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Sample records for erm tarmo soomere

  1. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the new "Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship" column entitled "ERM Ideas and Innovations," which will appear in each issue of JERL for the next 2 years, and possibly more, beginning with this issue. The overall focus of each column will be to introduce and expand ideas, discuss innovations, and ultimately encourage and foster…

  2. ERM proteins at a glance

    PubMed Central

    McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell cortex is a dynamic and heterogeneous structure that governs cell identity and behavior. The ERM proteins (ezrin, radixin and moesin) are major architects of the cell cortex, and they link plasma membrane phospholipids and proteins to the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies in several model systems have uncovered surprisingly dynamic and complex molecular activities of the ERM proteins and have provided new mechanistic insight into how they build and maintain cortical domains. Among many well-established and essential functions of ERM proteins, this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will focus on the role of ERMs in organizing the cell cortex during cell division and apical morphogenesis. These examples highlight an emerging appreciation that the ERM proteins both locally alter the mechanical properties of the cell cortex, and control the spatial distribution and activity of key membrane complexes, establishing the ERM proteins as a nexus for the physical and functional organization of the cell cortex and making it clear that they are much more than scaffolds. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). ‘Integrins and epithelial cell polarity’ by Jessica Lee and Charles Streuli (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3217–3225). PMID:24951115

  3. ERM proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    McClatchey, Andrea I

    2014-08-01

    The cell cortex is a dynamic and heterogeneous structure that governs cell identity and behavior. The ERM proteins (ezrin, radixin and moesin) are major architects of the cell cortex, and they link plasma membrane phospholipids and proteins to the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies in several model systems have uncovered surprisingly dynamic and complex molecular activities of the ERM proteins and have provided new mechanistic insight into how they build and maintain cortical domains. Among many well-established and essential functions of ERM proteins, this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will focus on the role of ERMs in organizing the cell cortex during cell division and apical morphogenesis. These examples highlight an emerging appreciation that the ERM proteins both locally alter the mechanical properties of the cell cortex, and control the spatial distribution and activity of key membrane complexes, establishing the ERM proteins as a nexus for the physical and functional organization of the cell cortex and making it clear that they are much more than scaffolds. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. PMID:24951115

  4. ERM Ideas and Innovations: Digital Repository Management as ERM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkas, María M.; Lin, Na

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the application of electronic resources management (ERM) to digital repository management at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The authors discuss electronic resources management techniques, through the application of "Techniques for Electronic Management,"…

  5. ERMes: Open Source Simplicity for Your E-Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2009-01-01

    ERMes, the latest version of electronic resource management system (ERM), is a relational database; content in different tables connects to, and works with, content in other tables. ERMes requires Access 2007 (Windows) or Access 2008 (Mac) to operate as the database utilizes functionality not available in previous versions of Microsoft Access. The…

  6. ERM proteins: from cellular architecture to cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Louvet-Vallée, S

    2000-08-01

    ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins, concentrated in actin rich cell-surface structures, cross-link actin filaments with the plasma membrane. They are involved in the formation of microvilli, cell-cell adhesion, maintenance of cell shape, cell motility and membrane trafficking. Recent analyses reveal that they are not only involved in cytoskeleton organization but also in signaling pathway. They play an important role in the activation of members of the Rho family by recruiting their regulators. The functions of ERM proteins are regulated by their conformational charges: the intramolecular interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of ERM proteins charges masks several binding sites, leading to a dormant protein. Different activation signals regulate ERM proteins functions by modulating these intramolecular interactions. The involvement of ERM proteins in many signaling pathways has led to study their role during development of different species. PMID:11071040

  7. New MLSB Resistance Gene erm(43) in Staphylococcus lentus

    PubMed Central

    Schwendener, Sybille

    2012-01-01

    The search for a specific rRNA methylase motif led to the identification of the new macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance gene erm(43) in Staphylococcus lentus. An inducible resistance phenotype was demonstrated by cloning and expressing erm(43) and its regulatory region in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(43) gene was detected in two different DNA fragments, of 6,230 bp and 1,559 bp, that were each integrated at the same location in the chromosome in several S. lentus isolates of human, dog, and chicken origin. PMID:22733067

  8. ERM proteins regulate growth cone responses to Sema3A

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C. David; Carcea, Ioana; McNickle, Daniel G.; Dickson, Tracey C.; Ge, Yongchao; Salton, Stephen R.J.; Benson, Deanna L.

    2008-01-01

    Axonal growth cones initiate and sustain directed growth in response to cues in their environment. A variety of events such as receptor internalization, kinase activation, and actin rearrangement can be stimulated by guidance cues and are essential for mediating targeted growth cone behavior. Surprisingly little is known about how such disparate actions are coordinated. Our data suggest that ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERMs), a family of highly homologous, multifunctional proteins may be able to coordinate growth cone responses to the guidance cue, Sema3A. We show that active ERMs concentrate asymmetrically in neocortical growth cones, are rapidly and transiently inactivated by Sema3A, and are required for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse and guidance. The FERM domain of active ERMs regulates internalization of the Sema3A receptor, Npn1 and its co-receptor, L1CAM, while the ERM C-terminal domain binds and caps F-actin. Our data support a model in which ERMs can coordinate membrane and actin dynamics in response to Sema3A. PMID:18651636

  9. ERMS guidebook: Cleaner air, reduced cost, Illinois EPA

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Illinois EPA has prepared this guidebook to help participants in the Emissions Reduction Market System and other interested persons understand how the system is designed and going to be operated. This guidebook serves as a supplement to other important reference materials such as the ERMS regulations (35 Ill. Admin. Code 205) and the Environmental Protection Act (Sec. 98.).

  10. Ecoremediation (ERM) and Saprobiology - is there a link?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirčev, Zorica; Marković, Slobodan; Krstić, Svetislav; Krstić, Kosta; Obreht, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Healthy environment is rapidly becoming very important value in human life and a criterion of the quality of living. To achieve this target, many of us consider the 'returning to nature' and respecting the ancient laws of nature as the possible solution. Accelerated or fast eutrophization is detected destiny in majority of fresh water ecosystems today, mainly due to global climate changes and adverse human impact. However, this process can be tackled by different activities, ecoremedation (ERM) having an especially important place. Ecoremediation is a system of utilizing the natural processes for revival and protection of the environment. ERM methods may reduce and avert the consequences of agricultural pollution, tourism, transport, industry, land fills and (over)population. In its essence, ERM represents the 'returning to nature' approach aiming to preserve or re-establish the natural balance of the ecosystems, but also a human endevour that enables new jobs and by-side activities important for economic and social (sustainable) development of the human society. In this study we propose the model of eutrophication control achieved on four important levels in the functional dynamics of the ecosystems. ERM is placed as key element in prevention, increasing of decomposition processes through different modes of aeration, decreasing of the total capacity of the ecosystem usually via constructed wetlands, planting and removing of the riparian vegetation.

  11. Core sequence in the RNA motif recognized by the ErmE methyltransferase revealed by relaxing the fidelity of the enzyme for its target.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L H; Vester, B; Douthwaite, S

    1999-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the ErmE methyltransferase specifically modifies a single adenosine within ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and thereby confers resistance to multiple antibiotics. The adenosine (A2058 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA) lies within a highly conserved structure, and is methylated efficiently, and with equally high fidelity, in rRNAs from phylogenetically diverse bacteria. However, the fidelity of ErmE is reduced when magnesium is removed, and over twenty new sites of ErmE methylation appear in E. coli 16S and 23S rRNAs. These sites show widely different degrees of reactivity to ErmE. The canonical A2058 site is largely unaffected by magnesium depletion and remains the most reactive site in the rRNA. This suggests that methylation at the new sites results from changes in the RNA substrate rather than the methyltransferase. Chemical probing confirms that the rRNA structure opens upon magnesium depletion, exposing potential new interaction sites to the enzyme. The new ErmE sites show homology with the canonical A2058 site, and have the consensus sequence aNNNcgGAHAg (ErmE methylation occurs exclusively at adenosines (underlined); these are preceded by a guanosine, equivalent to G2057; there is a high preference for the adenosine equivalent to A2060; H is any nucleotide except G; N is any nucleotide; and there are slight preferences for the nucleotides shown in lower case). This consensus is believed to represent the core of the motif that Erm methyltransferases recognize at their canonical A2058 site. The data also reveal constraints on the higher order structure of the motif that affect methyltransferase recognition. PMID:9917069

  12. Erythromycin-induced ribosome stall in the ermA leader: a barricade to 5'-to-3' nucleolytic cleavage of the ermA transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1989-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus ermA gene, whose product confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B family of antibiotics, is induced at the level of translation by nanomolar concentrations of erythromycin. Erythromycin also specifically stabilizes ermA transcripts, and the induced stabilization requires in-phase translation of at least one of two small leader peptides in the 5' leader region of the transcript. Erythromycin-induced mRNA stabilization was tested in three constructions in which the ermA transcript was elongated by making insertions at the ermA transcription start. Whereas mRNA downstream of the leader peptide is stabilized by erythromycin, mRNA upstream is not. In the presence of erythromycin, specific mRNA decay intermediates in both the extended ermA genes and the wild-type ermA gene were detected by both Northern blotting and S1 nuclease mapping. The 5' ends of the intermediates map to the sequences that encode each of the two ermA leader peptides, suggesting that the intermediates are produced by stalled erythromycin-bound ribosomes acting as barricades to degradation by 5'-to-3' RNases. In addition, whereas erythromycin was found previously to stabilize ermA transcripts only physically, an ermC-cat-86 hybrid transcript was stabilized both physically and functionally by erythromycin. Images PMID:2592348

  13. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  14. NHERF2 is crucial in ERM phosphorylation in pulmonary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background EBP50 and NHERF2 adaptor proteins are incriminated in various signaling pathways of the cell. They can bind ERM proteins and mediate ERM-membrane protein interactions. Results Binding of ERM to EBP50 and NHERF2 was compared in pulmonary artery endothelial cells by immunoprecipitation. NHERF2 associates with all three ERM, but EBP50 appeared to be a weak binding partner if at all. Furthermore, we detected co-localization of NHERF2 and phospho-ERM at the cell membrane and in the filopodia of dividing cells. Silencing of NHERF2 prevented agonist or angiogenesis induced phosphorylation of ERM, while overexpression of the adaptor elevated the phosphorylation level of ERM, likely catalyzed by Rho kinase 2, which co-immunoprecipitated with NHERF2/ERM in control EC, but did not bind to ERM in NHERF2 depleted cells. Dependence of ERM phosphorylation on NHERF2 was also shown in Matrigel tube formation assay, and NHERF2 was proved to be important in angiogenesis as well. Furthermore, when NHERF2 was depleted or cells were overexpressing a mutant form of NHERF2 unable to bind ERM, we found attenuated cell attachment with ECIS measurements, while it was supported by overexpression of wild type NHERF2. Conclusions Pivotal role of NHERF2 in the phosphorylation process of ERM in pulmonary artery endothelial cells is shown. We propose that NHERF2 provides a common anchoring surface for ERM and Rho kinase 2. Our results demonstrate the essential role of NHERF2 in endothelial cell adhesion/migration and angiogenesis. PMID:24364877

  15. Our ASHRM journey continues: ERM for our patients' safety.

    PubMed

    Oppenberg, Andrew A

    2013-01-01

    First and foremost, as your 2013 ASHRM president, I'd like to thank you for all of the significant accomplishments you've helped ASHRM attain this year. And I'll be forever grateful for your support and making my personal and professional dream come true-to serve as your president. Advocating on behalf of all healthcare risk managers and furthering the quest of Getting to Zero for our patients' safety through Enterprise Risk Management, or ERM, has been an honor, because everyone is a risk manager! PMID:24078201

  16. Detection of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant in staphylococci from aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Heß, Stefanie; Li, Jun; Feßler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Gallert, Claudia; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLSB) is not restricted to staphylococci from clinical samples but can also be present in staphylococci from the aquatic environment. Two coagulase-negative staphylococci-Staphylococcus xylosus and S. saprophyticus were obtained from sewage and receiving river water samples and were investigated for the genetic basis of inducible MLSB resistance by whole-genome sequencing. Two rRNA methylases encoded by erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant were identified, which had only 84% amino acid identity. While fragments of phage DNA were found in the vicinity of the erm(44) gene of S. xylosus, no relics of mobile genetic elements were detected in the sequences flanking the erm(44) variant gene in the S. saprophyticus strain. The functionality of the erm genes was confirmed by cloning and transformation experiments. Based on the obtained sequences, specific PCR assays for both erm genes were developed and used to identify erm(44) in another 7 S. xylosus and 17 S. saprophyticus isolates from aquatic environments. PMID:26207047

  17. Rapid detection of ermB gene in Clostridium difficile by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minyi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pu; Tan, Jiasheng; Zhou, Youlian; Wu, Peiqun; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance in Clostridium difficile is mostly due to the ermB resistance determinant. Here, we describe a sensitive and rapid molecular method to detect ermB in C. difficile to contribute to the wider epidemiological study. Five sets of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were designed and optimized for rapid detection of ermB. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers for ermB were detected, and the ermB LAMP assay was compared to conventional PCR with 80 clinical isolates of C. difficile. Real-time monitoring of turbidity and chromogenic reaction were used to determine negative and positive results. A total of 26 pathogenic bacterial strains of different species were found to be negative for ermB, which indicated the high specificity of the primers. ermB was detected in 78.8 % (63/80) of the clinical isolates by both LAMP and conventional PCR. The detection limit of LAMP was 36.1  pg DNA μl- 1 and its sensitivity was 10-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. This study is the first report regarding the development and application of the LAMP assay for detection of the ermB gene in C. difficile strains. The developed LAMP method is sensitive, specific and provides a user-friendly visual approach for the rapid detection of ermB-bearing C. difficile. PMID:26272634

  18. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  19. FGF2 stimulates SDF-1 expression through the Erm transcription factor in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Chae, Young-Mi; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2009-07-01

    Ets-related molecule (Erm) is a member of the Ets transcription factor family. Erm is known to be an important factor for the self-renewal of Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and the maintenance of spermatogenesis. We investigated the molecular mechanism of Erm regulation on SDF-1 in TM4 Sertoli cells. Erm and Sdf-1 levels were up-regulated after FGF2 treatment in TM4 cells, whereas these levels were significantly decreased by FGF2 in ST2 bone marrow stromal cells. Knockdown of Erm by siRNA in the presence of FGF2 decreased the Sdf-1 levels in TM4 cells. The expression levels of Erm were similar and Erm overexpression increased the Sdf-1 in both TM4 and ST2 cells. FGFR subtype analysis revealed that FGFR4 was expressed in TM4 cells but not in ST2 cells. A blocking experiment also confirmed that FGFR4 is partly responsible for the up-regulation of Erm and SDF-1 induced by FGF2 stimulation in TM4 cells. FGF2 and ERM increased the activity of Sdf-1 gene promoter region in a dose-dependent manner. EMSA revealed that ERM strongly binds to the -846 to -851 nucleotide region of the potential Ets binding site (EBS) in the Sdf-1 promoter. In addition, CXCR4, the SDF-1 receptor, was expressed in spermatogonia and Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubules of the mouse testis. Our results indicate that ERM directly regulates Sdf-1 gene expression by interacting with its cis-acting element in response to FGF2 stimulation in TM4 cells. PMID:19301256

  20. ErmF and ereD Are Responsible for Erythromycin Resistance in Riemerella anatipestifer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Linlin; Yu, Hui; Qi, Jingjing; Jiang, Pan; Sun, Bingqing; Cui, Junsheng; Ou, Changcan; Chang, Weishan; Hu, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of erythromycin resistance in Riemerella anatipestifer, the MIC to erythromycin of 79 R. anatipestifer isolates from China and one typed strain, ATCC11845, were evaluated. The results showed that 43 of 80 (53.8%) of the tested R. anatipestifer strains showed resistance to erythromycin, and 30 of 43 erythromycin-resistant R. anatipestifer strains carried ermF or ermFU with an MIC in the range of 32–2048 μg/ml, while the other 13 strains carrying the ereD gene exhibited an MIC of 4–16 μg/ml. Of 30 ermF + R. anatipestifer strains, 27 (90.0%) carried the ermFU gene which may have been derived from the CTnDOT-like element, while three other strains carried ermF from transposon Tn4351. Moreover, sequence analysis revealed that ermF, ermFU, and ereD were located within the multiresistance region of the R. anatipestifer genome. PMID:26107936

  1. Identification of ribosomal RNA methyltransferase gene ermF in Riemerella anatipestifer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongyan; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Lanying; Zhou, Wangshu; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Dekang

    2015-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is a major bacterial pathogen of waterfowl, globally responsible for avian septicaemic disease. As chemotherapy is the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of R. anatipestifer infection in poultry, the widespread use of antibiotics has favoured the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. However, little is known about R. anatipestifer susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics and its resistance mechanism. We report for the first time the identification of a macrolide resistance mechanism in R. anatipestifer that is mediated by the ribosomal RNA methyltransferase ermF. We identified the presence of the ermF gene in 64/206 (31%) R. anatipestifer isolates from different regions in China. An ermF deletion strain was constructed to investigate the function of the ermF gene on the resistance to high levels of macrolides. The ermF mutant strain showed significantly decreased resistance to macrolide and lincosamide, exhibiting 1024-, 1024-, 4- and >2048-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations for erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin and lincomycin, respectively. Furthermore, functional analysis of ermF expression in E. coli XL1-blue showed that the R. anatipestifer ermF gene was functional in E. coli XL1-blue and conferred resistance to high levels of erythromycin (100 µg/ml), supporting the hypothesis that the ermF gene is associated with high-level macrolide resistance. Our work suggests that ribosomal RNA modification mediated by the ermF methyltransferase is the predominant mechanism of resistance to erythromycin in R. anatipestifer isolates. PMID:25690020

  2. Characterization of a novel interaction between ELMO1 and ERM proteins.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Cynthia M; Lu, Mingjian; Haney, Lisa B; Kinchen, Jason M; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2006-03-01

    ERMs are closely related proteins involved in cell migration, cell adhesion, maintenance of cell shape, and formation of microvilli through their ability to cross-link the plasma membrane with the actin cytoskeleton. ELMO proteins are also known to regulate actin cytoskeleton reorganization through activation of the small GTPbinding protein Rac via the ELMO-Dock180 complex. Here we showed that ERM proteins associate directly with ELMO1 as purified recombinant proteins in vitro and at endogenous levels in intact cells. We mapped ERM binding on ELMO1 to the N-terminal 280 amino acids, which overlaps with the region required for binding to the GTPase RhoG, but is distinct from the C-terminal Dock180 binding region. Consistent with this, ELMO1 could simultaneously bind both radixin and Dock180, although radixin did not alter Rac activation via the Dock180-ELMO complex. Most interestingly, radixin binding did not affect ELMO binding to active RhoG and a trimeric complex of active RhoG-ELMO-radixin could be detected. Moreover, the three proteins colocalized at the plasma membrane. Finally, in contrast to most other ERM-binding proteins, ELMO1 binding occurred independently of the state of radixin C-terminal phosphorylation, suggesting an ELMO1 interaction with both the active and inactive forms of ERM proteins and implying a possible role of ELMO in localizing or retaining ERM proteins in certain cellular sites. Together these data suggest that ELMO1-mediated cytoskeletal changes may be coordinated with ERM protein crosslinking activity during dynamic cellular functions. PMID:16377631

  3. Are all ERMs and ERLs created equal: Is an exceedance by an individual PAH a potential risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.; Pavlou, S.; Titus, E.

    1995-12-31

    One available method to evaluate the potential for concentrations of chemicals in sediments to pose a potential risk to the benthic community, at least on a screening basis, is comparison to ERLs and ERMs. Historically, ERLs and ERMs have been available for mixtures of total, light and heavy PAH. In the past year, ERLs and ERMs have been derived for several individual PAH. This paper identifies some of the possible unintended consequences and inappropriate conclusions that can result when the new ERLs and ERMs are used without regard to their limitations. The limitations arise for several reasons including: the ubiquitous nature of PAH; the varied mixtures from which PAH in sediments may arise; uncertainty in analytical techniques; and, confounding effects of co-occurring chemicals in the samples used to derive ERLs and ERMs for PAH. This paper discusses these limitations and provides guidelines for use of ERLs and ERMs for individual PAH.

  4. SLK-dependent activation of ERMs controls LGN–NuMA localization and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Machicoane, Mickael; de Frutos, Cristina A.; Fink, Jenny; Rocancourt, Murielle; Lombardi, Yannis; Garel, Sonia; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation relies on a complex dialog between the spindle microtubules and the cell cortex, in which F-actin has been recently implicated. Here, we report that the membrane–actin linkers ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERMs) are strongly and directly activated by the Ste20-like kinase at mitotic entry in mammalian cells. Using microfabricated adhesive substrates to control the axis of cell division, we found that the activation of ERMs plays a key role in guiding the orientation of the mitotic spindle. Accordingly, impairing ERM activation in apical progenitors of the mouse embryonic neocortex severely disturbed spindle orientation in vivo. At the molecular level, ERM activation promotes the polarized association at the mitotic cortex of leucine-glycine-asparagine repeat protein (LGN) and nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein, two essential factors for spindle orientation. We propose that activated ERMs, together with Gαi, are critical for the correct localization of LGN–NuMA force generator complexes and hence for proper spindle orientation. PMID:24958772

  5. Ran GTPase promotes oocyte polarization by regulating ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dehapiot, Benoit; Halet, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric meiotic divisions in mammalian oocytes are driven by the eccentric positioning of the spindle, along with a dramatic reorganization of the overlying cortex, including a loss of microvilli and formation of a thick actin cap. Actin polarization relies on a Ran-GTP gradient centered on metaphase chromosomes; however, the downstream signaling cascade is not completely understood. In a recent study, we have shown that Ran promotes actin cap formation via the polarized activation of Cdc42. The related GTPase Rac is also activated in a polarized fashion in the oocyte cortex and co-localizes with active Cdc42. In other cells, microvilli collapse can be triggered by inactivation of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of actin-membrane crosslinkers under the control of Rac. Accordingly, we show here that Ran-GTP promotes a substantial loss of phosphorylated ERMs in the cortex overlying the spindle in mouse oocytes. However, this polarized phospho-ERM exclusion zone was unaffected by Rac or Cdc42 inhibition. Therefore, we suggest that Ran activates two distinct pathways to regulate actin cap formation and microvilli disassembly in the polarized cortex of mouse oocytes. The possibility of a crosstalk between Rho GTPase and ERM signaling and a role for ERM inactivation in promoting cortical actin dynamics are also discussed. PMID:23656777

  6. Gem1 and ERMES Do Not Directly Affect Phosphatidylserine Transport from ER to Mitochondria or Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology. PMID:22409400

  7. Small is beautiful: what flies tell us about ERM protein function in development.

    PubMed

    Polesello, Cédric; Payre, François

    2004-06-01

    Actin dynamics is recognized as being a determinant in many developmental processes and pathologies, such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and tumour metastasis. However, how actin interacts with the plasma membrane is poorly understood. Although numerous studies in cell culture point to the crucial role of Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin (ERM) proteins in the actin-membrane link, genetic approaches in mice have not yet revealed their activity during development. Drosophila has recently become an alternative and promising system for the genetic study of ERM protein function. This article focuses on advances made in flies, providing evidence for the evolutionary conservation of functional properties of ERM proteins, in addition to shedding new light on their importance for development. PMID:15183186

  8. Tylosin resistance in Arcanobacterium pyogenes is encoded by an erm X determinant.

    PubMed

    Jost, B Helen; Field, Adam C; Trinh, Hien T; Songer, J Glenn; Billington, Stephen J

    2003-11-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a commensal on the mucous membranes of many economically important animal species, is also a pathogen, causing abscesses of the skin, joints, and visceral organs as well as mastitis and abortion. In food animals, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for growth promotion, prophylaxis, and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide antibiotic used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Of 48 A. pyogenes isolates, 11 (22.9%) exhibited inducible or constitutive resistance to tylosin (MIC of > or = 128 microg/ml). These isolates also exhibited resistance to other macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics, suggesting a macrolide-lincosamide resistance phenotype. Of the 11 resistant isolates, genomic DNA from nine hybridized to an erm(X)-specific probe. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the A. pyogenes erm(X) gene indicated that it was >95% similar to erm(X) genes from Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium spp. Eight of the erm(X)-containing A. pyogenes isolates exhibited inducible tylosin resistance, which was consistent with the presence of a putative leader peptide upstream of the erm(X) open reading frame. For at least one A. pyogenes isolate, 98-4277-2, erm(X) was present on a plasmid, pAP2, and was associated with the insertion sequence IS6100. pAP2 also carried genes encoding the repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system determinant Tet 33. The repA gene from pAP2 was nonfunctional in Escherichia coli and at least one A. pyogenes isolate, suggesting that there may be host-encoded factors required for replication of this plasmid. PMID:14576111

  9. Selecting and Implementing an ERMS at Wayne State University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The successful development and implementation of an electronic resources management (ERM) system depends on an undertaking that includes many key factors. Some of these key factors include determining user groups and their needs, evaluating implementation and technical issues, testing the system, exploring how the system will be used, setting…

  10. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  11. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  12. First Report of Macrolide Resistance Gene erm(T) Harbored by a Novel Small Plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae. PMID:25666150

  13. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly

    PubMed Central

    AhYoung, Andrew P.; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Egea, Pascal F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits—the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  14. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. PMID:25683353

  15. A piRNA-like small RNA interacts with and modulates p-ERM proteins in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yuping; Wang, Yuyan; Kumari, Priti; Shetty, Amol Carl; Clark, David; Gable, Tyler; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Ma, Mark Z.; Weber, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Edelman, Martin J.; Mao, Li

    2015-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are thought to silence transposon and gene expression during development. However, the roles of piRNAs in somatic tissues are largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 555 piRNAs in human lung bronchial epithelial (HBE) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, including 295 that do not exist in databases termed as piRNA-like sncRNAs or piRNA-Ls. Distinctive piRNA/piRNA-L expression patterns are observed between HBE and NSCLC cells. piRNA-like-163 (piR-L-163), the top downregulated piRNA-L in NSCLC cells, binds directly to phosphorylated ERM proteins (p-ERM), which is dependent on the central part of UUNNUUUNNUU motif in piR-L-163 and the RRRKPDT element in ERM. The piR-L-163/p-ERM interaction is critical for p-ERM's binding capability to filamentous actin (F-actin) and ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50). Thus, piRNA/piRNA-L may play a regulatory role through direct interaction with proteins in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26095918

  16. Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin (ERM) proteins function as pleiotropic regulators of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yoshinao Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Tominaga, Chika; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2008-05-25

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins supply functional linkage between integral membrane proteins and cytoskeleton in mammalian cells to regulate membrane protein dynamisms and cytoskeleton rearrangement. To assess potential role of the ERM proteins in HIV-1 lifecycle, we examined if suppression of ERM function in human cells expressing HIV-1 infection receptors influences HIV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated HIV-1-vector transduction and cell-cell fusion. Expression of an ezrin dominant negative mutant or knockdown of ezrin, radixin, or moesin with siRNA uniformly decreased transduction titers of HIV-1 vectors having X4-tropic Env. In contrast, transduction titers of R5-tropic Env HIV-1 vectors were decreased only by radixin knockdown: ezrin knockdown had no detectable effects and moesin knockdown rather increased transduction titer. Each of the ERM suppressions had no detectable effects on cell surface expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 or VSV-Env-mediated HIV-1 vector transductions. Finally, the individual knockdown of ERM mRNAs uniformly decreased efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by X4- or R5-tropic Env and HIV-1 infection receptors. These results suggest that (i) the ERM proteins function as positive regulators of infection by X4-tropic HIV-1, (ii) moesin additionally functions as a negative regulator of R5-tropic HIV-1 virus infection at the early step(s) after the membrane fusion, and (iii) receptor protein dynamisms are regulated differently in R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections.

  17. TcdC does not significantly repress toxin expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Dennis; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Kuijper, Ed J; Corver, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB), the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR) and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC). The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC) and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested. PMID:22912837

  18. The New Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Gene erm(45) Is Located within a Genomic Island in Staphylococcus fleurettii

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Juliette R. K.; Schwendener, Sybille; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Genome alignment of a macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB)-resistant Staphylococcus fleurettii strain with an MLSB-susceptible S. fleurettii strain revealed a novel 11,513-bp genomic island carrying the new erythromycin resistance methylase gene erm(45). This gene was shown to confer inducible MLSB resistance when cloned into Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(45)-containing island was integrated into the housekeeping gene guaA in S. fleurettii and was able to form a circular intermediate but was not transmissible to S. aureus. PMID:25779586

  19. Transport and persistence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in soil and drainage water from fields receiving swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of manure from tylosin-treated swine introduces tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, which confer resistance to tylosin, and tylosin. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in tile-drained chisel plow and no-ti...

  20. Integration of erm(B)-containing elements through large chromosome fragment exchange in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Wasels, François; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Monot, Marc; Villa, Laura; Dupuy, Bruno; Carattoli, Alessandra; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In Clostridium difficile, erm(B) genes are located on mobile elements like Tn5398 and Tn6215. In previous studies, some of these elements were transferred by conjugation-like mechanisms, mobilized in trans by helper conjugative systems. In this study, we analyzed the genomes of several recipient strains that acquired either Tn5398 or Tn6215-like elements. We demonstrated that the integration of the transposons in the genome of the recipient cell was always due to homologous recombination events, involving exchange of large chromosomal segments. We did not observed transposon transfer to a C. difficile strain in presence of DNAse, suggesting that a possible transformation-like mechanism occurred in this recipient.

  1. The development of an on-line ERM system for the research reactors in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Wanno; Kim, Eun Han; Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2007-08-01

    A real-time on-line environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) system for the research reactor sites of Daejeon and Seoul is established. In the Daejeon site, a radio communication method with a radiofrequency of 468.8 MHz is used between the main computer and the six posts inside the Daejeon research reactor site. A general telephone communication method by a dial modem is applied between the main computer and a comparison point with one post outside the Daejeon research reactor site. In the Seoul site, a null modem communication method is employed between a sub-computer and the three posts inside the Seoul research reactor site, and a high-speed communication network such as ADSL is used between the sub-computer in the Seoul site and the main computer in the Daejeon site. Consequently, the real-time data from a total of 10 places is displayed on-line on a screen and it is statistically treated.

  2. Science applications of the multi-FOV lidar for ATMOS-B1/ERM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Liu, Zhaoyan; Voelger, Peter; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Asai, Kazuhiro; Ishizu, Mitsuo; Itabe, Toshikasu; Imai, Tadashi

    2001-02-01

    A new multi-FOV space-borne lidar named "A-lidar" is being studied by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) for the earth radiation mission proposed as a joint program with the European Space Agency (ESA). The mission is named "EarthCARE". It was formerly called ATMOS-B1 or ERM. The lidar has a two-wavelength transmitter (1064 nm and 532 nm), a dual polarization receiver at 1064 nm, and a multi-field-of-view (multi-FOV) receiver at 532 nm. The multi-FOV feature of A-lidar will enable us to solve the multiple scattering problems with space lidar measurements of profiles of clouds and aerosols. The multi-FOV feature can also be used for characterization of aerosols.

  3. Opening a Can of wERMS: Texas A&M University's Experiences in Implementing Two Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Price, Apryl; Smith, Jane; Barrett, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, Texas A&M University (TAMU) has searched for a way to administer its electronic subscriptions as well as the electronic subscriptions shared among the TAMU System. In this article, we address our attempts to implement an effective electronic resource management system (ERMS), both for subscriptions on the main campus and…

  4. The Novel Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Gene erm(44) Is Associated with a Prophage in Staphylococcus xylosus

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Juliette R. K.; Schwendener, Sybille

    2014-01-01

    A novel erythromycin ribosome methylase gene, erm(44), that confers resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics was identified by whole-genome sequencing of the chromosome of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from bovine mastitis milk. The erm(44) gene is preceded by a regulatory sequence that encodes two leader peptides responsible for the inducible expression of the methylase gene, as demonstrated by cloning in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(44) gene is located on a 53-kb putative prophage designated ΦJW4341-pro. The 56 predicted open reading frames of ΦJW4341-pro are structurally organized into the five functional modules found in members of the family Siphoviridae. ΦJW4341-pro is site-specifically integrated into the S. xylosus chromosome, where it is flanked by two perfect 19-bp direct repeats, and exhibits the ability to circularize. The presence of erm(44) in three additional S. xylosus strains suggests that this putative prophage has the potential to disseminate MLSB resistance. PMID:25092709

  5. The ETS family member ERM contains an alpha-helical acidic activation domain that contacts TAFII60.

    PubMed Central

    Defossez, P A; Baert, J L; Monnot, M; de Launoit, Y

    1997-01-01

    Transcription factors are modular entities built up of discrete domains, some devoted to DNA binding and others permitting transcriptional modulation. The structure of DNA binding domains has been thoroughly investigated and structural classes clearly defined. In sharp contrast, the structural constraints put on transactivating regions, if any, are mostly unknown. Our investigations focus on ERM, a eukaryotic transcription factor of the ETS family. We have previously shown that ERM harbours two transactivating domains (TADs) with distinct functional features: AD1 lies in the first 72 amino acids of ERM, while AD2 sits in the last 62. Here we show that AD1 is a bona fide acidic TAD, for it activated transcription in yeast cells, while AD2 did not. AD1 contains a 20 amino acid stretch predicted to form an alpha-helix that is found unchanged in the related PEA3 and ER81 transcription factors. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that a 32 amino acid peptide encompassing this region is unstructured in water but folds into a helix when the hydrophobic solvent trifluoroethanol is added. The isolated helix was sufficient to activate transcription and mutations predicted to disrupt it dramatically affected AD1-driven transactivation, whereas mutations decreasing its acidity had more gentle effects. A phenylalanine residue within the helix was particularly sensitive to mutations. Finally, we observed that ERM bound TAFII60 via AD1 and bound TBP and TAFII40, presumably via other activation domains. PMID:9358152

  6. Characterization of a new erm-related macrolide resistance gene present in probiotic strains of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Leclercq, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B was studied in four Bacillus clausii strains that are mixed in a probiotic administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic chemotherapy and in three reference strains of B. clausii, DSM8716, ATCC 21536, and ATCC 21537. An 846-bp gene called erm(34), which is related to the erm genes conferring resistance to these antibiotics by ribosomal methylation, was cloned from total DNA of B. clausii DSM8716 into Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence presented 61% identity with that of Erm(D) from B. licheniformis, B. halodurans, and B. anthracis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI, followed by hybridization with an erm(34)-specific probe, indicated a chromosomal location of the gene in all B. clausii strains. Repeated attempts to transfer resistance to macrolides by conjugation from B. clausii strains to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium HM1070, and B. subtilis UCN19 were unsuccessful. PMID:14711653

  7. The Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrion Tether ERMES Orchestrates Fungal Immune Evasion, Illuminating Inflammasome Responses to Hyphal Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tucey, Timothy M.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Nguyen, Julie; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Lo, Tricia L.; Shingu-Vazquez, Miguel; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Hill, James R.; Pettolino, Filomena A.; Beddoe, Travis; Cooper, Matthew A.; Naderer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans escapes macrophages by triggering NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent host cell death (pyroptosis). Pyroptosis is inflammatory and must be tightly regulated by host and microbe, but the mechanism is incompletely defined. We characterized the C. albicans endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrion tether ERMES and show that the ERMES mmm1 mutant is severely crippled in killing macrophages despite hyphal formation and normal phagocytosis and survival. To understand dynamic inflammasome responses to Candida with high spatiotemporal resolution, we established live-cell imaging for parallel detection of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis at the single-cell level. This showed that the inflammasome response to mmm1 mutant hyphae is delayed by 10 h, after which an exacerbated activation occurs. The NLRP3 inhibitor MCC950 inhibited inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by C. albicans, including exacerbated inflammasome activation by the mmm1 mutant. At the cell biology level, inactivation of ERMES led to a rapid collapse of mitochondrial tubular morphology, slow growth and hyphal elongation at host temperature, and reduced exposed 1,3-β-glucan in hyphal populations. Our data suggest that inflammasome activation by C. albicans requires a signal threshold dependent on hyphal elongation and cell wall remodeling, which could fine-tune the response relative to the level of danger posed by C. albicans. The phenotypes of the ERMES mutant and the lack of conservation in animals suggest that ERMES is a promising antifungal drug target. Our data further indicate that NLRP3 inhibition by MCC950 could modulate C. albicans-induced inflammation. IMPORTANCE The yeast Candida albicans causes human infections that have mortality rates approaching 50%. The key to developing improved therapeutics is to understand the host-pathogen interface. A critical interaction is that with macrophages: intracellular Candida triggers the NLRP3/caspase-1

  8. The Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrion Tether ERMES Orchestrates Fungal Immune Evasion, Illuminating Inflammasome Responses to Hyphal Signals.

    PubMed

    Tucey, Timothy M; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Nguyen, Julie; Hewitt, Victoria L; Lo, Tricia L; Shingu-Vazquez, Miguel; Robertson, Avril A B; Hill, James R; Pettolino, Filomena A; Beddoe, Travis; Cooper, Matthew A; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans escapes macrophages by triggering NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent host cell death (pyroptosis). Pyroptosis is inflammatory and must be tightly regulated by host and microbe, but the mechanism is incompletely defined. We characterized the C. albicans endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrion tether ERMES and show that the ERMES mmm1 mutant is severely crippled in killing macrophages despite hyphal formation and normal phagocytosis and survival. To understand dynamic inflammasome responses to Candida with high spatiotemporal resolution, we established live-cell imaging for parallel detection of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis at the single-cell level. This showed that the inflammasome response to mmm1 mutant hyphae is delayed by 10 h, after which an exacerbated activation occurs. The NLRP3 inhibitor MCC950 inhibited inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by C. albicans, including exacerbated inflammasome activation by the mmm1 mutant. At the cell biology level, inactivation of ERMES led to a rapid collapse of mitochondrial tubular morphology, slow growth and hyphal elongation at host temperature, and reduced exposed 1,3-β-glucan in hyphal populations. Our data suggest that inflammasome activation by C. albicans requires a signal threshold dependent on hyphal elongation and cell wall remodeling, which could fine-tune the response relative to the level of danger posed by C. albicans. The phenotypes of the ERMES mutant and the lack of conservation in animals suggest that ERMES is a promising antifungal drug target. Our data further indicate that NLRP3 inhibition by MCC950 could modulate C. albicans-induced inflammation. IMPORTANCE The yeast Candida albicans causes human infections that have mortality rates approaching 50%. The key to developing improved therapeutics is to understand the host-pathogen interface. A critical interaction is that with macrophages: intracellular Candida triggers the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome

  9. Hotspot-ridge interaction in the Indian Ocean: constraints from Geosat/ERM altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo

    1996-09-01

    Upper-mantle structure of Indian Ocean spreading ridges was investigated by track segments of Geosat/ERM altimeter measurements. To determine the upper-mantle structure of the Earth's gravity field, a low-degree and -order spherical harmonic representation of the geoid was removed. A test of several reference fields suggested that a degree 2-25 field with gradually rolled off coefficients (Sandwell & Renkin 1988) offers an adequate representation of the long-wavelength geoidal undulations. Filtered profiles of three individual ridge segments display a strong asymmetry in geoid versus age trends of conjugated rift flanks. The unusually low geoid slopes on one flank can perhaps best be explained as a dynamic or thermal phenomenon reflecting a flow connection between a neighbouring off-axis hotspot plume and the ridge axis, while the other flank simply cools as it spreads away from the axial zone. It seems reasonable to hypothesize that the Southwest Indian Ridge and the Southeast Indian Ridge act as sinks for plumes beneath Agulhas Plateau and Kerguelen Islands, respectively. The Carlsberg Ridge data suggest that the Réunion hotspot contaminated northwestern African lithosphere until 15 Ma. Moreover, symmetric flattening of geoid versus age trends of conjugated ridge flanks offers evidence that plume events affect geoid versus age trends

  10. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  11. Experiments and simulated calculations on the resistance to low-velocity impact of layered plates with a sandwiched ERM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yinyan; Xiao, Tianyuan; Xue, Sixin; Dong, Janhua

    2004-04-01

    Comparison experiments and simulated calculations are conducted on the resistance to low-velocity (or low-energy) impact of layered structures with and without an electro-rheological material (ERM) sandwiched, under different electric voltages applied to the ERM layer. From the experiments, it is found that the stiffness of the specimen under different electric intensities applied to the ERM layer is approximately a constant. From the calculations, within the range of 0.0 kV/mm⩽ E⩽3.5 kV/mm, the resistance to impact decreases somewhat with the increasing electric intensity for the layered composite specimens. The same conclusion is obtained for a layered aluminum plate within the range of 0.0 kV/mm⩽ E⩽0.75 kV/mm. Meanwhile, data from the experiments and calculations show that these results are repeatable under different impact velocities. Further analysis by computations shows that the change of viscous proportional damping, [ C]= α[ M]+ β[ C], is the main cause of the reduction of the specimen's resistance to impact, where the stiffness coefficient β is the key factor.

  12. Time-to-Detection of Inducible Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus Subspecies and Its Association with the Erm(41) Sequevar

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Sara; Grierson, William; Kein, Daniel; Tyler, Andrea D.; Wolfe, Joyce; Sharma, Meenu K.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the erm(41) gene of M.abscessus group organisms are associated with differences in inducible macrolide resistance, with current recommendations being to hold rapidly growing isolates for up to 14 days in order to ensure that resistance which develops more slowly can be detected. This study aimed to determine the ideal incubation time for accurate identification of inducible macrolide resistance as well as to determine if there was an association between the time taken to detect inducible resistance in M.abscessus group organisms and their erm(41) sequevar. We amplified and sequenced the erm(41) genes of a total of 104 M.abscessus group isolates and determined their sequevars. The isolates were tested for phenotypic clarithromycin resistance at days 7, 10, 14 and 21, using Trek Diagnostics Sensititre RAPMYCO microbroth dilution plates. Associations between erm(41) gene sequevars and time to detection of resistance were evaluated using Fisher’s exact test in R. The samples included in this study fell into 14 sequevars, with the majority of samples falling into Sequevar02 (16), Sequevar06 (15), Sequevar08 (7) and Sequvar 15 (31), and several isolates that were in small clusters, or unique. The majority (82.7%) of samples exhibiting inducible macrolide resistance were interpreted as resistant by day 7. Two isolates in Sequevar02, which has a T28C mutation that is associated with sensitivity, showed intermediate resistance at day 14, though the majority (13) were sensitive at day 14. The majority of isolates with inducible macrolide resistance fell into Sequevars 06,08 and 15, none of which contain the T28C mutation. These sequevars were analyzed to determine if there was any correlation between sequevar and time to detection of resistance. None was found. Based on these findings, we recommend the addition of a day 7 read to the CLSI guidelines to improve turn-around-times for these isolates. It is also recommended that erm(41) gene sequencing be added to

  13. Advanced order management in ERM systems: the tic-tac-toe algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badell, Mariana; Fernandez, Elena; Puigjaner, Luis

    2000-10-01

    The concept behind improved enterprise resource planning systems (ERP) systems is the overall integration of the whole enterprise functionality into the management systems through financial links. Converting current software into real management decision tools requires crucial changes in the current approach to ERP systems. This evolution must be able to incorporate the technological achievements both properly and in time. The exploitation phase of plants needs an open web-based environment for collaborative business-engineering with on-line schedulers. Today's short lifecycles of products and processes require sharp and finely tuned management actions that must be guided by scheduling tools. Additionally, such actions must be able to keep track of money movements related to supply chain events. Thus, the necessary outputs require financial-production integration at the scheduling level as proposed in the new approach of enterprise management systems (ERM). Within this framework, the economical analysis of the due date policy and its optimization become essential to manage dynamically realistic and optimal delivery dates with price-time trade-off during the marketing activities. In this work we propose a scheduling tool with web-based interface conducted by autonomous agents when precise economic information relative to plant and business actions and their effects are provided. It aims to attain a better arrangement of the marketing and production events in order to face the bid/bargain process during e-commerce. Additionally, management systems require real time execution and an efficient transaction-oriented approach capable to dynamically adopt realistic and optimal actions to support marketing management. To this end the TicTacToe algorithm provides sequence optimization with acceptable tolerances in realistic time.

  14. Protein kinase C regulates the phosphorylation and oligomerization of ERM binding phosphoprotein 50

    SciTech Connect

    Fouassier, Laura; Nichols, Matthew T.; Gidey, Elizabeth; McWilliams, Ryan R.; Robin, Helene; Finnigan, Claire; Howell, Kathryn E.; Housset, Chantal; Doctor, R. Brian . E-mail: brian.doctor@uchsc.edu

    2005-05-15

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50, a.k.a. NHERF-1) is a scaffold protein essential for the localization and coordinated activity of apical transporters, enzymes and receptors in epithelial cells. EBP50 acts via multiple protein binding interactions, including oligomerization through interactions of its PSD95-Dlg-ZO1 (PDZ) domains. EBP50 can be phosphorylated on multiple sites and phosphorylation of specific sites modulates the extent of oligomerization. The aim of the present study was to test the capacity of protein kinase C (PKC) to phosphorylate EBP50 and to regulate its oligomerization. In vitro experiments showed that the catalytic subunit of PKC directly phosphorylates EBP50. In HEK-293 cells transfected with rat EBP50 cDNA, a treatment with 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced a translocation of PKC{alpha} and {beta} isoforms to the membrane and increased {sup 32}P incorporation into EBP50. In co-transfection/co-precipitation studies, PMA treatment stimulated EBP50 oligomerization. Mass spectrometry analysis of full-length EBP50 and phosphorylation analyses of specific domains, and of mutated or truncated forms of EBP50, indicated that PKC-induced phosphorylation of EBP50 occurred on the Ser{sup 337}/Ser{sup 338} residue within the carboxyl-tail domain of the protein. Truncation of Ser{sup 337}/Ser{sup 338} also diminished PKC-induced oligomerization of EBP50. These results suggest the PKC signaling pathway can impact EBP50-dependent cellular functions by regulating EBP50 oligomerization.

  15. Genome-Wide Localization Study of Yeast Pex11 Identifies Peroxisome–Mitochondria Interactions through the ERMES Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mattiazzi Ušaj, M.; Brložnik, M.; Kaferle, P.; Žitnik, M.; Wolinski, H.; Leitner, F.; Kohlwein, S.D.; Zupan, B.; Petrovič, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pex11 is a peroxin that regulates the number of peroxisomes in eukaryotic cells. Recently, it was found that a mutation in one of the three mammalian paralogs, PEX11β, results in a neurological disorder. The molecular function of Pex11, however, is not known. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex11 has been shown to recruit to peroxisomes the mitochondrial fission machinery, thus enabling proliferation of peroxisomes. This process is essential for efficient fatty acid β-oxidation. In this study, we used high-content microscopy on a genome-wide scale to determine the subcellular localization pattern of yeast Pex11 in all non-essential gene deletion mutants, as well as in temperature-sensitive essential gene mutants. Pex11 localization and morphology of peroxisomes was profoundly affected by mutations in 104 different genes that were functionally classified. A group of genes encompassing MDM10, MDM12 and MDM34 that encode the mitochondrial and cytosolic components of the ERMES complex was analyzed in greater detail. Deletion of these genes caused a specifically altered Pex11 localization pattern, whereas deletion of MMM1, the gene encoding the fourth, endoplasmic-reticulum-associated component of the complex, did not result in an altered Pex11 localization or peroxisome morphology phenotype. Moreover, we found that Pex11 and Mdm34 physically interact and that Pex11 plays a role in establishing the contact sites between peroxisomes and mitochondria through the ERMES complex. Based on these results, we propose that the mitochondrial/cytosolic components of the ERMES complex establish a direct interaction between mitochondria and peroxisomes through Pex11. PMID:25769804

  16. A combined cryo-EM and molecular dynamics approach reveals the mechanism of ErmBL-mediated translation arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Bock, Lars V.; Graf, Michael; Innis, C. Axel; Beckmann, Roland; Grubmüller, Helmut; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Nascent polypeptides can induce ribosome stalling, regulating downstream genes. Stalling of ErmBL peptide translation in the presence of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin leads to resistance in Streptococcus sanguis. To reveal this stalling mechanism we obtained 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-EM structures of ErmBL-stalled ribosomes with erythromycin. The nascent peptide adopts an unusual conformation with the C-terminal Asp10 side chain in a previously unseen rotated position. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, the structures indicate that peptide-bond formation is inhibited by displacement of the peptidyl-tRNA A76 ribose from its canonical position, and by non-productive interactions of the A-tRNA Lys11 side chain with the A-site crevice. These two effects combine to perturb peptide-bond formation by increasing the distance between the attacking Lys11 amine and the Asp10 carbonyl carbon. The interplay between drug, peptide and ribosome uncovered here also provides insight into the fundamental mechanism of peptide-bond formation. PMID:27380950

  17. A combined cryo-EM and molecular dynamics approach reveals the mechanism of ErmBL-mediated translation arrest.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Bock, Lars V; Graf, Michael; Innis, C Axel; Beckmann, Roland; Grubmüller, Helmut; Vaiana, Andrea C; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Nascent polypeptides can induce ribosome stalling, regulating downstream genes. Stalling of ErmBL peptide translation in the presence of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin leads to resistance in Streptococcus sanguis. To reveal this stalling mechanism we obtained 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-EM structures of ErmBL-stalled ribosomes with erythromycin. The nascent peptide adopts an unusual conformation with the C-terminal Asp10 side chain in a previously unseen rotated position. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, the structures indicate that peptide-bond formation is inhibited by displacement of the peptidyl-tRNA A76 ribose from its canonical position, and by non-productive interactions of the A-tRNA Lys11 side chain with the A-site crevice. These two effects combine to perturb peptide-bond formation by increasing the distance between the attacking Lys11 amine and the Asp10 carbonyl carbon. The interplay between drug, peptide and ribosome uncovered here also provides insight into the fundamental mechanism of peptide-bond formation. PMID:27380950

  18. A combined cryo-EM and molecular dynamics approach reveals the mechanism of ErmBL-mediated translation arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, Stefan; Bock, Lars V.; Graf, Michael; Innis, C. Axel; Beckmann, Roland; Grubmüller, Helmut; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-07-01

    Nascent polypeptides can induce ribosome stalling, regulating downstream genes. Stalling of ErmBL peptide translation in the presence of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin leads to resistance in Streptococcus sanguis. To reveal this stalling mechanism we obtained 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-EM structures of ErmBL-stalled ribosomes with erythromycin. The nascent peptide adopts an unusual conformation with the C-terminal Asp10 side chain in a previously unseen rotated position. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, the structures indicate that peptide-bond formation is inhibited by displacement of the peptidyl-tRNA A76 ribose from its canonical position, and by non-productive interactions of the A-tRNA Lys11 side chain with the A-site crevice. These two effects combine to perturb peptide-bond formation by increasing the distance between the attacking Lys11 amine and the Asp10 carbonyl carbon. The interplay between drug, peptide and ribosome uncovered here also provides insight into the fundamental mechanism of peptide-bond formation.

  19. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  20. Evidence for the translational attenuation model: ribosome-binding studies and structural analysis with an in vitro run-off transcript of ermC.

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, C S; Dubnau, D

    1985-01-01

    Several features of the translational attenuation model of ermC regulation were tested. This model predicts two possible secondary structures for the leader of the ermC transcript and requires that the leader contains two Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences. The ribosome binding site for a leader peptide (SD1) is predicted to be accessible, whereas that for the rRNA methylase protein that confers erythromycin (Em) resistance (SD2) is sequestered by base pairing. The model suggests that in the presence of inducer (Em), a ribosome stalls while translating the peptide, altering the mRNA conformation, thereby exposing SD2. The results of our ribosome binding studies demonstrate that SD1 is exposed and binds to ribosomes, whereas SD2 is unavailable. Also, the secondary structure of the 5' region of the ermC transcript was analyzed using methidium propyl-EDTA.Fe (II), T1 nuclease, and nucleases from cobra venom and mung bean sprouts as structure probes. Our results support the previously proposed model for folding of ermC mRNA, and demonstrate that SD1 is single-stranded, while SD2 and its neighboring sequences are largely base paired, consistent with the ribosome-binding results. Images PMID:3903662

  1. Mutational analysis defines the roles of conserved amino acid residues in the predicted catalytic pocket of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2003-09-01

    Methyltransferases (MTases) from the Erm family catalyze S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent modification of a specific adenine residue in bacterial 23S rRNA, thereby conferring resistance to clinically important macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics. Despite the available structural data and functional analyses on the level of the RNA substrate, still very little is known about the mechanism of rRNA:adenine-N(6) methylation. Only predictions regarding various aspects of this reaction have been made based on the analysis of the crystal structures of methyltransferase ErmC' (without the RNA) and their comparison with the crystallographic and biochemical data for better studied DNA:m(6)A MTases. To validate the structure-based predictions of presumably essential residues in the catalytic pocket of ErmC', we carried out the site-directed mutagenesis and studied the function of the mutants in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that the active site of rRNA:m(6)A MTases is much more tolerant to amino acid substitutions than the active site of DNA:m(6)A MTases. Only the Y104 residue implicated in stabilization of the target base was found to be indispensable. Remarkably, the N101 residue from the "catalytic" motif IV and two conserved residues that form the floor (F163) and one of the walls (N11) of the base-binding site are not essential for catalysis in ErmC'. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in the light of the available structural data and in the phylogenetic context of the Erm family. PMID:12946350

  2. Characterization of Enterococcus faecium with macrolide resistance and reduced susceptibility to quinupristin/dalfopristin in a Japanese hospital: detection of extensive diversity in erm(B)-regulator regions.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Nayuta; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Suzaki, Keisuke; Watanabe, Naoki; Quiñones, Dianelys; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-08-01

    Cross-resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics is mainly mediated by the erm (erythromycin ribosome methylation) genes that encode 23S rRNA methylases in enterococi, and various mechanisms are involved in the streptogramin B resistance. Prevalence of MLSB resistance and its genetic mechanisms were analyzed for a total of 159 strains of Enterococcus faecium isolated from clinical specimens in a university hospital in Japan from 1997 to 2006. Resistance to erythromycin (EM) and clindamycin was detected in 88.1% and 89.9% of all the strains examined, respectively, and expression of resistance was totally constitutive. Although none of the strain was resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D), 28 strains (17.6%) showed intermediate resistance to Q/D (MIC: 2 μg/ml). The erm(B) gene was detected in 139 strains (87.4%), and msrC was found in all the strains examined, whereas no other known MLSB resistance genes were identified. The erm(B) regulator region (RR) containing a coding region of the leader peptide was classified into 13 genetic variations (L1-L3, M, S1-S7, D, and R genotypes) in 56 strains. However, no relatedness was identified between the erm(B) RR genotype and EM resistance, or reduced susceptibility to Q/D, although most of Q/D-intermediate strains were assigned to the L1, L2, and S1 genotypes. Q/D-intermediate strains were classified into five multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) types, including four types of clonal complex (CC)-C1, five sequence types (STs), including four STs of CC-17, and several resistance gene/virulence factor profiles. The present study revealed the occurrence of Q/D-intermediate E. faecium, which are composed of heterogeneous strains in Japan, and more genetic diversity in the erm(B) RRs than those reported previously. PMID:23442208

  3. Mutational analysis of basic residues in the N-terminus of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, G; Bujnicki, J M; Flögel, M

    2004-01-01

    Erm methyltransferases mediate the resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics via dimethylation of a specific adenine residue in 23S rRNA. The role of positively charged N-terminal residues of the ErmC' methyltransferase in RNA binding and/or catalysis was determined. Mutational analysis of amino acids K4 and K7 was performed and the mutants were characterized in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The K4 and K7 residues were suggested not to be essential for the enzyme activity but to provide a considerable support for the catalytic step of the reaction, probably by maintaining the optimum conformation of the transition state through interactions with the phosphate backbone of RNA. PMID:15114858

  4. Anchoring of Protein Kinase A by ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) Proteins Is Required for Proper Netrin Signaling through DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer)*

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Paula B.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Stone, Jamie B.; Rivard, Robert L.; Mercier, Alison L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling. PMID:25575591

  5. Novel erm(T)-Carrying Multiresistance Plasmids from Porcine and Human Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 That Also Harbor Cadmium and Copper Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T.; Zarazaga, Myriam; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This study describes three novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants. The plasmids, designated pUR1902, pUR2940, and pUR2941, were obtained from porcine and human methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of the clonal lineage ST398. In addition to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance gene erm(T), all three plasmids also carry the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L). Furthermore, plasmid pUR2940 harbors the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK and the MLSB resistance gene erm(C), while plasmids pUR1902 and pUR2941 possess the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD. Sequence analysis of approximately 18.1 kb of the erm(T)-flanking region from pUR1902, 20.0 kb from pUR2940, and 20.8 kb from pUR2941 revealed the presence of several copies of the recently described insertion sequence ISSau10, which is probably involved in the evolution of the respective plasmids. All plasmids carried a functional cadmium resistance operon with the genes cadD and cadX, in addition to the multicopper oxidase gene mco and the ATPase copper transport gene copA, which are involved in copper resistance. The comparative analysis of S. aureus RN4220 and the three S. aureus RN4220 transformants carrying plasmid pUR1902, pUR2940, or pUR2941 revealed an 8-fold increase in CdSO4 and a 2-fold increase in CuSO4 MICs. The emergence of multidrug resistance plasmids that also carry heavy metal resistance genes is alarming and requires further surveillance. The colocalization of antimicrobial resistance genes and genes that confer resistance to heavy metals may facilitate their persistence, coselection, and dissemination. PMID:23629701

  6. Analysis of mutations in Neurospora crassa ERMES components reveals specific functions related to β-barrel protein assembly and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Lackey, Sebastian W K; Srayko, Martin A; Norton, Kacie A; Nargang, Frank E

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethers the er to mitochondria and contains four structural components: Mmm1, Mdm12, Mdm10, and Mmm2 (Mdm34). The Gem1 protein may play a role in regulating ERMES function. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa strains lacking any of Mmm1, Mdm12, or Mdm10 are known to show a variety of phenotypic defects including altered mitochondrial morphology and defects in the assembly of β-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Here we examine ERMES complex components in N. crassa and show that Mmm1 is an ER membrane protein containing a Cys residue near its N-terminus that is conserved in the class Sordariomycetes. The residue occurs in the ER-lumen domain of the protein and is involved in the formation of disulphide bonds that give rise to Mmm1 dimers. Dimer formation is required for efficient assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. However, no effects are seen on porin assembly or mitochondrial morphology. This demonstrates a specificity of function and suggests a direct role for Mmm1 in Tom40 assembly. Mutation of a highly conserved region in the cytosolic domain of Mmm1 results in moderate defects in Tom40 and porin assembly, as well as a slight morphological phenotype. Previous reports have not examined the role of Mmm2 with respect to mitochondrial protein import and assembly. Here we show that absence of Mmm2 affects assembly of β-barrel proteins and that lack of any ERMES structural component results in defects in Tom22 assembly. Loss of N. crassa Gem1 has no effect on the assembly of these proteins but does affect mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23940790

  7. Molecular cloning of a novel NF2/ERM/4.1 superfamily gene, ehm2, that is expressed in high-metastatic K1735 murine melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Nagamachi, Y; Tani, M; Kimura, K; Shiroishi, T; Wakana, S; Yokota, J

    2000-04-15

    We have cloned a novel gene, Ehm2, that is expressed in high-metastatic but not in low-metastatic K-1735 murine melanoma cells. The Ehm2 gene encodes a protein of 527 amino acid residues, showing up to 41% amino acid identity with the FERM domain of NF2/ERM/4.1 superfamily proteins, which have the function of connecting cell surface transmembrane proteins to cytoskeletal molecules. The Ehm2 gene was mapped to chromosome 4 and was expressed in the liver, lung, kidney, and testis and in 7- to 17-day embryos. The highest level of homology was observed with NBL4, which is a new subfamily protein of the NF2/ERM/4.1 superfamily. A human homologue of the mouse Ehm2 gene, showing significant homology (83% identity), was identified in the genomic DNA and EST databases. Furthermore, seven rat EST clones and one pig EST clone in the GenBank EST database were identified as having 83-92% sequence homology with the cDNA sequence of the mouse Ehm2 gene. Thus, Ehm2 is a highly conserved gene that encodes a novel member of the NF2/ERM/4.1 superfamily proteins. PMID:10783258

  8. Genome sequence and virulence factors of a group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain with a new element carrying erm(B)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    A Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) strain WCHSDSE-1, which caused an outbreak of tonsillopharyngitis among healthcare workers in China, was subjected to genome sequencing and analysis. WCHSDSE-1 belongs to the Lancefield group G, emm type stG211.1 and sequence type 44. WCHSDSE-1 has virulence factors for adherence, impairing the recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites and toxins including streptolysins O and S and exotoxin G. WCHSDSE-1 has a 45.4-kb element resembling a conjugative transposon. This element is absent from other known SDSE genomes and contains the macrolide-resistant gene erm(B). Conjugative transfer of erm(B) was not successful in mating experiments, suggesting that the element might have lost its ability of conjugation. An almost identical element, which contains the tetracycline-resistant gene tet(M) instead of erm(B), is present on the genome of Filifactor alocis ATCC 35896. The boundaries and insertion sites of the two elements were identified and both were flanked by a 3-bp direct repeat, which is characteristic of transposition. In conclusion, the spectrum of virulence factors of WCHSDSE-1 is similar to other SDSE strains causing invasive diseases. WCHSDSE-1 possesses a new transposable element encoding macrolide resistance, which could pick up different resistance genes and could be transferred across species in oral microflora. PMID:26843282

  9. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the predicted rRNA-binding domain of ErmC' redefines the substrate-binding site and suggests a model for protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna

    2003-08-15

    The Erm family of adenine-N(6) methyltransferases (MTases) is responsible for the development of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics through the methylation of 23S ribosomal RNA. Hence, these proteins are important potential drug targets. Despite the availability of the NMR and crystal structures of two members of the family (ErmAM and ErmC', respectively) and extensive studies on the RNA substrate, the substrate-binding site and the amino acids involved in RNA recognition by the Erm MTases remain unknown. It has been proposed that the small C-terminal domain functions as a target-binding module, but this prediction has not been tested experimentally. We have undertaken structure-based mutational analysis of 13 charged or polar residues located on the predicted rRNA-binding surface of ErmC' with the aim to identify the area of protein-RNA interactions. The results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of mutant protein suggest that the key RNA-binding residues are located not in the small domain, but in the large catalytic domain, facing the cleft between the two domains. Based on the mutagenesis data, a preliminary three-dimensional model of ErmC' complexed with the minimal substrate was constructed. The identification of the RNA-binding site of ErmC' may be useful for structure-based design of novel drugs that do not necessarily bind to the cofactor-binding site common to many S-adenosyl-L- methionine-dependent MTases, but specifically block the substrate-binding site of MTases from the Erm family. PMID:12907737

  10. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Kari

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses how the management of e-books has introduced, at many libraries and in varying degrees, the challenges of maintaining effective technical services workflows. Four different e-book workflows are identified and explored, and the author takes a closer look at how particular variables for each are affected, such as…

  11. The NHERF2 sequence adjacent and upstream of the ERM-binding domain affects NHERF2-ezrin binding and dexamethasone stimulated NHE3 activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Singh, Varsha; Sarker, Prateeti; Yin, Jianyi; Chen, Tian-E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Li, Xuhang; Tse, C Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-08-15

    In the brush border of intestinal and kidney epithelial cells, scaffolding proteins ezrin, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF)1 and NHERF2 play important roles in linking transmembrane proteins to the cytoskeleton and assembling signalling regulatory complexes. The last 30 carboxyl residues of NHERF1 and NHERF2 form the EBDs [ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM)-binding domain]. The current study found that NHERF1/2 contain an ERM-binding regulatory sequence (EBRS), which facilitates the interaction between the EBD and ezrin. The EBRSs are located within 24 and 19 residues immediately upstream of EBDs for NHERF1 and NHERF2 respectively. In OK (opossum kidney) epithelial cells, EBRSs are necessary along with the EBD to distribute NHERF1 and NHERF2 exclusively to the apical domain. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Ser(303) located in the EBRS of NHERF2, decreases the binding affinity for ezrin, dislocates apical NHERF2 into the cytosol and increases the NHERF2 microvillar mobility rate. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Ser(303) was functionally significant preventing acute stimulation of NHE3 (Na(+)-H(+) exchanger 3) activity by dexamethasone. PMID:26251448

  12. Phylogeography of Yersinia ruckeri reveals effects of past evolutionary events on the current strain distribution and explains variations in the global transmission of enteric redmouth (ERM) disease

    PubMed Central

    Bastardo, Asmine; Ravelo, Carmen; Romalde, Jesús L.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns and population genetic structure of Yersinia ruckeri, the pathological agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in salmonids, were investigated on the basis of concatenated multiloci sequences from isolates of different phenotypes obtained between 1965 and 2009 from diverse areas and hosts. Sequence analyses revealed genetic differentiation among subpopulations with the largest genetic distance occurring between subpopulations of Europe and Canada and/or South America. Bayesian analysis indicated the presence of three ancestral population clusters. Mismatch distribution displayed signatures characteristic of changes in size due to demographic and spatial expansions in the overall Y. ruckeri population, and also in the geographically separate subpopulations. Furthermore, a weak signal of isolation by distance was determined. A significant positive correlation between genetic and geographical distances was observed. These results revealed that the population of Y. ruckeri has undergone both ancient and recent population changes that were probably induced by biogeography forces in the past and, much more recently, by adaptive processes forced by aquaculture expansion. These findings have important implications for future studies on Y. ruckeri population dynamics, on the potential role of genetic structure to explain variations in ERM transmission, and on the effect of past evolutionary events on current estimations of gene flow. PMID:26579104

  13. The NHERF2 sequence adjacent and upstream of the ERM-binding domain affects NHERF2–ezrin binding and dexamethasone stimulated NHE3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Singh, Varsha; Sarker, Prateeti; Yin, Jianyi; Chen, Tian-E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Li, Xuhang; Tse, C. Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In the brush border of intestinal and kidney epithelial cells, scaffolding proteins ezrin, Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF)1 and NHERF2 play important roles in linking transmembrane proteins to the cytoskeleton and assembling signalling regulatory complexes. The last 30 carboxyl residues of NHERF1 and NHERF2 form the EBDs [ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM)-binding domain]. The current study found that NHERF1/2 contain an ERM-binding regulatory sequence (EBRS), which facilitates the interaction between the EBD and ezrin. The EBRSs are located within 24 and 19 residues immediately upstream of EBDs for NHERF1 and NHERF2 respectively. In OK (opossum kidney) epithelial cells, EBRSs are necessary along with the EBD to distribute NHERF1 and NHERF2 exclusively to the apical domain. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Ser303 located in the EBRS of NHERF2, decreases the binding affinity for ezrin, dislocates apical NHERF2 into the cytosol and increases the NHERF2 microvillar mobility rate. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Ser303 was functionally significant preventing acute stimulation of NHE3 (Na+-H+ exchanger 3) activity by dexamethasone. PMID:26251448

  14. ICAM-2 regulates vascular permeability and N-cadherin localization through ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins and Rac-1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial junctions control functions such as permeability, angiogenesis and contact inhibition. VE-Cadherin (VECad) is essential for the maintenance of intercellular contacts. In confluent endothelial monolayers, N-Cadherin (NCad) is mostly expressed on the apical and basal membrane, but in the absence of VECad it localizes at junctions. Both cadherins are required for vascular development. The intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-2, also localized at endothelial junctions, is involved in leukocyte recruitment and angiogenesis. Results In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), both VECad and NCad were found at nascent cell contacts of sub-confluent monolayers, but only VECad localized at the mature junctions of confluent monolayers. Inhibition of ICAM-2 expression by siRNA caused the appearance of small gaps at the junctions and a decrease in NCad junctional staining in sub-confluent monolayers. Endothelioma lines derived from WT or ICAM-2-deficient mice (IC2neg) lacked VECad and failed to form junctions, with loss of contact inhibition. Re-expression of full-length ICAM-2 (IC2 FL) in IC2neg cells restored contact inhibition through recruitment of NCad at the junctions. Mutant ICAM-2 lacking the binding site for ERM proteins (IC2 ΔERM) or the cytoplasmic tail (IC2 ΔTAIL) failed to restore junctions. ICAM-2-dependent Rac-1 activation was also decreased in these mutant cell lines. Barrier function, measured in vitro via transendothelial electrical resistance, was decreased in IC2neg cells, both in resting conditions and after thrombin stimulation. This was dependent on ICAM-2 signalling to the small GTPase Rac-1, since transendothelial electrical resistance of IC2neg cells was restored by constitutively active Rac-1. In vivo, thrombin-induced extravasation of FITC-labeled albumin measured by intravital fluorescence microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle showed that permeability was increased in ICAM-2-deficient mice compared to controls

  15. Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Vpr induced downregulation of NHE1 induces alteration in intracellular pH and loss of ERM complex in target cells

    PubMed Central

    Janket, Michelle L.; DeRicco, Jeremy S.; Borowski, LuAnn; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2007-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr is known to dysregulate host cellular functions through its interaction with cellular proteins. Using a protein array we assessed Vpr-mediated differential regulation of host cellular proteins expression. Results demonstrated that Vpr differentially regulated host factors that are involved in functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. One of the most highly downregulated proteins attained was the sodium hydrogen exchanger, isoform 1 (NHE1), which showed a significant (60%) decrease in HIV-1 vpr(+) virus infected cells as compared to HIV-1 vpr(−) virus infected control. NHE1 downregulation further led to acidification of cells and was directly correlated with loss of ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) protein complex and decreased AKT phosphorylation. Vpr-mediated NHE1 dyregulation is in part through GR pathway as GR antagonist, mifepristone reversed Vpr-induced NHE1 downregulation. PMID:17349711

  16. Resistin, a fat-derived secretory factor, promotes metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells through ERM activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ok; Kim, Nami; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipocyte-secreted factor, is known to be elevated in breast cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanism by which resistin acts is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether resistin could stimulate invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Here, we report that resistin stimulated invasion and migration of breast cancer cells as well as phosphorylation of c-Src. Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cell invasion. Resistin increased intracellular calcium concentration, and chelation of intracellular calcium blocked resistin-mediated activation of Src. Resistin also induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-mediated PP2A phosphorylation. In addition, resistin increased phosphorylation of PKCα. Inhibition of PP2A enhanced resistin-induced PKCα phosphorylation, demonstrating that PP2A activity is critical for PKCα phosphorylation. Resistin also increased phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM). Additionally, ezrin interacted with PKCα, and resistin promoted co-localization of ezrin and PKCα. Either inhibition of c-Src and PKCα or knock-down of ezrin blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cells invasion. Moreover, resistin increased expression of vimentin, a key molecule for cancer cell invasion. Knock-down of ezrin abrogated resistin-induced vimentin expression. These results suggest that resistin play as a critical regulator of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26729407

  17. ERM 593 Applied Project_Guidance for Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System_Final_05-05-15

    SciTech Connect

    Elicio, Andy U.

    2015-05-05

    My ERM 593 applied project will provide guidance for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Stream Profile reviewer (i.e. RCRA reviewer) in regards to Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System. The Waste Compliance and Tracking system is called WCATS. WCATS is a web-based application that “supports the generation, characterization, processing and shipment of LANL radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste.” The LANL generator must characterize their waste via electronically by filling out a waste stream profile (WSP) in WCATS. Once this process is completed, the designated waste management coordinator (WMC) will perform a review of the waste stream profile to ensure the generator has completed their waste stream characterization in accordance with applicable state, federal and LANL directives particularly P930-1, “LANL Waste Acceptance Criteria,” and the “Waste Compliance and Tracking System User's Manual, MAN-5004, R2,” as applicable. My guidance/applied project will describe the purpose, scope, acronyms, definitions, responsibilities, assumptions and guidance for the WSP reviewer as it pertains to each panel and subpanel of a waste stream profile.

  18. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A Regulates Sporulation, but Does Not Contribute to Toxin Production, by Direct High-Affinity Binding to Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Bakker, Dennis; Kuijper, Ed J.; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI), for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative) targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely. PMID:23119071

  19. Certification of new Pb iCRM (Candidate ERM-38xx series) via Gravimetric Isotope Mixtures and MC-ICP-MS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzevera, E.; Quetel, C. R.

    2008-12-01

    Lead is known to be a particularly toxic chemical element. Mining and smelting of Pb and its domestic use over the centuries have contaminated the surface of Earth and jeopardized the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Omnipresence of Pb has however an advantage. It can be used as an isotopic tracer of pollution sources and pathways in the environment. Pb isotopic Certified Reference Materials (iCRM) with undisputed characteristics are then required to validate Pb isotope ratio measurements. The materials currently available worldwide were produced in the 1960's by the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST, USA) and are now the object of polemics regarding the accuracy of some of the accompanying certified values. Moreover, new materials with lower relative uncertainty statements are demanded by users. This presentation is centred on the production and the certification at the EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of a new series of Pb iCRM (candidate ERM-38xx series). The production included six Pb gravimetric isotope mixtures, a common Pb material dedicated to routine calibration work and a series of four 207Pb slightly enriched natural-like Pb materials for the validation of the δ-scale method below 0.01%. The gravimetric isotope mixtures method, originally supported by mass spectrometry measurements performed on GS-MS or TI-MS instruments, was applied successfully to MC-ICP-MS. The measurements and certification methods we developed were validated in several ways, including a systematic investigation on possible significant sources of uncertainty and comparisons of results obtained by different laboratories on identical samples. Relative uncertainties on isotope ratios obtained for the newly produced Pb iCRM are as low as 0.017%, which is between 2 and 4 times smaller than the uncertainties carried by the NIST-981 material. Going below 0.01% was not possible mainly because of uncompressible uncertainties coming from the

  20. A Locally Created ERM: How and Why We Did It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2008-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse's Murphy Library provides access to approximately 200 subscription databases. As with many academic libraries, methods and tools for managing these resources were sorely needed. However, the budget has been cut repeatedly over the past few years--thus the possibility of purchasing a commercial electronic…

  1. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  2. Tylosin-resistant Enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in drained fields receiving swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of tylosin at subtherapeutic levels by the swine industry provides selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. The land application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields might introduce elevated levels of total and tylosin-resistant ...

  3. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm). PMID:23387710

  4. Persistence of erythromycin resistance gene erm(B) in cattle feedlot pens over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance was evaluated in cattle feedlot surface soil samples collected prior to and after a 13-month feedlot trial of two common diets, a 0% wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) corn-based ration versus a 35% WDGS ration. Soil samples were collected from the mo...

  5. Efficacy testing of a 35 year old commercially produced Yersinia ruckeri bacterin for the control of Enteric Redmouth ERM) Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1976 the United States Department of Agriculture, Veterinary Services, granted the first veterinary product license for a biologic to be administered to fish. That license was issued for Enteric Redmouth Bacterin (Yerisina ruckeri) to the first commercial fish vaccine company, Wildlife Vaccines. ...

  6. Trimming the threshold dispersion below 10 e-rms in a large area readout IC working in a single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmon, P.; Maj, P.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of an in-pixel threshold dispersion correction implemented in a prototype readout integrated circuit (IC) operating in a single photon counting mode. The new threshold correction method was implemented in a readout IC of area 9.6× 14.9 mm2 containing 23552 square pixels with the pitch of 75 μm designed and fabricated in CMOS 130 nm technology. Each pixel of the IC consists of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaper, two discriminators, two 14-bit counters and a low-area trim DACs for threshold correction. The user can either control the range of the trim DAC globally for all the pixels in the integrated circuit or modify the trim DACs characteristics locally in each pixel independently. Using a simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo methods, we estimated how much we could improve the offset trimming by increasing the number of bits in the trim DACs or implementing additional bits in a pixel to modify the characteristics of the trim DACs. The measurements of our IC prototype show that it is possible to reduce the effective threshold dispersion in large-area single-photon counting chips below 10 electrons rms.

  7. Differential regulation of phagosome maturation in macrophages and dendritic cells mediated by Rho GTPases and ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Erwig, Lars-Peter; McPhilips, Kathleen A.; Wynes, Murray W.; Ivetic, Alexander; Ridley, Anne J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Deletion of apoptotic cells from tissues involves their phagocytosis by macrophages, dendritic cells, and tissue cells. Although much attention has been focused on the participating ligands, receptors, and mechanisms of uptake, little is known of the disposition of the ingested cell within the phagosome. Here we show that uptake of apoptotic cells by macrophages or fibroblasts results in rapid phagosome maturation, whereas macrophage phagosomes containing Ig-opsonized target cells mature at a slower rate. The early maturation was shown to depend on activation of Rho acting through Rho kinase on ezrin–radixin–moesin proteins. Blockade of Rho signaling or inhibition of moesin both delayed maturation rates to those seen with opsonized targets. By contrast, phagosome maturation in dendritic cells was slower, similar between apoptotic and opsonized target cells, and unaffected by Rho inhibition. These observations have direct implications for the clearance of dying cells and the roles played by different phagocytes in antigen digestion and presentation. PMID:16908865

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the ICESa2603 Family ICEs and Spread of erm(B)- and tet(O)-Carrying Transferable 89K-Subtype ICEs in Swine and Bovine Isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhu; Liang, Yuan; Guo, Dawei; Shang, Kexin; Ge, Lin; Kashif, Jam; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the ICESa2603 family have been isolated from several species of Streptococcus spp.; however, the comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses of these particular ICEs are currently only at their initial stages. By investigating 13 ICEs of the ICESa2603 family and two ICESa2603 family-like ICEs derived from diverse hosts and locations, we have determined that ICEs comprised a backbone of 30 identical syntenic core genes and accessory genes that were restricted to the intergenic sites or the 3'-end of the non-conserved domain of core genes to maintain its function. ICESa2603 family integrase IntICE Sa 2603 specifically recognized a 15-bp att sequence (TTATTTAAGAGTAAC) at the 3'-end of rplL, which was highly conserved in genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that extensive recombination/insertion and the occurrence of a hybrid/mosaic in the ICESa2603 family were responsible for the significant increase in ICE diversity, thereby broadening its host range. Approximately 42.5 and 38.1% of the tested Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus agalactiae clinical isolates respectively contained ICESa2603 family Type IV secretion system (T4SS) genes, and 80.5 and 62.5% of which also respectively carried int ICE Sa 2603, indicating that ICESa2603 family is widely distributed across these bacteria. Sequencing and conjugation transfer of a novel sequence type ST303 clinical S. suis isolate HB1011 demonstrated that the 89K-subtype ICESsuHB1011 retained its transferrable function, thereby conferring tetracycline and macrolide resistance. PMID:26870017

  9. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the ICESa2603 Family ICEs and Spread of erm(B)- and tet(O)-Carrying Transferable 89K-Subtype ICEs in Swine and Bovine Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhu; Liang, Yuan; Guo, Dawei; Shang, Kexin; Ge, Lin; Kashif, Jam; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the ICESa2603 family have been isolated from several species of Streptococcus spp.; however, the comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses of these particular ICEs are currently only at their initial stages. By investigating 13 ICEs of the ICESa2603 family and two ICESa2603 family-like ICEs derived from diverse hosts and locations, we have determined that ICEs comprised a backbone of 30 identical syntenic core genes and accessory genes that were restricted to the intergenic sites or the 3′-end of the non-conserved domain of core genes to maintain its function. ICESa2603 family integrase IntICESa2603 specifically recognized a 15-bp att sequence (TTATTTAAGAGTAAC) at the 3′-end of rplL, which was highly conserved in genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that extensive recombination/insertion and the occurrence of a hybrid/mosaic in the ICESa2603 family were responsible for the significant increase in ICE diversity, thereby broadening its host range. Approximately 42.5 and 38.1% of the tested Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus agalactiae clinical isolates respectively contained ICESa2603 family Type IV secretion system (T4SS) genes, and 80.5 and 62.5% of which also respectively carried intICESa2603, indicating that ICESa2603 family is widely distributed across these bacteria. Sequencing and conjugation transfer of a novel sequence type ST303 clinical S. suis isolate HB1011 demonstrated that the 89K-subtype ICESsuHB1011 retained its transferrable function, thereby conferring tetracycline and macrolide resistance. PMID:26870017

  10. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water. Manure concentrations for ermB, ermC and ermF were all >109 copy g-1. Manure contained 1.76 x 105 CFUg-1 enterococci w...

  11. Inhibition of cell adhesion by phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphorylation status of the C-terminal Thr residues of Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERM) is often linked to cell shape change. To determine the role of phophorylated ERM, we modified phosphorylation status of ERM and investigated changes in cell adhesion and morphology. Treatment with Calyculin-A (Cal-A), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, dramatically augmented phosphorylated ERM (phospho-ERM). Cal-A-treatment or expression of phospho-mimetic Moesin mutant (Moesin-TD) induced cell rounding in adherent cells. Moreover, reattachment of detached cells to substrate was inhibited by either treatment. Phospho-ERM, Moesin-TD and actin cytoskeleton were observed at the plasma membrane of such round cells. Augmented cell surface rigidity was also observed in both cases. Meanwhile, non-adherent KG-1 cells were rather rich in phospho-ERM. Treatment with Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor that dephosphorylates phospho-ERM, up-regulated the integrin-dependent adhesion of KG-1 cells to substrate. These findings strongly suggest the followings: (1) Phospho-ERM inhibit cell adhesion, and therefore, dephosphorylation of ERM proteins is essential for cell adhesion. (2) Phospho-ERM induce formation and/or maintenance of spherical cell shape. (3) ERM are constitutively both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in cultured adherent and non-adherent cells. PMID:26555866

  12. Charting a Course through CORAL: Texas A&M University Libraries' Experience Implementing an Open-Source Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Beh, Eugenia; Resnick, Taryn; Ugaz, Ana; Tabacaru, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, after two previous unsuccessful attempts at electronic resources management system (ERMS) implementation, Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries set out once again to find an ERMS that would fit its needs. After surveying the field, TAMU Libraries selected the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries-developed, open-source ERMS, CORAL…

  13. Pathway and sink activity for photosynthate translocation in Pisolithus extraradical mycelium of ectomycorrhizal Pinus thunbergii seedlings.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Munemasa; Wu, Bingyun; Hogetsu, Taizo

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the pathway and sink activity of photosynthate translocation in the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of a Pisolithus isolate. We labelled ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Pinus thunbergii seedlings with (14)CO2 and followed (14)C distribution within the ERM by autoradiography. (14)C photosynthate translocation in the ERM resulted in (14)C distribution in rhizomorphs throughout the ERM, with (14)C accumulation at the front. When most radial mycelial connections between ECM root tips and the ERM front were cut, the whole allocation of (14)C photosynthates to the ERM was reduced. However, the overall pattern of (14)C distribution in the ERM was maintained even in regions immediately above and below the cut, with no local (14)C depletion or accumulation. We inferred from this result that every portion in the ERM has a significant sink activity and a definite sink capacity for photosynthates and that photosynthates detour the cut and reach throughout the ERM by translocation in every direction. Next, we prepared paired ECM seedlings, ERMs of which had been connected with each other by hyphal fusion, alongside, labelled the left seedling with (14)CO2, and shaded none, one or both of them. (14)C photosynthates were acropetally and basipetally translocated from the left ERM to ECM root tips of the right seedling through rhizomorphs in the left and right ERMs, respectively. With the left seedling illuminated, (14)C translocation from the left to the right ERM increased by shading the right seedling. This result suggests that reduced photosynthate transfer from the host to its ERM increased sink activity of the ERM. PMID:26861479

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors induce the canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway to suppress growth and self-renewal in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eleanor Y.; DeRan, Michael T.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Grandinetti, Kathryn Brooke; Clagg, Ryan; McCarthy, Karin M.; Lobbardi, Riadh M.; Brockmann, Jillian; Keller, Charles; Wu, Xu; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is a common pediatric malignancy of muscle, with relapse being the major clinical challenge. Self-renewing tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) drive cancer relapse and are confined to a molecularly definable subset of ERMS cells. To identify drugs that suppress ERMS self-renewal and induce differentiation of TPCs, a large-scale chemical screen was completed. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitors were identified as potent suppressors of ERMS growth through inhibiting proliferation and inducing terminal differentiation of TPCs into myosin-expressing cells. In support of GSK3 inhibitors functioning through activation of the canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway, recombinant WNT3A and stabilized β-catenin also enhanced terminal differentiation of human ERMS cells. Treatment of ERMS-bearing zebrafish with GSK3 inhibitors activated the WNT/β-catenin pathway, resulting in suppressed ERMS growth, depleted TPCs, and diminished self-renewal capacity in vivo. Activation of the canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway also significantly reduced self-renewal of human ERMS, indicating a conserved function for this pathway in modulating ERMS self-renewal. In total, we have identified an unconventional tumor suppressive role for the canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway in regulating self-renewal of ERMS and revealed therapeutic strategies to target differentiation of TPCs in ERMS. PMID:24706870

  15. Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia M; Agarwal, Daniel R; Gelman, Rachel; Christoforidis, John B

    2016-01-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a disorder of the vitreomacular interface characterized by symptoms of decreased visual acuity and metamorphopsia. The diagnosis and classification of ERM has traditionally been based on clinical examination findings. However, modern optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be more sensitive than clinical examination for the diagnosis of ERM. Furthermore, OCT-derived findings, such as central foveal thickness and inner segment ellipsoid band integrity, have shown clinical relevance in the setting of ERM. To date, no OCT-based ERM classification scheme has been widely accepted for use in clinical practice and investigation. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification of ERMs and propose an OCT-based ERM classification system. PMID:27099458

  16. Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia M; Agarwal, Daniel R; Gelman, Rachel; Christoforidis, John B

    2016-01-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a disorder of the vitreomacular interface characterized by symptoms of decreased visual acuity and metamorphopsia. The diagnosis and classification of ERM has traditionally been based on clinical examination findings. However, modern optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be more sensitive than clinical examination for the diagnosis of ERM. Furthermore, OCT-derived findings, such as central foveal thickness and inner segment ellipsoid band integrity, have shown clinical relevance in the setting of ERM. To date, no OCT-based ERM classification scheme has been widely accepted for use in clinical practice and investigation. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification of ERMs and propose an OCT-based ERM classification system. PMID:27099458

  17. An ethanol extract of Ramulus mori improves blood circulation by inhibiting platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Park, Jieun; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Choe, Soo Young; Seo, Yoonhee; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can cause blood coagulation and thrombosis. In this study, the effect of an ethanol extract of Ramulus mori (ERM) on blood circulation was investigated. The antithrombotic activity of ERM on rat carotid arterial thrombosis was evaluated in vivo, and the effect of ERM on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation time was evaluated ex vivo. To evaluate the safety of ERM, its cytotoxicity to platelets and its effect on tail bleeding time were assessed; ERM was not toxic to rat platelets and did not prolong bleeding time. Moreover, administering ERM to rats had a significant preventive effect on carotid arterial thrombosis in vivo, and significantly inhibited adenosine diphosphate- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo, whereas it did not prolong coagulation periods, such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results suggest that ERM is effective in improving blood circulation via antiplatelet activity rather than anticoagulation activity. PMID:26967156

  18. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure.

    PubMed

    Luby, Elizabeth M; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water, which may contribute to the increase in antibiotic resistance in non-agricultural settings. We compared losses of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and macrolide-resistance (erm and msrA) genes in water draining from plots with or without swine manure application under chisel plow and no till conditions. Concentrations of ermB, ermC and ermF were all >10(9)copies g(-1) in manure from tylosin-treated swine, and application of this manure resulted in short-term increases in the abundance of these genes in soil. Abundances of ermB, ermC and ermF in manured soil returned to levels identified in non-manured control plots by the spring following manure application. Tillage practices yielded no significant differences (p>0.10) in enterococci or erm gene concentrations in drainage water and were therefore combined for further analysis. While enterococci and tylosin-resistant enterococci concentrations in drainage water showed no effects of manure application, ermB and ermF concentrations in drainage water from manured plots were significantly higher (p<0.01) than concentrations coming from non-manured plots. ErmB and ermF were detected in 78% and 44%, respectively, of water samples draining from plots receiving manure. Although ermC had the highest concentrations of the three genes in drainage water, there was no effect of manure application on ermC abundance. MsrA was not detected in manure, soil or water. This study is the first to report significant increases in abundance of resistance genes in waters draining from agricultural land due to manure application. PMID:26874610

  19. [Effects of Thermophilic Composting on Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) of Swine Manure Source].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning-guo; Huang, Nan; Wang, Wei-wei; Yu, Man; Chen, Xiao-yang; Yao, Yan-lai; Wang, Wei-ping; Hong, Chun-lai

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the effects of thermophilic composting process on antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of swine manure source at a field scale, the abundance of four erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and ermF), three β-lactam resistance genes (blaTEM, blaCTX and blaSHV) and two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) were quantified by quantitative PCR ( qPCR) during the composting process. The results suggested that the erm genes' copy numbers were significantly higher than those of the bla and qnr genes in the early stage of composting (P < 0.01). The maximum abundance of erm genes was ermB (9.88 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹), following by ermF (9.4 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹). At the end of the composting process, bla and qnr genes were at low levels, while erm genes were still at high levels. Even through ermF was proliferated comparing with the initial copies. These results indicated that thermophilic composting process could not effectively remove all ARGs. For some ARGs, compost may be a good bioreactor resulting in their proliferation. Application of composting products on farmland may cause transference of ARGs. PMID:27506057

  20. ER-mitochondrial junctions can be bypassed by dominant mutations in the endosomal protein Vps13.

    PubMed

    Lang, Alexander B; John Peter, Arun T; Walter, Peter; Kornmann, Benoît

    2015-09-14

    The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) complex tethers the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. It is thought to facilitate interorganelle lipid exchange and influence mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Despite this important role, ERMES is not found in metazoans. Here, we identified single amino acid substitutions in Vps13 (vacuolar protein sorting 13), a large universally conserved eukaryotic protein, which suppress all measured phenotypic consequences of ERMES deficiency. Combined loss of VPS13 and ERMES is lethal, indicating that Vps13 and ERMES function in redundant pathways. Vps13 dynamically localizes to vacuole-mitochondria and to vacuole-nucleus contact sites depending on growth conditions, suggesting that ERMES function can be bypassed by the activity of other contact sites, and that contact sites establish a growth condition-regulated organelle network. PMID:26370498

  1. Establishment of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath/epithelial rests of Malassez cell line from human periodontium.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jae-Won; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Jung-Wook; Lee, Gene

    2014-07-01

    Human Hertwig's epithelial root sheath/epithelial rests of Malassez (HERS/ERM) cells are epithelial remnants of teeth residing in the periodontium. Although the functional roles of HERS/ERM cells have yet to be elucidated, they are a unique epithelial cell population in adult teeth and are reported to have stem cell characteristics. Therefore, HERS/ERM cells might play a role as an epithelial component for the repair or regeneration of dental hard tissues; however, they are very rare population in periodontium and the primary isolation of them is considered to be difficult. To overcome these problems, we immortalized primary HERS/ERM cells isolated from human periodontium using SV40 large T antigen (SV40 LT) and performed a characterization of the immortalized cell line. Primary HERS/ERM cells could not be maintained for more than 6 passages; however, immortalized HERS/ERM cells were maintained for more than 20 passages. There were no differences in the morphological and immunophenotypic characteristics of HERS/ERM cells and immortalized HERS/ERM cells. The expression of epithelial stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers was maintained in immortalized HERS/ERM cells. Moreover, immortalized HERS/ERM cells could acquire mesenchymal phenotypes through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition via TGF-β1. In conclusion, we established an immortalized human HERS/ERM cell line with SV40 LT and expect this cell line to contribute to the understanding of the functional roles of HERS/ERM cells and the tissue engineering of teeth. PMID:25081036

  2. Rapid molecular detection of inducible macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium chelonae and M. abscessus strains: a replacement for 14-day susceptibility testing?

    PubMed

    Hanson, Kimberly E; Slechta, E Susan; Muir, Haleina; Barker, Adam P

    2014-05-01

    The erm(41) gene causes inducible macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus but not Mycobacterium chelonae. erm(41) sequencing of 285 M. abscessus and 45 M. chelonae isolates was compared to 14-day susceptibility; agreement percentages were 98.9% and 100%, respectively. Extended incubation may not be necessary for M. chelonae, and the erm(41) genotype is a useful adjunct for M. abscessus. PMID:24554745

  3. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:16037284

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra; Phelps, Michael; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Jenkins, Isaac; Chen, Eleanor Y.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat) in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients. PMID:26636678

  5. Ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins differentially regulate endothelial hyperpermeability after thrombin.

    PubMed

    Adyshev, Djanybek M; Dudek, Steven M; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Kim, Kyung-mi; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Kasa, Anita; Garcia, Joe G N; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-08-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption induced by inflammatory agonists such as thrombin leads to potentially lethal physiological dysfunction such as alveolar flooding, hypoxemia, and pulmonary edema. Thrombin stimulates paracellular gap and F-actin stress fiber formation, triggers actomyosin contraction, and alters EC permeability through multiple mechanisms that include protein kinase C (PKC) activation. We previously have shown that the ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) actin-binding proteins differentially participate in sphingosine-1 phosphate-induced EC barrier enhancement. Phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue in the COOH-terminus of ERM proteins causes conformational changes in ERM to unmask binding sites and is considered a hallmark of ERM activation. In the present study we test the hypothesis that ERM proteins are phosphorylated on this critical threonine residue by thrombin-induced signaling events and explore the role of the ERM family in modulating thrombin-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement and EC barrier function. Thrombin promotes ERM phosphorylation at this threonine residue (ezrin Thr567, radixin Thr564, moesin Thr558) in a PKC-dependent fashion and induces translocation of phosphorylated ERM to the EC periphery. Thrombin-induced ERM threonine phosphorylation is likely synergistically mediated by protease-activated receptors PAR1 and PAR2. Using the siRNA approach, depletion of either moesin alone or of all three ERM proteins significantly attenuates thrombin-induced increase in EC barrier permeability (transendothelial electrical resistance), cytoskeletal rearrangements, paracellular gap formation, and accumulation of phospho-myosin light chain. In contrast, radixin depletion exerts opposing effects on these indexes. These data suggest that ERM proteins play important differential roles in the thrombin-induced modulation of EC permeability, with moesin promoting barrier dysfunction and radixin opposing it. PMID:23729486

  6. Vitiating Vulnerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.

    2007-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is an institutionwide approach to identifying and responding to risks that threaten an institution's ability to achieve its objectives. Board members may use ERM to clarify the role of governance in risk management and decide whether the institution should take on new risks or reduce its current risks. Establishing…

  7. Leveraging Enterprise Risk Management: Opportunity for Greater Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.; Baird, Robert; Neugebauer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) gained a foothold in higher education during the first decade of the 21st century. College and university governing board members came to their board service with the perspective and experience of having served on corporate boards and in corporate leadership positions where ERM was in active use. Trustees asked…

  8. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci. PMID:11230937

  9. Think Locally: A Prudent Approach to Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson-Sundell, Nat

    2011-01-01

    A few articles have drawn some amount of attention specifically to the local causes of the success or failure of electronic resource management system (ERMS) implementations. In fact, it seems clear that local conditions will largely determine whether any given ERMS implementation will succeed or fail. This statement might seem obvious, but the…

  10. Multicenter Study of the Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Relationships of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates Resistant to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Ketolides in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. J.; Andreu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide, lincosamide, and ketolide mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships were characterized in a collection of 79 resistant group B streptococcus isolates obtained from neonates or pregnant women. The erm(B), erm(TR), and mef(A) genes were present in 62%, 30.4%, and 3.8% of the isolates, respectively. There was considerable clonal diversity among them. PMID:15917563

  11. Ericoid mycorrhizal root fungi and their multicopper oxidases from a temperate forest shrub

    PubMed Central

    Wurzburger, Nina; Higgins, Brian P; Hendrick, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi (ERM) may specialize in capturing nutrients from their host's litter as a strategy for regulating nutrient cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. In spite of their potential significance, we know little about the structure of ERM fungal communities and the genetic basis of their saprotrophic traits (e.g., genes encoding extracellular enzymes). Rhododendron maximum is a model ERM understory shrub that influences the nutrient cycles of montane hardwood forests in the southern Appalachians (North Carolina, USA). We sampled ERM roots of R. maximum from organic and mineral soil horizons and identified root fungi by amplifying and sequencing internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) collected from cultures and clones. We observed 71 fungal taxa on ERM roots, including known symbionts Rhizoscyphus ericae and Oidiodendron maius, putative symbionts from the Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Sebacinales, ectomycorrhizal symbionts, and saprotrophs. Supporting the idea that ERM fungi are adept saprotrophs, richness of root-fungi was greater in organic than in mineral soil horizons. To study the genetic diversity of oxidative enzymes that contribute to decomposition, we amplified and sequenced a portion of genes encoding multicopper oxidases (MCOs) from ERM ascomycetes. Most fungi possessed multiple copies of MCO sequences with strong similarities to known ferroxidases and laccases. Our findings indicate that R. maximum associates with a taxonomically and ecologically diverse fungal community. The study of MCO gene diversity and expression may be useful for understanding how ERM root fungi regulate the cycling of nutrients between the host plant and the soil environment. PMID:22408727

  12. Thinking beyond "the Way We've Always Done It"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Lila

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the future potential of electronic resources management (ERM) organization, within the development of the next-generation integrated library systems (ILS), as a very promising strategy. This also presents enormous challenges to ERM librarians though, especially on how to determine standards and workflows. The…

  13. Tools, Techniques, and Training: Results of an E-Resources Troubleshooting Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathmel, Angela; Mobley, Liisa; Pennington, Buddy; Chandler, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A primary role of any e-resources librarian or staff is troubleshooting electronic resources (e-resources). While much progress has been made in many areas of e-resources management (ERM) to understand the ERM lifecycle and to manage workflows, troubleshooting access remains a challenge. This collaborative study is the result of the well-received…

  14. Emergent Motivation to Read in Prekindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Guoguo; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Rogers, Samantha M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a measure of emergent reading motivation designed for prekindergarten children, called the Emergent Reading Motivation Scale (ERMS). The development of the ERMS was to overcome the limitation that current existing reading motivation measures are not developmentally appropriate for young children. Fifty-six…

  15. The conserved GTPase Gem1 regulates endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria connections

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Benoît; Osman, Christof; Walter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through specialized protein complexes. We recently identified the ER–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethering complex, which plays a role in phospholipid exchange between the two organelles. ERMES also has been implicated in the coordination of mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial DNA replication, and mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that these interorganelle contact sites play central regulatory roles in coordinating various aspects of the physiology of the two organelles. Here we purified ERMES complexes and identified the Ca2+-binding Miro GTPase Gem1 as an integral component of ERMES. Gem1 regulates the number and size of the ERMES complexes. In vivo, association of Gem1 to ERMES required the first of Gem1’s two GTPase domains and the first of its two functional Ca2+-binding domains. In contrast, Gem1’s second GTPase domain was required for proper ERMES function in phospholipid exchange. Our results suggest that ERMES is not a passive conduit for interorganellar lipid exchange, but that it can be regulated in response to physiological needs. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the metazoan Gem1 ortholog Miro-1 localizes to sites of ER–mitochondrial contact, suggesting that some of the features ascribed to Gem1 may be evolutionarily conserved. PMID:21825164

  16. In human T cells mifepristone antagonizes glucocorticoid non-genomic rapid responses in terms of Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 activity, but not ezrin/radixin/moesin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Eileen Jea; Hsu, Ching-Hui; Chang, Vincent Han-Jhih; Lin, Enoch Pin-Yi; Kuo, Trista Pin-Tsun; Chien, Chau-Heng; Lin, Hsiao-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and progesterone have been employed as immunosuppressive agents during pregnancy for many years. Intracellular acidification by GCs is due to a rapid non-genomic inhibition of membrane Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 (NHE1) activity and is followed by immunosuppression of PHA-stimulated proliferation. NHE1 is tethered to the cortical actin cytoskeleton through ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins within lipid rafts; these regulate cell shape, migration and resistance to apoptosis. We explored whether mifepristone (RU486), an antagonist of GCs in T cells, is able to completely block rapid non-genomic responses, namely NHE1 activity and the phosphorylation C-terminal residues of ERM proteins at threonine (cp-ERM). GCs stimulate a rapid non-genomic cp-ERM response in cells within 5min. RU486 antagonized the GC-induced rapid decrease in NHE1 activity, and arrested PHA-stimulated T cells at G0/G1 phase but had no effect on the rapid increase in cp-ERM, which persisted for 24h. However, the cp-ERM response was blocked by staurosporine in both resting and GC stimulated cells. The results of RU486 antagonized the GC induced rapid decrease in NHE1 ion transport activity, but not the increase cp-ERM. This suggests that RU486 in T cells exerts its antagonistic effects at NHE1 containing plasma membrane sites and not where cp-ERM links lipid rafts to cortical cytoskeletons. PMID:26773750

  17. Prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance among community-associated staphylococcal isolates in central Serbia.

    PubMed

    Aleksandra, A D; Misic, M S; Mira, Z V; Violeta, N M; Dragana, I T; Zoran, B M; Dejan, V S; Milanko, S D; Dejan, B D

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to most antimicrobial agents in staphylococci indicates the need for new effective agents in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. Clindamycin is considered to be one safe, effective and less costly agent. We analysed 482 staphylococcal isolates. Detection of inducible clindamycin resistance was performed by the D-test, while the presence of methylases genes: erm (A), erm (B) and erm (C), as well as, macrolide efflux gene mef was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Inducible clindamycin resistance phenotype was significantly higher in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains then in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Among analysed S. aureus isolates, the predominance of the erm (C) gene, followed by the erm (A) gene were detected. These results indicate that the D-test should be routinely performed on each staphylococcal isolates. PMID:24399388

  18. Disruption of mycorrhizal extraradical mycelium and changes in leaf water status and soil aggregate stability in rootbox-grown trifoliate orange.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Srivastava, A K; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas possess well developed extraradical mycelium (ERM) network that enlarge the surrounding soil for better acquisition of water and nutrients, besides soil aggregation. Distinction in ERM functioning was studied under a rootbox system, which consisted of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments separated by 37-μm nylon mesh with an air gap. Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae in root+hyphae compartment, and the ERM network was established between the two compartments. The ERM network of air gap was disrupted before 8 h of the harvest (one time disruption) or multiple disruptions during seedlings acclimation. Our results showed that mycorrhizal inoculation induced a significant increase in growth (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf, stem, and root biomass) and physiological characters (leaf relative water content, leaf water potential, and transpiration rate), irrespective of ERM status. Easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP) and total GRSP (T-GRSP) concentration and mean weight diameter (MWD, an indicator of soil aggregate stability) were significantly higher in mycorrhizosphere of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments than non-mycorrhizosphere. One time disruption of ERM network did not influence plant growth and soil properties but only notably decreased leaf water. Periodical disruption of ERM network at weekly interval markedly inhibited the mycorrhizal roles on plant growth, leaf water, GRSP production, and MWD in root+hyphae and hyphae chambers. EE-GRSP was the most responsive GRSP fraction to changes in leaf water and MWD under root+hyphae and hyphae conditions. It suggests that effect of peridical disruption of ERM network was more impactful than one-time disruption of ERM network with regard to leaf water, plant growth, and aggregate stability responses, thereby, implying ERM network aided in developing the host plant metabolically more active

  19. Artesunate induces ROS- and p38 MAPK-mediated apoptosis and counteracts tumor growth in vivo in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Beccafico, Sara; Morozzi, Giulio; Marchetti, Maria Cristina; Riccardi, Carlo; Sidoni, Angelo; Donato, Rosario; Sorci, Guglielmo

    2015-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma represents about 50% of soft-tissue sarcomas and 10% of malignant solid tumors in childhood. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most frequent subtype, suggested to have an origin in muscle precursor cells that fail to exit the cell cycle and terminally differentiate mainly because of overexpression of the transcription factor, PAX7, which sustains proliferation, migration and invasiveness in ERMS cells. Artesunate (ARS) is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin (ART), a natural compound well known as an antimalarial drug. However, ART and its derivatives have been found efficacious even as anticancer drugs that induce cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in several kinds of cancer. Here, we show that ARS dose-dependently induces DNA damage and apoptosis in ERMS cell lines. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of p38 MAPK have a central role in triggering ARS-mediated apoptosis in ERMS cells; indeed either the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine or the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, protects ERMS cells from ARS-induced apoptosis. Moreover, ARS treatment in ERMS cells ROS-dependently induces the expression of the myo-miRs, miR-133a and miR-206, which are down-regulated in RMS, and reduces PAX7 protein levels. Finally, ARS upregulates the expression of the adhesion molecules, NCAM and integrin β1, and reduces migration and invasiveness of ERMS cells in vitro, and ARS treatment reduces of about 50% the growth of ERMS xenografts in vivo. Our results are the first evidence of efficacy of ART derivatives in restraining ERMS growth in vivo, and suggest ARS as a potential candidate for therapeutic treatment of ERMS. PMID:26153023

  20. Disruption of mycorrhizal extraradical mycelium and changes in leaf water status and soil aggregate stability in rootbox-grown trifoliate orange

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Srivastava, A. K.; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas possess well developed extraradical mycelium (ERM) network that enlarge the surrounding soil for better acquisition of water and nutrients, besides soil aggregation. Distinction in ERM functioning was studied under a rootbox system, which consisted of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments separated by 37-μm nylon mesh with an air gap. Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae in root+hyphae compartment, and the ERM network was established between the two compartments. The ERM network of air gap was disrupted before 8 h of the harvest (one time disruption) or multiple disruptions during seedlings acclimation. Our results showed that mycorrhizal inoculation induced a significant increase in growth (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf, stem, and root biomass) and physiological characters (leaf relative water content, leaf water potential, and transpiration rate), irrespective of ERM status. Easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP) and total GRSP (T-GRSP) concentration and mean weight diameter (MWD, an indicator of soil aggregate stability) were significantly higher in mycorrhizosphere of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments than non-mycorrhizosphere. One time disruption of ERM network did not influence plant growth and soil properties but only notably decreased leaf water. Periodical disruption of ERM network at weekly interval markedly inhibited the mycorrhizal roles on plant growth, leaf water, GRSP production, and MWD in root+hyphae and hyphae chambers. EE-GRSP was the most responsive GRSP fraction to changes in leaf water and MWD under root+hyphae and hyphae conditions. It suggests that effect of peridical disruption of ERM network was more impactful than one-time disruption of ERM network with regard to leaf water, plant growth, and aggregate stability responses, thereby, implying ERM network aided in developing the host plant metabolically more active

  1. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  2. Different Distribution Patterns between Putative Ercoid Mycorrhizal and Other Fungal Assemblages in Roots of Rhododendron decorum in the Southwest of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lifu; Pei, Kequan; Wang, Fang; Ding, Qiong; Bing, Yanhong; Gao, Bo; Zheng, Yu; Liang, Yu; Ma, Keping

    2012-01-01

    Fungal diversity within plant roots is affected by several factors such as dispersal limitation, habitat filtering, and plant host preference. Given the differences in life style between symbiotic and non-symbiotic fungi, the main factors affecting these two groups of fungi may be different. We assessed the diversity of root associated fungi of Rhododendron decorum using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, and our aim was to evaluate the role of different factors in structuring ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) and non-ericoid mycorrhizal (NEM) fungal communities. Thirty-five fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found in roots of R. decorum, of which 25 were putative ERM fungal species. Of the two main groups of known ERM, helotialean fungi were more abundant and common than sebacinalean species. Geographic and host patterning of the fungal assemblages were different for ERM and NEM. The distribution of putative ERM fungal terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) showed that there were more common species within ERM than in the NEM fungal assemblages. Results of Mantel tests indicated that the composition of NEM fungal assemblages correlated with geographic parameters while ERM fungal assemblages lacked a significant geographic pattern and instead were correlated with host genotype. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that the NEM fungal assemblages were significantly correlated with latitude, longitude, elevation, mean annual precipitation (MAP), and axis 2 of a host-genetic principle component analysis (PCA), while ERM fungal assemblages correlated only with latitude and axis 1 of the host-genetic PCA. We conclude that ERM and NEM assemblages are affected by different factors, with the host genetic composition more important for ERM and geographic factors more important for NEM assemblages. Our results contribute to understanding the roles of dispersal limitation, abiotic factors and

  3. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides Among Staphylococci Isolated From the Nasal Cavity of Hospital Employees in Khorramabad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Tahmasbi, Farzad; Anbari, Khatereh; Ghafarzadeh, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus strains isolated from nasal carriers in each region can be helpful to select appropriate drugs to eradicate carriage states, control nosocomial infections and also treat patients. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile and the molecular prevalence of the ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes among Staphylococcus strains isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 Staphylococcus isolates, 51 Staphylococcus aureus, 49 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees in Khorramabad, Iran. Susceptibility pattern to macrolide antibiotics were determined using the disk diffusion method. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was applied to determine the major erythromycin-resistant genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Results Fifty-three (53%) isolates were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin (cross-resistance); while 8 (8%) isolates had variable macrolide susceptibility pattern. Among the S. aureus isolates, the difference in prevalence of resistance to erythromycin between males and females was significant (P = 0.011). The frequency of ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes were 3%, 5%, 33% and 20%, respectively. It was also found that out of 53 isolates resistant to erythromycin, 44 (83%) isolates (eight S. aureus and thirty-six CoNS strains) carried at least one of the four tested genes. Eight (8%) isolates had intermediate phenotype to erythromycin, in which 4 (50%) isolates carried ermB or ermC genes. In addition, out of 39 erythromycin-susceptible isolates, 3 (7.7%) isolates were positive for ermB or ermC genes. Conclusions No entire association was found between genotype and phenotype methods to detect macrolides-resistant isolates. In addition, distribution of genetically erythromycin

  4. Genetic engineering techniques for lactic acid bacteria: construction of a stable shuttle vector and expression vector for β-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ming; Yan, Tsong-Rong

    2014-02-01

    The shuttle vector, pUL6erm, was constructed by using a replicon from pL2, a multiple cloning site, colE1 ori, the ori of Gram-negative bacteria from vector pUC19, and the erythromycin resistance gene from pVA838 as a selection marker. pUL6erm could be transformed easily and maintained stably in Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei. Transformation assays of pUL6erm indicated that it had a narrow host range. β-Glucuronidase was induced in the presence of 0.3 M NaCl and 50 mM glutamate and expressed at 2.4 U mg(-1) with the expression vector (pUL6erm-gadR-GUS) constructed based on pUL6erm carrying β-glucuronidase gene wuth a chloride-inducible (gadR) expression cassette using Pgad as promoter. Therefore, pUL6erm and pUL6erm-gadR-GUS might be a safe and useful genetic tool for the improvement of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:24101246

  5. Evidence for a putative biomarker for substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jeanette; James, Lisa M

    2009-09-01

    Electrodermal response modulation (ERM) reflects the reduction in skin conductance response to an aversive stimulus that is temporally predictable relative to when it is unpredictable. Poor ERM is associated with substance dependence (SD). It was hypothesized that ERM is a putative biomarker for SD rather than for externalizing disorders generally. Participants included 83 controls (no SD, antisocial personality disorder [PD] or borderline PD), 52 participants with SD only (SD and no PD), 12 with PD only (antisocial and/or borderline PD and no SD), and 35 comorbid (having SD and PD). Diagnoses at definite and probable certainty levels were used and were determined by semistructured clinical interviews. ERM was calculated from skin conductance responses to predictable and unpredictable 2-s 110-dB white noise blasts. As expected, the SD-only and comorbid groups had significantly lower ERM scores than the control group, which did not differ significantly from the PD-only group. Results provide preliminary evidence that ERM is a putative biomarker for SD. Future research should examine cognitive correlates of ERM in an effort to understand why it relates to SD. PMID:19769433

  6. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2–mediated Phosphorylation of Ezrin Is Required for G Protein-coupled Receptor–dependent Reorganization of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Sarah H.; Pitcher, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates and desensitizes activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we identify ezrin as a novel non-GPCR substrate of GRK2. GRK2 phosphorylates glutathione S-transferase (GST)-ezrin, but not an ezrin fusion protein lacking threonine 567 (T567), in vitro. These results suggest that T567, the regulatory phosphorylation site responsible for maintaining ezrin in its active conformation, represents the principle site of GRK2-mediated phosphorylation. Two lines of evidence indicate that GRK2-mediated ezrin-radixinmoesin (ERM) phosphorylation serves to link GPCR activation to cytoskeletal reorganization. First, in Hep2 cells muscarinic M1 receptor (M1MR) activation causes membrane ruffling. This ruffling response is ERM dependent and is accompanied by ERM phosphorylation. Inhibition of GRK2, but not rho kinase or protein kinase C, prevents ERM phosphorylation and membrane ruffling. Second, agonist-induced internalization of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and M1MR is accompanied by ERM phosphorylation and localization of phosphorylated ERM to receptor-containing endocytic vesicles. The colocalization of internalized β2AR and phosphorylated ERM is not dependent on Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor binding to the β2AR. Inhibition of ezrin function impedes β2AR internalization, further linking GPCR activation, GRK activity, and ezrin function. Overall, our results suggest that GRK2 serves not only to attenuate but also to transduce GPCR-mediated signals. PMID:15843435

  7. Prevalence and mechanisms of erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae from healthy pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sandra; Radhouani, Hajer; Coelho, Céline; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Carvalho, Eulália; Carvalho, José António; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Torres, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2009-06-01

    We sought to determine the resistance phenotypes for erythromycin and clindamycin and the mechanisms implicated in 93 Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from healthy pregnant women. Susceptibility testing for erythromycin, clindamycin, penicillin, cefotaxime, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, choramphenicol, ofloxacin, and meropenen was carried out by disc-diffusion test, and the E-test was also applied for erythromycin and clindamycin. The constitutive MLS(B) resistance (cMLS(B)) and inducible MLS(B) resistance (iMLS(B)) phenotypes, respectively, as well as the M resistance phenotype were determined by the erythromycin-clindamycin double-disc test. The presence of ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA, and mef(A/E) macrolide resistance genes was studied by PCR. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 15% and 9.6% of the isolates, respectively. The resistance phenotypes detected among the 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates were as follows (number of isolates): cMLS(B) (9), iMLS(B) (3), and M (2). The MICs for erythromycin and clindamycin were as follows: cMLS(B) isolates (128-256 and >or=32 mg/L, respectively), iMLS(B) isolates (16-256 and 1 mg/L), and M isolates (2-8 and 1 mg/L). The following combination of genes were detected among isolates with cMLS(B) or iMLS(B) phenotypes: erm(B) (6 isolates), ermA + ermTR (3), ermA + ermB + ermTR (1), and none of these genes (2). The two isolates with M phenotype harbored the mef(A/E), and msrA gene was also found in one of them. PMID:19432524

  8. High Incidence of Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance among Streptococcus Agalactiae Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    EMANEINI, Mohammad; MIRSALEHIAN, Akbar; BEIGVIERDI, Reza; FOOLADI, Abbas Ali Imani; ASADI, Fatemeh; JABALAMELI, Fereshteh; TAHERIKALANI, Morovat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococci (GBS) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes a wide range of infections including neonatal sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and soft tissue or urinary tract infections. Material and methods: One hundred and fifteen isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae collected from urine specimens of patients attending a hospital in Tehran. All isolates were screened for their capsular types and genes encoding resistance to the macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics by PCR and multiplex PCR–based methods. Results: Most of isolates belonged to capsular types III (49%), V (19%), II (16%), and Ib (6%). Twelve isolates (10%) were nontypable. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and Quinupristin-dalfopristin, but were resistant to clindamycin (35%), chloramphenicol (45%), erythromycin (35%), linezolid (1%) and tetracycline (96%). The most prevalent antimicrobial resistance gene was tetM found in 93% of the isolates followed by ermTR, ermB, and tetK, found in 23%, 16%, and 16% of isolates, respectively. The genes, tetL, tetO, ermA, ermC and mefA were not detected in any of the S. agalactiae isolates. Of the 110 tetracycline resistant S. agalactiae, 89 isolates harbored the tetM gene alone and eighteen isolates carried the tetM gene with the tetK gene. All erythromycin-resistant isolates exhibited cMLSB resistance phenotype, 22 isolates harbored the ermTR gene alone and five isolates carried the ermTR gene with the ermB gene. The rate of coexistence of genes encoding the erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants was 34%. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that S. agalactiae isolates obtained from urine samples showed a high rate of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and macrolide antibiotics and were commonly associated with the resistance genes temM, ermTR or ermB. PMID:25705271

  9. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus hominis strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Makowska, Nicoletta; Bosacka, Karolina; Słotwińska, Anna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria from the blood and the predominant cause of nosocomial infections. Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, especially erythromycin and clindamycin, are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections. Among CoNS, Staphylococcus hominis represents the third most common organism. In spite of its clinical significance, very little is known about its mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, especially MLSB. Fifty-five S. hominis isolates from the blood and the surgical wounds of hospitalized patients were studied. The erm(C) gene was predominant in erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates. The methylase genes, erm(A) and erm(B), were present in 15 and 25 % of clinical isolates, respectively. A combination of various erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes was detected in 15 % S. hominis isolates. The efflux gene msr(A) was detected in 18 % of isolates, alone in four isolates, and in different combinations in a further six. The lnu(A) gene, responsible for enzymatic inactivation of lincosamides was carried by 31 % of the isolates. No erythromycin resistance that could not be attributed to the genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C) and msr(A) was detected. In S. hominis, 75 and 84 %, respectively, were erythromycin resistant and clindamycin susceptible. Among erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates, 68 % of these strains showed the inducible MLSB phenotype. Four isolates harbouring the msr(A) genes alone displayed the MSB phenotype. These studies indicated that resistance to MLSB in S. hominis is mostly based on the ribosomal target modification mechanism mediated by erm genes, mainly the erm(C), and enzymatic drug inactivation mediated by lnu(A). PMID:26253583

  10. [Fate of ARB and ARGs During Wastewater Treatment Process of Spiramycin Production].

    PubMed

    Qin, Cai-xia; Tong, Juan; Shen, Pei-hong; Wei, Yuan-song

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance gene(ARG) pose great risk to both environment and human health. This study aimed to investigate the fate of macrolide resistant bacteria, six macrolide resistance genes ermB, ermF, ermX, mefA, ereA, mphB and three transfer elements ISCR1, intIl and Tn916/1545 during wastewater biological treatment processes of spiramycin production. Samples were collected from an antibiotic wastewater treatment station in different seasons. Results showed that the total heterotrophs and Enterococci were mostly removed during wastewater biological treatment, with the reduction of 1. 6-2. 1 logs for total heterotrophs and of 3. 7 logs for Enterococci, respectively. For 94 antibiotic resistant Enterococci individually isolated from four different treatment units including adjusting tank, anaerobic tank, anoxic tank, and aerobic tank, all of these strains showed resistance to spiramycin, azithromycin, erythromycin, and clarithromycin; moreover, the antibiotic resistance rates was not reduced in the effluent. Results of PCR and quantitative PCR showed that 80% of antibiotic resistant Enterococci were positive for PCR amplification of erAB, but negative for PCR amplification of other genes. Concentrations of ermB and ermF were peaked in the spring and autumn samples. Resistance genes of ermB, ermF, mefA, ereA, mphB and transfer element of Tn916/1545 were reduced to some degree during antibiotic production wastewater treatment, but concentrations of ermX, intIl, ISCRl in the effluent were higher than those in the influent. The abundance of mefA, ereA and Tn916/1545 were reduced during wastewater treatment process, and the better removal performance for mefA, ereA, Tn916/1545 occurred in spring than in autumn; however, the abundance of ermX, intI1 and ISCR1 were increased. PMID:26717693

  11. Detection of macrolide and disinfectant resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major source of infections associated with indwelling medical devices. Many antiseptic agents are used in hygienic handwash to prevent nosocomial infections by Staphylococci. Our aim was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance to quaternary ammonium compound of 46 S. aureus strains and 71 CoNS. Methods S. aureus (n = 46) isolated from auricular infection and CoNS (n = 71), 22 of the strains isolated from dialysis fluids and 49 of the strains isolated from needles cultures were investigated. Erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and mef) were analysed by multiplex PCR and disinfectant-resistant genes (qacA, qacB, and qacC) were studied by PCR-RFLP. Results The frequency of erythromycin resistance genes in S. aureus was: ermA+ 7.7%, ermB+ 13.7%, ermC+ 6% and msrA+ 10.2%. In addition, the number of positive isolates in CoNS was respectively ermA+ (9.4%), ermB+ (11.1%), ermC+ (27.4%), and msrA+ (41%). The MIC analyses revealed that 88 isolates (74%) were resistant to quaternary ammonium compound-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC). 56% of the BC-resistant staphylococcus isolates have at least one of the three resistant disinfectants genes (qacA, qacB and qacC). Nine strains (7.7%) among the CoNS species and two S. aureus strains (2%) harboured the three-qac genes. In addition, the qacC were detected in 41 strains. Conclusions Multi-resistant strains towards macrolide and disinfectant were recorded. The investigation of antibiotics and antiseptic-resistant CoNS may provide crucial information on the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:22032892

  12. Identifying risks in the realm of enterprise risk management.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    An enterprise risk management (ERM) discipline is comprehensive and organization-wide. The effectiveness of ERM is governed in part by the strength and breadth of its practices and processes. An essential element in decision making is a thorough process by which organizational risks and value opportunities can be identified. This article will offer identification techniques that go beyond those used in traditional risk management programs and demonstrate how these techniques can be used to identify risks and opportunity in the ERM environment. PMID:26789745

  13. Localisation of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors to cells of vascular and avascular epiretinal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Hackett, S.; Schoenfeld, C.; Vinores, M.; Vinores, S.; Campochiaro, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Epiretinal membranes (ERMs) arise from a variety of causes or, in some cases, for unknown reasons. Once established, ERMs tend to progress, becoming more extensive and exerting increasing traction along the inner surface of the retina. One possible cause for their progression is the production of growth factors by cells within ERMs that may provide autocrine or paracrine stimulation. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors have been localised to cells of ERMs and may play such a role. In this study, comparative data were sought for several other growth factors that have been implicated in ERM formation.
METHODS—Immunohistochemical staining of ERMs was done for PDGF-A, PDGF-B, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), three isoforms of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and flk-1/KDR. Expression of flt-1 and flk-1/KDR was examined in cultured retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and retinal glia from postmortem eyes by immunohistochemistry and by reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
RESULTS—Staining was most intense and most frequently observed for VEGF and PDGF-A, both in vascular and avascular ERMs. The majority of cells stained for VEGF in nine of 11 (81.8%) diabetic ERMs and in 14 of 24 (58.3%) proliferative vitreoretinopathy ERMs. The receptors for VEGF, flt-1, and flk-1/KDR were also identified on cells in ERMs and on cultured RPE cells. By RT-PCR, mRNA for flt-1 was identified in RPE cells and retinal glia, and mRNA for flk-1/KDR was identified in RPE cells.
CONCLUSIONS—These data show that VEGF and its receptors are localised to both vascular and avascular ERMs and suggest that VEGF, like PDGF-A, may be an autocrine and paracrine stimulator that may contribute to progression of vascular and avascular ERMs.

 PMID:9486038

  14. Environmental Enterprise Risk Management Benefits for a Government Contractor

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Guinn

    2012-05-01

    An often overlooked advantage that an Environmental Enterprise Risk Management System (ERMS) has to organizations is the added protection from the Civil False Claims Act (FCA) for activities under a government contract.

  15. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  16. Adaptor Protein Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 (CCM3) Mediates Phosphorylation of the Cytoskeletal Proteins Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin by Mammalian Ste20-4 to Protect Cells from Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Fidalgo, Miguel; Guerrero, Ana; Fraile, María; Iglesias, Cristina; Pombo, Celia M.; Zalvide, Juan

    2012-01-01

    While studying the functions of CCM3/PDCD10, a gene encoding an adaptor protein whose mutation results in vascular malformations, we have found that it is involved in a novel response to oxidative stress that results in phosphorylation and activation of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins. This phosphorylation protects cells from accidental cell death induced by oxidative stress. We also present evidence that ERM phosphorylation is performed by the GCKIII kinase Mst4, which is activated and relocated to the cell periphery after oxidative stress. The cellular levels of Mst4 and its activation after oxidative stress depend on the presence of CCM3, as absence of the latter impairs the phosphorylation of ERM proteins and enhances death of cells exposed to reactive oxygen species. These findings shed new light on the response of cells to oxidative stress and identify an important pathophysiological situation in which ERM proteins and their phosphorylation play a significant role. PMID:22291017

  17. Novel Root-Fungus Symbiosis in Ericaceae: Sheathed Ericoid Mycorrhiza Formed by a Hitherto Undescribed Basidiomycete with Affinities to Trechisporales

    PubMed Central

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, Jesse J.; Kohout, Petr; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Nestby, Rolf; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Ericaceae (the heath family) are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed ‘sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza’, discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity) to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet remain

  18. DNA in Antibiotic Preparations: Absence of Intact Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Lagler, Heimo; Graninger, Wolfgang; Burgmann, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Fragments of erm(E2), otrA, and aph(6) shorter than 400 bp and producer strain-specific rRNA genes were amplified from various antibiotics. The amount of genetic material and the sizes of amplicons recovered from murine feces after oral administration of a β-lactamase-encoding plasmid indicated substantial DNA degradation in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. These observations imply that antibiotics are no major source for horizontal resistance gene transfer in clinical settings. PMID:15917552

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacillus Strains Isolated from Primary Starters for African Traditional Bread Production and Characterization of the Bacitracin Operon and Bacitracin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Kim I.; Thorsen, Line; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Abdelgadir, Warda S.; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Derkx, Patrick M. F.; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus spp. are widely used as feed additives and probiotics. However, there is limited information on their resistance to various antibiotics, and there is a growing concern over the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. The MIC for 8 antibiotics was determined for 85 Bacillus species strains, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis (n = 29), Bacillus licheniformis (n = 38), and Bacillus sonorensis (n = 18), all of which were isolated from starters for Sudanese bread production. All the strains were sensitive to tetracycline (8.0 mg/liter), vancomycin (4.0 mg/liter), and gentamicin (4.0 mg/liter) but resistant to streptomycin. Sensitivity to clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin was species specific. The erythromycin resistance genes ermD and ermK were detected by PCR in all of the erythromycin-resistant (MIC, ≥16.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strains and one erythromycin-sensitive (MIC, 4.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strain. Several amino acid changes were present in the translated ermD and ermK nucleotide sequences of the erythromycin-sensitive strain, which could indicate ErmD and ErmK protein functionalities different from those of the resistance strains. The ermD and ermK genes were localized on an 11.4-kbp plasmid. All of the B. sonorensis strains harbored the bacitracin synthetase gene, bacA, and the transporter gene bcrA, which correlated with their observed resistance to bacitracin. Bacitracin was produced by all the investigated species strains (28%), as determined by ultra-high-definition quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHD-QTOF LC/MS). The present study has revealed species-specific variations in the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Bacillus spp. and provides new information on MIC values, as well as the occurrence of resistance genes in Bacillus spp., including the newly described species B. sonorensis. PMID:22941078

  20. MicroRNA-200b Impacts Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Regulating Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hong; Yu, Haizhong; Yuan, Jianfen; Guo, Chunyan; Cao, Hongyan; Li, Weibing; Xiao, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) plays an important role in multiple links of tumors. It also involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and might be a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Another study suggested that ERM expression was regulated directly by miR-200c, and had a critical role in miR-200c suppressing cell migration. This study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-200b on ERM expression in a breast cancer cell line and its influence on invasion and metastasis ability in vitro. Material/Methods Breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different metastatic potentials were selected as a model. MiR-200b overexpression or inhibition was achieved by Lipofectamine™ 2000-mediated miRNA transfection. RT-PCR was used to test miR-200b level, while Western blot was selected to detect ERM protein expression. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were performed to determine cell migration and invasion ability. Results RT-PCR revealed that miR-200b level in MDA-MB-231 was obviously lower than that in MCF-7, while Western blot analysis showed that ERM expression was significantly higher. MiR-200b inhibition by transfection in MCF-7 markedly decreased miR-200b level, elevated ERM expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. MiR-200b overexpression in MDA-MB-231 obviously increased miR-200b level, reduced ERM expression, and weakened cell migration and invasion. Conclusions MiR-200b participates in breast cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating ERM in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. PMID:27276064

  1. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Helcococcus kunzii and molecular analysis of macrolide and tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Vergne, A; Guérin, F; Lienhard, R; Le Coustumier, A; Daurel, C; Isnard, C; Marty, N; Poyart, C; Cattoir, V

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the recent advent of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology, Helcococcus kunzii is now easily identifiable and considered as an opportunistic pathogen. However, data about antimicrobial susceptibilities remain very limited. The aim of the study was, then, to assess its in vitro susceptibility to 18 antimicrobial agents and to investigate the genetic basis of macrolide and tetracycline resistance. Thirty-nine human clinical isolates of H. kunzii collected from 2008 to 2013 were studied, as well as the type strain ATCC 51366(T). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, tigecycline, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, daptomycin, cotrimoxazole and rifampin were determined by the microdilution method. Screening for macrolide [erm(A) including erm(TR), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), erm(X), msr(A) and mef(A)] and tetracycline [tet(L), tet(M) and tet(O)] resistance genes was performed, as well as the detection of mutations in 23S rRNA. Except for one strain resistant to cefotaxime, all strains were categorised as susceptible to β-lactams, glycopeptides, linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline. Whereas ciprofloxacin and gentamicin exhibited limited activity, 95% of strains were categorised as susceptible to levofloxacin. Concerning erythromycin, a bimodal distribution was observed, with 29 'wild-type' strains (MICs from 0.25 to 2 mg/L) and 11 'resistant' strains (MICs ≥ 256 mg/L), including ten harbouring erm(TR). Two isolates exhibited acquired tetracycline resistance (MICs of 16 mg/L) by the production of tet(M). This large study on the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of H. kunzii suggests that β-lactams (especially penicillins) should be preferred for the treatment. PMID:26194694

  2. Significant groundwater input to a coastal plain estuary: assessment from excess radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. C.

    2003-01-01

    A submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) zone was identified through the investigation of persistent excess radon in the Delaware River and Bay Estuary. This zone, the excess radon maximum (ERM), was located approximately 82 km upstream from the mouth of the Delaware Bay. Water column radon activity at the ERM was elevated relative to the radon activity observed outside of this zone and was as high as 2.73 dpm l -1. A radon budget model developed to assess the contribution of multiple radon sources to the ERM indicated that simple molecular diffusion from sediments could not support the observed excess radon activity; an additional source of radon is required to sustain the excess radon activity in the ERM. A groundwater flux of 14-29 m 3 s -1 from the two aquifers that subcrop on the Delmarva Peninsula immediately west of the ERM can support the excess radon observed in the water column. The stratigraphy and hydrology of these aquifers make them likely sources of the groundwater discharge that results in the ERM. The calculated SGD flux is equivalent to the surface water discharge of the second and third largest tributary rivers of the Delaware Estuary.

  3. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm. PMID:27151950

  4. Mycoparasitism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a pathway for the entry of saprotrophic fungi into roots.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Nathalie; Declerck, Stéphane; de la Providencia, Ivan E

    2010-08-01

    Within the rhizosphere, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi interact with a cohort of microorganisms, among which is the biological control agent, Trichoderma spp. This fungus parasitizes a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, a phenomenon also reported in the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of AM fungi. Here, we question whether the mycoparasitism of the ERM could be extended to the intraradical mycelium (IRM), thus representing a pathway for the entry of Trichoderma harzianum within the root. Microcosm experiments allowing interactions between Glomus sp. MUCL 41833 placed in a clade that contains the recently described species Glomus irregulare and T. harzianum were set up under in vitro autotrophic culture conditions using potato as a host. A microscope camera-imaging system, coupled with succinate dehydrogenase staining, was used to assess the mycoparasitism in the ERM and IRM. Trichoderma harzianum colonized the ERM of the AM fungus and spread into the IRM, before exiting into the root cells. Intrahyphal growth of T. harzianum caused protoplasm degradation, decreasing the ERM and IRM viability. ERM of the AM fungus represented a pathway for the entry of T. harzianum into the roots of potato. It further sets off the debate on the susceptibility of the AM fungi of being infected by microorganisms from the rhizosphere. PMID:20533946

  5. The Mediator complex subunit MED25 is targeted by the N-terminal transactivation domain of the PEA3 group members

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Verreman, Kathye; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2013-01-01

    PEA3, ERM and ER81 belong to the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors and play important roles in a number of tissue-specific processes. Transcriptional activation by PEA3 subfamily factors requires their characteristic amino-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD). However, the cellular targets of this domain remain largely unknown. Using ERM as a prototype, we show that the minimal N-terminal TAD activates transcription by contacting the activator interacting domain (ACID)/Prostate tumor overexpressed protein 1 (PTOV) domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. We further show that depletion of MED25 disrupts the association of ERM with the Mediator in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MED25 as well as the overexpression of MED25-ACID and MED25-VWA domains efficiently inhibit the transcriptional activity of ERM. Moreover, mutations of amino acid residues that prevent binding of MED25 to ERM strongly reduce transactivation by ERM. Finally we show that siRNA depletion of MED25 diminishes PEA3-driven expression of MMP-1 and Mediator recruitment. In conclusion, this study identifies the PEA3 group members as the first human transcriptional factors that interact with the MED25 ACID/PTOV domain and establishes MED25 as a crucial transducer of their transactivation potential. PMID:23531547

  6. Predicting stress in benthic communities of southeastern U.S. estuaries in relation to chemical contamination of sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, J.L.; Dolah, R.F. van; Snoots, T.R.

    1999-11-01

    Matching data on sediment contaminants (metals, PAHs, PCBs) and macroinfaunal community structure from 231 subtidal stations in southeastern US estuaries were used to develop a framework for evaluating risks of benthic impacts from multiple-contaminant exposure. Sediment contamination was expressed as the mean ratio of individual contaminant concentrations relative to corresponding sediment quality guidelines, that is, to effects range-median (ERM) values, probable effects level (PEL) values, or an aggregate of the two. The probability of a degraded benthos was relatively low in samples with mean ERM quotients {le}0.020, PEL quotients {le}0.035, or combined ERM/PEL quotients {le}0.024. Only 5% of stations within these ranges had degraded benthic assemblages, while 95% had healthy assemblages. A higher probability of benthic impacts was observed in samples with mean ERM quotients >0.058, PEL quotients >0.096, or ERM/PEL quotients >0.077. Seventy-three to 78% of stations with values in these upper ranges had degraded benthic assemblages, while 22 to 27% had healthy assemblages. Only four stations (three with degraded, one with healthy assemblages) had mean ERM or PEL quotients >1.0, which is the beginning of the range associated with a high probability of mortality in short-term laboratory toxicity tests using amphipods.

  7. Ovarian embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare manifestation of the DICER1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Kock, Leanne; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Traubici, Jeffrey; Malkin, David; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Stewart, Colin J R; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2015-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Certain ERMSs are associated with the DICER1 syndrome, a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germ-line DICER1 mutations. Characteristic somatic mutations have also been identified in DICER1-associated tumor types. These "hotspot" mutations affect the catalytic activity of the DICER1 ribonuclease IIIb domain. Primary ovarian ERMS (oERMS) is extremely rare. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an oERMS harboring 2 DICER1 mutations. The girl also exhibited other DICER1 phenotypes: cystic nephroma (CN) and multinodular goiter. Somatic investigations of the CN identified a hotspot DICER1 mutation different from that in the oERMS. Significantly, the CN presented at 12 years of age, which is much older than the previously reported age range of susceptibility. This report documents the occurrence of DICER1 mutations in a case of oERMS, expanding the spectrum of DICER1-associated tumors. PMID:25836323

  8. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction. We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated. A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = −0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = −0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0

  9. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction.We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated.A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = -0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = -0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0.022).Following lens

  10. Genetic basis of resistance waves among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from milk and meat products in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Attia, A M; Abd El-Hamid, M I; El-Shorbagy, I M; Abd El-Kader, S A

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious problem for clinicians worldwide. The present study attempted to evaluate the susceptibility patterns of MRSA to various antimicrobials and the prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance as well as the relevant antibiotic and antiseptic resistance genes among these isolates. Totally, 40 MRSA isolates were recovered from examined milk and meat product samples (18.60%). Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was remarkably observed among 85% of these isolates. There was a good correlation between phenotypic determination of methicillin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and tetracycline resistances and PCR detections of mecA, blaZ and tet(K) genes, respectively, but norA gene was not detected in the four ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. Although, 55% of MRSA expressed resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BC), neither qacA/B nor smr gene was detected. Of 20 isolates exhibiting erythromycin- clindamycin discordant resistance pattern, 8 displayed positive double disk diffusion (D-zone) test denoting inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotype with the inducibly expressed erm(A) and erm(C) genes in 87.5% of these isolates. Besides, the remaining 12 isolates showed MS phenotype (resistant to macrolides and type B streptogramins only) with a variety of erm(A), mph(C), msr(A) or a combination of these genes including erm(C). Finally, the constitutive MLSB phenotype with the constitutive expression of erm(A), erm(B) and erm(C) genes was comprised in 2 isolates with higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for erythromycin (512 and 1024 µg/ml) and clindamycin (16 and 32 µg/ml). These findings suggested the importance of monitoring the evolution of MRSA resistance. PMID:27609468

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of antibiotic-resistant lactic acid bacteria from poultry and swine meat products.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Lucia; Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Silvestri, Gloria; Vignaroli, Carla; Clementi, Francesca

    2007-03-01

    The transfer via the food chain from animals to humans of microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents is of increasing concern. To determine the contributions of nonpathogenic microflora to the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in the food chain, 123 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 29 samples of raw and processed pork and chicken meat products that had previously tested positive for one or more AR genes that encode clinically relevant ARs: tet(M), tet(O), tet(K), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), aac (6')-Ie aph (2")-Ia, mecA, and blaZ. All of the isolates were initially tested for their AR gene profiles by PCR. The 59 isolates carrying a tet, erm, or blaZ gene were taken through molecular identification, analyzed by determination of the MIC, and subjected to genetic fingerprinting. Lactococcus garvieae was the predominant species (28 isolates), followed by Lactobacillus plantarum (11 isolates) and L. salivarius (6 isolates), whereas Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. crispatus, and L. brevis were identified at lower frequencies. The tet(M) and erm(B) genes were the most frequently detected. Assessment of multiple resistances in 18 tet positive (tet+) isolates revealed that tet(M) plus erm(B) and tet(K) plus erm(B) were the most frequent AR gene patterns. Partial sequencing of the tet(M) open reading frame of three selected strains showed high sequence similarities (> 99%) with tet(M) genes previously found in human pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Neisseria meningitidis). Southern hybridization with plasmid profiles revealed these strains contained tet(M)-carrying plasmids. PMID:17388042

  12. Reflectivity and thickness analysis of epiretinal membranes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyan, Ajay E.; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Smiddy, William E.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare thickness and reflectivity spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in patients with idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs), before and after ERM peeling surgery, with normal controls. METHODS A retrospective study analyzed SD-OCTs of eyes with ERMs undergoing ERM peeling surgery by one surgeon from 2008 to 2010 and normal control eyes. SD-OCTs were analyzed using a customized algorithm to measure reflectivity and thickness. The relationship between the SD-OCT findings and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) outcomes was also studied. RESULTS Thirty-four ERM eyes and 12 normal eyes were identified. Preoperative eyes had high reflectivity and thickness of the group of layers from the internal limiting membrane (ILM) to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the group of layers from the ILM to the external limiting membrane (ELM). The values of reflectivity of these two groups of layers decreased postoperatively, but were still higher than normal eyes. In contrast, preoperative eyes had lower reflectivity of two 10×15 pixel regions of interest (ROIs) incorporating: 1) ELM + outer nuclear layer (ONL) and 2) photoreceptor layer (PRL) + RPE, compared to controls. The values of reflectivity of these ROIs increased postoperatively, but were still lower than normal controls. A larger improvement in BCVA postoperatively was correlated with a greater degree of abnormal preoperative reflectivity and thickness findings. CONCLUSION Quantitative differences in reflectivity and thickness between preoperative, postoperative, and normal SD-OCTs allow assessment of changes in the retina secondary to ERM. Our study identified hyperreflective inner retina changes and hyporeflective outer retina changes in patients with ERMs. SD-OCT quantitative measures of reflectivity and/or thickness of specific groups of retinal layers and/or ROIs correlate with improvement in BCVA. PMID:26949617

  13. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Shamira J.; Moura, Natalia S.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. PMID:26269619

  14. Identification and characterization of proliferative retinopathy-related long noncoding RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Rong-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Yao, Jin; Shen, Yi; Chen, Sai-Nan; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2015-09-25

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery, which can lead to severe vision reduction. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in many biological processes and disease development. We attempted to determine the role of lncRNAs in the setting of PVR. Microarray analysis revealed that 78 lncRNAs were abnormally expressed in the epiretinal membranes (ERMs) of PVR patients, including 48 up-regulated and 30 down-regulated lncRNA transcripts. We subsequently focus on one lncRNA, MALAT1, and investigated its expression pattern in the biofluid of PVR patients. MALAT1 was significantly up-regulated in the cellular and plasma fraction of peripheral blood in PVR patients. MALAT1 expression was obviously reduced after PVR operation. In vitro experiments revealed the role of MALAT1 in regulating RPE proliferation and migration, which is critical for ERMs formation. This study suggests that lncRNAs are the potential regulators of PVR pathology. MALAT1 is a potential prognostic indicator and a target for the diagnosis and gene therapy for PVR diseases. - Highlights: • 78 lncRNAs are differentially expressed between PVR-ERMs and secondary ERMs. • MALAT1 level is elevated in the ERMs of PVR patients. • Circulating MALAT1 level is up-regulated in PVR patients. • MALAT1 knockdown regulates RPE proliferation and migration.

  15. Role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Shigeo; Kaplan, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a potentially blinding fibrotic complication. It is caused by the formation and contraction of epiretinal membranes (ERMs) that ultimately lead to retinal folds and traction retinal detachments. While multiple cell types have been identified in ERMs, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells have long been implicated as a key player in the pathophysiology of PVR. Clinical and experimental evidence has shown that RPE cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to adopt a fibroblastic phenotype. Cell-cell adhesions maintained by adherens and tight junctions are important for the maintenance of RPE phenotype, and disruption of these junctional complexes results in EMT via activation of signaling pathways such as β-catenin/Wnt and Hippo signaling, as well as transcription factors involving Zeb1, Snail, and ZONAB. Upon EMT, RPE cells can further differentiate into myofibroblasts in the presence of TGF-β with cytoskeletal tension mediated by RhoGTPase. These fibroblasts and myofibroblasts derived from RPE cells can contribute to ERM formation by cell migration, proliferation and matrix modification, and play a key role in ERM contraction. It is not solely the proliferation of these cells that results in PVR but rather the contraction of these cells in the ERM. PMID:26675400

  16. Effects of RAS on the genesis of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Langenau, David M.; Keefe, Matthew D.; Storer, Narie Y.; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Le, Xiuning; Goessling, Wolfram; Neuberg, Donna S.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2007-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is a devastating cancer with specific features of muscle differentiation that can result from mutational activation of RAS family members. However, to date, RAS pathway activation has not been reported in a majority of ERMS patients. Here, we have created a zebrafish model of RAS-induced ERMS, in which animals develop externally visible tumors by 10 d of life. Microarray analysis and cross-species comparisons identified two conserved gene signatures found in both zebrafish and human ERMS, one associated with tumor-specific and tissue-restricted gene expression in rhabdomyosarcoma and a second comprising a novel RAS-induced gene signature. Remarkably, our analysis uncovered that RAS pathway activation is exceedingly common in human RMS. We also created a new transgenic coinjection methodology to fluorescently label distinct subpopulations of tumor cells based on muscle differentiation status. In conjunction with fluorescent activated cell sorting, cell transplantation, and limiting dilution analysis, we were able to identify the cancer stem cell in zebrafish ERMS. When coupled with gene expression studies of this cell population, we propose that the zebrafish RMS cancer stem cell shares similar self-renewal programs as those found in activated satellite cells. PMID:17510286

  17. INTRAOPERATIVE SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING AFTER INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING IN IDIOPATHIC EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE WITH CONNECTING STRANDS

    PubMed Central

    NAM, DONG HEUN; DESOUZA, PHILIP J.; HAHN, PAUL; TAI, VINCENT; SEVILLA, MONICA B.; TRAN-VIET, DU; CUNEFARE, DAVID; FARSIU, SINA; IZATT, JOSEPH A.; TOTH, CYNTHIA A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the intraoperative optical coherence tomography findings in idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) with connecting strands and to describe the postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective, case series study within a prospective observational intraoperative optical coherence tomography imaging study was performed. Epiretinal membranes with connecting strands were characterized on preoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images and assessed against corresponding intraoperative (after internal limiting membrane [ILM] peeling) and postoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. Results Eleven locations of the connecting strands in 7 eyes were studied. The connecting strands had visible connections from the inner retinal surface to the ERM in all locations, and the reflectivity was moderate in 8 locations and high in 3 locations. After ERM and ILM peeling, disconnected strands were identified in all of the intraoperative optical coherence tomography images. The reflectivity of the remaining intraoperative strands was higher than that of the preoperative lesions and appeared as “finger-like” and branching projections. The remaining disconnected lesions were contiguous with the inner retinal layers. Postoperatively, the intraoperative lesions disappeared completely in all locations, and recurrent formation of ERM was not identified in any eyes. Conclusion In ERM eyes with connecting strands, intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging showed moderately to highly reflective sub-ILM finger-like lesions that persist immediately after membrane and ILM peeling. Postoperatively, the hyperreflective lesions disappeared spontaneously without localized nerve fiber layer loss. The sub-ILM connecting strands may represent glial retinal attachments. PMID:25829349

  18. Ezrin and Moesin Are Required for Efficient T Cell Adhesion and Homing to Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily J. H.; Shaffer, Meredith H.; Williamson, Edward K.; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K.

    2013-01-01

    T cell trafficking between the blood and lymphoid organs is a complex, multistep process that requires several highly dynamic and coordinated changes in cyto-architecture. Members of the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) family of actin-binding proteins have been implicated in several aspects of this process, but studies have yielded conflicting results. Using mice with a conditional deletion of ezrin in CD4+ cells and moesin-specific siRNA, we generated T cells lacking ERM proteins, and investigated the effect on specific events required for T cell trafficking. ERM-deficient T cells migrated normally in multiple in vitro and in vivo assays, and could undergo efficient diapedesis in vitro. However, these cells were impaired in their ability to adhere to the β1 integrin ligand fibronectin, and to polarize appropriately in response to fibronectin and VCAM-1 binding. This defect was specific for β1 integrins, as adhesion and polarization in response to ICAM-1 were normal. In vivo, ERM-deficient T cells showed defects in homing to lymphoid organs. Taken together, these results show that ERM proteins are largely dispensable for T cell chemotaxis, but are important for β1 integrin function and homing to lymphoid organs. PMID:23468835

  19. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. PMID:25637268

  20. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  1. Effects of tylosin use on erythromycin resistance in enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Barrett, John B; Ladely, Scott R

    2004-07-01

    The effect of tylosin on erythromycin-resistant enterococci was examined on three farms; farm A used tylosin for growth promotion, farm B used tylosin for treatment of disease, and farm C did not use tylosin for either growth promotion or disease treatment. A total of 1,187 enterococci were isolated from gestation, farrowing, suckling, nursery, and finishing swine from the farms. From a subset of those isolates (n = 662), 59% (124 out of 208), 28% (80 out of 281), and 2% (4 out of 170) were resistant to erythromycin (MIC >/= 8 microg/ml) from farms A, B, and C, respectively. PCR analysis and Southern blotting revealed that 95% (65 out of 68) of isolates chosen from all three farms for further study were positive for ermB, but all were negative for ermA and ermC. By using Southern blotting, ermB was localized to the chromosome in 56 of the isolates while 9 isolates from farms A and B contained ermB on two similar-sized plasmid bands (12 to 16 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolates were genetically diverse and represented a heterogeneous population of enterococci. This study suggests that although there was resistance to a greater number of enterococcal isolates on a farm where tylosin was used as a growth promotant, resistant enterococci also existed on a farm where no antimicrobial agents were used. PMID:15240302

  2. Variability in the Gulf of Alaska from Geosat altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Born, George H.; Emery, W. J.; Leben, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite altimetry was used to examine annual and interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska region. Crossover data from the Geosat Geodetic Mission (GM) and collinear data from the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) were processed separately to form sea surface height anomalies at grid points. The time series from the GM and ERM were then combined to produce a 3.75-year data set. The time series from the ERM data set agreed fairly well with hydrographic dynamic heights at several locations, with an average correlation of 0.70 between the two data sets. The combined and ERM altimetric data sets were analyzed using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These revealed variability that occurs primarily on annual and interannual time scales. A comparison with EOF analysis of the atmospheric pressure field during the same time periods showed that the annual variation in pressure seemed to be reflected in both the combined and ERM altimetric data sets. The amplitude time series of the first mode in the combined data set was very similar to the North Pacific pressure index during the 1985-1989 time frame. The maximum correlation was at a lag of 250 days. Finally, an interannual mode was present in all three data sets which was closely linked to the baroclinic variations measured by the hydrographic data.

  3. Investigation of postoperative intraocular pressure in cases of silicone oil removal using 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy with oblique incisions

    PubMed Central

    Takashina, Hirotsugu; Watanabe, Akira; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) in cases of silicone oil (SO) removal when using 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy (TSV) with oblique incisions. Methods We enrolled ten consecutive eyes with SO removal (SO group) and eleven consecutive eyes with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) as the initial vitrectomy (ERM group) in cases using 25-gauge TSV with oblique incisions. Postoperative IOPs were compared between the two groups at each of the four examination periods. Results No significant differences were identified in any of the periods examined. Conclusion The use of 25-gauge TSV with oblique incisions resulted in almost equivalent postoperative IOPs between cases with SO removal and idiopathic ERM as the initial operation. Self-sealing sclerotomy in 25-gauge TSV with oblique incisions may primarily involve the valve architecture, and be complemented by vitreous incarceration. PMID:26508831

  4. Evidence for an Unanticipated Relationship Between Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Brian P.; Nishijo, Koichi; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Yi, Xiaolan; Schuetze, David P.; Pal, Ranadip; Prajapati, Suresh I.; Abraham, Jinu; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Chen, Qing-Rong; Davis, Sean; McCleish, Amanda T.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Michalek, Joel E.; Zarzabal, Lee Ann; Khan, Javed; Yu, Zhongxin; Parham, David M.; Barr, Frederic G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Chen, Yidong; Keller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) shows the most myodifferentiation amongst sarcomas, yet the precise cell of origin remains undefined. Using Ptch1, p53 and/or Rb1 conditional mouse models and controlling prenatal or postnatal myogenic cell of origin, we demonstrate that eRMS and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) lie in a continuum, with satellite cells predisposed to giving rise to UPS. Conversely, p53 loss in maturing myoblasts gives rise to eRMS, which have the highest myodifferentiation potential. Irrespective of origin, Rb1 loss modifies tumor phenotype to mimic UPS. In human sarcomas that lack pathognomic chromosomal translocations, p53 loss of function is prevalent whereas Shh or Rb1 alterations likely act primarily as modifiers. Thus, sarcoma phenotype is strongly influenced by cell of origin and mutational profile. PMID:21316601

  5. Another Estimate for the Percentage of Partly Embayed Craters in Equilibrium Resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, P. J.

    1996-03-01

    When choosing between different scenarios of Venus' resurfacing history, one of the objections against an Equilibrium Resurfacing Model (ERM) is an apparent lack of craters that have suffered a partial embayment by lava flows of outside origin. Any test of ERM so far, be it numeric or analytic in nature, has failed to predict anything even near the observed ~5% of partly embayed craters (PECs) without violating the statistics of crater distribution. This study is mainly based on straightening out as many as possible of the simplifications that have been employed while estimating the statistical implications of the ERM. As a result, the expectation value for PECs falls to less than 10% from previous ~30%.

  6. Estimation of quality factors by energy ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zong-Jun; Cao, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Qu, Ying-Ming; Yuan, Dian; Yang, Jin-Hao; Shao, Guan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    The quality factor Q, which reflects the energy attenuation of seismic waves in subsurface media, is a diagnostic tool for hydrocarbon detection and reservoir characterization. In this paper, we propose a new Q extraction method based on the energy ratio before and after the wavelet attenuation, named the energy-ratio method (ERM). The proposed method uses multipoint signal data in the time domain to estimate the wavelet energy without invoking the source wavelet spectrum, which is necessary in conventional Q extraction methods, and is applicable to any source wavelet spectrum; however, it requires high-precision seismic data. Forward zero-offset VSP modeling suggests that the ERM can be used for reliable Q inversion after nonintrinsic attenuation (geometric dispersion, reflection, and transmission loss) compensation. The application to real zero-offset VSP data shows that the Q values extracted by the ERM and spectral ratio methods are identical, which proves the reliability of the new method.

  7. Precise orbit computation for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Bruce J.; Born, George H.; Rosborough, George W.; Marsh, James G.; Williamson, Ronald G.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from an extensive investigation of orbit-determination strategies for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The goal is to establish optimum geodetic parameters and procedures for the computation of the most accurate Geosat orbits possible and to apply these procedures for routine computation during the ERM for the following purposes: (1) to enhance the value of the Geosat oceanographic investigations by providing the user community with improved ephemerides, (2) to develop orbit determination techniques for the upcoming altimetric mission Topex/Poseidon, and (3) to assess the radial orbit accuracy obtainable with recently developed gravity models. To this end, ephemerides for the entire first year of the ERM have been computed using the GEODYN II orbit program on the Cyber 205 supercomputer system at the NASA Goddard.

  8. Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Adult’s Vocal Cord: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yining; Fu, Zhongying; Chen, Weilun; Yang, Lixin; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas (ERMS) represent the most common (50% - 60%) clinical form of rhabdomyosarcoma, these are extremely rare in adult’s vocal cords. To date, only five cases of laryngeal ERMS have been reported in adults and only one of them involved the vocal cords. Case Presentation: Herein, we reported a case of a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with ERMS, T1N0M0 stage, localized at the right vocal cord. Tumor was successfully treated with a radical excision and selective neck dissection and followed-up for 5 years with no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusions: Immunohistochemistry combined with computerized tomography (CT) and color Doppler solography of the neck and thorax should be performed. This study suggested that surgical resection was suitable for the treatment of this disease and reported the evaluations of an extremely rare case for five years. PMID:26430531

  9. A mouse model of rhabdomyosarcoma originating from the adipocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hatley, Mark E.; Tang, Wei; Garcia, Matthew R.; Finkelstein, David; Millay, Douglas P.; Liu, Ning; Graff, Jonathan; Galindo, Rene L.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive skeletal muscle-lineage tumor composed of malignant myoblasts that fail to exit the cell cycle and are blocked from fusing into syncytial muscle. Rhabdomyosarcoma includes two histolopathologic subtypes: alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, driven by the fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 or PAX7-FOXO1, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), which is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we show that adipocyte-restricted activation of Sonic Hedgehog signaling through expression of a constitutively active Smoothened allele in mice gives rise to aggressive skeletal muscle tumors that display the histologic and molecular characteristics of human ERMS with high penetrance. Our findings suggest that adipocyte progenitors can be a cell of origin for Sonic Hedgehog-driven ERMS, showing that RMS can originate from non-skeletal muscle precursors. PMID:23079662

  10. Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin family proteins in the regulation of B cell immune response

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Gupta, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton is essential for numerous cellular processes including B and T cell activation and migration. The Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin (ERM) family proteins play structural and regulatory roles in the rearrangement of plasma membrane flexibility and protrusions through their reversible interaction with cortical actin filaments and plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrate that ERM proteins are not only involved in cytoskeletal organization but also offer a platform for the transmission of signals in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli through their ability to crosslink transmembrane receptors with downstream signaling components. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge and recent progress made towards elucidating a novel role of ERM proteins in the regulation of B function in health and disease. PMID:25746045

  11. Pursuing enterprise risk management: a local road map for Canadian healthcare leaders.

    PubMed

    Haney, James R; Church, John; Cockerill, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of organizational risk management in healthcare, and in particular the concepts of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), has identified a 5-part model that can be used by Canadian healthcare leaders as an evidence-supported approach to successful organizational risk management. The Model for Organizational Risk Management, termed "the Model," has been developed as a basis for linking the components of an ERM Framework into a Canadian health organization to overcome the barriers that commonly disrupt strategic risk management. The Model addresses how an ERM Framework can fit within an existing health organization by building off and enhancing existing processes and resources to ensure familiarity, acceptance, and sustainability of the risk management program. By approaching the Model in a stepwise fashion (based on individual organizational context), healthcare leaders are provided with a road map from which to advance their own organizational risk management program. PMID:24409582

  12. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity. PMID:26987019

  13. Statin medication in patients with epiretinal membrane is associated with low intravitreal EPO, TGF-beta-1, and VEGF levels

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Raimo; Loukovaara, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    Background In eyes with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM), the intravitreal growth factor and cytokine levels may associate with postvitrectomy outcomes. Here, we have analyzed the perioperative intravitreal protein levels of potent vasoactive, proinflammatory, and extracellular matrix-remodeling factors in iERM eyes and evaluated the postvitrectomy outcomes. Methods This was an institutional, observational study. Eyes operated on for iERM (n=26) were analyzed according to the use of statin medication. Vitreous samples were subjected to protein measurements of angiopoietin-1 and -2, erythropoietin, transforming growth factor-β1, and vascular endothelial growth factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 by gelatin zymography. One-month visual outcomes and 1-year revitrectomy rates were recorded. Results In iERM eyes of patients taking statins, intravitreal levels of erythropoietin (mean ± standard deviation, 10.8±4.9 vs 82.9±119.5 mIU/mg, P=0.003), transforming growth factor-β1 (2.3±4.7 vs 15.8±16.3 pg/mg, P=0.035), and vascular endothelial growth factor (5.5±9.9 vs 236.6±491.6 pg/mg, P=0.006) were lower than in nonstatin-treated patients. At 1-month, visual gain did not significantly differ between iERM eyes of patients with statins and those without (improvement 0.27±0.20 vs 0.16±0.38 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units, P=0.118). Conclusion Systemic statin therapy might have a favorable effect on intravitreal factors involved in vascular permeability, inflammation, and fibroproliferation in aging human iERM eyes. PMID:27284236

  14. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of tigecycline against multiresistant Gram-positive cocci containing tetracycline resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Borbone, Sonia; Lupo, Agnese; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Campanile, Floriana; Santagati, Maria; Stefani, Stefania

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to test the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 117 clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens and to correlate this activity with their resistance gene content. Overall, tigecycline showed a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) range of 0.015-0.5mg/L, able to inhibit potently all multiresistant streptococci, enterococci and MR staphylococci. Tigecycline was active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and enterococci, with MICs for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90)) of 0.25 mg/L and 0.12 mg/L, respectively, being more active than linezolid (MIC(90)=2 mg/L) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (MIC(90)=0.5 and 2-4 mg/L, respectively). Molecular characterisation of resistance determinants demonstrated the concomitant presence of different classes of genes: in particular, tet(M), erm(B) and erm(C) in Streptococcus agalactiae; tet(O), variably associated with different erm genes, in Streptococcus pyogenes; vanA, tet(M) and erm(B) in Enterococcus faecalis, and vanA and erm(B) in Enterococcus faecium. All the MRSA strains harboured SCCmec and erm genes and 50% possessed tet(K) with tet(M) genes. Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were only resistant to erythromycin. These results clearly demonstrate that tigecycline has a MIC(90) range of 0.015-0.5 mg/L both against tetracycline-susceptible and -resistant isolates carrying other resistance determinants, suggesting that this drug could play an important role in the treatment of infections caused by these multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:17646087

  15. Direct detection of antibiotic resistance genes in specimens of chicken and pork meat.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Vignaroli, Carla; Zandri, Giada; Aquilanti, Lucia; Bordoni, Donatella; Osimani, Andrea; Clementi, Francesca; Biavasco, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) in bacteria, a major threat to human health, has emerged in the last few decades as a consequence of the selective pressure exerted by the widespread use of antibiotics in medicine, agriculture and veterinary practice and as growth promoters in animal husbandry. The frequency of 11 genes [tet(M), tet(O), tet(K), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), vanA, vanB, aac (6')-Ie aph (2'')-Ia, mecA, blaZ] encoding resistance to some antibiotics widely used in clinical practice was analysed in raw pork and chicken meat and in fermented sausages as well as in faecal samples from the relevant farm animals using a molecular approach based on PCR amplification of bacterial DNA directly extracted from specimens. Some of the 11 AR genes were highly prevalent, the largest number being detected in chicken meat and pig faeces. The genes found most frequently in meat were tet(K) and erm(B); vanB and mecA were the least represented. All 11 determinants were detected in faecal samples except mecA, which was found only in chicken faeces. erm(B) and erm(C) were detected in all faecal samples. The frequency of AR genes was not appreciably different in meat compared to faecal specimens of the relevant animal except for vanB, which was more prevalent in faeces. Our findings suggest that AR genes are highly prevalent in food-associated bacteria and that AR contamination is likely related to breeding rather than processing techniques. Finally, the cultivation-independent molecular method used in this work to determine the prevalence of AR genes in foods proved to be a rapid and reliable alternative to traditional tools. PMID:17005283

  16. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  17. Detection of a Common and Persistent tet(L)-Carrying Plasmid in Chicken-Waste-Impacted Farm Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hilpert, Markus; Ward, Mandy J.

    2012-01-01

    The connection between farm-generated animal waste and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in soil microbial communities, via mobile genetic elements, remains obscure. In this study, electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveying of a broiler chicken farm assisted soil sampling from a chicken-waste-impacted site and a marginally affected site. Consistent with the EMI survey, a disparity existed between the two sites with regard to soil pH, tetracycline resistance (Tcr) levels among culturable soil bacteria, and the incidence and prevalence of several tet and erm genes in the soils. No significant difference was observed in these aspects between the marginally affected site and several sites in a relatively pristine regional forest. When the farm was in operation, tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), and erm(C) genes were detected in the waste-affected soil. Two years after all waste was removed from the farm, tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), and erm(C) genes were still detected. The abundances of tet(L), tet(O), and erm(B) were measured using quantitative PCR, and the copy numbers of each were normalized to eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. tet(L) was the most prevalent gene, whereas tet(O) was the most persistent, although all declined over the 2-year period. A mobilizable plasmid carrying tet(L) was identified in seven of 14 Tcr soil isolates. The plasmid's hosts were identified as species of Bhargavaea, Sporosarcina, and Bacillus. The plasmid's mobilization (mob) gene was quantified to estimate its prevalence in the soil, and the ratio of tet(L) to mob was shown to have changed from 34:1 to 1:1 over the 2-year sampling period. PMID:22389375

  18. The Prevalence and Incidence of Epiretinal Membranes in Eyes With Inactive Extramacular CMV Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Vaidya, Vijay; Van Natta, Mark L.; Pak, Jeong W.; May, K. Patrick; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the prevalence and incidence of epiretinal membranes (ERM) in eyes with inactive extramacular cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods. A case–control report from a longitudinal multicenter observational study by the Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (SOCA) Research Group. A total of 357 eyes of 270 patients with inactive CMV retinitis and 1084 eyes of 552 patients with no ocular opportunistic infection (OOI) were studied. Stereoscopic views of the posterior pole from fundus photographs were assessed at baseline and year 5 visits for the presence of macular ERM. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence and 5-year incidence of ERM in eyes with and without CMV retinitis at enrollment. Crude and adjusted logistic regression was performed adjusting for possible confounders. Main outcome measures included the prevalence, incidence, estimated prevalence, and incidence odds ratios. Results. The prevalence of ERM at enrollment was 14.8% (53/357) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 1.8% (19/1084) in eyes with no OOI. The incidence of ERM at 5 years was 18.6% (16/86) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 2.4% (6/253) in eyes with no OOI. The crude odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval, CI) for prevalence was 9.8 (5.5–17.5) (P < 0.01). The crude OR (95% CI) for incidence was 9.4 (3.2–27.9) (P < 0.01). Conclusions. A history of extramacular CMV retinitis is associated with increased prevalence and incidence of ERM formation compared to what is seen in eyes without ocular opportunistic infections in AIDS patients. PMID:24925880

  19. In vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance--a model study in chickens.

    PubMed

    Marosevic, D; Cervinkova, D; Vlkova, H; Videnska, P; Babak, V; Jaglic, Z

    2014-07-16

    The influence of specific and non-specific antibiotic pressure on in vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance was evaluated in this study. Chickens repeatedly inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis harbouring the plasmid pAMβ1 carrying the erm(B) gene were perorally treated for one week with tylosin, lincomycin (both specific antibiotic pressure) and chlortetracycline (non-specific antibiotic pressure). Antibiotic non-treated but E. faecalis inoculated chickens served as a control. To quantify the erm(B) gene and characterise intestinal microflora, faecal DNA was analysed by qPCR and 454-pyrosequencing. Under the pressure of antibiotics, a significant increase in erm(B) was observed by qPCR. However, at the final stage of the experiment, an increase in erm(B) was also observed in two out of five non-treated chickens. In chickens treated with tylosin and chlortetracycline, the increase in erm(B) was accompanied by an increase in enterococci. However, E. faecalis was at the limit of detection in all animals. This suggests that the erm(B) gene spread among the gut microbiota other than E. faecalis. Pyrosequencing results indicated that, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacteria could be responsible for the spread of MLSB resistance. Different species of MLSB-resistant enterococci and streptococci were isolated from cloacal swabs during and after the treatment. PFGE analysis of MLSB-resistant enterococci revealed four clones, all differing from the challenge strain. All of the MLSB-resistant isolates harboured a plasmid of the same size as pAMβ1. This study has shown that MLSB resistance may spread within the gut microbiota under specific and non-specific pressure and even in the absence of any antimicrobial pressure. Finally, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacterial species seems to be involved in the spread of MLSB resistance. PMID:24467930

  20. Sicheres Navigieren in dynamischen Umgebungen mit 3D-Kollisionsvermeidung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiene, Stefan; Hertzberg, Joachim

    Diese Papier stellt eine neuartige Methode vor, die 3D-Hindernisvermeidung ermöglicht. Die Sensorkonfiguration beruht auf sechs Laserscannern, die die gesamte Roboteroberfläche abdecken. Die Daten der sechs Laserscanner werden zu einem virtuellen, zweidimensionalen, horizontal ausgerichteten 360°-Laserscanner kombiniert. Da der virtuelle Laserscanner die 3D-Umgebung in einem zweidimensionalen Datensatz repräsentiert, ermöglicht er in Kombination mit klassischen Hindernisvermeidungsalgorithmen wie der Vector Field Histogram Methode eine 3D-Hindernisvermeidung.

  1. [Juvenile idiopathic epiretinal membrane].

    PubMed

    Kontopoulou, K; Krause, S; Fili, S; Hayvazov, S; Schilling, H; Kohlhaas, M

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is very rare in adolescent patients. The pathogenesis remains unclear although the role of hyalocytes is of major importance. The clinical features in young patients are different from those in older patients. We describe a case of iERM in a 15-year-old girl who presented with metamorphopsia of the right eye. This case report presents the basis for the decision for surgical treatment as well as the clinical features at follow-up examination 9 months after surgery. PMID:26458892

  2. A Novel Erythromycin Resistance Plasmid from Bacillus Sp. Strain HS24, Isolated from the Marine Sponge Haliclona Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Dara; Morrissey, John P.; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the origin and natural reservoirs of resistance determinants is fundamental to efficiently tackle antibiotic resistance. This paper reports the identification of a novel 5.8 kb erythromycin resistance plasmid, from Bacillus sp. HS24 isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans. pBHS24B has a mosaic structure and carries the erythromycin resistance gene erm(T). This is the first report of an erythromycin resistance plasmid from a sponge associated bacteria and of the Erm(T) determinant in the genus Bacillus. PMID:25548909

  3. Baroclinic internal wave energy distribution in the Baltic Sea derived from 45 years of circulation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Artem; Soomere, Tarmo; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andrey; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Markus Meier, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves and internal tides are an essential component of the functioning of stratified shelf seas. They carry substantial amounts of energy through the water masses, drive key hydrophysical processes such as mixing and overturning and support the functioning of marine ecosystem in many ways. Their particular impact becomes evident near and at the bottom where they often create substantial loads to engineering structures and exert a wide range of impacts on the bottom sediments and evolution of the seabed. We analyse several properties of spatio-temporal distributions of energy of relatively long-period large-scale internal wave motions in the Baltic Sea. The analysis is based on numerically simulated pycnocline variations that are extracted from the hydrographic data calculated by the Rossby Centre Ocean circulation model (RCO) for the entire Baltic Sea for 1961-2005. This model has a horizontal resolution of 2 nautical miles and uses 41 vertical layers with a thickness between 3 m close to the surface and 12 m in 250 m depth. The model is forced with atmospheric data derived from the ERA-40 re-analysis using a regional atmosphere model with a horizontal resolution of 25 km. It also accounts for river inflow and water exchange through the Danish Straits. See (Meier, H.E.M., Höglund, A., 2013. Studying the Baltic Sea circulation with Eulerian tracers, in Soomere, T., Quak, E., eds., Preventive Methods for Coastal Protection, Springer, Cham, Heidelberg, 101-130) for a detailed description of the model and its forcing. The resolution of the model output used in this study (once in 6 hours) is sufficient for estimates of spectral amplitudes of the displacements of isopycnal surfaces with a typical period of 2-12 days. We provide the analysis of kinetic and potential energy of motions with these periods. The resulting maps of the maxima of energy and spatial distributions of near-bottom velocities have been evaluated for the entire simulation interval of 45

  4. 46 CFR 11.325 - Requirements to qualify for an STCW endorsement as chief engineer officer on vessels powered by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Engineroom resource management (ERM) if not completed at the operational level. (ii) Leadership and... at the operational level. (2) Leadership and managerial skills. (3) Management of electrical and... more (management level). 11.325 Section 11.325 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  5. Combined Exact-Repeat and Geodetic Mission Altimetry for High-Resolution Empirical Tide Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaron, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    The configuration of present and historical exact-repeat mission (ERM) altimeter ground tracks determines the maximum resolution of empirical tidal maps obtained with ERM data. Although the mode-1 baroclinic tide is resolvable at mid-latitudes in the open ocean, the ability to detect baroclinic and barotropic tides near islands and complex coastlines is limited, in part, by ERM track density. In order to obtain higher resolution maps, the possibility of combining ERM and geodetic mission (GM) altimetry is considered, using a combination of spatial thin-plate splines and temporal harmonic analysis. Given the present spatial and temporal distribution of GM missions, it is found that GM data can contribute to resolving tidal features smaller than 75 km, provided the signal amplitude is greater than about 1 cm. Uncertainties in the mean sea surface and environmental corrections are significant components of the GM error budget, and methods to optimize data selection and along-track filtering are still being optimized. Application to two regions, Monterey Bay and Luzon Strait, finds evidence for complex tidal fields in agreement with independent observations and modeling studies.

  6. Europäisches Organ der Festkörperforschung und DDR-Devisenbringer Die Zeitschrift Physica Status Solidi im Kalten Krieg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    Mit dem Ziele, ein einheitliches internationales Organ der Festkörperphysik für den europäischen Raum zu schaffen, das eine rasche Publikation der für das Festkörpergebiet repräsentative Arbeiten ermöglicht, wird durch ein internationales Herausgebergremium eine neue wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift gegründet.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Human Adult Epithelial Stem Cells from the Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, M; Papagerakis, P; Papagerakis, S

    2015-11-01

    We report a novel method for the isolation of adult human epithelial stem cells (hEpiSCs) from the epithelial component of the periodontal ligament-the human epithelial cell rests of Malassez (hERM). hEpiSC-rich integrin-α6(+ve) hERM cells derived by fluorometry can be clonally expanded, can grow organoids, and express the markers of pluripotency (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2), polycomb protein RING1B, and the hEpiSC supermarker LGR5. They maintain the growth profile of their originating hERM in vitro. Subcutaneous cotransplantation with mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp on poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds in nude mice gave rise to perfect heterotopic ossicles in vivo with ultrastructure of dentin, enamel, cementum, and bone. These remarkable fully mineralized ossicles underscore the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in tissue regeneration using human progenitor stem cells, which may have already committed to lineage despite maintaining hallmarks of pluripotency. In addition, we report the clonal expansion and isolation of human LGR5(+ve) cells from the hERM in xeno-free culture conditions. The genetic profile of LGR5(+ve) cells includes both markers of pluripotency and genes important for secretory epithelial and dental epithelial cell differentiation, giving us a first insight into periodontal ligament-derived hEpiSCs. PMID:26392003

  8. Multiple independent emergence of biotype 2 Yersinia ruckeri in the United States and Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotype 2 (BT2) variants of the bacterium Yersinia ruckeri are an emerging disease problem in US and European salmonid aquaculture. The emergence of this biotype has been associated with an increased frequency of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) outbreaks in previously vaccinated salmonid fish. We use...

  9. Meeting the Challenges of Enterprise Risk Management in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattie, John

    2007-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) and the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) held a summit on enterprise risk management (ERM) in Washington DC with senior officers and trustees from several leading colleges and universities. Approximately 40…

  10. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene. PMID:16258826

  11. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A’. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A’. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them. PMID:27008373

  12. Expression, Localization, and Binding Activity of the Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin Proteins in the Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Kurobo, Miho; Sai, Yoshimichi; Iseki, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins represent a family of adaptor proteins linking transmembrane proteins to the cytoskeleton. The seminiferous epithelium undergoes extensive changes in cellular composition, location, and shape, implicating roles of the membrane–cytoskeleton interaction. It remains unknown, however, whether the ERM proteins are expressed and play significant roles in the testis. In the present study, we examined the spatiotemporal expression of ERM proteins in the mouse testis by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Ezrin immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of steps 15 and 16 spermatids from 5 weeks postpartum through adulthood, whereas radixin immunoreactivity was in the apical cytoplasm of Sertoli cells from 1 week through 2 weeks postpartum. No immunoreactivity for moesin was detected at any age. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that ezrin was bound to the cytoskeletal component actin, whereas radixin was bound to both actin and tubulin. Of the transmembrane proteins known to interact with ERM proteins, only cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a chloride transporter, was bound to ezrin in elongated spermatids. These results suggest that ezrin is involved in spermiogenesis whereas radixin is involved in the maturation of Sertoli cells, through interaction with different sets of membrane proteins and cytoskeletal components. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:351–362, 2009) PMID:19064715

  13. Characterisation of geographically and temporally diverse Yersinia ruckeri isolates: evidence that UK and mainland European biotype 2 isolates represent different clonal groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been increased reports of outbreaks of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) caused by Yersinia ruckeri in previously-vaccinated salmonids in Europe, with some of these outbreaks attributed to emergent non-motile, Tween 80 negative, biotype 2 isolates. To gain information about their likely orig...

  14. The correlation between visual acuity outcomes and optical coherence tomography parameters following surgery for diabetic epiretinal membrane and taut posterior hyaloid

    PubMed Central

    Güngel, Hülya; Öztürker, Zeynep Kayaarası; Zırtıloğlu, Sibel; Eltutar, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between visual outcomes and the determinants detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in eyes with epiretinal membrane (ERM) and/or taut posterior hyaloid (TPH) that underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Materials and methods A total of 30 participants with diabetic ERM and TPH were included in the study. All study participants underwent PPV. Preoperative and postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), macular RNFL, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, and ganglion cell complex thicknesses were measured in each participant. Linear regression analyses were performed to determine the association between the OCT parameters and the visual acuity measured at the time of the OCT measurement. Results The postoperative BCVA logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) values were statistically higher than the preoperative values in the ERM group and TPH group (P=0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). The postoperative BCVA logMAR value was negatively correlated with average RNFL, inferior RNFL thicknesses, and image quality (P=0.002, P=0.004, and P=0.006, respectively). The preoperative and postoperative BCVA logMAR value difference was not correlated with age and all of the OCT parameters measured (P>0.05). Conclusion This study shows that achievement of better peripapillary RNFL thickness results in better visual outcome after PPV and ERM/TPH removal. PMID:26316690

  15. Targeting hedgehog signaling reduces self-renewal in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Satheesha, S; Manzella, G; Bovay, A; Casanova, E A; Bode, P K; Belle, R; Feuchtgruber, S; Jaaks, P; Dogan, N; Koscielniak, E; Schäfer, B W

    2016-04-21

    Current treatment regimens for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common pediatric soft tissue cancer, rely on conventional chemotherapy, and although they show clinical benefit, there is a significant risk of adverse side effects and secondary tumors later in life. Therefore, identifying and targeting sub-populations with higher tumorigenic potential and self-renewing capacity would offer improved patient management strategies. Hedgehog signaling has been linked to the development of embryonal RMS (ERMS) through mouse genetics and rare human syndromes. However, activating mutations in this pathway in sporadic RMS are rare and therefore the contribution of hedgehog signaling to oncogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show by genetic loss- and gain-of-function experiments and the use of clinically relevant small molecule modulators that hedgehog signaling is important for controlling self-renewal of a subpopulation of RMS cells in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. In addition, hedgehog activity altered chemoresistance, motility and differentiation status. The core stem cell gene NANOG was determined to be important for ERMS self-renewal, possibly acting downstream of hedgehog signaling. Crucially, evaluating the presence of a subpopulation of tumor-propagating cells in patient biopsies identified by GLI1 and NANOG expression had prognostic significance. Hence, this work identifies novel functional aspects of hedgehog signaling in ERMS, redefines the rationale for its targeting as means to control ERMS self-renewal and underscores the importance of studying functional tumor heterogeneity in pediatric cancers. PMID:26189795

  16. Usability Testing for e-Resource Discovery: How Students Find and Choose e-Resources Using Library Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Amy; Rich, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, library staff at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) in Ohio designed and conducted a usability study of key parts of the library web site, focusing on the web pages generated by the library's electronic resources management system (ERM) that list and describe the library's databases. The goal was to discover how users find and…

  17. A consolidated environmental monitoring plan for Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    The US Army operates facilities in Edgewood and Aberdeen under several licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Compliance with each license is time consuming and could potentially result in duplicated efforts to demonstrate compliance with existing environmental regulations. The goal of the ERM plan is to provide the sampling necessary to ensure that operations at Edgewood and Aberdeen are within applicable regulatory guidelines and to provide a means of ensuring that adverse effects to the environment are minimized. Existing sampling plans and environmental data generated from those plans are briefly reviewed as part of the development of the present ERM plan. The new ERM plan was designed to provide data that can be used for assessing risks to the environment and to humans using Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. Existing sampling is modified and new sampling is proposed based on the results of the long-term DU fate study. In that study, different environmental pathways were identified that would show transport of DU at Aberdeen. Those pathways would also be impacted by other radioactive constituents from Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. The ERM plan presented in this document includes sampling from Edgewood and Aberdeen facilities. The main radioactive constituents of concern at Edgewood are C, P, N, S, H, I, Co, Cs, Ca, Sr and U that are used in radiolabeling different compounds and tracers for different reactions and syntheses. Air and water sampling are the thrust of efforts at the Edgewood area.

  18. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  19. Getting insight into the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in specimens of marketed edible insects.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Vesna; Osimani, Andrea; Pasquini, Marina; Aquilanti, Lucia; Garofalo, Cristiana; Taccari, Manuela; Cardinali, Federica; Riolo, Paola; Clementi, Francesca

    2016-06-16

    This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of 11 transferable antibiotic resistance (AR) genes [erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), vanA, vanB, tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), tet(K), mecA, blaZ] in 11 species of marketed edible insects (small crickets powder, small crickets, locusts, mealworm larvae, giant waterbugs, black ants, winged termite alates, rhino beetles, mole crickets, silkworm pupae, and black scorpions) in order to provide a first baseline for risk assessment. Among the AR genes under study, tet(K) occurred with the highest frequency, followed by erm(B), tet(S) and blaZ. A high variability was seen among the samples, in terms of occurrence of different AR determinants. Cluster Analysis and Principal Coordinates Analysis allowed the 11 samples to be grouped in two main clusters, one including all but one samples produced in Thailand and the other including those produced in the Netherlands. PMID:27046628

  20. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel lincomycin derivatives. I. Enhancement of antibacterial activities by introduction of substituted azetidines.

    PubMed

    Kumura, Ko; Wakiyama, Yoshinari; Ueda, Kazutaka; Umemura, Eijiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Shitara, Eiki; Fushimi, Hideki; Yoshida, Takuji; Ajito, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis and antibacterial activity of (7S)-7-sulfur-azetidin-3-yl lincomycin derivatives are described. Modification was achieved by a simple reaction of (7R)-7-O-methanesulfonyllincomycin and the corresponding substituted azetidine-2-thiol. Several compounds first showed moderate antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes with erm gene as lincomycin derivatives. PMID:26758495

  1. Species Identification and Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of 278 Clinical Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria Isolates.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenjuan; Duan, Hongfei; Huang, Hairong; Lu, Yu; Chu, Naihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to analyze different species' proportion of nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) and susceptibility to clarithromycin of different species. 278 clinical NTM isolates were identified into species by using 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65. Then clarithromycin susceptibility testing against different species was done separately, using microplate Alamar Blue assay. Finally, resistance isolates' erm(41) of M. abscessus were sequenced in order to analyze mechanisms for clarithromycin resistant. In this test, 131 isolates (47%) belonged to M. avium complex (MAC), and 70 isolates (25%) belonged to M. abscessus. Nearly all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus resistant to clarithromycin had T28 in erm(41). However, all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus susceptible to clarithromycin had C28 in erm(41). In this study, we find that MAC was the most common pathogens of NTM, and the second one was M. abscessus. However, M. chelonei, M. fuerth, and M. gordon were rare. Clarithromycin had a good inhibition activity against all the NTM species except M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. The erm(41) genotype is of high relevance to clarithromycin resistance. PMID:26146620

  2. Species Identification and Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of 278 Clinical Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wenjuan; Duan, Hongfei; Huang, Hairong; Lu, Yu; Chu, Naihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to analyze different species' proportion of nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) and susceptibility to clarithromycin of different species. 278 clinical NTM isolates were identified into species by using 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65. Then clarithromycin susceptibility testing against different species was done separately, using microplate Alamar Blue assay. Finally, resistance isolates' erm(41) of M. abscessus were sequenced in order to analyze mechanisms for clarithromycin resistant. In this test, 131 isolates (47%) belonged to M. avium complex (MAC), and 70 isolates (25%) belonged to M. abscessus. Nearly all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus resistant to clarithromycin had T28 in erm(41). However, all the M. abscessus subsp. abscessus susceptible to clarithromycin had C28 in erm(41). In this study, we find that MAC was the most common pathogens of NTM, and the second one was M. abscessus. However, M. chelonei, M. fuerth, and M. gordon were rare. Clarithromycin had a good inhibition activity against all the NTM species except M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. The erm(41) genotype is of high relevance to clarithromycin resistance. PMID:26146620

  3. Electronic Resource Management 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Technologies as Cost-Effective Alternatives to an Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Designed to assist with the management of e-resources, electronic resource management (ERM) systems are time- and fund-consuming to purchase and maintain. Questions of system compatibility, data population, and workflow design/redesign can be difficult to answer; sometimes those answers are not what we'd prefer to hear. The two primary functions…

  4. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes. PMID:16008619

  5. Yersinia ruckeri lipopolysaccharide is necessary and sufficient for eliciting a protective immune response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric redmouth disease (ERM), caused by Yersinia ruckeri, has been controlled successfully using immersion-applied bacterin vaccines for several decades. While the host response to vaccination and the mechanism of protection of this vaccine have been elucidated, the bacterial components eliciting ...

  6. Restoration of retinal layers after epiretinal membrane peeling

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, K. I.; Schuster, A. K.; Bartsch, D.-U.; Kim, J. S.; Chhablani, J.; Freeman, W. R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the morphological restoration of retinal anatomy after surgery for epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Correlation of retinal structure with visual outcome. Design Retrospective consecutive case series Methods 34 consecutive eyes with epiretinal membrane underwent surgery with one year follow up examination. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were analyzed pre-operatively and 1 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-operative. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) using ETDRS charts was measured at each visit. Results All eyes showed a significant improvement of BCVA after ERM-peeling (p=0.002). The timepoint of BCVA and retinal restoration seen on SD-OCT occurred simultaneously and varied between individuals (occurrence of BCVA: mean 4.82 months; retinal restoration: mean 4.24 months). At 3-months, the retinal anatomic restoration rate was 70% and 88% at 6-months. Conclusion Restoration of the retinal anatomic structure predominantly occurs within the first three months post ERM peeling. An improvement of BCVA and anatomic retinal restoration after ERM-removal varies in individuals. If retinal layers fully restore in their anatomic structure, BCVA improves at the same time-point. PMID:24077089

  7. Immunolocalization of calbindin D28k and vitamin D receptor during root formation of murine molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Tomoyuki; Okawa, Rena; Murakami, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Ooshima, Takashi; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    Cells in the epithelial rest of Malassez (ERM cells) express calbindin D28k (CB); however, the hormonal regulation of CB in ERM cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the immunohistochemical localization of CB and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR) during root formation of mouse molar teeth in order to clarify whether the expression of CB in ERM cells is dependent on vitamin D. At the early stage of root formation (postnatal (PN) days 10-14), both CB- and VDR-immunoreactive cells were observed intermittently along the root surface. In the apical portion, almost all CB-immunoreactive cells showed VDR immunoreactivity; however, VDR-immunoreactive cells in the most apical portion were immunonegative for CB. In the middle and cervical portions, the distributions of the two proteins were completely different. At the late stage of root formation (PN28d) and in adult animals, CB immunoreactivity was distributed in cells found along the acellular cementum at the bifurcation region, as well as between the dentin and cellular cementum in the apical portion (although these lacked immunoreactivity for VDR). The present results indicate that CB expression in newly disrupted cells from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath occurs in a vitamin-D dependent manner, whereas the expression of CB in mature ERM cells may be independent of vitamin D. PMID:12845706

  8. Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

  9. "Not" a One-Size-Fits-All Solution: Lessons Learned from Implementing an Electronic Resources Management System in Three Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Auraria Library purchased Innovative Interfaces, Inc.'s Millennium Electronic Resources Management (ERM) to manage data about acquisitions, licensing, troubleshooting, and usage statistics of electronic resources. After 3 days of implementation, the software vendor enabled resources records to display. As a result, the electronic resources team…

  10. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  11. Teaching Electronic Records Management in the Archival Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic records management has been incorporated into the archival curriculum in North America since the 1990s. This study reported in this paper provides a systematic analysis of the content of electronic records management (ERM) courses currently taught in archival education programs. Through the analysis of course combinations and their…

  12. Enteric Redmouth Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM), is a disease of salmonid fish species that is endemic in areas of the world where salmonids are intensively cultured. The disease causes a chronic to acute hemorrhagic septicemia which can lead to high rates of mortality partic...

  13. Temporal and pathogen-load dependent changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) immune response traits following challenge with biotype 2 Yersinia ruckeri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout infected with Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM), produce a pro-inflammatory and acute-phase response attributed in part to the innate recognition of bacterial-produced flagellin. Recently, variants of Yersinia ruckeri have been identified that lac...

  14. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Resistant to Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Haanperä-Heikkinen, M.; Lindgren, M.; Seppälä, H.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2006-01-01

    The telithromycin susceptibility of 210 erythromycin-resistant pneumococci was tested with the agar diffusion method. Twenty-six erm(B)-positive isolates showed heterogeneous resistance to telithromycin, which was manifested by the presence of colonies inside the inhibition zone. When these cells were cultured and tested, they showed stable, homogeneous, and high-level resistance to telithromycin. PMID:16641460

  16. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A'. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A'. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them. PMID:27008373

  17. Somewhere over the Verde Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekart, Donna F.

    2008-01-01

    When the electronic resource management system (ERM) at Kansas State University Libraries suffered a horrible data loss, the "contract db" presented a challenge for the librarians responsible for electronic resources. It was a decent data repository, but it had no ability to manage the tangled process of licensing, acquiring, activating, using,…

  18. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  19. Fate of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in simulated swine manure storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The behavior of three antibiotics (bacitracin, chlortetracycline, and tylosin) and two classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), tet and erm, were monitored in swine manure slurry under anaerobic conditions. First-order decay rates were determined for each antibiotic with half-lives ranging fr...

  20. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), New Orleans, LA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crossman, M.; Ward, L.

    1994-04-11

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by Environmental Resources Management (ERM) at New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission under Public Laws 100-526 and 101-510. Under CERFA (Public Law 102-426), Federal agencies are required to identify expeditiously real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed NOMOT is a 17.6-acre site located in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOMOT has been used for warehousing and shipping of equipment since 1919. Environmentally significant operations include routine maintenance and hazardous material handling. ERM reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) , State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to NOMOT during this investigation. In addition, ERM conducted interviews and visual inspections of NOMOT as well as visual inspections of and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA report was current as of the site visit by ERM in October 1993. This information was used to divide the installation into two categories of parcels: CERFA Disqualified Parcels and CERFA Parcels, as defined by the Army. New Orleans military ocean terminal, CERF.

  1. LKB1 Is Required for the Development and Maintenance of Stereocilia in Inner Ear Hair Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Zhang, Tingting; Jin, Yecheng; Li, Huashun

    2015-01-01

    The LKB1 gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase, was discovered to play crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, and the establishment of cell polarity. In our study, LKB1 conditional knockout mice (Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice) were generated to investigate LKB1 function in the inner ear. Tests of auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions revealed significant decreases in the hearing sensitivities of the Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice. In Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice, malformations of hair cell stereocilliary bundles were present as early as postnatal day 1 (P1), a time long before the maturation of the hair cell bundles. In addition, we also observed outer hair cell (OHC) loss starting at P14. The impaired stereocilliary bundles occurred long before the presence of hair cell loss. Stereociliary cytoskeletal structure depends on the core actin-based cytoskeleton and several actin-binding proteins. By Western blot, we examined actin-binding proteins, specifically ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton of hair cell stereocilia. Our results revealed that the phosphorylation of ERM proteins (pERM) was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Thus, we propose that the decreased pERM may be a key factor for the impaired stereocillia function, and the damaged stereocillia may induce hair cell loss and hearing impairments. Taken together, our data indicates that LKB1 is required for the development and maintenance of stereocilia in the inner ear. PMID:26274331

  2. Flagella biosynthesis and regulation by the Rcs pathway within the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri during infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gram-negative Enterobacterium Yersinia ruckeri is the etiologic agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) within farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum). Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the prevalence of non-motile variants of Y. ruckeri and the appearance of these ...

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of the Two Unrelated Macrolide-Resistant Corynebacterium argentoratense Strains CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, Isolated from Patients in the University Hospital of León, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium argentoratense has been associated mainly with infections in the human respiratory tract. Genome sequencing of two unrelated clinical macrolide-resistant strains, CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, revealed the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene erm(X) allocated to a specific genomic region with 100% similarity to the widely distributed transposable element Tn5432. PMID:26159536

  4. Fate of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in simulated swine manure storage.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stacey R; Li, Xu; Snow, Daniel D; Gilley, John E; Woodbury, Bryan; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L

    2014-05-15

    The behavior of three antibiotics (bacitracin, chlortetracycline, and tylosin) and two classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), tet and erm, were monitored in swine manure slurry under anaerobic conditions. First-order decay rates were determined for each antibiotic with half-lives ranging from 1 day (chlortetracycline) to 10 days (tylosin). ARGs were monitored in the swine manure slurry, and losses of approximately 1 to 3 orders of magnitude in relative abundance were observed during the 40 day storage period. First-order degradation profiles were observed for chlortetracycline and its corresponding resistance genes, tet(X) and tet(Q). Tylosin was degraded to approximately 10% of the starting concentration by day 40; however, the relative abundance of erm(B) remained at 50-60% of the initial relative abundance while the relative abundance of erm(F) decreased by 80-90%, consistent with tylosin. These results indicate that tet resistance genes respond primarily to chlortetracycline antimicrobials, and may be lost when the parent tetracycline compound is degraded. In contrast, erm(B) resistance gene may respond to a range of antimicrobials in animal manure, and may persist despite losses of tylosin. PMID:24583946

  5. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo. PMID:16318892

  6. Accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential from Geosat and ERS 1 crossover altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Klokočník, J.

    1994-05-01

    Extensive analyses of altimetrically determined sea height differences at crossovers have been used to assess the accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential. The orbits used were determined with GEM-T2 for Geosat in its 17-day Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) in 1986-1989 and ERS 1 in both its 3-day ERM in 1991-1992 and its 35-day ERM in 1992. The data examined are completely independent of the data used in GEM-T2's development though GEM-T2 had considerable use of Doppler tracking information on Geosat. The test of the radial accuracy of the ERS 1 orbit (98.5° inclination) is especially significant because it is not ``close'' to any other orbit well represented in GEM-T2. The assessment consists of a comparison of observed mean height differences at thousands of distinct geographic locations with error projections from the GEM-T2 covariance matrix which was estimated from other data sources. This first comprehensive, independent test of the purely radial accuracy of an orbit-geopotential model clearly shows that the covariant predictions for GEM-T2 are broadly reliable for this purpose. Thus, the agreement of crossover predictions and observations suggests that the total radial errors for these ERMs, due to only to GEM-T2 (but excluding the effects of initial state error) are about 23 cm for Geosat and 115 cm (rms) for ERS 1. However, there is little detailed agreement of measurements and predictions for ERS 1 and only partial agreement in detail for Geosat. Our 30,000 mean crossover discrepancies for Geosat (derived from ERM cycles 1-44) are also shown to reduce substantially the crossover height differences in cycles 45-61, almost exactly as predicted if these are the true GEM-T2 errors for this orbit.

  7. Simultaneous observation of VHF radio wave transmission anomaly propagated beyond line of site prior to earthquakes in multiple sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, H.; Mogi, T.; Moriya, T.; Takada, M.; Morisada, M.

    2010-12-01

    The VHF radio wave transmission anomalies propagated beyond line of site prior to earthquakes (M>4), (hereafter termed EQ-echo) have been observed more than 20 times from 2004 at the Erimo observatory (ERM) in Hokkaido, Northern Japan. A statistical relationship between magnitude of preceding earthquake and total duration time of the EQ-echo has been proposed (Moriya et al.2009). To confirm a region where the EQ-echo simultaneously observed for each earthquake, we installed another 3 observatory with approximately 5 km spacing in the surroundings of ERM. The EQ-echoes have been observed simultaneously at two observatories prior to four earthquakes since 2008. The initial time and duration of each EQ echo were same time in several cases but different at some minutes each other in other cases. The wave forms of the EQ-echoes were similar in both records. In the Fuyushima observatory (FYS, 10km away from ERM) , three-way antennas were installed at every 120 degree to detect an arrival direction of EQ-echoes. Simultaneous observations of EQ-echoes at ERM and FYS for the preceding EQ (M=4.7) that occurred in the Hidaka mountains revealed that this EQ-echo came from direction of the epicenter based on the FYS observation and this direction was consistent with that of EQ-echo observed simultaneously in ERM. Although some of simultaneous observed EQ-echoes were observed in same time completely at both observatories, but some of them were with time rag of duration of each EQ-echo between multiple observed sites. We discussed what these time rags mean by considering possibilities of moving of scattering objects, generation of a radio duct, and so on, as in response to this fact.

  8. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation. PMID:24973730

  9. Intracellular sphingosine kinase 2-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced ezrin-radixin-moesin phosphorylation and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad M; Canals, Daniel; Jeong, Nara; Kelkar, Ashwin D; Hernandez-Corbacho, Maria; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-11-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) mediates cellular proliferation, mitogenesis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. These biologies are mediated through S1P binding to specific GPCRs [sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)1-5] and some other less well-characterized intracellular targets. Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, a family of adaptor molecules linking the cortical actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, are emerging as critical regulators of cancer invasion via regulation of cell morphology and motility. Recently, we identified S1P as an acute ERM activator (via phosphorylation) through its action on S1PR2. In this work, we dissect the mechanism of S1P generation downstream of epidermal growth factor (EGF) leading to ERM phosphorylation and cancer invasion. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, small interfering RNA technologies, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that sphingosine kinase (SK)2, and not SK1, is essential and sufficient in EGF-mediated ERM phosphorylation in HeLa cells. In fact, knocking down SK2 decreased ERM activation 2.5-fold. Furthermore, we provide evidence that SK2 is necessary to mediate EGF-induced invasion. In addition, overexpressing SK2 causes a 2-fold increase in HeLa cell invasion. Surprisingly, and for the first time, we find that this event, although dependent on S1PR2 activation, does not generate and does not require extracellular S1P secretion, therefore introducing a potential novel model of autocrine/intracrine action of S1P that still involves its GPCRs. These results define new mechanistic insights for EGF-mediated invasion and novel actions of SK2, therefore setting the stage for novel targets in the treatment of growth factor-driven malignancies. PMID:26209696

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Dong, Danfeng; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLS(B) and iMLS(B) phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLS(B) phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLS(B) CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. PMID:26915614

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLSB phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLSB CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. PMID:26915614

  12. FOXM1 expression in rhabdomyosarcoma: a novel prognostic factor and therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Masaaki; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yamada, Yuichi; Maekawa, Akira; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-04-01

    The transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is known to play critical roles in the development and progression of various types of cancer, but the clinical significance of FOXM1 expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of FOXM1 in RMS. We investigated the expression levels of FOXM1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenesis in a large series of RMS clinical cases using immunohistochemistry (n = 92), and we performed clinicopathologic and prognostic analyses. In vitro studies were conducted to examine the effect of FOXM1 knock-down on VEGF expression, cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in embryonal RMS (ERMS) and alveolar RMS (ARMS) cell lines, using small interference RNA (siRNA). High FOXM1 expression was significantly increased in the cases of ARMS, which has an adverse prognosis compared to ERMS (p = 0.0310). The ERMS patients with high FOXM1 expression (n = 25) had a significantly shorter survival than those with low FOXM1 expression (n = 24; p = 0.0310). FOXM1 expression was statistically correlated with VEGF expression in ERMS at the protein level as shown by immunohistochemistry and at the mRNA level by RT-PCR. The in vitro study demonstrated that VEGF mRNA levels were decreased in the FOXM1 siRNA-transfected ERMS and ARMS cells. FOXM1 knock-down resulted in a significant decrease of cell proliferation and migration in all four RMS cell lines and invasion in three of the four cell lines. Our results indicate that FOXM1 overexpression may be a prognostic factor of RMS and that FOXM1 may be a promising therapeutic target for the inhibition of RMS progression. PMID:26553361

  13. The over-expression of cell migratory genes in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma could contribute to metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Elizabeth; Hill, Sophie K; Morten, Karl J; Potter, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Alveolar (ARMS) and Embryonal (ERMS) rhabdomyosarcoma differ in their response to current treatments. The ARMS subtype has a less favourable prognosis and often presents with widespread metastases, while the less metastatic ERMS has a 5 year survival rate of more than 80 %. In this study we investigate gene expression differences that could contribute to the high frequency of metastasis in ARMS. Microarray analysis identified significant differences in DNA repair, cell cycle and cell migration between the two RMS subtypes. Two genes up regulated in ARMS and involved in cell migration; the engulfment and cell motility gene 1 (ELMO1) and NEL-like 1 gene (NELL1) were selected for further investigation. Over-expression of ELMO1 significantly increased cell invasion from 24.70 ± 7% to 93 ± 5.4% in primary myoblasts and from 29.43 ± 2.1% to 87.33 ± 4.1% in the ERMS cell line RD. siRNA knockout of ELMO1 in the ARMS cell line RH30 significantly reduced cell invasion from 88.2 ± 3.8% to 35.2 ± 2.5%. Over-expression of NELL1 significantly increased myoblast invasion from 23.6 ± 6.9% to 100 ± 0.1%, but had no effect on invasion of the ERMS cell line RD. These findings suggest that ELMO1 may play a key role in ARMS metastasis. NELL1 increased invasion in primary myoblasts, but other factors required for it to enhance motility were not present in the RD ERMS cell line. Impairing ELMO1 function by pharmacological or siRNA knockdown could be a highly effective approach to reduce the metastatic spread of RMS. PMID:22415709

  14. Serotypes, Clones, and Mechanisms of Resistance of Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Laura; Ardanuy, C.; Cercenado, E.; Fenoll, A.; Bouza, E.; Pallares, R.; Martín, R.; Liñares, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distributions of antibiotic susceptibility patterns, serotypes, phenotypes, genotypes, and macrolide resistance genes among 125 nonduplicated erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates collected in a Spanish point prevalence study. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides in this study was 34.7%. Multiresistance (to three or more antimicrobials) was observed in 81.6% of these strains. Among 15 antimicrobials studied, cefotaxime, moxifloxacin, telithromycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin were the most active drugs. The most frequent serotypes of erythromycin-resistant isolates were 19F (25%), 19A (17%), 6B (12%), 14 (10%), and 23F (10%). Of the 125 strains, 109 (87.2%) showed the MLSB phenotype [103 had the erm(B) gene and 6 had both erm(B) and mef(E) genes]. Sixteen (12.8%) strains showed the M phenotype [14 with mef(E) and 2 with mef(A)]. All isolates were tested by PCR for the presence of the int, xis, tnpR, and tnpA genes associated with conjugative transposons (Tn916 family and Tn917). Positive detection of erm(B), tet(M), int, and xis genes related to the Tn916 family was found in 77.1% of MLSB phenotype strains. In 16 strains, only the tndX, erm(B), and tet(M) genes were detected, suggesting the presence of Tn1116, a transposon recently described for Streptococcus pyogenes. Five clones, namely, Sweden15A-25, clone19F ST87, Spain23F-1, Spain6B-2, and clone19A ST276, accounted for half of the MLSB strains. In conclusion, the majority of erythromycin-resistant pneumococci isolated in Spain had the MLSB phenotype, belonged to multiresistant international clones, and carried the erm(B), tet(M), xis, and int genes, suggesting the spread of transposons of the Tn916 family. PMID:17606677

  15. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  16. Intraocular Lens Power Estimation in Combined Phacoemulsification and Pars Plana Vitrectomy in Eyes with Epiretinal Membranes: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min; Kim, Hyoung Eun; Lee, Dong Hyun; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of postoperative refractive outcomes of combined phacovitrectomy for epiretinal membrane (ERM) in comparison to cataract surgery alone. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine eyes that underwent combined phacovitrectomy with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for cataract and ERM (combined surgery group) and 39 eyes that received phacoemulsification for cataract (control group) were analyzed, retrospectively. The predicted preoperative refractive aim was compared with the results of postoperative refraction. Results In the combined surgery group, refractive prediction error by A-scan and IOLMaster were -0.305±0.717 diopters (D) and -0.356±0.639 D, respectively, compared to 0.215±0.541 and 0.077±0.529 in the control group, showing significantly more myopic change compared to the control group (p=0.001 and p=0.002, respectively). Within each group, there was no statistically significant difference in refractive prediction error between A-scan and IOLMaster (all p>0.05). IOL power calculation using adjusted A-scan measurement of axial length based on the macular thickness of the normal contralateral eye still resulted in significant postoperative refractive error (all p<0.05). Postoperative refraction calculated with adjusted axial length based on actual postoperative central foveal thickness change showed the closest value to the actual postoperative achieved refraction (p=0.599). Conclusion Combined phacovitrectomy for ERM resulted in significantly more myopic shift of postoperative refraction, compared to the cataract surgery alone, for both A-scan and IOLMaster. To improve the accuracy of IOL power estimation in eyes with cataract and ERM, sequential surgery for ERM and cataract may need to be considered. PMID:25837189

  17. Estrogen response element and the promoter context of the human and mouse lactoferrin genes influence estrogen receptor alpha-mediated transactivation activity in mammary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Kenya; Alston-Mills, Brenda; Teng, Christina

    2004-10-01

    A critical step in estrogen action is the recognition of estrogen responsive elements (EREs) by liganded estrogen receptor. Our current studies were designed to determine whether an extended estrogen response element half-site (ERRE) contributes to the differential estrogen responses of the human and mouse lactoferrin overlapping chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter/ERE sequences (estrogen response modules, ERMs) in the context of their natural promoters. Transient transfections of MCF-7 cells show that liganded estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) activates transcription of the human lactoferrin ERM fourfold higher than the mouse lactoferrin ERM in the context of their natural promoters. Since the ERRE of the human lactoferrin gene naturally occurs 18 bp upstream from the ERM and is absent in the mouse lactoferrin gene promoter, we created a chimeric mouse lactoferrin CAT reporter, which now encodes the ERRE in the identical location as in the human lactoferrin gene. The addition of the ERRE in the mouse lactoferrin gene rendered this reporter extremely responsive to estrogen stimulation. Using limited protease digestions and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we showed that the binding and protease sensitivity of ERalpha bound to the mouse ERM with or without the ERRE, differed. Importantly, occupancy of additional nuclear receptors at the ERRE may contribute to ERalpha binding and activation. Furthermore, the presence of ERRE influences the selectivity of coactivators in liganded ERalpha-mediated transcriptional activity. When the receptor is bound to human and mouse plus genes, which contain the ERRE, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-2 was preferred, while SRC-1 and SRC-3 coactivators selectively enhanced the mouse lactoferrin gene activity. Moreover, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1-related estrogen receptor coactivator (PERC) robustly increase the transcriptional function of ERalpha in the presence of the

  18. Different levels of hyphal self-incompatibility modulate interconnectedness of mycorrhizal networks in three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the Glomeraceae.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Alessandra; Giovannetti, Manuela; Sbrana, Cristiana

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) live in symbiosis with most plant species and produce underground extraradical hyphal networks functional in the uptake and translocation of mineral nutrients from the soil to host plants. This work investigated whether fungal genotype can affect patterns of interconnections and structural traits of extraradical mycelium (ERM), by comparing three Glomeraceae species growing in symbiosis with five plant hosts. An isolate of Funneliformis coronatus consistently showed low ability to form interconnected ERM and self-incompatibility that represented up to 21 % of hyphal contacts. The frequency of post-fusion self-incompatible interactions, never detected before in AMF extraradical networks, was 8.9 %. In F. coronatus ERM, the percentage of hyphal contacts leading to perfect hyphal fusions was 1.2-7.7, while it ranged from 25.8-48 to 35.6-53.6 in Rhizophagus intraradices and Funneliformis mosseae, respectively. Low interconnectedness of F. coronatus ERM resulted also from a very high number of non-interacting contacts (83.2 %). Such findings show that AMF genotypes in Glomeraceae can differ significantly in anastomosis behaviour and that ERM interconnectedness is modulated by the fungal symbiont, as F. coronatus consistently formed poorly interconnected networks when growing in symbiosis with five different host plants and in the asymbiotic stage. Structural traits, such as extent, density and hyphal self-compatibility/incompatibility, may represent key factors for the differential performance of AMF, by affecting fungal absorbing surface and foraging ability and thus nutrient flow from soil to host roots. PMID:26630971

  19. Global 3D Imaging of Yersinia ruckeri Bacterin Uptake in Rainbow Trout Fry

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming of salmonids for more than 35 years. The gills and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are believed to be the portals of antigen uptake during waterborne vaccination against ERM; however, the actual sites of bacterin uptake are only partly understood. In order to obtain insight into bacterin uptake during waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours. Large amounts of bacterin were present in the blood, and an accumulation of bacterin was found in filtering lymphoid organs such as spleen and trunk kidney where the bacterin accumulates 24 hours post vaccination as demonstrated by OPT and IHC. These results suggest that bacterin is taken up via the gill epithelium in the earliest phases of the bath exposure and from the GI tract in the later phase. The bacterin then enters the blood circulatory system, after which it is filtered by spleen and trunk kidney, before finally accumulating in lymphoid organs where adaptive immunity against ERM is likely to develop. PMID:25658600

  20. The Hippo effector TAZ (WWTR1) transforms myoblasts and TAZ abundance is associated with reduced survival in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Abdalla; Sun, Congshan; De Mello, Vanessa; Selfe, Joanna; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murray, Graeme I; Zammit, Pete S; Wackerhage, Henning

    2016-09-01

    The Hippo effector YAP has recently been identified as a potent driver of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Most reports suggest that the YAP paralogue TAZ (gene symbol WWTR1) functions as YAP but, in skeletal muscle, TAZ has been reported to promote myogenic differentiation, whereas YAP inhibits it. Here, we investigated whether TAZ is also a rhabdomyosarcoma oncogene or whether TAZ acts as a YAP antagonist. Immunostaining of rhabdomyosarcoma tissue microarrays revealed that TAZ is significantly associated with poor survival in ERMS. In 12% of fusion gene-negative rhabdomyosarcomas, the TAZ locus is gained, which is correlated with increased expression. Constitutively active TAZ S89A significantly increased proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts and, importantly, colony formation on soft agar, suggesting transformation. However, TAZ then switches to enhance myogenic differentiation in C2C12 myoblasts, unlike YAP. Conversely, lentiviral shRNA-mediated TAZ knockdown in human ERMS cells reduced proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. While TAZ S89A or YAP1 S127A similarly activated the 8XGTIIC-Luc Hippo reporter, only YAP1 S127A activated the Brachyury (T-box) reporter. Consistent with its oncogene function, TAZ S89A induced expression of the ERMS cancer stem cell gene Myf5 and the serine biosynthesis pathway (Phgdh, Psat1, Psph) in C2C12 myoblasts. Thus, TAZ is associated with poor survival in ERMS and could act as an oncogene in rhabdomyosarcoma. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:27184927

  1. The Potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to Form Root Symbioses with Ectomycorrhizal and Ericoid Mycorrhizal Middle European Forest Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lukešová, Tereza; Kohout, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Vohník, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.—Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch) with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs) with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE colonization without

  2. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin. PMID:18272297

  3. Susceptibility to tulathromycin in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle over a 3-year period

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Trevor W.; Cook, Shaun; Klima, Cassidy L.; Topp, Ed; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle were tested for tulathromycin resistance. Cattle were sampled over a 3-year period, starting 12 months after approval of tulathromycin for prevention and treatment of bovine respiratory disease. Nasopharyngeal samples from approximately 5,814 cattle were collected when cattle entered feedlots (N = 4) and again from the same cattle after ≥60 days on feed. The antimicrobial use history for each animal was recorded. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from 796 (13.7%) entry samples and 1,038 (20.6%) ≥ 60 days samples. Of the cattle positive for M. haemolytica, 18.5, 2.9, and 2.4% were administered therapeutic concentrations of tulathromycin, tilmicosin, or tylosin tartrate, respectively. In addition, 13.2% were administered subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin phosphate in feed. In years one and two, no tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica were detected, whereas five isolates (0.4%) were resistant in year three. These resistant isolates were collected from three cattle originating from a single pen, were all serotype 1, and were genetically related (≥89% similarity) according to pulsed-field gel electrophoreses patterns. The five tulathromycin-resistant isolates were multi-drug resistant also exhibiting resistance to oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, ampicillin, or penicillin. The macrolide resistance genes erm(42), erm(A), erm(B), erm(F), erm(X) and msr(E)-mph(E), were not detected in the tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica. This study showed that tulathromycin resistance in M. haemolytica from a general population of feedlot cattle in western Canada was low and did not change over a 3-year period after tulathromycin was approved for use in cattle. PMID:24130555

  4. The potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to form root symbioses with ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal middle European forest plants.

    PubMed

    Lukešová, Tereza; Kohout, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Vohník, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.--Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch) with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs) with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE colonization without

  5. Tylosin susceptibility of Staphylococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Entorf, Monika; Feßler, Andrea T; Kadlec, Kristina; Kaspar, Heike; Mankertz, Joachim; Peters, Thomas; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-07-16

    Although the 16-membered macrolide tylosin is commonly used for the treatment of bovine mastitis, little information is currently available about the susceptibility of mastitis pathogens to tylosin. In the present study, 112 Staphylococcus aureus and 110 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) spp. isolates from cases of bovine mastitis were tested by broth microdilution and agar disk diffusion with 30 μg tylosin disks. Susceptibility to erythromycin was tested by broth microdilution and disk diffusion using 15 μg disks. Both test populations showed bimodal distributions of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters with eleven S. aureus and eight CoNS isolates showing tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml and no zones of growth inhibition around the tylosin 30 μg disks. All 19 isolates with tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml were also resistant to erythromycin. For six additional erythromycin-resistant isolates, tylosin MICs of 1-8 μg/ml were observed. One S. aureus and two CoNS isolates showed inducible macrolide resistance. PCR analysis of the 25 erythromycin-resistant staphylococcal isolates identified the resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(T), mph(C) and msr(A) alone or in different combinations. An excellent correlation between the results of the different tylosin susceptibility tests (broth microdilution versus disk diffusion) was seen for S. aureus and CoNS isolates. Since tylosin does not induce the expression of the aforementioned erm genes, isolates with an inducible resistance phenotype may - if only tylosin is tested - be falsely classified as tylosin-susceptible. Thus, erythromycin should be tested in parallel and tylosin should only be used for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible staphylococci. PMID:24461550

  6. Erythromycin resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus faecalis from swine in China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-Kou; Wang, Hong-Ning; Zeng, Bo; Li, Jin-Niang; Li, Xu-Ting; Zhang, An-Yun; Zhou, Ying-Shun; Yang, Xin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Qing-Qing

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to describe the erythromycin resistance phenotypes and genotypes, and the prevalence of virulence genes of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from swine in China. A total of 117 nonreplicate E. faecalis isolates, obtained from 502 clinical samples taken from different pig farms between 2007 and 2009 were included in the study. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the broth microdilution method. All of the isolates were screened for the presence of seven virulence genes (ace, asa1, cylA, efaA, esp, gelE, and hyl). In addition, the DNA from rythromycin-resistant isolates were amplified with primers specific for erythromycin resistance erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), mef(A/E), and msr(C) genes. Results show that erythromycin, tylosin, and ciprofloxacin resistance rates in E. faecalis were 66.67% (n=78), 66.67% (n=78), and 64.10% (n=75), respectively. About 69.23% of isolates (n=81) were positive for gelE, 48.72% (n=57) for ace, 15.38% (n=18) for efa, 7.69% (n=9) for asa1, and 6.84% (n=8) for esp. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B) (n=54) was the most prevalent resistance gene, followed by erm(A) (n=37). A significant correlation was found between the presence of the gelE virulence gene and erythromycin resistance (P<0.05). These findings suggest that enterococci from swine should be regarded with caution because they can be reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. PMID:21344149

  7. Modeling gross primary production and ecosystem respiration for terrestrial ecosystems in North China and Tibet Plateau using MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Yu, G.; Yan, H.; Zhu, X.; Li, S.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Y.; Li, Y.; Zhao, L.; Shi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) are two large components in the studying of regional and global carbon cycles. Accurate quantification of spatio-temporal variations of GPP and Re for terrestrial ecosystems is of great importance to research carbon budget on regional and global scales. In this study, we proposed two satellite-based models, i.e. Photosynthetic Capacity Model (PCM) and Ecosystem Respiration Model (ERM), to simulate GPP and Re of terrestrial ecosystems, respectively. Multi-year eddy CO2 flux data from five vegetation types in North China (temperate mixed forest, temperate steppe) and Tibet Plateau (alpine shrubland, alpine marsh and alpine meadow-steppe) were used for assessing the model performances. The PCM model was driven by the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and the Land Surface Water Index (LSWI) from MODIS imagery. In most cases, the PCM-simulated GPP and the observed GPP displayed very consistent seasonal and inter-seasonal variability regardless of vegetation types. The PCM predicted versus observed GPP performed better than the MODIS GPP products, and was compatible with the Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM). Moreover, the model parameter of the PCM could be gained from the linear function of mean annual remote sensing data. Based on this linear function, the PCM model simulated 93% variations of the observed GPP across all five vegetation types. The ERM model was developed based on both GPP and temperature, and was driven by EVI, LSWI and the Land Surface Temperature (LST) from MODIS imagery. In most cases, the seasonal and interannual variations of the simulated Re matched well with the observed Re. Compared with the model driven by temperature, and the model further added GPP in the reference respiration, the ERM model was optimal in each vegetation type. The model parameters of the ERM could also be presented by the liner functions of mean annual remote sensing data. Based on these linear functions, 90

  8. Emergence of quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance among livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus ST9 clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangyou; Lu, Chaohui; Liu, Yunling; Sun, He; Shang, Yongpeng; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Huang, Xiaoying; Li, Yuping; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing

    2014-11-01

    Quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) is a valuable alternative to vancomycin for the treatment of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. However, not long after Q/D was approved, bacteria with resistance to this newer antimicrobial agent were reported. To investigate the prevalence of Q/D resistance, a total of 1476 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates, including 775 MRSA, from a Chinese tertiary hospital were selected randomly from 2003 to 2013. Of the 775 MRSA, 3 (0.4%) were resistant to Q/D. All meticillin-susceptible S. aureus were susceptible to Q/D. The prevalence of Q/D resistance among S. aureus was 0.2% (3/1476). The three isolates with Q/D resistance had the same antimicrobial resistance profile, except for cefaclor and chloramphenicol. All three Q/D-resistant MRSA were positive for five streptogramin B resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and msrB) and two streptogramin A resistance genes (vatC and vgaA) as determined by PCR and DNA sequencing. MRSA WZ1031 belonged to ST9-MRSA-SCCmecV-t899, whilst MRSA WZ414 and WZ480 belonged to ST9-MRSA-SCCmecNT(non-typeable)-t899. ST9 has been reported predominantly in livestock-associated (LA) MRSA in some Asian countries. The three patients with these MRSA isolates were not livestock handlers and did not keep close contact with livestock. The origin of these important LA-MRSA isolates causing human infections is not known. Taken together, Q/D resistance, which was caused by a combination of ermA-ermB-ermC-msrA-msrB-vatC-vgaA, was first found among S. aureus clinical isolates in China. The present study is the first report of the emergence of human infections caused by ST9 LA-MRSA isolates with Q/D resistance. PMID:25218154

  9. Thickness dependent fatigue life at microcrack nucleation for metal thin films on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. J.; Wang, C. C.; Zhang, J.; Liu, G.; Zhang, G. J.; Ding, X. D.; Zhang, G. P.; Sun, J.

    2008-10-01

    For polymer-supported metal thin films used in flexible electronics, the definition of the fatigue lifetime at microcrack nucleation (FLMN) should be more physically meaningful than all the previous definitions at structural instability. In this paper, the FLMN of Cu films (with thickness from 100 nm to 3.75 µm) as well as Al thin films (from 80 to 800 nm) was experimentally characterized at different strain ranges and different thicknesses by using a simple electrical resistance measurement (ERM). A significant thickness dependence was revealed for the FLMN and a similar Coffin-Manson fatigue relationship observed commonly in bulk materials was found to be still operative in both the films. Microstructural analyses were carried out to verify the feasibility of ERM correspondingly.

  10. Pollution from organic contaminants in Greek marine areas, receiving anthropogenic pressures from intense activities in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread pollutants in marine sediments, receiving the pressures from various anthropogenic activities in the coastal zone. Due to their mutagenic and carcinogenic behaviour, PAHs are classified as priority contaminants to be monitored in environmental quality control schemes. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of PAHs in coastal areas of Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone, investigate their sources and evaluate their potential toxicity by comparison against effect - based sediment quality guidelines. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three areas of the Hellenic coastline: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, influenced from the operation of an alumina and aluminium production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos gulf, influenced from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, influenced from a cement production plant. In all the areas studied, aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. PAH concentrations were determined by GC-MS, after soxhlet extraction and fractionation by silica column chromatography. PAH sources and origin were investigated by applying several isomeric ratio diagnostic criteria. The mean quotient Effect- Range Median (m-ERM) was used to evaluate the potential of adverse effects posed to benthic organisms. Three m-ERM-q values were used to differentiate the probability of observing toxicity and classify sites into four categories: sediments with m-ERM<0.1 have the lowest probability (9%) of being toxic, those with m-ERM from 0.11 to 0.5 have a 21% probability of toxicity, those with m-ERM from 0.51 to 1.5 a 49% probability of toxicity, while sediments with m-ERM >1.5 have the highest probability (76%) of toxicity. Extremely high PAH concentrations more than 100,000 ng/g were found in the close vicinity of the alumina