Science.gov

Sample records for erythromelalgia

  1. Genetics Home Reference: erythromelalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bennett DL, Wood JN, Kinali M. Novel mutations mapping to the fourth sodium channel domain of Nav1. ... and late-onset inherited erythromelalgia: genotype-phenotype correlation. Brain. 2009 Jul;132(Pt 7):1711-22. doi: ...

  2. Dual Effect of Ziconotide in Primary Erythromelalgia

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Rosario; Caroleo, Maria Cristina; Cione, Erika; Perri, Mariarita; Paparo, Maria Teresa; Russo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare disabling clinical syndrome more commonly known to affect the lower extremities. There is no single effective treatment for this disease that often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old woman affected by primary erythromelalgia who was successfully treated with intrathecal Ziconotide. We also observed an unexpected result following therapy with Ziconotide. The legs and feet of the patient that at the time of admission were swollen and tumefied dramatically improved after one week of the drug administration. PMID:26609309

  3. Dual Effect of Ziconotide in Primary Erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rosario; Caroleo, Maria Cristina; Cione, Erika; Perri, Mariarita; Paparo, Maria Teresa; Russo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare disabling clinical syndrome more commonly known to affect the lower extremities. There is no single effective treatment for this disease that often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old woman affected by primary erythromelalgia who was successfully treated with intrathecal Ziconotide. We also observed an unexpected result following therapy with Ziconotide. The legs and feet of the patient that at the time of admission were swollen and tumefied dramatically improved after one week of the drug administration. PMID:26609309

  4. Erythromelalgia as a manifestation of autonomic nervous system involvement in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Ivan; Lakoš Jukić, Ines; Habek, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare condition characterized by burning pain, erythema and increased temperature of the hands or the feet. Its etiology is not completely understood but it is believed that the underlying cause is a peripheral vascular dysfunction that leads to simultaneous tissue hypoxia and hyperemia. We present a rare co-occurrence of erythromelalgia and multiple sclerosis in a patient with autonomic nervous system dysfunction and propose a causative interconnection. PMID:27456866

  5. Infrequent SCN9A mutations in congenital insensitivity to pain and erythromelalgia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christopher J; Wu, Yanhong; Kilfoyle, Dean H; Sandroni, Paola; Davis, Mark D; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Low, Phillip A; Dyck, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mutations in SCN9A have been reported in (1) congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP); (2) primary erythromelalgia; (3) paroxysmal extreme pain disorder; (4) febrile seizures and recently (5) small fibre sensory neuropathy. We sought to investigate for SCN9A mutations in a clinically well-characterised cohort of patients with CIP and erythromelalgia. Methods We sequenced all exons of SCN9A in 19 clinically well-studied cases including 6 CIP and 13 erythromelalgia (9 with family history, 10 with small-fibre neuropathy). The identified variants were assessed in dbSNP135, 1K genome, NHLBI-Exome Sequencing Project (5400-exomes) databases, and 768 normal chromosomes. Results In erythromelalgia case 7, we identified a novel Q10>K mutation. In CIP case 6, we identified a novel, de novo splicing mutation (IVS8-2A>G); this splicing mutation compounded with a nonsense mutation (R523>X) and abolished SCN9A mRNA expression almost completely compared with his unaffected father. In CIP case 5, we found a variant (P610>T) previously considered causal for erythromelalgia, supporting recently raised doubt on its causal nature. We also found a splicing junction variant (IVS24-7delGTTT) in all 19 patients, this splicing variant was previously considered casual for CIP, but IVS24-7delGTTT was in fact the major allele in Caucasian populations. Conclusions Two novel SCN9A mutations were identified, but frequently polymorphism variants are found which may provide susceptibility factors in pain modulation. CIP and erythromelalgia are defined as genetically heterogeneous, and some SCN9A variants previously considered causal may only be modifying factors. PMID:23129781

  6. Erythromelalgia-like presentation of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy in a setting of past alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Dhand, Upinder K

    2016-02-01

    Erythromelalgia may be primary or secondary to an underlying medical condition. Association with small fiber neuropathy and axonal large fiber peripheral neuropathy has been described. Erythromelalgia in the setting of acquired demyelinating neuropathy has not been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman with severe erythromelalgia, pain and burning, progressive weakness, hyporeflexia and distal pan-sensory deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid protein was 219 mg/dL. Nerve conduction study revealed extreme (ten-fold) prolongation of distal motor latencies, markedly slow motor nerve conduction, reduced terminal latency index, reduced distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, possible conduction blocks, and distal denervation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, prednisone and azathioprine resulted in marked clinical and electrophysiological improvement. Our patient fulfills the diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP); however, the unique electrodiagnostic features and presentation with erythromelalgia may represent a CIDP variant or a novel dysimmune neuropathy, or may partly be related to neurotoxic effects of prior alcohol abuse. PMID:26804376

  7. Impaired skin vasomotor reflexes in patients with erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Littleford, R C; Khan, F; Belch, J J

    1999-05-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a chronic disorder characterized by intermittent burning pain, warmth and erythema of the extremities. Increasing the local temperature and dependency of the affected limb(s) precipitates the symptoms, whereas direct cooling and elevation of the limb(s) can provide partial relief. Our previous findings showed that patients with EM have enhanced cutaneous vascular tone at rest and during stimulation, which may be due to an increase in sympathetic neural activity. To test this, we measured skin vasoconstrictor responses to contralateral arm cold challenge (CC) and inspiratory gasp (IG) using laser Doppler flowmetry at the toe pulp and fingertip. These areas were chosen because of their dense sympathetic innervation. An index of the vasoconstrictor response (between 0 and 1) was calculated from the change in skin perfusion from baseline following CC and IG. In control subjects, vasoconstrictor responses to CC at the toe and fingertip were both 0. 70+/-0.02 (mean+/-S.E.M.), which were significantly greater (P<0. 001) than corresponding values in patients with EM (0.37+/-0.04 and 0.45+/-0.04 respectively). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to IG were significantly greater (P<0.001) at the toe and fingertip in control subjects (0.70+/-0.03 and 0.70+/-0.02 respectively) compared with values in EM patients (0.27+/-0.03 and 0.45+/-0.15 respectively). These data show that, in contrast with control subjects, patients with EM have diminished sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses to both CC and IG. Denervation supersensitivity may play a part by increasing vasoconstrictor responses to circulating catecholamines, leading to a reduction in skin blood flow. Therefore an interplay between neural and vasoactive agents may be involved in the pathophysiology of EM. PMID:10209083

  8. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  9. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  10. An Egyptian child with erythromelalgia responding to a new line of treatment: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Erythromelalgia is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by episodic erythema, warmth and intense burning pain, which commonly involves the extremities. For those affected, this disorder may lead to significant long-term morbidity. Unfortunately, to date, no definitive therapy is available. This case report describes an Egyptian child with primary erythromelalgia that manifested at an early age and showed partial response to therapy with cetirizine hydrochloride. This anecdotal case report may have a diagnostic value for clinicians who have not seen this disorder. Case presentation A 34-month-old previously healthy right-handed Hamitic boy without any significant past medical history presented at the age of 2 years with episodic bilateral pain in his feet. His mother reported associated warmth and erythema localized to his feet that never extended beyond his ankle joints. This pain is triggered by exertion and/or warm temperature exposure and is relieved by cooling measures. The diagnosis of erythromelalgia was made based on the patient’s medical history and a thorough physical examination during the episodes. No evidence of local or systemic infection was present. Other causes for the symptoms were excluded by a negative extensive diagnostic work-up. Our patient did not respond to ibuprofen (15mg/kg/dose) three times a day but partial improvement with the oral non-sedating antihistaminic cetirizine hydrochloride (2.5mg/kg/once daily) was observed. When the child stopped cetirizine hydrochloride for 1 month as a test, the symptoms became aggravated and were relieved when cetirizine therapy was restarted. Cetirizine hydrochloride had not previously been reported to have this effect in children with erythromelalgia. Conclusions Erythromelalgia is a clinical syndrome of which the etiology, diagnosis and management are controversial. We describe a case of a 34-month-old Egyptian child with primary erythromelalgia that manifested at an early age. We

  11. Genome Sequence of Erythromelalgia-Related Poxvirus Identifies it as an Ectromelia Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Rios, Jorge D.; Martens, Craig A.; Bruno, Daniel P.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Moss, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Erythromelagia is a condition characterized by attacks of burning pain and inflammation in the extremeties. An epidemic form of this syndrome occurs in secondary students in rural China and a virus referred to as erythromelalgia-associated poxvirus (ERPV) was reported to have been recovered from throat swabs in 1987. Studies performed at the time suggested that ERPV belongs to the orthopoxvirus genus and has similarities with ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox. We have determined the complete genome sequence of ERPV and demonstrated that it has 99.8% identity to the Naval strain of ectromelia virus and a slighly lower identity to the Moscow strain. Small DNA deletions in the Naval genome that are absent from ERPV may suggest that the sequenced strain of Naval was not the immediate progenitor of ERPV. PMID:22558090

  12. Bilateral congenital corneal anesthesia in a patient with SCN9A mutation, confirmed primary erythromelalgia, and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, David Ta; Rossignol, Elsa; Najem, Kinda; Ospina, Luis H

    2015-10-01

    The SCN9A gene codes for the sodium voltage-gated channel NaV 1.7. Gain of function mutations cause pain disorders such as primary erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and small fiber neuropathy. Loss of function mutations lead to congenital insensitivity to pain. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with a SCN9A mutation who presented with both gain of function and loss of function phenotypes, including congenital corneal anesthesia. PMID:26486037

  13. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-03-01

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960-2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large ``V''-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this ``V''-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks.

  14. Pharmacological reversal of a pain phenotype in iPSC-derived sensory neurons and patients with inherited erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lishuang; McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Nitzsche, Anja; Alexandrou, Aristos; Saintot, Pierre-Philippe; Loucif, Alexandre J C; Brown, Adam R; Young, Gareth; Mis, Malgorzata; Randall, Andrew; Waxman, Stephen G; Stanley, Philip; Kirby, Simon; Tarabar, Sanela; Gutteridge, Alex; Butt, Richard; McKernan, Ruth M; Whiting, Paul; Ali, Zahid; Bilsland, James; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-04-20

    In common with other chronic pain conditions, there is an unmet clinical need in the treatment of inherited erythromelalgia (IEM). TheSCN9Agene encoding the sodium channel Nav1.7 expressed in the peripheral nervous system plays a critical role in IEM. A gain-of-function mutation in this sodium channel leads to aberrant sensory neuronal activity and extreme pain, particularly in response to heat. Five patients with IEM were treated with a new potent and selective compound that blocked the Nav1.7 sodium channel resulting in a decrease in heat-induced pain in most of the patients. We derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four of five subjects and produced sensory neurons that emulated the clinical phenotype of hyperexcitability and aberrant responses to heat stimuli. When we compared the severity of the clinical phenotype with the hyperexcitability of the iPSC-derived sensory neurons, we saw a trend toward a correlation for individual mutations. The in vitro IEM phenotype was sensitive to Nav1.7 blockers, including the clinical test agent. Given the importance of peripherally expressed sodium channels in many pain conditions, our approach may have broader utility for a wide range of pain and sensory conditions. PMID:27099175

  15. Secondary erythromelalgia successfully treated with patient-controlled epidural analgesia and interferon α-2b: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LI, XINGZHI; LI, YAOMIN; QU, YAO; LU, LAIJIN

    2016-01-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a debilitating neurovascular disease that is refractory to numerous treatment modalities. The present study reported the case of a 72-year-old woman diagnosed with EM secondary to polycythemia vera (PV), who was effectively treated with the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and interferon α-2b therapy. The study aimed to provide clinical information on this condition based on the findings of the present case and previously-reported cases. PCEA containing local anesthetics and dexamethasone or fentanyl resulted in nearly complete relief of symptoms. Furthermore, continuous use of interferon α-2b for the treatment of the PV completely relieved the EM symptoms. In conclusion, PCEA and interferon α-2b may be promising treatments for EM secondary to PV. PMID:27168811

  16. Novel mutations mapping to the fourth sodium channel domain of Nav1.7 result in variable clinical manifestations of primary erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Cregg, Roman; Laguda, Bisola; Werdehausen, Robert; Cox, James J; Linley, John E; Ramirez, Juan D; Bodi, Istvan; Markiewicz, Michael; Howell, Kevin J; Chen, Ya-Chun; Agnew, Karen; Houlden, Henry; Lunn, Michael P; Bennett, David L H; Wood, John N; Kinali, Maria

    2013-06-01

    We identified and clinically investigated two patients with primary erythromelalgia mutations (PEM), which are the first reported to map to the fourth domain of Nav1.7 (DIV). The identified mutations (A1746G and W1538R) were cloned and transfected to cell cultures followed by electrophysiological analysis in whole-cell configuration. The investigated patients presented with PEM, while age of onset was very different (3 vs. 61 years of age). Electrophysiological characterization revealed that the early onset A1746G mutation leads to a marked hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependence of steady-state activation, larger window currents, faster activation kinetics (time-to-peak current) and recovery from steady-state inactivation compared to wild-type Nav1.7, indicating a pronounced gain-of-function. Furthermore, we found a hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependence of slow inactivation, which is another feature commonly found in Nav1.7 mutations associated with PEM. In silico neuron simulation revealed reduced firing thresholds and increased repetitive firing, both indicating hyperexcitability. The late-onset W1538R mutation also revealed gain-of-function properties, although to a lesser extent. Our findings demonstrate that mutations encoding for DIV of Nav1.7 can not only be linked to congenital insensitivity to pain or paroxysmal extreme pain disorder but can also be causative of PEM, if voltage dependency of channel activation is affected. This supports the view that the degree of biophysical property changes caused by a mutation may have an impact on age of clinical manifestation of PEM. In summary, these findings extent the genotype-phenotype correlation profile for SCN9A and highlight a new region of Nav1.7 that is implicated in PEM. PMID:23292638

  17. Pathological C-fibres in patients with a chronic painful condition.

    PubMed

    Ørstavik, Kristin; Weidner, Christian; Schmidt, Roland; Schmelz, Martin; Hilliges, Marita; Jørum, Ellen; Handwerker, Herman; Torebjörk, Erik

    2003-03-01

    Little is known about the contribution of C-afferent fibres to chronic painful conditions in humans. We sought to investigate the role of C-fibres in the pathophysiology of pain and hyperalgesia in erythromelalgia as a model disease for chronic pain. Erythromelalgia is a condition characterized by painful, red and hot extremities, and patients often report tenderness on walking. We made microneurographic recordings from single C-fibres in cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve in patients suffering from this disease. All patients had had a pain attack recently and psychophysical signs of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia were found. We obtained recordings from a total of 103 C-fibres and found significantly lower conduction velocities and increased activity-dependent slowing of the conduction velocity of afferent C-fibres in the patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, several units with biophysical properties of mechano-insensitive fibres were pathological, being spontaneously active or sensitized to mechanical stimuli. Since these fibres also mediate the axon reflex flare, their hyperexcitability might account not only for ongoing pain and tenderness but also for redness and warming in this pain syndrome. The changes in conductive properties found in the C-fibres of these patients could be the first signs of a small-fibre neuropathy. This is the first systematic study of single C-fibres in patients and it shows an active contribution of mechano-insensitive fibres to chronic pain. PMID:12566278

  18. Toxicological Profiles of Poisonous, Edible, and Medicinal Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Hossain, Md. Akil

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are a recognized component of the human diet, with versatile medicinal properties. Some mushrooms are popular worldwide for their nutritional and therapeutic properties. However, some species are dangerous because they cause toxicity. There are many reports explaining the medicinal and/or toxic effects of these fungal species. Cases of serious human poisoning generally caused by the improper identification of toxic mushroom species are reported every year. Different substances responsible for the fatal signs and symptoms of mushroom toxicity have been identified from various poisonous mushrooms. Toxicity studies of mushroom species have demonstrated that mushroom poisoning can cause adverse effects such as liver failure, bradycardia, chest pain, seizures, gastroenteritis, intestinal fibrosis, renal failure, erythromelalgia, and rhabdomyolysis. Correct categorization and better understanding are essential for the safe and healthy consumption of mushrooms as functional foods as well as for their medicinal use. PMID:25346597

  19. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  20. Sex differences in the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases in Olmsted County, Minnesota, United States, and a comparison with other rates published worldwide.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2016-09-01

    Many skin and skin-related diseases affect the sexes unequally, with attendant implications for public health and resource allocation. To evaluate better the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases affecting males vs. females, we reviewed published population-based epidemiology studies of skin disorders performed utilizing Rochester Epidemiology Project data. Females had a higher incidence of the following diseases: connective tissue diseases (scleroderma, morphea, dermatomyositis, primary Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus [not in all studies]), pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, condyloma acuminatum, hidradenitis suppurativa, herpes zoster (except in children), erythromelalgia, venous stasis syndrome, and venous ulcers. Males had a higher incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, basal cell carcinoma (exception, females aged ≤40 years), squamous cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna. Incidence rates were equal in males and females for cutaneous malignant melanoma (exception, higher in females aged 18-39 years), lower-extremity cellulitis, cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, Behçet disease, delusional infestation, alopecia areata, and bullous pemphigoid. Many of the population-based sex-specific incidence rates of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project are strikingly different from those estimated elsewhere. In general, females are more commonly affected by skin and skin-related diseases. The reasons for this imbalance remain to be determined and are likely multifactorial. PMID:27009931

  1. Postcoital generalised pruritus as a first symptom of polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed

    Patidar, O P; Patidar, Rekha; Patidar, R P

    2013-01-01

    Ploycythaemia vera (PV) is most common of chronic myeloproliferative disorder that involves the multipotent haemaotopoietic progenitor cells. PV has indolent course and recognised either by incidental discovery of high haemoglobin or haemtocrit. PV may present with aquagenic pruritus (AP) for years together without any other sign and symptoms. So advice of simple complete bood count as a routine in every case of pruritus can be helpful to diagnose it timely thereby dreaded complications of PV, related to hyperviscosity of blood like thrombosis both arterial and venous can be managed antecedently. A 50-year-old male doctor diagnosed as a case of PV presented to us with postcoital generalised pruritus (PCP) as a first, rarest symptoms and he remained undiagnosed for 10 years till he developed other features of PV like aquagenic pruritus, headache, red congestion in eyes and erythromelalgia symptoms complex erythema, burning pain and warmness of lower extremities. Then he was investigated and was found to have high haemoglobin or haemtocrit, JAK 2 genetic mutation changes were present, bone marrow biopsy and other biochemical investigations confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Initially he was managed with repeated phlebotomy to bring down high haemtocrit value in acceptable range (approximately 45%). Simultaneously he was put on hydroxyurea 500 mg twice daily doses. Since then his symptoms improved and monthly blood count was done to monitor the haemtocrit. So advice of simple blood count is highly informative in every case of generalised pruritus. PMID:24000512

  2. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E.; Habib, Abdella M.; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Wood, John N.; Cox, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man. PMID:26035178

  3. Sodium channel slow inactivation interferes with open channel block

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Martin; Eberhardt, Esther; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Lampert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are linked to inherited pain syndromes such as erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). PEPD mutations impair Nav1.7 fast inactivation and increase persistent currents. PEPD mutations also increase resurgent currents, which involve the voltage-dependent release of an open channel blocker. In contrast, IEM mutations, whenever tested, leave resurgent currents unchanged. Accordingly, the IEM deletion mutation L955 (ΔL955) fails to produce resurgent currents despite enhanced persistent currents, which have hitherto been considered a prerequisite for resurgent currents. Additionally, ΔL955 exhibits a prominent enhancement of slow inactivation (SI). We introduced mutations into Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 that either enhance or impair SI in order to investigate their effects on resurgent currents. Our results show that enhanced SI is accompanied by impaired resurgent currents, which suggests that SI may interfere with open-channel block. PMID:27174182

  4. [Chronic pain and regional anesthesia in children].

    PubMed

    Dadure, C; Marec, P; Veyckemans, F; Beloeil, H

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pain is usually underestimated in children, due to lack of knowledge and its specific signs. In addition to suffering, chronic pain causes a physical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial burden for the child and his family. Practitioners may find themselves in a situation of failure with depletion of medical resources. Some types of chronic pain are refractory to conventional systemic treatment and may require the use of regional anesthesia. Cancer pain is common in children and its medical management is sometimes insufficient. It is accessible to neuroaxial or peripheral techniques of regional anesthesia if it is limited to an area accessible to one of these techniques and no contraindications (e.g., thrombopenia) are present. Complex regional pain syndrome 1 is not rare in children and adolescents, but it often goes undiagnosed. Regional anesthesia may contribute to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome 1, mainly in case of recurrence, because it provides rapid effective analgesia and allows rapid implementation of intensive physiotherapy. These techniques have also shown interest in phantom limb pain after limb amputation, but they remain controversial for erythromelalgia pain or chronic abdominopelvic pain. Finally, the treatment of postdural puncture headache due to cerebrospinal fluid leak can be treated by performing an epidural injection of the patient's blood, called a blood-patch. Finally, the management of children with chronic pain should be multidisciplinary (pediatrician, physiotherapist, psychologist, surgeon, anesthesiologist) to support the child and her problem in its entirety. PMID:23953871

  5. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25250524

  6. Novel SCN9A Mutations Underlying Extreme Pain Phenotypes: Unexpected Electrophysiological and Clinical Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C.; Habib, Abdella M.; Cox, James J.; Nicholas, Adeline K.; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of NaV1.7 (encoded by SCN9A) in the regulation of pain sensing is exemplified by the heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes associated with its mutation. Gain-of-function mutations are typically pain-causing and have been associated with inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). IEM is usually caused by enhanced NaV1.7 channel activation, whereas mutations that alter steady-state fast inactivation often lead to PEPD. In contrast, nonfunctional mutations in SCN9A are known to underlie congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Although well documented, the correlation between SCN9A genotypes and clinical phenotypes is still unclear. Here we report three families with novel SCN9A mutations. In a multiaffected dominant family with IEM, we found the heterozygous change L245 V. Electrophysiological characterization showed that this mutation did not affect channel activation but instead resulted in incomplete fast inactivation and a small hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state slow inactivation, characteristics more commonly associated with PEPD. In two compound heterozygous CIP patients, we found mutations that still retained functionality of the channels, with two C-terminal mutations (W1775R and L1831X) exhibiting a depolarizing shift in channel activation. Two mutations (A1236E and L1831X) resulted in a hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. To our knowledge, these are the first descriptions of mutations with some retained channel function causing CIP. This study emphasizes the complex genotype–phenotype correlations that exist for SCN9A and highlights the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of NaV1.7 as a critical region for channel function, potentially facilitating analgesic drug development studies. PMID:25995458

  7. Expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to central preterminal branches and terminals in the dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sodium channel Nav1.7 has emerged as a target of considerable interest in pain research, since loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene that encodes Nav1.7, are associated with a syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain, gain-of-function mutations are linked to the debiliting chronic pain conditions erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and upregulated expression of Nav1.7 accompanies pain in diabetes and inflammation. Since Nav1.7 has been implicated as playing a critical role in pain pathways, we examined by immunocytochemical methods the expression and distribution of Nav1.7 in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons, from peripheral terminals in the skin to central terminals in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Results Nav1.7 is robustly expressed within the somata of peptidergic and non-peptidergic DRG neurons, and along the peripherally- and centrally-directed C-fibers of these cells. Nav1.7 is also expressed at nodes of Ranvier in a subpopulation of Aδ-fibers within sciatic nerve and dorsal root. The peripheral terminals of DRG neurons within skin, intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENF), exhibit robust Nav1.7 immunolabeling. The central projections of DRG neurons in the superficial lamina of spinal cord dorsal horn also display Nav1.7 immunoreactivity which extends to presynaptic terminals. Conclusions The expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to preterminal central branches and terminals in the dorsal horn. These data support a major contribution for Nav1.7 in pain pathways, including action potential electrogenesis, conduction along axonal trunks and depolarization/invasion of presynaptic axons. The findings presented here may be important for pharmaceutical development, where target engagement in the right compartment is essential. PMID:23134641

  8. Evidence of Small-Fiber Polyneuropathy in Unexplained, Juvenile-Onset, Widespread Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that acquired small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN), previously uncharacterized in children, contributes to unexplained pediatric widespread pain syndromes. METHODS: Forty-one consecutive patients evaluated for unexplained widespread pain beginning before age 21 had medical records comprehensively analyzed regarding objective diagnostic testing for SFPN (neurodiagnostic skin biopsy, nerve biopsy, and autonomic function testing), plus histories, symptoms, signs, other tests, and treatments. Healthy, demographically matched volunteers provided normal controls for SFPN tests. RESULTS: Age at illness onset averaged 12.3 ± 5.7 years; 73% among this poly-ethnic sample were female (P = .001). Sixty-eight percent were chronically disabled, and 68% had hospitalizations. Objective testing diagnosed definite SFPN in 59%, probable SFPN in 17%, and possible SFPN in 22%. Only 1 of 41 had entirely normal SFPN test results. Ninety-eight percent of patients had other somatic complaints consistent with SFPN dysautonomia (90% cardiovascular, 82% gastrointestinal, and 34% urologic), 83% reported chronic fatigue, and 63% had chronic headache. Neurologic examinations identified reduced sensation in 68% and vasomotor abnormalities in 55%, including 23% with erythromelalgia. Exhaustive investigations for SFPN causality identified only history of autoimmune illnesses in 33% and serologic markers of disordered immunity in 89%. Treatment with corticosteroids and/or intravenous immune globulin objectively and subjectively benefited 80% of patients (12/15). CONCLUSIONS: More than half among a large series of patients with childhood-onset, unexplained chronic widespread pain met rigorous, multitest, diagnostic criteria for SFPN, which extends the age range of acquired SFPN into early childhood. Some cases appeared immune-mediated and improved with immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:23478869

  9. Essential thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Brière, Jean B

    2007-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is an acquired myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by a sustained elevation of platelet number with a tendency for thrombosis and hemorrhage. The prevalence in the general population is approximately 30/100,000. The median age at diagnosis is 65 to 70 years, but the disease may occur at any age. The female to male ratio is about 2:1. The clinical picture is dominated by a predisposition to vascular occlusive events (involving the cerebrovascular, coronary and peripheral circulation) and hemorrhages. Some patients with ET are asymptomatic, others may experience vasomotor (headaches, visual disturbances, lightheadedness, atypical chest pain, distal paresthesias, erythromelalgia), thrombotic, or hemorrhagic disturbances. Arterial and venous thromboses, as well as platelet-mediated transient occlusions of the microcirculation and bleeding, represent the main risks for ET patients. Thromboses of large arteries represent a major cause of mortality associated with ET or can induce severe neurological, cardiac or peripheral artery manifestations. Acute leukemia or myelodysplasia represent only rare and frequently later-onset events. The molecular pathogenesis of ET, which leads to the overproduction of mature blood cells, is similar to that found in other clonal MPDs such as chronic myeloid leukemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. Polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia of the spleen and ET are generally associated under the common denomination of Philadelphia (Ph)-negative MPDs. Despite the recent identification of the JAK2 V617F mutation in a subset of patients with Ph-negative MPDs, the detailed pathogenetic mechanism is still a matter of discussion. Therapeutic interventions in ET are limited to decisions concerning the introduction of anti-aggregation therapy and/or starting platelet cytoreduction. The therapeutic value of hydroxycarbamide and aspirin in high risk

  10. [When should a myeloproliferative syndrome be suggested in vascular medicine?].

    PubMed

    Lazareth, I; Delarue, R; Priollet, P

    2005-02-01

    Thrombotic events are frequent in polycythemia vera (PV) and in essential thrombocythemia (ET). The frequency of thrombotic complications at presentation of PV and ET is nearly 50%. The spectrum of thrombotic complications is broad: thrombosis of arteries, veins and microvessels have been reported. Venous thrombosis can involve all territories but PV and TE are the commonest underlying etiology for Budd-Chiari Syndrome and splanchnic veins thrombosis. Endogenous erythroid-colony formation may be seen in up to 78% of patients thought to have Budd Chiari Syndrome and in 48% of splanchnic veins thrombosis. Major arterial thrombotic complications occur in 20%, especially in the extremities and in cerebral circulation. Microcirculatory disturbances are common in ET, occurring in 29% at presentation and 27% during follow up. In the extremities, erythromelalgia, a characteristic syndrome of red and congested extremities with raised temperature and painful burning sensations, is noticed in 30 to 50% of TE. Other microcirculatory manifestations like acrocyanosis, blue toes, digital gangrene can occur. All of these manifestations are highly sensitive to aspirin. Cerebral microcirculatory symptoms occur in about one-third of patients: migraine, transient visual symptoms like scotomata, blurred vision are characterized by a sudden onset, a short duration and a sequential course. Three kinds of leg ulcers have been described: leg ulceration as a consequence of microcirculatory thrombosis, exceptionally, pyoderma gangrenosum, and leg ulcers attributed to side effects of hydroxyurea. Microcirculatory leg ulcers are the most common: they are painful, inflammatory and sometimes, necrotic. They heal with treatment of SMP. Hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers are painful, fibrous and multiple in 60%. Cessation of hydroxyurea typically leads to wound healing. The Polycythemia Vera Study Group (PVSG) established diagnostic criteria for PV and TE. Because SMP can have incompletely expressed