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Sample records for erkki-sven tr flux

  1. Mixed-metal flux synthesis of quaternary RMn{sub 2} Tr{sub x} Zn{sub 20-} {sub x} compounds with Tr=Al, In

    SciTech Connect

    Benbow, Evan M. . E-mail: ebenbow@chem.fsu.edu; Latturner, Susan E. . E-mail: latturne@chem.fsu.edu

    2006-12-15

    Eighteen new intermetallic compounds RMn{sub 2} Tr{sub x} Zn{sub 20-} {sub x} (2Tr=Al, In) were synthesized using low-melting mixtures of (Tr/Zn) as a solvent. Structural refinementng single-crystal X-ray diffraction data shows that the compounds are substituted variants of the cubic CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}-type structure (Fd-3m, Z=8; unit cell parameters vary from a=14.1152(3)A for YbMn{sub 2}Al{sub 5.3}Zn{sub 14.7} to a=14.8125(4)A for SmMn{sub 2}In{sub 5.9}Zn{sub 14.1}). The Zn and Tr elements show site preferences in the indium compounds, but not in the aluminum analogs. The substitution of trielide element for zinc modifies the valence electron count of the compounds to allow for the incorporation of Mn into the structure. Magnetic susceptibility data show no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 3 K. - Graphical Abstract: Crystals of new intermetallic phases RMn{sub 2} Tr{sub x} Zn{sub 20-} {sub x} (Tr=Al or In; R=rare earth) were grown from Al/Zn or In/Zn flux mixtures. These compounds are quaternary variants of the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type. This structure can be viewed as a packing of polyhedra, as shown.

  2. Mixed-metal flux synthesis of quaternary RMn 2Tr xZn 20-x compounds with Tr=Al, In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbow, Evan M.; Latturner, Susan E.

    2006-12-01

    Eighteen new intermetallic compounds RMn 2Tr xZn 20-x (2< x<7; R=rare-earth metal; Tr=Al, In) were synthesized using low-melting mixtures of ( Tr/Zn) as a solvent. Structural refinement using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data shows that the compounds are substituted variants of the cubic CeCr 2Al 20-type structure ( Fd-3 m, Z=8; unit cell parameters vary from a=14.1152(3)Å for YbMn 2Al 5.3Zn 14.7 to a=14.8125(4)Å for SmMn 2In 5.9Zn 14.1). The Zn and Tr elements show site preferences in the indium compounds, but not in the aluminum analogs. The substitution of trielide element for zinc modifies the valence electron count of the compounds to allow for the incorporation of Mn into the structure. Magnetic susceptibility data show no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 3 K.

  3. TRANSCRIPTIONAL INDUCTION OF THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE (TR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously our lab has demonstrated in-vitro and in-vivo induction of TR activity by sulforaphane (SF) purified from broccoli. Luciferase reporter constructs were built using the TR promoter sequence. TR constructs transfected into HepG2 cells showed a dose dependent increase in transcription when...

  4. The Star Formation History of TR 14 and TR 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degioia-Eastwood, K.; Throop, H.; Walker, G.; Cudworth, K.

    1997-05-01

    H-R diagrams are presented for the very young galactic clusters Trumpler 14 and Trumpler 16, which are the two most populous clusters in the region of vigorous star formation surrounding eta Carinae. Point-spread function photometry of UBV CCD images is presented to a limiting magnitude of V ~ 19 for over 560 stars in Tr 16 and 290 stars in Tr 14. We have also obtained similar data for local background fields. Existing proper motions (Cudworth et al. 1993) have allowed us to analyze the reddening of both cluster members and the local background stars, thus providing an excellent determination of the cluster membership far deeper than the original proper motions. This work has revealed a significant population of protostars in both clusters. The location of the protostars in the diagram indicates that the theoretical "stellar birthline" of Palla and Stahler (1993) is much closer to the observations than that of Beech and Mitalas (1986). We also use the protostars and most massive stars to put limits on the coevality of the cluster.

  5. Integration Window Position Estimation in TR Receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2005-03-15

    Transmitted-reference (TR) receivers avoid the stringent synchronization requirements that exist in conventional pulse detection schemes. However, the performance of such receivers is highly sensitive to precise timing acquisition and tracking as well as the length of their integration window. This window in TR receivers defines the limits of the finite integrator prior to the final decision making block. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that allows us to extract the timing information of the integration window very accurately in UWB-TR receivers in the presence of channel noise. The principles of the method are presented and the BER performance of a modified UWB-TR receiver is investigated by computer simulation. Our studies show that the proposed estimation technique adds value to the conventional TR receiver structure with modest increase in complexity.

  6. Theoretical investigation of defect structure in B2 TrSc (Tr =Cd, Ru) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidoussi, Aissam; Belgacem-Bouzida, Aissa; Braga, Maria Helena; Righi, Haroun

    2015-12-01

    Point defect structure of B2 TrSc (Tr =Cd, Ru) alloys was investigated using supercell and special quasi-random structure (SQS) approaches. According to our results, Tr and Sc anti-sites are the constitutional point defects in Tr-rich and Sc-rich B2 TrSc, respectively. To investigate the thermal defect concentrations at finite temperatures, we adopted the Wagner-Schottky model using point defect formation enthalpies obtained from supercell and SQS approaches. The present results suggest that the predominant thermal defects in B2 CdSc are of exchange type, and in B2 RuSc are of interbranch Sc type. The calculated results show an agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  7. Minireview: Pathophysiological roles of the TR4 nuclear receptor: lessons learned from mice lacking TR4.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Zhang, Yanqing; Liu, Ning-Chun; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), also known as NR2C2, belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and shares high homology with the testicular nuclear receptor 2. The natural ligands of TR4 remained unclear until the recent discoveries of several energy/lipid sensors including the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and their synthetic ligands, thiazolidinediones, used for treatment of diabetes. TR4 is widely expressed throughout the body and particularly concentrated in the testis, prostate, cerebellum, and hippocampus. It has been shown to play important roles in cerebellar development, forebrain myelination, folliculogenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, muscle development, bone development, and prostate cancer progression. Here we provide a comprehensive summary of TR4 signaling including its upstream ligands/activators/suppressors, transcriptional coactivators/repressors, downstream targets, and their in vivo functions with potential impacts on TR4-related diseases. Importantly, TR4 shares similar ligands/activators with another key nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, which raised several interesting questions about how these 2 nuclear receptors may collaborate with or counteract each other's function in their related diseases. Clear dissection of such molecular mechanisms and their differential roles in various diseases may help researchers to design new potential drugs with better efficacy and fewer side effects to battle TR4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involved diseases. PMID:24702179

  8. The unusual lightcurve of 1990 TR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, Wieslaw Z.

    1992-01-01

    Amor asteroid 1990 TR was monitored during three nights shortly after discovery. Obtained lightcurves did not reveal a repeatable curve with two maxima and two minima. However, some features suggest periodicity, and a synodic rotational period P = 6.25 hours was determined. Individual and composite lightcurves are presented. The colors are best represented by the class S.

  9. Superconductivity in the ternary silicide TrIrSi (Tr = Ti, Zr, and Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Naoki; Suzuki, Harufumi; Nakano, Tomohito; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-03-01

    We discover a new superconductor, TiIrSi at T c = 1.4 K, and reveal a superconducting state of TrIrSi (Tr = Ti, Zr, and Hf) by using dc magnetic susceptibility χ (T), electrical resistivity ρ (T), and specific heat C(T) measurements. Superconductivity of TrIrSi is confirmed in ρ (T) at T c = 1.4, 1.85, and 3.4 K, respectively. The electronic specific heat {C}{{e}}(T) of TrIrSi can be fitted with the theoretical BCS curve of the weak-coupling limit with {{Δ }}{C}{{e}}/γ {T}{{c}}= 1.43. Measurements in several magnetic fields suggest that TrIrSi is a type-II superconducting material with upper critical fields of {μ }0{H}{{c}2}(0) = 0.751, 0.618, and 2.23 T, respectively. The electron-phonon coupling constants {λ }{ep} are calculated to be 0.441, 0.464, and 0.545, which are consistent with the weak-coupling limit inferred from the specific jump. The T c of TrIrSi depends on {λ }{ep} and is inversely proportional to N({E}{{F}}).

  10. Investigation of magnetic order in SmTr2Zn20 (Tr = Fe, Co, Ru) and SmTr2Cd20 (Tr = Ni, Pd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Duygu; White, B. D.; Ho, P.-C.; Kanchanavatee, N.; Huang, K.; Dilley, N. R.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-03-01

    Single crystals of the cage compounds Sm Tr 2Zn20 (Tr = Fe, Co, Ru) and Sm Tr 2Cd20 (Tr = Ni, Pd) have been investigated by means of electrical resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements. The compounds SmFe2Zn20, SmRu2Zn20,andSmNi2Cd20 exhibit ferromagnetic order with Curie temperatures of TC = 47.4 K, 7.6 K, and 7.5 K, respectively, whereas SmPd2Cd20 is an antiferromagnet with a Néel temperature of TN = 3.4 K. No evidence for magnetic order is observed in SmCo2Zn20 down to 110 mK. The Sommerfeld coefficients γ are found to be 57 mJ/mol-K2 for SmFe2Zn20, 79.5 mJ/mol-K2 for SmCo2Zn20, 258 mJ/mol-K2 for SmRu2Zn20, 165 mJ/mol-K2 for SmNi2Cd20, and 208 mJ/mol-K2 for SmPd2Cd20. Enhanced values of Sommerfeld coefficients γ and a quadratic temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity at low temperature for SmRu2Zn20andSmPd2Cd20 suggest an enhancement of the quasiparticle masses due to hybridization between localized 4 f and conduction electron states. Research at UCSD was supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-04-ER46105 and the U.S. NSF under Award Grant No. DMR 1206553. Research at California State University, Fresno was supported by the U.S. NSF under Grant No. DMR 1104544.

  11. DETECTION OF PLANETARY EMISSION FROM THE EXOPLANET TrES-2 USING SPITZER/IRAC

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donovan, Francis T.; Charbonneau, David; Knutson, Heather A.; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, N.; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake

    2010-02-20

    We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +- 0.021%, 0.230% +- 0.024%, 0.199% +- 0.054%, and 0.359% +- 0.060% at 3.6 {mu}m, 4.5 {mu}m, 5.8 {mu}m, and 8.0 {mu}m, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T{sub eff} = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four IRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet.

  12. Detection of Planetary Emission from the Exoplanet TrES-2 Using Spitzer/IRAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, Francis T.; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, N.; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +/- 0.021%, 0.230% +/- 0.024%, 0.199% +/- 0.054%, and 0.359% +/- 0.060% at 3.6 microns, 4.5 microns, 5.8 microns, and 8.0 microns, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T(sub eff) = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four lRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet. Key words: eclipses - infrared: stars - planetary systems - stars: individual (OSC 03549-02811) - techniques: photometric

  13. ATMOSPHERE AND SPECTRAL MODELS OF THE KEPLER-FIELD PLANETS HAT-P-7b AND TrES-2

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-10-10

    We develop atmosphere models of two of the three Kepler-field planets that were known prior to the start of the Kepler mission (HAT-P-7b and TrES-2). We find that published Kepler and Spitzer data for HAT-P-7b appear to require an extremely hot upper atmosphere on the dayside, with a strong thermal inversion and little day-night redistribution. The Spitzer data for TrES-2 suggest a mild thermal inversion with moderate day-night redistribution. We examine the effect of nonequilibrium chemistry on TrES-2 model atmospheres and find that methane levels must be adjusted by extreme amounts in order to cause even mild changes in atmospheric structure and emergent spectra. Our best-fit models to the Spitzer data for TrES-2 lead us to predict a low secondary eclipse planet-star flux ratio ({approx}<2 x 10{sup -5}) in the Kepler bandpass, which is consistent with what very recent observations have found. Finally, we consider how the Kepler-band optical flux from a hot exoplanet depends on the strength of a possible extra optical absorber in the upper atmosphere. We find that the optical flux is not monotonic in optical opacity, and the non-monotonicity is greater for brighter, hotter stars.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of Cepheids in Circinus (AV Cir, BP Cir) and Triangulum Australe (R TrA, S TrA, U TrA, LR TrA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Kravtsov, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra taken with the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory, we have determined the atmospheric parameters and chemical composition for three small-amplitude (AV Cir, BP Cir, and LR TrA), two classical (R TrA and S TrA), and one double-mode (U TrA) Cepheids. The averaged atmospheric parameters have been estimated for three Cepheids (AV Cir, BP Cir, and U TrA) observed at various pulsation phases. In all Cepheids, except U TrA, the metallicity has turned out to be higher than the solar one by 0.1-0.2 dex. The abundances of the key elements of the evolution of yellow supergiants (C, O, Na, Mg, Al) show that these objects have already passed the first dredge-up, while those of the remaining elements are nearly solar. Comparison of our results on the Cepheids from the list (except U TrA) with those of other authors shows significant differences in C and O abundance estimates for AV Cir, R TrA, S TrA, and LR TrA. For AV Cir and BP Cir, the H α line profiles are symmetric but with a slight asymmetry in the core at approximately the same phase near 0{·/ P } 7: on the "blue" side for AV Cir and on the "red" one for BP Cir. BP Cir exhibits a distinct asymmetry in the absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions at various pulsation phases, which can be explained by nonradial first-overtone pulsations. The constancy of the H α absorption line profiles with pulsation phase for AV Cir and BP Cir may suggest the presence of a hydrogen envelope around them. For the double-mode Cepheid U TrA, an asymmetry is observed in the cores of the H α line and the absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions at various pulsation phases, which can be explained by nonradial pulsations in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions of metals in LR TrA closely resemble those in the well-known Cepheid BG Cru: secondary "blue" and "red" components whose line depths vary with pulsation phase are noticeable. This Cepheid

  15. 42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break as seen from upstream. Note original timber cribbing to left. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  16. 44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from downstream showing break closed and installation of new concrete cap piece under way. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  17. Magnetic fluctuations on TR3Ba5Cu8Oδ (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) superconducting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supelano, G. I.; Sarmiento Santos, A.; Parra Vargas, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report the production of TR3Ba5Cu8Oδ (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) superconducting system using a usual solid state reaction method. The irreversibility line and the analysis of magnetization fluctuations for TR3Ba5Cu8Oδ (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) system were investigated. The curves of magnetization ZFC-FC were measured in magnetic fields of the 100-4000 Oe to obtain the values for T* and TC temperatures. The penetration depth and the coherence length parameters as a function of the applied magnetic field were obtained. The data of the magnetization excess ΔM(T, H) was analyzed from the curves of magnetization as a function of logarithm of applied field for different values of temperature in the corresponding range. The Bulavskii, Ledvij and Kogan theory was employed for this purpose which considers fluctuations effects in the free energy and into the equilibrium magnetization.

  18. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  19. Differential function and regulation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3 isoforms in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Cui, Pengfei; Zhao, Shengqiang; Ye, Taiyang; Li, Yan; Peng, Jin; Niu, Gengming; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    TR3 has been reported to be an excellent target for angiogenesis therapies. We reported three TR3 transcript variant messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and are differentially regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). TR3 transcript variant 1 (TR3-TV1) and variant 2 (TR3-TV2) encoding the same TR3 isoform 1 protein (TR3-iso1) that was named TR3 has been extensively studied. However, the function of TR3 isoform 2 protein (TR3-iso2) encoded by TR3 transcript variant 3 (TR3-TV3) is still not known. Here, we clone and express the novel TR3-iso2 protein and find that expression of TR3-iso2, in contrast to TR3-iso1, inhibits en-dothelial cell proliferation induced by VEGF-A, histamine, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The differential function of TR3-iso2 correlates with the down-regulation of cyclin D1. However, TR3-iso2 plays similar roles in endothelial cell migration and monolayer permeability as TR3-iso1. We further demonstrate that several intracellular signaling pathways are involved in histamine-induced TR3 transcript variants, including histamine receptor H1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)/calcium/calcineurin/protein kinase C (PKC)/ protein kinase D (PKD) pathway and ERK pathway, as well as histamine receptor H3-mediated PKC-ERK pathway. Further, expressions of TR3-TV1, TR3-TV2, and TR3-TV3 by VEGF and histamine are regulated by different promoters, but not by their mRNA stability. PMID:26440050

  20. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  1. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.411 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.411 Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Annual allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  3. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  4. 40 CFR 97.711 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.711 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  5. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  6. 40 CFR 97.421 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.421 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX...

  7. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 2 units in each State,...

  8. 40 CFR 97.711 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.711 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  9. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  10. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season..., Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin, March 26, 2012, the Administrator will record in each TR...

  11. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  12. 40 CFR 97.611 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.611 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  13. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  14. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 2 units in each State,...

  15. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.424 Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for...

  16. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  17. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  18. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted...

  19. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  20. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted...

  1. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  3. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  4. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  5. 40 CFR 97.421 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.421 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX...

  6. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  7. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  8. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  9. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  10. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted...

  11. 40 CFR 97.611 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.611 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  12. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  13. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.424 Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for...

  14. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  15. 40 CFR 97.411 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.411 Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Annual allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  16. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  17. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.424 Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for...

  18. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted...

  19. 40 CFR 97.421 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.421 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX...

  20. 40 CFR 97.411 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.411 Timing requirements for TR NOX Annual allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Annual allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  1. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  2. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  3. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  4. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  5. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season..., Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin, March 26, 2012, the Administrator will record in each TR...

  6. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  7. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are available to be deducted...

  8. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  9. 40 CFR 97.711 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.711 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  10. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR SO2 Group 2 allowances are available to be deducted...

  11. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season..., Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin, March 26, 2012, the Administrator will record in each TR...

  12. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  13. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 1 units in each State,...

  14. 40 CFR 97.611 - Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.611 Timing requirements for TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR SO2 Group 1 allowances are allocated, for the control periods in 2012...

  15. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 1 units in each State,...

  16. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  17. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 2 units in each State,...

  18. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a TR SO2 Group...

  19. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Annual allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with the...

  20. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR SO2 Group 1 units in each State,...

  1. TR-GRAV: National Center for Turkish Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simav, Mehmet; Akpınar, İlyas; Sezen, Erdinc; Cingöz, Ayhan; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    TR-GRAV, the National Center for Turkish Gravity Field (TR-GRAV) that has recently become operational,is a national center that collects, processes and distributes Absolute Gravimetry,Relative Gravimetry, Airborne Gravimetry,Shipborne Gravimetry,Satellite Gravimetry, GNSS/Levelling, Astrogeodetic Vertical Deflection data to model and improve regional gravity field for the Turkish territory and its surrounding regions and to provide accurate, consistent and value-added data & products to the scientific and engineering communities. In this presentation, we will introduce the center web portal and give some details about the database.

  2. Exotic Ground State and Elastic Softening under Pulsed Magnetic Fields in PrTr2Zn20 (Tr = Rh, Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Isao; Goto, Hiroki; Kamikawa, Shuhei; Yasin, Shadi; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Wosnitza, Joachim; Onimaru, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Keisuke T.; Takabatake, Toshiro; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate a field-induced level crossing of the ground-state doublet in PrTr2Zn20 (Tr = Rh, Ir), we performed ultrasonic measurements in pulsed magnetic fields applied along the [110] and [001] directions and analyzed the results in the framework of the strain-susceptibility approach. Above 40 T for H || [110], we observed an elastic softening of the transverse modulus (C11 - C12)/2 corresponding to the ground-state doublet. In both compounds the softening is followed by a minimum at about 47 T at low temperatures. We predict the presence of a new field-induced phase boundary in PrTr2Zn20 at this field with two possible cases. The magnetic field of the minimum cannot be explained by only the quadrupole interaction.

  3. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromski, J.; Majamaki, A. N.; Chianese, S. G.; Weinstock, V. D.; Kim, T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of the Exploration Initiative, with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Project. To meet Altair requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the lunar descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202, a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two phases of pintle injector testing. The first phase of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at several power levels across the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second phase of testing was performed on a calorimeter chamber and demonstrated injector performance at various power levels (75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 7.5%) across the throttle range as well as chamber heat flux to show that the engine can close an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program. It describes the different phases of the program with the key milestones of each phase. It then shows when those milestones were met. Next, it describes how the test data was used to update the conceptual design and how the test data has created a database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology that is readily scaleable and can be used to again update the design once the Altair program's requirements are firm. The final section of the paper describes the path forward, which includes

  4. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/GH2 Deep Throttling Pintle Injector Fabrication and Demonstration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, V. D.; Chianese, S.G.; Majamaki, A. N.; Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Wall, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of in support of the Exploration Initiative with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Lunar Lander. To address Altair's need for deep-throttling cryogenic engines, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine known as the TR202. This engine features independent turbopump assemblies and a variable area pintle injector similar to that used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). The TR202 program has completed a Conceptual Design (CoDR) of a possible throttling engine and has designed and built injector test hardware to demonstrate stable high performance over a 10:1 throttling range while providing the heat flux necessary to close the engine cycle. NGAS has partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which supplied the ablative and calorimeter thrust chambers for the injector test program and provided the test facility as well as test and engineering support personnel. An extensive hot-fire test campaign comprising more than 50 tests was initiated and successfully completed during 2009 on MSFC's Test Stand 116 using pressure-fed liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. All planned test objectives were met. The test program was structured in two distinct phases: Phase 1 relied on ablative chambers to demonstrate injector hardware durability and to obtain early deep-throttling results, while Phase 2 used a water-cooled calorimeter chamber to obtain detailed performance and heat flux measurements at various power levels and mixture ratios. This paper focuses on the early part of the test program and describes final hardware build and test integration efforts, injector water flow testing, igniter and engine operational sequence development, and results from the ablative chamber tests. Challenges

  5. 104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, 11 February 1981, clear as negative no. A-17701. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in background right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. 33. View of data converter and power supply for TR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View of data converter and power supply for TR system in transmitter building no. 102, mezzanine level. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. 61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter building no. 102 mezzanine level; note elevator door on right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Counsellors Respond to the DSM-IV-TR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Gaete, Joaquin; Sametband, Ines N.; French, Jared; Eeson, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is an administrative fact for many counsellors. This psychiatric approach to formulating client concerns runs counter to those used by counsellors of many approaches (e.g., systemic, feminist). Using an online survey of counsellors (N = 116), invited contributions to a website…

  10. 99. View of initial TR panel emplacement for radome, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. View of initial TR panel emplacement for radome, with workman welding at panel joint, RCA Services Company 8 October, 1965, Official photograph BMEWS Project, by unknown photographer, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6741. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. 100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and workers, original radome, RCA Services Company 2 October, 1965, Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6705. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 16. 'Erection Plan for 1 236' Single Tr. Thro' Draw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Erection Plan for 1 236' Single Tr. Thro' Draw Span over Sacramento River at Tehama Cal., Southern Pacific Co., The Phoenix Bridge Co., City Order: 952, Drawing No.: 2, Scale: 3/16' to 1', Engineer: F.G. Lippert, Drawn by: F.E. King, Date: May 20 98.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  13. UWB channel estimation using new generating TR transceivers

    DOEpatents

    Nekoogar, Faranak; Dowla, Farid U.; Spiridon, Alex; Haugen, Peter C.; Benzel, Dave M.

    2011-06-28

    The present invention presents a simple and novel channel estimation scheme for UWB communication systems. As disclosed herein, the present invention maximizes the extraction of information by incorporating a new generation of transmitted-reference (Tr) transceivers that utilize a single reference pulse(s) or a preamble of reference pulses to provide improved channel estimation while offering higher Bit Error Rate (BER) performance and data rates without diluting the transmitter power.

  14. APOSTLE: 11 TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF TrES-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Kundurthy, P.; Becker, A. C.; Agol, E.; Barnes, R.; Williams, B.

    2013-02-10

    The Apache Point Survey of Transit Lightcurves of Exoplanets (APOSTLE) observed 11 transits of TrES-3b over two years in order to constrain system parameters and look for transit timing and depth variations. We describe an updated analysis protocol for APOSTLE data, including the reduction pipeline, transit model, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyzer. Our estimates of the system parameters for TrES-3b are consistent with previous estimates to within the 2{sigma} confidence level. We improved the errors (by 10%-30%) on system parameters such as the orbital inclination (i {sub orb}), impact parameter (b), and stellar density ({rho}{sub *}) compared to previous measurements. The near-grazing nature of the system, and incomplete sampling of some transits, limited our ability to place reliable uncertainties on individual transit depths and hence we do not report strong evidence for variability. Our analysis of the transit timing data shows no evidence for transit timing variations and our timing measurements are able to rule out super-Earth and gas giant companions in low-order mean motion resonance with TrES-3b.

  15. Return flux experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    1992-01-01

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  16. TR4 nuclear receptor promotes prostate cancer metastasis via upregulation of CCL2/CCR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xianfan; Yang, Dong-Rong; Lee, Soo Ok; Chen, Ya-Ling; Xia, Liqun; Lin, Shin-Jen; Yu, Shicheng; Niu, Yuan-Jie; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-02-15

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) plays protective roles against oxidative stress and DNA damage and might contribute to aging. Our recent clinical tumor tissue staining results showed higher expression of TR4 in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with high Gleason scores compared to the tissues with the low Gleason scores. In vitro migration/invasion assays after manipulation of the TR4 expression in PCa cells showed that TR4 promoted PCa cells migration/invasion. Mechanism dissection found that the CCL2/CCR2 signal plays the key role in the mediation of TR4-promoted PCa cells migration/invasion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and Luciferase assays further confirmed TR4 modulation of CCL2 at the transcriptional level and addition of the CCR2 antagonist led to interruption of the TR4-enhanced PCa cells migration/invasion. Finally, the orthotopic xenografted mice studies using the luciferase expressing CWR22Rv1 cells found that TR4 enhanced PCa metastasis and this increased metastasis was reversed when the CCR2 antagonist was injected into the mice. Together, these in vitro and in vivo results revealed a positive role of TR4 in PCa metastasis and demonstrated CCL2/CCR2 signaling as an important mediator in exerting TR4 action. This finding suggests that TR4 may represent a biomarker related to PCa metastasis and targeting the TR4-CCL2/CCR2 axis may become a new therapeutic approach to battle PCa metastasis. PMID:24975468

  17. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  18. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For...

  19. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  20. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  1. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  2. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  3. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  4. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  5. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  6. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For...

  7. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  8. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.523 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a...

  9. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.523 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a...

  10. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For...

  11. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  12. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  13. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  14. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.523 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business days (except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section) of receiving a...

  15. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  16. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  17. First Detection of TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A Cyp51 Mutations in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P; Gil, Veronica Garcia; Gutierrez, Felipe; Lindner, Jonathan R; Albataineh, Mohammad T; McCarthy, Dora I; Sanders, Carmita; Fan, Hongxin; Fothergill, Annette W; Sutton, Deanna A

    2016-01-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing problem. The TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A mutations that can occur in patients without previous azole exposure have been reported in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia. Here, we report the detection of both the TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A mutations in confirmed A. fumigatus isolates collected in institutions in the United States. These mutations, other mutations known to cause azole resistance, and azole MICs are reported here. PMID:26491179

  18. First Detection of TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A Cyp51 Mutations in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Veronica Garcia; Gutierrez, Felipe; Lindner, Jonathan R.; Albataineh, Mohammad T.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Sanders, Carmita; Fan, Hongxin; Fothergill, Annette W.; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2015-01-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing problem. The TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A mutations that can occur in patients without previous azole exposure have been reported in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia. Here, we report the detection of both the TR34 L98H and TR46 Y121F T289A mutations in confirmed A. fumigatus isolates collected in institutions in the United States. These mutations, other mutations known to cause azole resistance, and azole MICs are reported here. PMID:26491179

  19. Posttranslational Control of ALA Synthesis Includes GluTR Degradation by Clp Protease and Stabilization by GluTR-Binding Protein1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Janina; Nishimura, Kenji; Wolf, Anja; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first committed substrate of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and is formed from glutamyl-tRNA by two enzymatic steps. Glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) as the first enzyme of ALA synthesis is encoded by HEMA genes and tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Here, we show that the caseinolytic protease (Clp) substrate adaptor ClpS1 and the ClpC1 chaperone as well as the GluTR-binding protein (GBP) interact with the N terminus of GluTR. Loss-of function mutants of ClpR2 and ClpC1 proteins show increased GluTR stability, whereas absence of GBP results in decreased GluTR stability. Thus, the Clp protease system and GBP contribute to GluTR accumulation levels, and thereby the rate-limiting ALA synthesis. These findings are supported with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hema1 mutants expressing a truncated GluTR lacking the 29 N-terminal amino acid residues of the mature protein. Accumulation of this truncated GluTR is higher in dark periods, resulting in increased protochlorophyllide content. It is proposed that the proteolytic activity of Clp protease counteracts GBP binding to assure the appropriate content of GluTR and the adequate ALA synthesis for chlorophyll and heme in higher plants. PMID:26884485

  20. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  1. Hints of Period Change for OGLE-TR-113b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elisabeth R.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Elliot, J. L.; Seager, S.; Osip, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    We present six new transits of the hot Jupiter OGLE-TR-113b observed with MagIC on the Magellan Telescopes between January 2007 and May 2009. We update the system parameters and revise the planetary radius, where the error is dominated by stellar radius uncertainties. The new transit midtimes reveal no transit timing variations from a constant ephemeris over two years, which places an upper limit of 1-2 Earth masses on any perturber in a 1:2 or 2:1 mean-motion resonance with OGLE-TR-113b. Combining the new transit epochs with five epochs published between 2002 and 2006, we find hints that the orbital period of the planet may not be constant, with the best fit indicating the period is decreasing by 60±15 milliseconds per year. If real, this change in period could result from either a long-period (more than 8 years) timing variation due to an external perturber, or more intriguingly from the orbital decay of the planet. The detection of a changing period is still tentative and must be checked with additional observations. If a period decay is confirmed, OGLE-TR-113b will be the first planet observed to be falling onto its star. This would enable direct tests of tidal stability and dynamical models of close-in planets and place observational constraints on the value of stellar tidal energy dissipation factors. This work was supported in part by NASA Origins grant NNX07AN63G and Hubble Fellowship grant HF-01210.01-A/HF-51233.01 awarded by the STScI, which is operated by the AURA, Inc. for NASA, under contract NAS5-26555.

  2. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  3. PHOTOMETRICALLY DERIVED MASSES AND RADII OF THE PLANET AND STAR IN THE TrES-2 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Mullally, Fergal; Seader, Shaun E.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E.; Barentsen, Geert; Bloemen, Steven; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Ragozzine, Darin

    2012-12-10

    We measure the mass and radius of the star and planet in the TrES-2 system using 2.7 years of observations by the Kepler spacecraft. The light curve shows evidence for ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming on a period consistent with the orbital period of the planet with amplitudes of 2.79{sup +0.44}{sub -0.62} and 3.44{sup +0.32}{sub -0.37} parts per million (ppm), respectively, and a difference between the dayside and the nightside planetary flux of 3.41{sup +0.55}{sub -0.82} ppm. We present an asteroseismic analysis of solar-like oscillations on TrES-2A which we use to calculate the stellar mass of 0.94 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} and radius of 0.95 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }. Using these stellar parameters, a transit model fit and the phase-curve variations, we determine the planetary radius of 1.162{sup +0.020}{sub -0.024} R{sub Jup} and derive a mass for TrES-2b from the photometry of 1.44 {+-} 0.21 M{sub Jup}. The ratio of the ellipsoidal variation to the Doppler beaming amplitudes agrees to better than 2{sigma} with theoretical predications, while our measured planet mass and radius agree within 2{sigma} of previously published values based on spectroscopic radial velocity measurements. We measure a geometric albedo of 0.0136{sup +0.0022}{sub -0.0033} and an occultation (secondary eclipse) depth of 6.5{sup +1.7}{sub -1.8} ppm which we combined with the day/night planetary flux ratio to model the atmosphere of TrES-2b. We find that an atmosphere model that contains a temperature inversion is strongly preferred. We hypothesize that the Kepler bandpass probes a significantly greater atmospheric depth on the night side relative to the day side.

  4. Pyroelectric Applications of the VDF-TrFE Copolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonne, J. J.; Bauer, Ph.; Audaire, L.; Bauer, F.

    1995-01-01

    VDF/TrFe pyroelectric sensors have now definitely reached the level of a product. Based on a bidimensional staring array, it can be considered as a whole system with a monolithic technology processed on a silicon substrate provided with the integrated read out circuit. The paper will describe the main procedure dealing with the elaboration of a 32 x 32 focal plane array developed, in the context of the PROMETHEUS PROCHIP European Program (EUREKA), as a passive infrared obstacle detection applied to automotive. Additional experimental data suggest that this microsystem could operate in space environment.

  5. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  6. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  7. TR3 is preferentially expressed by bulge epithelial stem cells in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lin; Yang, Ruifeng; Liu, Shujing; Lyle, Stephen; Cotsarelis, George; Xiang, Leihong; Zhang, Litao; Li, Bin; Wan, Miaojian; Xu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    TR3 is an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and it plays a pivotal role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. The expression and function of TR3 in skin have not been well investigated. Using a cDNA expression assay, we discover that TR3 is significantly enriched in human telogen bulge compared with anagen bulb. Immunohistochemical staining confirms that TR3 is highly expressed in the bulge region of human hair follicles and it colocalizes with cytokeratin 15 (K15), an epithelial stem cell marker. To study the function of TR3 in the effect of androgens in keratinocytes, we treat HaCaT keratinocytes and primary human keratinocytes with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T). The treated keratinocytes show a dose-dependent growth reduction to DHT and T. DHT increases the expression of TR3 in keratinocytes, associated with a concomitant increase of BAD and decrease of Bcl-2 expression. Knockdown TR3 expression by siRNA blocks the inhibitory effect of DHT on keratinocyte proliferation. Our results demonstrate that TR3 is localized to the stem cell compartment in the human hair follicles. Androgen increases TR3 expression in cultured keratinocytes. Our data suggest that TR3 mediates at least part of the inhibitory effect of androgens on keratinocytes. PMID:26707825

  8. TR3 is preferentially expressed by bulge epithelial stem cells in human hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lin; Yang, Ruifeng; Liu, Shujing; Lyle, Stephen; Cotsarelis, George; Xiang, Leihong; Zhang, Litao; Li, Bin; Wan, Miaojian; Xu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    TR3 is an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and it plays a pivotal role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. The expression and function of TR3 in skin have not been well investigated. Using a cDNA expression assay, we discover that TR3 is significantly enriched in human telogen bulge compared with anagen bulb. Immunohistochemical staining confirms that TR3 is highly expressed in the bulge region of human hair follicles and it colocalizes with cytokeratin 15 (K15), an epithelial stem cell marker. To study the function of TR3 in the effect of androgens in keratinocytes, we treat HaCaT keratinocytes and primary human keratinocytes with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T). The treated keratinocytes show a dose-dependent growth reduction to DHT and T. DHT increases the expression of TR3 in keratinocytes, associated with a concomitant increase of BAD and decrease of Bcl-2 expression. Knockdown TR3 expression by siRNA blocks the inhibitory effect of DHT on keratinocyte proliferation. Our results demonstrate that TR3 is localized to the stem cell compartment in the human hair follicles. Androgen increases TR3 expression in cultured keratinocytes. Our data suggest that TR3 mediates at least part of the inhibitory effect of androgens on keratinocytes. PMID:26707825

  9. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  10. Cryogenic flux-concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, B. M.; Brechna, H.; Hill, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Flux concentrator has high primary to secondary coupling efficiency enabling it to produce high magnetic fields. The device provides versatility in pulse duration, magnetic field strengths and power sources.

  11. Instance transfer learning with multisource dynamic TrAdaBoost.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Haigang; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since the transfer learning can employ knowledge in relative domains to help the learning tasks in current target domain, compared with the traditional learning it shows the advantages of reducing the learning cost and improving the learning efficiency. Focused on the situation that sample data from the transfer source domain and the target domain have similar distribution, an instance transfer learning method based on multisource dynamic TrAdaBoost is proposed in this paper. In this method, knowledge from multiple source domains is used well to avoid negative transfer; furthermore, the information that is conducive to target task learning is obtained to train candidate classifiers. The theoretical analysis suggests that the proposed algorithm improves the capability that weight entropy drifts from source to target instances by means of adding the dynamic factor, and the classification effectiveness is better than single source transfer. Finally, experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has higher classification accuracy. PMID:25152906

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  13. The Arabidopsis glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) forms a ternary complex with FLU and GluTR-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ying; Zhao, Shun; Zhang, Feilong; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is an essential and tightly regulated process, and glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) is a key target for multiple regulatory factors at the post-translational level. By binding to the thylakoid membrane protein FLUORESCENT (FLU) or the soluble stromal GluTR-binding protein (GBP), the activity of GluTR is down- or up-regulated. Here, we reconstructed a ternary complex composed of the C-terminal tetratricopepetide-repeat domain of FLU, GBP, and GluTR, crystallized and solved the structure of the complex at 3.2 Å. The overall structure resembles the shape of merged two binary complexes as previously reported, and shows a large conformational change within GluTR. We also demonstrated that GluTR binds tightly with GBP but does not bind to GSAM under the same condition. These findings allow us to suggest a biological role of the ternary complex for the regulation of plant GluTR. PMID:26794057

  14. The Arabidopsis glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) forms a ternary complex with FLU and GluTR-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Zhao, Shun; Zhang, Feilong; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is an essential and tightly regulated process, and glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) is a key target for multiple regulatory factors at the post-translational level. By binding to the thylakoid membrane protein FLUORESCENT (FLU) or the soluble stromal GluTR-binding protein (GBP), the activity of GluTR is down- or up-regulated. Here, we reconstructed a ternary complex composed of the C-terminal tetratricopepetide-repeat domain of FLU, GBP, and GluTR, crystallized and solved the structure of the complex at 3.2 Å. The overall structure resembles the shape of merged two binary complexes as previously reported, and shows a large conformational change within GluTR. We also demonstrated that GluTR binds tightly with GBP but does not bind to GSAM under the same condition. These findings allow us to suggest a biological role of the ternary complex for the regulation of plant GluTR. PMID:26794057

  15. 40 CFR 97.721 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.721 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  16. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide? (a) The TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program provisions and the TR SO2 Group...

  17. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide? (a) The TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program provisions and the TR SO2 Group...

  18. 40 CFR 97.621 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.621 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  19. 40 CFR 97.721 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.721 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  20. 40 CFR 97.621 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.621 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  1. 40 CFR 97.621 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.621 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  2. 40 CFR 97.721 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.721 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  3. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of sulfur dioxide? (a) The TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program provisions and the TR SO2 Group...

  4. SAMOS Surface Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Shawn; Bourassa, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The development of a new surface flux dataset based on underway meteorological observations from research vessels will be presented. The research vessel data center at the Florida State University routinely acquires, quality controls, and distributes underway surface meteorological and oceanographic observations from over 30 oceanographic vessels. These activities are coordinated by the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative in partnership with the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project. Recently, the SAMOS data center has used these underway observations to produce bulk flux estimates for each vessel along individual cruise tracks. A description of this new flux product, along with the underlying data quality control procedures applied to SAMOS observations, will be provided. Research vessels provide underway observations at high-temporal frequency (1 min. sampling interval) that include navigational (position, course, heading, and speed), meteorological (air temperature, humidity, wind, surface pressure, radiation, rainfall), and oceanographic (surface sea temperature and salinity) samples. Vessels recruited to the SAMOS initiative collect a high concentration of data within the U.S. continental shelf and also frequently operate well outside routine shipping lanes, capturing observations in extreme ocean environments (Southern, Arctic, South Atlantic, and South Pacific oceans). These observations are atypical for their spatial and temporal sampling, making them very useful for many applications including validation of numerical models and satellite retrievals, as well as local assessments of natural variability. Individual SAMOS observations undergo routine automated quality control and select vessels receive detailed visual data quality inspection. The result is a quality-flagged data set that is ideal for calculating turbulent flux estimates. We will describe the bulk flux algorithms that have been applied to the

  5. Fabrication of PVDF-TrFE based bilayered PbTiO3/PVDF-TrFE films capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurbaya, Z.; Wahid, M. H.; Rozana, M. D.; Annuar, I.; Alrokayan, S. A. H.; Khan, H. A.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Development of high performance capacitor is reaching towards new generation where the ferroelectric materials take places as the active dielectric layer. The motivation of this study is to produce high capacitance device with long life cycle. This was configured by preparing bilayered films where lead titanate as an active dielectric layer and stacked with the top dielectric layer, poly(vinyledenefluoride-trifluoroethylene). Both of them are being referred that have one in common which is ferroelectric behavior. Therefore the combination of ceramic and polymer ferroelectric material could perform optimum dielectric characteristic for capacitor applications. The fabrication was done by simple sol-gel spin coating method that being varied at spinning speed property for polymer layers, whereas maintaining the ceramic layer. The characterization of PVDF-TrFE/PbTiO3 was performed according to metal-insulator-metal stacked capacitor measurement which includes structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric measurement.

  6. An intermediary role for the tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2 in the biosynthesis of verruculogen.

    PubMed

    Willingale, J; Perera, K P; Mantle, P G

    1983-09-15

    14C-Labelled compound TR-2, a tremorgenic mycotoxin, was administered to Penicillium raistrickii in submerged fermentation. Half of the added radiolabel was taken up by the fungus during the 60 h incubation period and the secondary metabolites subsequently isolated, principally verruculogen but also fumitremorgin B, were found to be radiolabelled. The efficiency of biosynthetic incorporation of TR-2 into verruculogen within the mycelium was at least 35%, demonstrating for the first time an intermediary role for TR-2. Fumitremorgin B was also TR-2-derived but may not be an important intermediate in verruculogen biosynthesis. PMID:6626168

  7. An intermediary role for the tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2 in the biosynthesis of verruculogen.

    PubMed Central

    Willingale, J; Perera, K P; Mantle, P G

    1983-01-01

    14C-Labelled compound TR-2, a tremorgenic mycotoxin, was administered to Penicillium raistrickii in submerged fermentation. Half of the added radiolabel was taken up by the fungus during the 60 h incubation period and the secondary metabolites subsequently isolated, principally verruculogen but also fumitremorgin B, were found to be radiolabelled. The efficiency of biosynthetic incorporation of TR-2 into verruculogen within the mycelium was at least 35%, demonstrating for the first time an intermediary role for TR-2. Fumitremorgin B was also TR-2-derived but may not be an important intermediate in verruculogen biosynthesis. PMID:6626168

  8. Premature aging with impaired oxidative stress defense in mice lacking TR4

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Fen; Liu, Su; Liu, Ning-Chun; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Chen, Lu-Min; Lin, Wen-Jye; Ting, Huei-Ju; Ho, Hsin-Chiu; Li, Gonghui; Puzas, Edward J.; Wu, Qiao

    2011-01-01

    Early studies suggest that TR4 nuclear receptor is a key transcriptional factor regulating various biological activities, including reproduction, cerebella development, and metabolism. Here we report that mice lacking TR4 (TR4−/−) exhibited increasing genome instability and defective oxidative stress defense, which are associated with premature aging phenotypes. At the cellular level, we observed rapid cellular growth arrest and less resistance to oxidative stress and DNA damage in TR4−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in vitro. Restoring TR4 or supplying the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) to TR4−/− MEFs reduced the DNA damage and slowed down cellular growth arrest. Focused qPCR array revealed alteration of gene profiles in the DNA damage response (DDR) and anti-reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways in TR4−/− MEFs, which further supports the hypothesis that the premature aging in TR4−/− mice might stem from oxidative DNA damage caused by increased oxidative stress or compromised genome integrity. Together, our finding identifies a novel role of TR4 in mediating the interplay between oxidative stress defense and aging. PMID:21521714

  9. Algebraic Flux Correction II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Dmitri; Möller, Matthias; Gurris, Marcel

    Flux limiting for hyperbolic systems requires a careful generalization of the design principles and algorithms introduced in the context of scalar conservation laws. In this chapter, we develop FCT-like algebraic flux correction schemes for the Euler equations of gas dynamics. In particular, we discuss the construction of artificial viscosity operators, the choice of variables to be limited, and the transformation of antidiffusive fluxes. An a posteriori control mechanism is implemented to make the limiter failsafe. The numerical treatment of initial and boundary conditions is discussed in some detail. The initialization is performed using an FCT-constrained L 2 projection. The characteristic boundary conditions are imposed in a weak sense, and an approximate Riemann solver is used to evaluate the fluxes on the boundary. We also present an unconditionally stable semi-implicit time-stepping scheme and an iterative solver for the fully discrete problem. The results of a numerical study indicate that the nonlinearity and non-differentiability of the flux limiter do not inhibit steady state convergence even in the case of strongly varying Mach numbers. Moreover, the convergence rates improve as the pseudo-time step is increased.

  10. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can ``tunnel'' through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >>1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, >=2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and ``pass'' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  11. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R.B.; Antiochos, S.K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of {ital orthogonal} magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can {open_quotes}tunnel{close_quotes} through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch {gt}1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, {ge}2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and {open_quotes}pass{close_quotes} through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Superradiance and flux conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  13. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  14. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  15. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  16. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  17. Role of β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase receptor in UVB mediated responses in skin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Neehar; Demmer, Tara A.; Sharma, Alok K.; Elcheva, Irina; Spiegelman, Vladimir S.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancers are the most common cancers in the United States. Exposure to UVB radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase has been found to be involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and transformation. Aberrant up-regulation of beta-transducin repeats-containing proteins (β-TrCP) is often found in cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We have previously demonstrated that β-TrCP2 is over-expressed in chemically induced mouse skin tumors [1]. Various cellular stress stimuli, including UVB, induce an increase in β-TrCP1 mRNA and protein levels in human cells [2]. We have previously shown that inhibition of β-TrCP function, by induction of dominant negative β-TrCP2 (β-TrCP2ΔF), in vitro in hTERT immortalized normal keratinocytes, results in increase in UVB induced apoptosis [3]. We have generated transgenic mice with inducible, selective expression of dominant negative β-TrCP2 in epidermis with the Keratin 5 promoter (K5-rTA × TRE-HA-β-TrCPΔF). Here we report that inhibition of β-TrCP function in mouse epidermis results in decrease in UVB-induced edema, hyperplasia, and inflammatory response and increment in UVB-induced apoptosis in skin. Our results suggest that β-TrCP may be an essential player in UVB induced responses in skin and can be a potential therapeutic target for skin cancer. PMID:21187057

  18. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  19. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  20. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  1. Degradation of alkylphenol ethoxylates by Pseudomonas sp. strain TR01.

    PubMed

    Maki, H; Masuda, N; Fujiwara, Y; Ike, M; Fujita, M

    1994-07-01

    An alkylphenol ethoxylate-degrading bacterium was isolated from activated sludge of a municipal sewage treatment plant by enrichment culture. This organism was found to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; since no corresponding species was identified, we designated it as Pseudomonas sp. strain TR01. This strain had an optimal temperature and pH of 30 degrees C and 7, respectively, for both growth and the degradation of Triton N-101 (a nonylphenol ethoxylate in which the average number of ethylene oxide [EO] units is 9.5). The strain was unable to mineralize Triton N-101 but was able to degrade its EO chain exclusively. The resulting dominant intermediate was identified by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a nonylphenol ethoxylate with 2 mol of EO units. A carboxylated metabolite, [(nonylphenoxy)ethoxy]acetic acid, was detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This bacterium also metabolized alcohol ethoxylates with various numbers of EO units but not polyethylene glycols whatever their degree of polymerization. By oxygen consumption assay, the alkyl group or arene corresponding to the hydrophobic part of alcohol ethoxylates or alkylphenol ethoxylates was shown to contribute to the induction of the metabolic system of the EO chain of Triton N-101, instead of the EO chain itself, which corresponds to its hydrophilic part. Thus, the isolated pseudomonad bacterium has unique substrate assimilability: it metabolizes the EO chain only when the chain linked to bulky hydrophobic groups. PMID:8074508

  2. Degradation of alkylphenol ethoxylates by Pseudomonas sp. strain TR01.

    PubMed Central

    Maki, H; Masuda, N; Fujiwara, Y; Ike, M; Fujita, M

    1994-01-01

    An alkylphenol ethoxylate-degrading bacterium was isolated from activated sludge of a municipal sewage treatment plant by enrichment culture. This organism was found to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; since no corresponding species was identified, we designated it as Pseudomonas sp. strain TR01. This strain had an optimal temperature and pH of 30 degrees C and 7, respectively, for both growth and the degradation of Triton N-101 (a nonylphenol ethoxylate in which the average number of ethylene oxide [EO] units is 9.5). The strain was unable to mineralize Triton N-101 but was able to degrade its EO chain exclusively. The resulting dominant intermediate was identified by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a nonylphenol ethoxylate with 2 mol of EO units. A carboxylated metabolite, [(nonylphenoxy)ethoxy]acetic acid, was detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This bacterium also metabolized alcohol ethoxylates with various numbers of EO units but not polyethylene glycols whatever their degree of polymerization. By oxygen consumption assay, the alkyl group or arene corresponding to the hydrophobic part of alcohol ethoxylates or alkylphenol ethoxylates was shown to contribute to the induction of the metabolic system of the EO chain of Triton N-101, instead of the EO chain itself, which corresponds to its hydrophilic part. Thus, the isolated pseudomonad bacterium has unique substrate assimilability: it metabolizes the EO chain only when the chain linked to bulky hydrophobic groups. PMID:8074508

  3. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  4. EdTrAc Teacher Education Program: First-Year Implementation Evaluation (2005-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Brian; Shelton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The Educational Training Academy (EdTrAc) is an NSF-funded project of Normandale Community College to increase the number, diversity, and skills of students preparing to be elementary and middle school teachers with a specialty in math and science. Overall, this evaluation indicates that the EdTrAc implementation is on track after its first year…

  5. Measurement and Prediction of Water Outgassing from TR55 Silicone by the Isoconversional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Burnham, A K; Maxwell, R S; Balazs, B

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this report are to measure the H{sub 2}O outgassing kinetics of TR55 silicon after a few hours of vacuum pumping; and to make H{sub 2}O outgassing kinetic predictions for TR55 at low temperatures in a vacuum/dry environment.

  6. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  7. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  8. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    2015-08-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  9. Collapse of flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilets, L.; Puff, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of an idealized, infinite, MIT-type flux tube is followed in time as the interior evolves from a pure gluon field to a q¯q plasma. We work in color U(1). q¯q pair formation is evaluated according to the Schwinger mechanism using the results of Brink and Pavel. The motion of the quarks toward the tube end caps is calculated by a Boltzmann equation including collisions. The tube undergoes damped radial oscillations until the electric field settles down to zero. The electric field stabilizes the tube against pinch instabilities; when the field vanishes, the tube disintegrates into mesons. There is only one free parameter in the problem, namely the initial flux tube radius, to which the results are very sensitive. Among various quantities calculated is the mean energy of the emitted pions.

  10. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  11. Reconnecting Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; van Compernolle, Bart

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are due to helical currents and form a dense carpet of arches on the surface of the sun. Occasionally one tears loose as a coronal mass ejection and its rope structure is detected by satellites close to the earth. Current sheets can tear into filaments and these are nothing other than flux ropes. Ropes are not static, they exert mutual JxB forces causing them to twist about each other and merge. Kink instabilities cause them to violently smash into each other and reconnect at the point of contact. We report on experiments done in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA (L=17m,dia=60cm,0.3<=B0z<=2.5kG,n˜2x10^12cm-3)on three dimensional flux ropes. Two, three or more magnetic flux ropes are generated from initially adjacent pulsed current channels in a background magnetized plasma. The currents and magnetic fields form exotic shapes with no ignorable direction and no magnetic nulls. Volumetric space-time data show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The concept of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL), a tool to understand 3D reconnection without null points. In our experiment the QSL is a narrow ribbon-like region(s) that twists between field lines. Within the QSL(s) field lines that start close to one another rapidly diverge as they pass through one or more reconnection regions. When the field lines are tracked they are observed to slip along the QSL when reconnection occurs. The Heating and other co-existing waves will be presented.

  12. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  13. Transmantle flux tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, V. J.; Dolginov, A. Z.; Baker, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    Venus, Earth, and Mars have surfaces that display topographic domes and depressions with quasi-circular planimetric shapes, relief of 0 to several km, and large spatial scales (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) km). Our morphostructural mapping reveals hierarchical arrangements of these features. They are explained by a model of long-acting mantle convection, as a particular case of convection in a stratified and random inhomogeneous medium, which develops the form of a hierarchy of different convective pattern scales, each arising from different levels in the mantle. The hypothesis of transmantle flux tectonics parsimoniously explains a diversity of seemingly unrelated terrestrial planetary phenomena, including Earth megaplumes, global resurfacing epochs on Venus, and cyclic ocean formation and global climate change for Mars. All these phenomenon are hypothesized to be parsimoniously explained by a process of transmantle flux tectonics in which long-acting mantle convection generates stresses in blocks of planetary lithosphere to produce distinctive quasi-circular global-hierarchical morphostructure (QGM) patterns. Transmantle flux tectonics differs from plume tectonics in that individual plumes are not considered in isolation. Rather, a wholly interactive process is envisioned in which various spatial and temporal scales of convection operate contemporaneously and hierarchically within other scales. This process of continual change by hierarchical convective cells affects the surface at varying temporal and spatial scales, and its effects are discernable through their relic geological manifestations, the QGM patterns.

  14. Reconnection Between Twisted Flux Tubes - Implications for Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Wyper, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the heating of the Sun's corona has been a long-standing unanswered problem in solar physics. Beginning with the work of Parker (1972), many authors have argued that the corona is continuously heated through numerous small-scale reconnection events known as nanoflares. In these nanoflare models, stressing of magnetic flux tubes by photospheric motions causes the field to become misaligned, producing current sheets in the corona. These current sheets then reconnect, converting the free energy stored in the magnetic field into heat. In this work, we use the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) to perform 3D MHD simulations that dynamically resolve regions of strong current to study the reconnection between twisted flux tubes in a plane-parallel Parker configuration. We investigate the energetics of the process, and show that the flux tubes accumulate stress gradually before undergoing impulsive reconnection. We study the motion of the individual field lines during reconnection, and demonstrate that the connectivity of the configuration becomes extremely complex, with multiple current sheets being formed, which could lead to enhanced heating. In addition, we show that there is considerable interaction between the twisted flux tubes and the surrounding untwisted field, which contributes further to the formation of current sheets. The implications for observations will be discussed. This work was funded by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, and by the NASA TR&T Program.

  15. TR32DB - Management of Research Data in a Collaborative, Interdisciplinary Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curdt, Constanze; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Waldhoff, Guido; Lang, Ulrich; Bareth, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The management of research data in a well-structured and documented manner is essential in the context of collaborative, interdisciplinary research environments (e.g. across various institutions). Consequently, set-up and use of a research data management (RDM) system like a data repository or project database is necessary. These systems should accompany and support scientists during the entire research life cycle (e.g. data collection, documentation, storage, archiving, sharing, publishing) and operate cross-disciplinary in interdisciplinary research projects. Challenges and problems of RDM are well-know. Consequently, the set-up of a user-friendly, well-documented, sustainable RDM system is essential, as well as user support and further assistance. In the framework of the Transregio Collaborative Research Centre 32 'Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation' (CRC/TR32), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). Very heterogeneous research data are considered, which are resulting from field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes like publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are regarded. The TR32DB project database is set-up in cooperation with the Regional Computing Centre of the University of Cologne (RRZK) and also located in this hardware environment. The TR32DB system architecture is composed of three main components: (i) a file-based data

  16. miRNA-133a attenuates lipid accumulation via TR4-CD36 pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    lipid metabolism is the major causes of atherosclerosis. There is increasing evidence that miR-133a plays an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a in macrophages is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate that loss of TR4 leads to reduce lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues, etc, and lesional macrophages-derived TR4 can greatly increase the foam cell formation through increasing the CD36-mediated the uptake of ox-LDL. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that TR4 may be a target gene of miR-133a. Here, we examined whether miR-133a regulates TR4 expression in ox-LDL-induced mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, thereby affecting lipid accumulation. Using ox-LDL-treatment RAW 264.7 macrophages transfected with miR-133a mimics or inhibitors, we have showed that miR-133a can directly regulate the expression of TR4 in RAW 264.7 cells, thereby attenuates CD36-medide lipid accumulation. Furthermore, our studies suggest an additional explanation for the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a regulation to its functional target, TR4 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-133a may regulate lipid accumulation in ox-LDL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages via TR4-CD36 pathway. PMID:27109382

  17. Fate of TR-2, the hepatic metabolite of the tremorgenic mycotoxin verruculogen, in sheep.

    PubMed

    Laws, I; Mantle, P G; Rodrigues, L; Penny, R H

    1987-08-01

    1. Verruculogen is eliminated in bile after transformation to TR-2, only a trace of which was excreted as such in faeces of sheep given verruculogen per os. Negligible TR-2 was present free in urine; no glucuronide was found. 2. An isomer of TR-2, a minor component of the bile of sheep given verruculogen, has been defined by 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy and the isomerism involves the disposition of the two adjacent hydroxyl groups with a concomitant change in the conformation of the ring adjacent to the indole. 3. 14C-TR-2, added to the perfusate of isolated rat liver, was excreted unchanged in the bile, implying no significant loss of any biliary TR-2 subject to enterohepatic recycling in vivo. 4. 14C-TR-2 incubated anaerobically in sheep ileum contents was 95% transformed into more polar metabolites, the majority of the radiolabelled metabolites isolated being water soluble. 5. The principal fate of biliary TR-2 is as a metabolic substrate for the intestinal microflora. PMID:3673112

  18. A model-based assessment of the TrOCA approach for estimating oceanic anthropogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Oschlies, A.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2009-07-01

    The future behaviour of the global ocean as a sink for CO2 is significant for climate change, but it is also important to understand its past by quantifying anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) in the ocean today. Unfortunately, this is complicated by the difficulty of deconvoluting Cant from the natural, unperturbed carbon cycle. Nonetheless, a range of techniques have been devised that perform this separation using the information implicit in other physical, biogeochemical and artificial ocean tracers. One such method is the TrOCA approach, whose parameterisation is derived from relationships between biogeochemical tracers within watermasses defined by age tracers such as CFC-11. TrOCA has a number of methodological advantages, and has been shown to be plausible, relative to other methods, in a number of studies. Here we examine the TrOCA approach by using it to deconvolute the known distribution of Cant from an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) simulation of the industrial period (1864-2004). TrOCA is evaluated at local, regional and global scales, with an emphasis on the wider applicability of the parameterisations derived at these scales. Our work finds that the published TrOCA parameterisation performs poorly when extrapolated beyond its calibration region, either with observational data or (especially) model output. Optimising TrOCA parameters using model output as a synthetic dataset leads to some small improvements, but the resulting TrOCA variants still perform poorly. Furthermore, there are large ranges on the optimised TrOCA parameters suggesting that a "universal" TrOCA parameterisation is not achieveable.

  19. Differential roles of PPARγ vs TR4 in prostate cancer and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Lin, Shin-Jen; Li, Gonghui; Kim, Eungseok; Chen, Yei-Tsung; Yang, Dong-Rong; Tan, M H Eileen; Yong, Eu Leong; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, NR1C3) and testicular receptor 4 nuclear receptor (TR4, NR2C2) are two members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that can be activated by several similar ligands/activators including polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites, such as 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, as well as some anti-diabetic drugs such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs). However, the consequences of the transactivation of these ligands/activators via these two NRs are different, with at least three distinct phenotypes. First, activation of PPARγ increases insulin sensitivity yet activation of TR4 decreases insulin sensitivity. Second, PPARγ attenuates atherosclerosis but TR4 might increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Third, PPARγ suppresses prostate cancer (PCa) development and TR4 suppresses prostate carcinogenesis yet promotes PCa metastasis. Importantly, the deregulation of either PPARγ or TR4 in PCa alone might then alter the other receptor's influences on PCa progression. Knocking out PPARγ altered the ability of TR4 to promote prostate carcinogenesis and knocking down TR4 also resulted in TZD treatment promoting PCa development, indicating that both PPARγ and TR4 might coordinate with each other to regulate PCa initiation, and the loss of either one of them might switch the other one from a tumor suppressor to a tumor promoter. These results indicate that further and detailed studies of both receptors at the same time in the same cells/organs may help us to better dissect their distinct physiological roles and develop better drug(s) with fewer side effects to battle PPARγ- and TR4-related diseases including tumor and cardiovascular diseases as well as metabolic disorders. PMID:24623743

  20. TR4 orphan nuclear receptor functions as an apoptosis modulator via regulation of Bcl-2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eungseok; Ma, Wen-Lung; Lin, Din-Lii; Inui, Shigeki; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Chang, Chawnshang . E-mail: chang@urmc.rochester.edu

    2007-09-21

    While Bcl-2 plays an important role in cell apoptosis, its relationship to the orphan nuclear receptors remains unclear. Here we report that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells prepared from TR4-deficient (TR4{sup -} {sup /-}) mice are more susceptible to UV-irradiation mediated apoptosis compared to TR4-Wildtype (TR4 {sup +/+}) littermates. Substantial increasing TR4{sup -} {sup /-} MEF apoptosis to UV-irradiation was correlated to the down-regulation of Bcl-2 RNA and protein expression and collaterally increased caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, this TR4-induced Bcl-2 gene expression can be suppressed by co-transfection with TR4 coregulators, such as androgen receptor (AR) and receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) in a dose-dependent manner. Together, our results demonstrate that TR4 might function as an apoptosis modulator through induction of Bcl-2 gene expression.

  1. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Behrndt, Klaus

    2004-12-10

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  2. Variable-speed Generators with Flux Weakening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fardoun, A. A.; Fuchs, E. F.; Carlin, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    A cost-competitive, permanent-magnet 20 kW generator is designed such that the following criteria are satisfied: an (over) load capability of at least 30 kW over the entire speed range of 60-120 rpm, generator weight of about 550 lbs with a maximum radial stator flux density of 0.82 T at low speed, unity power factor operation, acceptably small synchronous reactances and operation without a gear box. To justify this final design four different generator designs are investigated: the first two designs are studied to obtain a speed range from 20 to 200 rpm employing rotor field weakening, and the latter two are investigated to obtain a maximum speed range of 40 to 160 rpm based on field weakening via the stator excitation. The generator reactances and induced voltages are computed using finite element/difference solutions. Generator losses and efficiencies are presented for all four designs at rated temperature of Tr=120C.

  3. Thermal flux transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freggens, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermal flux transfer system for use in maintaining the thrust chamber of an operative reaction motor at given temperatures is described. The system is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber surrounding a thrust chamber to be cooled, with a plurality of parallel, longitudinally spaced, disk-shaped wick members formed of a metallic mesh and employed in delivering a working fluid, in its liquid state, radially toward the thrust chamber and delivering the working fluid, in its vapor state, away from the nozzle for effecting a cooling of the nozzle, in accordance with known principles of an operating heat pipe.

  4. High flux reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lake, James A.; Heath, Russell L.; Liebenthal, John L.; DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R.; Leyse, Carl F.; Parsons, Kent; Ryskamp, John M.; Wadkins, Robert P.; Harker, Yale D.; Fillmore, Gary N.; Oh, Chang H.

    1988-01-01

    A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

  5. 77 FR 73456 - Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy...: Reference: TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy. Background: The following FRA policy applies to... increases in diesel fuel prices. Miscellaneous: A copy of the TR-12 FRA Policy can be accessed via the...

  6. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart...

  7. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart...

  8. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart...

  9. Electroslag remelting with used fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

    1988-05-01

    The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

  10. Computing the Flux Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    We address the flux footprint for measurement heights in the atmospheric surface layer, comparing eddy diffusion solutions with those furnished by the first-order Lagrangian stochastic (or "generalized Langevin") paradigm. The footprint given by Langevin models differs distinctly from that given by the random displacement model (i.e. zeroth-order Lagrangian stochastic model) corresponding to its "diffusion limit," which implies that a well-founded theory of the flux footprint must incorporate the turbulent velocity autocovariance. But irrespective of the choice of the eddy diffusion or Langevin class of model as basis for the footprint, tuning relative to observations is ultimately necessary. Some earlier treatments assume Monin-Obukhov profiles for the mean wind and eddy diffusivity and that the effective Schmidt number (ratio of eddy viscosity to the tracer eddy diffusivity) in the neutral limit , while others calibrate the model to the Project Prairie Grass dispersion trials. Because there remains uncertainty as to the optimal specification of (or a related parameter in alternative theories, e.g. the Kolmogorov coefficient in Langevin models) it is recommended that footprint models should be explicit in this regard.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Basidiomycetous Fungus Flammulina velutipes TR19

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Atsushi; Fukuta, Yasuhisa; Mori, Miho; Kishimoto, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Flammulina velutipes TR19, which was newly isolated from commercial strains in Japan. The genes related to fruiting body formation in the basidiomycete were identified by whole-genome analysis. PMID:27284132

  12. Pentacene organic ferroelectric transistors with [P(VDF-TrFE)] gate by Langmuir-Blodgett process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yilin; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Feng, Tingting; Zang, Yongyuan; Zhang, Cheng; Dai, Ruixuan; Meng, Xiangjian; Ji, Zhuoyu

    2015-09-01

    We report the fabrication and electrical properties of pentacene-based ferroelectric organic field-effect transistors (FeOFETs) with ultrathin poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] gate insulators. A ultrathin and uniform P(VDF-TrFE) film was successfully deposited by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) deposition with well-defined ferroelectric microdomains at the interface between P(VDF-TrFE) films and pentacene active layers. The P(VDF-TrFE) films derived by LB deposition significantly enhance the crystallization of the upper pentacene channel films and thus the performance of our FeOFETs. Our FeOFET device achieves a threshold voltage shift of 8.56 V induced by ferroelectric polarization under different voltage sweeping directions and such enhancement indicates a great potential for future organic nonvolatile memory applications.

  13. Trémaux on species: a theory of allopatric speciation (and punctuated equilibrium) before Wagner.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, John S; Nelson, Gareth J

    2008-01-01

    Pierre Trémaux's 1865 ideas on speciation have been unjustly derided following his acceptance by Marx and rejection by Engels, and almost nobody has read his ideas in a charitable light. Here we offer an interpretation based on translating the term sol as "habitat," in order to show that Trémaux proposed a theory of allopatric speciation before Wagner and a punctuated equilibrium theory before Gould and Eldredge, and we translate the relevant discussion from the French. We believe he may have influenced Darwin's revision to the third edition of the Origin on rates of evolution. We also suggest that Gould's dismissal of Trémaux is motivated by concern that others might think punctuated equilibrium theory was tainted by a connection with Trémaux. PMID:19203015

  14. Herpesvirus Telomerase RNA (vTR) with a Mutated Template Sequence Abrogates Herpesvirus-Induced Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Arndt, Sina; Trapp, Sascha; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Jarosinski, Keith W.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR) on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV) as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5) by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1) that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2) that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates against virus

  15. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1–10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1–100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  16. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation.

    PubMed

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1-10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1-100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  17. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  18. Metabolic control of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cell differentiation by AHR and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Yeste, Ada; Patel, Bonny; Wu, Yan; Kenison, Jessica E.; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Basso, Alexandre S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Priel, Avner; Clish, Clary B.; Robson, Simon C.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathways that regulate lymphocyte metabolism, as well as the effects of metabolism and its products on the immune response, is still limited. We report that a metabolic program controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) supports the differentiation of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells. HIF1-α controls the early metabolic reprograming of Tr1 cells. At later time points, AHR promotes HIF1-α degradation and takes control of Tr1 cell metabolism. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) and hypoxia, linked to inflammation, trigger AHR inactivation by HIF1-α and inhibit Tr1 cell differentiation. Conversely, CD39 promotes Tr1 cell differentiation by depleting eATP. CD39 also contributes to Tr1 suppressive activity by generating adenosine in cooperation with CD73 expressed by responder T cells and antigen presenting cells. These results suggest that HIF1-α and AHR integrate immunological, metabolic and environmental signals to regulate the immune response. PMID:26005855

  19. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e.,more » P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.« less

  20. Laboratory combustion tube studies. Part II. Report SUPRI TR-10

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Fassihi, M.R.; Satman, A.; Williams, R.L.; Pettit, P.; Grim, J.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    To promote a better understanding of the problems and mechanisms involved in dry in-situ combustion of crude oils in porous media, continuing laboratory studies are carried out at SUPRI. The report about the first two experiments was submitted earlier to the Department of Energy. This report describes the results of the last three tube runs. Three laboratory combustion tube studies were made with unconsolidated core material, and Lombardi Zone crude oil from the San Ardo field, California. After preparation, the material was packed into the combustion tube. Conditions employed during the steady burning phase of each run were about constant. Injection pressure for all of them was 100 Psig (6.8 Atm.). Burning front velocities ranged from 7.22 cm/hr (5.68 ft/day) to 12.96 cm/hr (10.2 ft/day) while the stream front velocities ranged from 10.4 cm/hr to 13.48 cm/hr. The air flux was between 88.33 SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/ and 122.7SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/. Observed fuel ration ranged from 162.54 SCF/lb to 169.33 SCF/lb of fuel burned. The detailed analysis of these experiments accompanied with their field application will be presented later.

  1. PromptNuFlux: Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottoli, Luca

    2015-11-01

    PromptNuFlux computes the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux E3Φ(GeV2/(cm2ssr)), including the total associated theory uncertainty, for a range of energies between E=103 GeV and E=107.5 GeV. Results are available for five different parametrizations of the input cosmic ray flux: BPL, H3P, H3A, H14a, H14b.

  2. California's Future Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  3. Quantitative Flux Ecoregions for AmeriFlux Using MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Hargrove, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Multivariate Geographic Clustering was used with maps of climate, soils, and physiography and MODIS remotely sensed data products to statistically produce a series of the 90 most-different homogeneous flux-relevant ecoregions in the conterminous United States using a parallel supercomputer. Nine separate sets of flux ecoregions were produced; only two will be discussed here. Both the IB and IIIB maps were quantitatively constructed from subsets of the input data integrated during the local growing season (frost-free period) in every 1 km cell. Each map is shown two ways --- once with the 90 flux ecoregions colored randomly, and once using color combinations derived statistically from the first three Principal Component Axes. Although the underlying flux ecoregion polygons are the same in both cases, the statistically derived colors show the similarity of conditions within each flux ecoregion. Coloring the same map in this way shows the continuous gradient of changing flux environments across the US. The IB map, since it considers only abiotic environmental factors, represents flux-ecoregions based on potential vegetation. The IIIB map, since it contains remotely sensed MODIS information about existing vegetation, includes the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbance, and represents actual or realized flux ecoregions. Thus, differences between the maps are attributable to human activity and natural disturbances. The addition of information on existing vegetation exerts a unifying effect on abiotic-only flux ecoregions. The Mississippi Valley and Corn Belt areas show large differences between the two maps. Map IIIB shows a mosaic of ``speckles'' in areas of intense human land use, ostensibly from disturbances like agriculture, irrigation, fertilization, and clearing. Such ``speckles'' are absent from areas devoid of intense human land use. Major cities are also evident in the IIIB map. We will use the quantitative similarity of the suite of flux

  4. Vorticity flux from active dimples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, Beverley; Sherwin, Spencer; Morrison, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    The effect of surface depressions, or dimples, in reducing drag on golf balls is well-known. Here this concept is extended to using ``active" dimples to manipulate vorticity flux at the wall. Surface vorticity flux is governed by surface accelerations, pressure and shear stress gradients, and surface curvature. ``Active" (or vibrating) dimples may generate vorticity flux by each of these terms, making them an excellent candidate for a basic study of flux manipulation, by which flow control may be achieved. Flow over an active dimple in fully-developed laminar channel flow is simulated with velocity boundary conditions developed from a linearized perturbation method imposed at the wall. This simple model cannot capture flow separation, but gives insight into the most straightforward means of flux generation from the concave surface. Vorticity flux due to dimple geometry and motion is quantified, and enhancements of two to three orders of magnitude in peak vorticity over the static dimple case are observed.

  5. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  6. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  7. Xylan oligosaccharides and cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) interaction and effect on activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The well-studied cellulase mixture secreted by Trichoderma reesei (anamorph to Hypocrea jecorina) contains two cellobiohydolases (CBHs), cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) and cellobiohydrolase II (TrCeI6A), that are core enzymes for the solubilisation of cellulose. This has attracted significant research interest because of the role of the CBHs in the conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars. However, the CHBs are notoriously slow and susceptible to inhibition, which presents a challenge for the commercial utilisation of biomass. The xylans and xylan fragments that are also present in the biomass have been suggested repeatedly as one cause of the reduced activity of CHBs. Yet, the extent and mechanisms of this inhibition remain poorly elucidated. Therefore, we studied xylan oligosaccharides (XOSs) of variable lengths with respect to their binding and inhibition of both TrCel7A and an enzyme variant without the cellulose-binding domain (CBM). Results We studied the binding of XOSs to TrCel7A by isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that XOSs bind to TrCel7A and that the affinity increases commensurate with XOS length. The CBM, on the other hand, did not affect the affinity significantly, which suggests that XOSs may bind to the active site. Activity assays of TrCel7A clearly demonstrated the negative effect of the presence of XOSs on the turnover number. Conclusions On the basis of these binding data and a comparison of XOS inhibition of the activity of the two enzyme variants towards, respectively, soluble and insoluble substrates, we propose a competitive mechanism for XOS inhibition of TrCel7A with phosphoric swollen cellulose as a substrate. PMID:22035059

  8. South Atlantic meridional fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzoli, Silvia L.; Baringer, Molly O.; Dong, Shenfu; Perez, Renellys C.; Yao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and associated meridional heat transport (MHT) and salt fluxes are analyzed in the South Atlantic. The oceanographic data used for the study consist of Expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data collected along 27 sections at nominally 35°S for the period of time 2002-2011, and Argo profile data collected in the region. Previous estimates obtained with a shorter record are improved and extended, using new oceanographic sections and wind fields. Different wind products are analyzed to determine the uncertainty in the Ekman component of the MHT derived from their use. Results of the analysis provide a 9-year time series of MHT, and volume transport in the upper layer of the MOC. Salt fluxes at 35°S are estimated using a parameter introduced by numerical studies, the Mov that represents the salt flux and helps determine the basin scale salt feedback associated with the MOC. Volume and heat transport by the western and eastern boundary currents are estimated, and their covariablity is examined. Analysis of the data shows that the South Atlantic is responsible for a northward MHT with a mean value of 0.54±0.14 PW. The MHT exhibits no significant trend from 2002 to 2011. The MOC varies from 14.4 to 22.7 Sv with a mean value of 18.1±2.3 Sv and the maximum overturning transport is found at a mean depth of 1250 m. Statistical analysis suggests that an increase of 1 Sv in the MOC leads to an increase of the MHT of 0.04±0.02 PW. Estimates of the Mov from data collected from three different kinds of observations, contrary to those obtained from models, feature a positive salt advection feedback (Mov<0) suggesting that freshwater perturbations will be amplified and that the MOC is bistable. In other words, the MOC might collapse with a large enough freshwater perturbation. Observations indicate that the mean value of the Brazil Current is -8.6±4.1 Sv at 24°S and -19.4±4.3 Sv at 35°S, increasing towards the

  9. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  10. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  11. Flux Compression Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In pulsed fusion propulsion schemes in which the fusion energy creates a radially expanding plasma, a magnetic nozzle is required to redirect the radially diverging flow of the expanding fusion plasma into a rearward axial flow, thereby producing a forward axial impulse to the vehicle. In a highly electrically conducting plasma, the presence of a magnetic field B in the plasma creates a pressure B(exp 2)/2(mu) in the plasma, the magnetic pressure. A gradient in the magnetic pressure can be used to decelerate the plasma traveling in the direction of increasing magnetic field, or to accelerate a plasma from rest in the direction of decreasing magnetic pressure. In principle, ignoring dissipative processes, it is possible to design magnetic configurations to produce an 'elastic' deflection of a plasma beam. In particular, it is conceivable that, by an appropriate arrangement of a set of coils, a good approximation to a parabolic 'magnetic mirror' may be formed, such that a beam of charged particles emanating from the focal point of the parabolic mirror would be reflected by the mirror to travel axially away from the mirror. The degree to which this may be accomplished depends on the degree of control one has over the flux surface of the magnetic field, which changes as a result of its interaction with a moving plasma.

  12. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-12-08

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression.

  13. Norcantharidin induces melanoma cell apoptosis through activation of TR3 dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujing; Yu, Hong; Kumar, Suresh M.; Martin, James S.; Bing, Zhanyong; Sheng, Weiqi; Bosenberg, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD) has been reported to induce tumor cell apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism behinds its antitumor effect remains elusive. We have previously shown that TR3 expression is significantly decreased in metastatic melanomas and involved in melanoma cell apoptosis. In this study, we showed that NCTD inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose related manner. NCTD induced translocation of TR3 from nucleus to mitochondria where it co-localized with Bcl-2 in melanoma cells. NCTD also increased cytochome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. These changes were accompanied by increased expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 along with decreased expression of Bcl2 and NF-κB2. The effects of NCTD were inhibited by knockdown of TR3 expression using TR3 specific shRNA in melanoma cells. Furthermore, NCTD significantly decreased tumor volume and improved survival of Tyr::CreER; BRAFCa/+; Ptenlox/lox transgenic mice. Our data indicates that NCTD inhibits melanoma growth by inducing tumor cell apoptosis via activation of a TR3 dependent pathway. These results suggest that NCTD is a potential therapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:22123174

  14. Estimation of Theaflavins (TF) and Thearubigins (TR) Ratio in Black Tea Liquor Using Electronic Vision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuli, Amitava; Pal, Abhra; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyya, Rajib; Tamuly, Pradip; Gogoi, Nagen

    2011-09-01

    Quality of black tea is generally assessed using organoleptic tests by professional tea tasters. They determine the quality of black tea based on its appearance (in dry condition and during liquor formation), aroma and taste. Variation in the above parameters is actually contributed by a number of chemical compounds like, Theaflavins (TF), Thearubigins (TR), Caffeine, Linalool, Geraniol etc. Among the above, TF and TR are the most important chemical compounds, which actually contribute to the formation of taste, colour and brightness in tea liquor. Estimation of TF and TR in black tea is generally done using a spectrophotometer instrument. But, the analysis technique undergoes a rigorous and time consuming effort for sample preparation; also the operation of costly spectrophotometer requires expert manpower. To overcome above problems an Electronic Vision System based on digital image processing technique has been developed. The system is faster, low cost, repeatable and can estimate the amount of TF and TR ratio for black tea liquor with accuracy. The data analysis is done using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Multiple Discriminate Analysis (MDA). A correlation has been established between colour of tea liquor images and TF, TR ratio. This paper describes the newly developed E-Vision system, experimental methods, data analysis algorithms and finally, the performance of the E-Vision System as compared to the results of traditional spectrophotometer.

  15. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Observations of Transiting Extrasolar Planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jake; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Smart, B.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Cunningham, K.; Hardegree-Ullman, E. E.; Crawford, B.; Mueting, J.; Carleton, T.; Schwarz, K.; Robertson, A.; Guvenen, B.; Towner, A.; Austin, C.; Henz, T.; Keys, D.; Johnson, K.

    2011-05-01

    Using the Steward Observatory 61" Kuiper Telescope, The University of Arizona Astronomy Club observed extrasolar planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b. We observed the planets with the Harris-B, V, and R filters as they transited their parent stars during the months of May-July 2009. The main goal of this project was to get undergraduates involved with a research astronomy project and allow them to gain experience beyond what they would receive in the classroom. Many of the team members were introduced to astronomical observing techniques and data reduction using IRAF. Part of the project involved determining the optimum number of flat-field and bias frames required for image calibrations. With our results, we have been able to confirm and refine previously published values for the planets' orbital inclination, mass, radius, and density.

  16. Neoclassical Angular Momentum Flux Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2004-11-01

    The toroidal angular momentum flux in neoclassical transport theory of small rotations depends on the second order (in ion poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length) ion distribution function. Owing to the complexity of the calculation, the result obtained a long time ago for circular cross-section tokamak plasmas in the banana regime [M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495] has never been reproduced. Using a representation of the angular momentum flux based on the solution of an adjoint equation to the usual linearized drift kinetic equation, and performing systematically a large-aspect-ratio expansion, we have obtained the flux for flux surfaces of arbitrary shape. We have found the same analytic form for the temperature gradient driven part of the flux, but the overall numerical multiplier is different and has the opposite sign. Implications for rotations in discharges with no apparent momentum input will be discussed.

  17. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  18. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e., P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.

  19. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growthmore » in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.« less

  20. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.-Q.

    2015-04-01

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. The reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. For the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  1. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2)more » and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.« less

  2. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2) and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.

  3. A comparison of ALPHAScreen, TR-FRET, and TRF as assay methods for FXR nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Glickman, J Fraser; Wu, Xiang; Mercuri, Robert; Illy, Chantal; Bowen, Benjamin R; He, Yang; Sills, Matthew

    2002-02-01

    New developments in detection technologies are providing a variety of biomolecular screening strategies from which to choose. Consequently, we performed a detailed analysis of both separation-based and non-separation-based formats for screening nuclear receptor ligands. In this study, time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), ALPHAScreen, and time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) assays were optimized and compared with respect to sensitivity, reproducibility, and miniaturization capability. The results showed that the ALPHAScreen system had the best sensitivity and dynamic range. The TRF assay was more time consuming because of the number of wash steps necessary. The TR-FRET assay had less interwell variation, most likely because of ratiometric measurement. Both the ALPHAScreen and the TR-FRET assays were miniaturized to 8-microl volumes. Of the photomultiplier tube-based readers, the ALPHAScreen reader (ALPHAQuest) presented the advantage of faster reading times through simultaneous reading with four photomultiplier tubes. PMID:11897050

  4. Chemical Composition of the Planet-Harboring Star TrES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, A.; Yong, D.; Carney, B. W.; Laird, J. B.; Latham, D. W.; Torres, G.

    2005-12-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of the parent star of the transiting extrasolar planet TrES-1. Based on high-resolution Keck/HIRES and HET/HRS spectra, we have determined abundances relative to the Sun for 16 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, and Ba). The resulting average abundance of <[X/H]> = -0.02± 0.06 is in good agreement with initial estimates of solar metallicity based on iron. We compare the elemental abundances of TrES-1 with those of the sample of stars with planets, searching for possible chemical abundance anomalies. TrES-1 appears not to be chemically peculiar in any measurable way. We investigate possible signs of selective accretion of refractory elements in TrES-1 and other stars with planets, and find no statistically significant trends of metallicity [X/H] with condensation temperature Tc. We use published abundances and kinematic information for the sample of planet-hosting stars (including TrES-1) and several statistical indicators to provide an updated classification in terms of their likelihood to belong to either the thin disk or the thick disk of the Milky Way Galaxy. TrES-1 is found to be a very likely member of the thin disk population. By comparing α -element abundances of planet hosts and a large control sample of field stars, we also find that metal-rich ([Fe/H]> 0.0) stars with planets appear to be systematically underabundant in [α /Fe] by ˜ 0.1 dex with respect to comparison field stars. The reason for this signature is unclear, but systematic differences in the analysis procedures adopted by different groups cannot be ruled out.

  5. Chemical Composition of the Planet-harboring Star TrES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, Alessandro; Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Laird, John B.; Latham, David W.; Torres, Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of the parent star of the transiting extrasolar planet TrES-1. Based on high-resolution Keck HIRES and Hobby-Eberly Telescope HRS spectra, we have determined abundances relative to the Sun for 16 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, and Ba). The resulting average abundance of <[X/H]>=-0.02+/-0.06 is in good agreement with initial estimates of solar metallicity based on iron. We compare the elemental abundances of TrES-1 with those of the sample of stars with planets, searching for possible chemical abundance anomalies. TrES-1 appears not to be chemically peculiar in any measurable way. We investigate possible signs of selective accretion of refractory elements in TrES-1 and other stars with planets and find no statistically significant trends of metallicity [X/H] with condensation temperature Tc. We use published abundances and kinematic information for the sample of planet-hosting stars (including TrES-1) and several statistical indicators to provide an updated classification in terms of their likelihood to belong to either the thin disk or the thick disk of the Milky Way. TrES-1 is found to be very likely a member of the thin-disk population. By comparing α-element abundances of planet hosts and a large control sample of field stars, we also find that metal-rich ([Fe/H]>~0.0) stars with planets appear to be systematically underabundant in [α/Fe] by ~0.1 dex with respect to comparison field stars. The reason for this signature is unclear, but systematic differences in the analysis procedures adopted by different groups cannot be ruled out.

  6. Standardized test for anti-Tr/DNER in patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Christian; de Graaff, Esther; van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen; Rogemond, Veronique; Honnorat, Jerome; Sabeter, Lidia; Graus, Francesc; Jarius, Sven; Voltz, Raymond; Wildemann, Brigitte; Franciotta, Diego; Blöcker, Inga M.; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Stöcker, Winfried; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine sensitivity and specificity of a standardized recombinant cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (RC-IFA) for anti-Tr antibodies in comparison to a reference procedure. Methods: Delta/Notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor (DNER) was expressed in HEK293 and used as a substrate for RC-IFA. HEK293 control cells expressing CDR2/Yo and CDR2L as well as mock-transfected HEK293 cells were used as controls. Serum samples from 38 patients with anti-Tr antibodies (33 with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD] and Hodgkin lymphoma), 66 patients with anti-Tr–negative PCD, 53 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma without neurologic symptoms, 40 patients with rheumatic diseases, and 42 healthy blood donors were tested for anti-DNER reactivity in the RC-IFA. In addition, RC-IFA results were compared to those from a commercial tissue-based IFA using monkey cerebellum. Results: Using the RC-IFA, anti-DNER was detected in all anti-Tr–positive patients but in none of the controls (sensitivity 100%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 92.8%–100%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 98.7%–100%). In comparison, anti-Tr was not detected in 4 samples with low-titer autoantibodies using the commercial tissue-based assay. Preadsorption of sera with either recombinant full-length DNER or its extracellular domain selectively abolished anti-Tr reactivity. Conclusion: Anti-Tr antibodies bind to the extracellular domain of DNER and can be detected by RC-IFA using HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant receptor. The new method performs better than a frequently used commercial tissue-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in samples with low-titer antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that RC-IFA accurately detects anti-Tr as compared to conventional IFA. PMID:25745634

  7. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  8. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated. PMID:26792224

  9. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated. PMID:26792224

  10. A Case of Leser-Trélat Syndrome Associated with a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dietrich; Puhlmann, Silvio; Barth, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses can often be found in elderly people. In general, they appear gradually. In cases of a sudden eruption with itching it might be paraneoplastic. Although some authors doubt the existence of the paraneoplastic Leser-Trélat syndrome, we present a case of sudden eruption of seborrheic keratoses connected with a newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma. As far as we know, this is the first case report of a Leser-Trélat syndrome with a malignancy of the kidney. PMID:26500537

  11. An introduction to TR-X: a simplified tool for standardized analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Russell C; Waters, Laurie S; Fallgren, Andrew J; Ghoreson, Gregory G

    2010-09-09

    TR-X is a multi-platform program that provides a graphical interface to Monte Carlo N-Particle transport (MCNP) and Monte Carlo N-Particle transport eXtended (MCNPX) codes. Included in this interface are tools to reduce the tedium of input file creation, provide standardization of model creation and analysis, and expedite the execution of the created models. TR-X provides tools to make the rapid testing of multiple permutations of these models easier, while also building in standardization that allows multiple solutions to be compared.

  12. Were the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides multi-staged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allin, Joshua; Mozzato, Alessandro; Tappin, David; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides originating from active and extinct trough mouth fans are some of the largest single mass movements evident on Earth. These landslides are capable of damaging offshore infrastructure and can also trigger far-reaching tsunamis. For these reasons understanding the timing, dynamics, and triggering mechanisms of large submarine landslides is important for regional geohazard assessment. The Trænadjupet Slide occurred 4,000 ca. years ago and originated from the Trænadjupet paleo-ice stream on the Central Norwegian margin. The Trænadjupet Slide partially buried the deposits of a previous slide originating from the same section of the Norwegian margin; the Nyk Slide, which occurred at 16,000 ca years ago. Although the Trænadjupet Slide had an estimated volume of 900 km3 and originated from a shallow water depth, it does not appear to have triggered a tsunami. This is in contrast to the comparably-sized Storegga Slide, which produced a tsunami that devastated coastal areas as far away as Scotland. The apparent absence of a tsunami suggests that the failure dynamics for the Trænadjupet slide were different to that of other large slides along the Norwegian Margin. The deposits of both the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides consist of several blocky lobes extending out into the Lofoten Basin. The lobate morphology of the deposits may imply that both slides occurred in a number of different and possibly temporally-disparate stages. Importantly, multi-staged failures have a much lower tsunamigenic potential due to the lower initial volume displacement. These staggered failures consisting of smaller sediment volumes might explain why no contemporaneous onshore tsunami deposits are found on nearby coastlines, particularly in the case of the post-glacial Trænadjupet Slide. Here we present a new sediment core dataset collected from the previously un-sampled lobes of the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides. These cores will help us better characterise the deposit types

  13. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated.

  14. A Case of Leser-Trélat Syndrome Associated with a Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Barth, Dietrich; Puhlmann, Silvio; Barth, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses can often be found in elderly people. In general, they appear gradually. In cases of a sudden eruption with itching it might be paraneoplastic. Although some authors doubt the existence of the paraneoplastic Leser-Trélat syndrome, we present a case of sudden eruption of seborrheic keratoses connected with a newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma. As far as we know, this is the first case report of a Leser-Trélat syndrome with a malignancy of the kidney. PMID:26500537

  15. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-19

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  16. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  17. Evolution, Three-Dimensional Model and Localization of Truncated Hemoglobin PttTrHb of Hybrid Aspen

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Estelle; Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Parkash, Vimal; Vuosku, Jaana; Sundström, Robin; Nymalm, Yvonne; Sutela, Suvi; Taskinen, Katariina; Kallio, Pauli T.; Salminen, Tiina A.; Häggman, Hely

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, research on plant hemoglobins (Hbs) has mainly concentrated on symbiotic and non-symbiotic Hbs, and information on truncated Hbs (TrHbs) is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the origin, structure and localization of the truncated Hb (PttTrHb) of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × tremuloides Michx.), the model system of tree biology. Additionally, we studied the PttTrHb expression in relation to non-symbiotic class1 Hb gene (PttHb1) using RNAi-silenced hybrid aspen lines. Both the phylogenetic analysis and the three-dimensional (3D) model of PttTrHb supported the view that plant TrHbs evolved vertically from a bacterial TrHb. The 3D model suggested that PttTrHb adopts a 2-on-2 sandwich of α-helices and has a Bacillus subtilis -like ligand-binding pocket in which E11Gln and B10Tyr form hydrogen bonds to a ligand. However, due to differences in tunnel cavity and gate residue (E7Ala), it might not show similar ligand-binding kinetics as in Bs-HbO (E7Thr). The immunolocalization showed that PttTrHb protein was present in roots, stems as well as leaves of in vitro -grown hybrid aspens. In mature organs, PttTrHb was predominantly found in the vascular bundles and specifically at the site of lateral root formation, overlapping consistently with areas of nitric oxide (NO) production in plants. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside treatment increased the amount of PttTrHb in stems. The observed PttTrHb localization suggests that PttTrHb plays a role in the NO metabolism. PMID:24520401

  18. Elucidation, functional clustering and structural characterization of βTrCP1 substrates through a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Shagufta; Younis, Saima; Niaz, Hafsa; Rashid, Sajid

    2016-06-21

    The current interest in the identification and characterization of βTrCP1 substrates necessitates a promising approach with broad structural constraints of WD40 potential binding sites. Here, we employed an in silico integrative approach to identify putative novel substrates of βTrCP1. Through a screened degradation motif (DSGXXS) for the entire human proteome and comparative substrate binding analysis of βTrCP1, we identified 344 substrates, sharing high sequence similarity with the consensus motif. Subsequent filtering on the basis of functional annotation and clustering resulted in the isolation of hits having clear roles in various cancer types. These substrates were phosphorylated at the Ser residues (Ser14 and Ser18) of the conserved motif. A comprehensive and thorough analysis of βTrCP1-phosphopeptide association indicated residual contributions located at the upper face of the β-propeller. Evidently, upon binding to phosphopeptides, the central channel of βTrCP1 attains a more open conformation to assist substrate binding. To elaborate the oncogenic function of βTrCP1, the SKP1-βTrCP1-CDH6 ternary complex was docked against CUL1-RBX1 and the acquired model exactly resembled the previously characterized SKP1-βTrCP1-β-catenin model. Overall, a deeper understanding of substrate targeting mechanisms coupled with the structural knowledge of βTrCP1 and associated proteins will be useful for designing novel targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:27156994

  19. TR4 nuclear receptor functions as a tumor suppressor for prostate tumorigenesis via modulation of DNA damage/repair system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Soo Ok; Lee, Yi-Fen; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays important roles in metabolism, fertility and aging. The linkage of TR4 functions in cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using three different mouse models, we found TR4 could prevent or delay prostate cancer (PCa)/prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia development. Knocking down TR4 in human RWPE1 and mouse mPrE normal prostate cells promoted tumorigenesis under carcinogen challenge, suggesting TR4 may play a suppressor role in PCa initiation. Mechanism dissection in both in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies found that knocking down TR4 led to increased DNA damage with altered DNA repair system that involved the modulation of ATM expression at the transcriptional level, and addition of ATM partially interrupted the TR4 small interfering RNA-induced tumorigenesis in cell transformation assays. Immunohistochemical staining in human PCa tissue microarrays revealed ATM expression is highly correlated with TR4 expression. Together, these results suggest TR4 may function as a tumor suppressor to prevent or delay prostate tumorigenesis via regulating ATM expression at the transcriptional level. PMID:24583925

  20. Solar flux and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. V. P.; Gottlieb, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the solar irradiance as derived from a number of sources. An attempt was made to bring these data onto a uniform scale. Summation of fluxes at all wavelengths yields a figure of 1357.826 for the solar constant. Estimates are made of the solar flux variations due to flares, active regions (slowly varying component), 27-day period, and the 11-yr cycle. Solar activity does not produce a significant variation in the value of the solar constant. Variations in the X-ray and EUV portions of the solar flux may be several orders of magnitude during solar activity, especially at times of major flares. It is established that these short wavelength flux enhancements cause significant changes in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  1. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  2. Distribution and flux of micrometeoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Zinner, E.

    1977-01-01

    The mass distribution, flux, and distribution in space of the micrometeoroid complex at 1 AU are estimated on the basis of data from Apollo 17 rocks and recent calibrations of solar-flare track-production rates. It is found that the size frequency distribution of microcraters on lunar rocks suggests a bimodal mass distribution of micrometeoroids, but the precise form of the curve requires further definition, particularly insofar as the degree of depletion of particles producing craters 10 to 100 microns in diameter is concerned. Variations in slope with crater-diameter or particle-mass increments are shown to indicate that different processes affect one or more particle populations. Fluxes corresponding to varied lunar surface orientation and residence time are calculated, but no striking difference is observed between the flux of submicron-diameter particles with orbits in the plane of the ecliptic and fluxes of particles with orbits normal to the plane in the solar apex direction.

  3. Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

  4. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  5. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  6. Hans Georg Trüper (1936–2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper’s contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira—Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds – glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose – known to serve as “compatible solutes” in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper’s studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper. PMID:27187481

  7. Hans Georg Trüper (1936-2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper's contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira-Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds - glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose - known to serve as "compatible solutes" in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper's studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper. PMID:27187481

  8. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using "DSM-IV-TR" and "DSM-5" Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harstad, Elizabeth B.; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the "DSM-5" criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the "DSM-5" model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and "DSM-IV-TR" sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70).…

  9. T/R module development for large aperture L-band phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Andricos, Constantine; Kumley, Kendra; Berkun, Andrew; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a transmit / receive (T/R) module for a large L-band space based radar active phased array being developed at JPL. Electrical performance and construction techniques are described, with emphasis on the former. The T/R modules have a bandwidth of more than 80 MHz centered at 1260MHz and support dual, switched polarizations. Phase and amplitude are controlled by a 6-bit phase shifter and a 6-bit attenuator, respectively. The transmitter power amplifier generates 2.4 W into a nominal 50 ohm load with 36% overall efficiency. The receiver noise figure is 4.4 dB including all front-end losses. The module weighs 32 g and has a footprint of 8 cm x 4.5 cm. Fourteen of these T/R modules were fabricated at the JPL Pick-and-Place Facility and were tested using a computer-controlled measurement facility developed at JPL. Calibrated performance of this set of T/R modules is presented and shows good agreement with design predictions.

  10. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation. PMID:26138396