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Sample records for er membrane anchor

  1. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Anderie, Ines Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-09-10

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure.

  2. Rhomboid intramembrane protease RHBDL4 triggers ER-export and non-canonical secretion of membrane-anchored TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Wunderle, Lina; Knopf, Julia D.; Kühnle, Nathalie; Morlé, Aymeric; Hehn, Beate; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Freeman, Matthew; Lemberg, Marius K.

    2016-01-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases are the enzymes that release active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in Drosophila and C. elegans, but little is known about their functions in mammals. Here we show that the mammalian rhomboid protease RHBDL4 (also known as Rhbdd1) promotes trafficking of several membrane proteins, including the EGFR ligand TGFα, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus, thereby triggering their secretion by extracellular microvesicles. Our data also demonstrate that RHBDL4-dependent trafficking control is regulated by G-protein coupled receptors, suggesting a role for this rhomboid protease in pathological conditions, including EGFR signaling. We propose that RHBDL4 reorganizes trafficking events within the early secretory pathway in response to GPCR signaling. Our work identifies RHBDL4 as a rheostat that tunes secretion dynamics and abundance of specific membrane protein cargoes. PMID:27264103

  3. Rhomboid intramembrane protease RHBDL4 triggers ER-export and non-canonical secretion of membrane-anchored TGFα.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Lina; Knopf, Julia D; Kühnle, Nathalie; Morlé, Aymeric; Hehn, Beate; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Freeman, Matthew; Lemberg, Marius K

    2016-01-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases are the enzymes that release active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in Drosophila and C. elegans, but little is known about their functions in mammals. Here we show that the mammalian rhomboid protease RHBDL4 (also known as Rhbdd1) promotes trafficking of several membrane proteins, including the EGFR ligand TGFα, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus, thereby triggering their secretion by extracellular microvesicles. Our data also demonstrate that RHBDL4-dependent trafficking control is regulated by G-protein coupled receptors, suggesting a role for this rhomboid protease in pathological conditions, including EGFR signaling. We propose that RHBDL4 reorganizes trafficking events within the early secretory pathway in response to GPCR signaling. Our work identifies RHBDL4 as a rheostat that tunes secretion dynamics and abundance of specific membrane protein cargoes. PMID:27264103

  4. Lipid transfer proteins do their thing anchored at membrane contact sites… but what is their thing?

    PubMed

    Wong, Louise H; Levine, Tim P

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites are structures where two organelles come close together to regulate flow of material and information between them. One type of inter-organelle communication is lipid exchange, which must occur for membrane maintenance and in response to environmental and cellular stimuli. Soluble lipid transfer proteins have been extensively studied, but additional families of transfer proteins have been identified that are anchored into membranes by transmembrane helices so that they cannot diffuse through the cytosol to deliver lipids. If such proteins target membrane contact sites they may be major players in lipid metabolism. The eukaryotic family of so-called Lipid transfer proteins Anchored at Membrane contact sites (LAMs) all contain both a sterol-specific lipid transfer domain in the StARkin superfamily (related to StART/Bet_v1), and one or more transmembrane helices anchoring them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), making them interesting subjects for study in relation to sterol metabolism. They target a variety of membrane contact sites, including newly described contacts between organelles that were already known to make contact by other means. Lam1-4p target punctate ER-plasma membrane contacts. Lam5p and Lam6p target multiple contacts including a new category: vacuolar non-NVJ cytoplasmic ER (VancE) contacts. These developments confirm previous observations on tubular lipid-binding proteins (TULIPs) that established the importance of membrane anchored proteins for lipid traffic. However, the question remaining to be solved is the most difficult of all: are LAMs transporters, or alternately are they regulators that affect traffic more indirectly? PMID:27068964

  5. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  6. Ergosterol content specifies targeting of tail-anchored proteins to mitochondrial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Katrin; Frumkin, Idan; Herzig, Yonatan; Rimon, Nitzan; Özbalci, Cagakan; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Schuldiner, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins have a single C-terminal transmembrane domain, making their biogenesis dependent on posttranslational translocation. Despite their importance, no dedicated insertion machinery has been uncovered for mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) TA proteins. To decipher the molecular mechanisms guiding MOM TA protein insertion, we performed two independent systematic microscopic screens in which we visualized the localization of model MOM TA proteins on the background of mutants in all yeast genes. We could find no mutant in which insertion was completely blocked. However, both screens demonstrated that MOM TA proteins were partially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in ∆spf1 cells. Spf1, an ER ATPase with unknown function, is the first protein shown to affect MOM TA protein insertion. We found that ER membranes in ∆spf1 cells become similar in their ergosterol content to mitochondrial membranes. Indeed, when we visualized MOM TA protein distribution in yeast strains with reduced ergosterol content, they phenocopied the loss of Spf1. We therefore suggest that the inherent differences in membrane composition between organelle membranes are sufficient to determine membrane integration specificity in a eukaryotic cell. PMID:22918956

  7. Structural basis for membrane anchoring of HIV-1 envelope spike.

    PubMed

    Dev, Jyoti; Park, Donghyun; Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We used nuclear magnetic resonance to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An amino-terminal coiled-coil and a carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes, and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  8. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  9. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jimin Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  10. Analysis of the C-Terminal Membrane Anchor Domains of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins E1 and E2: toward a Topological Model

    PubMed Central

    Charloteaux, Benoit; Lins, Laurence; Moereels, Henri; Brasseur, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoproteins E1 and E2 should be anchored in the viral membrane by their C-terminal domains. During synthesis, they are translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen where they remain. The 31 C-terminal residues of the E1 protein and the 29 C-terminal residues of the E2 protein are implicated in the ER retention. Moreover, the E1 and E2 C termini are implicated in E1-E2 heterodimerization. We studied the E1 and E2 C-terminal sequences of 25 HCV strains in silico using molecular modeling techniques. We conclude that both C-terminal domains should adopt a similar and peculiar configuration: one amphipathic α-helix followed by a pair of transmembrane β-strands. Several three-dimensional (3-D) models were generated. After energy minimization, their ability to interact with membranes was studied using the molecular hydrophobicity potentials calculation and the IMPALA procedure. The latter simulates interactions with a membrane by a Monte Carlo minimization of energy. These methods suggest that the β-hairpins could anchor the glycoproteins in the ER membrane at least transiently. Anchoring could be stabilized by the adsorption of the nearby amphipathic α-helices at the membrane surface. The 3-D models correlate with experimental results which indicate that the E1-E2 transmembrane domains are involved in the heterodimerization and have ER retention properties. PMID:11799189

  11. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2015-12-01

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  12. An androgenic gland membrane-anchored gene associated with the crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Manor, Rivka; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Bakhrat, Anna; Abdu, Uri; Sagi, Amir

    2013-06-01

    Crustacean male sexual differentiation is governed by the androgenic gland (AG) and specifically by the secreted insulin-like AG hormone (IAG), thus far identified in several decapod species including the Australian red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (termed Cq-IAG). While a few insulin-like AG genes have been identified in crustaceans, other AG-specific genes have not been documented until now. In the present study, we describe the recent identification of a non-IAG AG-specific transcript obtained from the C. quadricarinatus AG cDNA library. This transcript, termed C. quadricarinatus membrane-anchored AG-specific factor (Cq-MAG), was fully sequenced and found to encode a putative product of 189 amino acids including a signal anchoring peptide. Expression of a recombinant GFP fusion protein lacking the signal anchor encoding sequence dramatically affected recombinant protein localization pattern. While the expression of the deleterious fusion protein was observed throughout most of the cell, the native GFP::Cq-MAG fusion protein was observed mainly surrounding the periphery of the nucleus, demonstrating an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like localization pattern. Moreover, co-expression of the wild-type Cq-MAG (fused to GFP) and the Cq-IAG hormone revealed that these peptides indeed co-localize. This study is the first to report a protein specifically associated with the insulin-like AG hormone in addition to the finding of another AG-specific transcript in crustaceans. Previous knowledge suggests that insulin/insulin-like factor secretion involves tissue-specific transcripts and membrane-anchored proteins. In this regard, Cq-MAG's tissue specificity, anchoring properties and intracellular co-localization with Cq-IAG suggest that it may play a role in the processing and secretion of this insulin-like AG hormone. PMID:23470660

  13. Monitoring Lipid Anchor Organization in Cell Membranes by PIE-FCCS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the dynamic co-localization of lipid-anchored fluorescent proteins in living cells using pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS) and fluorescence lifetime analysis. Specifically, we look at the pairwise co-localization of anchors from lymphocyte cell kinase (LCK: myristoyl, palmitoyl, palmitoyl), RhoA (geranylgeranyl), and K-Ras (farnesyl) proteins in different cell types. In Jurkat cells, a density-dependent increase in cross-correlation among RhoA anchors is observed, while LCK anchors exhibit a more moderate increase and broader distribution. No correlation was detected among K-Ras anchors or between any of the different anchor types studied. Fluorescence lifetime data reveal no significant Förster resonance energy transfer in any of the data. In COS 7 cells, minimal correlation was detected among LCK or RhoA anchors. Taken together, these observations suggest that some lipid anchors take part in anchor-specific co-clustering with other existing clusters of native proteins and lipids in the membrane. Importantly, these observations do not support a simple interpretation of lipid anchor-mediated organization driven by partitioning based on binary lipid phase separation. PMID:22631607

  14. Effects of GPI-anchored TNAP on the dynamic structure of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A F; Simão, A M S; Bolean, M; Hoylaerts, M F; Millán, J L; Ciancaglini, P; Costa-Filho, A J

    2015-10-21

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) plays a crucial role during skeletal mineralization, and TNAP deficiency leads to the soft bone disease hypophosphatasia. TNAP is anchored to the external surface of the plasma membranes by means of a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. Membrane-anchored and solubilized TNAP displays different kinetic properties against physiological substrates, indicating that membrane anchoring influences the enzyme function. Here, we used Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements along with spin labeled phospholipids to probe the possible dynamic changes prompted by the interaction of GPI-anchored TNAP with model membranes. The goal was to systematically analyze the ESR data in terms of line shape changes and of alterations in parameters such as rotational diffusion rates and order parameters obtained from non-linear least-squares simulations of the ESR spectra of probes incorporated into DPPC liposomes and proteoliposomes. Overall, the presence of TNAP increased the dynamics and decreased the ordering in the three distinct regions probed by the spin labeled lipids DOPTC (headgroup), and 5- and 16-PCSL (acyl chains). The largest change was observed for 16-PCSL, thus suggesting that GPI-anchored TNAP can give rise to long reaching modifications that could influence membrane processes halfway through the bilayer. PMID:26389140

  15. Simulations of a Membrane-Anchored Peptide: Structure, Dynamics, and Influence on Bilayer Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten Ø.; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Peters, Günther H.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional structure of a model decapeptide is obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations of the peptide in explicit water. Interactions between an N-myristoylated form of the folded peptide anchored to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine fluid phase lipid membranes are studied at different applied surface tensions by molecular dynamics simulations. The lipid membrane environment influences the conformational space explored by the peptide. The overall secondary structure of the anchored peptide is found to deviate at times from its structure in aqueous solution through reversible conformational transitions. The peptide is, despite the anchor, highly mobile at the membrane surface with the peptide motion along the bilayer normal being integrated into the collective modes of the membrane. Peptide anchoring moderately alters the lateral compressibility of the bilayer by changing the equilibrium area of the membrane. Although membrane anchoring moderately affects the elastic properties of the bilayer, the model peptide studied here exhibits conformational flexibility and our results therefore suggest that peptide acylation is a feasible way to reinforce peptide-membrane interactions whereby, e.g., the lifetime of receptor-ligand interactions can be prolonged. PMID:15189854

  16. Inhibitors of Protein Translocation Across the ER Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Römisch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) constitutes the first step of protein secretion. ER protein import is essential in all eukaryotic cells and is particularly critical in fast-growing tumour cells. Thus, the process can serve as target both for potential cancer drugs and for bacterial virulence factors. Inhibitors of protein transport across the ER membrane range from broad-spectrum to highly substrate-specific and can interfere with virtually any stage of this multistep process, and even with transport of endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for cross-presentation. PMID:26122014

  17. Arv1 regulates PM and ER membrane structure and homeostasis but is dispensable for intracellular sterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander G.; Johansen, Jesper; Ramanathan, Vidhya D.; Sere, Yves Y.; Beh, Christopher T.; Menon, Anant K.

    2013-01-01

    The pan-eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein Arv1 has been suggested to play a role in intracellular sterol transport. We tested this proposal by comparing sterol traffic in wild-type and Arv1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We used fluorescence microscopy to track the retrograde movement of exogenously supplied dehydroergosterol (DHE) from the plasma membrane (PM) to the ER and lipid droplets and high performance liquid chromatography to quantify, in parallel, the transport-coupled formation of DHE esters. Metabolic labeling and subcellular fractionation were used to assay anterograde transport of ergosterol from the ER to the PM. We report that sterol transport between the ER and PM is unaffected by Arv1 deficiency. Instead, our results indicate differences in ER morphology and the organization of the PM lipid bilayer between wild-type and arv1Δ cells suggesting a distinct role for Arv1 in membrane homeostasis. In arv1Δ cells, specific defects affecting single C-terminal transmembrane domain proteins suggest that Arv1 might regulate membrane insertion of tail-anchored proteins involved in membrane homoeostasis. PMID:23668914

  18. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1-E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. PMID:24725935

  19. Maleimide-functionalized lipids that anchor polypeptides to lipid bilayers and membranes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J T; Prestwich, G D

    2000-01-01

    Two maleimide-containing diacylglycerol derivatives were synthesized to permit the anchoring of short peptides and longer polypeptides to phospholipid bilayers and membranes. The maleimide was introduced at the site normally occupied by a phospholipid headgroup. The first lipid, the dipalmitoyl ester of 1-maleimido-2,3-propanediol, was developed as a membrane anchor for extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins. The second anchoring lipid, in which the 3-position contained a 6-aminohexanoate, was designed for convenient modification with amine-reactive reporter groups. Specifically, the NBD fluorophore, 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-aminohexanoic-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, was attached to give an fluorescent anchoring reagent. Next, these reagents were applied to the anchoring of a C-terminally cysteamine-modified 8 kDa polypeptide that comprises the extracellular N-terminal domain of the human thrombin receptor, a transmembrane protease-activated receptor (PAR-1). Gel filtration and fluorescence analysis showed that the fluorescent lipopolypeptide spontaneously inserted into preformed phospholipid vesicles, but it did not insert into whole cell membranes. In contrast, the dipalmitoyl derivative could only be reconstituted into artificial membranes by mixing the lipopolypeptide and phospholipid before vesicle formation. These results suggest that biophysical interactions governing the lipopolypeptide insertion into artificial and cellular membranes may differ. The thiol-reactive lipidating reagents should be valuable materials for studying the structure and function of peptides and polypeptides at phospholipid bilayer surfaces. PMID:11087332

  20. Vacuolar SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains Serve as Nonspecific Membrane Anchors with Unequal Roles in Lipid Mixing*

    PubMed Central

    Pieren, Michel; Desfougères, Yann; Michaillat, Lydie; Schmidt, Andrea; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is induced by SNARE complexes that are anchored in both fusion partners. SNAREs zipper up from the N to C terminus bringing the two membranes into close apposition. Their transmembrane domains (TMDs) might be mere anchoring devices, deforming bilayers by mechanical force. Structural studies suggested that TMDs might also perturb lipid structure by undergoing conformational transitions or by zipping up into the bilayer. Here, we tested this latter hypothesis, which predicts that the activity of SNAREs should depend on the primary sequence of their TMDs. We replaced the TMDs of all vacuolar SNAREs (Nyv1, Vam3, and Vti1) by a lipid anchor, by a TMD from a protein unrelated to the membrane fusion machinery, or by artificial leucine-valine sequences. Individual exchange of the native SNARE TMDs against an unrelated transmembrane anchor or an artificial leucine-valine sequence yielded normal fusion activities. Fusion activity was also preserved upon pairwise exchange of the TMDs against unrelated peptides, which eliminates the possibility for specific TMD-TMD interactions. Thus, a specific primary sequence or zippering beyond the SNARE domains is not a prerequisite for fusion. Lipid-anchored Vti1 was fully active, and lipid-anchored Nyv1 permitted the reaction to proceed up to hemifusion, and lipid-anchored Vam3 interfered already before hemifusion. The unequal contribution of proteinaceous TMDs on Vam3 and Nyv1 suggests that Q- and R-SNAREs might make different contributions to the hemifusion intermediate and the opening of the fusion pore. Furthermore, our data support the view that SNARE TMDs serve as nonspecific membrane anchors in vacuole fusion. PMID:25817997

  1. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Czapiewski, Rafal; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature aging progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are (1) weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and (2) disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both. PMID:27200088

  2. The Crystal Structures of Yeast Get3 Suggest a Mechanism for Tail-Anchored Protein Membrane Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Junbin; Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Denic, Vlad; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-08-16

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins that contain a single C-terminal transmembrane helix. The post-translational insertion of the yeast TA proteins into the ER membrane requires the Golgi ER trafficking (GET) complex which contains Get1, Get2 and Get3. Get3 is an ATPase that recognizes and binds the C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of the TA proteins. We have determined the crystal structures of Get3 from two yeast species, S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii, respectively. These high resolution crystal structures show that Get3 contains a nucleotide-binding domain and a 'finger' domain for binding the TA protein TMD. A large hydrophobic groove on the finger domain of S. cerevisiae Get3 structure might represent the binding site for TMD of TA proteins. A hydrophobic helix from a symmetry-related Get3 molecule sits in the TMD-binding groove and mimics the TA binding scenario. Interestingly, the crystal structures of the Get3 dimers from S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii exhibit distinct conformations. The S. cerevisiae Get3 dimer structure does not contain nucleotides and maintains an 'open' conformation, while the D. hansenii Get3 dimer structure binds ADP and stays in a 'closed' conformation. We propose that the conformational changes to switch the Get3 between the open and closed conformations may facilitate the membrane insertions for TA proteins.

  3. The structural basis of tail-anchored membrane protein recognition by Get3

    SciTech Connect

    Mateja, Agnieszka; Szlachcic, Anna; Downing, Maureen E.; Dobosz, Malgorzata; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2009-10-05

    Targeting of newly synthesized membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum is an essential cellular process. Most membrane proteins are recognized and targeted co-translationally by the signal recognition particle. However, nearly 5% of membrane proteins are 'tail-anchored' by a single carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain that cannot access the co-translational pathway. Instead, tail-anchored proteins are targeted post-translationally by a conserved ATPase termed Get3. The mechanistic basis for tail-anchored protein recognition or targeting by Get3 is not known. Here we present crystal structures of yeast Get3 in 'open' (nucleotide-free) and 'closed' (ADP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -}-bound) dimer states. In the closed state, the dimer interface of Get3 contains an enormous hydrophobic groove implicated by mutational analyses in tail-anchored protein binding. In the open state, Get3 undergoes a striking rearrangement that disrupts the groove and shields its hydrophobic surfaces. These data provide a molecular mechanism for nucleotide-regulated binding and release of tail-anchored proteins during their membrane targeting by Get3.

  4. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  5. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome. PMID:24078306

  6. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  7. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  8. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  9. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here, we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase, nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  10. Site-specific Proteolysis Mobilizes TorsinA from the Membrane of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) in Response to ER Stress and B Cell Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenguang; Brown, Rebecca S H; Tang, Chih-Hang Anthony; Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew; Schlieker, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Torsin ATPases are the only representatives of the AAA+ ATPase family that reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear envelope. Two of these, TorsinA and TorsinB, are anchored to the ER membrane by virtue of an N-terminal hydrophobic domain. Here we demonstrate that the imposition of ER stress leads to a proteolytic cleavage event that selectively removes the hydrophobic domain from the AAA+ domain of TorsinA, which retains catalytic activity. Both the pharmacological inhibition profile and the identified cleavage site between two juxtaposed cysteine residues are distinct from those of presently known proteases, suggesting that a hitherto uncharacterized, membrane-associated protease accounts for TorsinA processing. This processing occurs not only in stress-exposed cell lines but also in primary cells from distinct organisms including stimulated B cells, indicating that Torsin conversion in response to physiologically relevant stimuli is an evolutionarily conserved process. By establishing 5-nitroisatin as a cell-permeable inhibitor for Torsin processing, we provide the methodological framework for interfering with Torsin processing in a wide range of primary cells without the need for genetic manipulation. PMID:26953341

  11. Lipocarbazole, an efficient lipid peroxidation inhibitor anchored in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Gabin; Hänchen, Anne; Calliste, Claude-Alain; Berka, Karel; Banala, Srinivas; Otyepka, Michal; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Trouillas, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major deleterious effect caused by oxidative stress. It is involved in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. In order to inhibit lipid peroxidation, antioxidants must efficiently scavenge free radicals and penetrate inside biological membranes. Lipocarbazole has recently been shown to be a powerful antioxidant in solution. Here, we show its powerful capacity as lipid peroxidation inhibitor. Its mechanism of action is rationalized based on molecular dynamics simulations on a biomembrane model, quantum calculations and experimental evaluation. The role of the lipocarbazole side chain is particularly highlighted as a critical chemical feature responsible for its antioxidant activity. PMID:26068016

  12. Neurotactin, a membrane-anchored chemokine upregulated in brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Lloyd, C; Zhou, H; Dolich, S; Deeds, J; Gonzalo, J A; Vath, J; Gosselin, M; Ma, J; Dussault, B; Woolf, E; Alperin, G; Culpepper, J; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Gearing, D

    1997-06-01

    Chemokines are small secreted proteins that stimulate the directional migration of leukocytes and mediate inflammation. During screening of a murine choroid plexus complementary DNA library, we identified a new chemokine, designated neurotactin. Unlike other chemokines, neurotactin has a unique cysteine pattern, Cys-X-X-X-Cys, and is predicted to be a type 1 membrane protein. Full-length recombinant neurotactin is localized on the surface of transfected 293 cells. Recombinant neurotactin containing the chemokine domain is chemotactic for neutrophils both in vitro and in vivo. Neurotactin messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in normal murine brain and its protein expression in activated brain microglia is upregulated in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, as well as in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide. Distinct from all other chemokine genes, the neurotactin gene is localized to human chromosome 16q. Consequently we propose that neurotactin represents a new delta-chemokine family and that it may play a role in brain inflammation processes. PMID:9177350

  13. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenases reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  14. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah C; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenase reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  15. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  16. Selective and programmed cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface membrane by phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra; Klöppel, Christine; Smith-Valentine, Megan; Van Houten, Judith; Simon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many surface proteins of eukaryotic cells are tethered to the membrane by a GPI-anchor which is enzymatically cleavable. Here, we investigate cleavage and release of different GPI-proteins by phospholipase C from the outer membrane of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. Our data indicate that different GPI-proteins are not equally cleaved as proteins of the surface antigen family are preferentially released in vitro compared to several smaller GPI-proteins. Likewise, the analysis of culture medium indicates exclusive in vivo release of surface antigens by two phospholipase C isoforms (PLC2 and PLC6). This suggests that phospholipase C shows affinity for select groups of GPI-anchored proteins. Our data also reveal an up-regulation of PLC isoforms in GPI-anchored protein cleavage during antigenic switching. As a consequence, silencing of these PLCs leads to a drastic decrease of antigen concentration in the medium. These results suggest a higher order of GPI-regulation by phospholipase C as cleavage occurs programmed and specific for single GPI-proteins instead of an unspecific shedding of the entire surface membrane GPI-content. PMID:22024023

  17. Influence of Trifluoroethanol on Membrane Interfacial Anchoring Interactions of Transmembrane α-Helical Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Özdirekcan, Suat; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Raja, Mobeen; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial anchoring interactions between aromatic amino acid residues and the lipid-water interface are believed to be important determinants for membrane protein structure and function. Thus, it is possible that molecules that partition into the lipid-water interface can influence membrane protein activity simply by interfering with these anchoring interactions. Here we tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) on the interaction of a Trp-flanked synthetic transmembrane peptide (acetyl-GW2(LA)8LW2A-NH2) with model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Two striking observations were made. First, using 2H nuclear magnetic resonance on acyl chain deuterated lipids, we found that addition of 4 or 8 vol % of TFE completely abolishes the ability of the peptide to order and stretch the lipid acyl chains in these relatively thin bilayers. Second, we observed that addition of 8 vol % TFE reduces the tilt angle of the peptide from 5.3° to 2.5°, as measured by 2H NMR on Ala-d4 labeled peptides. The “straightening” of the peptide was accompanied by an increased exposure of Trp to the aqueous phase, as shown by Trp-fluorescence quenching experiments using acrylamide. The observation of a reduced tilt angle was surprising because we also found that TFE partioning results in a significant thinning of the membrane, which would increase the extent of hydrophobic mismatch. In contrast to the Trp-flanked peptide, no effect of TFE was observed on the interaction of a Lys-flanked analog (acetyl-GK2(LA)8LK2A-NH2) with the lipid bilayer. These results emphasize the importance of interfacial anchoring interactions for membrane organization and provide new insights into how molecules such as TFE that can act as anesthetics may affect the behavior of membrane proteins that are enriched in aromatic amino acids at the lipid-water interface. PMID:17905843

  18. Quality control of nonstop membrane proteins at the ER membrane and in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Shunsuke; Yunoki, Kaori; Izawa, Toshiaki; Tamura, Yasushi; Nishikawa, Shuh-Ichi; Endo, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Since messenger RNAs without a stop codon (nonstop mRNAs) for organelle-targeted proteins and their translation products (nonstop proteins) generate clogged translocon channels as well as stalled ribosomes, cells have mechanisms to degrade nonstop mRNAs and nonstop proteins and to clear the translocons (e.g. the Sec61 complex) by release of nonstop proteins into the organellar lumen. Here we followed the fate of nonstop endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins with different membrane topologies in yeast to evaluate the importance of the Ltn1-dependent cytosolic degradation and the Dom34-dependent release of the nonstop membrane proteins. Ltn1-dependent degradation differed for membrane proteins with different topologies and its failure did not affect ER protein import or cell growth. On the other hand, failure in the Dom34-dependent release of the nascent polypeptide from the ribosome led to the block of the Sec61 channel and resultant inhibition of other protein import into the ER caused cell growth defects. Therefore, the nascent chain release from the translation apparatus is more instrumental in clearance of the clogged ER translocon channel and thus maintenance of normal cellular functions. PMID:27481473

  19. Quality control of nonstop membrane proteins at the ER membrane and in the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Shunsuke; Yunoki, Kaori; Izawa, Toshiaki; Tamura, Yasushi; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Endo, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Since messenger RNAs without a stop codon (nonstop mRNAs) for organelle-targeted proteins and their translation products (nonstop proteins) generate clogged translocon channels as well as stalled ribosomes, cells have mechanisms to degrade nonstop mRNAs and nonstop proteins and to clear the translocons (e.g. the Sec61 complex) by release of nonstop proteins into the organellar lumen. Here we followed the fate of nonstop endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins with different membrane topologies in yeast to evaluate the importance of the Ltn1-dependent cytosolic degradation and the Dom34-dependent release of the nonstop membrane proteins. Ltn1-dependent degradation differed for membrane proteins with different topologies and its failure did not affect ER protein import or cell growth. On the other hand, failure in the Dom34-dependent release of the nascent polypeptide from the ribosome led to the block of the Sec61 channel and resultant inhibition of other protein import into the ER caused cell growth defects. Therefore, the nascent chain release from the translation apparatus is more instrumental in clearance of the clogged ER translocon channel and thus maintenance of normal cellular functions. PMID:27481473

  20. A conserved archaeal pathway for tail-anchored membrane protein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, John; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Dominik, Pawel; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins are inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum by a post-translational TRC40 pathway, but no comparable pathway is known in other domains of life. The crystal structure of an archaebacterial TRC40 sequence homolog bound to ADP•AlF4− reveals characteristic features of eukaryotic TRC40 including a zinc-mediated dimer and a large hydrophobic groove. Moreover, archaeal TRC40 interacts with the transmembrane domain of TA substrates and directs their membrane insertion. Thus, the TRC40 pathway is more broadly conserved than previously recognized. PMID:21658170

  1. Membrane-Induced Structural Rearrangement and Identification of a Novel Membrane Anchor in Talin F2F3

    PubMed Central

    Arcario, Mark J.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Experimental challenges associated with characterization of the membrane-bound form of talin have prevented us from understanding the molecular mechanism of its membrane-dependent integrin activation. Here, utilizing what we believe to be a novel membrane mimetic model, we present a reproducible model of membrane-bound talin observed across multiple independent simulations. We characterize both local and global membrane-induced structural transitions that successfully reconcile discrepancies between biochemical and structural studies and provide insight into how talin might modulate integrin function. Membrane binding of talin, captured in unbiased simulations, proceeds through three distinct steps: initial electrostatic recruitment of the F2 subdomain to anionic lipids via several basic residues; insertion of an initially buried, conserved hydrophobic anchor into the membrane; and association of the F3 subdomain with the membrane surface through a large, interdomain conformational change. These latter two steps, to our knowledge, have not been observed or described previously. Electrostatic analysis shows talin F2F3 to be highly polarized, with a highly positive underside, which we attribute to the initial electrostatic recruitment, and a negative top face, which can help orient the protein optimally with respect to the membrane, thereby reducing the number of unproductive membrane collision events. PMID:25418091

  2. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points. PMID:26723621

  3. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  4. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol-lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J.; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways, downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol, that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG-lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a “molecular rod”, namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Application of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques reveals that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG-lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit displayed at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG-lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of PKC translocation from cytosol to membranes induced by the molecular-rod DAG-lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side-residues of DAG-lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions and in that fashion may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands. PMID:19961537

  5. SMN affects membrane remodelling and anchoring of the protein synthesis machinery.

    PubMed

    Gabanella, Francesca; Pisani, Cinzia; Borreca, Antonella; Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Onori, Annalisa; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Corbi, Nicoletta; Canu, Nadia; Monaco, Lucia; Passananti, Claudio; Di Certo, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-15

    Disconnection between membrane signalling and actin networks can have catastrophic effects depending on cell size and polarity. The survival motor neuron (SMN) protein is ubiquitously involved in assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Other SMN functions could, however, affect cellular activities driving asymmetrical cell surface expansions. Genes able to mitigate SMN deficiency operate within pathways in which SMN can act, such as mRNA translation, actin network and endocytosis. Here, we found that SMN accumulates at membrane protrusions during the dynamic rearrangement of the actin filaments. In addition to localization data, we show that SMN interacts with caveolin-1, which mediates anchoring of translation machinery components. Importantly, SMN deficiency depletes the plasma membrane of ribosomes, and this correlates with the failure of fibroblasts to extend membrane protrusions. These findings strongly support a relationship between SMN and membrane dynamics. We propose that SMN could assembly translational platforms associated with and governed by the plasma membrane. This activity could be crucial in cells that have an exacerbated interdependence of membrane remodelling and local protein synthesis. PMID:26743087

  6. Membrane anchoring stabilizes and favors secretion of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase.

    PubMed

    González, Lisandro J; Bahr, Guillermo; Nakashige, Toshiki G; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J

    2016-07-01

    Carbapenems, 'last-resort' β-lactam antibiotics, are inactivated by zinc-dependent metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The host innate immune response withholds nutrient metal ions from microbial pathogens by releasing metal-chelating proteins such as calprotectin. We show that metal sequestration is detrimental for the accumulation of MBLs in the bacterial periplasm, because those enzymes are readily degraded in their nonmetallated form. However, the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) can persist under conditions of metal depletion. NDM-1 is a lipidated protein that anchors to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Membrane anchoring contributes to the unusual stability of NDM-1 and favors secretion of this enzyme in outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs containing NDM-1 can protect nearby populations of bacteria from otherwise lethal antibiotic levels, and OMVs from clinical pathogens expressing NDM-1 can carry this MBL and the blaNDM gene. We show that protein export into OMVs can be targeted, providing possibilities of new antibacterial therapeutic strategies. PMID:27182662

  7. Induction of stable ER-plasma-membrane junctions by Kv2.1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Akin, Elizabeth J; Seel, Peter J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    Junctions between cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and the plasma membrane are a subtle but ubiquitous feature in mammalian cells; however, very little is known about the functions and molecular interactions that are associated with neuronal ER-plasma-membrane junctions. Here, we report that Kv2.1 (also known as KCNB1), the primary delayed-rectifier K(+) channel in the mammalian brain, induces the formation of ER-plasma-membrane junctions. Kv2.1 localizes to dense, cell-surface clusters that contain non-conducting channels, indicating that they have a function that is unrelated to membrane-potential regulation. Accordingly, Kv2.1 clusters function as membrane-trafficking hubs, providing platforms for delivery and retrieval of multiple membrane proteins. Using both total internal reflection fluorescence and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the clustered Kv2.1 plays a direct structural role in the induction of stable ER-plasma-membrane junctions in both transfected HEK 293 cells and cultured hippocampal neurons. Glutamate exposure results in a loss of Kv2.1 clusters in neurons and subsequent retraction of the cER from the plasma membrane. We propose Kv2.1-induced ER-plasma-membrane junctions represent a new macromolecular plasma-membrane complex that is sensitive to excitotoxic insult and functions as a scaffolding site for both membrane trafficking and Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:25908859

  8. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  9. New insights into the targeting of a sub-set of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins that are defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Nout-Cin orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA p...

  10. Solid-state NMR Study of the YadA Membrane-Anchor Domain in the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shakeel A; Nagaraj, Madhu; Chauhan, Nandini; Franks, Trent W; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Habeck, Michael; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Linke, Dirk; van Rossum, Barth-J

    2015-10-19

    MAS-NMR was used to study the structure and dynamics at ambient temperatures of the membrane-anchor domain of YadA (YadA-M) in a pellet of the outer membrane of E. coli in which it was expressed. YadA is an adhesin from the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica that is involved in interactions with the host cell, and it is a model protein for studying the autotransport process. Existing assignments were sucessfully transferred to a large part of the YadA-M protein in the E. coli lipid environment by using (13) C-(13) C DARR and PDSD spectra at different mixing times. The chemical shifts in most regions of YadA-M are unchanged relative to those in microcrystalline YadA-M preparations from which a structure has previously been solved, including the ASSA region that is proposed to be involved in transition-state hairpin formation for transport of the soluble domain. Comparisons of the dynamics between the microcrystalline and membrane-embedded samples indicate greater flexibility of the ASSA region in the outer-membrane preparation at physiological temperatures. This study will pave the way towards MAS-NMR structure determination of membrane proteins, and a better understanding of functionally important dynamic residues in native membrane environments. PMID:26332158

  11. STIM1 Is a Novel Component of ER-Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Agaisse, Hervé; Derré, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Productive developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis depends on the interaction of the replicative vacuole, named the inclusion, with cellular organelles. We have recently reported the formation of ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites (MCSs), where the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is in apposition to the inclusion membrane. These platforms contain the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane protein IncD, the mammalian ceramide transfer protein CERT and the ER resident proteins VAPA/B and were proposed to play a role in the non-vesicular trafficking of lipids to the inclusion. Here, we identify STIM1 as a novel component of ER-Inclusion MCSs. STIM1, an ER calcium (Ca2+) sensor that relocate to ER-Plasma Membrane (PM) MCSs upon Ca2+ store depletion, associated with C. trachomatis inclusion. STIM1, but not the general ER markers Rtn3C and Sec61ß, was enriched at the inclusion membrane. Ultra-structural studies demonstrated that STIM1 localized to ER-Inclusion MCSs. Time-course experiments showed that STIM1, CERT and VAPB co-localized throughout the developmental cycle. By contrast, Orai1, the PM Ca2+ channel that interacts with STIM1 at ER-PM MCSs, did not associate with C. trachomatis inclusion. Upon ER Ca2+ store depletion, a pool of STIM1 relocated to ER-PM MCSs, while the existing ER-Inclusion MCSs remained enriched in STIM1. Finally, we have identified the CAD domain, which mediates STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as the minimal domain required for STIM1 enrichment at ER-Inclusion MCSs. Altogether this study identifies STIM1 as a novel component of ER-C. trachomatis inclusion MCSs. We discuss the potential role(s) of STIM1 during the infection process. PMID:25915399

  12. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 is expressed in intestinal ER.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Shadab A; Mahan, James; Siddiqi, Shahzad; Gorelick, Fred S; Mansbach, Charles M

    2006-03-01

    Intestinal dietary triacylglycerol absorption is a multi-step process. Triacylglycerol exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the rate-limiting step in the progress of the lipid from its apical absorption to its basolateral membrane export. Triacylglycerol is transported from the ER to the cis Golgi in a specialized vesicle, the pre-chylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV). The vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) was found to be more concentrated on PCTVs compared with ER membranes. VAMP7 has been previously identified associated with post-Golgi sites in eukaryotes. To examine the potential role of VAMP7 in PCTV trafficking, antibodies were generated that identified a 25 kDa band consistent with VAMP7 but did not crossreact with VAMP1,2. VAMP7 was concentrated on intestinal ER by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the ER proteins Sar1 and rBet1 were present on PCTVs and colocalized with VAMP7. Iodixanol gradient centrifugation showed VAMP7 to be isodense with ER and endosomes. Although VAMP7 localized to intestinal ER, it was not present in the ER of liver and kidney. Anti-VAMP7 antibodies reduced the transfer of triacylglycerol, but not newly synthesized proteins, from the ER to the Golgi by 85%. We conclude that VAMP7 is enriched in intestinal ER and that it plays a functional role in the delivery of triacylglycerol from the ER to the Golgi. PMID:16495485

  13. The mechanism of membrane-associated steps in tail-anchored protein insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Mateja, Agnieszka; Dobosz, Malgorzata; Bove, Elia; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2012-06-19

    Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins destined for the endoplasmic reticulum are chaperoned by cytosolic targeting factors that deliver them to a membrane receptor for insertion. Although a basic framework for TA protein recognition is now emerging, the decisive targeting and membrane insertion steps are not understood. Here we reconstitute the TA protein insertion cycle with purified components, present crystal structures of key complexes between these components and perform mutational analyses based on the structures. We show that a committed targeting complex, formed by a TA protein bound to the chaperone ATPase Get3, is initially recruited to the membrane through an interaction with Get2. Once the targeting complex has been recruited, Get1 interacts with Get3 to drive TA protein release in an ATPase-dependent reaction. After releasing its TA protein cargo, the now-vacant Get3 recycles back to the cytosol concomitant with ATP binding. This work provides a detailed structural and mechanistic framework for the minimal TA protein insertion cycle.

  14. Discovery of Dual-Action Membrane-Anchored Modulators of Incretin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Chinnapen, Daniel; Beinborn, Martin; Lencer, Wayne; Kopin, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors are considered complementary therapeutic targets for type 2 diabetes. Using recombinant membrane-tethered ligand (MTL) technology, the present study focused on defining optimized modulators of these receptors, as well as exploring how local anchoring influences soluble peptide function. Methodology/Principal Findings Serial substitution of residue 7 in membrane-tethered GIP (tGIP) led to a wide range of activities at the GIP receptor, with [G7]tGIP showing enhanced efficacy compared to the wild type construct. In contrast, introduction of G7 into the related ligands, tGLP-1 and tethered exendin-4 (tEXE4), did not affect signaling at the cognate GLP-1 receptor. Both soluble and tethered GIP and GLP-1 were selective activators of their respective receptors. Although soluble EXE4 is highly selective for the GLP-1 receptor, unexpectedly, tethered EXE4 was found to be a potent activator of both the GLP-1 and GIP receptors. Diverging from the pharmacological properties of soluble and tethered GIP, the newly identified GIP-R agonists, (i.e. [G7]tGIP and tEXE4) failed to trigger cognate receptor endocytosis. In an attempt to recapitulate the dual agonism observed with tEXE4, we conjugated soluble EXE4 to a lipid moiety. Not only did this soluble peptide activate both the GLP-1 and GIP receptors but, when added to receptor expressing cells, the activity persists despite serial washes. Conclusions These findings suggest that conversion of a recombinant MTL to a soluble membrane anchored equivalent offers a means to prolong ligand function, as well as to design agonists that can simultaneously act on more than one therapeutic target. PMID:21935440

  15. Calpain cleavage of the B isoform of Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase separates the catalytic domain from the membrane anchoring domain.

    PubMed Central

    Pattni, Krupa; Millard, Thomas H; Banting, George

    2003-01-01

    Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] is one of the key intracellular second messengers in cells and mobilizes Ca2+ stores in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). Ins(1,4,5)P3 has a short half-life within the cell, and is rapidly metabolized through one of two pathways, one of which involves further phosphorylation of the inositol ring: Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase (IP3-3K) phosphorylates Ins(1,4,5)P3, resulting in the formation of inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4]. There are three known isoforms of IP3-3K, designated IP3-3KA, IP3-3KB and IP3-3KC. These have differing N-termini, but highly conserved C-termini harbouring the catalytic domain. The three IP3-3K isoforms have different subcellular locations and the B-kinase is uniquely present in both cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. As it is the N-terminus of the B-kinase that differs most from the A- and C-kinases, we have hypothesized that this portion of the protein may be responsible for membrane localization. Although there are no known membrane-targeting protein motifs within the sequence of IP3-3KB, it is found to be tightly associated with the ER membrane. Here, we show that specific regions of the N-terminus of IP3-3KB are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane localization of the protein. We also report that, in the presence of Ca2+, the kinase domain of IP3-3KB is cleaved from the membrane-anchoring region by calpain. PMID:12906709

  16. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  17. Insertion stability of poly(ethylene glycol)-cholesteryl-based lipid anchors in liposome membranes.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Daniel; Linders, Jürgen; Mayer, Christian; Schubert, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Liposomes consist of a hydrophilic core surrounded by a phospholipid (PL) bilayer. In human blood, the half-life of such artificial vesicles is limited. To prolong their stability in the circulation, liposomal bilayers can be modified by inserting poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules using either PL or sterols as membrane anchors. This establishes a hydrophilic steric barrier, reducing the adsorption of serum proteins, recognition and elimination by cells of the immune system. In addition, targeting ligands (such as antibodies) are frequently coupled to the distal end of the PEG chains to direct the vesicles (then called 'immuno-liposomes') to specific cell types, such as tumor cells. To our knowledge, experiments on the stability of ligand anchoring have so far only been conducted with PL-based PEGs and not with sterol-based PEGs after insertion via the sterol-based post-insertion technique (SPIT). Therefore, our study examines the insertion stability of PEG-cholesteryl ester (Chol-PEG) molecules with PEG chains of 1000, 1500 and 2000Da molecular mass which have been inserted into the membranes of liposomes using SPIT. For this study we used different acceptor media and multiple analytical techniques, including pulsed-field-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR), free-flow electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The obtained data consistently showed that a higher molar mass of PEG chains positively correlates with higher release from the liposome membranes. Furthermore, we could detect and quantify the migration of Chol-PEG molecules from radioactively double-labeled surface-modified liposomes to negatively charged acceptor liposomes via free-flow electrophoresis. Insertion of Chol-PEG molecules into the membrane of preformed liposomes using SPIT is an essential step for the functionalization of liposomes with the aim of specific targeting. For the first time, we present a kinetic analysis of this insertion process using PFG

  18. Structural and genetic analyses reveal the protein SepF as a new membrane anchor for the Z ring

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Ramona; Ishikawa, Shu; Celik, Ilkay; Strahl, Henrik; Ogasawara, Naotake; Troc, Paulina; Löwe, Jan; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2013-01-01

    A key step in bacterial cell division is the polymerization of the tubulin homolog FtsZ at midcell. FtsZ polymers are anchored to the cell membrane by FtsA and are required for the assembly of all other cell division proteins. In Gram-positive and cyanobacteria, FtsZ filaments are aligned by the protein SepF, which in vitro polymerizes into large rings that bundle FtsZ filaments. Here we describe the crystal structure of the only globular domain of SepF, located within the C-terminal region. Two-hybrid data revealed that this domain comprises the FtsZ binding site, and EM analyses showed that it is sufficient for ring formation, which is explained by the filaments in the crystals of SepF. Site-directed mutagenesis, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that dimers form the basic units of SepF filaments. High-resolution structured illumination microscopy suggested that SepF is membrane associated, and it turned out that purified SepF not only binds to lipid membranes, but also recruits FtsZ. Further genetic and biochemical analyses showed that an amphipathic helix at the N terminus functions as the membrane-binding domain, making SepF a unique membrane anchor for the FtsZ ring. This clarifies why Bacillus subtilis grows without FtsA or the putative membrane anchor EzrA and why bacteria lacking FtsA contain SepF homologs. Both FtsA and SepF use an amphipathic helix for membrane binding. These helices prefer positively curved membranes due to relaxed lipid density; therefore this type of membrane anchor may assist in keeping the Z ring positioned at the strongly curved leading edge of the developing septum. PMID:24218584

  19. Effect of anchor positioning on binding and diffusion of elongated 3D DNA nanostructures on lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskaia, Alena; Franquelim, Henri G.; Petrov, Eugene P.; Schwille, Petra

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the fabrication of nano-objects with defined shapes, to which functional moieties, such as lipophilic anchors, can be attached with a nanometre scale precision. Although binding of DNA origami to lipid membranes has been extensively demonstrated, the specific requirements necessary for membrane attachment are greatly overlooked. Here, we designed a set of amphipathic rectangular-shaped DNA origami structures with varying placement and number of chol-TEG anchors used for membrane attachment. Single- and multiple-cholesteryl-modified origami nanostructures were produced and studied in terms of their membrane localization, density and dynamics. We show that the positioning of at least two chol-TEG moieties near the corners is essential to ensure efficient membrane binding of large DNA nanostructures. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data further confirm that increasing the number of corner-positioned chol-TEG anchors lowers the dynamics of flat DNA origami structures on freestanding membranes. Taken together, our approach provides the first evidence of the importance of the location in addition to the number of hydrophobic moieties when rationally designing minimal DNA nanostructures with controlled membrane binding.

  20. Covalent binding and anchoring of cytochrome c to mitochondrial mimetic membranes promoted by cholesterol carboxyaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Appolinário, Patricia P; Mugnol, Katia C U; Bloch, Carlos; Nantes, Iseli L; Di Mascio, Paolo; Miyamoto, Sayuri

    2013-10-21

    Mitochondrial cholesterol has been reported to be increased under specific pathological conditions associated with enhanced oxidative stress parameters. In this scenario, cholesterol oxidation would be increased, leading to the production of reactive aldehydes, including cholesterol carboxyaldehyde (ChAld). By using SDS micelles as a mitochondrial mimetic model, we have demonstrated that ChAld covalently modifies cytochrome c (cytc), a protein known to participate in electron transport and apoptosis signaling. This mimetic model induces changes in cytc structure in the same way as mitochondrial membranes do. Tryptic digestion of the cytc-ChAld adduct followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses revealed that modifications occur at Lys residues (K22) localized at cytc site L, a site involved in protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. Interestingly, ChAld ligation prevented cytc detachment from liposomes even under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, it can be concluded that ChAld ligation to Lys residues at site L creates a hydrophobic tail at cytc, which promotes cytc anchoring to the membrane. Although not investigated in detail in this study, cytc adduction to cholesterol derived aldehydes could have implications in cytc release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. PMID:24059586

  1. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  2. A novel import route for an N-anchor mitochondrial outer membrane protein aided by the TIM23 complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiyao; Tamura, Yasushi; Yoshihisa, Tohru; Endo, Toshiya

    2014-06-01

    The membrane topology of Om45 in the yeast mitochondrial outer membrane (OM) is under debate. Here, we confirm that Om45 is anchored to the OM from the intermembrane space (IMS) by its N-terminal hydrophobic segment. We show that import of Om45 requires the presequence receptors, Tom20 and Tom22, and the import channel of Tom40. Unlike any of the known OM proteins, Om45 import requires the TIM23 complex in the inner membrane, a translocator for presequence-containing proteins, and the membrane potential (ΔΨ). Therefore, Om45 is anchored to the OM via the IMS by a novel import pathway involving the TIM23 complex. PMID:24781694

  3. Membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase complex is required for the turnover of lysosomal membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Koshi, Tatsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cells must regulate the abundance and activity of numerous nutrient transporters in different organelle membranes to achieve nutrient homeostasis. As the recycling center and major storage organelle, lysosomes are essential for maintaining nutrient homeostasis. However, very little is known about mechanisms that govern the regulation of its membrane proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that changes of Zn2+ levels trigger the downregulation of vacuolar Zn2+ transporters. Low Zn2+ levels cause the degradation of the influx transporter Cot1, whereas high Zn2+ levels trigger the degradation of the efflux channel Zrt3. The degradation process depends on the vacuole membrane recycling and degradation pathway. Unexpectedly, we identified a RING domain–containing E3 ligase Tul1 and its interacting proteins in the Dsc complex that are important for the ubiquitination of Cot1 and partial ubiquitination of Zrt3. Our study demonstrated that the Dsc complex can function at the vacuole to regulate the composition and lifetime of vacuolar membrane proteins. PMID:26527740

  4. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes.

    PubMed

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-14

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification. PMID:27020773

  5. Loss of the membrane anchor of the target receptor is a mechanism of bioinsecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Darboux, Isabelle; Pauchet, Yannick; Castella, Claude; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Charles, Jean-François; Pauron, David

    2002-04-30

    The mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus sphaericus is because of a binary toxin (Bin), which binds to Culex pipiens maltase 1 (Cpm1), an alpha-glucosidase present in the midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. In this work, we studied the molecular basis of the resistance to Bin developed by a strain (GEO) of C. pipiens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization experiments showed that Cpm1 was undetectable in the midgut of GEO larvae, although the gene was correctly transcribed. The sequence of the cpm1(GEO) cDNA differs from the sequence we previously reported for a susceptible strain (cpm1(IP)) by seven mutations: six missense mutations and a mutation leading to the premature termination of translation. When produced in insect cells, Cpm1(IP) was attached to the membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). In contrast, the premature termination of translation of Cpm1(GEO) resulted in the targeting of the protein to the extracellular compartment because of truncation of the GPI-anchoring site. The interaction between Bin and Cpm1(GEO) and the enzyme activity of the receptor were not affected. Thus, Bin is not toxic to GEO larvae because it cannot interact with the midgut cell membrane, even though its receptor site is unaffected. This mechanism contrasts with other known resistance mechanisms in which point mutations decrease the affinity of binding between the receptor and the toxin. PMID:11983886

  6. Regulation by the quorum sensor from Vibrio indicates a receptor function for the membrane anchors of adenylate cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Stephanie; Bassler, Jens; Schultz, Joachim E

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate cyclases convert intra- and extracellular stimuli into a second messenger cAMP signal. Many bacterial and most eukaryotic ACs possess membrane anchors with six transmembrane spans. We replaced the anchor of the AC Rv1625c by the quorum-sensing receptor from Vibrio harveyi which has an identical 6TM design and obtained an active, membrane-anchored AC. We show that a canonical class III AC is ligand-regulated in vitro and in vivo. At 10 µM, the cholera-autoinducer CAI-1 stimulates activity 4.8-fold. A sequence based clustering of membrane domains of class III ACs and quorum-sensing receptors established six groups of potential structural and functional similarities. The data support the notion that 6TM AC membrane domains may operate as receptors which directly regulate AC activity as opposed and in addition to the indirect regulation by GPCRs in eukaryotic congeners. This adds a completely novel dimension of potential AC regulation in bacteria and vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13098.001 PMID:26920221

  7. When under pressure, get closer: PERKing up membrane contact sites during ER stress.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the main hub of cellular Ca(2+)signalling and protein synthesis and folding. The ER moreover is the central player in the formation of contact sites with other organelles and structures, including mitochondria, plasma membrane (PM) and endosomes. The most studied of these, the ER-mitochondria contact sites, are crucial regulators of cellular Ca(2+)homoeostasis, metabolism and cell death signalling. Protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), an ER stress kinase and crucial signalling protein in the unfolded protein response (UPR), was found to be able to orchestrate contact sites between the ER and mitochondria and to be indispensable for the pre-apoptotic trafficking of calreticulin (CRT) at the PM during immunogenic cell death (ICD). Furthermore, PERK has recently been linked with ER and PM contact sites through the mechanism of store-operated Ca(2+)entry (SOCE). Here we discuss emerging findings disclosing novel roles of the ER stress sensor PERK in orchestrating inter-organellar communication in the context of ER stress. PMID:27068961

  8. Presenilin-1 influences processing of the acetylcholinesterase membrane anchor PRiMA.

    PubMed

    García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Campanari, María-Letizia; Montenegro, María-Fernanda; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Belbin, Olivia; Lleó, Alberto; Tsim, Karl; Vidal, Cecilio J; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2014-07-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) is the catalytic component of the γ-secretase complex. In this study, we explore if PS1 participates in the processing of the cholinergic acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The major AChE variant expressed in the brain is a tetramer (G(4)) bound to a proline-rich membrane anchor (PRiMA). Overexpression of the transmembrane PRiMA protein in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing AChE and treated with the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester have enabled us to study whether, through its γ-secretase activity, PS1 participates in the processing of PRiMA-linked AChE. γ-Secretase inhibition led to a notable increase in the level of PRiMA-linked AChE, suggesting that γ-secretase is involved in the cleavage of PRiMA. We demonstrate that cleavage of PRiMA by γ-secretase results in a C-terminal PRiMA fragment. Immunofluorescence labeling allowed us to identify this PRiMA fragment in the nucleus. Moreover, we have determined changes in the proportion of the raft-residing AChE-PRiMA in a PS1 conditional knockout mouse. Our results are of interest as both enzymes have therapeutic relevance for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24612677

  9. Plasma membrane localization and function of the estrogen receptor α variant (ER46) in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Haynes, M. Page; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α variants have been identified in an array of nonendothelial cells. We previously demonstrated that estrogen rapidly induces nitric oxide release via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway in EA.hy926 cells (immortalized human endothelial cells), which express a 46-kDa ER. We now confirm that, due to alternative splicing, the 46-kDa endothelial cell protein (ER46) is an amino-terminal truncated product of full-length ERα (ER66). ER46 is expressed in the plasma membrane, cytosol, and nucleus of resting, estrogen-deprived cells. Flow cytometric and immunofluorescence microscopic analyses demonstrated that the ER46 C but not N terminus is Ab-accessible in the plasma membrane. Inhibition of palmitoylation with tunicamycin and [3H]palmitic acid labeling demonstrated an estrogen-induced, palmitoylation-dependent plasma membrane ER46 recruitment, with reorganization into caveolae. In reconstituted, estrogen-stimulated COS-7 (ER-null) cells, membrane ER46 more efficiently triggered membrane eNOS phosphorylation than ER66. Conversely, ER66 more efficiently mediated estrogen response element reporter-gene transactivation than ER46. These results demonstrate that ER46 is localized and further dynamically targeted to the plasma membrane in a palmitoylation-dependent manner. ER46 more efficiently modulates membrane-initiated estrogen actions, including eNOS activation, than full-length ER66. These findings may have important implications in vascular-specific targeting of estrogen receptor agonists. PMID:12682286

  10. Drought Stress-Induced Rma1H1, a RING Membrane-Anchor E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Homolog, Regulates Aquaporin Levels via Ubiquitination in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Kyung; Cho, Seok Keun; Son, Ora; Xu, Zhengyi; Hwang, Inhwan; Kim, Woo Taek

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitination is involved in a variety of biological processes, but the exact role of ubiquitination in abiotic responses is not clearly understood in higher plants. Here, we investigated Rma1H1, a hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) homolog of a human RING membrane-anchor 1 E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase. Bacterially expressed Rma1H1 displayed E3 Ub ligase activity in vitro. Rma1H1 was rapidly induced by various abiotic stresses, including dehydration, and its overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants conferred strongly enhanced tolerance to drought stress. Colocalization experiments with marker proteins revealed that Rma1H1 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Overexpression of Rma1H1 in Arabidopsis inhibited trafficking of an aquaporin isoform PIP2;1 from the ER to the plasma membrane and reduced PIP2;1 levels in protoplasts and transgenic plants. This Rma1H1-induced reduction of PIP2;1 was inhibited by MG132, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Furthermore, Rma1H1 interacted with PIP2;1 in vitro and ubiquitinated it in vivo. Similar to Rma1H1, Rma1, an Arabidopsis homolog of Rma1H1, localized to the ER, and its overexpression reduced the PIP2;1 protein level and inhibited trafficking of PIP2;1 from the ER to the plasma membrane in protoplasts. In addition, reduced expression of Rma homologs resulted in the increased level of PIP2;1 in protoplasts. We propose that Rma1H1 and Rma1 play a critical role in the downregulation of plasma membrane aquaporin levels by inhibiting aquaporin trafficking to the plasma membrane and subsequent proteasomal degradation as a response to dehydration in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. PMID:19234086

  11. Entangled in a membranous web: ER and lipid droplet reorganization during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Nathan L; Fontaine, Krystal A; Kumar, G Renuka; Ott, Melanie

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. To establish and maintain chronic infection, HCV extensively rearranges cellular organelles to generate distinct compartments for viral RNA replication and virion assembly. Here, we review our current knowledge of how HCV proliferates and remodels ER-derived membranes while preserving and expanding associated lipid droplets during viral infection. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms responsible for HCV-induced membrane reorganization will enhance our understanding of the HCV life-cycle, the associated liver pathology, and the biology of the ER:lipid droplet interface in general. PMID:27240021

  12. Design and characterization of a modular membrane protein anchor to functionalize the moss Physcomitrella patens with extracellular catalytic and/or binding activities.

    PubMed

    Morath, Volker; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Albrecht, Florian; Polte, Ingmar; Ciccone, Rosario Adriano; Funke, Louise Friederike; Reichart, Leonie; Wolf, Christopher Guy; Brunner, Andreas-David; Fischer, Katrin; Schneider, Philipp Constantin; Brüggenthies, Johanna Barbara; Fröhlich, Fabian; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Skerra, Arne

    2014-12-19

    Heterologous enzymes and binding proteins were secreted by the moss Physcomitrella patens or anchored extracellularly on its cell membrane in order to functionalize the apoplast as a biochemical reaction compartment. This modular membrane anchoring system utilizes the signal peptide and the transmembrane segment of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK), which were identified in a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the P. patens genome. By fusing the soluble enzyme NanoLuc luciferase to the signal peptide, its secretion capability was confirmed in vivo. The membrane localization of hybrid proteins comprising the SERK signal peptide, NanoLuc or other functional modules, the SERK transmembrane anchor, and a C-terminal GFP reporter was demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy as well as site-specific proteolytic release of the extracellular enzyme domain. Our membrane anchoring system enables the expression of various functional proteins in the apoplast of P. patens, empowering this photoautotrophic organism for biotechnological applications. PMID:25524107

  13. Triggered Ca2+ influx is required for extended synaptotagmin 1-induced ER-plasma membrane tethering

    PubMed Central

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Lü, Alice; Xie, Beichen; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are ER proteins that act as Ca2+-regulated tethers between the ER and the plasma membrane (PM) and have a putative role in lipid transport between the two membranes. Ca2+ regulation of their tethering function, as well as the interplay of their different domains in such function, remains poorly understood. By exposing semi-intact cells to buffers of variable Ca2+ concentrations, we found that binding of E-Syt1 to the PI(4,5)P2-rich PM critically requires its C2C and C2E domains and that the EC50 of such binding is in the low micromolar Ca2+ range. Accordingly, E-Syt1 accumulation at ER-PM contact sites occurred only upon experimental manipulations known to achieve these levels of Ca2+ via its influx from the extracellular medium, such as store-operated Ca2+ entry in fibroblasts and membrane depolarization in β-cells. We also show that in spite of their very different physiological functions, membrane tethering by E-Syt1 (ER to PM) and by synaptotagmin (secretory vesicles to PM) undergo a similar regulation by plasma membrane lipids and cytosolic Ca2+. PMID:26202220

  14. Er:YAG delamination of immersed biological membranes using sealed flexible hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi-Dolev, A. M.; Dror, Jacob; Inberg, Alexandra; Ferencz, J. R.; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1996-04-01

    The radiation of Er-YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.94 micrometer) gives selective interaction with tissues. The extinction in soft tissues is only a few micrometers and in hard tissues is of the order of hundreds of micrometers. This makes this type of laser very suitable for treatments in dentistry, orthopedy, or ophthalmology. Because the usual silica fibers are not transmitting the radiation at lambda equals 2.94 micrometer of this laser, many applications cannot be presently performed. Fused silica hollow fibers for Er-YAG radiation were developed in our laboratory and several possible applications in dentistry, orthopedy and ophthalmology were indicated. Hole opening and implantation preparation of teeth were experimented, using Er-YAG laser and hollow plastic waveguide delivery systems. Hole drilling in cow bones was demonstrated for applications in orthopedy. A new procedure of delivering Er-YAG radiation on fibrotic membranes of inner eggshell as a model of the membranes in eyes was developed employing silica hollow waveguides of 0.5 and 0.7 mm ID or a plastic waveguide of 1.0 mm ID. For this purpose waveguides with sealed distal tip were employed to enable us to approach the delivery system through liquid media near to the membrane. This experiment demonstrates the possibility of surgical applications in vitectomy in ophthalmology using Er-YAG laser and silica hollow waveguides.

  15. Er:YAG delamination of dense biological membranes using flexible hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi-Dolev, A. M.; Dror, Jacob; Inberg, Alexandra; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1995-01-01

    Fused silica flexible hollow wave guides developed at TAU were used to deliver Er-YAG laser radiation to a biological membrane model. The model was composed of fibrotic (inner egg shell) membranes that were either brushed with or immersed in physiological saline solution. Waveguides used included fibers with an inner diameter of 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm. Membrane aperture size and fiber output power density were obtained. Results for the 0.5 mm waveguides yielded average apertures of 100 micrometer length at a power density of 5.35 W/cm2 and threshold fluence of 10 mJ/cm2 for exposed membranes and 35 mJ/cm2 for wet membranes. The results indicate that this waveguide can be used to cut dense membranes, finally, we have succeeded in delaminating immersed membranes using a sealed waveguide. These results show the applicability of using fused silica flexible hollow waveguides for Er-YAG surgical applications of dense membranes in aqueous surroundings such as vitrectomy and posterio-copsulectomy in ophthalmology, and possibly for procedures involving pleural membranes.

  16. ER network formation and membrane fusion by atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants

    PubMed Central

    Ulengin, Idil; Park, John J.; Lee, Tina H.

    2015-01-01

    At least 38 distinct missense mutations in the neuronal atlastin1/SPG3A GTPase are implicated in an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor-neurological disorder manifested by lower limb weakness and spasticity and length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Because the atlastin GTPase is sufficient to catalyze membrane fusion and required to form the ER network, at least in nonneuronal cells, it is logically assumed that defects in ER membrane morphogenesis due to impaired fusion activity are the primary drivers of SPG3A-associated HSP. Here we analyzed a subset of established atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants using cell-based assays for atlastin-mediated ER network formation and biochemical assays for atlastin-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, dimer formation, and membrane fusion. As anticipated, some variants exhibited clear deficits. Surprisingly however, at least two disease variants, one of which represents that most frequently identified in SPG3A HSP patients, displayed wild-type levels of activity in all assays. The same variants were also capable of co-redistributing ER-localized REEP1, a recently identified function of atlastins that requires its catalytic activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that a deficit in the membrane fusion activity of atlastin1 may be a key contributor, but is not required, for HSP causation. PMID:25761634

  17. ER network formation and membrane fusion by atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants.

    PubMed

    Ulengin, Idil; Park, John J; Lee, Tina H

    2015-05-01

    At least 38 distinct missense mutations in the neuronal atlastin1/SPG3A GTPase are implicated in an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor-neurological disorder manifested by lower limb weakness and spasticity and length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Because the atlastin GTPase is sufficient to catalyze membrane fusion and required to form the ER network, at least in nonneuronal cells, it is logically assumed that defects in ER membrane morphogenesis due to impaired fusion activity are the primary drivers of SPG3A-associated HSP. Here we analyzed a subset of established atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants using cell-based assays for atlastin-mediated ER network formation and biochemical assays for atlastin-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, dimer formation, and membrane fusion. As anticipated, some variants exhibited clear deficits. Surprisingly however, at least two disease variants, one of which represents that most frequently identified in SPG3A HSP patients, displayed wild-type levels of activity in all assays. The same variants were also capable of co-redistributing ER-localized REEP1, a recently identified function of atlastins that requires its catalytic activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that a deficit in the membrane fusion activity of atlastin1 may be a key contributor, but is not required, for HSP causation. PMID:25761634

  18. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomerization in Solution Impairs Functional Interactions with Membrane-anchored Mitochondrial Fission Factor.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Ryan W; Francy, Christopher A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Qi, Xin; Mears, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is a crucial cellular process mediated by the mechanoenzymatic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). During mitochondrial division, Drp1 is recruited from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane by one, or several, integral membrane proteins. One such Drp1 partner protein, mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), is essential for mitochondrial division, but its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Previous studies have been limited by a weak interaction between Drp1 and Mff in vitro. Through refined in vitro reconstitution approaches and multiple independent assays, we show that removal of the regulatory variable domain (VD) in Drp1 enhances formation of a functional Drp1-Mff copolymer. This protein assembly exhibits greatly stimulated cooperative GTPase activity in solution. Moreover, when Mff was anchored to a lipid template, to mimic a more physiologic environment, significant stimulation of GTPase activity was observed with both WT and ΔVD Drp1. Contrary to recent findings, we show that premature Drp1 self-assembly in solution impairs functional interactions with membrane-anchored Mff. Instead, dimeric Drp1 species are selectively recruited by Mff to initiate assembly of a functional fission complex. Correspondingly, we also found that the coiled-coil motif in Mff is not essential for Drp1 interactions, but rather serves to augment cooperative self-assembly of Drp1 proximal to the membrane. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanism wherein the multimeric states of both Mff and Drp1 regulate their collaborative interaction. PMID:26578514

  19. Targeting the membrane-anchored serine protease testisin with a novel engineered anthrax toxin prodrug to kill tumor cells and reduce tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik W.; Buzza, Marguerite S.; Driesbaugh, Kathryn H.; Liu, Shihui; Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine proteases are a unique group of trypsin-like serine proteases that are tethered to the cell surface via transmembrane domains or glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchors. Overexpressed in tumors, with pro-tumorigenic properties, they are attractive targets for protease-activated prodrug-like anti-tumor therapies. Here, we sought to engineer anthrax toxin protective antigen (PrAg), which is proteolytically activated on the cell surface by the proprotein convertase furin to instead be activated by tumor cell-expressed membrane-anchored serine proteases to function as a tumoricidal agent. PrAg's native activation sequence was mutated to a sequence derived from protein C inhibitor (PCI) that can be cleaved by membrane-anchored serine proteases, to generate the mutant protein PrAg-PCIS. PrAg-PCIS was resistant to furin cleavage in vitro, yet cytotoxic to multiple human tumor cell lines when combined with FP59, a chimeric anthrax toxin lethal factor-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein. Molecular analyses showed that PrAg-PCIS can be cleaved in vitro by several serine proteases including the membrane-anchored serine protease testisin, and mediates increased killing of testisin-expressing tumor cells. Treatment with PrAg-PCIS also potently attenuated the growth of testisin-expressing xenograft tumors in mice. The data indicates PrAg can be engineered to target tumor cell-expressed membrane-anchored serine proteases to function as a potent tumoricidal agent. PMID:26392335

  20. A 39-kD plasma membrane protein (IP39) is an anchor for the unusual membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiere, T.K.; Marrs, J.A.; Bouck, G.B. )

    1990-04-01

    The major integral plasma membrane protein (IP39) of Euglena gracilis was radiolabeled, peptide mapped, and dissected with proteases to identify cytoplasmic domains that bind and anchor proteins of the cell surface. When plasma membranes were radioiodinated and extracted with octyl glucoside, 98% of the extracted label was found in IP39 or the 68- and 110-kD oligomers of IP39. The octyl glucoside extracts were incubated with unlabeled cell surface proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (overlays). Radiolabel from the membrane extract bound one (80 kD) of the two (80 and 86 kD) major membrane skeletal protein bands. Resolubilization of the bound label yielded a radiolabeled polypeptide identical in Mr to IP39. Intact plasma membranes were also digested with papain before or after radioiodination, thereby producing a cytoplasmically truncated IP39. The octyl glucoside extract of truncated IP39 no longer bound to the 80-kD membrane skeletal protein in the nitrocellulose overlays. EM of intact or trypsin digested plasma membranes incubated with membrane skeletal proteins under stringent conditions similar to those used in the nitrocellulose overlays revealed a partially reformed membrane skeletal layer. Little evidence of a membrane skeletal layer was found, however, when plasma membranes were predigested with papain before reassociation. A candidate 80-kD binding domain of IP39 has been tentatively identified as a peptide fragment that was present after trypsin digestion of plasma membranes, but was absent after papain digestion in two-dimensional peptide maps of IP39. Together, these data suggest that the unique peripheral membrane skeleton of Euglena binds to the plasma membrane through noncovalent interactions between the major 80-kD membrane skeletal protein and a small, papain sensitive cytoplasmic domain of IP39.

  1. Fatal Transmissible Amyloid Encephalopathy: A New Type of Prion Disease Associated with Lack of Prion Protein Membrane Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Chesebro, Bruce; Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly; LaCasse, Rachel; Race, Richard; Klingeborn, Mikael; Striebel, James; Dorward, David; McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals characterized by gray matter spongiosis and accumulation of aggregated, misfolded, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres). PrPres can be deposited in brain in an amyloid-form and/or non-amyloid form, and is derived from host-encoded protease-sensitive PrP (PrPsen), a protein normally anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). Previously, using heterozygous transgenic mice expressing only anchorless PrP, we found that PrP anchoring to the cell membrane was required for typical clinical scrapie. However, in the present experiments, using homozygous transgenic mice expressing two-fold more anchorless PrP, scrapie infection induced a new fatal disease with unique clinical signs and altered neuropathology, compared to non-transgenic mice expressing only anchored PrP. Brain tissue of transgenic mice had high amounts of infectivity, and histopathology showed dense amyloid PrPres plaque deposits without gray matter spongiosis. In contrast, infected non-transgenic mice had diffuse non-amyloid PrPres deposits with significant gray matter spongiosis. Brain graft studies suggested that anchored PrPsen expression was required for gray matter spongiosis during prion infection. Furthermore, electron and light microscopic studies in infected transgenic mice demonstrated several pathogenic processes not seen in typical prion disease, including cerebral amyloid angiopathy and ultrastructural alterations in perivascular neuropil. These findings were similar to certain human familial prion diseases as well as to non-prion human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20221436

  2. The ubiquitous and ancient ER membrane protein complex (EMC): tether or not?

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Jeremy G.

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein complex (EMC) has been implicated in ER-associated degradation (ERAD), lipid transport and tethering between the ER and mitochondrial outer membranes, and assembly of multipass ER-membrane proteins. The EMC has been studied in both animals and fungi but its presence outside the Opisthokont clade (animals + fungi + related protists) has not been demonstrated. Here, using homology-searching algorithms, I show that the EMC is truly an ancient and conserved protein complex, present in every major eukaryotic lineage. Very few organisms have completely lost the EMC, and most, even over 2 billion years of eukaryote evolution, have retained a majority of the complex members. I identify Sop4 and YDR056C in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as Emc7 and Emc10, respectively, subunits previously thought to be specific to animals. This study demonstrates that the EMC was present in the last eukaryote common ancestor (LECA) and is an extremely important component of eukaryotic cells even though its primary function remains elusive. PMID:26512320

  3. A Lentiviral Vector Allowing Physiologically Regulated Membrane-anchored and Secreted Antibody Expression Depending on B-cell Maturation Status.

    PubMed

    Fusil, Floriane; Calattini, Sara; Amirache, Fouzia; Mancip, Jimmy; Costa, Caroline; Robbins, Justin B; Douam, Florian; Lavillette, Dimitri; Law, Mansun; Defrance, Thierry; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-11-01

    The development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for expression of a specific antibody can be achieved through the transduction of mature B-cells. This approach would provide a versatile tool for active immunotherapy strategies for infectious diseases or cancer, as well as for protein engineering. Here, we created a lentiviral expression system mimicking the natural production of these two distinct immunoglobulin isoforms. We designed a LV (FAM2-LV) expressing an anti-HCV-E2 surface glycoprotein antibody (AR3A) as a membrane-anchored Ig form or a soluble Ig form, depending on the B-cell maturation status. FAM2-LV induced high-level and functional membrane expression of the transgenic antibody in a nonsecretory B-cell line. In contrast, a plasma cell (PC) line transduced with FAM2-LV preferentially produced the secreted transgenic antibody. Similar results were obtained with primary B-cells transduced ex vivo. Most importantly, FAM2-LV transduced primary B-cells efficiently differentiated into PCs, which secreted the neutralizing anti-HCV E2 antibody upon adoptive transfer into immunodeficient NSG (NOD/SCIDγc(-/-)) recipient mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the conditional FAM2-LV allows preferential expression of the membrane-anchored form of an antiviral neutralizing antibody in B-cells and permits secretion of a soluble antibody following B-cell maturation into PCs in vivo. PMID:26281898

  4. Annexin A1 Tethers Membrane Contact Sites that Mediate ER to Endosome Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; Sanchez-Heras, Elena; Tsapara, Anna; Sobota, Andrzej; Levine, Tim P; Futter, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Membrane contact sites between the ER and multivesicular endosomes/bodies (MVBs) play important roles in endosome positioning and fission and in neurite outgrowth. ER-MVB contacts additionally function in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase downregulation by providing sites where the ER-localized phosphatase, PTP1B, interacts with endocytosed EGFR before the receptor is sorted onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). Here we show that these contacts are tethered by annexin A1 and its Ca(2+)-dependent ligand, S100A11, and form a subpopulation of differentially regulated contact sites between the ER and endocytic organelles. Annexin A1-regulated contacts function in the transfer of ER-derived cholesterol to the MVB when low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in endosomes is low. This sterol traffic depends on interaction between ER-localized VAP and endosomal oxysterol-binding protein ORP1L, and is required for the formation of ILVs within the MVB and thus for the spatial regulation of EGFR signaling. PMID:27270042

  5. The bridging conformations of double-end anchored polymer-surfactants destabilize a hydrogel of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, N. L.; Davidson, P.; Chibbaro, M. A.; Jeppesen, C.; Eiselt, P.; Warriner, H. E.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Pincus, P.; Safinya, C. R.

    2001-10-01

    Double-end-anchored poly-ethylene-glycol-surfactants (DEA-PEG-surfactants) induce the gelation of lyotropic lamellar Lα phases stabilized by undulation forces. The physical hydrogel (Lα,g) derives its viscoelasticity from the proliferation of defects at a mesoscopic level. The DEA-PEG-surfactants assume both looping and bridging conformations. The existence of novel bridging conformations is indicated by the coexistence of two lamellar phases and the limited swelling of the Lα and Lα,g phases. Modeling of the polymer decorated membranes demonstrates the existence of bridging and yields a rapidly decreasing density of bridging conformations with increasing interlayer spacing.

  6. Multifunctional Roles for the Protein Translocation Machinery in RNA Anchoring to the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C.-C.; Reid, David W.; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J.; Moseley, Arthur M.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.

    2014-01-01

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis. PMID:25063809

  7. Anchoring tick salivary anti-complement proteins IRAC I and IRAC II to membrane increases their immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Laurent; Schroeder, Hélène; Mast, Jan; Thirion, Muriel; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dewals, Benjamin; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Tick salivary proteins are promising targets for the development of anti-tick vaccines. Recently, we described two paralogous anti-complement proteins, called Ixodes ricinus anti-complement (IRAC) proteins I and II, that are co-expressed in tick I. ricinus salivary glands. However, our previous attempts to immunize rabbits against IRAC via infection with recombinant Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors invariably failed although both recombinants expressed high levels of functional IRAC proteins in vitro. As IRAC are soluble monovalent antigens, one of the possible explanations is that monovalent ligation of the B-cell receptor induces receptor activation but fails to promote antigen presentation, a phenomenon that is thought to induce a state of B-cell tolerance. In the present study, we tried to increase IRAC immunogenicity by expressing them as oligovalent antigens. To this end, IRAC were fused to membrane anchors and BoHV-4 vectors expressing these recombinant forms were produced. The immunization potentials of recombinant viruses expressing either secreted or transmembrane IRAC proteins were then compared. While the former did not induce a detectable immune response against IRAC, the latter led to high titres of anti-IRAC antibodies that only marginally affected tick blood feeding. All together, the data presented in this study demonstrate that the immunogenicity of a soluble antigen can be greatly improved by anchoring it in membrane. PMID:19531344

  8. Physiological lipid composition is vital for homotypic ER membrane fusion mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase Sey1p

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shintaro; Mima, Joji

    2016-01-01

    Homotypic fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for generating and maintaining the characteristic reticular ER membrane structures. This organelle membrane fusion process depends on the ER-bound dynamin-related GTPases, such as atlastins in animals and Sey1p in yeast. Here, to investigate whether specific lipid molecules facilitate GTPase-dependent ER membrane fusion directly, we comprehensively evaluated membrane docking and lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes bearing purified Sey1p and a set of ER-mimicking lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and ergosterol. Remarkably, we revealed that each specific lipid species contributed little to membrane docking mediated by Sey1p. Nevertheless, Sey1p-dependent lipid mixing was strongly reduced by omitting three major acidic lipids from the ER-mimicking set and, moreover, was entirely abolished by omitting either phosphatidylethanolamine or ergosterol. Our reconstitution studies thus established that physiological lipid composition is vital for lipid bilayer rearrangements in GTPase-mediated homotypic ER membrane fusion. PMID:26838333

  9. Subcellular Fractionation Analysis of the Extraction of Ubiquitinated Polytopic Membrane Substrate during ER-Associated Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kamura, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    During ER-associated degradation (ERAD), misfolded polytopic membrane proteins are ubiquitinated and retrotranslocated to the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. However, our understanding as to how polytopic membrane proteins are extracted from the ER to the cytosol remains largely unclear. To better define the localization and physical properties of ubiquitinated polytopic membrane substrates in vivo, we performed subcellular fractionation analysis of Ste6*, a twelve transmembrane protein that is ubiquitinated primarily by Doa10 E3 ligase in yeast. Consistent with previous in vitro studies, ubiquitinated Ste6* was extracted from P20 (20,000 g pellet) fraction to S20 (20,000 g supernatant) fraction in a Cdc48/p97-dependent manner. Similarly, Ubx2p, which recruits Cdc48/p97 to the ER, facilitated the extraction of Ste6*. By contrast, lipid droplet formation, which was suggested to be dispensable for the degradation of Hrd1-substrates in yeast, was not required for the degradation of Ste6*. Intriguingly, we found that ubiquitinated Ste6* in the S20 fraction could be enriched by further centrifugation at 100,000 g. Although it is currently uncertain whether ubiquitinated Ste6* in P100 fraction is completely free from any lipids, membrane flotation analysis suggested the existence of two distinct populations of ubiquitinated Ste6* with different states of membrane association. Together, these results imply that ubiquitinated Ste6* may be sequestered into a putative quality control sub-structure by Cdc48/p97. Fractionation assays developed in the present study provide a means to further dissect the ill-defined post-ubiquitination step during ERAD of polytopic membrane substrates. PMID:26849222

  10. Geranylgeranyl-regulated transport of the prenyltransferase UBIAD1 between membranes of the ER and Golgi.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Marc M; Jun, Dong-Jae; Jo, Youngah; Seemann, Joachim; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-07-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein-1 (UBIAD1) utilizes geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGpp) to synthesize the vitamin K2 subtype menaquinone-4. Previously, we found that sterols trigger binding of UBIAD1 to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in synthesis of cholesterol and nonsterol isoprenoids, including GGpp. This binding inhibits sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase, which contributes to feedback regulation of the enzyme. The addition to cells of geranylgeraniol (GGOH), which can become converted to GGpp, triggers release of UBIAD1 from reductase, allowing for its maximal degradation and permitting ER-to-Golgi transport of UBIAD1. Here, we further characterize geranylgeranyl-regulated transport of UBIAD1. Results of this characterization support a model in which UBIAD1 continuously cycles between the ER and medial-trans Golgi of isoprenoid-replete cells. Upon sensing a decline of GGpp in ER membranes, UBIAD1 becomes trapped in the organelle where it inhibits reductase degradation. Mutant forms of UBIAD1 associated with Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD), a human eye disease characterized by corneal accumulation of cholesterol, are sequestered in the ER and block reductase degradation. Collectively, these findings disclose a novel sensing mechanism that allows for stringent metabolic control of intracellular trafficking of UBIAD1, which directly modulates reductase degradation and becomes disrupted in SCD. PMID:27121042

  11. Transmembrane domain-dependent sorting of proteins to the ER and plasma membrane in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, J C; Pelham, H R

    1997-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins between compartments of the secretory pathway is mediated in part by their transmembrane domains (TMDs). In animal cells, TMD length is a major factor in Golgi retention. In yeast, the role of TMD signals is less clear; it has been proposed that membrane proteins travel by default to the vacuole, and are prevented from doing so by cytoplasmic signals. We have investigated the targeting of the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER) t-SNARE Ufe1p. We show that the amino acid sequence of the Ufe1p TMD is important for both function and ER targeting, and that the requirements for each are distinct. Targeting is independent of Rer1p, the only candidate sorting receptor for TMD sequences currently known. Lengthening the Ufe1p TMD allows transport along the secretory pathway to the vacuole or plasma membrane. The choice between these destinations is determined by the length and composition of the TMD, but not by its precise sequence. A longer TMD is required to reach the plasma membrane in yeast than in animal cells, and shorter TMDs direct proteins to the vacuole. TMD-based sorting is therefore a general feature of the yeast secretory pathway, but occurs by different mechanisms at different points. PMID:9155009

  12. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Covalent modifications of proteins provide a mechanism to control protein function. Here, we have investigated modifications of the heptameric Sec complex which is responsible for post-translational protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It consists of the Sec61 complex (Sec61p, Sbh1p, Sss1p) which on its own mediates cotranslational protein import into the ER and the Sec63 complex (Sec63p, Sec62p, Sec71p, Sec72p). Little is known about the biogenesis and regulation of individual Sec complex subunits. Results We show that Sbh1p when it is part of the Sec61 complex is phosphorylated on T5 which is flanked by proline residues. The phosphorylation site is conserved in mammalian Sec61ß, but only partially in birds, and not in other vertebrates or unicellular eukaryotes, suggesting convergent evolution. Mutation of T5 to A did not affect the ability of mutant Sbh1p to complement the growth defect in a Δsbh1Δsbh2 strain, and did not result in a hypophosphorylated protein which shows that alternate sites can be used by the T5 kinase. A survey of yeast phosphoproteome data shows that Sbh1p can be phosphorylated on multiple sites which are organized in two patches, one at the N-terminus of its cytosolic domain, the other proximal to the transmembrane domain. Surprisingly, although N-acetylation has been shown to interfere with ER targeting, we found that both Sbh1p and Sec62p are cotranslationally N-acetylated by NatA, and N-acetyl-proteome data indicate that Sec61p is modified by the same enzyme. Mutation of the N-acetylation site, however, did not affect Sec62p function in posttranslational protein import into the ER. Disabling NatA resulted in growth retardation, but not in co- or posttranslational translocation defects or instability of Sec62p or Sbh1p. Conclusions We conclude that N-acetylation of transmembrane and tail-anchored proteins does not interfere with their ER-targeting, and that Sbh1p phosphorylation on T5, which is not present in

  13. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongtao; Qi, Yinglin; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP), which containing glycoprotein (G) and matrix protein (M) of rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs) were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M). The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies. PMID:25768031

  14. Chimeric rabies virus-like particles containing membrane-anchored GM-CSF enhances the immune response against rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongtao; Qi, Yinglin; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-03-01

    Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP), which containing glycoprotein (G) and matrix protein (M) of rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs) were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M). The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies. PMID:25768031

  15. The membrane anchor of the transcriptional activator SREBP is characterized by intrinsic conformational flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Linser, Rasmus; Salvi, Nicola; Briones, Rodolfo; Rovó, Petra; de Groot, Bert L.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) is a conserved mechanism crucial for numerous cellular processes, including signaling, transcriptional regulation, axon guidance, cell adhesion, cellular stress responses, and transmembrane protein fragment degradation. Importantly, it is relevant in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Even though a number of structures of different intramembrane proteases have been solved recently, fundamental questions concerning mechanistic underpinnings of RIP and therapeutic interventions remain. In particular, this includes substrate recognition, what properties render a given substrate amenable for RIP, and how the lipid environment affects the substrate cleavage. Members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors are critical regulators of genes involved in cholesterol/lipid homeostasis. After site-1 protease cleavage of the inactive SREBP transmembrane precursor protein, RIP of the anchor intermediate by site-2 protease generates the mature transcription factor. In this work, we have investigated the labile anchor intermediate of SREBP-1 using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, NMR chemical shifts, site-resolved solvent exposure, and relaxation studies show that the cleavage site of the lipid-signaling protein intermediate bears rigid α-helical topology. An evolutionary conserved motif, by contrast, interrupts the secondary structure ∼9–10 residues C-terminal of the scissile bond and acts as an inducer of conformational flexibility within the carboxyl-terminal transmembrane region. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Topology, stability, and site-resolved dynamics data suggest that the cleavage of the α-helical substrate in the case of RIP may be associated with a hinge motion triggered by the molecular environment. PMID:26392539

  16. New insights into the targeting of a subset of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Naomi J.; Teresinski, Howard J.; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Clendening, Eric A.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Sliwinska, Elwira; Zhang, Daiyuan; Miernyk, Ján A.; Brito, Glauber C.; Andrews, David W.; Dyer, John M.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Ncytoplasm-Corganelle interior orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA proteins are sorted to the proper organelles are not well-understood. Herein we present results indicating that a dibasic targeting motif (i.e., -R-R/K/H-X{X≠E}) identified previously in the C terminus of the mitochondrial isoform of the TA protein cytochrome b5, also exists in many other A. thaliana outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM)-TA proteins. This motif is conspicuously absent, however, in all but one of the TA protein subunits of the translocon at the outer membrane of mitochondria (TOM), suggesting that these two groups of proteins utilize distinct biogenetic pathways. Consistent with this premise, we show that the TA sequences of the dibasic-containing proteins are both necessary and sufficient for targeting to mitochondria, and are interchangeable, while the TA regions of TOM proteins lacking a dibasic motif are necessary, but not sufficient for localization, and cannot be functionally exchanged. We also present results from a comprehensive mutational analysis of the dibasic motif and surrounding sequences that not only greatly expands the functional definition and context-dependent properties of this targeting signal, but also led to the identification of other novel putative OMM-TA proteins. Collectively, these results provide important insight to the complexity of the targeting pathways involved in the biogenesis of OMM-TA proteins and help define a consensus targeting motif that is utilized by at least a subset of these proteins. PMID:25237314

  17. Membrane anchoring domain of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gB is sufficient for nuclear envelope localization.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, R; Ghosh, K; Rasile, L; Ghosh, H P

    1994-01-01

    We have used the glycoprotein gB of herpes simplex virus type 1 (gB-1), which buds from the inner nuclear membrane, as a model protein to study localization of membrane proteins in the nuclear envelope. To determine whether specific domains of gB-1 glycoprotein are involved in localization in the nuclear envelope, we have used deletion mutants of gB-1 protein as well as chimeric proteins constructed by replacing the domains of the cell surface glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus with the corresponding domains of gB. Mutant and chimeric proteins expressed in COS cells were localized by immunoelectron microscopy. A chimeric protein (gB-G) containing the ectodomain of gB and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of G did not localize in the nuclear envelope. When the ectodomain of G was fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of gB, however, the resulting chimeric protein (G-gB) was localized in the nuclear envelope. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of G with the 69 hydrophobic amino acids containing the membrane anchoring domain of gB allowed the hybrid protein (G-tmgB) to be localized in the nuclear envelope, suggesting that residues 721 to 795 of gB can promote retention of proteins in the nuclear envelope. Deletion mutations in the hydrophobic region further showed that a transmembrane segment of 21 hydrophobic amino acids, residues 774 to 795 of gB, was sufficient for localization in the nuclear envelope. Since wild-type gB and the mutant and chimeric proteins that were localized in the nuclear envelope were also retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, the membrane spanning segment of gB could also influence retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Images PMID:8139012

  18. Membrane Anchoring of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases by Convergent Acquisition of a Novel Protein Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluis; Luque, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Four distinct aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) found in some cyanobacterial species contain a novel protein domain that bears two putative transmembrane helices. This CAAD domain is present in glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, leucyl-, and valyl-tRNA synthetases, the latter of which has probably recruited the domain more than once during evolution. Deleting the CAAD domain from the valyl-tRNA synthetase of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 did not significantly modify the catalytic properties of this enzyme, suggesting that it does not participate in its canonical tRNA-charging function. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the function of the CAAD domain is structural, mediating the membrane anchorage of the enzyme, although membrane localization of aaRSs has not previously been described in any living organism. Synthetases containing the CAAD domain were localized in the intracytoplasmic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria and were largely absent from the plasma membrane. The CAAD domain was necessary and apparently sufficient for protein targeting to membranes. Moreover, localization of aaRSs in thylakoids was important under nitrogen limiting conditions. In Anabaena, a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium often used as a model for prokaryotic cell differentiation, valyl-tRNA synthetase underwent subcellular relocation at the cell poles during heterocyst differentiation, a process also dependent on the CAAD domain. PMID:21965654

  19. The formation and function of ER-endosome membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in membrane contact site (MCS) biology have revealed key roles for MCSs in inter-organellar exchange, the importance of which is becoming increasingly apparent. Roles for MCSs in many essential physiological processes including lipid transfer, calcium exchange, receptor tyrosine kinase signalling, lipid droplet formation, autophagosome formation, organelle dynamics and neurite outgrowth have been reported. The ER forms an extensive and dynamic network of MCSs with a diverse range of functionally distinct organelles. MCSs between the ER and endocytic pathway are particularly abundant, suggesting important physiological roles. Here, our current knowledge of the formation and function of ER contact sites with endocytic organelles from studies in mammalian systems is reviewed. Their relatively poorly defined molecular composition and recently identified functions are discussed. In addition, likely, but yet to be established, roles for these contacts in lipid transfer and calcium signalling are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26898183

  20. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  1. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  2. C-terminal anchoring of mid1p to membranes stabilizes cytokinetic ring position in early mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Bordes, Nicole; Fraisier, Vincent; Tran, Phong T; Paoletti, Anne

    2004-12-01

    mid1p is a key factor for the central positioning of the cytokinetic ring in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In interphase and early mitosis, mid1p forms a medial cortical band overlying the nucleus, which may represent a landmark for cytokinetic ring assembly. It compacts before anaphase into a tight ring with other cytokinetic ring components. We show here that mid1p binds to the medial cortex by at least two independent means. First, mid1p C-terminus association with the cortex requires a putative amphipathic helix adjacent to mid1p nuclear localization sequence (NLS), which is predicted to insert directly into the lipid bilayer. This association is stabilized by the polybasic NLS. mid1p mutated within the helix and the NLS forms abnormal filaments in early mitosis that are not properly anchored to the medial cortex. Misplaced rings assemble in late mitosis, indicating that mid1p C-terminus binding to membranes stabilizes cytokinetic ring position. Second, the N terminus of mid1p has the ability to associate faintly with the medial cortex and is sufficient to form tight rings. In addition, we show that mid1p oligomerizes. We propose that membrane-bound oligomers of mid1p assemble recruitment "platforms" for cytokinetic ring components at the medial cortex and stabilize the ring position during its compaction. PMID:15572668

  3. HxcQ Liposecretin Is Self-piloted to the Outer Membrane by Its N-terminal Lipid Anchor*

    PubMed Central

    Viarre, Véronique; Cascales, Eric; Ball, Geneviève; Michel, Gérard P. F.; Filloux, Alain; Voulhoux, Romé

    2009-01-01

    Secretins are an unusual and important class of bacterial outer membrane (OM) proteins. They are involved in the transport of single proteins or macromolecular structures such as pili, needle complexes, and bacteriophages across the OM. Secretins are multimeric ring-shaped structures that form large pores in the OM. The targeting of such macromolecular structures to the OM often requires special assistance, conferred by specific pilotins or pilot proteins. Here, we investigated HxcQ, the OM component of the second Pseudomonas aeruginosa type II secretion system. We found that HxcQ forms high molecular mass structures resistant to heat and SDS, revealing its secretin nature. Interestingly, we showed that HxcQ is a lipoprotein. Construction of a recombinant nonlipidated HxcQ (HxcQnl) revealed that lipidation is essential for HxcQ function. Further phenotypic analysis indicated that HxcQnl accumulates as multimers in the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa, a typical phenotype observed for secretins in the absence of their cognate pilotin. Our observations led us to the conclusion that the lipid anchor of HxcQ plays a pilotin role. The self-piloting of HxcQ to the OM was further confirmed by its correct multimeric OM localization when expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Altogether, our results reveal an original and unprecedented pathway for secretin transport to the OM. PMID:19815547

  4. Tromp1, a putative rare outer membrane protein, is anchored by an uncleaved signal sequence to the Treponema pallidum cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Akins, D R; Robinson, E; Shevchenko, D; Elkins, C; Cox, D L; Radolf, J D

    1997-01-01

    Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane protein 1 (Tromp1) has extensive sequence homology with substrate-binding proteins of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Because such proteins typically are periplasmic or cytoplasmic membrane associated, experiments were conducted to clarify Tromp1's physicochemical properties and cellular location in T. pallidum. Comparison of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis mobilities of (i) native Tromp1 and Tromp1 synthesized by coupled in vitro transcription-translation and (ii) native Tromp1 and recombinant Tromp1 lacking the N-terminal signal sequence revealed that the native protein is not processed. Other studies demonstrated that recombinant Tromp1 lacks three basic porin-like properties: (i) the ability to form aqueous channels in liposomes which permit the influx of small hydrophilic solutes, (ii) an extensive beta-sheet secondary structure, and (iii) amphiphilicity. Subsurface localization of native Tromp1 was demonstrated by immunofluorescence analysis of treponemes encapsulated in gel microdroplets, while opsonization assays failed to detect surface-exposed Tromp1. Incubation of motile treponemes with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)-diazarine, a photoactivatable, lipophilic probe, also did not result in the detection of Tromp1 within the outer membranes of intact treponemes but, instead, resulted in the labeling of a basic 30.5-kDa presumptive outer membrane protein. Finally, analysis of fractionated treponemes revealed that native Tromp1 is associated predominantly with cell cylinders. These findings comprise a body of evidence that Tromp1 actually is anchored by an uncleaved signal sequence to the periplasmic face of the T. pallidum cytoplasmic membrane, where it likely subserves a transport-related function. PMID:9260949

  5. Sec35p, a Novel Peripheral Membrane Protein, Is Required for ER to Golgi Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    VanRheenen, Susan M.; Cao, Xiaochun; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Barlowe, Charles; Gerard Waters, M.

    1998-01-01

    SEC35 was identified in a novel screen for temperature-sensitive mutants in the secretory pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Wuestehube et al., 1996. Genetics. 142:393–406). At the restrictive temperature, the sec35-1 strain exhibits a transport block between the ER and the Golgi apparatus and accumulates numerous vesicles. SEC35 encodes a novel cytosolic protein of 32 kD, peripherally associated with membranes. The temperature-sensitive phenotype of sec35-1 is efficiently suppressed by YPT1, which encodes the rab-like GTPase required early in the secretory pathway, or by SLY1-20, which encodes a dominant form of the ER to Golgi target -SNARE–associated protein Sly1p. Weaker suppression is evident upon overexpression of genes encoding the vesicle-SNAREs SEC22, BET1, or YKT6. The cold-sensitive lethality that results from deleting SEC35 is suppressed by YPT1 or SLY1-20. These genetic relationships suggest that Sec35p acts upstream of, or in conjunction with, Ypt1p and Sly1p as was previously found for Uso1p. Using a cell-free assay that measures distinct steps in vesicle transport from the ER to the Golgi, we find Sec35p is required for a vesicle docking stage catalyzed by Uso1p. These genetic and biochemical results suggest Sec35p acts with Uso1p to dock ER-derived vesicles to the Golgi complex. PMID:9606204

  6. An N-Terminal ER Export Signal Facilitates the Plasma Membrane Targeting of HCN1 Channels in Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuan; Laird, Joseph G.; Yamaguchi, David M.; Baker, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 1 (HCN1) channels are widely expressed in the retina. In photoreceptors, the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) carried by HCN1 is important for shaping the light response. It has been shown in multiple systems that trafficking HCN1 channels to specific compartments is key to their function. The localization of HCN1 in photoreceptors is concentrated in the plasma membrane of the inner segment (IS). The mechanisms controlling this localization are not understood. We previously identified a di-arginine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif that negatively regulates the surface targeting of HCN1. In this study, we sought to identify a forward trafficking signal that could counter the function of the ER retention signal. Methods. We studied trafficking of HCN1 and several mutants by imaging their subcellular localization in transgenic X. laevis photoreceptors. Velocity sedimentation was used to assay the assembly state of HCN1 channels. Results. We found the HCN1 N-terminus can redirect a membrane reporter from outer segments (OS) to the plasma membrane of the IS. The sequence necessary for this behavior was mapped to a 20 amino acid region containing a leucine-based ER export motif. The ER export signal is necessary for forward trafficking but not channel oligomerization. Moreover, this ER export signal alone counteracted the di-arginine ER retention signal. Conclusions. We identified an ER export signal in HCN1 that functions with the ER retention signal to maintain equilibrium of HCN1 between the endomembrane system and the plasma membrane. PMID:26030105

  7. Touché! STARD3 and STARD3NL tether the ER to endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Léa P; Tomasetto, Catherine; Alpy, Fabien

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) are subcellular regions where the membranes of distinct organelles come into close apposition. These specialized areas of the cell, which are involved in inter-organelle metabolite exchange, are scaffolded by specific complexes. STARD3 [StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein)-related lipid transfer domain-3] and its close paralogue STARD3NL (STARD3 N-terminal like) are involved in the formation of contacts between late-endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The lipid transfer protein (LTP) STARD3 and STARD3NL, which are both anchored on the limiting membrane of late endosomes (LEs), interact with ER-anchored VAP [VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-associated protein] (VAP-A and VAP-B) proteins. This direct interaction allows ER-endosome contact formation. STARD3 or STARD3NL-mediated ER-endosome contacts, which affect endosome dynamics, are believed to be involved in cholesterol transport. PMID:27068960

  8. Biodegradable, Tethered Lipid Bilayer-Microsphere Systems with Membrane-Integrated α-Helical Peptide Anchors.

    PubMed

    Fried, Eric S; Luchan, Joshua; Gilchrist, M Lane

    2016-04-12

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are ideally suited for the study of biomembrane-biomembrane interactions and for the biomimicry of cell-to-cell communication, allowing for surface ligand displays that contain laterally mobile elements. However, the SLB paradigm does not include three-dimensionality and biocompatibility. As a way to bypass these limitations, we have developed a biodegradable form of microsphere SLBs, also known as proteolipobeads (PLBs), using PLGA microspheres. Microspheres were synthesized using solvent evaporation and size selected with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Biomembranes were covalently tethered upon fusion to microsphere supports via short-chain PEG spacers connecting membrane-integrated α-helical peptides and the microsphere surface, affecting membrane diffusivity and mobility as indicated by confocal FRAP analysis. Membrane heterogeneities, which are attributed to PLGA hydrophobicity and rough surface topography, are curtailed by the addition of PEG tethers. This method allows for the presentation of tethered, laterally mobile biomembranes in three dimensions with functionally embedded attachment peptides for mobile ligand displays. PMID:26972467

  9. A novel role of Rab11 in trafficking GPI-anchored trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Sayantanee; Docampo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a unicellular parasite that possesses a contractile vacuole complex (CVC). This organelle is usually present in free-living protists and is mainly involved in osmoregulation. However, in some organisms, like for example Dictyostelium discoideum, other roles include calcium homeostasis and transference of proteins to the plasma membrane. T. cruzi plasma membrane is very rich in glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GPI-AP) and a very important group of GPI-AP is that of the trans-sialidases. These enzymes catalyze the transfer of sialic acid from host glycoconjugates to mucins present in the surface of the parasite and are important for host cell invasion among other functions. We recently reported that a pathway dependent on the Rab GTPase Rab11 is involved in the traffic of trans-sialidases to the plasma membrane through the CVC of the infective stages of the parasite and that preventing this traffic results in considerable reduction in the ability of T. cruzi to infect host cells. We also found that traffic of other GPI-anchored proteins is also through the CVC but uses a Rab11-independent pathway. These represent unconventional pathways of GPI-anchored protein traffic to the plasma membrane. PMID:25862161

  10. Upregulated function of mitochondria-associated ER membranes in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Area-Gomez, Estela; del Carmen Lara Castillo, Maria; Tambini, Marc D; Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina; de Groof, Ad J C; Madra, Moneek; Ikenouchi, Junichi; Umeda, Masato; Bird, Thomas D; Sturley, Stephen L; Schon, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase, via an unknown mechanism. We recently showed that presenilin-1 and -2, the catalytic components of γ-secretase, and γ-secretase activity itself, are highly enriched in a subcompartment of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is physically and biochemically connected to mitochondria, called mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs). We now show that MAM function and ER–mitochondrial communication—as measured by cholesteryl ester and phospholipid synthesis, respectively—are increased significantly in presenilin-mutant cells and in fibroblasts from patients with both the familial and sporadic forms of AD. We also show that MAM is an intracellular detergent-resistant lipid raft (LR)-like domain, consistent with the known presence of presenilins and γ-secretase activity in rafts. These findings may help explain not only the aberrant APP processing but also a number of other biochemical features of AD, including altered lipid metabolism and calcium homeostasis. We propose that upregulated MAM function at the ER–mitochondrial interface, and increased cross-talk between these two organelles, may play a hitherto unrecognized role in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22892566

  11. Biochemical requirements for the targeting and fusion of ER-derived transport vesicles with purified yeast Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In order for secretion to progress, ER-derived transport vesicles must target to, and fuse with the cis-Golgi compartment. These processes have been reconstituted using highly enriched membrane fractions and partially purified soluble components. The functionally active yeast Golgi membranes that have been purified are highly enriched in the cis- Golgi marker enzymes alpha 1,6 mannosyltransferase and GDPase. Fusion of transport vesicles with these membranes requires both GTP and ATP hydrolysis, and depends on cytosolic and peripheral membrane proteins. At least two protein fractions from yeast cytosol are required for the reconstitution of ER-derived vesicle fusion. Soluble fractions prepared from temperature-sensitive mutants revealed requirements for the Ypt1p, Sec19p, Sly1p, Sec7p, and Uso1 proteins. A model for the sequential involvement of these components in the targeting and fusion reaction is proposed. PMID:8636207

  12. Membrane topologies of the PGLa antimicrobial peptide and a transmembrane anchor sequence by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization/solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Evgeniy Sergeevich; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Tordo, Paul; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been introduced to overcome the sensitivity limitations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy also of supported lipid bilayers. When investigated by solid-state NMR techniques the approach typically involves doping the samples with biradicals and their investigation at cryo-temperatures. Here we investigated the effects of temperature and membrane hydration on the topology of amphipathic and hydrophobic membrane polypeptides. Although the antimicrobial PGLa peptide in dimyristoyl phospholipids is particularly sensitive to topological alterations, the DNP conditions represent well its membrane alignment also found in bacterial lipids at ambient temperature. With a novel membrane-anchored biradical and purpose-built hardware a 17-fold enhancement in NMR signal intensity is obtained by DNP which is one of the best obtained for a truly static matrix-free system. Furthermore, a membrane anchor sequence encompassing 19 hydrophobic amino acid residues was investigated. Although at cryotemperatures the transmembrane domain adjusts it membrane tilt angle by about 10 degrees, the temperature dependence of two-dimensional separated field spectra show that freezing the motions can have beneficial effects for the structural analysis of this sequence. PMID:26876950

  13. Membrane topologies of the PGLa antimicrobial peptide and a transmembrane anchor sequence by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization/solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Salnikov, Evgeniy Sergeevich; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Tordo, Paul; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been introduced to overcome the sensitivity limitations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy also of supported lipid bilayers. When investigated by solid-state NMR techniques the approach typically involves doping the samples with biradicals and their investigation at cryo-temperatures. Here we investigated the effects of temperature and membrane hydration on the topology of amphipathic and hydrophobic membrane polypeptides. Although the antimicrobial PGLa peptide in dimyristoyl phospholipids is particularly sensitive to topological alterations, the DNP conditions represent well its membrane alignment also found in bacterial lipids at ambient temperature. With a novel membrane-anchored biradical and purpose-built hardware a 17-fold enhancement in NMR signal intensity is obtained by DNP which is one of the best obtained for a truly static matrix-free system. Furthermore, a membrane anchor sequence encompassing 19 hydrophobic amino acid residues was investigated. Although at cryotemperatures the transmembrane domain adjusts it membrane tilt angle by about 10 degrees, the temperature dependence of two-dimensional separated field spectra show that freezing the motions can have beneficial effects for the structural analysis of this sequence. PMID:26876950

  14. Oligomerization of the UapA Purine Transporter Is Critical for ER-Exit, Plasma Membrane Localization and Turnover.

    PubMed

    Martzoukou, Olga; Karachaliou, Mayia; Yalelis, Vassilis; Leung, James; Byrne, Bernadette; Amillis, Sotiris; Diallinas, George

    2015-08-14

    Central to the process of transmembrane cargo trafficking is the successful folding and exit from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) through packaging in COPII vesicles. Here, we use the UapA purine transporter of Aspergillus nidulans to investigate the role of cargo oligomerization in membrane trafficking. We show that UapA oligomerizes (at least dimerizes) and that oligomerization persists upon UapA endocytosis and vacuolar sorting. Using a validated bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we provide evidence that a UapA oligomerization is associated with ER-exit and turnover, as ER-retained mutants due to either modification of a Tyr-based N-terminal motif or partial misfolding physically associate but do not associate properly. Co-expression of ER-retained mutants with wild-type UapA leads to in trans plasma membrane localization of the former, confirming that oligomerization initiates in the ER. Genetic suppression of an N-terminal mutation in the Tyr motif and mutational analysis suggest that transmembrane α-helix 7 affects the oligomerization interface. Our results reveal that transporter oligomerization is essential for membrane trafficking and turnover and is a common theme in fungi and mammalian cells. PMID:26049015

  15. A Plasma Membrane-Anchored Fluorescent Protein Fusion Illuminates Sieve Element Plasma Membranes in Arabidopsis and Tobacco1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew V.; Wolniak, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid acquisition of quantitative anatomical data from the sieve tubes of angiosperm phloem has been confounded by their small size, their distance from organ surfaces, and the time-consuming nature of traditional methods, such as transmission electron microscopy. To improve access to these cells, for which good anatomical data are critical, a monomeric yellow fluorescent protein (mCitrine) was N-terminally fused to a small (approximately 6 kD) membrane protein (AtRCI2A) and stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0 ecotype) and Nicotiana tabacum (‘Samsun’) under the control of a companion cell-specific promoter (AtSUC2p). The construct, called by its abbreviation SUmCR, yielded stable sieve element (SE) plasma membrane fluorescence labeling, even after plastic (methacrylate) embedding. In conjunction with wide-field fluorescence measurements of sieve pore number and position using aniline blue-stained callose, mCitrine-labeled material was used to calculate rough estimates of sieve tube-specific conductivity for both species. The SUmCR construct also revealed a hitherto unknown expression domain of the AtSUC2 Suc-H+ symporter in the epidermis of the cell division zone of developing root tips. The success of this construct in targeting plasma membrane-anchored fluorescent proteins to SEs could be attributable to the small size of AtRCI2A or to the presence of other signals innate to AtRCI2A that permit the protein to be trafficked to SEs. The construct provides a hitherto unique entrée into companion cell-to-SE protein targeting, as well as a new tool for studying whole-plant phloem anatomy and architecture. PMID:18223149

  16. Modification-specific proteomics of plasma membrane proteins: identification and characterization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins released upon phospholipase D treatment.

    PubMed

    Elortza, Felix; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Foster, Leonard J; Nühse, Thomas S; Brodbeck, Urs; Peck, Scott C; Jensen, Ole N

    2006-04-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are displayed through diverse mechanisms, including anchoring in the extracellular leaflet via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecules. GPI-anchored membrane proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse protein family, and their importance is well-recognized as they are candidate cell surface biomarker molecules with potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in molecular medicine. GPI-APs have also attracted interest in plant biotechnology because of their role in root development and cell remodeling. Using a shave-and-conquer concept, we demonstrate that phospholipase D (PLD) treatment of human and plant plasma membrane fractions leads to the release of GPI-anchored proteins that were identified and characterized by capillary liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to phospholipase C, the PLD enzyme is not affected by structural heterogeneity of the GPI moiety, making PLD a generally useful reagent for proteomic investigations of GPI-anchored proteins in a variety of cells, tissues, and organisms. A total of 11 human GPI-APs and 35 Arabidopsis thaliana GPI-APs were identified, representing a significant addition to the number of experimentally detected GPI-APs in both species. Computational GPI-AP sequence analysis tools were investigated for the characterization of the identified GPI-APs, and these demonstrated that there is some discrepancy in their efficiency in classification of GPI-APs and the exact assignment of omega-sites. This study highlights the efficiency of an integrative proteomics approach that combines experimental and computational methods to provide the selectivity, specificity, and sensitivity required for characterization of post-translationally modified membrane proteins. PMID:16602701

  17. Membrane contacts between endosomes and ER provide sites for PTP1B-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; White, Ian J; Tsapara, Anna; Futter, Clare E

    2010-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a critical determinator of cell fate. Signalling from this receptor tyrosine kinase is spatially regulated by progression through the endocytic pathway, governing receptor half-life and accessibility to signalling proteins and phosphatases. Endocytosis of EGFR is required for interaction with the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B (ref. 1), which localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), raising the question of how PTP1B comes into contact with endosomal EGFR. We show that EGFR-PTP1B interaction occurs by means of direct membrane contacts between the perimeter membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the ER. The population of EGFR interacting with PTP1B is the same population that undergo ESCRT-mediated (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) sorting within MVBs, and PTP1B activity promotes the sequestration of EGFR on to MVB internal vesicles. Membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER form in both the presence and absence of stimulation by EGF. Thus membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER may represent a global mechanism for direct interaction between proteins on these two organelles. PMID:20118922

  18. Distinct mechanisms regulating mechanical force-induced Ca2+ signals at the plasma membrane and the ER in human MSCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Joo, Chirlmin; Seong, Jihye; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W; Palmer, Amy E; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip; Jakobsson, Eric; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear that how subcellular organelles respond to external mechanical stimuli. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical force regulates Ca2+ signaling at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in human mesenchymal stem cells. Without extracellular Ca2+, ER Ca2+ release is the source of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations induced by laser-tweezer-traction at the plasma membrane, providing a model to study how mechanical stimuli can be transmitted deep inside the cell body. This ER Ca2+ release upon mechanical stimulation is mediated not only by the mechanical support of cytoskeleton and actomyosin contractility, but also by mechanosensitive Ca2+ permeable channels on the plasma membrane, specifically TRPM7. However, Ca2+ influx at the plasma membrane via mechanosensitive Ca2+ permeable channels is only mediated by the passive cytoskeletal structure but not active actomyosin contractility. Thus, active actomyosin contractility is essential for the response of ER to the external mechanical stimuli, distinct from the mechanical regulation at the plasma membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04876.001 PMID:25667984

  19. Roles of the Protruding Loop of Factor B Essential for the Localization of Lipoproteins (LolB) in the Anchoring of Bacterial Triacylated Proteins to the Outer Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  20. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  1. MT4-(MMP17) and MT6-MMP (MMP25), A unique set of membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinases: properties and expression in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Anjum; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Huiren; Bernardo, M. Margarida; Cho, Jin-Ah

    2014-01-01

    The process of cancer progression involves the action of multiple proteolytic systems, among which the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a pivotal role. The MMPs evolved to accomplish their proteolytic tasks in multiple cellular and tissue microenvironments including lipid rafts by incorporation and deletions of specific structural domains. The membrane type-MMPs (MT-MMPs) incorporated membrane anchoring domains that display these proteases at the cell surface, and thus they are optimal pericellular proteolytic machines. Two members of the MT-MMP subfamily, MMP-17 (MT4-MMP) and MMP-25 (MT6-MMP), are anchored to the plasma membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor, which confers these enzymes a unique set of regulatory and functional mechanisms that separates them from the rest of the MMP family. Discovered almost a decade ago, the body of work on GPI-MT-MMPs today is still surprisingly limited when compared to other MT-MMPs. However, new evidence shows that the GPI-MT-MMPs are highly expressed in human cancer, where they are associated with progression. Accumulating biochemical and functional evidence also highlights their distinct properties. In this review, we summarize the structural, biochemical, and biological properties of GPI-MT-MMPs and present an overview of their expression and role in cancer. We further discuss the potential implications of GPI-anchoring for enzyme function. Finally, we comment on the new scientific challenges that lie ahead to better understand the function and role in cancer of these intriguing but yet unique MMPs. PMID:18286233

  2. Lipid-sorting by ceramide structure from plasma membrane to ER for the cholera toxin receptor ganglioside GM1

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapen, Daniel J.-F.; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; te Welscher, Yvonne M.; Saslowsky, David E.; Kaoutzani, Lydia; Brandsma, Eelke; D’Auria, Ludovic; Park, Hyejung; Wagner, Jessica S.; Drake, Kimberly R.; Kang, Minchul; Benjamin, Thomas; Ullman, M. David; Costello, Catherine E.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; Baumgart, Tobias; Massol, Ramiro H.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The glycosphingolipid GM1 binds cholera toxin (CT) on host cells and carries it retrograde from the plasma membrane (PM) through endosomes, the trans-Golgi (TGN), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to induce toxicity. To elucidate how a membrane lipid can specify trafficking in these pathways, we synthesized GM1 isoforms with alternate ceramide domains and imaged their trafficking in live cells. Only GM1 with unsaturated acyl chains sorted efficiently from PM to TGN and ER. Toxin binding, which effectively crosslinks GM1 lipids, was dispensable, but membrane cholesterol and the lipid raft-associated proteins actin and flotillin were required. The results implicate a protein-dependent mechanism of lipid-sorting by ceramide structure and provide a molecular explanation for the diversity and specificity of retrograde trafficking by CT in host cells. PMID:22975326

  3. Phosphorylation of the C Terminus of RHD3 Has a Critical Role in Homotypic ER Membrane Fusion in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Haruko; Yokota, Etsuo; Kuwata, Keiko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Mano, Shoji; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Brandizzi, Federica; Shimmen, Teruo; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of dynamically changing tubules and cisternae. In animals and yeast, homotypic ER membrane fusion is mediated by fusogens (atlastin and Sey1p, respectively) that are membrane-associated dynamin-like GTPases. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), another dynamin-like GTPase, ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 (RHD3), has been proposed as an ER membrane fusogen, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we show that RHD3 has an ER membrane fusion activity that is enhanced by phosphorylation of its C terminus. The ER network was RHD3-dependently reconstituted from the cytosol and microsome fraction of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultured cells by exogenously adding GTP, ATP, and F-actin. We next established an in vitro assay system of ER tubule formation with Arabidopsis ER vesicles, in which addition of GTP caused ER sac formation from the ER vesicles. Subsequent application of a shearing force to this system triggered the formation of tubules from the ER sacs in an RHD-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, in the absence of a shearing force, Ser/Thr kinase treatment triggered RHD3-dependent tubule formation. Mass spectrometry showed that RHD3 was phosphorylated at multiple Ser and Thr residues in the C terminus. An antibody against the RHD3 C-terminal peptide abolished kinase-triggered tubule formation. When the Ser cluster was deleted or when the Ser residues were replaced with Ala residues, kinase treatment had no effect on tubule formation. Kinase treatment induced the oligomerization of RHD3. Neither phosphorylation-dependent modulation of membrane fusion nor oligomerization has been reported for atlastin or Sey1p. Taken together, we propose that phosphorylation-stimulated oligomerization of RHD3 enhances ER membrane fusion to form the ER network. PMID:26684656

  4. The ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 is a positive regulator of T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanming; Zhao, Fang; Qiu, Quan; Chen, Kun; Wei, Juncheng; Kong, Qingfei; Gao, Beixue; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jinping; Song, Jianxun; Zhang, Donna D.; Zhang, Jianing; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin; Fang, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of positive regulators of T-cell immunity induced during autoimmune diseases is critical for developing novel therapies. The endoplasmic reticulum resident ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 has recently emerged as a critical regulator of dendritic cell antigen presentation, but its role in T-cell immunity is unknown. Here we show that genetic deletion of Hrd1 in mice inhibits T-cell proliferation, production of IL-2, and differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells, and consequently protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Hrd1 facilitates T-cell proliferation by the destruction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, and deletion of p27kip1 in Hrd1-null T-cells rescues proliferative capacity but not the production of cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17. T-cell expression of Hrd1 is higher in patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy individuals, and knockdown of Hrd1 in human CD4+ T cells inhibits activation and differentiation to Th1 and Th17 cells. Our study identifies Hrd1 as a previously unappreciated positive regulator of T cells and implies that Hrd1 is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27417417

  5. The ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 is a positive regulator of T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanming; Zhao, Fang; Qiu, Quan; Chen, Kun; Wei, Juncheng; Kong, Qingfei; Gao, Beixue; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jinping; Song, Jianxun; Zhang, Donna D; Zhang, Jianing; Fan, Yunping; Li, Huabin; Fang, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of positive regulators of T-cell immunity induced during autoimmune diseases is critical for developing novel therapies. The endoplasmic reticulum resident ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 has recently emerged as a critical regulator of dendritic cell antigen presentation, but its role in T-cell immunity is unknown. Here we show that genetic deletion of Hrd1 in mice inhibits T-cell proliferation, production of IL-2, and differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells, and consequently protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Hrd1 facilitates T-cell proliferation by the destruction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1), and deletion of p27(kip1) in Hrd1-null T-cells rescues proliferative capacity but not the production of cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17. T-cell expression of Hrd1 is higher in patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy individuals, and knockdown of Hrd1 in human CD4(+) T cells inhibits activation and differentiation to Th1 and Th17 cells. Our study identifies Hrd1 as a previously unappreciated positive regulator of T cells and implies that Hrd1 is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27417417

  6. Cooperation of the ER-shaping proteins atlastin, lunapark, and reticulons to generate a tubular membrane network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songyu; Tukachinsky, Hanna; Romano, Fabian B; Rapoport, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contains a network of membrane tubules, which transitions into sheets during mitosis. Network formation involves curvature-stabilizing proteins, including the reticulons (Rtns), as well as the membrane-fusing GTPase atlastin (ATL) and the lunapark protein (Lnp). Here, we have analyzed how these proteins cooperate. ATL is needed to not only form, but also maintain, the ER network. Maintenance requires a balance between ATL and Rtn, as too little ATL activity or too high Rtn4a concentrations cause ER fragmentation. Lnp only affects the abundance of three-way junctions and tubules. We suggest a model in which ATL-mediated fusion counteracts the instability of free tubule ends. ATL tethers and fuses tubules stabilized by the Rtns, and transiently sits in newly formed three-way junctions. Lnp subsequently moves into the junctional sheets and forms oligomers. Lnp is inactivated by mitotic phosphorylation, which contributes to the tubule-to-sheet conversion of the ER. PMID:27619977

  7. Enhancement of tendon–bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon–bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon–bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon–bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon–bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. PMID:27601901

  8. Enhancement of tendon-bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon-bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon-bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon-bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon-bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. PMID:27601901

  9. Mutations in the membrane anchor of yeast cytochrome c1 compensate for the absence of Oxa1p and generate carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, P; Lemaire, C; Bonnefoy, N; Brivet-Chevillotte, P; Dujardin, G

    1998-01-01

    Oxa1p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that is mainly required for the insertion/assembly of complex IV and ATP synthase and is functionally conserved in yeasts, humans, and plants. We have isolated several independent suppressors that compensate for the absence of Oxa1p. Molecular cloning and sequencing reveal that the suppressor mutations (CYT1-1 to -6) correspond to amino acid substitutions that are all located in the membrane anchor of cytochrome c1 and decrease the hydrophobicity of this anchor. Cytochrome c1 is a catalytic subunit of complex III, but the CYT1-1 mutation does not seem to affect the electron transfer activity. The double-mutant cyt1-1,164, which has a drastically reduced electron transfer activity, still retains the suppressor activity. Altogether, these results suggest that the suppressor function of cytochrome c1 is independent of its electron transfer activity. In addition to the membrane-bound cytochrome c1, carbonate-extractable forms accumulate in all the suppressor strains. We propose that these carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1 are responsible for the suppressor function by preventing the degradation of the respiratory complex subunits that occur in the absence of Oxa1p. PMID:9755193

  10. mRNA encoding Sec61β, a tail-anchored protein, is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianying A.; Zhang, Hui; Ilan, Lena; Liu, Ai Xin; Kharchuk, Iryna; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although one pathway for the post-translational targeting of tail-anchored proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been well defined, it is unclear whether additional pathways exist. Here, we provide evidence that a subset of mRNAs encoding tail-anchored proteins, including Sec61β and nesprin-2, is partially localized to the surface of the ER in mammalian cells. In particular, Sec61b mRNA can be targeted to, and later maintained on, the ER using both translation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our data suggests that this process is independent of p180 (also known as RRBP1), a known mRNA receptor on the ER, and the transmembrane domain recognition complex (TRC) pathway components, TRC40 (also known as ASNA1) and BAT3 (also known as BAG6). In addition, our data indicates that Sec61b mRNA might access translocon-bound ribosomes. Our results show that certain tail-anchored proteins are likely to be synthesized directly on the ER, and this facilitates their membrane insertion. Thus, it is clear that mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to ensure efficient targeting of tail-anchored proteins to the surface of the ER. PMID:26272916

  11. Autophagy-Related Direct Membrane Import from ER/Cytoplasm into the Vacuole or Apoplast: A Hidden Gateway also for Secondary Metabolites and Phytohormones?

    PubMed Central

    Kulich, Ivan; Žárský, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Transportation of low molecular weight cargoes into the plant vacuole represents an essential plant cell function. Several lines of evidence indicate that autophagy-related direct endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to vacuole (and also, apoplast) transport plays here a more general role than expected. This route is regulated by autophagy proteins, including recently discovered involvement of the exocyst subcomplex. Traffic from ER into the vacuole bypassing Golgi apparatus (GA) acts not only in stress-related cytoplasm recycling or detoxification, but also in developmentally-regulated biopolymer and secondary metabolite import into the vacuole (or apoplast), exemplified by storage proteins and anthocyanins. We propose that this pathway is relevant also for some phytohormones’ (e.g., auxin, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA)) degradation. We hypothesize that SA is not only an autophagy inducer, but also a cargo for autophagy-related ER to vacuole membrane container delivery and catabolism. ER membrane localized enzymes will potentially enhance the area of biosynthetic reactive surfaces, and also, abundant ER localized membrane importers (e.g., ABC transporters) will internalize specific molecular species into the autophagosome biogenesis domain of ER. Such active ER domains may create tubular invaginations of tonoplast into the vacuoles as import intermediates. Packaging of cargos into the ER-derived autophagosome-like containers might be an important mechanism of vacuole and exosome biogenesis and cytoplasm protection against toxic metabolites. A new perspective on metabolic transformations intimately linked to membrane trafficking in plants is emerging. PMID:24786101

  12. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity. PMID:27284108

  13. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  14. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  15. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  16. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J.; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  17. Localization of FtsI (PBP3) to the Septal Ring Requires Its Membrane Anchor, the Z Ring, FtsA, FtsQ, and FtsL

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, David S.; Chen, Joseph C.; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon

    1999-01-01

    Assembly of the division septum in bacteria is mediated by several proteins that localize to the division site. One of these, FtsI (also called penicillin-binding protein 3) of Escherichia coli, consists of a short cytoplasmic domain, a single membrane-spanning segment, and a large periplasmic domain that encodes a transpeptidase activity involved in synthesis of septal peptidoglycan. We have constructed a merodiploid strain with a wild-type copy of ftsI at the normal chromosomal locus and a genetic fusion of ftsI to the green fluorescent protein (gfp) at the lambda attachment site. gfp-ftsI was expressed at physiologically appropriate levels under control of a regulatable promoter. Consistent with previous results based on immunofluorescence microscopy GFP-FtsI localized to the division site during the later stages of cell growth and throughout septation. Localization of GFP-FtsI to the cell pole(s) was not observed unless the protein was overproduced about 10-fold. Membrane anchor alterations shown previously to impair division but not membrane insertion or transpeptidase activity were found to interfere with localization of GFP-FtsI to the division site. In contrast, GFP-FtsI localized well in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics that inhibit the transpeptidase activity of FtsI. Septal localization depended upon every other division protein tested (FtsZ, FtsA, FtsQ, and FtsL). We conclude that FtsI is a late recruit to the division site, and that its localization depends on an intact membrane anchor. PMID:9882665

  18. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome. PMID:27123544

  19. Eukaryotic N-Glycosylation Occurs via the Membrane-anchored C-terminal Domain of the Stt3p Subunit of Oligosaccharyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Bhaskaran, Rajagopalan; Mohanty, Smita

    2012-01-01

    N-Glycosylation is an essential and highly conserved protein modification. In eukaryotes, it is catalyzed by a multisubunit membrane-associated enzyme, oligosaccharyltransferase (OT). We report the high resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic Stt3p. Unlike its soluble β-sheet-rich prokaryotic counterparts, our model reveals that the C-terminal domain of yeast Stt3p is highly helical and has an overall oblate spheroid-shaped structure containing a membrane-embedded region. Anchoring of this protein segment to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is likely to bring the membrane-embedded donor substrate closer, thus facilitating glycosylation efficiency. Structural comparison of the region near the WWDYG signature motif revealed that the acceptor substrate-binding site of yeast OT strikingly resembles its prokaryotic counterparts, suggesting a conserved mechanism of N-glycosylation from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Furthermore, comparison of the NMR and cryo-EM structures of yeast OT revealed that the molecular architecture of this acceptor substrate-recognizing domain has interesting spatial specificity for interactions with other essential OT subunits. PMID:22865878

  20. Enhancement of fuel cell performance with less-water dependent composite membranes having polyoxometalate anchored nanofibrous interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzari-lotf, Ebrahim; Jacob, Mohan V.; Ghassemi, Hossein; Ahmad, Arshad; Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Zakeri, Masoumeh; Mehdipour-Ataei, Shahram

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxometalate immobilized nanofiber was used to fabricate low gas permeable layer for composite membranes designed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operating at low relative humidity (RH). The composite membranes revealed enhanced proton conductivity in dry conditions compared with state-of-the-art pristine membrane (Nafion 112, N112). This was coupled with a low fuel crossover inheriting the composite membranes about 100 mV higher OCV than N112 when tested in PEMFC at 60 °C and 40% RH. A maximum power density of up to 930 mW cm-2 was also achieved which is substantially higher than the N112 under similar conditions (577 mW cm-2). Such remarkable performance enhancement along with undetectable leaching of immobilized polyoxometalate, high dimensional stability and low water uptake of the composite membranes suggest a strong potential for PEMFC under low RH operation.

  1. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  2. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  3. Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 encodes a cell membrane-anchored modulator of cell cycle and negatively controls fruit size

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2015-01-01

    Physalis species show a significant variation in berry size; however, the underlying molecular basis is unknown. In this work, we showed that cell division difference in the ovaries might contribute to the ultimate berry size variation within Physalis species, and that mRNA abundance of Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 (PfCNR1), the putative orthologue of the tomato fruit weight 2.2 (FW2.2), was negatively correlated with cell division in the ovaries. Moreover, heterochronic expression variation of the PfCNR1 genes in the ovaries concomitantly correlated with berry weight variation within Physalis species. In transgenic Physalis, multiple organ sizes could be negatively controlled by altering PfCNR1 levels, and cell division instead of cell expansion was primarily affected. PfCNR1 was shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane and to interact with PfAG2 (an AGAMOUS-like protein determining ovary identity). The expression of PfCYCD2;1, a putative orthologue of the mitosis-specific gene CyclinD2;1 in the cell cycle was negatively correlated with the PfCNR1 mRNA levels. PfAG2 was found to selectively bind to the CArG-box in the PfCYCD2;1 promoter and to repress PfCYCD2;1 expression, thus suggesting a PfAG2-mediated pathway for PfCNR1 to regulate cell division. The interaction of PfCNR1 with PfAG2 enhanced the repression of PfCYCD2;1 expression. The nuclear import of PfAG2 was essential in the proposed pathway. Our data provide new insights into the developmental pathways of a cell membrane-anchored protein that modulates cell division and governs organ size determination. This study also sheds light on the link between organ identity and organ growth in plants. PMID:25305759

  4. Characterization of a Functional Soluble Form of a Brassica napus Membrane-Anchored Endo-1,4-β-Glucanase Heterologously Expressed in Pichia pastoris1

    PubMed Central

    Mølhøj, Michael; Ulvskov, Peter; Dal Degan, Florence

    2001-01-01

    The Brassica napus gene, Cel16, encodes a membrane-anchored endo-1,4-β-glucanase with a deduced molecular mass of 69 kD. As for other membrane-anchored endo-1,4-β-glucanases, Cel16 consists of a predicted intracellular, charged N terminus (methionine1-lysine70), a hydrophobic transmembrane domain (isoleucine71-valine93), and a periplasmic catalytic core (lysine94-proline621). Here, we report the functional analysis of Δ1-90Cel16, the N terminally truncated Cel16, missing residues 1 through 90 and comprising the catalytic domain of Cel16 expressed recombinantly in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris as a soluble protein. A two-step purification protocol yielded Δ1-90Cel16 in a pure form. The molecular mass of Δ1-90Cel16, when determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was about 130 kD and about 60 kD after enzymatic removal of N-glycans, fitting the expected molecular mass of 59 kD. Δ1-90Cel16 was highly N glycosylated as compared with the native B. napus Cel16 protein. Δ1-90Cel16 had a pH optimum of 6.0. The activity of Δ1-90Cel16 was inhibited by EDTA and exhibited a strong dependence on calcium. Δ1-90Cel16 showed substrate specificity for low substituted carboxymethyl-cellulose and amorphous cellulose. It did not hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, xyloglycan, xylan, (1→3),(1→4)-β-d-glucan, the highly substituted hydroxyethylcellulose, or the oligosaccharides cellotriose, cellotetraose, cellopentaose, or xylopentaose. Size exclusion analysis of Δ1-90Cel16-hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose showed that Δ1-90Cel16 is a true endo-acting glucanase. PMID:11598241

  5. A new family of StART domain proteins at membrane contact sites has a role in ER-PM sterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Alberto T; Wong, Louise H; Sere, Yves Y; Calderón-Noreña, Diana M; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Menon, Anant K; Levine, Tim P

    2015-01-01

    Sterol traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs by a poorly understood non-vesicular mechanism. We identified a novel, evolutionarily diverse family of ER membrane proteins with StART-like lipid transfer domains and studied them in yeast. StART-like domains from Ysp2p and its paralog Lam4p specifically bind sterols, and Ysp2p, Lam4p and their homologs Ysp1p and Sip3p target punctate ER-PM contact sites distinct from those occupied by known ER-PM tethers. The activity of Ysp2p, reflected in amphotericin-sensitivity assays, requires its second StART-like domain to be positioned so that it can reach across ER-PM contacts. Absence of Ysp2p, Ysp1p or Sip3p reduces the rate at which exogenously supplied sterols traffic from the PM to the ER. Our data suggest that these StART-like proteins act in trans to mediate a step in sterol exchange between the PM and ER. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07253.001 PMID:26001273

  6. The solution structure of the C-terminal domain of NfeD reveals a novel membrane-anchored OB-fold.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yohta; Ohno, Ayako; Morii, Taichi; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-11-01

    Nodulation formation efficiency D (NfeD) is a member of a class of membrane-anchored ClpP-class proteases. There is a second class of NfeD homologs that lack the ClpP domain. The genes of both NfeD classes usually are part of an operon that also contains a gene for a prokaryotic homolog of stomatin. (Stomatin is a major integral-membrane protein of mammalian erythrocytes.) Such NfeD/stomatin homolog gene pairs are present in more than 290 bacterial and archaeal genomes, and their protein products may be part of the machinery used for quality control of membrane proteins. Herein, we report the structure of the isolated C-terminal domain of PH0471, a Pyrococcus horikoshii NfeD homolog, which lacks the ClpP domain. This C-terminal domain (termed NfeDC) contains a five-strand beta-barrel, which is structurally very similar to the OB-fold (oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding fold) domain. However, there is little sequence similarity between it and previously characterized OB-fold domains. The NfeDC domain lacks the conserved surface residues that are necessary for the binding of an OB-fold domain to DNA/RNA, an ion. Instead, its surface is composed of residues that are uniquely conserved in NfeD homologs and that form the structurally conserved surface turns and beta-bulges. There is also a conserved tryptophan present on the surface. We propose that, in general, NfeDC domains may interact with other spatially proximal membrane proteins and thereby regulate their activities. PMID:18687870

  7. Palmitoylation regulates plasma membrane–nuclear shuttling of R7BP, a novel membrane anchor for the RGS7 family

    PubMed Central

    Drenan, Ryan M.; Doupnik, Craig A.; Boyle, Maureen P.; Muglia, Louis J.; Huettner, James E.; Linder, Maurine E.; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2005-01-01

    The RGS7 (R7) family of RGS proteins bound to the divergent Gβ subunit Gβ5 is a crucial regulator of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in the visual and nervous systems. Here, we identify R7BP, a novel neuronally expressed protein that binds R7–Gβ5 complexes and shuttles them between the plasma membrane and nucleus. Regional expression of R7BP, Gβ5, and R7 isoforms in brain is highly coincident. R7BP is palmitoylated near its COOH terminus, which targets the protein to the plasma membrane. Depalmitoylation of R7BP translocates R7BP–R7–Gβ5 complexes from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Compared with nonpalmitoylated R7BP, palmitoylated R7BP greatly augments the ability of RGS7 to attenuate GPCR-mediated G protein–regulated inward rectifying potassium channel activation. Thus, by controlling plasma membrane nuclear–shuttling of R7BP–R7–Gβ5 complexes, reversible palmitoylation of R7BP provides a novel mechanism that regulates GPCR signaling and potentially transduces signals directly from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. PMID:15897264

  8. Er:YAG laser ablation of epiretinal membranes in perfluorocarbon fluid-filled eyeballs: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Weber, Heinz P.; Wesendahl, Th.; Janknecht, P.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: The Er:YAG laser emitting radiation at a wavelength of 2.94 micrometer has been shown to produce precise tissue ablation because of the high water absorption at this wavelength. These studies evaluated the effects of the Er:YAG laser on pig retina utilizing a perfluoro-carbon/retina interphase with the goal to precisely ablate epiretinal membranes. Method: Various laser pulse energies were applied to the surface of pig retinas in perfluorocarbon filled enucleated eyes using a specially designed rotating sample holder. Free running ((tau) equals 250 microseconds) Er:YAG laser pulses were transmitted through a zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) fiber guarded by a low OH-quartz fiber at its distal tip. The tip diameters measured 400 micrometers and 1 mm. The fiber probe was elevated 1 mm above the retinal surface. The laser energy was applied in a systematic fashion while alternating energy settings and probe diameters. Radiant exposures were set to 1 J/cm2, 3 J/cm2, 5 J/cm2, and 10 J/cm2. Results: Eight of ten eyes were treated with concentric circles of 3.5 mm, 6.5 mm, and 9.5 mm radius. The remaining two eyes were treated with a hand held probe. Tissue ablation increased with radiant exposure in a linear fashion. At a radiant exposure of 1 J/cm2, tissue ablation was minimal with a maximum tissue ablation depth of 10 micrometers and minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue. A radiant exposure of 10 J/cm2 produced an ablation depth of 30 - 50 micrometers. As the ablation was performed under perfluorcarbon fluid, used as transmitting medium, no laser- induced pressure transients have been measured. Conclusion: The Er:YAG laser in combination with perfluorocarbon fluid produced precise and homogeneous tissue ablation of the pig retina. Such precise tissue ablation needs to be achieved in order to safely ablate epiretinal membranes in close proximity to the retina surface. Further in-vivo experiments will be done to examine the functionality of the retina after laser

  9. Bradyrhizobium japonicum TlpA, a novel membrane-anchored thioredoxin-like protein involved in the biogenesis of cytochrome aa3 and development of symbiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Loferer, H; Bott, M; Hennecke, H

    1993-01-01

    We report the discovery of a bacterial gene, tlpA, that codes for a hitherto unknown type of thioredoxin-like protein. The gene was found in the course of studying a Tn5 insertion mutant of the soybean root nodule symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The TlpA protein shared up to 31% amino acid sequence identity with various eukaryotic and prokaryotic thioredoxins and protein disulfide isomerases, and possessed a characteristic active-site sequence, Trp-Cys-Val-Pro-Cys. In contrast to all members of the thioredoxin family known to date, TlpA was shown to be anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane by means of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, while the active site-containing part of the protein faced the periplasm. The tlpA mutant had a pleiotropic phenotype in that it was defective in the development of a nitrogen fixing endosymbiosis and exhibited a strongly decreased oxidase activity, as compared with the wild-type. Holocytochrome aa3 was spectroscopically undetectable in the mutant, whereas the apoprotein of subunit one (CoxA) of this oxidase was still synthesized and incorporated into the cytoplasmic membrane. Since cytochrome aa3 is not a prerequisite for the development of symbiosis, the results suggest that TlpA is involved in at least two independent cellular processes, one of which is an essential periplasmic step in the maturation of cytochrome aa3. Images PMID:8253065

  10. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  11. Efficient Trafficking of MDR1/P-Glycoprotein to Apical Canalicular Plasma Membranes in HepG2 Cells Requires PKA-RIIα Anchoring and Glucosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Wojtal, Kacper A.; de Vries, Erik; Hoekstra, Dick

    2006-01-01

    In hepatocytes, cAMP/PKA activity stimulates the exocytic insertion of apical proteins and lipids and the biogenesis of bile canalicular plasma membranes. Here, we show that the displacement of PKA-RIIα from the Golgi apparatus severely delays the trafficking of the bile canalicular protein MDR1 (P-glycoprotein), but not that of MRP2 (cMOAT), DPP IV and 5′NT, to newly formed apical surfaces. In addition, the direct trafficking of de novo synthesized glycosphingolipid analogues from the Golgi apparatus to the apical surface is inhibited. Instead, newly synthesized glucosylceramide analogues are rerouted to the basolateral surface via a vesicular pathway, from where they are subsequently endocytosed and delivered to the apical surface via transcytosis. Treatment of HepG2 cells with the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor PDMP delays the appearance of MDR1, but not MRP2, DPP IV, and 5′NT at newly formed apical surfaces, implicating glucosylceramide synthesis as an important parameter for the efficient Golgi-to-apical surface transport of MDR1. Neither PKA-RIIα displacement nor PDMP inhibited (cAMP-stimulated) apical plasma membrane biogenesis per se, suggesting that other cAMP effectors may play a role in canalicular development. Taken together, our data implicate the involvement of PKA-RIIα anchoring in the efficient direct apical targeting of distinct proteins and glycosphingolipids to newly formed apical plasma membrane domains and suggest that rerouting of Golgi-derived glycosphingolipids may underlie the delayed Golgi-to-apical surface transport of MDR1. PMID:16723498

  12. CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity and membrane anchoring are required for T-cell antigen receptor signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Niklinska, B B; Hou, D; June, C; Weissman, A M; Ashwell, J D

    1994-01-01

    T cells that lack the CD45 transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase have a variety of T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling defects that are corrected by reexpression of wild-type CD45 or its intracytoplasmic domains. In this study, a chimeric molecule containing the myristylation sequence of Src and the intracellular portion of CD45, previously shown to restore function in CD45- T cells, was mutagenized to determine if membrane-associated CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity is required to restore TCR-mediated signaling in CD45- T cells. Abolition of enzymatic activity by substitution of a serine for a critical cysteine in the first catalytic domain resulted in failure of this molecule to restore TCR signaling. Another mutation, in which a single amino acid substitution destroyed the myristylation site, resulted in failure of the chimeric molecule to partition to the plasma membrane. Although expressed at high levels and enzymatically active, this form of intracellular CD45 also failed to restore normal signaling in CD45- T cells. These findings strongly suggest that CD45's function in TCR signaling requires its proximity to membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatase substrates. Images PMID:7526153

  13. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  14. Incorporation of membrane-anchored flagellin or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit enhances the immunogenicity of rabies virus-like particles in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yinglin; Kang, Hongtao; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains an important worldwide public health threat, so safe, effective, and affordable vaccines are still being sought. Virus-like particle-based vaccines targeting various viral pathogens have been successfully produced, licensed, and commercialized. Here, we designed and constructed two chimeric rabies virus-like particles (cRVLPs) containing rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G), matrix (M) protein, and membrane-anchored flagellin (EVLP-F) or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (EVLP-L) as molecular adjuvants to enhance the immune response against rabies. The immunogenicity and potential of cRVLPs as novel rabies vaccine were evaluated by intramuscular vaccination in mouse and dog models. Mouse studies demonstrated that both EVLP-F and EVLP-L induced faster and larger virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) responses and elicited greater numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells secreting IFN-γ or IL-4 compared with a standard rabies VLP (sRVLP) containing only G and M. Moreover, cRVLPs recruited and/or activated more B cells and dendritic cells in inguinal lymph nodes. EVLP-F induced a strong, specific IgG2a response but not an IgG1 response, suggesting the activation of Th1 class immunity; in contrast, Th2 class immunity was observed with EVLP-L. The significantly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses induced by cRVLPs provided complete protection against lethal challenge with RABV. Most importantly, dogs vaccinated with EVLP-F or EVLP-L exhibited increased VNA titers in sera and enhanced IFN-γ and IL-4 secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Taken together, these results illustrate that when incorporated into sRVLP, membrane-anchored flagellin, and heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit possess strong adjuvant activity. EVLP-F and EVLP-L induce significantly enhanced RABV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in both mouse and dog. Therefore, these cRVLPs may be developed as safe and more efficacious rabies vaccine

  15. Incorporation of membrane-anchored flagellin or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit enhances the immunogenicity of rabies virus-like particles in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yinglin; Kang, Hongtao; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains an important worldwide public health threat, so safe, effective, and affordable vaccines are still being sought. Virus-like particle-based vaccines targeting various viral pathogens have been successfully produced, licensed, and commercialized. Here, we designed and constructed two chimeric rabies virus-like particles (cRVLPs) containing rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G), matrix (M) protein, and membrane-anchored flagellin (EVLP-F) or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (EVLP-L) as molecular adjuvants to enhance the immune response against rabies. The immunogenicity and potential of cRVLPs as novel rabies vaccine were evaluated by intramuscular vaccination in mouse and dog models. Mouse studies demonstrated that both EVLP-F and EVLP-L induced faster and larger virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) responses and elicited greater numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ or IL-4 compared with a standard rabies VLP (sRVLP) containing only G and M. Moreover, cRVLPs recruited and/or activated more B cells and dendritic cells in inguinal lymph nodes. EVLP-F induced a strong, specific IgG2a response but not an IgG1 response, suggesting the activation of Th1 class immunity; in contrast, Th2 class immunity was observed with EVLP-L. The significantly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses induced by cRVLPs provided complete protection against lethal challenge with RABV. Most importantly, dogs vaccinated with EVLP-F or EVLP-L exhibited increased VNA titers in sera and enhanced IFN-γ and IL-4 secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Taken together, these results illustrate that when incorporated into sRVLP, membrane-anchored flagellin, and heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit possess strong adjuvant activity. EVLP-F and EVLP-L induce significantly enhanced RABV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in both mouse and dog. Therefore, these cRVLPs may be developed as safe and more efficacious rabies vaccine

  16. AMIGO2, a novel membrane anchor of PDK1, controls cell survival and angiogenesis via Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojin; Lee, Sungwoon; Shrestha, Pravesh; Kim, Jihye; Park, Jeong Ae; Ko, Yeongrim; Ban, Young Ho; Park, Dae-Young; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Hong, Victor Sukbong; Mochizuki, Naoki; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, Weontae

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase–Akt signaling pathway is essential to many biological processes, including cell proliferation, survival, metabolism, and angiogenesis, under pathophysiological conditions. Although 3-phosphoinositide–dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a primary activator of Akt at the plasma membrane, the optimal activation mechanism remains unclear. We report that adhesion molecule with IgG-like domain 2 (AMIGO2) is a novel scaffold protein that regulates PDK1 membrane localization and Akt activation. Loss of AMIGO2 in endothelial cells (ECs) led to apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis with Akt inactivation. Amino acid residues 465–474 in AMIGO2 directly bind to the PDK1 pleckstrin homology domain. A synthetic peptide containing the AMIGO2 465–474 residues abrogated the AMIGO2–PDK1 interaction and Akt activation. Moreover, it effectively suppressed pathological angiogenesis in murine tumor and oxygen-induced retinopathy models. These results demonstrate that AMIGO2 is an important regulator of the PDK1–Akt pathway in ECs and suggest that interference of the PDK1–AMIGO2 interaction might be a novel pharmaceutical target for designing an Akt pathway inhibitor. PMID:26553931

  17. Structure of the Sgt2/Get5 complex provides insights into GET-mediated targeting of tail-anchored membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Aline C.; Simpson, Peter J.; Goldstone, Rachael M.; Krysztofinska, Ewelina M.; Murray, James W.; High, Stephen; Isaacson, Rivka L.

    2013-01-01

    Small, glutamine-rich, tetratricopeptide repeat protein 2 (Sgt2) is the first known port of call for many newly synthesized tail-anchored (TA) proteins released from the ribosome and destined for the GET (Guided Entry of TA proteins) pathway. This leads them to the residential membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum via an alternative to the cotranslational, signal recognition particle-dependent mechanism that their topology denies them. In yeast, the first stage of the GET pathway involves Sgt2 passing TA proteins on to the Get4/Get5 complex through a direct interaction between the N-terminal (NT) domain of Sgt2 and the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Get5. Here we characterize this interaction at a molecular level by solving both a solution structure of Sgt2_NT, which adopts a unique helical fold, and a crystal structure of the Get5_UBL. Furthermore, using reciprocal chemical shift perturbation data and experimental restraints, we solve a structure of the Sgt2_NT/Get5_UBL complex, validate it via site-directed mutagenesis, and empirically determine its stoichiometry using relaxation experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry. Taken together, these data provide detailed structural information about the interaction between two key players in the coordinated delivery of TA protein substrates into the GET pathway. PMID:23297211

  18. Scanning electron microscopy study of neutrophil membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) and their role in anchoring, aggregation and phagocytosis. The effect of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.ru; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Ullrich, Volker; Sud'ina, Galina F.

    2005-04-01

    We have shown that human neutrophils develop dynamic thin and very long tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) upon adhesion to fibronectin, if cell spreading was blocked by Na{sup +}-free medium or by 4-bromophenacyl bromide, N-ethylmaleimide, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole and cytochalasin D (S. I. Galkina, G. F. Sud'ina and V. Ullrich (2001). Exp. Cell Res. 266, 222-228). In the present work we found that similar in size and behavior tubulovesicular extensions were formed on the neutrophil cell bodies upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata in the presence of the nitric oxide donor diethylamine NONOate. In the presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-{omega}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, neutrophils were well spread and had no microextensions. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated that tubulovesicular extensions of neutrophils executed long-range adhesion and binding objects for phagocytosis, such as serum-opsonized zymosan particles and erythrocytes. Tubulovesicular extensions anchored neutrophils to substrata in a {beta}1 and {beta}2 integrin-independent, but L-selectin-dependent manner. BODIPY-sphingomyelin impaired development of tubulovesicular extension, and heparitinase 1 played a role in their destruction. Membrane tubulovesicular extensions are supposed to represent protrusions of an intracellular exocytotic traffic and serve as cellular sensory and adhesive organelles. Nitric oxide seems to play a role in regulation of tubulovesicular extensions formation, thus affecting neutrophil adhesive interactions and phagocytosis.

  19. TssK Is a Trimeric Cytoplasmic Protein Interacting with Components of Both Phage-like and Membrane Anchoring Complexes of the Type VI Secretion System*

    PubMed Central

    Zoued, Abdelrahim; Durand, Eric; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Brunet, Yannick R.; Douzi, Badreddine; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Journet, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine that mediates bacteria-host or bacteria-bacteria interactions. The T6SS core apparatus assembles from 13 proteins that form two sub-assemblies: a phage-like complex and a trans-envelope complex. The Hcp, VgrG, TssE, and TssB/C subunits are structurally and functionally related to components of the tail of contractile bacteriophages. This phage-like structure is thought to be anchored to the membrane by a trans-envelope complex composed of the TssJ, TssL, and TssM proteins. However, how the two sub-complexes are connected remains unknown. Here we identify TssK, a protein that establishes contacts with the two T6SS sub-complexes through direct interactions with TssL, Hcp, and TssC. TssK is a cytoplasmic protein assembling trimers that display a three-armed shape, as revealed by TEM and SAXS analyses. Fluorescence microscopy experiments further demonstrate the requirement of TssK for sheath assembly. Our results suggest a central role for TssK by linking both complexes during T6SS assembly. PMID:23921384

  20. ER – the key to the highway

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Giovanni; Hawes, Chris; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the key organelle at the start of the secretory pathway and the list of its functions is continually growing. The ER organization as a tubular/cisternal network at the cortex of plant cells has recently been shown to be governed by the membrane tubulation proteins of the reticulon family working alongside plant atlastin homologues, members of the RHD3 group of proteins. Such a network has intimate connections with other organelles such as peroxisomes via peroxules, chloroplasts, Golgi bodies and at the cell cortex to the plasma membrane with cytoskeleton at so called “anchor/contact sites”. The ER network is by no means static displaying a range of different movements and acting as a sub-cellular highway supports the motility of organelles such as peroxisomes, mitochondria and Golgi bodies plus the transport of macromolecules such as viral movement proteins, nucleocapsid proteins and RNA. Here we highlight recent and exciting discoveries on the maintenance of the ER structure and its role on movement and biology of other organelles. PMID:25259957

  1. Subcellular Partitioning of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Depends Sensitively on the Composition of Its Tail Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Julia; Egorov, Mikhail V.; Walther, Kirstin A.; Sabet, Ola; Mallah, Jana; Grabenbauer, Markus; Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling networks. PTP1B has long been thought to exert its influence solely from its perch on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, an additional subpopulation of PTP1B has recently been detected in mitochondria extracted from rat brain tissue. Here, we show that PTP1B’s mitochondrial localization is general (observed across diverse mammalian cell lines) and sensitively dependent on the transmembrane domain length, C-terminal charge and hydropathy of its short (≤35 amino acid) tail anchor. Our electron microscopy of specific DAB precipitation revealed that PTP1B localizes via its tail anchor to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy establishing that this OMM pool contributes to the previously reported cytoplasmic interaction of PTP1B with endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptor. We additionally examined the mechanism of PTP1B’s insertion into the ER membrane through heterologous expression of PTP1B’s tail anchor in wild-type yeast and yeast mutants of major conserved ER insertion pathways: In none of these yeast strains was ER targeting significantly impeded, providing in vivo support for the hypothesis of spontaneous membrane insertion (as previously demonstrated in vitro). Further functional elucidation of the newly recognized mitochondrial pool of PTP1B will likely be important for understanding its complex roles in cellular responses to external stimuli, cell proliferation and diseased states. PMID:26431424

  2. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses. PMID:27110810

  3. Macoilin, a Conserved Nervous System–Specific ER Membrane Protein That Regulates Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Africa; Cheung, Benny H. H.; Labouesse, Michel; de Bono, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequence comparisons have highlighted many novel gene families that are conserved across animal phyla but whose biological function is unknown. Here, we functionally characterize a member of one such family, the macoilins. Macoilins are characterized by several highly conserved predicted transmembrane domains towards the N-terminus and by coiled-coil regions C-terminally. They are found throughout Eumetazoa but not in other organisms. Mutants for the single Caenorhabditis elegans macoilin, maco-1, exhibit a constellation of behavioral phenotypes, including defects in aggregation, O2 responses, and swimming. MACO-1 protein is expressed broadly and specifically in the nervous system and localizes to the rough endoplasmic reticulum; it is excluded from dendrites and axons. Apart from subtle synapse defects, nervous system development appears wild-type in maco-1 mutants. However, maco-1 animals are resistant to the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb and sensitive to levamisole, suggesting pre-synaptic defects. Using in vivo imaging, we show that macoilin is required to evoke Ca2+ transients, at least in some neurons: in maco-1 mutants the O2-sensing neuron PQR is unable to generate a Ca2+ response to a rise in O2. By genetically disrupting neurotransmission, we show that pre-synaptic input is not necessary for PQR to respond to O2, indicating that the response is mediated by cell-intrinsic sensory transduction and amplification. Disrupting the sodium leak channels NCA-1/NCA-2, or the N-,P/Q,R-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, also fails to disrupt Ca2+ responses in the PQR cell body to O2 stimuli. By contrast, mutations in egl-19, which encodes the only Caenorhabditis elegans L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel α1 subunit, recapitulate the Ca2+ response defect we see in maco-1 mutants, although we do not see defects in localization of EGL-19. Together, our data suggest that macoilin acts in the ER to regulate assembly or traffic of ion channels or ion channel

  4. Expression and interaction of the mango ethylene receptor MiETR1 and different receptor versions of MiERS1.

    PubMed

    Winterhagen, Patrick; Hagemann, Michael H; Wünsche, Jens N

    2016-05-01

    Different versions of the mango ethylene receptor MiERS1 were identified and the analysis indicates that, in addition to MiERS1, two short versions of this receptor (MiERS1m, MiERS1s), representing truncated proteins with central deletions of functional domains, are present in mango. The short receptor versions reveal a different expression pattern compared to MiERS1, and they are highly variably transcribed. With transient expression assays using fluorescent fusion proteins, the localisation and the interaction of the receptors were determined in leaf cells of the tobacco model. MiERS1, MiETR1, and the short MiERS1 receptor versions are anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and co-localise with each other and with an ER-marker. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the mango receptors appears to induce a re-organisation of the ER resulting in accumulation of ER bodies. Interaction assays suggest that both short MiERS1 receptor versions can bind to proteins located in the ER. Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays indicate, that MiERS1m may dimerise with itself and can also interact with MiERS1, but not with MiETR1. Further, it as found that MiETR1 can interact with MiERS1. Interaction of MiERS1s with the other ethylene receptors could not be detected, although it was located in the ER membrane system. PMID:26993233

  5. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  6. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  7. ER stress and basement membrane defects combine to cause glomerular and tubular renal disease resulting from Col4a1 mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Frances E.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Murray, Lydia S.; Lu, Yinhui; McNeilly, Sarah; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Lennon, Rachel; Sado, Yoshikazu; Brownstein, David G.; Mullins, John J.; Kadler, Karl E.; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Collagen IV is a major component of basement membranes, and mutations in COL4A1, which encodes collagen IV alpha chain 1, cause a multisystemic disease encompassing cerebrovascular, eye and kidney defects. However, COL4A1 renal disease remains poorly characterized and its pathomolecular mechanisms are unknown. We show that Col4a1 mutations in mice cause hypotension and renal disease, including proteinuria and defects in Bowman's capsule and the glomerular basement membrane, indicating a role for Col4a1 in glomerular filtration. Impaired sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and distal nephron despite elevated aldosterone levels indicates that tubular defects contribute to the hypotension, highlighting a novel role for the basement membrane in vascular homeostasis by modulation of the tubular response to aldosterone. Col4a1 mutations also cause diabetes insipidus, whereby the tubular defects lead to polyuria associated with medullary atrophy and a subsequent reduction in the ability to upregulate aquaporin 2 and concentrate urine. Moreover, haematuria, haemorrhage and vascular basement membrane defects confirm an important vascular component. Interestingly, although structural and compositional basement membrane defects occurred in the glomerulus and Bowman's capsule, no tubular basement membrane defects were detected. By contrast, medullary atrophy was associated with chronic ER stress, providing evidence for cell-type-dependent molecular mechanisms of Col4a1 mutations. These data show that both basement membrane defects and ER stress contribute to Col4a1 renal disease, which has important implications for the development of treatment strategies for collagenopathies. PMID:26839400

  8. Ion transport proteins anchor and regulate the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Denker, Sheryl P; Barber, Diane L

    2002-04-01

    Structurally diverse ion transport proteins anchor the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane by binding directly to linker proteins of the ankyrin and protein 4.1 families. Cytoskeletal anchoring regulates cell shape and restricts the activity of ion transport proteins to specialised membrane domains. New directions are being forged by recent findings that localised anchoring by ion transport proteins regulates the ordered assembly of actin filaments and the actin-dependent processes of cell adhesion and motility. PMID:11891121

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial-Associated ER Membranes (MAM) during RNA Virus Infection Reveals Dynamic Changes in Protein and Organelle Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; Wilkins, Courtney; Badil, Samantha; Iskarpatyoti, Jason; Gale, Michael

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I pathway signaling of innate immunity against RNA virus infection is organized between the ER and mitochondria on a subdomain of the ER called the mitochondrial-associated ER membrane (MAM). The RIG-I adaptor protein MAVS transmits downstream signaling of antiviral immunity, with signaling complexes assembling on the MAM in association with mitochondria and peroxisomes. To identify components that regulate MAVS signalosome assembly on the MAM, we characterized the proteome of MAM, ER, and cytosol from cells infected with either chronic (hepatitis C) or acute (Sendai) RNA virus infections, as well as mock-infected cells. Comparative analysis of protein trafficking dynamics during both chronic and acute viral infection reveals differential protein profiles in the MAM during RIG-I pathway activation. We identified proteins and biochemical pathways recruited into and out of the MAM in both chronic and acute RNA viral infections, representing proteins that drive immunity and/or regulate viral replication. In addition, by using this comparative proteomics approach, we identified 3 new MAVS-interacting proteins, RAB1B, VTN, and LONP1, and defined LONP1 as a positive regulator of the RIG-I pathway. Our proteomic analysis also reveals a dynamic cross-talk between subcellular compartments during both acute and chronic RNA virus infection, and demonstrates the importance of the MAM as a central platform that coordinates innate immune signaling to initiate immunity against RNA virus infection. PMID:25734423

  10. PAQR3 modulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daqian; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yuxue; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yi; Song, Bao-Liang; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol biosynthesis is regulated by transcription factors SREBPs and their escort protein Scap. On sterol depletion, Scap/SREBP complex is transported from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus where SREBP is activated. Under cholesterol sufficient condition, Insigs act as anchor proteins to retain Scap/SREBP in the ER. However, the anchor protein of Scap/SREBP in the Golgi is unknown. Here we report that a Golgi-localized membrane protein progestin and adipoQ receptors 3 (PAQR3) interacts with Scap and SREBP and tethers them to the Golgi. PAQR3 promotes Scap/SREBP complex formation, potentiates SREBP processing and enhances lipid synthesis. The mutually exclusive interaction between Scap and PAQR3 or Insig-1 is regulated by cholesterol level. PAQR3 knockdown in liver blunts SREBP pathway and decreases hepatic cholesterol content. Disrupting the interaction of PAQR3 with Scap/SREBP by a synthetic peptide inhibits SREBP processing and activation. Thus, PAQR3 regulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP to the Golgi and disruption of such function reduces cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:26311497

  11. Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase is required in vivo for glycosyl phosphatidylinositol membrane anchoring, O mannosylation, and N glycosylation of protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Orlean, P

    1990-01-01

    Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring, N glycosylation, and O mannosylation of protein occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and involve transfer of precursor structures that contain mannose. Direct genetic evidence is presented that dolichol phosphate mannose (Dol-P-Man) synthase, which transfers mannose from GDPMan to the polyisoprenoid dolichol phosphate, is required in vivo for all three biosynthetic pathways leading to these covalent modifications of protein in yeast cells. Temperature-sensitive yeast mutants were isolated after in vitro mutagenesis of the yeast DPM1 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature of 37 degrees C, the dpm1 mutants were blocked in [2-3H]myo-inositol incorporation into protein and accumulated a lipid that could be radiolabeled with both [2-3H]myo-inositol and [2-3H]glucosamine and met existing criteria for an intermediate in GPI anchor biosynthesis. The likeliest explanation for these results is that Dol-P-Man donates the mannose residues needed for completion of the GPI anchor precursor lipid before it can be transferred to protein. Dol-P-Man synthase is also required in vivo for N glycosylation of protein, because (i) dpm1 cells were unable to make the full-length precursor Dol-PP-GlcNAc2Man9Glc3 and instead accumulated the intermediate Dol-PP-GlcNAc2Man5 in their pool of lipid-linked precursor oligosaccharides and (ii) truncated, endoglycosidase H-resistant oligosaccharides were transferred to the N-glycosylated protein invertase after a shift to 37 degrees C. Dol-P-Man synthase is also required in vivo for O mannosylation of protein, because chitinase, normally a 150-kDa O-mannosylated protein, showed a molecular size of 60 kDa, the size predicted for the unglycosylated protein, after shift of the dpm1 mutant to the nonpermissive temperature. Images PMID:2146492

  12. Mass spectrometric identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Nomura, Ayako; Okayama, Akiko; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2013-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a post-translational modification widely observed among eukaryotic membrane proteins. GPI anchors are attached to proteins via the carboxy-terminus in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, where GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) perform important functions as coreceptors and enzymes. Precursors of GPI-APs (Pre-GPI-APs) contain a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that is involved in cleavage of the signal sequence from the protein and addition of the GPI anchor by the transamidase complex. In order to confirm that a given protein contains a GPI anchor, it is essential to identify the C-terminal peptide containing the GPI-anchor modification site (ω-site). Previously, efficient identification of GPI-anchored C-terminal peptides by mass spectrometry has been difficult, in part because of complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety. We developed a method to experimentally identify GPI-APs and their ω-sites. In this method, a part of GPI-anchor moieties are removed from GPI-anchored peptides using phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF), and peptide sequence is then determined by mass spectrometry. Using this method, we successfully identified 10 GPI-APs and 12 ω-sites in the cultured ovarian adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating that this method is useful for identifying efficiently GPI-APs. PMID:24001144

  13. Confinement of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells is mediated by selective interactions with PDZ domain and A-kinase anchoring proteins but not caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Cathleen D.; Haggie, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates cardiac output by activating adrenergic receptors (ARs) in cardiac myocytes. The predominant cardiac ARs, β1- and β2AR, are structurally similar but mediate distinct signaling responses. Scaffold protein–mediated compartmentalization of ARs into discrete, multiprotein complexes has been proposed to dictate differential signaling responses. To test the hypothesis that βARs integrate into complexes in live cells, we measured receptor diffusion and interactions by single-particle tracking. Unstimulated β1- and β2AR were highly confined in the membrane of H9c2 cardiomyocyte-like cells, indicating that receptors are tethered and presumably integrated into protein complexes. Selective disruption of interactions with postsynaptic density protein 95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)–domain proteins and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) increased receptor diffusion, indicating that these scaffold proteins participate in receptor confinement. In contrast, modulation of interactions between the putative scaffold caveolae and β2AR did not alter receptor dynamics, suggesting that these membrane domains are not involved in β2AR confinement. For both β1- and β2AR, the receptor carboxy-terminus was uniquely responsible for scaffold interactions. Our data formally demonstrate that distinct and stable protein complexes containing β1- or β2AR are formed in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like cells and that selective PDZ and AKAP interactions are responsible for the integration of receptors into complexes. PMID:21680711

  14. Oligomerization and Ca2+/calmodulin control binding of the ER Ca2+-sensors STIM1 and STIM2 to plasma membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rajesh; Müller, Hans-Michael; Nickel, Walter; Seedorf, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ (calcium) homoeostasis and signalling rely on physical contacts between Ca2+ sensors in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and Ca2+ channels in the PM (plasma membrane). STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) and STIM2 Ca2+ sensors oligomerize upon Ca2+ depletion in the ER lumen, contact phosphoinositides at the PM via their cytosolic lysine (K)-rich domains, and activate Ca2+ channels. Differential sensitivities of STIM1 and STIM2 towards ER luminal Ca2+ have been studied but responses towards elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and the mechanism of lipid binding remain unclear. We found that tetramerization of the STIM1 K-rich domain is necessary for efficient binding to PI(4,5)P2-containing PM-like liposomes consistent with an oligomerization-driven STIM1 activation. In contrast, dimerization of STIM2 K-rich domain was sufficient for lipid binding. Furthermore, the K-rich domain of STIM2, but not of STIM1, forms an amphipathic α-helix. These distinct features of the STIM2 K-rich domain cause an increased affinity for PI(4,5)P2, consistent with the lower activation threshold of STIM2 and a function as regulator of basal Ca2+ levels. Concomitant with higher affinity for PM lipids, binding of CaM (calmodulin) inhibited the interaction of the STIM2 K-rich domain with liposomes in a Ca2+ and PI(4,5)P2 concentration-dependent manner. Therefore we suggest that elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration down-regulates STIM2-mediated ER–PM contacts via CaM binding. PMID:24044355

  15. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  16. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  17. Defective lipid remodeling of GPI anchors in peroxisomal disorders, Zellweger syndrome, and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

    PubMed Central

    Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Murakami, Yoshiko; Waterham, Hans R.; Mukai, Satoru; Fujita, Morihisa; Maeda, Yusuke; Taguchi, Ryo; Fujiki, Yukio; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2012-01-01

    Many cell surface proteins in mammalian cells are anchored to the plasma membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). The predominant form of mammalian GPI contains 1-alkyl-2-acyl phosphatidylinositol (PI), which is generated by lipid remodeling from diacyl PI. The conversion of diacyl PI to 1-alkyl-2-acyl PI occurs in the ER at the third intermediate in the GPI biosynthetic pathway. This lipid remodeling requires the alkyl-phospholipid biosynthetic pathway in peroxisome. Indeed, cells defective in dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase (DHAP-AT) or alkyl-DHAP synthase express only the diacyl form of GPI-anchored proteins. A defect in the alkyl-phospholipid biosynthetic pathway causes a peroxisomal disorder, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), and defective biogenesis of peroxisomes causes Zellweger syndrome, both of which are lethal genetic diseases with multiple clinical phenotypes such as psychomotor defects, mental retardation, and skeletal abnormalities. Here, we report that GPI lipid remodeling is defective in cells from patients with Zellweger syndrome having mutations in the peroxisomal biogenesis factors PEX5, PEX16, and PEX19 and in cells from patients with RCDP types 1, 2, and 3 caused by mutations in PEX7, DHAP-AT, and alkyl-DHAP synthase, respectively. Absence of the 1-alkyl-2-acyl form of GPI-anchored proteins might account for some of the complex phenotypes of these two major peroxisomal disorders. PMID:22253471

  18. Membrane-Anchored Cytochrome P450 1A2-Cytochrome b5 Complex Features an X-Shaped Contact between Antiparallel Transmembrane Helices.

    PubMed

    Jeřábek, Petr; Florián, Jan; Martínek, Václav

    2016-04-18

    Eukaryotic cytochromes P450 (P450) are membrane-bound enzymes oxidizing a broad spectrum of hydrophobic substrates, including xenobiotics. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. In particular, the formation of transient complexes of P450 with another protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, cytochrome b5 (cyt b5), dictates catalytic activities of several P450s. To lay a structural foundation for the investigation of these effects, we constructed a model of the membrane-bound full-length human P450 1A2-cyt b5 complex. The model was assembled from several parts using a multiscale modeling approach covering all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD). For soluble P450 1A2-cyt b5 complexes, these simulations yielded three stable binding modes (sAI, sAII, and sB). The membrane-spanning transmembrane domains were reconstituted with the phospholipid bilayer using self-assembly MD. The predicted full-length membrane-bound complexes (mAI and mB) featured a spontaneously formed X-shaped contact between antiparallel transmembrane domains, whereas the mAII mode was found to be unstable in the membrane environment. The mutual position of soluble domains in binding mode mAI was analogous to the sAI complex. Featuring the largest contact area, the least structural flexibility, the shortest electron transfer distance, and the highest number of interprotein salt bridges, mode mAI is the best candidate for the catalytically relevant full-length complex. PMID:26918755

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel repeat-containing Leishmania major gene, ppg1, that encodes a membrane-associated form of proteophosphoglycan with a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Montgomery, J; Stierhof, Y D; Handman, E

    1999-10-29

    Leishmania parasites secrete a variety of proteins that are modified by phosphoglycan chains structurally similar to those of the cell surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan. These proteins are collectively called proteophosphoglycans. We report here the cloning and sequencing of a novel Leishmania major proteophosphoglycan gene, ppg1. It encodes a large polypeptide of approximately 2300 amino acids. The N-terminal domain of approximately 70 kDa exhibits 11 imperfect amino acid repeats that show some homology to promastigote surface glycoproteins of the psa2/gp46 complex. The large central domain apparently consists exclusively of approximately 100 repetitive peptides of the sequence APSASSSSA(P/S)SSSSS(+/-S). Gene fusion experiments demonstrate that these peptide repeats are the targets of phosphoglycosylation in Leishmania and that they form extended filamentous structures reminiscent of mammalian mucins. The C-terminal domain contains a functional glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor addition signal sequence, which confers cell surface localization to a normally secreted Leishmania acid phosphatase, when fused to its C terminus. Antibody binding studies show that the ppg1 gene product is phosphoglycosylated by phosphoglycan repeats and cap oligosaccharides. In contrast to previously characterized proteophosphoglycans, the ppg1 gene product is predominantly membrane-associated and it is expressed on the promastigote cell surface. Therefore this membrane-bound proteophosphoglycan may be important for direct host-parasite interactions. PMID:10531342

  20. A biochemical analysis of the constraints of tail-anchored protein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leznicki, Pawel; Warwicker, Jim; High, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    TA (tail-anchored) proteins utilize distinct biosynthetic pathways, including TRC40 (transmembrane domain recognition complex of 40 kDa)-mediated, chaperone-dependent and/or unassisted routes to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane. We have addressed the flexibility of cytosolic components participating in these pathways, and explored the thermodynamic constraints of their membrane insertion, by exploiting recombinant forms of Sec61β and Cytb5 (cytochrome b5) bearing covalent modifications within their TA region. In both cases, efficient membrane insertion relied on cytosolic factors capable of accommodating a surprising range of covalent modifications to the TA region. For Sec61β, we found that both SGTA (small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α) and TRC40 can bind this substrate with a singly PEGylated TA region. However, by introducing two PEG [poly(ethylene glycol)] moieties, TRC40 binding can be prevented, resulting in a block of subsequent membrane integration. Although TRC40 can bind Sec61β polypeptides singly PEGylated at different locations, membrane insertion is more sensitive to the precise location of PEG attachment. Modelling and experimentation indicate that this post-TRC40 effect results from an increased energetic cost of inserting different PEGylated TA regions into the lipid bilayer. We therefore propose that the membrane integration of TA proteins delivered via TRC40 is strongly dependent upon underlying thermodynamics, and speculate that their insertion is via a phospholipid-mediated process. PMID:21466504

  1. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    PubMed

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling. PMID:27426920

  2. Phytoplasma infection in tomato is associated with re-organization of plasma membrane, ER stacks, and actin filaments in sieve elements

    PubMed Central

    Buxa, Stefanie V.; Degola, Francesca; Polizzotto, Rachele; De Marco, Federica; Loschi, Alberto; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; di Toppi, Luigi Sanità; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Musetti, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplasmas, biotrophic wall-less prokaryotes, only reside in sieve elements of their host plants. The essentials of the intimate interaction between phytoplasmas and their hosts are poorly understood, which calls for research on potential ultrastructural modifications. We investigated modifications of the sieve-element ultrastructure induced in tomato plants by ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma solani,’ the pathogen associated with the stolbur disease. Phytoplasma infection induces a drastic re-organization of sieve-element substructures including changes in plasma membrane surface and distortion of the sieve-element reticulum. Observations of healthy and stolbur-diseased plants provided evidence for the emergence of structural links between sieve-element plasma membrane and phytoplasmas. One-sided actin aggregates on the phytoplasma surface also inferred a connection between phytoplasma and sieve-element cytoskeleton. Actin filaments displaced from the sieve-element mictoplasm to the surface of the phytoplasmas in infected sieve elements. Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of actin and an increase of ER-resident chaperone luminal binding protein (BiP) in midribs of phytoplasma-infected plants. Collectively, the studies provided novel insights into ultrastructural responses of host sieve elements to phloem-restricted prokaryotes. PMID:26347766

  3. Structure and topology of the huntingtin 1-17 membrane anchor by a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Matthias; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2013-08-01

    The very amino-terminal domain of the huntingtin protein is directly located upstream of the protein's polyglutamine tract, plays a decisive role in several important properties of this large protein and in the development of Huntington's disease. This huntingtin 1-17 domain is on the one hand known to markedly increase polyglutamine aggregation rates and on the other hand has been shown to be involved in cellular membrane interactions. Here, we determined the high-resolution structure of huntingtin 1-17 in dodecyl phosphocholine micelles and the topology of its helical domain in oriented phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Using two-dimensional solution NMR spectroscopy the low-energy conformations of the polypeptide were identified in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine detergent micelles. In a next step a set of four solid-state NMR angular restraints was obtained from huntingtin 1-17 labeled with (15)N and (2)H at selected sites. Of the micellar ensemble of helical conformations only a limited set agrees in quantitative detail with the solid-state angular restraints of huntingtin 1-17 obtained in supported planar lipid bilayers. Thereby, the solid-state NMR data were used to further refine the domain structure in phospholipid bilayers. At the same time its membrane topology was determined and different motional regimes of this membrane-associated domain were explored. The pronounced structural transitions of huntingtin 1-17 upon membrane-association result in a α-helical conformation from K6 to F17, i.e., up to the very start of the polyglutamine tract. This amphipathic helix is aligned nearly parallel to the membrane surface (tilt angle ∼77°) and is characterized by a hydrophobic ridge on one side and an alternation of cationic and anionic residues that run along the hydrophilic face of the helix. This arrangement facilitates electrostatic interactions between huntingtin 1-17 domains and possibly with the proximal polyglutamine tract. PMID:23931318

  4. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  5. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  6. Regulation of lipid biosynthesis, sliding motility, and biofilm formation by a membrane-anchored nucleoid-associated protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Indi, Shantinath S; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria use a number of small basic proteins for organization and compaction of their genomes. By their interaction with DNA, these nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) also influence gene expression. Rv3852, a NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is conserved among the pathogenic and slow-growing species of mycobacteria. Here, we show that the protein predominantly localizes in the cell membrane and that the carboxy-terminal region with the propensity to form a transmembrane helix is necessary for its membrane localization. The protein is involved in genome organization, and its ectopic expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in altered nucleoid morphology, defects in biofilm formation, sliding motility, and change in apolar lipid profile. We demonstrate its crucial role in regulating the expression of KasA, KasB, and GroEL1 proteins, which are in turn involved in controlling the surface phenotypes in mycobacteria. PMID:23396914

  7. Regulation of Lipid Biosynthesis, Sliding Motility, and Biofilm Formation by a Membrane-Anchored Nucleoid-Associated Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Indi, Shantinath S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use a number of small basic proteins for organization and compaction of their genomes. By their interaction with DNA, these nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) also influence gene expression. Rv3852, a NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is conserved among the pathogenic and slow-growing species of mycobacteria. Here, we show that the protein predominantly localizes in the cell membrane and that the carboxy-terminal region with the propensity to form a transmembrane helix is necessary for its membrane localization. The protein is involved in genome organization, and its ectopic expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in altered nucleoid morphology, defects in biofilm formation, sliding motility, and change in apolar lipid profile. We demonstrate its crucial role in regulating the expression of KasA, KasB, and GroEL1 proteins, which are in turn involved in controlling the surface phenotypes in mycobacteria. PMID:23396914

  8. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  9. A Methylated Phosphate Group and Four Amide-linked Acyl Chains in Leptospira interrogans Lipid A. The Membrane Anchor of an Unusual Lipopolysaccharide that Activates TLR2*

    PubMed Central

    Que-Gewirth, Nanette L. S.; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Cotter, Robert J.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Adler, Ben; Girons, Isabelle Saint; Werts, Catherine; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans differs from other spirochetes in that it contains homologs of all the Escherichia coli lpx genes required for the biosynthesis of the lipid A anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from L. interrogans cells is unusual in that it activates TLR2 rather than TLR4. The structure of L. interrogans lipid A has now been determined by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical studies. Lipid A was released from LPS of L. interrogans serovar Pomona by 100 °C hydrolysis at pH 4.5 in the presence of SDS. Following purification by anion exchange and thin layer chromatography, the major component was shown to have a molecular weight of 1727. Mild hydrolysis with dilute NaOH reduced this to 1338, consistent with the presence of four N-linked and two O-linked acyl chains. The lipid A molecules of both the virulent and nonvirulent forms of L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae (strain Verdun) were identical to those of L. interrogans Pomona by the above criteria. Given the selectivity of L. interrogans LpxA for 3-hydroxylaurate, we propose that L. interrogans lipid A is acylated with R-3-hydroxylaurate at positions 3 and 3′ and with R-3-hydroxypalmitate at positions 2 and 2′. The hydroxyacyl chain composition was validated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of fatty acid methyl esters. Intact hexa-acylated lipid A of L. interrogans Pomona was also analyzed by NMR, confirming the presence a β-1′,6-linked disaccharide of 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucopyranose units. Two secondary unsaturated acyl chains are attached to the distal residue. The 1-position of the disaccharide is derivatized with an axial phosphate moiety, but the 4′-OH is unsubstituted. 1H and 31P NMR analyses revealed that the 1-phosphate group is methylated. Purified L. interrogans lipid A is inactive against human THP-1 cells but does stimulate tumor necrosis factor production by

  10. The code for directing proteins for translocation across ER membrane: SRP cotranslationally recognizes specific features of a signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, IngMarie; Lara, Patricia; Hessa, Tara; Johnson, Arthur E; von Heijne, Gunnar; Karamyshev, Andrey L

    2015-03-27

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) cotranslationally recognizes signal sequences of secretory proteins and targets ribosome-nascent chain complexes to the SRP receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, initiating translocation of the nascent chain through the Sec61 translocon. Although signal sequences do not have homology, they have similar structural regions: a positively charged N-terminus, a hydrophobic core and a more polar C-terminal region that contains the cleavage site for the signal peptidase. Here, we have used site-specific photocrosslinking to study SRP-signal sequence interactions. A photoreactive probe was incorporated into the middle of wild-type or mutated signal sequences of the secretory protein preprolactin by in vitro translation of mRNAs containing an amber-stop codon in the signal peptide in the presence of the N(ε)-(5-azido-2 nitrobenzoyl)-Lys-tRNA(amb) amber suppressor. A homogeneous population of SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complexes was obtained by the use of truncated mRNAs in translations performed in the presence of purified canine SRP. Quantitative analysis of the photoadducts revealed that charged residues at the N-terminus of the signal sequence or in the early part of the mature protein have only a mild effect on the SRP-signal sequence association. However, deletions of amino acid residues in the hydrophobic portion of the signal sequence severely affect SRP binding. The photocrosslinking data correlate with targeting efficiency and translocation across the membrane. Thus, the hydrophobic core of the signal sequence is primarily responsible for its recognition and binding by SRP, while positive charges fine-tune the SRP-signal sequence affinity and targeting to the translocon. PMID:24979680

  11. Sampling the membrane: function of rhomboid-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, Marius K

    2013-05-01

    Rhomboids constitute a conserved protein superfamily that specifically binds membrane proteins and directs them into various different cellular pathways ranging from regulated secretion to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD). Rhomboid proteases are known to release protein domains from membranes by a cut in their membrane anchor, whereas an emerging new class of rhomboid-family proteins lacks key catalytic residues and is not proteolytically active. Recent work has shown that these rhomboid pseudoproteases, including iRhoms and derlins, bind membrane proteins to regulate their fate, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not known. This review summarizes recent advances in the molecular understanding of rhomboid-family proteins and discusses common principles in how they recognize and bind proteins in the plane of the membrane. PMID:23369641

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1 genes encode a novel family of membrane-anchored lipases that are required for steryl ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Köffel, René; Tiwari, Rashi; Falquet, Laurent; Schneiter, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Sterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells relies on the reciprocal interconversion of free sterols and steryl esters. The formation of steryl esters is well characterized, but the mechanisms that control steryl ester mobilization upon cellular demand are less well understood. We have identified a family of three lipases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for efficient steryl ester mobilization. These lipases, encoded by YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1, are paralogues of the mammalian acid lipase family, which is composed of the lysosomal acid lipase, the gastric lipase, and four novel as yet uncharacterized human open reading frames. Lipase triple-mutant yeast cells are completely blocked in steryl ester hydrolysis but do not affect the mobilization of triacylglycerols, indicating that the three lipases are required for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. Lipase single mutants mobilize steryl esters to various degrees, indicating partial functional redundancy of the three gene products. Lipase double-mutant cells in which the third lipase is expressed from the inducible GAL1 promoter have greatly reduced steady-state levels of steryl esters, indicating that overexpression of any of the three lipases is sufficient for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. The three yeast enzymes constitute a novel class of membrane-anchored lipases that differ in topology and subcellular localization. PMID:15713625

  13. Molecular characterization of rice OsBIANK1, encoding a plasma membrane-anchored ankyrin repeat protein, and its inducible expression in defense responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchun; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Xiaoe; Zheng, Zhong; Song, Fengming

    2010-02-01

    A rice gene, OsBIANK1, encoding a protein containing a typical ankyrin repeat domain, was cloned and identified. The OsBIANK1 protein, consisting of 329 amino acids, contains a conserved ankyrin repeat domain with two ankyrin repeats organized in tandem and was showed to be localized on cytoplasmic membrane during transient expression in onion epidermal cells. Expression of OsBIANK1 was induced by treatment with benzothiadiazole (BTH), a chemical inducer capable of inducing disease resistance response in rice. In BTH-treated rice seedlings, expression of OsBIANK1 was further induced by infection with Magnaporthe grisea, the rice blast fungus, as compared with those in water-treated seedlings. Our preliminary results confirm previous evidences that OsBIANK1 may be involved in regulation of disease resistance response in rice. PMID:19288292

  14. The Arabidopsis Synaptotagmin1 Is Enriched in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites and Confers Cellular Resistance to Mechanical Stresses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sancho, Jessica; Vanneste, Steffen; Lee, Eunkyoung; McFarlane, Heather E.; Esteban del Valle, Alicia; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) contact sites are evolutionarily conserved microdomains that have important roles in specialized metabolic functions such as ER-PM communication, lipid homeostasis, and Ca2+ influx. Despite recent advances in knowledge about ER-PM contact site components and functions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, relatively little is known about the functional significance of these structures in plants. In this report, we characterize the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phospholipid binding Synaptotagmin1 (SYT1) as a plant ortholog of the mammal extended synaptotagmins and yeast tricalbins families of ER-PM anchors. We propose that SYT1 functions at ER-PM contact sites because it displays a dual ER-PM localization, it is enriched in microtubule-depleted regions at the cell cortex, and it colocalizes with Vesicle-Associated Protein27-1, a known ER-PM marker. Furthermore, biochemical and physiological analyses indicate that SYT1 might function as an electrostatic phospholipid anchor conferring mechanical stability in plant cells. Together, the subcellular localization and functional characterization of SYT1 highlights a putative role of plant ER-PM contact site components in the cellular adaptation to environmental stresses. PMID:25792253

  15. The Membrane-Anchored BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 Plays Distinct Roles in Arabidopsis Resistance to Necrotrophic and Biotrophic PathogensW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, Paola; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Bluhm, Burton; AbuQamar, Synan; Chen, Xi; Salmeron, John; Dietrich, Robert A.; Hirt, Heribert; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2006-01-01

    Plant resistance to disease is controlled by the combination of defense response pathways that are activated depending on the nature of the pathogen. We identified the Arabidopsis thaliana BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) gene that is transcriptionally regulated by Botrytis cinerea infection. Inactivation of BIK1 causes severe susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens but enhances resistance to a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. The response to an avirulent bacterial strain is unchanged, limiting the role of BIK1 to basal defense rather than race-specific resistance. The jasmonate- and ethylene-regulated defense response, generally associated with resistance to necrotrophic fungi, is attenuated in the bik1 mutant based on the expression of the plant defensin PDF1.2 gene. bik1 mutants show altered root growth, producing more and longer root hairs, demonstrating that BIK1 is also required for normal plant growth and development. Whereas the pathogen responses of bik1 are mostly dependent on salicylic acid (SA) levels, the nondefense responses are independent of SA. BIK1 is membrane-localized, suggesting possible involvement in early stages of the recognition or transduction of pathogen response. Our data suggest that BIK1 modulates the signaling of cellular factors required for defense responses to pathogen infection and normal root hair growth, linking defense response regulation with that of growth and development. PMID:16339855

  16. DjlA, a Membrane-Anchored DnaJ-Like Protein, Is Required for Cytotoxicity of Clam Pathogen Vibrio tapetis to Hemocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal, Fatma; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Nomane, Yanoura; Le Goïc, Nelly; Paillard, Christine; Jacq, Annick

    2008-01-01

    DjlA is an inner membrane cochaperone belonging to the DnaJ family, which has been shown to be involved in Legionella sp. pathogenesis. In this study, we explored the role of this protein in the physiology and virulence of Vibrio tapetis, the etiological agent of brown ring disease (BRD) in Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum). Analysis of the djlA locus in V. tapetis revealed a putative organization in an operon with a downstream gene that we designated duf924Vt, which encodes a conserved protein with an unknown function and has homologues in bacteria and eukaryotes. djlA mutants displayed a reduced growth rate and showed an important loss of cytotoxic activity against R. philippinarum hemocytes in vitro, which could be restored by extrachromosomal expression of wild-type djlAVt but not duf924Vt. These results are in keeping with the potential importance of DjlA for bacterial pathogenicity and open new perspectives for understanding the mechanism of action of this protein in the novel V. tapetis-R. philippinarum interaction model. PMID:18641167

  17. Mdm1/Snx13 is a novel ER-endolysosomal interorganelle tethering protein.

    PubMed

    Henne, W Mike; Zhu, Lu; Balogi, Zsolt; Stefan, Christopher; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Emr, Scott D

    2015-08-17

    Although endolysosomal trafficking is well defined, how it is regulated and coordinates with cellular metabolism is unclear. To identify genes governing endolysosomal dynamics, we conducted a global fluorescence-based screen to reveal endomembrane effector genes. Screening implicated Phox (PX) domain-containing protein Mdm1 in endomembrane dynamics. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that Mdm1 is a novel interorganelle tethering protein that localizes to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-vacuole/lysosome membrane contact sites (MCSs). We show that Mdm1 is ER anchored and contacts the vacuole surface in trans via its lipid-binding PX domain. Strikingly, overexpression of Mdm1 induced ER-vacuole hypertethering, underscoring its role as an interorganelle tether. We also show that Mdm1 and its paralogue Ydr179w-a (named Nvj3 in this study) localize to ER-vacuole MCSs independently of established tether Nvj1. Finally, we find that Mdm1 truncations analogous to neurological disease-associated SNX14 alleles fail to tether the ER and vacuole and perturb sphingolipid metabolism. Our work suggests that human Mdm1 homologues may play previously unappreciated roles in interorganelle communication and lipid metabolism. PMID:26283797

  18. Decoding Cytoskeleton-Anchored and Non-Anchored Receptors from Single-Cell Adhesion Force Data.

    PubMed

    Sariisik, Ediz; Popov, Cvetan; Müller, Jochen P; Docheva, Denitsa; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Benoit, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Complementary to parameters established for cell-adhesion force curve analysis, we evaluated the slope before a force step together with the distance from the surface at which the step occurs and visualized the result in a two-dimensional density plot. This new tool allows detachment steps of long membrane tethers to be distinguished from shorter jumplike force steps, which are typical for cytoskeleton-anchored bonds. A prostate cancer cell line (PC3) immobilized on an atomic-force-microscopy sensor interacted with three different substrates: collagen-I (Col-I), bovine serum albumin, and a monolayer of bone marrow-derived stem cells (SCP1). To address PC3 cells' predominant Col-I binding molecules, an antibody-blocking β1-integrin was used. Untreated PC3 cells on Col-I or SCP1 cells, which express Col-I, predominantly showed jumps in their force curves, while PC3 cells on bovine-serum-albumin- and antibody-treated PC3 cells showed long membrane tethers. The probability density plots thus revealed that β1-integrin-specific interactions are predominately anchored to the cytoskeleton, while the nonspecific interactions are mainly membrane-anchored. Experiments with latrunculin-A-treated PC3 cells corroborated these observations. The plots thus reveal details of the anchoring of bonds to the cell and provide a better understanding of receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:26445433

  19. Behavior of Giant Vesicles with Anchored DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Vesselin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2007-01-01

    We study changes in curvature and elastic properties of lipid membranes induced by anchoring of long hydrophilic polymers at low polymer surface concentrations (corresponding to the mushroom regime). The effect of anchored polymers on the membrane spontaneous curvature is characterized by monitoring the changes in the fluctuation spectra and the morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles. The polymers used in our study are fluorescently labeled and biotinylated λ-phage DNA molecules which bind to biotinylated giant unilamellar vesicles via a biotin-avidin-biotin linkage. By varying the amount of biotinylated lipid in the membrane, we control the surface concentration of anchors. At low anchor concentrations, the spontaneous curvature of the membrane increases linearly with the DNA concentration. The linear increase is consistent with theoretical predictions for polymer surface concentrations in the mushroom regime. At higher anchor concentrations, which should still belong to the mushroom regime, the vesicles undergo budding transitions. In this latter regime, the bud size is used to estimate the polymer-induced membrane curvature. PMID:17384074

  20. Anchoring the Deficit of the Anchor Deficit: Dyslexia or Attention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willburger, Edith; Landerl, Karin

    2010-01-01

    In the anchoring deficit hypothesis of dyslexia ("Trends Cogn. Sci.", 2007; 11: 458-465), it is proposed that perceptual problems arise from the lack of forming a perceptual anchor for repeatedly presented stimuli. A study designed to explicitly test the specificity of the anchoring deficit for dyslexia is presented. Four groups, representing all…

  1. Three-dimensional architecture of extended synaptotagmin-mediated endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén; Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-04-21

    The close apposition between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM) plays important roles in Ca(2+) homeostasis, signaling, and lipid metabolism. The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts; tricalbins in yeast) are ER-anchored proteins that mediate the tethering of the ER to the PM and are thought to mediate lipid transfer between the two membranes. E-Syt cytoplasmic domains comprise a synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid-binding protein (SMP) domain followed by five C2 domains in E-Syt1 and three C2 domains in E-Syt2/3. Here, we used cryo-electron tomography to study the 3D architecture of E-Syt-mediated ER-PM contacts at molecular resolution. In vitrified frozen-hydrated mammalian cells overexpressing individual E-Syts, in which E-Syt-dependent contacts were by far the predominant contacts, ER-PM distance (19-22 nm) correlated with the amino acid length of the cytosolic region of E-Syts (i.e., the number of C2 domains). Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) shortened the ER-PM distance at E-Syt1-dependent contacts sites. E-Syt-mediated contacts displayed a characteristic electron-dense layer between the ER and the PM. These features were strikingly different from those observed in cells exposed to conditions that induce contacts mediated by the stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and the Ca(2+) channel Orai1 as well as store operated Ca(2+) entry. In these cells the gap between the ER and the PM was spanned by filamentous structures perpendicular to the membranes. Our results define specific ultrastructural features of E-Syt-dependent ER-PM contacts and reveal their structural plasticity, which may impact on the cross-talk between the ER and the PM and the functions of E-Syts in lipid transport between the two bilayers. PMID:25787254

  2. Blind-Anchor-Nut-Installation Fixture (BANIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Norman F., Jr.; Linker, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Blind-anchor-nut-installation fixture, BANIF, developed for replacing or installing anchor nuts in blind holes or other inaccessible places. Attachment of anchor nut to BANIF enables placement of anchor nut on blind side of component.

  3. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  4. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  5. ER-stress in Alzheimer's disease: turning the scale?

    PubMed

    Endres, Kristina; Reinhardt, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are intensely investigated as it is the most common form of dementia and burdens society by its costs and social demands. While key molecules such as A-beta peptides and tau have been identified decades ago, it is still enigmatic what drives the disease in its sporadic manifestation. Synthesis of A-beta peptides as well as phosphorylation of tau proteins comprise normal cellular functions and occur in principle in the healthy as well as in dementia-affected persons. Dyshomeostasis of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) cleavage, energy metabolism or kinase/phosphatase activity due to stressors has been suggested as a trigger of the disease. One way for cells to escape stress based on dysfunction of ER is the unfolded protein response - the UPR. This pathway is composed out of three different routes that differ in proteins involved, targets and consequences for cell fate: activation of transmembrane ER resident kinases IRE1-alpha and PERK or monomerization of membrane-anchored activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) induce activation of versatile transcription factors (XBP-1, eIF2-alpha/ATF4 and ATF6 P50). These bind to specific DNA sequences on target gene promoters and on one hand attenuate general ER-prone protein synthesis and on the other equip the cell with tools to de-stress. If cells fail in stress compensation, this signaling also is able to evoke apoptosis. In this review we summarized knowledge on how APP processing and phosphorylation of tau might be influenced by ER-stress signaling. In addition, we depicted the effects UPR itself seems to have on molecules closely related to AD and describe what is known about UPR in AD animal models as well as in human patients. PMID:24319643

  6. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2016-06-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca(2+) signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca(2+) signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  7. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  8. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  9. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-01-01

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. PMID:25104828

  10. Selective activation of the transcription factor ATF6 mediates endoplasmic reticulum proliferation triggered by a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Bulotta, Stefania; Verderio, Claudia; Benfante, Roberta; Borgese, Nica

    2011-05-10

    It is well known that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is capable of expanding its surface area in response both to cargo load and to increased expression of resident membrane proteins. Although the response to increased cargo load, known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), is well characterized, the mechanism of the response to membrane protein load has been unclear. As a model system to investigate this phenomenon, we have used a HeLa-TetOff cell line inducibly expressing a tail-anchored construct consisting of an N-terminal cytosolic GFP moiety anchored to the ER membrane by the tail of cytochrome b5 [GFP-b(5)tail]. After removal of doxycycline, GFP-b(5)tail is expressed at moderate levels (1-2% of total ER protein) that, nevertheless, induce ER proliferation, as assessed both by EM and by a three- to fourfold increase in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. We investigated possible participation of each of the three arms of the UPR and found that only the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) arm was selectively activated after induction of GFP-b(5)tail expression; peak ATF6α activation preceded the increase in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Surprisingly, up-regulation of known ATF6 target genes was not observed under these conditions. Silencing of ATF6α abolished the ER proliferation response, whereas knockdown of Ire1 was without effect. Because GFP-b(5)tail lacks a luminal domain, the response we observe is unlikely to originate from the ER lumen. Instead, we propose that a sensing mechanism operates within the lipid bilayer to trigger the selective activation of ATF6. PMID:21521793

  11. A Cell-Free Translocation System Using Extracts of Cultured Insect Cells to Yield Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ezure, Toru; Nanatani, Kei; Sato, Yoko; Suzuki, Satomi; Aizawa, Keishi; Souma, Satoshi; Ito, Masaaki; Hohsaka, Takahiro; von Heijine, Gunnar; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Abe, Keietsu; Ando, Eiji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a powerful method to explore the structure and function of membrane proteins and to analyze the targeting and translocation of proteins across the ER membrane. Developing a cell-free system based on cultured cells for the synthesis of membrane proteins could provide a highly reproducible alternative to the use of tissues from living animals. We isolated Sf21 microsomes from cultured insect cells by a simplified isolation procedure and evaluated the performance of the translocation system in combination with a cell-free translation system originating from the same source. The isolated microsomes contained the basic translocation machinery for polytopic membrane proteins including SRP-dependent targeting components, translocation channel (translocon)-dependent translocation, and the apparatus for signal peptide cleavage and N-linked glycosylation. A transporter protein synthesized with the cell-free system could be functionally reconstituted into a lipid bilayer. In addition, single and double labeling with non-natural amino acids could be achieved at both the lumen side and the cytosolic side in this system. Moreover, tail-anchored proteins, which are post-translationally integrated by the guided entry of tail-anchored proteins (GET) machinery, were inserted correctly into the microsomes. These results showed that the newly developed cell-free translocation system derived from cultured insect cells is a practical tool for the biogenesis of properly folded polytopic membrane proteins as well as tail-anchored proteins. PMID:25486605

  12. Granular Simulation of NEO Anchoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazhar, Hammad

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in designing a spacecraft capable of visiting a Near Earth Object (NEO), performing experiments, and then returning safely. Certain periods of this mission will require the spacecraft to remain stationary relative to the NEO. Such situations require an anchoring mechanism that is compact, easy to deploy and upon mission completion, easily removed. The design philosophy used in the project relies on the simulation capability of a multibody dynamics physics engine. On Earth it is difficult to create low gravity conditions and testing in low gravity environments, whether artificial or in space is costly and therefore not feasible. Through simulation, gravity can be controlled with great accuracy, making it ideally suited to analyze the problem at hand. Using Chrono::Engine [1], a simulation package capable of utilizing massively parallel GPU hardware, several validation experiments will be performed. Once there is sufficient confidence, modeling of the NEO regolith interaction will begin after which the anchor tests will be performed and analyzed. The outcome of this task is a study with an analysis of several different anchor designs, along with a recommendation on which anchor is better suited to the task of anchoring. With the anchors tested against a range of parameters relating to soil, environment and anchor penetration angles/velocities on a NEO.

  13. Msp1/ATAD1 maintains mitochondrial function by facilitating the degradation of mislocalized tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chan; Umanah, George K E; Dephoure, Noah; Andrabi, Shaida A; Gygi, Steven P; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ER-targeted tail-anchored (TA) proteins are inserted into membranes by the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored protein (GET) system. Disruption of this system causes a subset of TA proteins to mislocalize to mitochondria. We show that the AAA+ ATPase Msp1 limits the accumulation of mislocalized TA proteins on mitochondria. Deletion of MSP1 causes the Pex15 and Gos1 TA proteins to accumulate on mitochondria when the GET system is impaired. Likely as a result of failing to extract mislocalized TA proteins, yeast with combined mutation of the MSP1 gene and the GET system exhibit strong synergistic growth defects and severe mitochondrial damage, including loss of mitochondrial DNA and protein and aberrant mitochondrial morphology. Like yeast Msp1, human ATAD1 limits the mitochondrial mislocalization of PEX26 and GOS28, orthologs of Pex15 and Gos1, respectively. GOS28 protein level is also increased in ATAD1−/− mouse tissues. Therefore, we propose that yeast Msp1 and mammalian ATAD1 are conserved members of the mitochondrial protein quality control system that might promote the extraction and degradation of mislocalized TA proteins to maintain mitochondrial integrity. PMID:24843043

  14. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  15. Microtubules Contribute to Tubule Elongation and Anchoring of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Resulting in High Network Complexity in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Takahiro; Ueda, Haruko; Kawase, Takashi; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a network of tubules and sheet-like structures in eukaryotic cells. Some ER tubules dynamically change their morphology, and others form stable structures. In plants, it has been thought that the ER tubule extension is driven by the actin-myosin machinery. Here, we show that microtubules also contribute to the ER tubule extension with an almost 20-fold slower rate than the actin filament-based ER extension. Treatment with the actin-depolymerizing drug Latrunculin B made it possible to visualize the slow extension of the ER tubules in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing ER-targeted green fluorescent protein. The ER tubules elongated along microtubules in both directions of microtubules, which have a distinct polarity. This feature is similar to the kinesin- or dynein-driven ER tubule extension in animal cells. In contrast to the animal case, ER tubules elongating with the growing microtubule ends were not observed in Arabidopsis. We also found the spots where microtubules are stably colocalized with the ER subdomains during long observations of 1,040 s, suggesting that cortical microtubules contribute to provide ER anchoring points. The anchoring points acted as the branching points of the ER tubules, resulting in the formation of multiway junctions. The density of the ER tubule junction positively correlated with the microtubule density in both elongating cells and mature cells of leaf epidermis, showing the requirement of microtubules for formation of the complex ER network. Taken together, our findings show that plants use microtubules for ER anchoring and ER tubule extension, which establish fine network structures of the ER within the cell. PMID:25367857

  16. Poxvirus membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  17. Poxvirus Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  18. Anchoring International sets new water depth record

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, H.J.

    1983-07-01

    Santa Barbara Channel has a history steeped in firsts in techniques for the production of offshore oil. Landscaped drilling and production islands, production piers, and directional drilling from land rigs to production under the channel, to name a few. The latest such project was handled by Anchoring International, Inc., a pipe line anchoring company headquartered in Houston, Texas. Contracted by Healy Tibbets Construction Company, prime contractor, Anchoring was commissioned to handle a new deep water record breaking anchoring job. The job was to anchor J-tube extensions in 820 feet of water--the deepest pipe line anchoring job ever undertaken. In most shallow water pipe line anchoring jobs, anchors and anchor installation unit placement over the pipe line is handled from a crane topside with visual assist from divers. However, due to the extreme depth of this project, the installation unit with anchors had to be modified for submersible operator-assisted placement capability. Anchoring International handled the anchor design and installation equipment, and submersible operator assistance was furnished by Oceaneering, International. WASP and JIM atmospheric diving systems were used. All ocean bottom activities were monitored topside with the JERED video-equipped remote controlled vehicle. Since the weight of the anchor sets and power installation unit are minimum, the entire operation was conducted from a small boat sufficient to carry dive equipment and the anchor installation unit power supply. A small pedestal crane was used to lower and retrieve the anchor installation unit.

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  20. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  1. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). The “prion diseases” arise following the conversion of PrPC to a disease-associated isoform called PrPSc or “prion”. Our paper showed that desialylated PrPC inhibited PrPSc formation. Aggregated PrPSc creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrPC trafficking and hence PrPSc formation. The presence of desialylated PrPC caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrPSc production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. PMID:27195066

  2. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). The "prion diseases" arise following the conversion of PrP(C) to a disease-associated isoform called PrP(Sc) or "prion". Our paper showed that desialylated PrP(C) inhibited PrP(Sc) formation. Aggregated PrP(Sc) creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrP(C) trafficking and hence PrP(Sc) formation. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrP(Sc) production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. PMID:27195066

  3. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled "Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment" (Masuishi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27141528

  4. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment” (Masuishi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27141528

  5. Permanent ground anchors: Nicholson design criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. J.; Uranowski, D. D.; Wycliffe-Jones, P. T.

    1982-09-01

    The methods used by Nicholson Construction Company in the design of permanent ground anchors specifically as related to retaining walls are discussed. Basic soil parameters, design concepts, drilling and grouting methods for ground anchors are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on anchors founded in soil rather than rock formations. Also, soil properties necessary for the proper design of anchored retaining walls are detailed. The second chapter of the report is devoted to a general discussion of retaining wall and anchor design. In addition, a design example of an anchored retaining wall is presented in a step by step manner.

  6. Activation of the motor protein upon attachment: Anchors weigh in on cytoplasmic dynein regulation.

    PubMed

    Ananthanarayanan, Vaishnavi

    2016-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major minus-end-directed motor protein in eukaryotes, and has functions ranging from organelle and vesicle transport to spindle positioning and orientation. The mode of regulation of dynein in the cell remains elusive, but a tantalising possibility is that dynein is maintained in an inhibited, non-motile state until bound to cargo. In vivo, stable attachment of dynein to the cell membrane via anchor proteins enables dynein to produce force by pulling on microtubules and serves to organise the nuclear material. Anchor proteins of dynein assume diverse structures and functions and differ in their interaction with the membrane. In yeast, the anchor protein has come to the fore as one of the key mediators of dynein activity. In other systems, much is yet to be discovered about the anchors, but future work in this area will prove invaluable in understanding dynein regulation in the cell. PMID:27143631

  7. ER-α36, a novel variant of ERα, is involved in the regulation of Tamoxifen-sensitivity of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Liang; Guan, Xin; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Qi-Qi; Han, Chao; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Cui; Zhang, Yejun; Qu, Chao; Liu, Jing; Zou, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Although accumulating evidence has confirmed that adjuvant Tamoxifen (TAM) treatment is able to sensitize glioblastoma cells to radiotherapy and inhibit their proliferation, TAM is not a suitable treatment for all types of glioblastoma cells; furthermore, long-term TAM usage may lead to TAM resistance. Therefore, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of TAM resistance is necessary in order to improve TAM clinical therapy and the quality of life of patients suffering from glioblastomas. In this study, the significance of ER-α36 to TAM resistance in glioblastoma cells was examined. First, an analysis of ER-α36 expression in two glioblastoma cell lines U87-MG and U251, showed that ER-α36 was anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane of these cells via Caveolin-1. Subsequent experiments investigating the mechanism of TAM-induced inhibition of U87-MG cell growth showed that TAM exerts its effect by inducing apoptosis via a down-regulation of Survivin expression and an up-regulation of Caspase-3 expression. Furthermore, TAM also arrested the cell cycle at S-phase. However, when U87-MG cells were preconditioned with an ER-α36-specific agonist, IC162, this neutralized TAM-induced inhibition of cell growth. This contrasted with the effect of ER-α36 depletion by RNAi, which enhanced TAM-induced inhibition of cell growth. These findings suggest that resistance to TAM involves ER-α36, which probably acts as a negative regulator of TAM-induced inhibition of glioblastoma cell growth. These findings provide a novel insight into the basis of TAM resistance during glioblastoma therapy and a further study is underway to reveal more about the specific molecular mechanisms associated with ER-α36-mediated TAM resistance. PMID:26898538

  8. ER-phagy mediates selective degradation of endoplasmic reticulum independently of the core autophagy machinery

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Sebastian; Gallagher, Ciara M.; Walter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selective autophagy of damaged or redundant organelles is an important mechanism for maintaining cell homeostasis. We found previously that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes massive ER expansion and triggers the formation of large ER whorls. Here, we show that stress-induced ER whorls are selectively taken up into the vacuole, the yeast lysosome, by a process termed ER-phagy. Import into the vacuole does not involve autophagosomes but occurs through invagination of the vacuolar membrane, indicating that ER-phagy is topologically equivalent to microautophagy. Even so, ER-phagy requires neither the core autophagy machinery nor several other proteins specifically implicated in microautophagy. Thus, autophagy of ER whorls represents a distinct type of organelle-selective autophagy. Finally, we provide evidence that ER-phagy degrades excess ER membrane, suggesting that it contributes to cell homeostasis by controlling organelle size. PMID:25052096

  9. The Pathogenic Mechanism of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Virulence Factor, Mycolactone, Depends on Blockade of Protein Translocation into the ER

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Belinda S.; Hill, Kirsti; McKenna, Michael; Ogbechi, Joy; High, Stephen; Willis, Anne E.; Simmonds, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans is characterised by tissue necrosis and immunosuppression due to mycolactone, the necessary and sufficient virulence factor for Buruli ulcer disease pathology. Many of its effects are known to involve down-regulation of specific proteins implicated in important cellular processes, such as immune responses and cell adhesion. We have previously shown mycolactone completely blocks the production of LPS-dependent proinflammatory mediators post-transcriptionally. Using polysome profiling we now demonstrate conclusively that mycolactone does not prevent translation of TNF, IL-6 and Cox-2 mRNAs in macrophages. Instead, it inhibits the production of these, along with nearly all other (induced and constitutive) proteins that transit through the ER. This is due to a blockade of protein translocation and subsequent degradation of aberrantly located protein. Several lines of evidence support this transformative explanation of mycolactone function. First, cellular TNF and Cox-2 can be once more detected if the action of the 26S proteasome is inhibited concurrently. Second, restored protein is found in the cytosol, indicating an inability to translocate. Third, in vitro translation assays show mycolactone prevents the translocation of TNF and other proteins into the ER. This is specific as the insertion of tail-anchored proteins into the ER is unaffected showing that the ER remains structurally intact. Fourth, metabolic labelling reveals a near-complete loss of glycosylated and secreted proteins from treated cells, whereas cytosolic proteins are unaffected. Notably, the profound lack of glycosylated and secreted protein production is apparent in a range of different disease-relevant cell types. These studies provide a new mechanism underlying mycolactone's observed pathological activities both in vitro and in vivo. Mycolactone-dependent inhibition of protein translocation into the ER not only explains the deficit of innate cytokines, but

  10. Final Report for DE-FG02-04ER15626: P-type ATPases in Plants – Role of Lipid Flippases in Membrane Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2015-02-24

    The long-range goal of the research is to understand the structure and biological functions of different P-type ATPases (ion pumps) in plant cells, and to use that knowledge to enhance the production of bioenergy from plants, or plant-research inspired technologies. Ptype ATPases include ion pumps that specifically transport H+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, or Na+, as well as at least one unusual subfamily that appears to function as lipid flippases, flipping specific lipids from one side of a membrane bilayer to the other. As a group, P-type ATPases are thought to consume more than 1/3 of the cellular ATP in typical eukaryotic cells. Recent research in the Harper lab focused on understanding the biochemical and biological functions of P-type ATPases that flip lipids. These flippases belong to the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases. The activity of lipid flippases is thought to induce membrane curvature and/or create an asymmetry in which certain lipid head groups are preferential exposed to one surface or the other. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 12 members of this family referred to as Aminophospholipid ATPase (ALA) 1 to ALA12. Using genetic knockouts, the Harper lab has established that this unusual subfamily of P-type ATPases are critical for plants to cope with even modest changes in temperature (e.g., down to 15°C, or up to 30°C). In addition, members of one subclade are critical for cell expansion, and loss of function mutants result in severe dwarfism. Other members of this same sub-clade are critical for pollen tube growth, and loss of function mutants are sterile under conditions of hot days and cold nights. While the cellular processes that depend on lipid flippases are still unclear, the genetic analysis of loss of function mutants clearly show they are of fundamental importance to plant growth and response to the environment.

  11. A chemical approach to unraveling the biological function of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor

    PubMed Central

    Paulick, Margot G.; Forstner, Martin B.; Groves, Jay T.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor is a C-terminal posttranslational modification found on many eukaryotic proteins that reside in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. The complex and diverse structures of GPI anchors suggest a rich spectrum of biological functions, but few have been confirmed experimentally because of the lack of appropriate techniques that allow for structural perturbation in a cellular context. We previously synthesized a series of GPI anchor analogs with systematic deletions within the glycan core and coupled them to the GFP by a combination of expressed protein ligation and native chemical ligation [Paulick MG, Wise AR, Forstner MB, Groves JT, Bertozzi CR (2007) J Am Chem Soc 129:11543–11550]. Here we investigate the behavior of these GPI-protein analogs in living cells. These modified proteins integrated into the plasma membranes of a variety of mammalian cells and were internalized and directed to recycling endosomes similarly to GFP bearing a native GPI anchor. The GPI-protein analogs also diffused freely in cellular membranes. However, changes in the glycan structure significantly affected membrane mobility, with the loss of monosaccharide units correlating to decreased diffusion. Thus, this cellular system provides a platform for dissecting the contributions of various GPI anchor components to their biological function. PMID:18077333

  12. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  13. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  14. Cross-species sequence analysis reveals multiple charged residue-rich domains that regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and membrane localization of a kinase anchoring protein 12 (SSeCKS/Gravin).

    PubMed

    Streb, Jeffrey W; Miano, Joseph M

    2005-07-29

    A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) assemble and compartmentalize multiprotein signaling complexes at discrete subcellular locales and thus confer specificity to transduction cascades using ubiquitous signaling enzymes, such as protein kinase A. Intrinsic targeting domains in each AKAP determine the subcellular localization of these complexes and, along with protein-protein interaction domains, form the core of AKAP function. As a foundational step toward elucidating the relationship between location and function, we have used cross-species sequence analysis and deletion mapping to facilitate the identification of the targeting determinants of AKAP12 (also known as SSeCKS or Gravin). Three charged residue-rich regions were identified that regulate two aspects of AKAP12 localization, nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and perinuclear/cell periphery targeting. Using deletion mapping and green fluorescent protein chimeras, we uncovered a heretofore unrecognized nuclear localization potential. Five nuclear localization signals, including a novel class of this type of signal termed X2-NLS, are found in the central region of AKAP12 and are important for nuclear targeting. However, this nuclear localization is suppressed by the negatively charged C terminus that mediates nuclear exclusion. In this condition, the distribution of AKAP12 is regulated by an N-terminal targeting domain that simultaneously directs perinuclear and peripheral AKAP12 localization. Three basic residue-rich regions in the N-terminal targeting region have similarity to the MARCKS proteins and were found to control AKAP12 localization to ganglioside-rich regions at the cell periphery. Our data suggest that AKAP12 localization is regulated by a hierarchy of targeting domains and that the localization of AKAP12-assembled signaling complexes may be dynamically regulated. PMID:15923193

  15. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  16. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale. PMID:23944468

  17. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-01

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions. PMID:23046176

  18. Polymers at membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenich, Markus

    2000-11-01

    The surface of biological cells consists of a lipid membrane and a large amount of various proteins and polymers, which are embedded in the membrane or attached to it. We investigate how membranes are influenced by polymers, which are anchored to the membrane by one end. The entropic pressure exerted by the polymer induces a curvature, which bends the membrane away from the polymer. The resulting membrane shape profile is a cone in the vicinity of the anchor segment and a catenoid far away from it. The perturbative calculations are confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. An additional attractive interaction between polymer and membrane reduces the entropically induced curvature. In the limit of strong adsorption, the polymer is localized directly on the membrane surface and does not induce any pressure, i.e. the membrane curvature vanishes. If the polymer is not anchored directly on the membrane surface, but in a non-vanishing anchoring distance, the membrane bends towards the polymer for strong adsorption. In the last part of the thesis, we study membranes under the influence of non-anchored polymers in solution. In the limit of pure steric interactions between the membrane and free polymers, the membrane curves towards the polymers (in contrast to the case of anchored polymers). In the limit of strong adsorption the membrane bends away from the polymers. Die Oberfläche biologischer Zellen besteht aus einer Lipidmembran und einer Vielzahl von Proteinen und Polymeren, die in die Membran eingebaut sind. Die Beeinflussung der Membran durch Polymere, die mit einem Ende an der Membran verankert sind, wird im Rahmen dieser Arbeit anhand eines vereinfachten biomimetischen Systems studiert. Der entropische Druck, den das Polymer durch Stöße auf die Membran ausübt, führt dazu, dass sich die Membran vom Polymer weg krümmt. Die resultierende Membranform ist ein Kegel in der Nähe des Ankers und ein Katenoid in grossem Abstand vom Ankerpunkt. Monte Carlo-Simulationen best

  19. Accessorizing and anchoring the LINC complex for multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wakam; Worman, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, composed of outer and inner nuclear membrane Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology (KASH) and Sad1 and UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, respectively, connects the nucleus to cytoskeletal filaments and performs diverse functions including nuclear positioning, mechanotransduction, and meiotic chromosome movements. Recent studies have shed light on the source of this diversity by identifying factors associated with the complex that endow specific functions as well as those that differentially anchor the complex within the nucleus. Additional diversity may be provided by accessory factors that reorganize the complex into higher-ordered arrays. As core components of the LINC complex are associated with several diseases, understanding the role of accessory and anchoring proteins could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25559183

  20. Ethylene Perception by the ERS1 Protein in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anne E.; Findell, Jennifer L.; Schaller, G. Eric; Sisler, Edward C.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2000-01-01

    Ethylene perception in Arabidopsis is controlled by a family of five genes, including ETR1, ERS1 (ethylene response sensor 1), ERS2, ETR2, and EIN4. ERS1, the most highly conserved gene with ETR1, encodes a protein with 67% identity to ETR1. To clarify the role of ERS1 in ethylene sensing, we biochemically characterized the ERS1 protein by heterologous expression in yeast. ERS1, like ETR1, forms a membrane-associated, disulfide-linked dimer. In addition, yeast expressing the ERS1 protein contains ethylene-binding sites, indicating ERS1 is also an ethylene-binding protein. This finding supports previous genetic evidence that isoforms of ETR1 also function in plants as ethylene receptors. Further, we used the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) to characterize the ethylene-binding sites of ERS1 and ETR1. We found 1-MCP to be both a potent inhibitor of the ethylene-induced seedling triple response, as well as ethylene binding by yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1. Yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1 showed nearly identical sensitivity to 1-MCP, suggesting that the ethylene-binding sites of ETR1 and ERS1 have similar affinities for ethylene. PMID:10938361

  1. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  2. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    1993-01-01

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  3. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  4. Anchored Instruction and Anchored Assessment: An Ecological Approach to Measuring Situated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    Anchored instruction and anchored assessment are described and illustrated through a mathematics problem from the Jasper problem solving series developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville (Tennessee). Anchored instruction is instruction situated in a context complex enough to provide meaning and reasons for why information is useful. Problems…

  5. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  6. ER-Mitochondria contact sites: A new regulator of cellular calcium flux comes into play.

    PubMed

    Krols, Michiel; Bultynck, Geert; Janssens, Sophie

    2016-08-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria membrane contacts are hotspots for calcium signaling. In this issue, Raturi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512077) show that the thioredoxin TMX1 inhibits the calcium pump SERCA2b at ER-mitochondria contact sites, thereby affecting ER-mitochondrial calcium transfer and mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:27528654

  7. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  10. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.