-05-16

    We present a new solvable system, solving the equations of five-dimensional ungauged N=1 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets, that allows for non-extremal solutions and reduces to a known system when restricted to the floating brane Ansatz. A two-centre globally hyperbolic smooth geometry is obtained as a solution to this system, describing a bubble linking a Gibbons--Hawking centre to a charged bolt. However this solution turns out to violate the BPS bound, and we show that its generalisation to an arbitrary number of Gibbons--Hawking centres never admits a spin structure.

  2. A bubbling bolt

    E-print Network

    Bossard, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    We present a new solvable system, solving the equations of five-dimensional ungauged N=1 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets, that allows for non-extremal solutions and reduces to a known system when restricted to the floating brane Ansatz. A two-centre globally hyperbolic smooth geometry is obtained as a solution to this system, describing a bubble linking a Gibbons--Hawking centre to a charged bolt. However this solution turns out to violate the BPS bound, and we show that its generalisation to an arbitrary number of Gibbons--Hawking centres never admits a spin structure.

  3. Magnetospheric space plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) generalized semikinetic models; (2) collision-collisionless transition model; (3) observation of O+ outflows; (4) equatorial transitions; (5) inner plasmasphere-ionosphere coupling; (6) plasma wave physical processes; (7) ULF wave ray-tracing; and (8) nighttime anomalous electron heating events.

  4. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F?Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  5. Why Are Bubbles So Colorful?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Optical Society of America

    2008-01-01

    In this activity, learners explore why they can see colors in bubbles and why they change. Learners also examine what thin slits do to light and how this phenomenon is similar to that of bubbles and oil slicks. Note: This activity works best outside in the sunlight.

  6. A prediction for bubbling geometries

    E-print Network

    Takuya Okuda

    2008-02-11

    We study the supersymmetric circular Wilson loops in N=4 Yang-Mills theory. Their vacuum expectation values are computed in the parameter region that admits smooth bubbling geometry duals. The results are a prediction for the supergravity action evaluated on the bubbling geometries for Wilson loops.

  7. Bubble detector investigations in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Lun

    2006-01-01

    Investigation on bubble detectors started in China in 1989. Five types of bubble detectors have been developed, with LET thresholds ranging from 0.05 to 6.04 MeV mg(-1) cm(2) at 25 degrees C. The neutron response of bubble detectors made with freon-12 has been investigated with mono-energetic neutrons from 20 keV to 19 MeV. Its effective threshold energy for neutron detection is approximately 100 keV at 28 degrees C. The response above this threshold is approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) (bubble cm(-2))/(n cm(-2)). Bubble detectors are unique not only for neutron dosimetry but also for monitoring and identifying high-energy heavy ions such as cosmic radiation in the space. High-energy heavy ion tracks in large size bubble detectors have been investigated in cooperation with scientists in Japan. The key parameter behind the thresholds of bubble detectors for track registration is the critical rate of energy loss. Three approaches to identify high-energy heavy ions with bubble detectors are suggested. PMID:16782985

  8. THE FERMI BUBBLES. II. THE POTENTIAL ROLES OF VISCOSITY AND COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN JET MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dobler, Gregory [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Oh, S. Peng, E-mail: fulai@ucolick.org [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo and Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity ({mu}{sub visc} {approx}> 3 g cm{sup -1} s{sup -1}, or {approx}0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  9. Bubble dynamics in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander R.

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics are central concepts in engineering, the natural sciences, and the mathematics of fluid mechanics. Due to the nonlinear nature of their dynamics, the governing equations are not fully solvable. Here, the dynamics of a spherical bubble in an N-dimensional fluid are discussed in the hope that examining bubble behavior in N dimensions will add insight to their behavior in three dimensions. Several canonical results in bubble dynamics are re-derived, including the Rayleigh collapse time, the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, and the Minnaert frequency. Recent analytical approximations to the Rayleigh collapse are discussed, and the N-dimensional generalization is used to resolve a known discrepancy. Numerical simulations are used to examine the onset of nonlinear behavior. Overall, the dynamics of bubbles are faster at higher dimensions, with nonlinear behavior occurring at lower strain. Several features are found to be unique to three dimensions, including the trend of nonlinear behavior and apparent coincidences in timescales.

  10. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  11. Swarm equatorial electric field chain: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.; Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Sirol, O.; Hulot, G.

    2015-02-01

    The eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the E region ionosphere drives many important phenomena at low latitudes. We developed a method of estimating the EEF from magnetometer measurements of near-polar orbiting satellites as they cross the magnetic equator, by recovering a clean signal of the equatorial electrojet current and modeling the observed current to determine the electric field present during the satellite pass. This algorithm is now implemented as an official Level-2 Swarm product. Here we present first results of EEF estimates from nearly a year of Swarm data. We find excellent agreement with independent measurements from the ground-based coherent scatter radar at Jicamarca, Peru, as well as horizontal field measurements from the West African Magnetometer Network magnetic observatory chain. We also calculate longitudinal gradients of EEF measurements made by the A and C lower satellite pair and find gradients up to about 0.05 mV/m/deg with significant longitudinal variability.

  12. Metallic ions in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four positive ion composition measurements of the equatorial E region made at Thumba, India, are presented. During the day, the major ions between 90 and 125 km are NO(+) and O2(+). A metallic ion layer centered at 92 km is observed, and found to contain Mg(+), Fe(+), Ca(+), K(+), Al(+), and Na(+) ions. The layer is explained in terms of a similarly shaped latitude distribution of neutral atoms which are photoionized and charge-exchanged with NO(+) and O2(+). Three body reactions form molecular metallic ions which are rapidly lost by dissociative ion-electron recombination. Nighttime observations show downward drifting of the metallic ion layer caused by equatorial dynamo effects. These ions react and form neutral metals which exchange charges with NO(+) and O2(+) to produce an observed depletion of those ions within the metallic ion region.

  13. Capillarity-Driven Bubble Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Dreyer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Techniques for phase separation in the absence of gravity continue to be sought after 5 decades of space flight. This work focuses on the fundamental problem of gas bubble separation in bubbly flows through open wedge-shaped channel in a microgravity environment. The bubbles appear to rise in the channel and coalesce with the free surface. Forces acting on the bubble are the combined effects of surface tension, wetting conditions, and geometry; not buoyancy. A single dimensionless group is identified that characterizes the bubble behavior and supportive experiments are conducted in a terrestrial laboratory, in a 2.1 second drop tower, and aboard the International Space Station as part of the Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiments. The data is organized into regime maps that provide insight on passive phase separations for applications ranging from liquid management aboard spacecraft to lab-on-chip technologies. Techniques for phase separation in the absence of gravity continue to be sought after 5 decades of space flight. This work focuses on the fundamental problem of gas bubble separation in bubbly flows through open wedge-shaped channel in a microgravity environment. The bubbles appear to rise in the channel and coalesce with the free surface. Forces acting on the bubble are the combined effects of surface tension, wetting conditions, and geometry; not buoyancy. A single dimensionless group is identified that characterizes the bubble behavior and supportive experiments are conducted in a terrestrial laboratory, in a 2.1 second drop tower, and aboard the International Space Station as part of the Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiments. The data is organized into regime maps that provide insight on passive phase separations for applications ranging from liquid management aboard spacecraft to lab-on-chip technologies. NASA NNX09AP66A, NASA Oregon Space Grant NNX10AK68H, NASA NNX12AO47A, DLR 50WM0535/0845/1145

  14. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Mendillo; Jeffrey Baumgardner; Xiaoqing Pi; Peter J. Sultan; Roland Tsunoda

    1992-01-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities

  15. An equatorial oscillation in Saturn's middle atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Fouchet, T; Guerlet, S; Strobel, D F; Simon-Miller, A A; Bézard, B; Flasar, F M

    2008-05-01

    The middle atmospheres of planets are driven by a combination of radiative heating and cooling, mean meridional motions, and vertically propagating waves (which originate in the deep troposphere). It is very difficult to model these effects and, therefore, observations are essential to advancing our understanding of atmospheres. The equatorial stratospheres of Earth and Jupiter oscillate quasi-periodically on timescales of about two and four years, respectively, driven by wave-induced momentum transport. On Venus and Titan, waves originating from surface-atmosphere interaction and inertial instability are thought to drive the atmosphere to rotate more rapidly than the surface (superrotation). However, the relevant wave modes have not yet been precisely identified. Here we report infrared observations showing that Saturn has an equatorial oscillation like those found on Earth and Jupiter, as well as a mid-latitude subsidence that may be associated with the equatorial motion. The latitudinal extent of Saturn's oscillation shows that it obeys the same basic physics as do those on Earth and Jupiter. Future highly resolved observations of the temperature profile together with modelling of these three different atmospheres will allow us determine the wave mode, the wavelength and the wave amplitude that lead to middle atmosphere oscillation. PMID:18464737

  16. A Campaign to Study Equatorial Ionospheric Phenomena over Guam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Balthazor, R.; Dearborn, M.; Enloe, L.; Lawrence, T.; McHarg, M.; Petrash, D.; Reinisch, B. W.; Stuart, T.

    2007-05-01

    With the development of a series of ground-based and space-based experiments, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is in the process of planning a campaign to investigate the relationship between equatorial ionospheric plasma dynamics and a variety of space weather effects, including: 1) ionospheric plasma turbulence in the F region, and 2) scintillation of radio signals at low latitudes. A Digisonde Portable Sounder DPS-4 will operate from the island of Guam (with a magnetic latitude of 5.6° N) and will provide measurements of ionospheric total electron content (TEC), vertical drifts of the bulk ionospheric plasma, and electron density profiles. Additionally, a dual-frequency GPS TEC/scintillation monitor will be located along the Guam magnetic meridian at a magnetic latitude of approximately 15° N. In campaign mode, we will combine these ground-based observations with those collected from space during USAFA's FalconSAT-3 and FalconSAT-5 low-earth orbit satellite missions, the first of which is scheduled to be active over a period of several months beginning in the 2007 calendar year. The satellite experiments are designed to characterize in situ irregularities in plasma density, and include measurements of bulk ion density and temperature, minority-to- majority ion mixing ratios, small scale (10 cm to 1 m) plasma turbulence, and ion distribution spectra in energy with sufficient resolution for observations of non-thermalized distributions that may be associated with velocity- space instabilities. Specific targets of investigation include: a) a comparison of plasma turbulence observed on- orbit with spread F on ionograms as measured with the Digisonde, b) a correlation between the vertical lifting of the ionospheric layer over Guam and the onset of radio scintillation activity along the Guam meridian at 15° N magnetic latitude, and c) a correlation between on-orbit turbulence and ionospheric scintillation at 15° N magnetic latitude. These relationships may provide further clues into understanding the trigger mechanisms responsible for instigating disturbances in the ionospheric plasma, thus resulting in a turbulent radio propagation medium that may cause outages of radio based communication and navigation systems.

  17. Bubbles in the Pericardium.

    PubMed

    Saini, Aditya; Patel, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Purulent pericarditis is a rare but life-threatening illness. Often, it may be masked by the primary infectious etiology like pneumonia, endocarditis, or CNS infection, leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Echocardiography is the modality of choice for estimating the presence and size of pericardial effusion and detecting presence of tamponade. CASE REPORT We present a case of a young man with acute respiratory illness in whom clinical exam, electrocardiography, and classic echocardiographic findings played a key role in diagnosis. An echo-dense effusion (rather than echo-free space) appearing like "bubbles" within the pericardial space was seen and a purulent nature of the fluid was strongly suspected. Prompt institution of antimicrobial therapy and timely pericardial drainage resulted in complete clinical recovery of the patient. CONCLUSIONS In this case, timely diagnosis and prompt treatment of effusion with pericardial drainage and antibiotics resulted in complete recovery from this otherwise devastating infection. PMID:26134605

  18. Rheology of bubble-bearing magmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Manga; Jonathan Castro; Katharine V. Cashman; Michael Loewenberg

    1998-01-01

    The rheology of bubble-bearing suspensions is investigated through a series of three-dimensional boundary integral calculations in which the effects of bubble deformation, volume fraction, and shear rate are considered. The behaviour of bubbles in viscous flows is characterized by the capillary number, Ca, the ratio of viscous shear stresses that promote deformation to surface tension stresses that resist bubble deformation.

  19. Interactions between bubbles in magmas and lavas: effects of bubble deformation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Manga; H. A. Stone

    1994-01-01

    The interactions between two deformable bubbles are studied in order to determine the effects of deformation on bubble dynamics and to determine the limits in which the effects of deformation can be ignored. Deformation due to hydrodynamic interactions with other bubbles leads to alignment of horizontally offset bubbles and thus an enhanced rate of coalescence. Bubble alignment may produce spatial

  20. Global Structure of Isothermal Diffuse X-Ray Emission along the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    In our previous works, we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ? 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes | l| < 20° and latitude 5°? | b| < 60°, covering the whole extent of the Fermi bubbles. We show that the plasma temperature is constant at kT ? 0.30 ± 0.07 keV, while the emission measure (EM) varies by an order of magnitude, increasing toward the Galactic center (i.e., low | b| ) with enhancements at the North Polar Spur (NPS), SE-claw, and NW-clump features. Moreover, the EM distribution of kT ? 0.30 keV plasma is highly asymmetric in the northern and southern bubbles. Although the association of the X-ray emission with the bubbles is not conclusive, we compare the observed EM properties with simple models assuming (i) a filled halo without bubbles, whose gas density follows a hydrostatic isothermal model (King profile), and (ii) a bubble-in-halo in which two identical bubbles expand into the halo, forming thick shells of swept halo gas. We argue that the EM profile in the north (b > 0°) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0°) is rather close to (i), but a weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles’ axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial conditions.

  1. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  2. Global Observations of Equatorial Ionospheric Plasma Drift Speeds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Immel; H. U. Frey; S. B. Mende; E. Sagawa

    Abstract Space-based measurements,from an imager aboard the high-apogee NASA-IMAGE satellite allows for global-scale observations of nightside ionospheric densities and structure. Such a view cannot be provided by imagers in near earth orbit or based on the ground. The IMAGE Spectroscopic Imager (SI) isolates the Far-ultraviolet (FUV) O I 135.6-nm emission which is produced,through radiative recombination,of O,. These observations clearly show

  3. An empirical relation of daytime equatorial total electron content with equatorial electrojet in the Indian zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Rajat; Roy, Bijoy; Sivaraman, M. R.; Dasgupta, Ashish

    2010-06-01

    The variability of Total Electron Content (TEC) at Trivandrum, located within equatorial anomaly region at the dip equator, with respect to a reference level derived from the TEC measurements at Shimla, located outside the region has been studied during low solar activity period. Chapman function is assumed to hold good for regions outside the anomaly extent. It shows that the difference of total measured TEC at the equator from the derived reference is highly correlated with equatorial electrojet. The observations conform to the previous investigations and are interpreted in light of established relations. A stochastic relationship with electrojet is derived and validated.

  4. The longitudinal variability of equatorial electrojet and vertical drift velocity in the African and American sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Rabiu, B.; Valladares, C. F.; Stoneback, R.

    2014-03-01

    While the formation of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and its temporal variation is believed to be fairly well understood, the longitudinal variability at all local times is still unknown. This paper presents a case and statistical study of the longitudinal variability of dayside EEJ for all local times using ground-based observations. We found EEJ is stronger in the west American sector and decreases from west to east longitudinal sectors. We also confirm the presence of significant longitudinal difference in the dusk sector pre-reversal drift, using the ion velocity meter (IVM) instrument onboard the C/NOFS satellite, with stronger pre-reversal drift in the west American sector compared to the African sector. Previous satellite observations have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities compared to the American and Asian sectors. This study's results raises the question if the vertical drift, which is believed to be the main cause for the enhancement of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate, is stronger in the American sector and weaker in the African sector - why are the occurrence and amplitude of equatorial irregularities stronger in the African sector?

  5. Heating the bubbly gas of galaxy clusters with weak shocks and sound waves

    E-print Network

    S. Heinz; E. Churazov

    2005-09-26

    Using hydrodynamic simulations and a technique to extract the rotational component of the velocity field, we show how bubbles of relativistic gas inflated by AGN jets in galaxy clusters act as a catalyst, transforming the energy carried by sound and shock waves to heat. The energy is stored in a vortex field around the bubbles which can subsequently be dissipated. The efficiency of this process is set mainly by the fraction of the cluster volume filled by (sub-)kpc scale filaments and bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  6. On the Necessity and Feasibility of an Equatorial Magnetospheric Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelopoulos, V.; Carlson, C. W.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Lin, R. P.; Mozer, F. S.; Pankow, D. H.; Raeder, J.; Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    Synthesizing multi-point in-situ observations from the magnetosphere is the only way that we can retain an accurate knowledge of the driving mechanisms of convection and energy flow while "imaging" its vast volume. In addition to measuring the wavenumber of plasma instabilities thus opening up for study a previously unexplored domain of space plasma physics the Constellation mission can afford us a view of the rapid topological reconfigurations and the energy circulation throughout the astrophysical laboratory closest to human space activity. In this paper we argue that the deployment of approximately 80 autonomous micro-satellites (probes) to monitor the Earth's magnetosphere and measure the plasma and magnetic field in the near-equatorial magnetosphere is a necessary and sufficient condition for answering long standing, high priority questions regarding magnetospheric stability and dynamics. The proposed mission concept is technically feasible and fiscally modest. The probes can be raised from a Geosynchronous Transfer orbit to their final elliptical orbits with perigee approximately 3R(sub E)and apogees ranging from 12 to 42 R(sub E) by a single dispenser propelled by an ion engine. Each probe will weigh approximately 5 kg. The mission can form a cornerstone of an incrementally deployed Solar Terrestrial Probe Line Magnetospheric Constellation, as it requires no new technologies in the areas of spacecraft subsystems and instruments, but some development in the areas of dispenser design, probe packaging, mechanical release and spin-up. The technology developed can be utilized by follow-on Constellation class missions as well.

  7. Bubble cavitation noise and cavitation noise spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Latorre, R. [Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States). School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Cavitaton noise from collapsing bubbles generates noise pulses and a cavitation noise spectrum. This paper examines the relationship of cavitation bubble noise pulse and the noise spectra. The scaling relationships are developed from the transformation relationships of bubble potential energy into bubble noise. The resulting scaling relationships allow the bubble cavitation noise spectra to be reduced to a single curve. The analysis leads to a second relationship for sheet cavitation noise spectrum.

  8. A PIV\\/PTV system for analysing turbulent bubbly flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bröder; M. Sommerfeld

    Bubble columns are widely used in chemical industry and biotechnology. Flow and turbulence in such an apparatus are induced by the bubble rise, and the bubble behaviour is strongly affected by swarm effects (i.e. the interaction between bubbles). For analysing the bubble swarm behaviour and simultaneously evaluating the flow structure and bubble-induced turbulence in a bubble column of 140 mm

  9. Bubble nucleation in stout beers.

    PubMed

    Lee, W T; McKechnie, J S; Devereux, M G

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide-such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers-is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets. PMID:21728549

  10. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  11. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics. PMID:26067256

  12. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  13. An acoustic technique for measurement of bubble solids mass loading (a) Fundamental study of single bubble

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Wen

    of attached solids in industrial flotation cells. It is observed that the coating of solids on a bubble on a bubble surface alters bubble dynamics. As intuitively expected, the added mass causes a decrease

  14. The equatorial electrojet satellite and surface comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, J. C. (editor); Sweeney, R. E. (editor)

    1972-01-01

    The OGO 4 and 6 (POGO) magnetic field results for the equatorial electrojet indicate that while the present models are approximately correct, the possibility of a westward component must be incorporated. The scatter diagrams of POGO amplitudes and surface data show a correlation. The ratios between the amplitudes estimated from surface data and those at 400 km altitude are as follows: India 5 to 8, East Africa (Addis Ababa) 4, Central Africa 3, West Africa (Nigeria) 3, South America (Huancayo) 5, and Philippines 5. The variation in the ratio is due to the conductivity structure of the earth in various zones.

  15. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind amplitude in the oscillation pattern and the rate of descent constrain the absorbed wave flux of zonal momentum. On Saturn this is approximately 0.05 square meters per square seconds, which is comparable to if not greater than that associated with the terrestrial oscillations. We discuss possible candidates for the absorbed waves on Saturn. On Earth the wave forcing of the equatorial oscillation generales secondary circulations that can affcct the temperature and wind structure at latitudes well away from the equator, and we discuss possible evidence of that on Saturn.

  16. Giant bubble-pinchoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    Self-similarity has been the paradigmatic picture for the pinch-off of a drop. Here we will show through high-speed imaging and boundary integral simulations that the inverse problem, the pinch-off of an air bubble in water, does not obey self-similarity (of the first kind): A disk is quickly pulled through a water surface, leading to a giant, cylindrical void, which at collapse creates an upward and a downward jet. The neck radius h(tau) of the void does NOT scale with the inertial power law exponent 1/2 (i.e., does not obey ``Rayleigh-scaling''). This is due to a second length-scale, the inverse curvature of the void,which follows a power-law scaling with a different exponent. Only for infinite Froude numbers the scaling exponent 1/2 is recovered. In all cases we find the void-profile to be symmetric around the minimal void radius up to the time the airflow in the neck deforms the interface.

  17. Bubbles in the Pericardium

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Aditya; Patel, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 22 Final Diagnosis: Purulent pericardial effusion with tamponade Symptoms: Chest pain • short of breath Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Pericardial drainage Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Purulent pericarditis is a rare but life-threatening illness. Often, it may be masked by the primary infectious etiology like pneumonia, endocarditis, or CNS infection, leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Echocardiography is the modality of choice for estimating the presence and size of pericardial effusion and detecting presence of tamponade. Case Report: We present a case of a young man with acute respiratory illness in whom clinical exam, electrocardiography, and classic echocardiographic findings played a key role in diagnosis. An echo-dense effusion (rather than echo-free space) appearing like “bubbles” within the pericardial space was seen and a purulent nature of the fluid was strongly suspected. Prompt institution of antimicrobial therapy and timely pericardial drainage resulted in complete clinical recovery of the patient. Conclusions: In this case, timely diagnosis and prompt treatment of effusion with pericardial drainage and antibiotics resulted in complete recovery from this otherwise devastating infection. PMID:26134605

  18. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas. Credits: NASA and Jeffrey Kenney and Elizabeth Yale (Yale University)

  19. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  20. Nighttime ionospheric D region: Equatorial and nonequatorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil R.; McRae, Wayne M.

    2009-08-01

    Nighttime ionospheric D region parameters are found to be generally well modeled by the traditional H? and ? as used by Wait and by the U.S. Navy in their Earth-ionosphere VLF radio waveguide programs. New comparisons with nonequatorial, mainly all-sea VLF path observations reported over several decades are shown to be consistent with the previously determined height H? ˜ 85.0 km and sharpness ? ˜ 0.63 km-1. These paths include NPM (Hawaii) to Washington, D. C., Omega Hawaii and NLK (Seattle) to Japan, NWC (N.W. Australia) to Madagascar, and NBA (Panama) to Colorado. In marked contrast, transequatorial path observations (even when nearly all-sea) are found to be often not well modeled: for example, for Omega Japan and JJI (Japan) to Dunedin, New Zealand, the observed amplitudes are markedly lower than those which would be expected from H? ˜ 85.0 km and ? ˜ 0.63 km-1, or any other realistic values of H? and ?. Other transequatorial observations compared with modeling include NWC to Japan, Omega Hawaii to Dunedin, and NPM (Hawaii) to Dunedin. It is suggested that the effects of irregularities in the equatorial electrojet may extend down into the nighttime D region and so account for the observed equatorial VLF perturbations through scattering or mode conversion.

  1. Observations of the generation of eastward equatorial electric fields near dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Pfaff, R. F.; Klenzing, J.

    2014-09-01

    We report and discuss interesting observations of the variability of electric fields and ionospheric densities near sunrise in the equatorial ionosphere made by instruments onboard the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite over six consecutive orbits. Electric field measurements were made by the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI), and ionospheric plasma densities were measured by Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP). The data were obtained on 17 June 2008, a period of solar minimum conditions. Deep depletions in the equatorial plasma density were observed just before sunrise on three orbits, for which one of these depletions was accompanied by a very large eastward electric field associated with the density depletion, as previously described by de La Beaujardière et al. (2009), Su et al. (2009) and Burke et al. (2009). The origin of this large eastward field (positive upward/meridional drift), which occurred when that component of the field is usually small and westward, is thought to be due to a large-scale Rayleigh-Taylor process. On three subsequent orbits, however, a distinctly different, second type of relationship between the electric field and plasma density near dawn was observed. Enhancements of the eastward electric field were also detected, one of them peaking around 3 mV m-1, but they were found to the east (later local time) of pre-dawn density perturbations. These observations represent sunrise enhancements of vertical drifts accompanied by eastward drifts such as those observed by the San Marco satellite (Aggson et al., 1995). Like the San Marco measurements, the enhancements occurred during winter solstice and low solar flux conditions in the Pacific longitude sector. While the evening equatorial ionosphere is believed to present the most dramatic examples of variability, our observations exemplify that the dawn sector can be highly variable as well.

  2. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) has begun laboratory experiments and coordinated nonlinear MHD simulations to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Experimental parameters can be adjusted so that important dimensionless parameters are relevant to the astrophysical context. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. First experimental data, including magnetic probe measurements and high-speed camera imaging, will be presented. [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008).

  3. Probability distribution function of the upper equatorial Pacific current speeds

    E-print Network

    Chu, Peter C.

    Probability distribution function of the upper equatorial Pacific current speeds Peter C. Chu1] The probability distribution function (PDF) of the upper (0­50 m) tropical Pacific current speeds (w), constructed), Probability distribution function of the upper equatorial Pacific current speeds, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L

  4. Net Transports in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Robert Kendall

    1969-01-01

    Surface currents of the western equatorial Pacific Ocean have been mapped by Schott [1939] and are presented in Figures I and 2. This early work was based on numerous drift calculations obtained from sailing vessels plying that part of the world. As illustrated by Figure 1, the North Equatorial Current drives a portion of flow into the Kuroshio and the

  5. IRON PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN SEAWATER FROM THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photochemistry of iron in surface waters, and its implications to iron bioavailability, was examined on two cruises to the equatorial Pacific. ecktop incubations were performed with equatorial seawater to which iron was added in various chemical forms. esults showed clear diu...

  6. The mixed layer of the western equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Lukas; Eric Lindstrom

    1991-01-01

    The mixed layer of the western equatorial Pacific and its thermodynamics are poorly known because of a general lack of data. Conductivity-temperature- depth (CTD) profiles from the recent Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean Circulation Study (WEPOCS) cruises have been analyzed for various measures of the upper layer and mixed layer thickness, using criteria which depend on vertical gradients of temperature, salinity,

  7. Modelling and observations of the equatorial ionosphere. Rept. for 1 Oct 87-30 Sep 88

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.

    1990-10-10

    The equatorial ionosphere experiences one of the most severe forms of a geophysical plasma instability - a phenomenon known as spread F. An observational campaign was organized to bring a complement of diagnostic instruments to two sites in the western Pacific sector (Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands and Wake Island) for a period of coordinated optical and radio measurements o spread F phenomena in August 1988. All-sky optical imaging observations were conducted from 2-16 August in conjunction with ALTAIR radar observations on Kwajalein. Preliminary review of the data sets obtained identified at least five case study events for detailed investigation.

  8. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the midlatitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  9. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique compared to the traditional corona or dielectric barrier discharges. These conditions make the experimental evidence presented in this work valuable for the advancement of modeling and the theoretical understanding of the discharge in bubbles in water.

  10. Physics-based forecasts of equatorial radio scintillation for the Communication and Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C\\/NOFS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Retterer

    2005-01-01

    The plans for producing long-term (6–24 hour) forecasts of equatorial plasma structure and radio scintillation for the Communication and Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C\\/NOFS) program are described. We discuss the calculations and computer models required to represent the physics of the phenomena pertinent to the C\\/NOFS mission. We describe the means by which the models will be integrated into a

  11. Evolution of glass bubbles in VAD sintering process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alireza Hassani I; Nosratollah Granpayeh; Faramarz E. Seraji; Mohammad S. Zabihi

    2003-01-01

    Behavior of the bubbles in the fast and slow heating rate of the sintering process is simulated. In fast sintering, bubbles expand and can be joined together to create bigger bubbles. In slow heating rate, bubbles shrink slowly.

  12. Initial conditions for bubble universes

    SciTech Connect

    McInnes, Brett [Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    The ''bubble universes'' of Coleman and De Luccia play a crucial role in string cosmology. Since our own Universe is supposed to be of this kind, bubble cosmology should supply definite answers to the long-standing questions regarding cosmological initial conditions. In particular, it must explain how an initial singularity is avoided, and also how the initial conditions for inflation were established. I argue that the simplest nonanthropic approach to these problems involves a requirement that the spatial sections defined by distinguished bubble observers should not be allowed to have arbitrarily small volumes. Casimir energy is a popular candidate for a quantum effect which can ensure this, but (because it violates energy conditions) there is a danger that it could lead to nonperturbative instabilities in string theory. I make a simple proposal for the initial conditions of a bubble universe, and show that my proposal ensures that the system is nonperturbatively stable. Thus, low-entropy conditions can be established at the beginning of a bubble universe without violating the second law of thermodynamics and without leading to instability in string theory. These conditions are inherited from the ambient spacetime.

  13. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  14. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the west, from between the cloud layers and over the patchy white clouds to the east of the hotspot. This is probably an area where moist convection is occurring over large horizontal distances, similar to the atmosphere over the equatorial ocean on Earth. The clouds are high and thick, and are observed to change rapidly over short time scales.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  15. Alkylmercury species in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. P.; Fitzgerald, W. F.

    1990-10-01

    HIGH levels of mercury in piscivorous fish constitute a long-standing health hazard1-6. Monomethyl mercury, the main form of mercury in fish, is more toxic than inorganic mercury. But although something is known of the ability of organisms to methylate mercury7,8, the sources, synthesis and fate of methyl mercury in aquatic waters are not well understood. Inorganic and alkylated mercury has been studied in natural waters9-11, precipitation and the atmosphere12,13. We now report evidence of monomethyl and dimethyl mercury in the low-oxygen waters of the equatorial Pacific. The presence of these species has important implications for our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in the marine environment. Although the source of monomethyl mercury in open-ocean fish is still unknown, our data show that a pathway exists for the accumulation of methylated mercury in marine pelagic fish.

  16. Bubble memory module for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P. J.; Looney, K. T.; Nichols, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Bubble domain technology offers an all-solid-state alternative for data storage in onboard data systems. A versatile modular bubble memory concept was developed. The key module is the bubble memory module which contains all of the storage devices and circuitry for accessing these devices. This report documents the bubble memory module design and preliminary hardware designs aimed at memory module functional demonstration with available commercial bubble devices. The system architecture provides simultaneous operation of bubble devices to attain high data rates. Banks of bubble devices are accessed by a given bubble controller to minimize controller parts. A power strobing technique is discussed which could minimize the average system power dissipation. A fast initialization method using EEPROM (electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory) devices promotes fast access. Noise and crosstalk problems and implementations to minimize these are discussed. Flight memory systems which incorporate the concepts and techniques of this work could now be developed for applications.

  17. A study of bubble wetting on surfaces

    E-print Network

    Day, Julia Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In microfluidics, the formation of bubbles within devices obstructs flow and can damage the microfluidic chip or the samples contained therein. This thesis works toward a better understand of bubble wetting on surfaces, ...

  18. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  19. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70?°C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling. PMID:24580324

  20. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.

  1. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  2. Bubbles and Fads in Asset Prices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin Camerer

    1989-01-01

    The article considers the possibility that asset prices might deviate from intrinsic values based on market fundamentals. Three broad categories of theory are surveyed: (1) growing bubbles, (2) fads, and (3) information bubbles. \\

  3. Experimental characterisation of bubbly flow using MRI

    E-print Network

    Tayler, Alexander B.

    2011-11-08

    This thesis describes the first application of ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards the characterisation of bubbly flow systems. The principle goal of this study is to provide a hydrodynamic characterisation of a model bubble column...

  4. STATE ESTIMATION OF BUBBLE FREQUENCY AND VELOCITY IN A BUBBLING FLUIDIZED BED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DALE C. GYURE; DAVID E. CLOUGH

    1986-01-01

    Bubble frequency and velocity in a bubbling fluidized bed are estimated by combining advanced estimation theory and the cross correlation function of pressure measurements. The cross correlation function is shown to be a mathematical function of bubble frequency and velocity. Sequential weighted least squares and a version of Kalman filtering are used to compute optimal estimates of these bubble parameters

  5. The good, the bad and the bubbly. Micro bubble behavior under ultrasound.

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    The good, the bad and the bubbly. Micro bubble behavior under ultrasound. Michael Conneely Division of Physics The good, the bad and the bubbly. Micro bubble behavior under ultrasound. PaLS Open Day 2013 #12] microsecond behaviour of microbubbles in Ultrasound fields. · Direct relevance across therapeutic

  6. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent ?<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent ?<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value ?<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates ??3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  7. Plasma Clouds in the Magnetosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. DeForest; C. E. McIlwain

    1971-01-01

    Previous equatorial observations of the magnetospheric plasma [Gringauz, 1961; Frank, 1967 a, b, c, 1970; Vasyliunas, 19'6.8; Frank and Owens, 1970] have been made from spacecraft that made rapid but infrequent traversals of the region between 5 and 20 Rr or, as for the Vela spacecraft Bame et al., 1967], remained at great distances. The ATS I observations [Freeman and

  8. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Micha?; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those involving microbubbles to deliver cargo into a cell, and those - not necessarily involving microubbles - to release cargo from a phospholipid vesicle (or reverse sonoporation). It is shown that the rate of (reverse) sonoporation from liposomes correlates with phospholipid bilayer phase behavior, liquid-disordered phases giving appreciably faster release than liquid-ordered phases. Moreover, liquid-disordered phases exhibit evidence of two release mechanisms, which are described well mathematically by enhanced diffusion (possibly via dilation of membrane phospholipids) and irreversible membrane disruption, whereas liquid-ordered phases are described by a single mechanism, which has yet to be positively identified. The ability to tune release kinetics with bilayer composition makes reverse sonoporation of phospholipid vesicles a promising methodology for controlled drug delivery. Moreover, nesting of microbubbles inside vesicles constitutes a truly “theranostic” vehicle, one that can be used for both long-lasting, safe imaging and for controlled drug delivery. PMID:23382772

  9. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  10. Wake bubbles imaging, processing, and simulation of optical properties of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ronghua; Wang, Jiang-an; Cao, Jing; Ma, Zhiguo

    2007-11-01

    This paper designed a bubble recognition system which was based on back light-scattering of bubbles in wake of ships, studied imaging characteristics of remote bubbles, and used technologies of imaging processing and target recognition to analyze CCD images of bubbles' back light-scattering so as to study the influence of bubbles and bubble density for back light-scattering. And then, based on scattering theory and theory of multiple light scattering, the light scattering properties of bubbles in wake were analyzed by simulation. Both the results of simulation and imaging processing technology validated that it was feasible to use the light wake homing bombs.

  11. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model, we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecting bubble is very high when hit by a positive pulse.

  12. Bubble effect on Kelvin-Helmholtz' instability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    We derive boundary conditions at interfaces (contact discontinuities) for a class of Lagrangian models describing, in particular, bubbly flows. We use these conditions to study Kelvin-Helmholtz' instability which de- velops in the flow of two superposed layers of a pure incompressible fluid and a fluid containing gas bubbles, co-flowing with different velocities. We show that the presence of bubbles in

  13. Bubble effect on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey L. Gavrilyuk; Henri Gouin; Vladimir M. Teshukov

    2004-01-01

    We derive boundary conditions at interfaces (contact discontinuities) for a class of Lagrangian models describing, in particular, bubbly flows. We use these conditions to study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that develops in the flow of two superposed layers of a pure incompressible fluid and a fluid containing gas bubbles, co-flowing with different velocities. We show that the presence of bubbles in

  14. Possible applications of bubble acoustics in Nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. G. Leighton; D. C. Finfer

    Gas bubbles are the most potent naturally-occurring entities that influence the acoustic environment in liquids. Upon entrainment under breaking waves, waterfalls, or rainfall over water, each bubble undergoes small amplitude decaying pulsations with a natural frequency that varies approximately inversely with the bubble radius, giving rise to the 'plink' of a dripping tap or the roar of a cataract. When

  15. Pulsed electrogeneration of bubbles for electroflotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. K. Khosla; S. Venkatachalam; P. Somasundaran

    1991-01-01

    Fine bubbles of the size required for many processes such as electroflotation can be generated by electrolysis. A large number of factors such as electrode material, electrode surface\\/morphological properties, pH and current density affect the gas bubble size distribution. This work is aimed at studies on the effect of interrupted current (pulsed) electrolysis on the generation of gas bubbles. A

  16. Attentive vision, scene representation and bubble space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Erkent; H. I. Bozma

    2010-01-01

    Visual data based environmental representation is crucial for mobile robot applications requiring recognition. Previous work has shown that bubble memory - which is an egocentric approach based on hypothetically surrounding a spherical surface around the robot, to provide a compact representation of the scene from a single viewpoint. This paper proposes bubble space as an extension of bubble model to

  17. Adaptive Bubble Pulse Cancellation and Its Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng-Xiang Ge; Yan Zhang; Zheng Lin Li; Renhe Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Explosive sources are widely used as sound sources in underwater acoustics experiments. Unfortunately, the resulting direct pulse is often corrupted by bubble pulses, which has an undesired influence on the observation and its applications. Canceling these bubble pulses will greatly enhance the quality of the observation and will be helpful for its applications. To cancel the bubble pulse, an adaptive

  18. Viscosity of magmas containing highly deformable bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Manga; M. Loewenberg

    2001-01-01

    The shear viscosity of a suspension of deformable bubbles dispersed within a Newtonian fluid is calculated as a function of the shear rate and strain. The relative importance of bubble deformation in the suspension is characterized by the capillary number (Ca), which represents the ratio of viscous and surface tension stresses. For small Ca, bubbles remain nearly spherical, and for

  19. Nonequilibrium bubbles in a flowing langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Muruganathan, Rm; Khattari, Z; Fischer, Th M

    2005-11-24

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of two-dimensional gas bubbles in Langmuir monolayers. A cavitation bubble is induced in liquid expanded phase by locally heating a Langmuir monolayer with an IR-laser. At low IR-laser power the cavitation bubble is immersed in quiescent liquid expanded monolayer. At higher IR-laser power thermo capillary flow around the laser-induced cavitation bubble sets in. The thermo capillary flow is caused by a temperature dependence of the gas/liquid line tension. The slope of the line tension with temperature is determined by measuring the thermo capillary flow velocity. Thermodynamically stable satellite bubbles are generated by increasing the surface area of the monolayer. Those satellite bubbles collide with the cavitation bubble. Upon collision the satellite bubbles either coalesce with the cavitation bubble or slide past the cavitation bubble. Moreover we show that the satellite bubbles can also be produced by the emission from the laser-induced cavitation bubbles. PMID:16853828

  20. Overcomingthe Dephasing Limit in the Bubble Regime by Synergybetween Direct Laser Acceleration and Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-10-01

    Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) in the bubble regime is an acceleration mechanism that combines the traditional plasma wakefield acceleration inside the plasma bubble with energy gain directly from the laser pulse. Recent experiments demonstrated one of the signatures of the DLA: highly efficient gamma-rays from resonantly excited betatron oscillations of accelerated electrons inside the plasma bubble. Here we propose another potential benefit of DLA: the reduction of dephasing between the accelerated electrons and accelerating field of the bubble. A simple semi-analytic model is developed to investigate the synergy between DLA and LWA acceleration mechanisms. We propose to enhance the DLA by adding a second time-delayed weak laser pulse capable of interacting with bubble electrons right after self-injection. This scenario is validated by direct PIC modeling using the 2D VLPL code. The prospects for achieving high-energy electrons at the Texas Petawatt laser are discussed. This work is supported by the US DOE grant DE-SC0007889.

  1. Low transition-region characteristics of equatorial coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Bocchialini, K.; Vial, J.-C.

    1997-01-01

    The results of observations concerning the low transition region of equatorial coronal holes, performed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), are discussed. A study performed by other authors led to the conclusion that the chromospheric network corresponding to an equatorial hole is brighter in some lines than the one corresponding to the quiet sun. A statistical study on equatorial holes using the Lyman beta lines from the solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation (SUMER), onboard SOHO, is presented. The mean profiles of cell, network and bright points in and out of the coronal holes are discussed, together with the possible implications of the observations.

  2. Bubble-Driven Inertial Micropump

    E-print Network

    Torniainen, Erik D; Markel, David P; Kornilovitch, Pavel E

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental action of the bubble-driven inertial micropump is investigated. The pump has no moving parts and consists of a thermal resistor placed asymmetrically within a straight channel connecting two reservoirs. Using numerical simulations, the net flow is studied as a function of channel geometry, resistor location, vapor bubble strength, fluid viscosity, and surface tension. Two major regimes of behavior are identified: axial and non-axial. In the axial regime, the drive bubble either remains inside the channel or continues to grow axially when it reaches the reservoir. In the non-axial regime the bubble grows out of the channel and in all three dimensions while inside the reservoir. The net flow in the axial regime is parabolic with respect to the hydraulic diameter of the channel cross-section but in the non-axial regime it is not. From numerical modeling, it is determined that the net flow is maximal when the axial regime crosses over to the non-axial regime. To elucidate the basic physical princi...

  3. Breaking waves, turbulence and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Vagle, Svein; Thomson, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, and gases are to a large extent affected by wave-induced turbulence in the near-surface ocean layer, and are generally increased over the fluxes in a law-of-the-wall type boundary layer. However, air-bubbles generated during the wave breaking process may affect the density stratification and in turn reduce turbulence intensity in the near-surface layer. The turbulence field beneath surface waves is rather complex and provides great challenges for detailed observations. We obtained high resolution near-surface velocity profiles, bubble cloud measurements and video recordings of the breaking activity in a coastal strait. Conditions ranged from moderate to strong wind forcing with wind speed ranging from 5 m/s to 20 m/s. Estimates of the dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are calculated from the in-situ velocity measurements. We find dissipation rates, fluctuating by more than two orders of magnitude, are closely linked to the air-fraction associated with micro-bubbles. Combining these turbulence estimates and the bubble cloud characteristics we infer differences in the strength of wave breaking and its effect on wave-induced mixing and air-sea exchange processes.

  4. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  5. Ice bubbles confirm big chill

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1996-06-14

    Clues buried in Greenland`s icesheet indicate that during the last ice age, the climate repeatedly warmed sharply, only to slide into a renewed chill lasting thousands of years. New indicators derived from trapped bubbles of ancient gases, nitrogen and methane, indicate that these were indeed catastrophic events. This article describes the research and adjunct issues.

  6. Pulling bubbles from a bath

    E-print Network

    Kao, Justin C. T.

    Deposition of bubbles on a wall withdrawn from a liquid bath is a phenomenon observed in many everyday situations—the foam lacing left behind in an emptied glass of beer, for instance. It is also of importance to the many ...

  7. Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus; Eckerle, Kate; Greene, Brian

    2015-03-01

    We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by `free passage' dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

  8. Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage

    E-print Network

    Pontus Ahlqvist; Kate Eckerle; Brian Greene

    2014-12-26

    We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by 'free passage' dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

  9. Bubble departure size in flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Peng; Jia, Li; Yin, Liaofei; Tan, Zetao

    2014-12-01

    Flow boiling experiments were conducted in a vertical annular channel to study bubble departure characteristics. Deionized water was used as the working fluid, and the tests were performed at atmospheric pressure. Bubble departure diameters were obtained from the images which were captured by a high-speed digital camera. The relationship between bubble contact diameter and departure diameter was discussed. A new model base on force balance analysis, taking bubble contact diameter into account for predicting bubble departure diameter is proposed in this study. A good agreement between predicted and measured results is achieved.

  10. Lidar signature from bubbles in the sea.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H

    2010-04-12

    The lidar signature from a collection of bubbles is proportional to the volume backscatter coefficient at a scattering angle of 180 degrees . This quantity, calculated using a combination of geometric optics and diffraction, is proportional to the void fraction of the bubbles in the water for any bubble size distribution. The constant of proportionality is 233 m(-1) sr(-1)for clean bubbles, slightly less for bubbles coated with a thin layer of organic material, and as large as 1445 m(-1) sr(-1) for a thick coating of protein. PMID:20588675

  11. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from above and to the south of the visualized area, showing the entire model. The entire region is overlain by a thin, transparent haze. In places the haze is high and thick, especially to the east (to the right of) the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  12. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from the southwest looking northeast, from an altitude just above the high haze layer. The streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot are visible. The upper haze layer is mostly flat, with notable small peaks that can be matched with features in the lower cloud. In reality, these areas may represent a continuous vertical cloud column.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  13. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The upper haze layer has some features that match the lower cloud, such as the bright streak in the foreground of the frame. These are probably thick clouds that span several tens of vertical kilometers.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  14. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The hotspot is clearly visible as a deep blue feature. The cloud streaks end near the hotspot, consistent with the idea that clouds traveling along these streak lines descend and evaporate as they approach the hotspot. The upper haze layer is slightly bowed upwards above the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  15. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the southeast, from between the cloud layers and over the north center of the region. The tall white clouds in the lower cloud deck are probably much like large terrestrial thunderclouds. They may be regions where atmospheric water powers vertical convection over large horizontal distances.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper and lower clouds are separated in the rendering by an arbitrary amount, and the height variations are exaggerated by a factor of 25.

    The lower cloud is colored using the same false color scheme used in previously released image products, assigning red, green, and blue to the 756, 727, and 889 nanometer mosaics, respectively. Light bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the lower cloud with an overlying thin haze.

    The images used cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  16. Equatorial Energy Accumulation and Emanation Regions: Impacts of a Zonally Varying Basic State

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Webster; Hai-Ru Chang

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the regions of mean anomalous perturbation kinetic energy which exist in the vicinity of the equatorial upper-tropospheric westerlies are the result of the propagation of extratropical synoptic and low frequency waves through the equatorial `westerly duet' where a subsequent wave energy convergence occurs. The proposition that these perturbed equatorial regions may arise from remote equatorial

  17. Observations of the relationship between solar wind parameters and equatorial noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbackova, Z.; Santolik, O.; Nemec, F.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2012-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind plasma can substantially influence processes in the Earth's magnetosphere. This especially concerns processes in the outer radiation belt, where electrons can be accelerated to relativistic energies. According to recent results equatorial noise (EN) emissions might be responsible for the acceleration of electrons with energies above 10 keV. We focus on possible connection between the IMF and the flow speed of the solar wind to the characteristics of EN. We use data from the STAFF-SA instrument located on board the Cluster spacecraft for EN emissions and data from OMNIWeb (mainly from spacecraft ACE, WIND, IMP 8 and Geotail) for the flow speed of plasma and IMF. We study the occurrence of EN as a function of the magnetic local time, McIlwain's L parameter, and the magnetic latitude, parameterized by the flow speed and IMF.

  18. Authigenic Uranium in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcantonio, F.; Lyle, M. W.; Loveley, M. R.; Ibrahim, R.

    2014-12-01

    Authigenic U concentrations have been used as an indicator of redox state in marine sediments. Soluble U(VI) in porewaters is reduced to insoluble U(IV) under suboxic conditions setting up a diffusion gradient through which U in bottom waters is supplied to reducing sediments. Researchers have used sedimentary redox enrichment of U as a tool to identify past redox changes, which may be caused by changes in organic carbon rain rates and/or bottom water oxygen levels. Differentiating between these two explanations is important, as the former is tied to the use of authigenic U as a paleoproductivity proxy. We examined sediments from 4 sediment cores retrieved from two different localities in the Panama Basin in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Two cores were retrieved from the northern Panama basin at the Cocos Ridge, (4JC at 5° 44.7'N 85° 45.5' W, 1730 m depth; 8JC at 6° 14.0'N 86° 2.6' W, 1993 m depth), and two were retrieved from the south at the Carnegie Ridge, (11JC at 0° 41.6'S 85° 20.0' W, 2452 m depth; 17JC at 0° 10.8'S 85° 52.0' W, 2846 m depth). Using 230Th systematics and seismic profiling at each of the sites, we've identified significant sediment winnowing (4JC and 11JC) and focusing (8JC and 17JC). At all sites, we believe that changes in age-model-derived sand (i.e., >63µm) mass accumulation rates (MAR) best represent changes in rain rates. Glacial rain rates are higher than those in the Holocene by a factor of 2-3 at both sites. Peak Mn levels (>1%), the brown-to-green color transition (which likely represents the oxic/post-oxic boundary), and peak U concentrations all appear in the same order with increasing depth down core. At the Carnegie sites, where MARs are greater than those at the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 4 ppm) occur during the mid- to late Holocene at depths of 10-15 cm. At the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 12 ppm) occur lower in the sediment column (25-30 cm) during the late glacial. The decrease in sediment MAR (and, likely, productivity) between the last glacial and the Holocene has most likely driven the syndiagenetic enrichment of U at these sites by diffusion of bottom water U to slightly beyond the oxic/post-oxic boundary. Hence, changing bottom water oxygen levels are not a requirement to explain authigenic U concentrations in eastern equatorial Pacific sediments.

  19. Simulations of Rising Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, P. M.; Robinson, K.; Dursi, L. J.; Rosner, R.; Calder, A. C.; Zingale, M.; Truran, J. W.; Linde, T.; Caceres, A.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Vladimirova, N.

    Motivated by recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of X-ray emission voids in galaxy cluster cooling flows, we have investigated the behavior of rising bubbles in stratified atmospheres using the FLASH adaptive-mesh simulation code. We present results from two-dimensional simulations with and without the effects of magnetic fields, and with varying bubble sizes and background stratifications. We find purely hydrodynamic bubbles to be unstable; a dynamically important magnetic field is required to maintain a bubble's integrity. This suggests that, even absent thermal conduction, for bubbles to be persistent enough to be regularly observed, they must be supported in large part by magnetic fields. We also observe that magnetically supported bubbles leave a tail as they rise. The structure of these tails may provide clues to the bubble's dynamical history.

  20. Dynamics of the equatorial undercurrent and its determination

    E-print Network

    Wacongne, Sophie

    1988-01-01

    This study focuses on the zonal weakening, eastern termination and seasonal variations of the Atlantic equatorial undercurrent (EUC). The main and most original contribution of the dissertation is a detailed analysis of ...

  1. VHF radar and rocket observations of equatorial spread F on Kwajalein

    SciTech Connect

    Hysell, D.L.; Kelley, M.C.; Swartz, W.E.; Farley, D.T. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1994-08-01

    VHF radar data from the Summer 1990 Equatorial Spread F campaign on Kwajalein are presented. The Cornell 50 MHz portable radar interferometer (CUPRI) operated concurrently with the Altair UHF incoherent scatter radar throughout July and August and supported two sounding rocket flights on July 30 and August 2. This experiment provided the first opportunity to simultaneously diagnose equatorial spread F using the three prime experimental techniques: VHF/UHF coherent scatter, incoherent scatter, and in situ probe measurements of electric field and density fluctuations. The intensity of the coherent echoes observed was consistent with typical Jicamarca spread F observations, but chains of periodic, large-scale plasma upwellings were observed more often and for much longer durations on Kwajalein than have been seen over Peru. CUPRI also measured Doppler frequencies in one upwelling corresponding to 1200-m/s plasma drift velocities. This measurement agrees with recent observations of supersonic drift rates at the magnetic equator by spacecraft. Near the most active localized plasma upwellings, interferometer data reveal that the zonal drift rate of plasma irregularities can vary sharply in space, as one would expect for two-dimensional incompressible flow. The authors introduce a semiempirical model of the three-dimensional spectrum of F region irregularities that is consistent with the one-dimensional spectra of density fluctuations observed by sounding rockets and with the axial ratio of irregularities determined recently. Normalized to data from one of the rocket flights on Kwajalein, the model predicts the 3-m scattering cross-section measured by CUPRI to within a few decibels. 55 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Total hydrogen budget of the equatorial upper stratosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan E. Wrotny; Gerald E. Nedoluha; Chris Boone; Gabriele P. Stiller; John P. McCormack

    2010-01-01

    Water vapor and methane mixing ratios measured by the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) along with simulations from the NRL CHEM2D middle atmosphere model are used to study the hydrogen budget in the equatorial upper stratosphere. Multiyear time series of equatorial upper stratospheric H2O + 2*CH4 show

  3. On the West Atlantic Ocean Equatorial boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitti, A.; van Haren, H.; Gerkema, T.; Maas, L. R. M.

    2012-04-01

    The equatorial Ocean shows a different dynamics compared to off-equatorial regions and it can be therefore interpreted as a boundary layer. It presents a current system that is strongly coherent in zonal direction and time, constituted by stacked alternating zonal currents known as Equatorial Deep Jets. Internal wave activity in the equatorial belt is high, and presents sudden transitions in polarization and mixing properties (van Haren, 2005). Surprisingly, the causes and feeding mechanisms of these equatorial features are still poorly understood. In this work, data collected in a CTD/LADCP transect between 0°and 2°N in the deep West Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, off the Brazilian coast, are used for a study on non traditional equatorial geostrophy, where full Coriolis force is taken into account (Gerkema et al., 2008). For the same area, measurements from a series of one year moored ADCPs and current meters are also considered, with special attention to the observed internal wave field . Low latitude dynamics asks for a robust interpretation and in situ measurements as the ones presented here can provide us with a partial, but direct view of the processes taking place in this unique region. Hans van Haren, (2005). Sharp near-equatorial transitions in inertial motions and deep-ocean step-formation. Geophys. Res. Lett., 32(1), L01605, doi:10.1029/2004GL021630 Theo Gerkema, Zimmermann, J. T. F., Maas, L. R. M., and van Haren, H. (2008). Geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics beyond the traditional approximation. Rev. Geophys., 46, RG2004, doi:10.1029/2006RG000220

  4. Ancient El Nino may have warmed equatorial Pacific

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yair Rosenthal

    Sediment records were used to report the sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Sulu Sea. These results were compared to ice core records in Greenland, specifically examining the size and timing of climate change shifts between the equatorial Pacific and the rest of the world. Results indicate that modern sea surface temperatures, combined with larger weather patterns like El Nino, significantly affect atmospheric circulation patterns and global climate conditions.

  5. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.; Baumgardner, J.; Xiaoqing Pi; Sultan, P.J. (Boston Univ., MA (United States)); Tsunoda, R. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities did not occur (August 14, 1988) and did occur (August 15, 1988) in the Kwajalein sector was that the northern meridional gradient of 6300-[angstrom] airglow was reduced on the night of limited ESF activity. Modeling results suggest that this unusual airglow pattern is due to equatorward neutral winds. Previous researchers have shown that transequatorial thermospheric winds can exert a control over ESF seasonal and longitudinal occurrence patterns by inhibiting Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rates. They present evidence to suggest that this picture can be extended to far shorter time scales, namely, that 'surges' in transequatoral winds acting over characteristic times of a few hours to a day can result in a stabilizing influence upon irregularity growth rates. The seemingly capricious nature of ESF onset may thus be controlled, in part, by the inherent variability of low-latitude thermospheric winds.

  6. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Pi, Xiaoqing; Sultan, Peter J.; Tsunoda, Roland

    1992-01-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities did not occur (August 14, 1988) and did occur (August 15, 1988) in the Kwajalein sector was that the northern meridional gradient of 6300-A airglow was reduced on the night of limited ESF activity. Modeling results suggest that this unusual airglow pattern is due to equatorward neutral winds. Previous researchers have shown that transequatorial thermospheric winds can exert a control over ESF seasonal and longitudinal occurrence patterns by inhibiting Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rates. Evidence is presented to suggest that this picture can be extended to far shorter time scales, namely, that 'surges' in transequatorial winds acting over characteristic times of a few hours to a day can result in a stabilizing influence upon irregularity growth rates. The seemingly capricious nature of ESF onset may thus be controlled, in part, by the inherent variability of low-latitude thermospheric winds.

  7. POGO observations of the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, J. C.; Sweeney, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    During intervals in 1967 to 1970, the OGO-4 and 6 spacecraft made over 2000 traversals over the equatorial electrojet in the altitude range 400-800 km when local times were between 9 and 15 hours. These spacecraft carried total field magnetometers making measurements to an accuracy of 2 gamma with a sample rate greater than once a second. Delta F values, the deviations from these observations, were formed from an internal reference model. The results were plotted for a 30 deg band about the equator, and the characteristics of the electrojet effect in the data were investigated. This effect was characterized by a sharp negative V-signature of some 16-19 deg in width and a variable amplitude. The position of this minimum was found to lie within 0.5 deg of the dip equator. A slight northward shift was noted at the longitude of Huancayo. The jet amplitudes were normalized to 400 km amplitudes and observed to be highly variable in time. Amplitudes over the longitude range 50 to 90 deg W averaged 60% higher than elsewhere, as expected, due to the weaker main field. However, though the scatter of amplitudes is high, the expected minima in east Asia was not evident. It was speculated that this could be due to a less conducting upper mantle in this area.

  8. Influence of Assimilation of Subsurface Temperature Measurements on Simulations of Equatorial Undercurrent and South Equatorial Current Along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Leetmaan, Ants; Reynolds, Richard W.; Ji, Ming

    1997-01-01

    Equatorial Pacific current and temperature fields were simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature measurements for April 1992 - March 1995, and compared with moored bouy and research vessel current measurements.

  9. Observations of Neutral and Electron Structure in the Equatorial Mesosphere by Rocket and Radar During EQUIS-2/LEMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmacher, G. A.; Croskey, C. L.; Mitchell, J. D.; Friedrich, M.; Luebken, F.; Rapp, M.; Kudeki, E.; Fritts, D. C.

    2005-05-01

    The NASA EQUIS-2 rocket campaign was conducted in August-September 2004 from USAKA/RTS on Roi-Namur, Marshall Islands (9 N, 168 E). One part of the program was dedicated to neutral and plasma density fluctuations in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The objective was to detect layers of small scale structures that can be associated with mesospheric VHF radar echoes observed frequently at equatorial and low latitudes. One instrumented rocket and three passive falling spheres were launched successfully on September 20, 2004, supported by ALTAIR UHF radar observing incoherent backscatter from ~85-700 km. We give an overview of the investigation and present first results that include the comparison of in situ and radar electron density profiles, neutral temperature and wind structure, and characteristics of neutral and electron fluctuation layers.

  10. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  11. Magnetar Driven Bubbles and the Origin of Collimated Outflows from GRBs

    E-print Network

    N. Bucciantini; E. Quataert; J. Arons; B. D. Metzger; Todd A. Thompson

    2007-10-05

    We model the interaction between the wind from a newly formed rapidly rotating magnetar and the surrounding progenitor. In the first few seconds after core collapse the magnetar inflates a bubble of plasma and magnetic fields behind the supernova shock, which expands asymmetrically because of the pinching effect of the toroidal magnetic field, as in PWNe, even if the host star is spherically symmetric. The degree of asymmetry depends on the ratio of the magnetic energy to the total energy in the bubble. We assume that the wind by newly formed magnetars inflating these bubbles is more magnetized than for PWNe. We show that for a magnetic to total power supplied by the central magnetar $\\sim 0.1$ the bubble expands relatively spherically while for values greater than 0.3, most of the pressure in the bubble is exerted close to the rotation axis, driving a collimated outflow out through the host star. This can account for the collimation inferred from observations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Given that the wind magnetization increases in time, we thus suggest that the magnetar-driven bubble initially expands relatively spherically (enhancing the energy of the associated supernova) while at late times it becomes progressivelymore collimated (producing the GRB). Similar processes may operate in more modestly rotating neutron stars to produce asymmetric supernovae and lower energy transients such as X-ray flashes.

  12. There is No Housing Bubble

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James F. Smith

    2005-01-01

    There is no evidence of a housing “bubble” in the United States and housing demand should stay strong for years to come. Three major factors lead to this conclusion. First, the 77 million baby boomers are approaching the peak home ownership ages of 65-75 (over 83.0 percent versus a national average in 2004 of 69.0 percent). Second, immigrants, a growing

  13. Improved Bubble-Point Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Peter J.; Rhodes, Russell E.; Aman, Robert; Nagy, Zoltan

    1994-01-01

    Improved bubble-point test devised for large pleated filter elements. Sizes of pores in filters determined more accurately. Test method replaces older test accurate for pore sizes of 20 microns or less, but subject to gross inaccuracy for filter elements with pores of 70 microns or larger. Unlike older test, no measurement of pressure is necessary. Also no need to estimate average depth of filter-element pleats below surface of liquid.

  14. Giant Bubble Pinch-Off

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Bergmann; Meer van der Devaraj; Mark Stijnman; Marijn Sandtke; Andrea Prosperetti; Detlef Lohse

    2006-01-01

    Self-similarity has been the paradigmatic picture for the pinch-off of a drop. Here we will show through high-speed imaging and boundary integral simulations that the inverse problem, the pinch-off of an air bubble in water, is not self-similar in a strict sense: A disk is quickly pulled through a water surface, leading to a giant, cylindrical void which after collapse

  15. The quest for the most spherical bubble: experimental setup and data overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Kobel, Philippe; de Bosset, Aurele; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    We describe a recently realized experiment producing the most spherical cavitation bubbles today. The bubbles grow inside a liquid from a point plasma generated by a nanosecond laser pulse. Unlike in previous studies, the laser is focussed by a parabolic mirror, resulting in a plasma of unprecedented symmetry. The ensuing bubbles are sufficiently spherical that the hydrostatic pressure gradient caused by gravity becomes the dominant source of asymmetry in the collapse and rebound of the cavitation bubbles. To avoid this natural source of asymmetry, the whole experiment is therefore performed in microgravity conditions (ESA, 53rd and 56th parabolic flight campaign). Cavitation bubbles were observed in microgravity (˜0 g), where their collapse and rebound remain spherical, and in normal gravity (1 g) to hyper-gravity (1.8 g), where a gravity-driven jet appears. Here, we describe the experimental setup and technical results, and overview the science data. A selection of high-quality shadowgraphy movies and time-resolved pressure data is published online.

  16. Electron injection by a nanowire in the bubble regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, B.; Li, Y.; Nemeth, K.; Shang, H.; Soliday, R.; Crowell, R.; Frank, E.; Gropp, W.; Cary, J.; Shanghai Inst.of optics and Fine Mechanics; Univ. of Colorado; Tech-X Corp.

    2007-01-01

    The triggering of wave-breaking in a three-dimensional laser plasma wake (bubble) is investigated. The Coulomb potential from a nanowire is used to disturb the wake field to initialize the wave-breaking. The electron acceleration becomes more stable and the laser power needed for self-trapping is lowered. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations were performed. Electrons with a charge of about 100 pC can be accelerated stably to energy about 170 MeV with a laser energy of 460 mJ. The first step towards tailoring the electron beam properties such as the energy, energy spread, and charge is discussed.

  17. A Drying Trend in Central Equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Hartter, J.; Ryan, S. J.; Palace, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    There has been considerable uncertainty about changes in rainfall over central equatorial Africa over the past three decades due to a lack of reliable rainfall data in the region. This region contains the northern portion of the Albertine Rift, which is one of the world's hotspots for biodiversity, and within this region there is an exploding human population dependent on rainfed agriculture. Both the human population and conservation/preservation areas are becoming increasingly sensitive to changes in rainfall. There now exists an accurate, high-resolution, satellite based precipitation dataset, African Rainfall Climatology version 2 (ARC2), for the region that provides daily rainfall estimates from 1983 to the present. Here we show significant declines in monthly and annual rainfall in west-central Uganda, which exists in the far northeastern portion of the Rift, from 1983-2012. The decrease in annual rainfall was 110 mm per decade. Therefore, the current annual rainfall of approximately 1,200 mm is less than 80% of the annual rainfall three decades ago. The drying trend most likely extended westward into the Congo Basin. There were significant increasing (decreasing) trends in light-rainfall (heavy-rainfall) days over the period. Using results from previous studies, Indian Ocean warming and increasing carbonaceous aerosols from biomass burning in tropical Africa, are explored as potential causes of the drying trend. The aim of the study is not to find the fingerprint of local and regional anthropogenic forcings on the drying trend, but our results suggest that those forcings could be a leading cause of the drying trend.

  18. Equatorial Kelvin Waves: A UARS MLS View.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canziani, Pablo O.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.

    1994-10-01

    Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out using an asynoptic mapping technique. A wide bandpass filter is used to isolate the frequency bands where Kelvin waves have been identified in previous studies. Time-height and time-latitude plots of the bandpassed data are used to identify Kelvin wave activity in the temperature and ozone fields. Frequency spectra of temperature and ozone amplitudes are constructed to further analyze the latitudinal and meridional distribution of Kelvin wave activity in zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. The characteristics identified in these plots agree well with theoretical predictions and previous observations of middle atmosphere Kelvin waves.The time-height and time-latitude plots support the existence of Kelvin waves in discrete frequency bands; the slow, fast, and ultrafast Kelvin modes are all identified in the data. The characteristics of these modes do not vary much despite different mean flow conditions in the two periods examined.For the Kelvin wave-induced perturbations in ozone, the change from a transport-dominated regime below 10 hPa to a photochemically controlled regime above 10 hPa is clearly apparent in the height dependence of the phase difference between temperature and ozone. The ratios of the ozone perturbation amplitude to the temperature perturbation amplitude for the various observed Kelvin wave modes are in agreement with model estimates and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations in the lower half of the region sampled but appear to be too large in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

  19. Equatorial Kelvin waves: A UARS MLS view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canziani, Pablo O.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.

    1994-01-01

    Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out using an asynoptic mapping technique. A wide bandpass filter is used to isolate the frequency bands where Kelvin waves have been identified in previous studies. Time-height and time-latitude plots of the bandpassed data are used to identify Kelvin wave activity in the temperature and ozone fields. Frequency spectra of temperature and ozone amplitudes are constructed to further analyze the latitudinal and meridional distribution of Kelvin wave activity in zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. The characteristics identified in these plots agree well with theoretical predictions and previous observations of middle atmosphere Kelvin waves. The time-height and time-latitude plots support the existence of Kelvin waves in discrete frequency bands; the slow, fast, and ultrafast Kelvin modes are all identified in the data. The characteristics of these modes do not vary much despite different mean flow conditions in the two periods examined. For the Kelvin wave-induced perturbations in ozone, the change from a transport-dominated regime below 10 hPa to a photochemically controlled regime above 10 hPa is clearly apparent in the height dependence of the phase difference between temperature and ozone. The ratios of the ozone perturbation amplitude to the temperature perturbation amplitude for the various observed Kelvin wave modes are in agreement with model estimates and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations in the lower half of the region sampled but appear to be too large in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

  20. Scattering measurements from a dissolving bubble.

    PubMed

    Kapodistrias, George; Dahl, Peter H

    2012-06-01

    A laboratory-scale study on acoustic scattering from a single bubble undergoing dissolution in undersaturated fresh water is presented. Several experiments are performed with the acoustic source driven with five-cycle tone bursts, center frequency of 120 kHz, to insonify a single bubble located on axis of the combined beam of the set of transducers. The bubble is placed on a fine nylon thread located in the far field of the transducer set, arranged in bistatic configuration, in a tank filled with undersaturated water. Backscattered waveforms from the bubble target are acquired every few seconds for several hours until the bubble has completely dissolved, and detailed dissolution curves are produced from the acoustic data. The rate of bubble dissolution is calculated using the solution developed by Epstein and Plesset [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 1505-1509 (1950)]. The results of the experiments performed are in agreement with the calculations. PMID:22712899

  1. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon, E-mail: junkeun@postech.ac.kr; Kang, Kwan Hyoung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, In Seok [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  2. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon; Kang, In Seok; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2013-11-01

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  3. DNA Bubble Life Time in Denaturation

    E-print Network

    Zh. S. Gevorkian; Chin-Kun Hu

    2010-10-11

    We have investigated the denaturation bubble life time for a homogeneous as well as for a heterogeneous DNA within a Poland-Scheraga model. It is shown that at criticality the bubble life time for a homogeneous DNA is finite provided that the loop entropic exponent c>2 and has a scaling dependence on DNA length for c<2. Heterogeneity in the thermodynamical limit makes the bubble life time infinite for any entropic exponent.

  4. Simulations of Rising Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Ricker; K. Robinson; L. J. Dursi; R. Rosner; A. C. Calder; M. Zingale; J. W. Truran; T. Linde; A. Caceres; B. Fryxell; K. Olson; K. Riley; A. Siegel; N. Vladimirova

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of X-ray emission voids in galaxy cluster cooling flows, we have investigated the behavior of rising bubbles in stratified atmospheres using the FLASH adaptive-mesh simulation code. We present results from two-dimensional simulations with and without the effects of magnetic fields, and with varying bubble sizes and background stratifications. We find purely hydrodynamic bubbles

  5. Single cavitation bubble generation and observation of the bubble collapse flow induced by a pressure wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Jaw, Shenq-Yuh; Yeh, Keh-Chia

    2009-08-01

    This study utilizes a U-shape platform device to generate a single cavitation bubble for a detailed analysis of the flow field characteristics and the cause of the counter jet during the process of bubble collapse caused by sending a pressure wave. A high speed camera is used to record the flow field of the bubble collapse at different distances from a solid boundary. It is found that a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex is formed when a liquid jet penetrates the bubble surface after the bubble is compressed and deformed. If the bubble center to the solid boundary is within one to three times the bubble’s radius, a stagnation ring will form on the boundary when impinged by the liquid jet. The fluid inside the stagnation ring will be squeezed toward the center of the ring to form a counter jet after the bubble collapses. At the critical position, where the bubble center from the solid boundary is about three times the bubble’s radius, the bubble collapse flow will vary. Depending on the strengths of the pressure waves applied, the collapse can produce a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, or the generation of a counter jet flow. If the bubble surface is in contact with the solid boundary, the liquid jet can only move inside-out without producing the stagnation ring and the counter jet; thus, the bubble collapses along the radial direction. The complex phenomenon of cavitation bubble collapse flows is clearly manifested in this study.

  6. Multi-point observations of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet during geomagnetic disturbances

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of the equatorial dusk-side plasma in the string-of-pearls configuration, allowing the dynamics of particle- sphere in a string-of-pearls configuration, successively crossing geostationary orbit, allowing

  7. Stable bubble oscillations beyond Blake's critical threshold.

    PubMed

    Heged?s, Ferenc

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium radius of a single spherical bubble containing both non-condensable gas and vapor is determined by the mechanical balance at the bubble interface. This expression highlights the fact that decreasing the ambient pressure below the so called Blake's critical threshold, the bubble has no equilibrium state at all. In the last decade many authors have tried to find evidence for the existence of stable bubble oscillation under harmonic forcing in this regime, that is, they have tried to stabilize the bubble motion applying ultrasonic radiation on the bubble. The available numerical results provide only partial proof for the existence as they are usually based on linearized or weakly nonlinear (higher order approximation) bubble models. Here, based on numerical techniques of the modern nonlinear and bifurcation theory, the existence of stable bubble motion has been proven without any restrictions in nonlinearities. Although the model, applied in this paper, is the rather simple Rayleigh-Plesset equation, the presented technique can be extended to more complex bubble models easily. PMID:24485747

  8. Active microuidic mixer and gas bubble lter driven by thermal bubble micropump$

    E-print Network

    Lin, Liwei

    Active micro¯uidic mixer and gas bubble ®lter driven by thermal bubble micropump$ Jr-Hung Tsaia-diffuser micropump is successfully demonstrated. The oscillatory ¯ow generated by the micropump can induce wavy B.V. Keywords: Micropump; Bubble; Micro¯uidics; Mixing; Filter 1. Introduction Liquid mixing

  9. The Behavior of Micro Bubbles and Bubble Cluster in Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2001-11-01

    Ultrasound is widely applied in the clinical field today, such as ultrasound imaging, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) and so on. It is essential to take a real understanding of the dynamics of micro bubbles and bubble cluster in these applications. Thus we numerically simulate them in ultrasound field in this paper. In the numerical simulation, we consider the thermal behavior inside the bubble and the pressure wave phenomena in the bubble cluster in detail, namely, the evaporation and condensation of liquid at the bubble wall, heat transfer through the bubble wall, diffusion of non-condensable gas inside the bubble and the compressibility of liquid. Initial cluster radius is to 0.5[mm], bubble radius is 1.7[mm], void fraction is 0.1[ambient pressure is 101.3[kPa], temperature is 293[K] and the amplitude of ultrasound is 50[kPa]. We simulate bubble cluster in ultrasound field at various frequencies and we obtain the following conclusions. 1) The maximum pressure inside bubble cluster reaches 5[MPa] and this is much higher than that of a bubble. 2) Bubble cluster behaves like a rigid body acoustically when the frequency of ultrasound is much higher than its natural frequency.

  10. Equatorial Winds on Saturn and the Stratospheric Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Jian, Xun; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Porco, Carolyn C.; West, Robert A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    The zonal jets on the giant planets are generally thought to be stable with time. Recently, there are still some debates about the general thought. Here, we report a significant temporal variation of the equatorial jet at high-altitude on Saturn. Long-term (2004-2009) observations by Cassini reveal that wind speed at the 60-mbar level increased from 270 m/s in 2004 to 290 m/s in 2008, while the wind speed has been mostly constant over time at the 500-mbar level in the southern equatorial region. The Cassini observations further reveal that the equatorial jet intensified approximately 60 m/s in the stratosphere (1-5 mbar) from 2005 to 2008. The fact that the wind acceleration is weaker at the 60-mbar level (approximately 20 m/s) than at the 1-mbar level (approximately 60 m/s) demonstrates that the equatorial oscillation is damped when it propagates downwards to the tropopause around 60 mbar. The direct measurement of the varying equatorial jet around the tropopause also serves as a key boundary condition when deriving the thermal wind fields in the stratosphere.

  11. The annual cycle in equatorial convection and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Todd P.; Wallace, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic exhibits a distinct annual cycle that is reflected in contrasting conditions at the times of the two equinoxes. The contrasts are so strong that they dominate the annual march of zonally averaged outgoing long wave radiation for the equatorial belt. The March equinox corresponds to the warm season when the equatorial cold tongues in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic area absent. With the onset of summer monsoon convection over Colombia, Central America, and West Africa in May-June, northward surface winds strengthen over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, the equatorial cold tongues reappear, and the marine convection shifts from the equatorial belt to the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs) along 8 deg N. On the basis of observational evidence concerning the timing and year-to-year regularity of the surface wind changes during the development of the cold tongues, it is argued that (1) the increase in the northward surface winds in response to the onset of the northern summer monsoon may be instrumental in reestablishing the cold tongues, and (2) positive feedbacks involving both the zonal and meridional wind components contribute to the remarkable robustness of the cold tongue-ITCZs complexes in both oceans.

  12. Simulations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles produced in water by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Scammon, R.J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vogel, A. [Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lueebeck GmbH (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    The authors compare numerical simulations of bubble dynamics in water with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck. Spatial and temporal features of the laser beam were modeled. Plasma growth was predicted using a moving breakdown model. The authors compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and the bubble wall as a function of time after optical breakdown in water. Nd:YAG laser pulses of 30-ps 1-mJ and 6-ns 10-mJ were simulated. The authors have extended previous work in which picosecond deposition was modeled as temporally instantaneous and spatially uniform.

  13. Simulations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles produced in water by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scammon, Richard J.; Chapyak, Edward J.; Godwin, Robert P.; Vogel, Alfred

    1998-05-01

    We compare numerical simulations of bubble dynamics in water with experiments performed at the Medizineisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. Spatial and temporal features of the laser beam were modeled. Plasma growth was predicted using a moving breakdown model. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and the bubble wall as a function of time after optical breakdown in water. Nd:YAG laser pulses of 30-ps 1-mJ and 6-ns 10-mJ were simulated. We have extended previous work in which picosecond deposition was modeled at temporally instantaneous and spatially uniform.

  14. Equatorial Density Irregularity Structures at Intermediate Scales and Their Temporal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We examine high resolution measurements of ion density in the equatorial ionosphere from the AE-E satellite during the years 1977-1981. Structure over spatial scales from 18 km to 200 m is characterized by the spectrum of irregularities at larger and smaller scales and at altitudes above 350 km and below 300 km. In the low-altitude region, only small amplitude large-scale (lambda greater than 5 km) density modulations are often observed, and thus the power spectrum of these density structures exhibits a steep spectral slope at kilometer scales. In the high-altitude region, sinusoidal density fluctuations, characterized by enhanced power near 1-km scale, are frequently observed during 2000-0200 LT. However, such fluctuations are confined to regions at the edges of larger bubble structures where the average background density is high. Small amplitude irregularity structures, observed at early local time hours, grow rapidly to high-intensity structures in about 90 min. Fully developed structures, which are observed at late local time hours, decay very slowly producing only-small differences in spectral characteristics even 4 hours later. The local time evolution of irregularity structure is investigated by using average statistics for low-(1% less than sigma less than 5%) and high-intensity (sigma greater than 10%) structures. At lower altitudes, little chance in the spectral slope is seen as a function of local time, while at higher attitudes the growth and maintenance of structures near 1 km scales dramatically affects the spectral slope.

  15. A rotating and magnetized three-dimensional hot plasma equilibrium in a gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Peter J.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.

    2015-06-01

    A rotating and magnetized three-dimensional axisymmetric equilibrium for hot plasma confined by a gravitational field is found. The plasma density and current can exhibit strong equatorial plane localization, resulting in disk equilibria with open magnetic field lines. The associated equatorial plane pinching results in magnetic field flaring, implying a strong gravitational squeezing of the plasma carrying ambient magnetic field lines toward the gravitational source. At high plasma pressure, the magnetic field becomes strongly radial outside the disk. The model predicts the rotation frequency bound, the condition for a plasma disk, and the requirement for strong magnetic field flaring.

  16. Fluid mechanics of bubble capture by the diving bell spider

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Alice (Alice P.)

    2010-01-01

    The water spider, a unique member of its species, is used as inspiration for a bubble capture mechanism. Bubble mechanics are studied in the pursuit of a biomimetic solution for transporting air bubbles underwater. Careful ...

  17. Water in the Equatorial Regions of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, D. M.; Team, G.

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) suite of instruments on board the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has detected the signature of hydrogen on Mars. This signature is the 2223 MeV gamma ray given off by hydrogen when its nucleus is excited by capture of a thermal neutron. The number of such gamma rays emitted is not only a function of the concentration of hydrogen, but also of the number of cosmic rays, the atmospheric composition and thickness, and the composition of the martian regolith, all of which are involved in producing and moderating the thermal neutrons responsible for raising the hydrogen nucleus to an excited state. Fortunately, we are able to take these parameters into account and normalize our results since silicon produces gamma rays by both inelastic scatter and thermal capture, is relatively evenly distributed, and has been measured in situ. We report the results of this detection as the equivalent wt% of water in the martian regolith for the equatorial region (~±45°). Values range from a low of 1.5 (± 0.3) up to 7.5 (± 0.6) wt%. Results assume that any water is uniformly distributed within the top meter or so of the surface, the depth to which gamma ray spectrometry is sensitive. Uncertainties in the data are seen to be relatively small, on the order of ±10% relative, and are dominated by counting statistics. Thus the regions of greatest uncertainty are those areas where the atmospheric thickness is greatest, e.g. Hellas Basin, and are well known. Our results for water concentration are generally lower than those reported by the Neutron Spectrometer (NS) aboard the same spacecraft. It has been suggested that variation in water content with depth, having a wetter layer buried below a dryer surface layer, might account for this discrepancy. However, such a distribution would result in our measured gamma ray flux returning a lower derived value for the concentration, exacerbating the problem. Hydrogen is the most variable of any of the elements that the GS has mapped to date, ranging over a factor of 5. High concentrations of water occur in Arabia Patera and Apollinaris Patera. The distribution of water generally correlates with that of chlorine particularly within Apollinaris Patera and to a lesser extent in Arabia Terra. There are no significant correlations of water with the other elements GS has mapped to date: iron, silicon, potassium and thorium.

  18. Numerical investigation of electron self-injection in the nonlinear bubble regime

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rossi, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The process of electron self-injection in the nonlinear bubble wake generated by a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a uniform underdense plasma is studied by means of fully self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations and test-particle simulations. We consider a wake generated by a non-evolving laser driver traveling with a prescribed velocity, which then sets the structure and the velocity of the wake, so the injection dynamics is decoupled from driver evolution, but a realistic structure for the wakefield is retained. We show that a threshold for self-injection into a non-evolving bubble wake exists, and we characterize the dependence of the self-injection threshold on laser intensity, wake velocity, and plasma temperature for a range of parameters of interest for current and future laser-plasma accelerators.

  19. Bubbles and denaturation in DNA.

    PubMed

    van Erp, T S; Cuesta-López, S; Peyrard, M

    2006-08-01

    The local opening of DNA is an intriguing phenomenon from a statistical-physics point of view, but is also essential for its biological function. For instance, the transcription and replication of our genetic code cannot take place without the unwinding of the DNA double helix. Although these biological processes are driven by proteins, there might well be a relation between these biological openings and the spontaneous bubble formation due to thermal fluctuations. Mesoscopic models, like the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model, have fairly accurately reproduced some experimental denaturation curves and the sharp phase transition in the thermodynamic limit. It is, hence, tempting to see whether these models could be used to predict the biological activity of DNA. In a previous study, we introduced a method that allows to obtain very accurate results on this subject, which showed that some previous claims in this direction, based on molecular-dynamics studies, were premature. This could either imply that the present PBD model should be improved or that biological activity can only be predicted in a more complex framework that involves interactions with proteins and super helical stresses. In this article, we give a detailed description of the statistical method introduced before. Moreover, for several DNA sequences, we give a thorough analysis of the bubble-statistics as a function of position and bubble size and the so-called l-denaturation curves that can be measured experimentally. These show that some important experimental observations are missing in the present model. We discuss how the present model could be improved. PMID:16957832

  20. Propagation of VLF waves through the equatorial anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Cairo, L.

    1980-12-01

    The propagation characteristics of artificial VLF waves (NBA, 24.0 kHz) through the equatorial ionosphere have been studied by means of data obtained onboard the FR-1 satellite at 750 km altitude over Latin America. Large latitudinal variations of the vertical component of the wave normal generally appear in the evening at geomagnetic latitudes of 10 to 15 deg, and they also appear on most of the passes examined at night at latitudes of 5 to 10 deg. Ray and wave normal directions of the VLF waves are computed in various models of field-aligned equatorial anomaly. The latitudinal variations in the evening are due to large negative latitudinal gradients of electron density associated with the equatorial anomaly, and the latitudinal variations at night are due to relatively small density gradients.

  1. IMF polarity effects on the equatorial ionospheric F-region

    SciTech Connect

    Sastri, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An exploratory study is made of the influence, during the equinoxes, of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sector structure on the ionospheric F-region using ionosonde data from several equatorial stations for a 3-yr period around the 19th sunspot cycle maximum. It is found that, compared with days having positive IMF polarity, the post-sunset increase of h'F near the dip equator and the depth of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) are reduced during the vernal equinox and enhanced during the autumnal equinox on days with negative IMF polarity. Similar trends are also noted in the data for the 20th sunspot cycle maximum, but with reduced amplitude. The systematic changes in the F-region characteristics suggest a modification of the equatorial zonal electric fields in association with the IMF polarity-related changes in the semi-annual variation of geomagnetic activity. 24 references.

  2. Modeling Equatorial Annual Cycle with a Linear Coupled Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengyu

    1996-10-01

    A simple linear coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to study the equatorial annual cycle. The ocean is a stab mixed-layer model and the atmosphere is the Lindzen-Nigam model. The model is shown to capture most features of the observed equatorial annual cycle. A significant part of the tropical annual cycle is found to be generated by the extratropical annual variability that propagates toward the equator through a coupled ocean-atmosphere wave. The back-pressure effect in the atmosphere model can contribute to several important aspects of the variability, especially in the vicinity of the equator. Comparison with other mechanisms for the equatorial annual cycle is also discussed.

  3. Equatorial Imaging with e-MERLIN Including the Chilbolton Antenna

    E-print Network

    Ian Heywood; Hans-Rainer Kloeckner; Steve Rawlings

    2008-01-14

    We discuss the equatorial imaging benefits that arise from the addition of the 25-metre dish at Chilbolton to the e-MERLIN array. Its inclusion considerably enhances the capabilities of e-MERLIN on and below the equator. This will become particularly important in the era of ALMA and other upcoming southern hemisphere facilities. We present simulated observations of point sources in the equatorial region of the sky which is the target area for many existing sky surveys. We find that the additional baselines created by the inclusion of the Chilbolton dish favourably adjust the beam shape of e-MERLIN to a more compact and circular shape, with significantly reduced sidelobe structure. Putting aside the benefits of increased collecting area, the modified beam shape has implications for more rapidly reaching a given completeness limit for equatorial surveys.

  4. Interaction of two bubbles produced with time difference

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kotaro [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan); Tomita, Yukio [Hokkaido Univ. of Education, Hakodate (Japan); Shima, Akira [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Institute of Fluid Science

    1994-12-31

    Some aspects of the bubble-bubble interaction were simulated experimentally. Two cavitation bubbles were generated in water by focusing two beams released from a twin pulsed ruby laser which has a couple of ruby rods. Time deference between the former generated bubble and the latter one was controlled with a delay circuit and their dynamic behaviors were investigated by means of high-speed photography. Consequently, it is found that the bubble-bubble interaction is influenced not only by the relative size of two bubbles but also by the time difference between two bubble generations.

  5. Nonlinear interaction between gas bubble and free surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.X.; Yeo, K.S.; Khoo, B.C.; Lam, K.Y. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The nonlinear evolution of gas bubbles in the vicinity of a free surface is investigated numerically. The flow is assumed to be potential and a boundary-integral method is used to solve the Laplace equation for the velocity potential. The bubble content is described by an adiabatic gas law. Investigations were carried out for gas bubbles which are injected as close as one maximum bubble radius from the free surface. The relations between bubble jet penetration, bubble rebound and bubble connectedness to bubble strength are discussed. Results are also compared against the prediction of Blake`s Kelvin impulse theory.

  6. Intense spreading of radar echoes from ionospheric plasmas

    E-print Network

    Dorfman, Seth E

    2005-01-01

    On December 25, 2004, a large-scale ionospheric plasma bubble was observed over Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, inducing significant range spreading on ionograms. This phenomena may be explained by means of the E x B ...

  7. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 2; Evolution of Thermally Controlled Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The previously developed dynamic theory of growth and detachment of vapour bubbles under conditions of nucleate pool boiling is applied to study motion and deformation of a bubble evolving at a single nucleation site. The bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled, and two components of heat transfer to the bubble are accounted of: the one from the bulk of surrounding liquid and the one due to heat conduction across a liquid microlayer formed underneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is governed by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force, both the forces making the bubble centre of mass move away from the wall and, thus, assisting its detachment. Buoyancy-controlled and surface-tension-controlled regimes are considered separately in a meticulous way. The duration of the whole process of bubble evolution till detachment, the rate of growth, and the bubble departure size are found as functions of time and physical and operating parameters. Some repeatedly observed phenomena, such as an influence of gravity on the growth rate, are explained. Inferences of the model agree qualitatively with available experimental evidence, and conclusions pertaining to the dependence on gravity of the bubble radius at detachment and the whole time of the bubble development when being attached to the wall are confirmed quantitatively.

  8. Moving with bubbles: a review of the interactions between bubbles and the microorganisms that surround them.

    PubMed

    Walls, Peter L L; Bird, James C; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2014-12-01

    Bubbles are ubiquitous in biological environments, emerging during the complex dynamics of waves breaking in the open oceans or being intentionally formed in bioreactors. From formation, through motion, until death, bubbles play a critical role in the oxygenation and mixing of natural and artificial ecosystems. However, their life is also greatly influenced by the environments in which they emerge. This interaction between bubbles and microorganisms is a subtle affair in which surface tension plays a critical role. Indeed, it shapes the role of bubbles in mixing or oxygenating microorganisms, but also determines how microorganisms affect every stage of the bubble's life. In this review, we guide the reader through the life of a bubble from birth to death, with particular attention to the microorganism-bubble interaction as viewed through the lens of fluid dynamics. PMID:25096288

  9. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A., E-mail: caro@lanl.gov; Schwen, D.; Martinez, E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2?/R, with ? the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1?nm and below.

  10. Sonoluminescence: Why fiery bubbles have eternal life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Detlef Lohse; Michael Brenner; Sascha Hilgenfeldt

    1996-01-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. Phase diagrams are presented in the gas concentration vs forcing pressure state space and also in the ambient radius vs forcing pressure state space. These phase diagrams are

  11. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids.

  12. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  13. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  14. Bubbles, Gating, and Anesthetics in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk; Nonner, Wolfgang; Eisenberg, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that bubbles are the bistable hydrophobic gates responsible for the on-off transitions of single channel currents. In this view, many types of channels gate by the same physical mechanism—dewetting by capillary evaporation—but different types of channels use different sensors to modulate hydrophobic properties of the channel wall and thereby trigger and control bubbles and gating. Spontaneous emptying of channels has been seen in many simulations. Because of the physics involved, such phase transitions are inherently sensitive, unstable threshold phenomena that are difficult to simulate reproducibly and thus convincingly. We present a thermodynamic analysis of a bubble gate using morphometric density functional theory of classical (not quantum) mechanics. Thermodynamic analysis of phase transitions is generally more reproducible and less sensitive to details than simulations. Anesthetic actions of inert gases—and their interactions with hydrostatic pressure (e.g., nitrogen narcosis)—can be easily understood by actions on bubbles. A general theory of gas anesthesia may involve bubbles in channels. Only experiments can show whether, or when, or which channels actually use bubbles as hydrophobic gates: direct observation of bubbles in channels is needed. Existing experiments show thin gas layers on hydrophobic surfaces in water and suggest that bubbles nearly exist in bulk water. PMID:18234836

  15. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, A.; Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-01

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2?/R, with ? the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  16. Bubble Breakup Caused by Shape Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.-H.; Feng, Z. C.

    1998-11-01

    The breakup of a bubble is the most intriguing phenomenon in the bubble dynamics to many fluid dynamics researcher. Bubble may break up due to different kinds of mechanisms. However due to the complexity of the system, no general analytical approachis available for studying this breakup phenomenon of a bubble. Hence numerical approach is taken in our current work to investigate the breakup of a single ideal gas bubble oscillating in an infinite region of an inviscid and incompressible fluid due to the one-to two resonance mechanism. Boundary element method combined with 4-th order Runge-Kutta integrator is used to simulate the bubble motion. Several simulations with different time steps are conducted to ensure the convergence of numerical integration. Conservation of energy is used as a measure of justifying the accuracy of our calculation. Our numerical data shows that the velocity of two poles of an axisymmetric bubble starts to vary at a very high frequency before the bubble breaks up. Several flow fields just before the breakup show that the velocity at the two poles is much larger than the velocity elsewhere.

  17. The Minnaert bubble: an acoustic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Devaud; Thierry Hocquet; Jean-Claude Bacri; Valentin Leroy

    2008-01-01

    We propose an ab initio introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian variables. In unbounded

  18. The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerardo Adrian Delgadino

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast compressions and expansions may occur in microbubbles undergoing forced oscillations. For certain conditions ultra high temperatures are produced. In a spherically symmetric stationary acoustic field, a gas bubble about ten micrometers in diameter was levitated. Bubble volume oscillations caused by the varying pressure field were excited. The non-linear oscillations were characterized by a slow growth, up to ten times

  19. Bubble Growth and Detachment from a Needle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Shusser; Edmond Rambod; Morteza Gharib

    1999-01-01

    The release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle or orifice occurs in large number of applications, such as perforated plate columns, blood oxygenators and various methods of water treatment. It is also a widely used method in laboratory research on multiphase flow and acoustics for generating small bubbles in a controlled fashion. We studied experimentally the growth and pinch-off of

  20. Mixture segregation by an inertial cavitation bubble

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Grossier; O. Louisnard; Y. Vargas

    2007-01-01

    Pressure diffusion is a mass diffusion process forced by pressure gradients. It has the ability to segregate two species of a mixture, driving the densest species toward high pressure zones, but requires very large pressure gradients to become noticeable. An inertial cavitation bubble develops large pressure gradients in its vicinity, especially as the bubble rebounds at the end of its

  1. The Physics of Foams, Droplets and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarker, Dipak K.

    2013-01-01

    Foams or bubble dispersions are common to milkshakes, bread, champagne froth, shaving mousse, shampoo, crude oil extraction systems, upholstery packing and bubble wrap, whereas the term droplet is often synonymous with either a small drop of water or a drop of oil--a type of coarse dispersion. The latter are seen in butter and milk, household…

  2. Stock market bubbles in the laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Porter; Vernon L. Smith

    1994-01-01

    Trading at prices above the fundamental value of an asset, i.e. a bubble, has been verified and replicated in laboratory asset markets for the past seven years. To date, only common group experience provides minimal conditions for common investor sentiment and trading at fundamental value. Rational expectations models do not predict the bubble and crash phenomena found in these experimental

  3. Interaction mechanism of double bubbles in hydrodynamic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengchao; Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Bin

    2013-06-01

    Bubble-bubble interaction is an important factor in cavitation bubble dynamics. In this paper, the dynamic behaviors of double cavitation bubbles driven by varying pressure field downstream of an orifice plate in hydrodynamic cavitation reactor are examined. The bubble-bubble interaction between two bubbles with different radii is considered. We have shown the different dynamic behaviors between double cavitation bubbles and a single bubble by solving two coupling nonlinear equations using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control. The simulation results indicate that, when considering the role of the neighbor smaller bubble, the oscillation of the bigger bubble gradually exhibits a lag in comparison with the single-bubble case, and the extent of the lag becomes much more obvious as time goes by. This phenomenon is more easily observed with the increase of the initial radius of the smaller bubble. In comparison with the single-bubble case, the oscillation of the bigger bubble is enhanced by the neighbor smaller bubble. Especially, the pressure pulse of the bigger bubble rises intensely when the sizes of two bubbles approach, and a series of peak values for different initial radii are acquired when the initial radius ratio of two bubbles is in the range of 0.9˜1.0. Although the increase of the center distance between two bubbles can weaken the mutual interaction, it has no significant influence on the enhancement trend. On the one hand, the interaction between two bubbles with different radii can suppress the growth of the smaller bubble; on the other hand, it also can enhance the growth of the bigger one at the same time. The significant enhancement effect due to the interaction of multi-bubbles should be paid more attention because it can be used to reinforce the cavitation intensity for various potential applications in future.

  4. Numerical Simulations and Forecasts of Equatorial Spread F in the American Sector Based on ISR and HF Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    An ongoing effort to simulate plasma instability in the equatorial ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) in the American sector is described. Ionospheric state parameters including plasma number density and vector drift velocity profiles have been measured at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in campaigns in 2013 and 2014. Coherent radar backscatter from plasma irregularities has been recorded simultaneously, and images of the irregularities have been generated using aperture synthesis methods. A fully 3D numerical simulation of ionospheric irregularities, initialized and forced using parametrizations derived from measurements and empirical models, has been used in attempts to reproduce the ESF activity observed. Emphasis is placed on representing currents in the bottomside F region completely with the simulation. The simulations have been able to recover many of the features of the irregularities, although some important exceptions have been noted. ESF events in which the first appearance of radar plumes occurs either very early or very late cannot be reproduced in simulation and may be indicative of nonlocal influences. A new multistatic network of HF beacons is being deployed to estimate and track nonlocal influences on ionospheric stability. The network eploys PRN coding, Doppler discrimination, and interferometry and provides data suitable for inverse modeling. Preliminary results from the network will be presented.

  5. Global structure of isothermal X-ray emission along the Fermi bubbles

    E-print Network

    Kataoka, J; Totani, T; Sofue, Y; Inoue, Y; Nakashima, S; Cheung, C C

    2015-01-01

    In our previous works (Kataoka et al. 2013, Tahara et al. 2015), we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ~ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo (GH) gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes |l| 0 deg) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0 deg) is rather close to (i), but weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur; SPS). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles' axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial condition.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic interaction of high-speed streams. [near solar equatorial plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Chien, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical solutions of a magnetohydrodynamic model are carried out to describe the nonlinear interaction of corotating high-speed streams near the solar equatorial plane. Two problems are studied. The first problem is to simulate the evolution of an idealized high-speed stream. Numerical solutions are obtained to represent the variations of flow velocity, magnetic field, plasma density, temperature, and conduction heat flux in the interaction region. They demonstrate that the dynamical interaction and heat conduction process are responsible for the thermal structure of a high-speed stream. The second problem deals with the formation of corotating shock waves near the leading edge of a broad stream resulting from the merging of characteristic curves. Corotating shocks do not necessarily occur in pairs; a reverse shock can be formed without a forward shock nearby.

  7. Implications of the equipotential field line approximation for equatorial spread F analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    Three different approaches to the evaluation of the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere under equatorial spread F (ESF) conditions are considered. First, we calculate the potential using an analytical approach, applying force balance laws to a simplified ionosphere. Second, we compute the potential around a cylinder-like plasma depletion in an idealized ionosphere using both the equipotential field line (EFL) approach and the full 3-D solution to the electrostatic potential problem. Our third approach involves an initial boundary value simulation in a realistic ionosphere using both EFL and 3-D potential solutions. The results show that the equipotential field line assumption does not fully capture the 3-D structure of the ionospheric current system and leads to an underestimation of the growth rate of ESF irregularities in numerical simulations.

  8. Evidence for lobe reconnection as a source mechanism for the cold dense plasma sheet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Wilber; James McFadden; Kristen Brown; Wenhui Li; Joachim Raeder

    2010-01-01

    Initial observations of cold, dense plasma sheet (CDPS) regions by equatorial spacecraft indicated that they occur during extended intervals of northward IMF near the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). Since CDPS domains have plasma characteristics intermediate between the plasma sheet and the magnetosheath, the latter has long been considered a candidate source. During northward IMF the flanks of the LLBL

  9. Storm-enhanced plasma density features investigated during the Bastille Day Superstorm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ildiko Horvath; Brian C. Lovell

    2010-01-01

    Field-aligned passes track true profiles. Such Defense Meteorological Satellite Program passes permitted investigating storm-enhanced plasma density (SED) feature development during the Bastille Day Superstorm in a comprehensive way. We tracked equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and SED features and their underlying forward fountain circulation and downward SED plume plasma flows, respectively. Northward subauroral polarization stream E fields detaching plasma and producing

  10. Air bubble migration rates as a proxy for bubble pressure distribution in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, Ruzica; Schneebeli, Martin; Bertler, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Air bubble migration can be used as a proxy to measure the pressure of individual bubbles and can help constrain the gradual close-off of gas bubbles and the resulting age distribution of gases in ice cores. The close-off depth of single bubbles can vary by tens of meters, which leads to a distribution of pressures for bubbles at a given depth. The age distribution of gases (along with gas-age-ice-age differences) decreases the resolution of the gas level reconstructions from ice cores and limits our ability to determine the phase relationship between gas and ice, and thus, the impact of rapid changes of greenhouse gases on surface temperatures. For times of rapid climate change, including the last 150 years, and abrupt climate changes further back in the past, knowledge of the age distribution of the gases trapped in air bubbles will enable us to refine estimates of atmospheric changes. When a temperature gradient is applied to gas bubbles in an ice sample, the bubbles migrate toward warmer ice. This motion is caused by sublimation from the warm wall and subsequent frost deposition on the cold wall. The migration rate depends on ice temperature and bubble pressure and is proportional to the temperature gradient. The spread in migration rates for bubbles in the same samples at given temperatures should therefore reflect the variations in bubble pressures within a sample. Air bubbles with higher pressures would have been closed off higher in the firn column and thus have had time to equilibrate with the surrounding ice pressure, while air bubbles that have been closed off recently would have pressures that are similar to todays atmospheric pressure above the firn column. For ice under pressures up to ~13-16 bar, the pressure distribution of bubbles from a single depth provides a record of the trapping function of air bubbles in the firn column for a certain time in the past. We will present laboratory experiments on air bubble migration, using Antarctic ice core samples from a range of depths, to show that air bubble migration is a valid proxy for bubble pressure and can thus be used to determine the trapping function of air bubbles and gas age distribution for past conditions.

  11. Wettability dependent bubble dynamics in microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthiban, Pravien; Khan, Saif A.; Kreutzer, Michiel T.

    2010-11-01

    The routing of bubble or droplet traffic through microfluidic networks depends greatly on the hydrodynamic resistance in the individual branches of that network. We find that a confined bubble translating through a partially wetting liquid experiences significantly more friction than a bubble lubricated by a completely wetting liquid, with important consequences for the dynamic behavior. For our system, we observe symmetric bubble break up and alternating left-right routing at a microfluidic junction, as described previously by Link et al. For partially wetting liquids, we observe a much richer dynamic behavior, with asymmetric splitting and left-right routing with chaotic periodicity. We identify the contact angle as a key control parameter that determines the different regimes and we explore how the transitions between these regimes can be effected by tuning this parameter. The results of this work aid the prediction and control of bubble traffic through complex microfluidic networks. Link et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2005) 054503

  12. Giant Bubble Pinch-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Raymond; van der Meer, Devaraj; Stijnman, Mark; Sandtke, Marijn; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-04-01

    Self-similarity has been the paradigmatic picture for the pinch-off of a drop. Here we will show through high-speed imaging and boundary integral simulations that the inverse problem, the pinch-off of an air bubble in water, is not self-similar in a strict sense: A disk is quickly pulled through a water surface, leading to a giant, cylindrical void which after collapse creates an upward and a downward jet. Only in the limiting case of large Froude numbers does the purely inertial scaling h(-log?h)1/4??1/2 for the neck radius h [J. M. Gordillo , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 95, 194501 (2005)] become visible. For any finite Froude number the collapse is slower, and a second length scale, the curvature of the void, comes into play. Both length scales are found to exhibit power-law scaling in time, but with different exponents depending on the Froude number, signaling the nonuniversality of the bubble pinch-off.

  13. Exploring the climate change refugia potential of equatorial Pacific coral reefs

    E-print Network

    Drenkard, Elizabeth Joan

    2015-01-01

    Global climate models project a 21st century strengthening of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The consequent increase in topographic upwelling of cool waters onto equatorial coral reef islands would mitigate ...

  14. Seasonal heat balance in the upper 100 m of the equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seasonal heat balance in the upper 100 m of the equatorial Atlantic Ocean Julien Jouanno,1.M. Molines (2011), Seasonal heat balance in the upper 100 m of the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res

  15. Observations and modelling of deep equatorial currents in the central Pacific

    E-print Network

    Ponte, Rui Vasques de Melo

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of vertical profiles of absolute horizontal velocity collected in January 1981, February 1982 and April 1982 in the central equatorial Pacific as part of the Pacific Equatorial Ocean Dynamics (PEQUOD) program, ...

  16. Primary Particles from different bubble generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, A. C.; King, S. M.; Rosenoern, T.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) are of major interest to global climate models due to large uncertainty in their emissions and ability to form Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). In general, SSA are produced from wind breaking waves that entrain air and cause bubble bursting on the ocean surface. Preliminary results are presented for bubble generation, bubble size distribution, and CCN activity for laboratory generated SSA. In this study, the major processes of bubble formation are examined with respect to particle emissions. It has been suggested that a plunging jet closely resembles breaking wave bubble entrainment processes and subsequent bubble size distributions (Fuentes, Coe et al. 2010). Figure 1 shows the different particle size distributions obtained from the various bubble generation techniques. In general, frits produce a higher concentration of particles with a stronger bimodal particle size distribution than the various jet configurations used. The experiments consist of a stainless steel cylinder closed at both ends with fittings for aerosol sampling, flow connections for the recirculating jet, and air supply. Bubble generation included a recirculating jet with 16 mm or 4 mm nozzles, a stainless steel frit, or a ceramic frit. The chemical composition of the particles produced via bubble bursting processes has been probed using particle CCN activity. The CCN activity of sodium chloride, artificial sea salt purchased from Tropic Marin, and laboratory grade artificial sea salt (Kester, Duedall et al. 1967) has been compared. Considering the the limits of the shape factor as rough error bars for sodium chloride and bubbled sea salt, the CCN activity of artificial sea salt, Tropic Marin sea salt, and sodium chloride are not significantly different. This work has been supported by the Carlsberg Foundation.

  17. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  18. Nighttime behavior of the equatorial topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatraman, Sarita

    The high altitude region of the ionosphere above the F2 peak is called the topside ionosphere. In this region, the effects of diffusion are comparable to production and loss processes. The behavior of this region is dominated by transport and chemical processes which help determine the relative amounts of O+ and H+ which are the dominant ions in the topside. In order to understand the dynamics and energetics of this region, it is also necessary to understand the roles of E × B drifts and F region neutral winds. This region of the ionosphere has been studied for the last 30 years using in- situ measurements from instruments on spacecraft, ground-based radars, mathematical and computational methods, etc. In our study we use data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F10 satellite which orbits in a sun- synchronous polar orbit with an orbital inclination of about 98°. We have examined latitude profiles of ion temperatures and densities at 2100 hours LT and at an altitude of 800 km to discover the influence of field- aligned plasma transport induced by F region neutral winds. Such dependencies are readily seen by contrasting observations at different seasons, longitudes, and magnetic declinations. Our initial study involves examination of the temperature and density variations in 1991 under high solar activity levels. Data show strong evidence for adiabatic heating effects produced by interhemispheric plasma transport. This heating manifests itself as a local temperature maximum that appears in the winter hemisphere during solstices and is generally absent during equinox. A longitudinal variation in the appearance of this maximum is consistent with the roles of meridional and zonal winds in modulating the field-aligned plasma velocities. The data also show a local temperature minimum near the dip equator. However, it is not so easy to attribute this minimum to adiabatic cooling. This initial study is followed by a further study involving solar activity dependencies in the topside. A study of plasma temperatures under moderate solar activity conditions in 1992 indicates features similar to those in 1991, except that overall temperatures are lower. Evidence for ion cooling and heating by adiabatic expansion and compression seen in 1991 are also seen in 1992, and are attributed to interhemispheric transport of plasma. In this case, temperature and density data in 1992 are examined and compared with similar data set in 1991. It is found that the adiabatic effects are strongly dependent on the location of the transition height. In contrast to high solar activity levels, both, the temperature maximum and the temperature minimum manifest themselves much closer to the dip equator under moderate levels of solar activity. Note that, for both years O+ is the dominant ion at latitudes where the heating effect is seen.

  19. Investigation of hydrophilic modification for bubble-free operation in microfluidic systems and micropump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, N. B.; Hsu, Y. C.

    2010-03-01

    This study developed a bubble-free method for microfluidic devices and micropump applications by modifying the wetting characteristic of their chamber surfaces. Two methods of hydrophilic film formation were investigated, that is, microwave plasma surface modification and TiO2 thin film deposition. The evaluation results indicated that TiO2 thin film deposition showed better stability and it was therefore selected to improve the surface wettability and unify the spreading behavior. Different hydrophilic strip shape and strip numbers were investigated and the results indicated that the vertical design with trisection strip gives the best result and effectively discharges the bubbles of microfluidic devices. The results were then applied to a peristaltic micropump and very good results were obtained. That is, the micropump stability and robustness are enhanced significantly. Furthermore, in the pump operation frequency range (i.e. 75 ±10?Hz), bubbles are discharged effectively. The results show that when the micropump operated at frequencies lower than 100?Hz, air bubbles became insignificant; therefore, operation frequencies lower than 100?Hz are considered to be the micropump's stable performance range. From the results it was concluded that bubble formation is also responsible for the flow rate downhill effect.

  20. Rethinking Tropical Ocean Response to Global Warming: The Enhanced Equatorial Warming*

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    SST fingerprint to global warming is an enhanced equatorial warming relative to the subtropics. This enhanced equatorial warming provides a fingerprint of SST response more robust than the traditionallyRethinking Tropical Ocean Response to Global Warming: The Enhanced Equatorial Warming* ZHENGYU LIU

  1. Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-print Network

    Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean Marlos] In this work the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean circulation dynamics for warm and cold composite events are analyzed.Wainer, Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean, Geophys. Res

  2. Solar flux influence on propagation of disturbance dynamo to equatorial ionosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Kakad; D. Tiwari; T. Kpani

    2011-01-01

    On some magnetically disturbed days equatorial ionospheric electric fields are changed which affects the quiet time behavior of equatorial F layer height in the post sunset hours. The effects seen at equatorial F region are either associated with disturbance dynamo (DD) or prompt penetration (PP) or combination of both DD and PP. In the present investigation an attempt is made

  3. Seaglider observations of equatorial Indian Ocean Rossby waves associated with the Madden-Julian

    E-print Network

    Matthews, Adrian

    Seaglider observations of equatorial Indian Ocean Rossby waves associated with the Madden.: EQUATORIAL OCEAN ROSSBY WAVES & THE MJO Abstract. During the CINDY­DYNAMO field campaign of September 2011-resolution subsurface observations provide insight into equatorial ocean Rossby wave activity forced by three Madden

  4. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  5. ASE OFF-EQUATORIAL THERMAL DATE 6 April 1970

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    well within the specification range of -76°F to 186°F for a nominal thermal control coating conditionASE OFF-EQUATORIAL THERMAL STUDY NO. ~TM 864 PAGE i REV. NO. OF iv DATE 6 April 1970 .RECEIVED The purpose of this ATM is to summarize the results of an in-house thermal study conducted to evaluate

  6. Phanerozoic geological evolution of the Equatorial Atlantic domain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Basile; Jean Mascle; René Guiraud

    2005-01-01

    The Phanerozoic geological evolution of the Equatorial Atlantic domain has been controlled since the end of Early Cretaceous by the Romanche and Saint Paul transform faults. These faults did not follow the PanAfrican shear zones, but were surimposed on Palæozoic basins. From Neocomian to Barremian, the Central Atlantic rift propagated southward in Cassiporé and Marajó basins, and the South Atlantic

  7. IRON LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC OCEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface waters of the equatorial Pacific have unusually high nitrate and phosphate concentrations, but relatively low phytoplankton biomass. his high nitrate, low chlorophyll' (HNLC) phenomenon has been ascribed to 'top-down' grazing pressure by herbivores which prevent the p...

  8. Early Miocene Carbonate Dissolution in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Julia Keegan

    2014-11-19

    , XRF records are used here to define an early Miocene low CaCO3 event in the equatorial Pacific that corresponds to the seismic horizon termed “Lavender”. The low CaCO3 interval is correlated at submeter scale in 4 drill sites from IODP Expedition 320...

  9. Peruvian Andes helped to cool eastern equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-11-01

    During the latter half of the Cenozoic, starting during the Pliocene, the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) underwent a change from warm, wet climate conditions—which scientists refer to as "permanent El Niño"—to more moderate conditions like those observed today. Although scientists can track this change using marine proxy records, they are still puzzled as to why the sudden shift occurred.

  10. Nonlinear Balance on an Equatorial David J. Raymond

    E-print Network

    Raymond, David J.

    Nonlinear Balance on an Equatorial Beta Plane David J. Raymond Physics Department and Geophysical Research Center New Mexico Tech Socorro, NM 87801 April 26, 2009 Summary Extension of the nonlinear balance parameter goes to zero at the equator, it is usually supposed that balanced theories such as quasigeostrophy

  11. EXTENDED REPORT Topographical changes of biconvex objects during equatorial

    E-print Network

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    : air, water, and gel filled mylar and rubber balloons and spherical vesicles. In the vesicles, traction, with wall thickness of 0.350 mm, were filled with either air, water, or gelatin. When filled, the balloons filled mylar balloons was quantified. Results: Whenever an outward equatorial force was applied

  12. Coral Record of Equatorial Sea-Surface Temperatures

    E-print Network

    Coral Record of Equatorial Sea-Surface Temperatures During the Penultimate Deglaciation at Huon, Bradley Pillans, Allan R. Chivas, Akio Omura Uplifted coral terraces at Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. Porites coral, which grew during this period, has oxygen isotopic values and strontium/calcium ratios

  13. Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean Sedimentation: Investigating Constant Flux Proxies

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ajay 1980-

    2012-12-03

    to the equator in productive waters. To examine whether lateral mixing of productive equatorial waters with adjacent waters delivers xs230Th to the Panama Basin, I measured dissolved 230Th in eight deep-water casts within the Guatemala, Panama, and Peru Basins...

  14. Nitric oxide measurements in the equatorial pacific region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. McFarland; D. Kley; J. W. Drummond; A. L. Schmeltekopf; R. H. Winkler

    1979-01-01

    Surface nitric oxide mixing ratios were measured in the equatorial Pacific region using a chemiluminescent detector. The average NO mixing ratio was about 4 pptv during noontime conditions for nine days of measurements. These NO mixing ratios, which are much lower than any previously reported, imply that the Oâ production rate due to CO and CHâ oxidation may be less

  15. Mechanisms That Interchange Axial and Equatorial Atoms in Fluxional Processes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Berry pseudorotation is a classical mechanism for interchanging axial and equatorial ligands in molecules with trigonal bipyramidal geometry. Teaching this mechanism presents particular pedagogic problems due to both its dynamic and three dimensional character. The approach taken here illustrates these processes using interactive animations embedded in a Web page and overcomes many limitations of a printed page.

  16. An analytic solution for the J2 perturbed equatorial orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic solution for the J2 perturbed equatorial orbit is obtained in terms of elliptic functions and integrals. The necessary equations for computing the position and elocity vectors, and the time are given in terms of known functions. The perturbed periapsis and apoapsis distances are determined from the roots of a characteristic cubic.

  17. On the Annual Cycle of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianming Li; S. George H. Philander

    1996-01-01

    Although the sun `crosses' the equator twice a year, the eastern equatorial Pacific has a pronounced annual cycle, in sea surface temperature and in both components of the surface winds for example. (This is in contrast to the Indian Ocean and western Pacific where a semiannual oscillation of the zonal wind is the dominant signal on the equator.) Calculations with

  18. History of the Italian San Marco equatorial mobile range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, H. N.

    1971-01-01

    Events leading to the development of the San Marco Equatorial Range are presented. Included are background information leading to the cooperative space program between the United States and Italy, conceptual planning, training activities, equipment design and fabrication, and range utilization. The technical support provided the San Marco Program by Scout Project Office, and other NASA installations is described.

  19. 8) Equatorial waves a)Observations in the low stratosphere

    E-print Network

    Spiga, Aymeric

    8) Equatorial waves a)Observations in the low stratosphere A balloon trip around the world Spectral://web.lmd.jussieu.fr/~flott #12;a) Observation in the low stratosphere A balloon trip around the worldUn tour du monde en ballon End on May 11 #12;Zonal wind Meridional wind a) Observation in the low stratosphere A balloon trip

  20. Effect of bubble's arrangement on the viscous torque in bubbly Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua, G. Ndongo; Gabillet, C.; Aubert, A.; Colin, C.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental investigation of the interactions between bubbles, coherent motion, and viscous drag in a Taylor-Couette flow with the outer cylinder at rest is presented. The cylinder radii ratio ? is 0.91. Bubbles are injected inside the gap through a needle at the bottom of the apparatus. Different bubbles sizes are investigated (ratio between the bubble diameter and the gap width ranges from 0.05 to 0.125) for very small void fraction (? ? 0.23%). Different flow regimes are studied corresponding to Reynolds number Re based on the gap width and velocity of the inner cylinder, ranging from 6 × 102 to 2 × 104. Regarding these Re values, Taylor vortices are persistent leading to an axial periodicity of the flow. A detailed characterization of the vortices is performed for the single-phase flow. The experiment also develops bubbles tracking in a meridian plane and viscous torque of the inner cylinder measurements. The findings of this study show evidence of the link between bubbles localisation, Taylor vortices, and viscous torque modifications. We also highlight two regimes of viscous torque modification and various types of bubbles arrangements, depending on their size and on the Reynolds number. Bubbles can have a sliding and wavering motion near the inner cylinder and be either captured by the Taylor vortices or by the outflow areas near the inner cylinder. For small buoyancy effect, bubbles are trapped, leading to an increase of the viscous torque. When buoyancy induced bubbles motion is increased by comparison to the coherent motion of the liquid, a decrease in the viscous torque is rather observed. The type of bubble arrangement is parameterized by the two dimensionless parameters C and H introduced by Climent et al. ["Preferential accumulation of bubbles in Couette-Taylor flow patterns," Phys. Fluids 19, 083301 (2007)]. Phase diagrams summarizing the various types of bubbles arrangements, viscous torque modifications, and axial wavelength evolution are built.

  1. MOBI: Microgravity Observations of Bubble Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2004-01-01

    One of the greatest uncertainties affecting the design of multiphase flow technologies for space exploration is the spatial distribution of phases that will arise in microgravity or reduced gravity. On Earth, buoyancy-driven motion predominates whereas the shearing of the bubble suspension controls its behavior in microgravity. We are conducting a series of ground-based experiments and a flight experiment spanning the full range of ratios of buoyancy to shear. These include: (1) bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid in a vertical channel; (2) weak shear flow induced by slightly inclining the channel; (3) moderate shear flow in a terrestrial vertical pipe flow; and (4) shearing of a bubble suspension in a cylindrical Couette cell in microgravity. We consider nearly monodisperse suspensions of 1 to 1.8 mm diameter bubbles in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The liquid velocity disturbance produced by bubbles in this size range can often be described using an inviscid analysis. Electrolytic solutions lead to hydrophilic repulsion forces that stabilize the bubble suspension without causing Marangoni stresses. We will discuss the mechanisms that control the flow behavior and phase distribution in the ground-based experiments and speculate on the factors that may influence the suspension flow and bubble volume fraction distribution in the flight experiment.

  2. Bubbly Suspension Generated in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Bubbly suspensions are crucial for mass and heat transport processes on Earth and in space. These processes are relevant to pharmaceutical, chemical, nuclear, and petroleum industries on Earth. They are also relevant to life support, in situ resource utilization, and propulsion processes for long-duration space missions such as the Human Exploration and Development of Space program. Understanding the behavior of the suspension in low gravity is crucial because of factors such as bubble segregation, which could result in coalescence and affect heat and mass transport. Professors A. Sangani and D. Koch, principal investigators in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, are studying the physics of bubbly suspension. They plan to shear a bubbly suspension in a couette cell in microgravity to study bubble segregation and compare the bubble distribution in the couette gap with the one predicted by the suspension-averaged equations of motion. Prior to the Requirement Definition Review of this flight experiment, a technology for generating a bubbly suspension in microgravity has to be established, tested, and verified.

  3. Interacting bubble clouds and their sonochemical production.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Laura; Dollet, Benjamin; Fernández Rivas, David; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-09-01

    An acoustically driven air pocket trapped in a pit etched on a surface can emit a bubble cluster. When several pits are present, the resulting bubble clusters interact in a nontrivial way. Ferna?ndez Rivas et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9699-9701 (2010)] observed three different behaviors at increasing driving power: clusters close to their "mother" pits, clusters attracting each other but still well separated, and merging clusters. The last is highly undesirable for technological purposes as it is associated with a reduction of the radical production and an enhancement of the erosion of the reactor walls. In this paper, the conditions for merging to occur are quantified in the case of two clusters, as a function of the following control parameters: driving pressure, distance between the two pits, cluster radius, and number of bubbles within each cluster. The underlying mechanism, governed by the secondary Bjerknes forces, is strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the bubble oscillations and not directly by the number of nucleated bubbles. The Bjerknes forces are found to dampen the bubble oscillations, thus reducing the radical production. Therefore, the increased number of bubbles at high power could be the key to understanding the experimental observation that, above a certain power threshold, any further increase of the driving does not improve the sonochemical efficiency. PMID:23967919

  4. Acoustic Bubble Removal from Boiling Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The object of the study was the investigation of the forces generated by standing acoustic waves on vapor bubbles, both far and near boundaries. In order to accomplish this objective, in view of the scarcity of publications on the topic, it has been necessary to build an edifice of knowledge about vapor bubbles in sound and flow fields from the ground up, as it were. We have addressed problems of gradually greater difficulty as follows: 1. In the first place, the physics of an stationary isolated bubble subject to a sound field in an unbounded liquid was addressed; 2. The case of bubbles translating in a stationary pressure field was then considered; 3. This was followed by a study of the combined effects of sound and translation, 4. And of a neighboring boundary 5. Finally, a new method to deal with nonspherical bubbles was developed- In addition to the work on vapor bubbles, some studies on gas bubbles were conducted in view of NASA's interest in the phenomenon of sonoluminescence.

  5. Photon Bubbles in Accretion Discs

    E-print Network

    Charles F. Gammie

    1998-02-17

    We show that radiation dominated accretion discs are likely to suffer from a ``photon bubble'' instability similar to that described by Arons in the context of accretion onto neutron star polar caps. The instability requires a magnetic field for its existence. In an asymptotic regime appropriate to accretion discs, we find that the overstable modes obey the remarkably simple dispersion relation \\omega^2 = -i g k F(B,k). Here g is the vertical gravitational acceleration, B the magnetic field, and F is a geometric factor of order unity that depends on the relative orientation of the magnetic field and the wavevector. In the nonlinear outcome it seems likely that the instability will enhance vertical energy transport and thereby change the structure of the innermost parts of relativistic accretion discs.

  6. The Minnaert bubble: an acoustic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-11-01

    We propose an ab initio introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian variables. In unbounded water, the air-water system has a continuum of eigenmodes, some of them correspond to regular Fabry-Pérot resonances. A singular resonance, the lowest one, is shown to coincide with that of Minnaert. In bounded water, the eigenmodes spectrum is discrete, with a finite fundamental frequency. A spectacular quasi-locking of the latter occurs if it happens to exceed the Minnaert frequency, which provides an unforeseen one-bubble alternative version of the famous 'hot chocolate effect'. In the (low) frequency domain in which sound propagation inside the bubble reduces to a simple 'breathing' (i.e. inflation/deflation), the light air bubble can be 'dressed' by the outer water pressure forces, and is turned into the heavy Minnaert bubble. Thanks to this unexpected renormalization process, we demonstrate that the Minnaert bubble definitely behaves like a true harmonic oscillator of the spring-bob type, but with a damping term and a forcing term in apparent disagreement with those commonly admitted in the literature. Finally, we underline the double role played by the water. In order to tell the water motion associated with water compressibility (i.e. the sound) from the simple incompressible accompaniment of the bubble breathing, we introduce a new picture analogous to the electromagnetic radiative picture in Coulomb gauge, which naturally leads us to split the water displacement in an instantaneous and a retarded part. The Minnaert renormalized mass of the dressed bubble is then automatically recovered.

  7. Magnetic Topology of Bubbles in Quiescent Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, J.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Zapiór, M.; Heinzel, P.

    2012-12-01

    We study a polar-crown prominence with a bubble and its plume observed in several coronal filters by the SDO/AIA and in H? by the MSDP spectrograph in Bia?ków (Poland) to address the following questions: what is the brightness of prominence bubbles in EUV with respect to the corona outside of the prominence and the prominence coronal cavity? What is the geometry and topology of the magnetic field in the bubble? What is the nature of the vertical threads seen within prominences? We find that the brightness of the bubble and plume is lower than the brightness of the corona outside of the prominence, and is similar to that of the coronal cavity. We constructed linear force-free models of prominences with bubbles, where the flux rope is perturbed by inclusion of parasitic bipoles. The arcade field lines of the bipole create the bubble, which is thus devoid of magnetic dips. Shearing the bipole or adding a second one can lead to cusp-shaped prominences with bubbles similar to the observed ones. The bubbles have complex magnetic topology, with a pair of coronal magnetic null points linked by a separator outlining the boundary between the bubble and the prominence body. We conjecture that plume formation involves magnetic reconnection at the separator. Depending on the viewing angle, the prominence can appear either anvil-shaped with predominantly horizontal structures, or cusp-shaped with predominantly vertical structuring. The latter is an artifact of the alignment of magnetic dips with respect to the prominence axis and the line of sight.

  8. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J. Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  9. Visualization studies of a freon-113 bubble condensing in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kalman; A. Ullmann; R. Letan

    1987-01-01

    Several visualization methods have been applied in studies of organic bubbles condensing in water. The results, although qualitative in nature, have furnished an insight into the physical phenomena governing the process. Shadow graphing of the collapsing bubbles has outlined the thermal surroundings of the bubble. Shadowgraphs of a freon-113 bubble recorded in sequence have illustrated the formation of a thermal

  10. Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing Junction Michinao Hashimoto the stable formation of trains of mono-, bi-, and tri-disperse bubbles in microfluidic flow- focusing (FF-assembly through the patterns of flow created by the bubbles. 1.1 Bubbles and Droplets in Microfluidics

  11. Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang *

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Youxue

    Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang * The Department of Geological Sciences rhyolitic melt with 1.4^2.0 wt% initial total H2O at 0.1 MPa and 500^600³C. Growth of many bubbles. The average growth rate for bubbles growing in an infinite rhyolitic melt at a bubble radius of 25 Wm is V0

  12. Bubble - Crystal Interactions in Magmatic Three-Phase Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Belien; K. Cashman; A. Rempel; L. Pioli; M. Pistolesi

    2007-01-01

    The influence of crystals on the movement of bubbles through basaltic magmas is poorly understood. We study the interaction of bubbles with a suspension of crystals in a viscous fluid through analog experiments. In our experiments, an air bubble rises through a suspension of plastic beads in a viscous corn syrup - water mixture; we vary bubble volumes, crystal spacings

  13. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence in Low Gravity and Optical Radiation Pressure Positioning of the Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiessen, D. B.; Young, J. E.; Marr-Lyon, M. J.; Richardson, S. L.; Breckon, C. D.; Douthit, S. G.; Jian, P. S.; Torruellas, W. E.; Marston, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    Several groups of researchers have demonstrated that high frequency sound in water may be used to cause the regular repeated compression and luminescence of a small bubble of gas in a flask. The phenomenon is known as single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). It is potentially important because light emitted by the bubble appears to be associated with a significant concentration of energy within the volume of the bubble. Unfortunately, the detailed physical mechanisms causing the radiation of light by oscillating bubbles are poorly understood and there is some evidence that carrying out experiments in a weightless environment may provide helpful clues. In addition, the radiation pressure of laser beams on the bubble may provide a way of simulating weightless experiments in the laboratory. The standard model of SBSL attributes the light emission to heating within the bubble by a spherically imploding shock wave to achieve temperatures of 50,000 K or greater. In an alternative model, the emission is attributed to the impact of a jet of water which is required to span the bubble and the formation of the jet is linked to the buoyancy of the bubble. The coupling between buoyancy and jet formation is a consequence of the displacement of the bubble from a velocity node (pressure antinode) of the standing acoustic wave that drives the radial bubble oscillations. One objective of this grant is to understand SBSL emission in reduced buoyancy on KC-135 parabolic flights. To optimize the design of those experiments and for other reasons which will help resolve the role of buoyancy, laboratory experiments are planned in simulated low gravity in which the radiation pressure of laser light will be used to position the bubble at the acoustic velocity node of the ultrasonic standing wave. Laser light will also be used to push the bubble away from the velocity node, increasing the effective buoyancy. The original experiments on the optical levitation and radiation pressure on bubbles in water by Unger and Marston noted above were carried out using a continuous wave (CW) beam of an Argon laser. For lateral stability the beam had a intensity minimum along its axis. Calculations of the optical radiation force on an SBSL bubble indicate that ion laser technology is a poor choice for providing the magnitude of the average optical radiation force required. Consequently it is necessary to examine various diode-pumped solid state laser technologies. The approach for this part of the research will be to achieve optical levitation of a quiescent bubble based on contemporary laser technology and then to strobe the laser synchronously with the SBSL bubble oscillations.

  14. Co-operative oscillations of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A closed cryogenic storage tank in space may contain several bubbles. It is shown that these bubbles can oscillate in volume with n-1 resonant frequencies for n bubbles. The resonances can be excited by a sudden change in pressure, such as withdrawing fluid or venting, or by motion of the vehicle. In situations in which the ac accelerations dominate, such as in large space structures, the potential for harmful coupling of these oscillations to the spacecraft structure must be examined. Experimental data are presented which support the theoretical predictions.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic bubble memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compact memory uses magnetic bubble technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement, in the form of stacks of magnetic bubble layers, is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. Output tracks are used within each layer to allow data to be accessed uniquely and unambiguously. Storage can be achieved using either current access or field access magnetic bubble technology. Optical sensing via the Faraday effect is used to detect data. Optical sensing facilitates the accessing of data from within the three-dimensional package and lends itself to parallel operation for supporting high data rates and vector and parallel processing.

  16. Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed

    E-print Network

    Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

    2010-01-01

    We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

  17. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction can be measured, from which the bubble phase pressure gradient can be obtained and compared to theory and numerical simulations. The presence of bounding walls further complicates the experiments, since the detailed interactions of the bubbles with bounding walls is not well understood, especially in the presence of gravity, where the momentum and energy exchange depends on the inclination of the wall.

  18. Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications to magma fragmentation and bubble nucleation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurzon Ittai; Lyakhovsky Vladimir; Navon Oded

    2011-01-01

    We present a visco-elastic bubble growth model, accounting for viscous and elastic deformations and for volatile mass transfer\\u000a between bubbles and melt. We define the borders between previous bubble growth models accounting for incompressible viscous\\u000a melt, and our new model accounting also for elastic deformation; this is done by a set of end-member analytical solutions\\u000a and numerical simulations. Elastic deformation

  19. Influence of coalescence behaviour of the liquid and of gas sparging on hydrodynamics and bubble characteristics in a bubble column

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Camarasa; C Vial; S Poncin; G Wild; N Midoux; J Bouillard

    1999-01-01

    This experimental study is aimed at investigating the effect of liquid phase properties and gas distribution on bubble and hydrodynamic characteristics in bubble columns. With the various measuring techniques used, systematic measurements of bubble size, velocity and frequency and gas hold-up are possible. Bubble size distribution and shape factors which are rarely found in literature, are also available. Water–alcohol solutions

  20. Equinoctial asymmetry of ionospheric vertical plasma drifts and its effect on F-region plasma density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhipeng Ren; Weixing Wan; Libo Liu; Yiding Chen; Huijun Le

    2011-01-01

    The equinoctial asymmetry of the ionospheric vertical E × B plasma drift velocity (V$\\\\perp$) in the equatorial F region is investigated based on observations from ROCSAT-1 during 1999 to 2004. It is found that the observed asymmetry exhibits obvious local time dependence with three noticeable features. First, in the Eastern Hemisphere during the interval between 0900 and 1300 LT, V$\\\\perp$

  1. Suzaku Observations of the Diffuse X-Ray Emission across the Fermi Bubbles' Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Stawarz, ?.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Kimura, M.; Takei, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Inoue, Y.; Nakamori, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ~= 20 ks pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ~= 0.1 keV) from the Local Bubble, absorbed kT ~= 0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ~= 50% toward the inner regions of the northeast bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear whether the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within or around the Galactic center, our Suzaku observations provide evidence that suggests the latter scenario. In the latter framework, the presence of a large amount of neutral matter absorbing the X-ray emission as well as the existence of the kT ~= 0.3 keV gas can be naturally interpreted as a weak shock driven by the bubbles' expansion in the surrounding medium, with velocity v exp ~ 300 km s-1 (corresponding to shock Mach number {M} \\simeq 1.5), compressing the GH gas to form the NPS feature. We also derived an upper limit for any non-thermal X-ray emission component associated with the bubbles and demonstrate that, in agreement with the aforementioned findings, the non-thermal pressure and energy estimated from a one-zone leptonic model of its broadband spectrum, are in rough equilibrium with that of the surrounding thermal plasma.

  2. Frictional Drag Reduction by Bubbles in Taylor-Couette Flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuichi Murai; Hiroshi Oiwa; Yasushi Takeda

    2006-01-01

    Frictional drag reduction provided with small bubbles is investigated experimentally using a Couette-Taylor flow system, i.e. shear flow between concentric cylinders. Torque and bubble behavior are measured up to Re=4500 when air bubbles are injected constantly and rise through the cells. Silicone oil is used for avoiding uncertain interfacial property of bubbles as well as for keeping nearly mono-sized bubbles.

  3. How are soap bubbles blown? Fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Lambert, Lori; Sherman, Erica; Wei, Timothy; Ryu, Sangjin

    2013-11-01

    Soap bubbles are a common interfacial fluid dynamics phenomenon having a long history of delighting not only children and artists but also scientists. In contrast to the dynamics of liquid droplets in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, the dynamics of soap bubbles has not been well documented. This is possibly because studying soap bubbles is more challenging due to there existing two gas-liquid interfaces. Having the thin-film interface seems to alter the characteristics of the bubble/drop creation process since the interface has limiting factors such as thickness. Thus, the main objective of this study is to determine how the thin-film interface differentiates soap bubbles from gas bubbles and liquid drops. To investigate the creation process of soap bubbles, we constructed an experimental model consisting of air jet flow and a soap film, which consistently replicates the conditions that a human produces when blowing soap bubbles, and examined the interaction between the jet and the soap film using the high-speed videography and the particle image velocimetry.

  4. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

    2012-05-01

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  5. Longitudinal differences of ionospheric vertical density distribution and equatorial electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valladares, C. E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian ˜37°E and 290°E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as from VEFI onboard Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite and JULIA radar, is equally promising. The observations at different longitudes suggest that the vertical drift velocities and the vertical density distribution have significant longitudinal differences; especially the equatorial anomaly peaks expand to higher latitudes more in American sector than the African sector, indicating that the vertical drift in the American sector is stronger than the African sector.

  6. Motion of an intravascular axisymmetric bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.

    2003-11-01

    The motion of a gas bubble in an arteriolar blood vessel or microvessel is investigated numerically. An imposed pressure gradient drives blood flow. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a front tracking method. Comparative behaviors of bubbles of various ratios (effective diameter/vessel diameter) are ascertained. Effects of vessel size, magnitude of the applied pressure gradient, presence of a soluble surfactant, variations in the values of the density ratio (?_g/?_l) and viscosity ratio (?_g/?_l) on the motion and interfacial shape of the bubble are determined. The results obtained have significance in the study of activation of blood clotting, initiation of inflammation, cellular injury, and adhesion of gas bubbles to the vessel wall occurring in intravascular gas embolism. Supported by NIH R01 HL67986.

  7. Wormholes, void bubbles and vacuum energy suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    The gargantuan discrepancy between the value of the observed cosmological constant and that expected from the zero-point energy of known matter fields can be eliminated by supposing that on macroscopic scales, the overwhelming majority of any volume of spacetime is literal nothingness. This nothingness or void results from the proliferative nucleation of tiny void bubbles (a.k.a. 'bubbles of nothing' or 'semi wormholes') that expand until their surfaces, presumed to be 2-branes, collide. This process results in a dense packing of void bubbles of various sizes that leaves only the vanishing interstitial regions between bubbles for spacetime to occupy. This vast reduction in the amount of actual space, contained within any apparent volume, reduces correspondingly the effective zero-point energy density. Unlike previous wormhole-based attempts at vacuum energy suppression, the current approach is entirely Lorentzian and results in a nonzero value for the cosmological constant.

  8. Loop exponent in DNA bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Vojt?ch; Novotný, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    Dynamics of DNA bubbles are of interest for both statistical physics and biology. We present exact solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation governing bubble dynamics in the presence of a long-range entropic interaction. The complete meeting time and meeting position probability distributions are derived from the solutions. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) reflect the value of the loop exponent of the entropic interaction. Our results extend previous results which concentrated mainly on the tails of the PDFs and open a way to determining the strength of the entropic interaction experimentally which has been a matter of recent discussions. Using numerical integration, we also discuss the influence of the finite size of a DNA chain on the bubble dynamics. Analogous results are obtained also for the case of subdiffusive dynamics of a DNA bubble in a heteropolymer, revealing highly universal asymptotics of meeting time and position probability functions.

  9. Scientific Method Lab Using Bubble Gum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is a lab investigation where students gather data which compares 2 types of bubble gum, while learning to use the scientific method to collect qualitative and quantitative data using SI units.

  10. Nucleate boiling bubble growth and departure

    E-print Network

    Staniszewski, Bogumil E.

    1959-01-01

    The vapor bubble formation on the heating surface during pool boiling has been studied experimentally. Experiments were made at the atmospheric pressure 28 psi and 40 psi, using degassed distilled water and ethanol. The ...

  11. Universe out of a breathing bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Sakai, Nobuyuki [Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Department of Education, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    We consider the model of a false-vacuum bubble with a thin wall where the surface energy density is composed of two different components, 'domain-wall' type and 'dust' type, with opposite signs. We find stably oscillating solutions, which we call 'breathing bubbles'. By decay to a lower mass state, such a breathing bubble could become either (i) a child universe or ii) a bubble that 'eats up' the original universe, depending on the sign of the surface energy of the domain-wall component. We also discuss the effect of the finite-thickness corrections to the thin-wall approximation and possible origins of the energy contents of our model.

  12. Enhancing acoustic cavitation using artificial crevice bubbles.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Fernandez Rivas, David; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    We study the response of pre-defined cavitation nuclei driven continuously in the kHz regime (80, 100 and 200 kHz). The nuclei consist of stabilized gaspockets in cylindrical pits of 30 ?m diameter etched in silicon or glass substrates. It is found that above an acoustic pressure threshold the dynamics of the liquid-gas meniscus switches from a stable drum-like vibration to expansion and deformation, frequently resulting in detachment of microbubbles. Just above this threshold small bubbles are continuously and intermittently ejected. At elevated input powers bubble detachment becomes more frequent and cavitation bubble clouds are formed and remain in the vicinity of the pit bubble. Surprisingly, the resulting loss of gas does not lead to deactivation of the pit which can be explained by a rectified gas diffusion process. PMID:25455191

  13. Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Craig, Richard A.

    1999-11-15

    This report examines two radiation detection technologies (superheated droplet detectors and bubble chambers) in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be adapted for use in national security applications.

  14. Fabrication of magnetic bubble memory overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Self-contained magnetic bubble memory overlay is fabricated by process that employs epitaxial deposition to form multi-layered complex of magnetically active components on single chip. Overlay fabrication comprises three metal deposition steps followed by subtractive etch.

  15. Acoustic manifestations of gas hydrate shelled bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, A. O.; Sosedko, E. V.

    2009-11-01

    The hydrocarbon seeps emitting buoyant bubble plumes from seafloor vents—gas flares have been actively investigated in different regions of the World Ocean, in particular, on the Sakhalin slope in the Sea of Okhotsk. The gas flares can be easily detected by regular echo sounders, because the scattering cross section of a gas bubble is large. Within the gas-hydrate stability zone—for high hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures, methane-hydrate ice skins are formed on rising seep bubbles which are typically methane. The objective of the present study was to develop a suitable model describing rheological characteristics of gas-hydrate shell and to analyze acoustic manifestations of such bubbles for the frequency range used in marine field experiments.

  16. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help astronomers understand the similarity between small black holes formed from exploded stars and the supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies. Very powerful jets have been seen from supermassive black holes, but are thought to be less frequent in the smaller microquasar variety. The new discovery suggests that many of them may simply have gone unnoticed so far. The gas-blowing black hole is located 12 million light-years away, in the outskirts of the spiral galaxy NGC 7793 (eso0914b). From the size and expansion velocity of the bubble the astronomers have found that the jet activity must have been ongoing for at least 200 000 years. Note: [1] Astronomers do not have yet any means of measuring the size of the black hole itself. The smallest stellar black hole discovered so far has a radius of about 15 km. An average stellar black hole of about 10 solar masses has a radius of about 30 km, while a "big" stellar black hole may have a radius of up to 300 km. This is still much smaller than the jets, which extend out to 1000 light-years, or about 9000 million million km! More Information: This result appears in a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Nature (A 300 parsec long jet-inflated bubble around a powerful microquasar in the galaxy NGC 7793, by Manfred W. Pakull, Roberto Soria and Christian Motch). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in C

  17. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help astronomers understand the similarity between small black holes formed from exploded stars and the supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies. Very powerful jets have been seen from supermassive black holes, but are thought to be less frequent in the smaller microquasar variety. The new discovery suggests that many of them may simply have gone unnoticed so far. The gas-blowing black hole is located 12 million light-years away, in the outskirts of the spiral galaxy NGC 7793 (eso0914b). From the size and expansion velocity of the bubble the astronomers have found that the jet activity must have been ongoing for at least 200 000 years. Notes [1] Astronomers do not have yet any means of measuring the size of the black hole itself. The smallest stellar black hole discovered so far has a radius of about 15 km. An average stellar black hole of about 10 solar masses has a radius of about 30 km, while a "big" stellar black hole may have a radius of up to 300 km. This is still much smaller than the jets, which extend out to several hundreds light years on each side of the black hole, or about several thousand million million km! More information This result appears in a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Nature (A 300 parsec long jet-inflated bubble around a powerful microquasar in the galaxy NGC 7793, by Manfred W. Pakull, Roberto Soria and Christian Motch). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO

  18. Methane bubbling: from speculation to quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinham, A. R.; Dunbabin, M.; Yuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Rates of methane bubbling (ebullition) represent a notoriously difficult emission pathway to quantify with highly variable spatial and temporal changes. However, the importance of bubbling fluxes in terms of total emissions is increasingly recognised from a number of different globally relevant natural systems including lakes, reservoirs and wetlands. This represents a critical challenge to current survey efforts to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the uncertainty associated with bubbling fluxes. A number of different methods have been proposed to overcome this challenge including bubble traps, floating chambers, echo sounders, laser spectrography and camera systems. Each method has relative merits and deficiencies with all trading-off the ability to directly quantify methane and provide spatial and temporal coverage. Here we present a novel method that allows direct measurement of methane bubble concentration as well as the ability to persistently monitor a wide spatial area. Central to the monitoring system is an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) and an Optical Methane Detector (OMD). The ASV is equipped with solar panels and uses electric motors for propulsion to allow persistent environmental monitoring. The OMD has a path length of 1.3 m and 7 Hz sampling so a typical mission of 3 hours at 1 m s-1 covers an area in excess of 10 000 m2 and over 65 000 data points. The system was assessed on four sub-tropical freshwater reservoirs of varying surface area (0.5 to 100 km2), age (2 to 65 y) and catchment land use (40 to 90% natural vegetation cover). Each reservoir had unique challenges in terms of navigation and field conditions to test feasibility of this method. Deployment length varied from a single day to over 4 months to test method durability. In addition to ASV bubble surveys, floating static chambers were deployed to determine diffusive fluxes. Localised instantaneous bubble flux rates within a single reservoir ranged over three orders of magnitude from 500 to 100 000 mg m-2 d-1 depending on time of day and water depth. Average storage bubble flux rates between reservoirs varied by two orders of magnitude from 1 200 to 15 000 mg m-2 d-1, with the primary driver likely to be catchment forest cover. The relative contribution of bubbling to total fluxes varied from 10% to more than 90% depending on the reservoir and time of sampling. This method was consistently shown to greatly improve the spatial mapping and quantification of methane bubbling rates from reservoir surfaces and reduces the uncertainty associated with the determining the relative contribution of bubbling to total flux.

  19. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar, E-mail: mpsalem@stanford.edu, E-mail: ps88@stanford.edu, E-mail: edgars@stanford.edu [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  20. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    E-print Network

    Michael P. Salem; Prashant Saraswat; Edgar Shaghoulian

    2013-02-13

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.