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Sample records for escherichia coli bl21de3

  1. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Derivative Strains To Minimize E. coli Protein Contamination after Purification by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B.; Benner, Jack S.; Samuelson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The “NiCo” strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein. PMID:21602383

  2. Expression of a Chimeric Allergen with High Rare Codons Content in Codon Bias-Adjusted Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)-Codon Plus RIL as an Efficient Host.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Hamid Reza; Karkhah, Ahmad; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2016-07-01

    The expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is importantly affected by codon bias. Hence, the aim of the current study was to determine which codon bias-adjusted E. coli strain is sufficient for expression of a chimeric allergen coded by high rare codon content. To investigate the expression level, a chimeric protein of Chenopodium album (C. album) was used as an appropriate model. An expression construct was assembled and was transformed to four strains of codon bias-adjusted E. coli including origami, BL21 (DE3), BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL, and Rosetta. The level of expression and solubility of the chimeric allergen was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the allergenicity of chimeric allergen was determined using immunoblotting. Our results showed that the chimeric allergen was expressed at high level in E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. In detail, this recombinant allergen was isolated from soluble fraction in the codon bias-adjusted strains of E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. Moreover, some lower molecular weight proteins were observed in Rosetta, which could be related to inappropriate expression or broken compartments of the chimeric allergen. The immunoblotting assay confirmed that the IgE-specific immune reactivity of our chimeric allergen expressed in BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL was significantly higher than the other strains. Our results showed that the expression of the chimeric allergen with high rare codons content in a codon bias-adjusted strain E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL improves the quality and solubility of the heterologous protein production. PMID:27040822

  3. Down Regulation of ackA-pta Pathway in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3): A Step Toward Optimized Recombinant Protein Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Nahid; Mirshahi, Manouchehr; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Maghsoudi, Nader; Tahzibi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the most important problems in production of recombinant protein is to attain over-expression of the target gene and high cell density. In such conditions, the secondary metabolites of bacteria become toxic for the medium and cause cells to die. One of these aforementioned metabolites is acetate, which enormously accumulated in the medium, so that both cell and protein yields are affected. Objectives: To overcome this problem, several strategies applied. In this research we used antisense RNA strategy, where the transcription of phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and acetate kinase (ACK), two acetate pathway key enzymes, could be controlled, which led to reduced acetate production. Materials and Methods: In order to achieve this, recombinant plasmid harboring antisense sequences targeting both of pta and ackA was assembled, after transfecting to the cells, its effects on the cell growth and acetate accumulation in the minimal media was assessed and compared with the control, the plasmid without antisense cassette, in presence and absence of IPTG in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Results: It was observed that the mentioned strategy partially affect the growth and amount of excreted acetate in comparison with the control. In addition it was found that high down-regulation of the acetate production pathway reduces the growth rate of E. coli BL21 (DE3). Conclusions: The study principally proved the importance of this strategy in acetate excretion control. PMID:25147677

  4. Lactose fed-batch overexpression of recombinant metalloproteins in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3): process control yielding high levels of metal-incorporated, soluble protein.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J; Broadwater, J A; Johnson, P; Harper, J; Fox, B G; Kenealy, W R

    1995-10-01

    A method for producing recombinant proteins in pilot scale fermentation equipment using a glucose fed-batch initial growth, followed by a midlog phase feeding of a glucose and lactose mixture is described. Using the host strain Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), the diiron protein stearoyl-acyl carrier protein delta 9 desaturase has been overexpressed at a biomass level of up to 12 g x liter-1 dry cell weight, representing a 12-fold increase in volumetric productivity relative to that obtained from batch fermentations. Under these conditions, a maximum of 36% of the total cellular protein accumulates as the desaturase polypeptide. A correlation between the slowed growth rate of the fed-batch culture, a continued, albeit slower, exponential growth under inducing conditions, and a favorable partitioning between formation of the soluble holoprotein and inclusion bodies is reported. This correlation suggests that fed-batch techniques can be used to beneficially influence rate-limiting processes in the maturation of overexpressed proteins, such as metal uptake and incorporation proposed here. By using cells produced from the fed-batch method, the iron-containing, soluble desaturase can be purified in a yield of up to 66 mg x g-1 dry cell weight (approximately 500 mg x liter-1 culture), representing a three to fivefold increase in the yield relative to that obtained from batch fermentations. In addition, these methods are suitable for the production of the Anabena 7120 vegetative [2Fe 2S] ferredoxin in E. coli BL21(DE3) pLysS, a host strain used for the overexpression of toxic proteins. PMID:8535158

  5. Identification of riboflavin: revealing different metabolic characteristics between Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinran; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-06-01

    There are many physiological differences between Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains, owing to their different origins. Deeper insight into the metabolic and regulative mechanisms of these strains will inform improved usage of these industrial workhorses. In the present study, we observed that BL21 fermentation broth gradually turned yellow during cultivation. By spectral analysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identification, we confirmed for the first time that the yellow substance accumulated in the fermentation broth is riboflavin. Comparing the enzyme sequences involved in riboflavin metabolism between BL21 and MG1655, we identified a site mutation on the 115 residue of bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenylyltransferase (RibF) in BL21. This His115Leu mutation was found to reduce enzyme activity to 55% of that of MG1655, which is probably one reason for riboflavin accumulation in BL21. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that genes of the entire branch of the riboflavin and FAD biosynthesis pathways in BL21 were up-regulated. Several physiological and metabolic characteristics of BL21 and MG1655 were found to be different, and may also be related to the riboflavin accumulation. PMID:25926527

  6. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  7. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  8. Understanding the differences between genome sequences of Escherichia coli B strains REL606 and BL21(DE3), and comparison of the closely related E. coli B and K-12 genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Studier, F.W.; Daegelen, P.; Lenski, R. E.; Maslov, S.; Kim, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    Each difference between the genome sequences of Escherichia coli B strains REL606 and BL21(DE3) can be interpreted in light of known laboratory manipulations plus a gene conversion between ribosomal RNA operons. Two treatments with 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine in the REL606 lineage produced at least 93 single-base-pair mutations ({approx} 90% GC-to-AT transitions) and 3 single-base-pair GC deletions. Two UV treatments in the BL21(DE3) lineage produced only 4 single-base-pair mutations but 16 large deletions. P1 transductions from K-12 into the two B lineages produced 317 single-base-pair differences and 9 insertions or deletions, reflecting differences between B DNA in BL21(DE3) and integrated restriction fragments of K-12 DNA inherited by REL606. Two sites showed selective enrichment of spontaneous mutations. No unselected spontaneous single-base-pair mutations were evident. The genome sequences revealed that a progenitor of REL606 had been misidentified, explaining initially perplexing differences. Limited sequencing of other B strains defined characteristic properties of B and allowed assembly of the inferred genome of the ancestral B of Delbrueck and Luria. Comparison of the B and K-12 genomes shows that more than half of the 3793 proteins of their basic genomes are predicted to be identical, although {approx} 310 appear to be functional in either B or K-12 but not in both. The ancestral basic genome appears to have had {approx} 4039 coding sequences occupying {approx} 4.0 Mbp. Repeated horizontal transfer from diverged Escherichia coli genomes and homologous recombination may explain the observed variable distribution of single-base-pair differences. Fifteen sites are occupied by phage-related elements, but only six by comparable elements at the same site. More than 50 sites are occupied by IS elements in both B and K, 16 in common, and likely founding IS elements are identified. A signature of widespread cryptic phage P4-type mobile elements was

  9. [Fusion expression and identification of angiostatin and endostatin in E. coli BL21(DE3)].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Weibin; Fu, Shihong; Li, Rende; Liang, Guodong

    2006-10-01

    Angiostatin(AS) and endostatin(ES) are both potent endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, and the combination of AS and ES has been shown to have synergistic antiangiogenic effects. Here we report the fusion protein AS-ES expressed in E. coli which has antiangiogenic effects. At first, AS and ES genes were cloned respectively through RT-PCR, then fusion gene was made through gene splicing ,finally pET-42 (b)/AS-ES expression plasmid was constructed and transduced in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Target protein was in form of inclusion body,the rate of expression was about 14%, and MW about 65KD. Western blotting assay showed expressed protein had specific immune reaction to both the antibodies of AS and ES. The expressed protein which was refolded and purified through heparin affinity chromatography had antiangiogenic effect to vessels on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. The results show that fusion protein AS-ES was expressed successfully in E. coli, and the expressed protein,which was renatured and purified, had immuno-reactivity to anti-AS and anti-ES in Western blotting and angiogenesis inhibition activity. PMID:17121360

  10. Rapid label-free quantitative analysis of the E. coli BL21(DE3) inner membrane proteome.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Kountourakis, Nikos; Koukaki, Marina; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes define cells and cellular compartments and are essential in regulating bidirectional flow of chemicals and signals. Characterizing their protein content therefore is required to determine their function, nevertheless, the comprehensive determination of membrane-embedded sub-proteomes remains challenging. Here, we experimentally characterized the inner membrane proteome (IMP) of the model organism E. coli BL21(DE3). We took advantage of the recent extensive re-annotation of the theoretical E. coli IMP regarding the sub-cellular localization of all its proteins. Using surface proteolysis of IMVs with variable chemical treatments followed by nanoLC-MS/MS analysis, we experimentally identified ∼45% of the expressed IMP in wild type E. coli BL21(DE3) with 242 proteins reported here for the first time. Using modified label-free approaches we quantified 220 IM proteins. Finally, we compared protein levels between wild type cells and those over-synthesizing the membrane-embedded translocation channel SecYEG proteins. We propose that this proteomics pipeline will be generally applicable to the determination of IMP from other bacteria. PMID:26466526

  11. Improving the Expression of Recombinant Proteins in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under Acetate Stress: An Alkaline pH Shift Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengwei; Wang, Fengqing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Xueling; Wei, Dongzhi; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2014-01-01

    Excess acetate has long been an issue for the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells. Recently, improvements in acetate tolerance have been achieved through the use of genetic strategies and medium supplementation with certain amino acids and pyrimidines. The aim of our study was to evaluate an alternative to improve the acetate tolerance of E. coli BL21 (DE3), a popular strain used to express recombinant proteins. In this work we reported the cultivation of BL21 (DE3) in complex media containing acetate at high concentrations. In the presence of 300 mM acetate, compared with pH 6.5, pH 7.5 improved cell growth by approximately 71%, reduced intracellular acetate by approximately 50%, and restored the expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP). Further experiments showed that alkaline pHs up to 8.5 had little inhibition in the expression of GST, GFP and CYP. In addition, the detrimental effect of acetate on the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) by the cell membrane, an index of cellular metabolic capacity, was substantially alleviated by a shift to alkaline pH values of 7.5–8.0. Thus, we suggest an approach of cultivating E. coli BL21 (DE3) at pH 8.0±0.5 to minimize the effects caused by acetate stress. The proposed strategy of an alkaline pH shift is a simple approach to solving similar bioprocessing problems in the production of biofuels and biochemicals from sugars. PMID:25402470

  12. Cloning and construction of recombinant palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca on pET-32b into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS for production of isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Moeis, Maelita R. Berlian, Liska Suhandono, Sony Prima, Alex Komalawati, Eli Kristianti, Tati

    2014-03-24

    Klebsiella oxytoca produces sucrose isomerase which catalyses the conversion of sucrose to isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar. From the previous study, palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca was succesfully isolated from sapodilla fruit (Manilkara zapota). The full-length palI gene sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca was cloned in E. coli DH5α. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 498 residues which includes conserved motif for sucrose isomerisation {sup 325}RLDRD{sup 329} and 97% identical to palI gene from Klebsiella sp. LX3 (GenBank:AAK82938.1). This fragment was succesfullly ligated into the expression vector pET-32b using overlap-extension PCR and cloned in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. DNA sequencing result shows that palI gene of Klebsiella oxytoca was inserted in-frame in pET-32b. This is the first report on cloning of palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca.

  13. Cloning and construction of recombinant palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca on pET-32b into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS for production of isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeis, Maelita R.; Berlian, Liska; Suhandono, Sony; Prima, Alex; Komalawati, Eli; Kristianti, Tati

    2014-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca produces sucrose isomerase which catalyses the conversion of sucrose to isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar. From the previous study, palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca was succesfully isolated from sapodilla fruit (Manilkara zapota). The full-length palI gene sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca was cloned in E. coli DH5α. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 498 residues which includes conserved motif for sucrose isomerisation 325RLDRD329 and 97% identical to palI gene from Klebsiella sp. LX3 (GenBank:AAK82938.1). This fragment was succesfullly ligated into the expression vector pET-32b using overlap-extension PCR and cloned in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. DNA sequencing result shows that palI gene of Klebsiella oxytoca was inserted in-frame in pET-32b. This is the first report on cloning of palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca.

  14. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h. PMID:23053089

  15. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively. PMID:27549808

  16. High-level expression of Bacillus naganoensis pullulanase from recombinant Escherichia coli with auto-induction: effect of lac operator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yao; Yan, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chen, Wen Bo; Mu, Xiao Qing; Wang, Xinye; Xiao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanase plays an important role in specific hydrolysis of branch points in amylopectin and is generally employed as an important enzyme in starch-processing industry. So far, however, the production level of pullulanase is still somewhat low from wide-type strains and even heterologous expression systems. Here the gene encoding Bacillus naganoensis pullulanase was amplified and cloned. For expression of the protein, two recombinant systems, Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul and E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul, were constructed, both bearing T7 promoter and signal peptide sequence, but different in the existance of lac operator and lacI gene encoding lac repressor. Recombinant pullulanase was initially expressed with the activity of up to 14 U/mL by E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul with IPTG induction in LB medium, but its expression level reduced continually with the extension of cryopreservation time and basal expression was observed. However, E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul , involving lac operator downstream of T7 promoter to regulate foreign gene transcription, exhibited pullulanase activity consistently without detected basal expression. By investigating the effect of lac operator, basal expression of foreign protein was found to cause expression instability and negative effect on production of target protein. Thus double-repression strategy was proposed that lac operators in both chromosome and plasmid were bound with lac repressor to repress T7 RNA polymerase synthesis and target protein expression before induction. Consequently, the total activity of pullulanase was remarkably increased to 580 U/mL with auto-induction by lac operator-involved E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul. When adding 0.6% glycine in culture, the extracellular production of pullulanase was significantly improved with the extracellular activity of 502 U/mL, which is a relatively higher level achieved to date for extracellular production of pullulanase. The successful

  17. High-Level Expression of Bacillus naganoensis Pullulanase from Recombinant Escherichia coli with Auto-Induction: Effect of lac Operator

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Chen, Wen Bo; Mu, Xiao Qing; Wang, Xinye; Xiao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanase plays an important role in specific hydrolysis of branch points in amylopectin and is generally employed as an important enzyme in starch-processing industry. So far, however, the production level of pullulanase is still somewhat low from wide-type strains and even heterologous expression systems. Here the gene encoding Bacillus naganoensis pullulanase was amplified and cloned. For expression of the protein, two recombinant systems, Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul and E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul, were constructed, both bearing T7 promoter and signal peptide sequence, but different in the existance of lac operator and lacI gene encoding lac repressor. Recombinant pullulanase was initially expressed with the activity of up to 14 U/mL by E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul with IPTG induction in LB medium, but its expression level reduced continually with the extension of cryopreservation time and basal expression was observed. However, E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul , involving lac operator downstream of T7 promoter to regulate foreign gene transcription, exhibited pullulanase activity consistently without detected basal expression. By investigating the effect of lac operator, basal expression of foreign protein was found to cause expression instability and negative effect on production of target protein. Thus double-repression strategy was proposed that lac operators in both chromosome and plasmid were bound with lac repressor to repress T7 RNA polymerase synthesis and target protein expression before induction. Consequently, the total activity of pullulanase was remarkably increased to 580 U/mL with auto-induction by lac operator-involved E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul. When adding 0.6% glycine in culture, the extracellular production of pullulanase was significantly improved with the extracellular activity of 502 U/mL, which is a relatively higher level achieved to date for extracellular production of pullulanase. The successful

  18. Increasing recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli K12 through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Waegeman, Hendrik; De Lausnay, Stijn; Beauprez, Joeri; Maertens, Jo; De Mey, Marjan; Soetaert, Wim

    2013-01-25

    Escherichia coli strains are widely used as host for the production of recombinant proteins. Compared to E. coli K12, E. coli BL21 (DE3) has several biotechnological advantages, such as a lower acetate yield and a higher biomass yield, which have a beneficial effect on protein production. In a previous study (BMC Microbiol. 2011, 11:70) we have altered the metabolic fluxes of a K12 strain (i.e. E. coli MG1655) by deleting the regulators ArcA and IclR in such a way that the biomass yield is remarkably increased, while the acetate production is decreased to a similar value as for BL21 (DE3). In this study we show that the increased biomass yield beneficially influences recombinant protein production as a higher GFP yield was observed for the double knockout strain compared to its wild type. However, at higher cell densities (>2 g L(-1) CDW), the GFP concentration decreases again, due to the activity of proteases which obstructs the application of the strain in high cell density cultivations. By further deleting the genes lon and ompT, which encode for proteases, this degradation could be reduced. Consequently, higher GFP yields were observed in the quadruple knockout strain as opposed to the double knockout strain and the MG1655 wild type and its yield approximates the GFP yield of E. coli BL21 (DE3), that is, 27±5 mg g(CDW)(-1) vs. 30±5 mg g(CDW)(-1), respectively. PMID:22115732

  19. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Imani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains RosettaTM(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and RosettaTM(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain RosettaTM(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin. PMID:27543150

  20. Highly reproductive Escherichia coli cells with no specific assignment to the UAG codon

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Takahito; Hoshi, Hiroko; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widely used host organism for recombinant technology, and the bacterial incorporation of non-natural amino acids promises the efficient synthesis of proteins with novel structures and properties. In the present study, we developed E. coli strains in which the UAG codon was reserved for non-natural amino acids, without compromising the reproductive strength of the host cells. Ninety-five of the 273 UAG stop codons were replaced synonymously in the genome of E. coli BL21(DE3), by exploiting the oligonucleotide-mediated base-mismatch-repair mechanism. This genomic modification allowed the safe elimination of the UAG-recognizing cellular component (RF-1), thus leaving the remaining 178 UAG codons with no specific molecule recognizing them. The resulting strain B-95.ΔA grew as vigorously as BL21(DE3) in rich medium at 25–42°C, and its derivative B-95.ΔAΔfabR was better adapted to low temperatures and minimal media than B-95.ΔA. UAG was reassigned to synthetic amino acids by expressing the specific pairs of UAG-reading tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Due to the preserved growth vigor, the B-95.ΔA strains showed superior productivities for hirudin molecules sulfonated on a particular tyrosine residue, and the Fab fragments of Herceptin containing multiple azido groups. PMID:25982672

  1. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  2. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  3. Production of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cultured in extract from waste product alga, Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Rechtin, Tammy M; Hurst, Matthew; Potts, Tom; Hestekin, Jamie; Beitle, Robert; McLaughlin, John; May, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the potential for waste product alga, Ulva lactuca, to serve as a media component for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. To facilitate this investigation, U. lactuca harvested from Jamaica Bay was dried, and nutrients acid extracted for use as a growth media. The E. coli cell line BL21(DE3) was used to assess the effects on growth and production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP). This study showed that media composed of acid extracts without further nutrient addition maintained E. coli growth and recombinant protein production. Extracts made from dried algae lots less than six-months-old were able to produce two-fold more GFP protein than traditional Lysogeny Broth media. PMID:24799463

  4. High-level soluble expression of a bacterial N-acyl-d-glucosamine 2-epimerase in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Klermund, Ludwig; Riederer, Amelie; Groher, Anna; Castiglione, Kathrin

    2015-07-01

    N-Acyl-d-glucosamine 2-epimerase (AGE) is an important enzyme for the biocatalytic synthesis of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Due to the wide range of biological applications of Neu5Ac and its derivatives, there has been great interest in its large-scale synthesis. Thus, suitable strategies for achieving high-level production of soluble AGE are needed. Several AGEs from various organisms have been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. However, the soluble expression level was consistently low with an excessive formation of inclusion bodies. In this study, the effects of different solubility-enhancement tags, expression temperatures, chaperones and host strains on the soluble expression of the AGE from the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 (AvaAGE) were examined. The optimum combination of tag, expression temperature, co-expression of chaperones and host strain (His6-tag, 37°C, GroEL/GroES, E. coli BL21(DE3)) led to a 264-fold improvement of the volumetric epimerase activity, a measure of the soluble expression, compared to the starting conditions (His6-maltose-binding protein-tag, 20°C, without chaperones, E. coli BL21(DE3)). A maximum yield of 22.5mg isolated AvaAGE per liter shake flask culture was obtained. PMID:25804337

  5. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  6. A Polyclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Bovine Haptoglobin Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Chunqiu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp), without the signal peptide sequence, was synthesized based on the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli. The synthesized pirBoHp gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a (+), which contains a His-tag. The recombinant pirBoHp protein was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Western blot analysis showed that the purified recombinant pirBoHp protein could be recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody. Further investigations indicated that a polyclonal antibody against the recombinant pirBoHp protein could recognize the α and β chains of native bovine haptoglobin in a pooled plasma sample from dairy cattle suffering from foot rot. PMID:24328747

  7. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  8. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  9. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  10. Expression and purification of lacticin Q by small ubiquitin-related modifier fusion in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingshan; Yu, Zhanqiao; Han, Bing; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Rijun

    2012-04-01

    Lacticin Q is a broad-spectrum class II bacteriocin with potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotics. The objective of this study was to produce recombinant lacticin Q using a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion protein expression system. The 168-bp lacticin Q gene was cloned into the expression vector pET SUMO and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The soluble fusion protein was recovered with a Ni-NTA Sepharose column (95% purity); 130 mg protein was obtained per liter of fermentation culture. The SUMO tag was then proteolytically cleaved from the protein, which was re-applied to the column. Finally, about 32 mg lacticin Q (≥96% purity) was obtained. The recombinant protein exhibited antimicrobial properties similar to that of the native protein, demonstrating that lacticin Q had been successfully expressed by the SUMO fusion system. PMID:22538663

  11. Optimization of expression and purification of two biologically active chimeric fusion proteins that consist of human interleukin-13 and Pseudomonas exotoxin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bharat H; Puri, Raj K

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that a variety of solid human tumor cell lines express a large number of receptors for interleukin-13 (IL-13). These receptors could be targeted with a chimeric fusion protein consisting of human IL-13 and a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). We describe here optimization of critical steps involved in high yield expression of two recombinant chimeric fusion proteins for obtaining highly purified and biologically active cytotoxins in Escherichia coli. The chimeric constructs of human IL-13 and two 38 kDa truncated PEs: (i) PE38 and (ii) PE38QQR, (three lysine residues in PE38 at 590, 606, and 613 substituted with two glutamine and one arginine) were used for protein expression in pET prokaryotic expression vector system with kanamycin as a selection antibiotic. Our results suggest that fresh transformation of E. coli and induction by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for 6 h resulted in maximum protein expression. To further improve the yield, we used a genetically modified E. coli strain, BL21(DE3)pLysS, which carries a plasmid for lysozyme with a weak promoter that inhibits T7 RNA polymerase and minimizes protein production in the absence of IPTG. Use of this strain eliminated the need for lysozyme digestion of the induced bacteria to release inclusion bodies, which resulted in expression of purer protein as compared to the conventional BL21(DE3) strain. Additional protocol optimizations included 16 h solubilization of inclusion bodies, constitution of refolding buffer, and timing of dialysis. These proteins were finally purified by Q-Sepharose, mono-Q, and gel filtration chromatography. Between 14-22 and 21-28 mg highly purified and biologically active protein was obtained from 1L of BL21 (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) pLysS bacteria culture, respectively. As IL-13R targeting for brain tumor therapy offers an exciting treatment option, optimization of production of IL-13PE will enhance production of clinical grade material

  12. Secretion-dependent proteolysis of heterologous protein by recombinant Escherichia coli is connected to an increased activity of the energy-generating dissimilatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Viaplana, E; Hoffmann, F; Marten, S; Villaverde, A; Rinas, U

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis of a proteolytically unstable protein, originally designed for periplasmic export in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), a strain naturally deficient for the ATP-dependent protease Lon (or La) and the outer membrane protease OmpT, is associated with a severe growth inhibition. This inhibition is not observed in BL21(DE3) synthesizing a closely related but proteolytically stable protein that is sequestered into inclusion bodies. It is shown that the growth inhibition is mainly caused by a slower cell division rate and a reduced growth yield and not by a general loss of cell division competence. Cells proceed with their normal growth characteristics when exposed again to conditions that do not sustain the expression of the heterologous gene. The performance of cells synthesizing either the stable or the degraded protein was also studied in high cell density cultures by employing a new method to calculate the actual specific growth rate, the biomass yield coefficient, and the dissimilated fraction of the carbon substrate in real-time. It is shown that the growth inhibition of cells synthesizing the proteolytically degraded protein is connected to an increased dissimilation of the carbon substrate resulting in a concomitant reduction of the growth rate and the biomass yield coefficient with respect to the carbon source. It is postulated that the increased dissimilation of the carbon substrate by lon-deficient Bl21(DE3) cells synthesizing the proteolytically unstable protein may result from a higher energy demand required for the in vivo degradation of this protein by ATP-dependent proteases different from the protease Lon. PMID:10556795

  13. Evaluation of three industrial Escherichia coli strains in fed-batch cultivations during high-level SOD protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are among the most frequently used bacterial hosts for producing recombinant proteins because they allow a simple process set-up and they are Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for human applications. Widespread use of E. coli in biotechnology has led to the development of many different strains, and selecting an ideal host to produce a specific protein of interest is an important step in developing a production process. E. coli B and K–12 strains are frequently employed in large-scale production processes, and therefore are of particular interest. We previously evaluated the individual cultivation characteristics of E. coli BL21 and the K–12 hosts RV308 and HMS174. To our knowledge, there has not yet been a detailed comparison of the individual performances of these production strains in terms of recombinant protein production and system stability. The present study directly compared the T7-based expression hosts E. coli BL21(DE3), RV308(DE3), and HMS174(DE3), focusing on evaluating the specific attributes of these strains in relation to high-level protein production of the model protein recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD). The experimental setup was an exponential carbon-limited fed-batch cultivation with minimal media and single-pulse induction. Results The host strain BL21(DE3) produced the highest amounts of specific protein, followed by HMS174(DE3) and RV308(DE3). The expression system HMS174(DE3) exhibited system stability by retaining the expression vector over the entire process time; however, it entirely stopped growing shortly after induction. In contrast, BL21(DE3) and RV308(DE3) encountered plasmid loss but maintained growth. RV308(DE3) exhibited the lowest ppGpp concentration, which is correlated with the metabolic stress level and lowest degradation of soluble protein fraction compared to both other strains. Conclusions Overall, this study provides

  14. Expression of Recombinant Human Insulin-like Growth Factor Type 1 (rhIGF-1) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Iranpoor, Hamidreza; Omidinia, Eskandar; Vatankhah, Venus; Gharanjik, Vahid; Shahbazi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human insulin-like growth factor type 1 (hIGF-1) is a protein consisting of 70 amino acids (MW=7.6 kDa) and mainly synthesized by liver. Mecasermin (Trade name INCRELEX) is the synthetic form of the protein which is used as an effective treatment for particular disorders such as short stature, type 1 and 2 diabetes, and wound healing. Current study was aimed to investigate the expression of human insulin-like growth factor type1 in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21 (DE3) expression system in order to produce an active recombinant form of the protein. Methods: For the purpose of the study, firstly codon optimization was done for hIGF-1 gene, using bioinformatics databases. Then, the gene was synthesized and inserted in pET-24a vector by a cutting strategy included NdeI and BamHI-HF enzymes. In the next step, gene was run in agarose gel and purified. The constructed expression cassette was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells through CaCl 2 heat shock method. Identification and confirmation of the transformed colonies were performed using screening PCR method. Synthesis of hIGF-1 was induced by IPTG. The expression in induced strains was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting techniques. Confirmation of cloning and IGF-1 expression cassette was carried out through genetic engineering procedures. Results: Analysis of transformed E. coli strain with SDS-PAGE and western blotting techniques confirmed that gene was expressed in host cells. Molecular weight of the expressed protein was estimated to be 7.6 kDa. Conclusion: hIGF-1 expression cassette for cloning and expression in E. coli was designed and the protein of interest was successfully induced and identified. In addition, E. coli BL21 (DE3) can be used as a suitable host for production of recombinant hIGF-1 and this technology has a potential to be localized. PMID:26306149

  15. Biochemical Characterization of the FEZ-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase of Legionella gormanii ATCC 33297T Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, Paola Sandra; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Boschi, Letizia; Lamotte-Brasseur, Josette; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Devreese, Bart; van Beeumen, Jozef; Frère, Jean-Marie; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Galleni, Moreno

    2001-01-01

    The blaFEZ-1 gene coding for the metallo-β-lactamase of Legionella (Fluoribacter) gormanii ATCC 33297T was overexpressed via a T7 expression system in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)(pLysS). The product was purified to homogeneity in two steps with a yield of 53%. The FEZ-1 metallo-β-lactamase exhibited a broad-spectrum activity profile, with a preference for cephalosporins such as cephalothin, cefuroxime, and cefotaxime. Monobactams were not hydrolyzed. The β-lactamase was inhibited by metal chelators. FEZ-1 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 29,440 Da which possesses two zinc-binding sites. Its zinc content did not vary in the pH range of 5 to 9, but the presence of zinc ions modified the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. A model of the FEZ-1 three-dimensional structure was built. PMID:11257043

  16. High-level production of Arthrobacter aurescens CYC705 nitrilase in Escherichia coli for biosynthesis of iminodiacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Erzheng; Lu, Chao; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Wenwen; Zhu, Shujing

    2016-07-01

    Nitrilase from Arthrobacter aurescens CYC705 can hydrolyze the iminodiacetonitrile to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) efficiently, and its high-level production in Escherichia coli has not been established. In the present work, the production of this nitrilase expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) with a recombinant plasmid pET28a-cyc705 was optimized. Various culture conditions and process parameters including medium components and concentrations, inducer types and concentrations, inducing temperature and time were systematically examined in a shake flask. After optimization, the OD600 , nitrilase activity, and productivity were obviously improved and achieved to 40.91 ± 1.341, 98.12 ± 1.248 U/mL, and 2,230 ± 28.36 U L(-1)  H(-1) , respectively, about 2.1-, 30-, and 33-fold increases as compared with those in the primary medium. Furthermore, four different fermentation strategies were adopted to scale up cultivation of the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET28a-cyc705 in a 3.7-L fermenter. Substituting the peanut powder with fish peptone and accompanying with 1.0% glycerol feeding could significantly reduce the bubble production and shorten the fermentation time, which resulted in a nitrilase productivity of 4,653 ± 38.16 U L(-1) H(-1) that was about two times higher than that in a shake flask. The high-level production of A. aurescens CYC705 nitrilase established in this study will meet the need of industrial biosynthesis of IDA. PMID:26095946

  17. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25146562

  18. Antimicrobial action of histone H2B in Escherichia coli: evidence for membrane translocation and DNA-binding of a histone H2B fragment after proteolytic cleavage by outer membrane proteinase T.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Koyama, Takumi; Conlon, J Michael; Yamakura, Fumiyuki; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have led to the isolation of histone H2B with antibacterial properties from an extract of the skin of the Schlegel's green tree frog Rhacophorus schlegelii and it is now demonstrated that the intact peptide is released into norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of this peptide, a maltose-binding protein (MBP)-fused histone H2B (MBP-H2B) conjugate was prepared and subjected to antimicrobial assay. The fusion protein showed bacteriostatic activity against Escherichia coli strain JCM5491 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 11 microM. The lysate prepared from JCM5491 cells was capable of fragmenting MBP-H2B within the histone H2B region, but the lysate from the outer membrane proteinase T (OmpT) gene-deleted BL21(DE3) cells was not. FITC-labeled MBP-H2B (FITC-MBP-H2B) penetrated into the bacterial cell membrane of JCM5491 and ompT-transformed BL21(DE3) cells, but not into ompT-deleted BL21(DE3) cells. Gel retardation assay using MBP-H2B-deletion mutants indicated that MBP-H2B bound to DNA at a site within the N-terminal region of histone H2B. Consequently, it is proposed that the antimicrobial action of histone H2B involves, at least in part, penetration of an OmpT-produced N-terminal histone H2B fragment into the bacterial cell membrane with subsequent inhibition of cell functions. PMID:18706965

  19. Development of anaerobically inducible nar promoter expression vectors for the expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nag-Jong; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Yeon Chul; Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Sang Yup; Chang, Ho Nam; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2011-01-10

    Dissolved oxygen (DO)-controlled nar promoter expression vectors were constructed, and their expression efficiency was compared with that of the T7 promoter pET22 expression vector by expressing human growth hormone (hGH), enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and β-tyrosinase in Escherichia coli cells. The nar promoter expression vector pRBS, which was engineered with a 5'-untranslated region and ribosomal binding site for the T7 promoter, expressed hGH at a rate of up to 32% of the total cellular proteins (TCP) in E. coli W3110narL⁻. The expression level of hGH was further enhanced, up to ~42% of the TCP, by adding the N-terminal peptide tag of β-galactosidase to hGH, which was comparable to the expression of ~43% of the TCP in pET-lac:hGH/BL21(DE3). A further engineered expression vector, pRBS(fnr), which coexpressed fumarate/nitrate reductase (fnr), expressed more EGFP than pET22 in BL21(DE3). In addition, recombinant β-tyrosinase was successfully expressed at a rate of up to ~45% of the TCP in pRBS(fnr) in W3110narL⁻. From these results, the DO-controlled nar promoter system developed in this study can be considered a reliable and cost-effective expression system for protein production, especially in large-scale fermentation, as an alternative to the pET/BL(DE3) system. PMID:21111764

  20. Expression and secretion of functional recombinant μO-conotoxin MrVIB-His-tag in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bingmiao; Zhangsun, Dongting; Hu, Yuanyan; Wu, Yong; Sheng, Lizi; Fang, Licong; Wu, Xiaosa; Yu, Jinpeng; Luo, Sulan

    2013-09-01

    μO-conotoxin MrVIB is a 31-amino acid peptide containing three disulfide bonds isolated from the venom of Conus marmoreus, which is a selective antagonist of voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) Nav1.8 and has a long-lasting analgesic activity. Drug development of MrVIB has long been hindered over 15 years by difficult chemical synthesis and oxidative folding. Herein we describe a different approach based on the recombinant expression of gene MrVIB in Escherichia coli. A secretion vector pET22b(+)-MrVIB fused with pelB leader signal peptide and His-tag was constructed, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) strain of E. coli. The recombinant conotoxin MrVIB-His-tag (rMrVIB-His) was successfully expressed and secreted into the periplasmic space of BL21 (DE3) cells. The pelB leader signal peptide was properly cleaved and three disulfide bonds were also formed properly to yield biological active rMrVIB-His. Folded rMrVIB-His in the periplasmic fraction was isolated with a Ni-NTA affinity column, which was further purified using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry (LC/MS-IT-TOF). Biological activity assay of rMrVIB-His showed it had good analgesic effects in three pain models. PMID:23811388

  1. High-level soluble expression of Serratia marcescens H30 lipase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Su, Erzheng; Xu, Jingjing; Wu, Xiangping

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens lipase (SmL) is an important biocatalyst used to enantioselectively hydrolyze (±)-trans-3-(4-methoxyphynyl) glycidic acid methyl ester. However, the economically justified level recombinant soluble expression of SmL in Escherichia coli has not been established. Thus, fusion genes of lipase from S. marcescens H30 with different fusion tags were constructed and expressed in E. coli. The effects of fusion tags were revealed. A significant increase in recombinant lipase solubility showed that E. coli BL21 (DE3)/pET32a-SmL was a suitable choice for SmL production. To optimize the performance of recombinant SmL production, changes in culture medium compositions and induction conditions were systematically tested. Finally, the recombinant SmL activity and productivity reached approximately 23,000 U/L and 1,278 U/L/H in shake flasks, respectively. This value is the highest SmL activity attained by heterogeneous recombinant expression in E. coli. Lipase activity and productivity reached 19,650 U/L and 1,228 U/L/H, respectively, by scaling up SmL production in a 7.0 L fermenter. The existence of the Trx tag did not influence the chiral selectivity of recombinant SmL. These findings indicate a possibility for soluble and economical SmL expression in E. coli to meet industrial needs. PMID:24852607

  2. Comparison of Three Escherichia coli Strains in Recombinant Production of Reteplase

    PubMed Central

    Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Akhavian-Tehrani, Asal; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most extensively used host for the production of recombinant proteins. However, most of the eukaryotic proteins are typically obtained as insoluble, misfolded inclusion bodies that need solubilization and refolding. Reteplase as a highly disulfide-bonded recombinant protein is an example of difficult to express protein in E. coli. Methods: In this study, a codon optimized reteplase gene was synthetically prepared and cloned under the control of an IPTG inducible T7 promoter. The vector was simultaneously transformed and expressed in three different E. coli strains. The ability of strains for expression of this recombinant pharmaceutical was compared. Also, an attempt was made to increase the soluble production of reteplase in SHuffle T7 E. coli with alterations of expression condition like temperature, inducer concentration and oxygen supply. Results: High amounts of reteplase were expressed as inclusion bodies in all three strains. BL21 (DE3) showed the highest level of expression in inclusion bodies followed by Rosetta-gami (DE3) and Shuffle T7. Changes of expression conditions were insufficient for soluble expression of reteplase in SHuffle T7 as a genetically engineered host for production of disulfide bonded proteins. Conclusion: The oxidizing cytoplasm of Rosetta-gami and Shuffle T7 in addition to alterations of cultivation parameters could not result in soluble production of reteplase, although the inclusion bodies produced in these two strains might increase the rate of refolding procedure likely due to formation of folding intermediates. PMID:26855731

  3. [Expression of Pleurocidin from winter flounder in Escherichia coli and optimization of culture conditions].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejiao; Zha, Xiangdong; Che, Yuanyuan; Ma, Lijuan; Wu, Siqun; Yang, Peilong; Huang, Huoqing; Yao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To express Pleurocidin in Escherichia coli and to enhance the secretory efficiency of the fusion protein, the gene encoding Pleurocidin was ligated with Cherry DNA sequence via blunt-end ligation. Then this fusion gene was cloned into pET22b (+) vector and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Lactose was used to induce expression of fusion protein. The recombinant plasmid pET22b (+) -CP was successfully constructed and high-level expression of fusion protein was induced with lactose. Statistics showed that addition of glycine after 16 h of induction significantly enhanced the secretory efficiency of the fusion protein. After hydrolysis of the fusion protein by diluted hydrochloric acid and some further purification steps, r-Pleurocidin was obtained with antibacterial activity against E. coli DH5α and Bacillus subtilis BS168. In conclusion, the fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and biologically active r-Pleurocidin was obtained after hydrochloric acid cleavage and purification. PMID:27349119

  4. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the stress kinase YeaG from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tagourti, Jihen; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Richarme, Gilbert

    2008-05-01

    We cloned, overexpressed and purified the Escherichia coli yeaG gene product, whose amino acid sequence displays homology to prokaryotic serine protein kinases. The gene coding for YeaG was generated by amplifying the yeaG gene from E. coli by polymerase chain reaction. It was inserted into the expression plasmid pET-21a, under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. A BL21(DE3) E. coli strain transformed with the YeaG-expression vector pET-21a-yeaG accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein with a molecular mass of 76kDa in SDS-PAGE, which matches the expected YeaG molecular weight of 74.5kDa. YeaG, although soluble, has a marked tendency to aggregate in the absence of detergents, so that it was purified in the presence of 0.1% Triton X-100, by ion exchange chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified protein is monomeric and displays autokinase and casein kinase activities which are optimal in the presence of 10mM Mn(2+). The purification of the active protein kinase YeaG described in this study should allow us to characterize its biochemical target(s) in E. coli extracts. PMID:18276156

  5. High-yield recombinant expression of the chicken antimicrobial peptide fowlicidin-2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingjun; Xu, Wenshan; Qu, Pei; Li, Xiaochong; Xing, Liwei; Liu, Di; Jiao, Jian; Wang, Jue; Li, Zhongqiu; Liu, Chunlong

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide fowlicidin-2 identified in chicken is a member of the cathelicidins family. The mature fowlicidin-2 possesses high antibacterial efficacy and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) neutralizing activity, and also represents an excellent candidate as an antimicrobial agent. In the present study, the recombinant fowlicidin-2 was successfully produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) recombinant expression system. The gene encoding fowlicidin-2 with the codon preference of E. coli was designed through codon optimization and synthesized in vitro. The gene was then ligated into the plasmid pET-32a(+), which features fusion protein thioredoxin at the N-terminal. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and cultured in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. After isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, the fowlicidin-2 fusion protein was successfully expressed as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were dissolved and successfully released the peptide in 70% formic acid solution containing cyanogen bromide (CNBr) in a single step. After purification by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), ∼6.0 mg of fowlicidin-2 with purity more than 97% was obtained from 1 litre of bacteria culture. The recombinant peptide exhibited high antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and even drug-resistant strains. This system could be used to rapidly and efficiently produce milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant antimicrobial peptides as well as for large-scale production. PMID:25641948

  6. Codon optimization for high level expression of human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Pramesti, H T; Santika, P Y; Valerius, O; Asjarie, S; Suciati, T

    2012-08-01

    Codons in the open reading frame (ORF) encoding for human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) were optimized to reach high level expression in Escherichia coli. The optimization was done by the computer programs DNA works and DNA Star according to Thermodynamically Balanced Inside Out (TBIO) approach. The ORF consisting of 342 base pairs (bp) was assembled using two-steps Polymerase Chain Reaction, cloned into a pGEM-T vector with a mutation rate of 6.38 bp per kb and transformed into E. coli JM109. After a DNA sequence confirmation, mutation-free ORF was subcloned into pET32b and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). The rhBMP-2 was produced as a thioredoxin-his-tag fusion protein at relatively high level, approximately 60% of total intracellular proteins as inclusion bodies (IB), with a yield of 1.39 g per liter culture. Solubilization of IB gave soluble monomer rhBMP-2 with a recovery of 13.6% and refolding of soluble rhBMP-2 produced dimeric forms with a yield of 8.7%. The size and identity of the purified rhBMP-2 was confirmed by nano-LC-MS/MS2 analysis. Our work demonstrates for the first time that by using TBIO approach, a codon-optimized ORF encoding for rhBMP-2 protein can be expressed at high level in E. coli expression system. PMID:22691543

  7. Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the ... at CDC Foodborne disease Travelers' Health: Safe Food & Water Healthy Swimming E. coli Infection & Farm ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  8. Cloning and Optimization of Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor165 Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Ali; Babashamsi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a coordinate regulator of physiological angiogenesis during embryogenesis, skeletal growth and reproductive functions. There are several types of VEGF, including VEGF165. VEGFs stimulate endothelial cell growth, angiogenesis, and capillary permeability. Low induction temperature is a major factor for expression of the recombinant VEGF165 in soluble form. The purpose of this study was cloning and optimization of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor165 expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: In this study, total RNA of HeLa cell [cervix epithelium] was extracted. The VEGF165 gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR), and then VEGF165 was subcloned into prokaryotic expression vectors pET-32a(+) and transformed into BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain. VEGF165 expression was optimized by fine adjustments such as induction time and incubation temperature. VEGF165 was analyzed by DNA sequencing prior to expression and the protein was further characterized by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using His•tag specific polyclonal antibody. Results: Our results demonstrated that VEGF165 was successfully cloned and expressed in pET-32a(+) vector. Optimization of the expression procedure showed that, induction by 1 mM IPTG at OD600=0.7 and overnight incubation at 22°C resulted in the highest expression levels of soluble VEGF165. Conclusion: In this study, the expression of VEGF165 in a high soluble level was successfully cloned and optimized. PMID:26855732

  9. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products inmore » BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.« less

  10. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.

  11. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coursolle, Dan; Lian, Jiazhang; Shanklin, John; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-09-01

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg L(-1) long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg L(-1) titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system. PMID:26135500

  12. Expression and purification of bioactive high-purity human midkine in Escherichia coli *

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-hui; Du, Li-juan; Xiang, Di; Zhu, Shun-ying; Wu, Ming-yuan; Lu, Hui-li; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Midkine is a heparin-binding growth factor, which plays important roles in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The non-tagged recombinant human midkine (rhMK) is therefore required to facilitate its functional studies of this important growth factor. In the present work, rhMK was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21 (DE3). The expression of midkine was efficiently induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). After sonication, midkine was recovered in an insoluble form, and was dissolved in guanidine hydrochloride buffer. Renaturation of the denatured protein was carried out in the defined protein refolding buffer, and the refolded protein was purified using S-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography. The final preparation of the rhMK was greater than 98% pure as measured by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The purified rhMK enhanced the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. PMID:19235265

  13. Optimization of a single-chain antibody fragment overexpression in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Akbari, V; Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Chou, C Perry; Abedi, D

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family plays an important role in various types of cancers. As a result, antibodies against HER and the mechanism of antigen-antibody binding action are under active investigation. We previously constructed a single-chain variable fragment (ScFv) against HER2, i.e. anti-Her2 ScFv, for expressing in the Escherichia coli. In the present study, we report the optimization of anti-Her2 ScFv expression in an E. coli host of BL21 (DE3) pLysS using response surface methodology based on tuning of three cultivation variables, including isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentration, temperature and post-induction time. A model for protein expression according to the Box-Behnken design predicted a maximal anti-Her2 ScFv expression at 37 °C, a post-induction time of 10.45 h and 0.75 mM IPTG. In addition, strategies based on inclusion body isolation and affinity chromatography were applied to purify anti-Her2 ScFv. The purity of the final product for inclusion bodies isolation and purification by Ni-NTA resin were 70 % and 95 %, respectively. The solubilization of the inclusion bodies was carried out using two denaturant agents, guanidine hydrochloride and urea. The present study showed that guanidine hydrochloride was more effective than urea in solubilizing the inclusion bodies. PMID:26430460

  14. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans antimicrobial peptide NLP-31 in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a fulminant disease endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The standardized form of therapy is antibiotics treatment; however, the bacterium has become increasingly resistant to these antibiotics. This has spurred the need to search for alternative therapeutic agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small proteins that possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. In a previous study, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was infected by B. pseudomallei and a whole animal transcriptome analysis identified a number of AMP-encoded genes which were induced significantly in the infected worms. One of the AMPs identified is NLP-31 and to date, there are no reports of anti-B. pseudomallei activity demonstrated by NLP-31. To produce NLP-31 protein for future studies, the gene encoding for NLP-31 was cloned into the pET32b expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Protein expression was induced with 1 mM IPTG for 20 hours at 20°C and recombinant NLP-31 was detected in the soluble fraction. Taken together, a simple optimized heterologous production of AMPs in an E. coli expression system has been successfully developed.

  15. Genetically encoded ratiometric biosensors to measure intracellular exchangeable zinc in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Hurst, Tamiika K.; Thompson, Richard B.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-08-01

    Zinc is an essential element for numerous cellular processes, therefore zinc homeostasis is regulated in living organisms. Fluorescent sensors have been developed as important tools to monitor the concentrations of readily exchangeable zinc in live cells. One type of biosensor uses carbonic anhydrase (CA) as the recognition element based on its tunable affinity, superior metal selectivity, and fluorescence signal from aryl sulfonamide ligands coupled to zinc binding. Here, we fuse carbonic anhydrase with a red fluorescent protein to create a series of genetically-encoded Förster resonance energy transfer-based excitation ratiometric zinc sensors that exhibit large signal increases in response to alterations in physiological-free zinc concentrations. These sensors were applied to the prokaryotic model organism Escherichia coli to quantify the readily exchangeable zinc concentration. In minimal media, E. coli BL21(DE3) cells expressing the CA sensor, exhibit a median intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration of 20 pM, much less than the total cellular zinc concentration of ~0.2 mM. Furthermore, the intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration varies with the concentration of environmental zinc.

  16. Recombinant expression and characterization of a novel endoglucanase from Bacillus subtilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muddassar; Ahmed, Sibtain; Khan, Muhammad Imran Mahmood; Jamil, Amer

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this work was to produce high levels of endoglucanase in Escherichia coli for its potential usage in different industrial applications. Endoglucanase gene was amplified from genomic DNA of Bacillus subtilis JS2004 by PCR. The isolated putative endoglucanase gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1,701 nucleotides and encoded a protein of 567 amino acids with a molecular mass of 63-kDa. The gene was cloned into pET-28a(+) and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Optimum temperature and pH of the recombinant endoglucanase were 50 °C and 9, respectively which makes it very attractive for using in bio-bleaching and pulp industry. It had a K M of 1.76 μmol and V max 0.20 μmol/min with carboxymethylcellulose as substrate. The activity of recombinant endoglucanse was enhanced by Mg2+, Ca2+, isopropanol and Tween 20 and inhibited by Hg2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and SDS. The activity of this recombinant endoglucanase was significantly higher than wild type. Therefore, this recombinant enzyme has potential for many industrial applications involving biomass conversions, due to characteristic of broad pH and higher temperature stability. PMID:24493451

  17. A proposed feeding strategy for the overproduction of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rasoul; Maghsoudi, Nader; Tabandeh, Fatemeh

    2008-02-01

    Different feeding strategies for the production of human interferon-gamma using an isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside-inducible expression system in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) (plasmid pET3a-ifngamma) were studied. Four fed-batch modes were designed to compare the effect of mu (specific growth rate) on recombinant-protein production, substrate consumption, by-product formation and plasmid stability during pre- and post-chemical induction in high-cell-density cultures of E. coli. It was found that Y(p/s), the product/substrate yield of interferon-gamma was significantly affected by mu throughout the process, but product/biomass yield (Y(p/x)) was influenced by mu at the pre-induction stage. By applying an efficient feeding strategy, in which the mu was maintained at the maximum attainable level, recombinant protein was accumulated up to a level of 60% of the total cell protein and its productivity was increased significantly. In this case, the overall productivities of biomass and recombinant protein were 6.36 g l(-1) h(-1) and 2.1 g l(-1) h(-1) respectively, in comparison with 1.91 g l(-1) h(-1) and 0.16 g l(-1) h(-1) during exponential feeding, in which the specific growth rate was kept constant throughout the entire process. PMID:17630954

  18. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  19. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  20. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  1. Expression and purification of a functional recombinant aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lihui; Zhao, Haijian; Wang, Daguang; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Xiao, Fei

    2014-07-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST; E.C. 2.6.1.1), a vitamin B6-dependent enzyme, preferentially promotes the mutual transformation of aspartate and α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate and glutamate. It plays a key role in amino acid metabolism and has been widely recommended as a biomarker of liver and heart damage. Our study aimed to evaluate the extensive preparation of AST and its application in quality control in clinical laboratories. We describe a scheme to express and purify the 6His-AST fusion protein. An optimized sequence coding AST was synthesized and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression. Ideally, the fusion protein has a volumetric productivity achieving 900 mg/l cultures. After affinity chromatography, the enzyme activity of purified AST reached 150,000 U/L. Commutability assessment between the engineered AST and standard AST from Roche suggested that the engineered AST was the better candidate for the reference material. Moreover, the AST showed high stability during long-term storage at -20ºC. In conclusion, the highly soluble 6His-tagged AST can become a convenient tool for supplying a much better and cheaper standard or reference material for the clinical laboratory. PMID:24722375

  2. Heterologous Expression and Efficient Secretion of Chitosanase from Microbacterium sp. in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuying; Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Shujun

    2015-06-01

    A recombinant expression vector, pCT7-CHISP6H, was constructed for the secretory expression of mature peptide of chitosanase (mMschito) from Microbacterium sp. OU01. The vector contains several elements, including T7 promoter, signal peptide sequence of mschito, 6 × His-tag sequence and PmaCI restriction enzyme cloning site. In pCT7-CHISP6H, mMschito was fused into signal peptide sequence of mschito gene to construct recombinant plasmid pCT7-CHISP6H-mMschito. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and then expressed. The recombinant protein was secreted into the Luria-Bertani broth and the chitosanase activity in supernatant of the culture could reach up to 67.56 U/mL. The rmMschito in the broth supernatant was purified using HisTrap™ FF Crude column and the purified rmMschito was shown to be apparent homogeneity by 12 % SDS-PAGE analysis. Detected by 4700 MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS, the molecular weight of the purified rmMschito was 26,758.1875 and it was consistent with the predicted molecular weight. Chitosan (degree of deacetylation of 99 %) was mostly hydrolyzed into chitopentaose, chitotriose, and chitobiose by the purified rmMschito. PMID:25805906

  3. Scaling Up the Production of Recombinant Antimicrobial Plantaricin E from a Heterologous Host, Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pal, Gargi; Srivastava, Sheela

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced production of heterologously expressed plantaricin (plnE) from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was achieved from a small- to large-scale batch culture. Starting from a 15-ml shake-flask culture grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, the protein expression could be scaled up using 50 ml, 100 ml, 1 l, and 2 l batch culture. Using similar condition, plantaricin E (PlnE) was successfully expressed in a 30-l stirred fermenter. The protein was expressed as TRX-(His)6-fusion protein and separated by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. Growth in two complex media, LB and Terrific broth (TB), was optimized and compared for the production of PlnE, which was higher in LB in comparison with that of TB. In the fermenter, 140 and 180 mg of PlnE could be produced from 12 l of culture volume at 30 and 25 °C, respectively. The yield of heterologously purified PlnE was found to be 1.2-1.5%, which was much higher in comparison with the plantaricins produced from the native strain of Lactobacillus plantarum (0.3-0.7%). Overproduction of PlnE with the help of heterologous expression can overcome the constraint of the low yield from producer strain and provides an easy and low-cost strategy for large-scale production. PMID:26044056

  4. Expression and purification of bioactive high-purity recombinant mouse SPP1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yunsheng; Zhang, Xiyuan; Weng, Shunyan; Guan, Wen; Xiang, Di; Gao, Jin; Li, Jingjing; Han, Wei; Yu, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) is a phosphorylated acidic glycoprotein. It is broadly expressed in a variety of tissues, and it is involved in a number of physiological and pathological events, including cancer metastasis, tissues remodeling, pro-inflammation regulation, and cell survival. SPP1 has shown its function of protecting tissues and organs against injury and wound, giving itself potentials to become a therapy target or giving its antibodies of other counter-acting reagents potentials to become drug candidates. Non-tagged (native) recombinant SPP1 would be valuable in therapeutic and pharmaceutical researches. In our study, mouse Spp1 DNA fragment without signal peptide was built in pET28a(+) vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant mouse SPP1 (rmSPP1) was then expressed in bacteria upon induction by isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The abundance of rmSPP1 was increased using isoelectric precipitation and ammonium sulfate fractionation methods, and anion and cation exchange chromatography was employed to further purify rmSPP1. Finally, we got rmSPP1 product with 12.8 % productivity, 97 % purity, satisfactory bioactivity, and low endotoxin content. PMID:24664233

  5. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future. PMID:26920159

  6. Improved production of biohydrogen in light-powered Escherichia coli by co-expression of proteorhodopsin and heterologous hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Solar energy is the ultimate energy source on the Earth. The conversion of solar energy into fuels and energy sources can be an ideal solution to address energy problems. The recent discovery of proteorhodopsin in uncultured marine γ-proteobacteria has made it possible to construct recombinant Escherichia coli with the function of light-driven proton pumps. Protons that translocate across membranes by proteorhodopsin generate a proton motive force for ATP synthesis by ATPase. Excess protons can also be substrates for hydrogen (H2) production by hydrogenase in the periplasmic space. In the present work, we investigated the effect of the co-expression of proteorhodopsin and hydrogenase on H2 production yield under light conditions. Results Recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) co-expressing proteorhodopsin and [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio marinus produced ~1.3-fold more H2 in the presence of exogenous retinal than in the absence of retinal under light conditions (70 μmole photon/(m2·s)). We also observed the synergistic effect of proteorhodopsin with endogenous retinal on H2 production (~1.3-fold more) with a dual plasmid system compared to the strain with a single plasmid for the sole expression of hydrogenase. The increase of light intensity from 70 to 130 μmole photon/(m2·s) led to an increase (~1.8-fold) in H2 production from 287.3 to 525.7 mL H2/L-culture in the culture of recombinant E. coli co-expressing hydrogenase and proteorhodopsin in conjunction with endogenous retinal. The conversion efficiency of light energy to H2 achieved in this study was ~3.4%. Conclusion Here, we report for the first time the potential application of proteorhodopsin for the production of biohydrogen, a promising alternative fuel. We showed that H2 production was enhanced by the co-expression of proteorhodopsin and [NiFe]-hydrogenase in recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) in a light intensity-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that E. coli can be applied as

  7. Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Mobley, Harry L

    2004-02-01

    Few microorganisms are as versatile as Escherichia coli. An important member of the normal intestinal microflora of humans and other mammals, E. coli has also been widely exploited as a cloning host in recombinant DNA technology. But E. coli is more than just a laboratory workhorse or harmless intestinal inhabitant; it can also be a highly versatile, and frequently deadly, pathogen. Several different E. coli strains cause diverse intestinal and extraintestinal diseases by means of virulence factors that affect a wide range of cellular processes. PMID:15040260

  8. Enhanced production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glucose via malonyl-CoA pathway by engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuan; Jiang, Jiaqi; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, production of 3-HP via malonyl-CoA was investigated by using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli carrying heterogeneous acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc) from Corynebacterium glutamicum and codon-optimized malonyl-CoA reductase (MCR) from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Three engineered E. coli strains with different host-vector systems were constructed and investigated. The results indicated that the combination of E. coli BL21(DE3) and pET28a was the most efficient host-vector system for 3-HP production, and the highest concentration of 3-HP attained in shake flask cultivation reached 1.80g/L by the strain BE-MDA with induction at 0.25mM IPTG and 25°C, and supplementation of NaHCO3 and biotin. In fed-batch fermentation performed in a 5-L reactor, the concentration of 3-HP achieved 10.08g/L in 36h. PMID:26606325

  9. Escherichia coli EDA is a novel fusion expression partner to improve solubility of aggregation-prone heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Sik; Song, Jong-Am; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Jeewon

    2015-01-20

    Since the use of solubility enhancer proteins is one of the effective methods to produce active recombinant proteins within Escherichia coli, the development of a novel fusion expression partner that can be applied to various aggregation-prone proteins is of crucial importance. In our previous work, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was employed to systematically analyze the E. coli BL21 (DE3) proteome profile in response to heat treatment, and KDPG aldolase (EDA) was identified as a heat-responsive and aggregation-resistant protein. When used as fusion expression partner, EDA significantly increased the solubility of seven aggregation-prone heterologous proteins in the E. coli cytoplasm. The efficacy of EDA as a fusion expression partner was evaluated through the analysis of bioactivity or secondary structure of several target proteins: EDA-fusion expression resulted in the synthesis of bioactive human ferritin light chain and bacterial arginine deiminase and the formation of correct secondary structure of human granulocyte colony stimulation factor. PMID:25486632

  10. Production of extracellular fatty acid using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As an alternative for economic biodiesel production, the microbial production of extracellular fatty acid from renewable resources is receiving more concerns recently, since the separation of fatty acid from microorganism cells is normally involved in a series of energy-intensive steps. Many attempts have been made to construct fatty acid producing strains by targeting genes in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway, while few studies focused on the cultivation process and the mass transfer kinetics. Results In this study, both strain improvements and cultivation process strategies were applied to increase extracellular fatty acid production by engineered Escherichia coli. Our results showed overexpressing ‘TesA and the deletion of fadL in E. coli BL21 (DE3) improved extracellular fatty acid production, while deletion of fadD didn’t strengthen the extracellular fatty acid production for an undetermined mechanism. Moreover, the cultivation process controls contributed greatly to extracellular fatty acid production with respect to titer, cell growth and productivity by adjusting the temperature, adding ampicillin and employing on-line extraction. Under optimal conditions, the E. coli strain (pACY-‘tesA-ΔfadL) produced 4.8 g L−1 extracellular fatty acid, with the specific productivity of 0.02 g h−1 g−1dry cell mass, and the yield of 4.4% on glucose, while the ratios of cell-associated fatty acid versus extracellular fatty acid were kept below 0.5 after 15 h of cultivation. The fatty acids included C12:1, C12:0, C14:1, C14:0, C16:1, C16:0, C18:1, C18:0. The composition was dominated by C14 and C16 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Using the strain pACY-‘tesA, similar results appeared under the same culture conditions and the titer was also much higher than that ever reported previously, which suggested that the supposedly superior strain did not necessarily perform best for the efficient production of desired product. The strain p

  11. Characterization of the sensor domain of QseE histidine kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Young Ho; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Cheong, Hae-Kap

    2016-10-01

    In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), the QseEF two-component system causes attaching and effacing (AE) lesion on epithelial cells. QseE histidine kinase senses the host hormone epinephrine, sulfate, and phosphate; it also regulates QseF response regulator, which activates LEE gene that encodes AE lesion. In order to understand the recognition of ligand molecules and signal transfer mechanism in pathogenic bacteria, structural studies of the sensor domain of QseE of Escherichia coli should be conducted. In this study, we describe the overexpression, purification, and structural and biophysical properties of the sensor domain of QseE. The fusion protein had a 6×His tag at its N-terminus; this protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was denatured in 7M guanidine hydrochloride and refolded by dialysis. The purification of the refolded protein was carried out using Ni-NTA affinity column and size-exclusion chromatography. Thereafter, the characteristics of the refolded protein were determined from NMR, CD, and MALS spectroscopies. In a pH range of 7.4-5.0, the folded protein existed in a monomeric form with a predominantly helical structure. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra shows that approximately 93% backbone amide peaks are detected at pH 5.0, suggesting that the number of backbone signals is sufficient for NMR studies. These data might provide an opportunity for structural and functional studies of the sensor domain of QseE. PMID:27371359

  12. Impact of Ralstonia eutropha's Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Depolymerases and Phasins on PHB Storage in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The model organism for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis, Ralstonia eutropha H16, possesses multiple isoenzymes of granules coating phasins as well as of PHB depolymerases, which degrade accumulated PHB under conditions of carbon limitation. In this study, recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains were used to study the impact of selected PHB depolymerases of R. eutropha H16 on the growth behavior and on the amount of accumulated PHB in the absence or presence of phasins. For this purpose, 20 recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) strains were constructed, which harbored a plasmid carrying the phaCAB operon from R. eutropha H16 to ensure PHB synthesis and a second plasmid carrying different combinations of the genes encoding a phasin and a PHB depolymerase from R. eutropha H16. It is shown in this study that the growth behavior of the respective recombinant E. coli strains was barely affected by the overexpression of the phasin and PHB depolymerase genes. However, the impact on the PHB contents was significantly greater. The strains expressing the genes of the PHB depolymerases PhaZ1, PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7 showed 35% to 94% lower PHB contents after 30 h of cultivation than the control strain. The strain harboring phaZ7 reached by far the lowest content of accumulated PHB (only 2.0% [wt/wt] PHB of cell dry weight). Furthermore, coexpression of phasins in addition to the PHB depolymerases influenced the amount of PHB stored in cells of the respective strains. It was shown that the phasins PhaP1, PhaP2, and PhaP4 are not substitutable without an impact on the amount of stored PHB. In particular, the phasins PhaP2 and PhaP4 seemed to limit the degradation of PHB by the PHB depolymerases PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7, whereas almost no influence of the different phasins was observed if phaZ1 was coexpressed. This study represents an extensive analysis of the impact of PHB depolymerases and phasins on PHB accumulation and provides a deeper insight into the complex interplay

  13. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  14. Expression and characterization of the prtV gene encoding a collagenase from Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, M S; Lee, C Y

    1999-01-01

    The prtV gene, encoding a collagenase of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The transformant E. coli BL21(DE3)(pPRT2) secreted the recombinant PrtV, and the highest enzyme activity was detected in the culture supernatant after 5 h IPTG induction. The molecular mass of purified PrtV was 62 kDa as determined by gel filtration, which was similar to that obtained by SDS-PAGE (64 kDa). This suggested that PrtV was a monomer protein having no subunit structure. The isoelectric point of PrtV was 8.52. In addition, PrtV contained a 27 amino acid signal peptide, and the amino acid composition of the PrtV showed satisfactory agreement with that predicted from the DNA sequence. The optimum temperature and pH of PrtV were 40 degrees C and pH 7.5, respectively. The activity of PrtV was inhibited by chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline; however, its activity was restored by the addition of various metal ions (Co2+, Mn2+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+), indicating that PrtV is a metalloprotease. PrtV degraded both type I collagen and synthetic substrate FALGPA well, showing that PrtV is indeed a collagenase. PMID:10206692

  15. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids. PMID:27367290

  16. Biochemical characterization of the novel α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase WclR from Escherichia coli O3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Bin; Xu, Yongchang; Utkina, Natalia; Zhou, Dawei; Danilov, Leonid; Torgov, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Vladimir; Feng, Lu

    2016-07-22

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the formation of regio- and stereo-specific glycosidic linkages between specific sugar donors and recipients. In this study, the function of the gene wclR from the Escherichia coli O3 O-antigen gene cluster that encodes an α 1, 3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) that acts on the linkage Gal α 1, 3-GlcNAc was biochemically characterized. WclR was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic product was identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), collision-induced dissociation electrospray ionization ion trap multiple tandem MS (CID-ESI-IT-MS(n)) and galactosidase digestion, using UDP-Gal as the donor substrate and the synthetic acceptor substrate GlcNAc-PP-De (decyl diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine). The physiochemical properties and the substrate specificity of WclR were investigated. WclR is the first bacterial GalT characterized that acts on the linkage Gal α 1, 3-GlcNAc. This study enhanced our knowledge of the diversified functions of GTs and provided a novel enzyme source for possible pharmaceutical application. PMID:27196310

  17. Enhanced production of recombinant Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase through optimization of induction strategy and addition of pyridoxine.

    PubMed

    Su, Lingqia; Huang, Yan; Wu, Jing

    2015-12-01

    This report describes the optimization of recombinant Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) production from engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) in a 3-L fermentor. Investigation of different induction strategies revealed that induction was optimal when the temperature was maintained at 30°C, the inducer (lactose) was fed at a rate of 0.2 g L(-1)h(-1), and protein expression was induced when the cell density (OD600) reached 50. Under these conditions, the GAD activity of 1273.8 U mL(-1) was achieved. Because GAD is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, the effect of supplementing the medium with pyridoxine hydrochloride (PN), a cheap and stable PLP precursor, on GAD production was also investigated. When the culture medium was supplemented with PN to a concentration of 2mM at the initiation of protein expression, and then again 10h later, the GAD activity reached 3193.4 U mL(-1), which represented the highest GAD production ever reported. PMID:26364229

  18. Extracellular production of Pseudozyma (Candida) antarctica lipase B with genuine primary sequence in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Ayana; Nakano, Hideo; Iwasaki, Yugo

    2016-03-01

    An Escherichia coli expression system was established to produce recombinant extracellular Pseudozyma (Candida) antarctica lipase B (CALB). With the aim of producing the genuine CALB without additional amino acid residues, the mature portion of the CALB gene was fused seamlessly to a pelB signal sequence and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) using the pET system. Inducing gene expression at low temperature (20°C) was crucial for the production of active CALB; higher temperatures caused inclusion body formation. Prolonged induction for 48 h at 20°C allowed for the enzyme to be released into the culture medium, with more than half of the activity detected in the culture supernatant. A catalytically inactive CALB mutant (S105A) protein was similarly released, suggesting that the lipid-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme was not the reason for the release. The CALB production level was further improved by optimizing the culture medium. Under the optimized conditions, the CALB in the culture supernatant amounted to 550 mg/L. The recombinant CALB was purified from the culture supernatant, yielding 5.67 mg of purified CALB from 50 mL of culture. N-terminal sequencing and ESI-MS analyses showed proper removal of the pelB signal sequence and the correct molecular weight of the protein, respectively, confirming the structural integrity of the recombinant CALB. The kinetic parameters towards p-nitrophenylbutyrate and the enantiomeric selectivity on rac-1-phenylethylacetate of the recombinant CALB were consistent with those of the authentic CALB. This is the first example of E. coli-based extracellular production of a CALB enzyme without extra amino acid residues. PMID:26272415

  19. Cloning, expression, and purification of the general stress protein YhbO from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jad; Kern, Renee; Malki, Abderrahim; Eckey, Viola; Richarme, Gilbert

    2006-06-01

    We cloned, expressed, and purified the Escherichia coli yhbO gene product, which is an amino acid sequence homolog to the Bacillus subtilis general stress protein 18 (the yfkM gene product), the Pyrococcus furiosus intracellular protease PfpI, and the human Parkinson disease protein DJ-1. The gene coding for YhbO was generated by amplifying the yhbO gene from E. coli by polymerase chain reaction. It was inserted into the expression plasmid pET-21a, under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. A BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain transformed with the YhbO-expression vector, pET-21a-yhbO, accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein with a molecular mass of 20 kDa in SDS-PAGE that matches the expected YhbO molecular weight. YhbO was purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography, and its identity was confirmed by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis. The native protein exists in monomeric, trimeric, and hexameric forms. We also report a strong sequence homology between YhbO and the general stress protein YfkM (64% identities), which suggests that YhbO is a stress protein, and a strong structural homology between YhbO and the Pyrococcus horikoshii intracellular protease PhpI. We could not, however, detect any proteolytic or peptidolytic activity of YhbO, using classical biochemical substrates. PMID:16380269

  20. Cloning, expression, and purification of recombinant bovine rotavirus hemagglutinin, VP8*, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Favacho, Alexsandra R M; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Sardi, Silvia I; Gouvea, Vera S

    2006-04-01

    Rotavirus VP8* subunit is the minor trypsin cleavage product of the spike protein VP4, which is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. To study the structure-function relationship of this fragment and to obtain type-specific reagents, substantial amounts of this protein are needed. Thus, full-length VP8* cDNA, including the entire trypsin cleavage-encoding region in gene 4, was synthesized and amplified by RT-PCR from total RNA purified from bovine rotavirus strain C486 propagated in MA104 cell culture. The extended VP8* cDNA (VP8ext) was cloned into the pGEM-T Easy plasmid and subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression plasmid pET28a(+). The correspondent 30 kDa protein was overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells under the control of the T7 promoter. The identity and the antigenicity of VP8ext were confirmed on Western blots using anti-His and anti-rotavirus antibodies. Immobilized Ni-ion affinity chromatography was used to purify the expressed protein resulting in a yield of 4 mg of VP8ext per liter of induced E. coli culture. Our results indicate that VP8ext maintained its native antigenicity and specificity, providing a good source of antigen for the production of P type-specific immune reagents. Detailed structural analysis of pure recombinant VP8 subunit should allow a better understanding of its role in cell attachment and rotavirus tropism. Application of similar procedure to distinct rotavirus P serotypes should provide valuable P serotype-specific immune reagents for rotavirus diagnostics and epidemiologic surveys. PMID:16275130

  1. Cloning of a fibrinolytic enzyme (subtilisin) gene from Bacillus subtilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Younes; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Ghasemian, Abdollah

    2012-09-01

    Several investigations are being pursued to enhance the efficacy and specificity of fibrinolytic therapy. In this regard, microbial fibrinolytic enzymes attracted much more medical interests during these decades. Subtilisin, a member of subtilases (the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases) and also a fibrinolytic enzyme is quite common in Gram-positive bacteria, and Bacillus species stand out in particular, as many extracellular and even intracellular variants have been identified. In the present work, the subtilisin gene from Bacillus subtilis PTCC 1023 was cloned into the vector pET-15b and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Total genomic DNA were isolated and used for PCR amplification of the subtilisin gene by means of the specific primers. SDS-PAGE and enzyme assay were done for characterizing the expressed protein. A ~1,100 bp of the structural subtilisin gene was amplified. The DNA and amino acid sequence alignments resulting from the BLAST search of subtilisin showed high sequence identity with the other strains of B. subtilis, whereas significantly lower identity was observed with other bacterial subtilisins. The recombinant enzyme had the same molecular weight as other reported subtilisins and the E. coli transformants showed high subtilisin activity. This study provides evidence that subtilisin can be actively expressed in E. coli. The commercial availability of subtilisin is of great importance for industrial applications and also pharmaceutical purposes as thrombolytic agent. Thus, the characterization of new recombinant subtilisin and the development of rapid, simple, and effective production methods are not only of academic interest, but also of practical importance. PMID:22069026

  2. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  3. Periplasmic production of native human proinsulin as a fusion to E. coli ecotin.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Jenzsch, Marco; Lübbert, Andreas; Rudolph, Rainer; Söhling, Brigitte

    2007-09-01

    Native proinsulin belongs to the class of the difficult-to-express proteins in Escherichia coli. Problems mainly arise due to its small size, a high proteolytic decay, and the necessity to form a native disulfide pattern. In the present study, human proinsulin was produced in the periplasm of E. coli as a fusion to ecotin, which is a small periplasmic protein of 16 kDa encoded by the host, containing one disulfide bond. The fusion protein was secreted to the periplasm and native proinsulin was determined by ELISA. Cultivation parameters were studied in parallel batch mode fermentations using E. coli BL21(DE3)Gold as a host. After improvement of fed-batch high density fermentation conditions, 153 mg fusion protein corresponding to 51.5mg native proinsulin was obtained per L. Proteins were extracted from the periplasm by osmotic shock treatment. The fusion protein was purified in one step by ecotin affinity chromatography on immobilized trypsinogen. After thrombin cleavage of the fusion protein, the products were separated by Ni-NTA chromatography. Proinsulin was quantified by ELISA and characterized by mass spectrometry. To evaluate the influence of periplasmic proteases, the amount of ecotin-proinsulin was determined in E. coli BL21(DE3)Gold and in a periplasmic protease deficient strain, E. coli SF120. PMID:17509894

  4. Optimizing expression and purification of an ATP-binding gene gsiA from Escherichia coli k-12 by using GFP fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Wang, Guangjun; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2011-01-01

    The cloning, expression and purification of the glutathione (sulfur) import system ATP-binding protein (gsiA) was carried out. The coding sequence of Escherichia coli gsiA, which encodes the ATP-binding protein of a glutathione importer, was amplified by PCR, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pWaldo-GFPe harboring green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The resulting recombinant plasmid pWaldo-GFP-GsiA was transformed into various E. coli strains, and expression conditions were optimized. The effect of five E. coli expression strains on the production of the recombinant gsiA protein was evaluated. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was found to be the most productive strain for GsiA-GFP fusion-protein expression, most of which was insoluble fraction. However, results from in-gel and Western blot analysis suggested that expression of recombinant GsiA in Rosetta (DE3) provides an efficient source in soluble form. By using GFP as reporter, the most suitable host strain was conveniently obtained, whereby optimizing conditions for overexpression and purification of the proteins for further functional and structural studies, became, not only less laborious, but also time-saving. PMID:22215971

  5. Expression of rat liver S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Escherichia coli results in two active oligomeric forms.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, L; Mingorance, J; Pajares, M A; Mato, J M

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA containing the complete coding sequence for rat liver S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pT7-7 and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). A major additional band corresponding to a protein of 48 kDa was detected on SDS/PAGE after induction with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. This protein was distributed in both the soluble and insoluble fractions and accounted for approx. 30% of the total bacterial protein. The soluble enzyme was fully active, as revealed by assays in vitro of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity. In addition, transformed bacteria exhibited highly increased levels of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine. Two active forms of the recombinant enzyme, with apparent molecular masses of 210 kDa and 110 kDa, were detected when cytosolic extracts of the transformed cells were fractionated by gel-filtration chromatography. It is concluded that the expressed S-adenosylmethionine synthetase polypeptide assemble as tetramers and dimers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8043003

  6. Expression of a novel bacteriocin-the plantaricin Pln1-in Escherichia coli and its functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanqiang; Zhao, Haizhen; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2016-03-01

    A potential bacteriocin gene was isolated from 18575 ORFs by bioinformatics methods. It was named pln1, and cloned into pET32a. Then, it was expressed as a thioredoxin-Pln1 fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA, and thioredoxin was removed by enterokinase. Finally, Pln1 was purified using a cation affinity column. The yields of fused and cleaved Pln1 peptides were 100-110 mg/l and 9-11 mg/l, respectively. Pln1 was stable in an acidic environment and at temperatures below 60 °C, but was easily degraded under alkaline conditions and by protease treatment. The cleaved and purified Pln1 showed strong antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria such as Micrococcus luteus CMCC 63202, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactococcus lactis NZ3900, Lactobacillus paracasei CICC 20241, and Listeria innocua CICC 10417. In particular, Pln1 had a better activity against methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) than nisin, thereby offering an attractive approach to counter bacterial antibiotic resistance. PMID:26586613

  7. Mitochondrial intermediate peptidase: Expression in Escherichia coli and improvement of its enzymatic activity detection with FRET substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Marcelo F.; Torquato, Ricardo J.S.; Assis, Diego M.; Juliano, Maria A.; Hayashi, Mirian A.F.; Oliveira, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, soluble, functionally-active, recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP), a mitochondrial metalloendoprotease, was expressed in a prokaryotic system. The hMIP fusion protein, with a poly-His-tag (6x His), was obtained by cloning the coding region of hMIP cDNA into the pET-28a expression vector, which was then used to transform Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. After isolation and purification of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography using Ni-Sepharose resin, the protein was purified further using ion exchange chromatography with a Hi-trap resource Q column. The recombinant hMIP was characterized by Western blotting using three distinct antibodies, circular dichroism, and enzymatic assays that used the first FRET substrates developed for MIP and a series of protease inhibitors. The successful expression of enzymatically-active hMIP in addition to the FRET substrates will contribute greatly to the determination of substrate specificity of this protease and to the development of specific inhibitors that are essential for a better understanding of the role of this protease in mitochondrial functioning.

  8. Tat Peptide-Mediated Soluble Expression of the Membrane Protein LSECtin-CRD in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guofu; Wang, Changzhen; Wu, Yonghong; Cong, Jianbo; Cheng, Li; Wang, Mingqun; Zhao, Pengkai; Tang, Li; Zhang, Chenggang; Wu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The human liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin (hLSECtin), a type II integral membrane protein, containing a Ca2+-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), has a well-established biological activity, yet its three-dimensional structure is unknown due to low expression yields and aggregation into inclusion bodies. Previous study has demonstrated that the HIV-1 virus-encoded Tat peptide (‘YGRKKRRQRRR’) can increase the yields and the solubility of heterologous proteins. However, whether the Tat peptide could promote the high-yield and soluble expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli is not known. Therefore, the prokaryotic expression vector pET28b-Tat-hLSECtin-CRD (using pET28b and pET28b-hLSECtin-CRD as controls) was constructed, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) followed with identifying by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Subsequently, the bacterial subcellular structure, in which overexpressed the heterologous proteins Tat-hLSECtin-CRD and Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD, was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) respectively, and the mannose-binding activity of Tat-hLSECtin-CRD was also determined. Expectedly, the solubility of Tat-LSECtin-CRD significantly increased compared to Tat-free LSECtin-CRD (**p < 0.01) with prolonged time, and the Tat-LSECtin-CRD had a significant mannose-binding activity. The subcellular structure analysis indicated that the bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-hLSECtin-CRD exhibited denser region compared with controls, while dot denser region aggregated in the two ends of bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD. This study provided a novel method for improving the soluble expression of membrane proteins in prokaryotic systems by fusion with the Tat peptide, which may be potentially expanded to the expression of other membrane proteins. PMID:24358298

  9. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Trigoso, Yvonne D.; Evans, Russell C.; Karsten, William E.; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5’and 3’ terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40–50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  10. Engineering the productivity of recombinant Escherichia coli for limonene formation from glycerol in minimal media.

    PubMed

    Willrodt, Christian; David, Christian; Cornelissen, Sjef; Bühler, Bruno; Julsing, Mattijs K; Schmid, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency and productivity of cellular biocatalysts play a key role in the industrial synthesis of fine and bulk chemicals. This study focuses on optimizing the synthesis of (S)-limonene from glycerol and glucose as carbon sources using recombinant Escherichia coli. The cyclic monoterpene limonene is extensively used in the fragrance, food, and cosmetic industries. Recently, limonene also gained interest as alternative jet fuel of biological origin. Key parameters that limit the (S)-limonene yield, related to genetics, physiology, and reaction engineering, were identified. The growth-dependent production of (S)-limonene was shown for the first time in minimal media. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was chosen as the preferred host strain, as it showed low acetate formation, fast growth, and high productivity. A two-liquid phase fed-batch fermentation with glucose as the sole carbon and energy source resulted in the formation of 700 mg L(org) (-1) (S)-limonene. Specific activities of 75 mU g(cdw) (-1) were reached, but decreased relatively quickly. The use of glycerol as a carbon source resulted in a prolonged growth and production phase (specific activities of ≥50 mU g(cdw) (-1) ) leading to a final (S)-limonene concentration of 2,700 mg L(org) (-1) . Although geranyl diphosphate (GPP) synthase had a low solubility, its availability appeared not to limit (S)-limonene formation in vivo under the conditions investigated. GPP rerouting towards endogenous farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) formation also did not limit (S)-limonene production. The two-liquid phase fed-batch setup led to the highest monoterpene concentration obtained with a recombinant microbial biocatalyst to date. PMID:24756896

  11. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Trigoso, Yvonne D; Evans, Russell C; Karsten, William E; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  12. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  13. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  14. Cloning, Purification and Initial Characterization of E. coli McrA, a Putative 5-methylcytosine-specific Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan,E.; Dunn, J.

    2008-01-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m5C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys4-Zn2+ finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high a-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm5CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in 'restricting' m5C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m5C residues.

  15. Cloning, purification and initial characterization of E. coli McrA, a putative 5-methylcytosine-specific nuclease.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Elizabeth A; Dunn, John J

    2008-11-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m(5)C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 degrees C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 degrees C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys(4)-Zn(2+) finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high alpha-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm(5)CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in "restricting" m(5)C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m(5)C residues. PMID:18662788

  16. Significant expression of a Chinese scorpion peptide, BmK1, in Escherichia coli through promoter engineering and gene dosage strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yingying; Zhao, Na; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous expression is an efficient alternative to conventional extraction to produce a specific Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) peptide. In this work, BmK1 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli after genetic codon optimization, but BmK1 content was <6% of total cellular protein. To improve BmK1 expression, a trc promoter library with a wide relative strength was constructed, and three promoters, PpJF136 (0.55), PpJF325 (1.29), and PpJF288 (2.31), were selected to control BmK1 expression. A higher BmK1 expression (>13.9% of total protein) was obtained using a stronger promoter, PpJF325 . Furthermore, a maximum BmK1 content (>21.7% of total protein) was obtained by combining promoter PpJF325 and three copies of the BmK1 gene. The yield of the purified BmK1 achieved 196.74 mg L(-1) in E. coli BL21(DE3) pJF431, which was improved 2.09-fold compared with the control. This was the highest reported production of scorpion peptides in E. coli. PMID:24372571

  17. Frameshift events associated with the lysyl-tRNA and the rare arginine codon, AGA, in Escherichia coli: a case study involving the human Relaxin 2 protein.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, John J; McNulty, Dean E; Burns, Matthew; Allen, Kimberly E; Tang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Quinn; Trulli, Janice M; Johanson, Kyung O; Kane, James F

    2008-08-01

    Human Relaxin 2 is an insulin-related peptide hormone with a mass of 19,084 Da. The mRNA contains a number of arginine codons that are rarely used by Escherichia coli to produce highly expressed proteins. As a result, expressing this recombinant protein in E. coli is problematic. When human Relaxin 2 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), several forms of the protein were made. One species had the expected molecular weight (19,084 Da). A second species observed had a molecular weight of 21,244 Da. A third minor species had a molecular weight of 17,118 Da. These aberrant molecular weights can be explained as follows. First, a sequence CGA-AAA-AAG-AGA, containing the rare arginine codons CGA and AGA was the site of the +1 frameshift that generated the 21,244 Da species. Since there was a limited supply of this arginyl-tRNA, the peptidyl-tRNA moved +1 nucleotide to occupy the codon and resumed protein synthesis. Second, a -1 frameshift associated with 'slippery A' sequence XXA-AAA-AAG accounted for 10% of the product with a mass of 17,118 Da. Presumably, the shift to -1 also occurred because there was a paucity of the arginyl-tRNAArgucu. Introduction of a plasmid coding for the cognate tRNA for AGA and site directed mutagenesis prevented the formation of both frameshift species. PMID:18474430

  18. Development of recombinant Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing a novel alkaline lipase-coding gene from Proteus sp. for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Su, Erzheng; Lin, Jinping; Jiang, Zhengbing; Ma, Yushu; Wei, Dongzhi

    2009-01-15

    A lipase-producing bacterium K107 was isolated from soil samples of China and identified to be a strain of Proteus sp. With genome-walking method, the open reading frame of lipase gene lipK107, encoding 287 amino acids, was cloned and expressed in a heterologous host, Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant lipase was purified and characterized, and the optimum pH of the purified LipK107 was 9, at 35 degrees C. The recombinant E. coli expressing lipK107 was applied in biodiesel production in the form of whole-cell biocatalyst. Activity of the biocatalyst increased significantly when cells were permeabilized with 0.3% (w/v) cetyl-trimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB). This transesterification was carried out efficiently in a mixture containing 5M equivalents of methanol to the oil and 100% water by weight of the substrate. It was the first time to use E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing lipase in biodiesel production, and the biodiesel reached a yield of nearly 100% after 12h reaction at the optimal temperature of 15 degrees C, which was the lowest temperature among all the known catalyst in biodiesel production. PMID:19007827

  19. Cloning expression and analysis of phytochelatin synthase (pcs) gene from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 offering multiple stress tolerance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chaurasia, Neha; Mishra, Yogesh; Rai, Lal Chand

    2008-11-07

    Phytochelatin synthase (PCS) is involved in the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs), plays role in heavy metal detoxification. The present study describes for first time the functional expression and characterization of pcs gene of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in Escherichia coli in terms of offering protection against heat, salt, carbofuron (pesticide), cadmium, copper, and UV-B stress. The involvement of pcs gene in tolerance to above abiotic stresses was investigated by cloning of pcs gene in expression vector pGEX-5X-2 and its transformation in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The E. coli cells transformed with pGEX-5X-pcs showed better growth than control cells (pGEX-5X-2) under temperature (47 deg. C), NaCl (6% w/v), carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), and UV-B (10 min) exposure. The enhanced expression of pcs gene revealed by RT-PCR analysis under above stresses at different time intervals further advocates its role in tolerance against above abiotic stresses.

  20. Cloning and expression of full-length human insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) in the Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Emad; Panjepour, Mojtaba; Abbasian, Mahdi; Broujeni, Zahra Khalili; Mofid, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of the growth hormone on target cells is mediated by the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 binds to the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in blood and biological fluids. Considering the important application of IGBP3 as a drug component, in this research we cloned and expressed the full-length IGFBP3 in the pET-11a vector and BL21 (DE3) expression host. Materials and Methods: First the sequence encoding of IGFBP3 was designed based on the amino acid sequence of the protein and then by codon optimization, in order to ensure the maximum expression in Escherichia coli. In the next step, the synthetic DNA encoding IGFBP3 was inserted into the pUC57 vector, at the appropriate restriction sites and then subcloned in the pET-11a expression vector in the same restriction sites. The constructed vector was transformed to E. coli BL21 as an expression host and induced in the presence of IPTG for expression of the IGFBP3 protein. Protein expression was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: Double digestion of the new plasmid (pET-11a -IGBP3) with NdeI and BamHI showed two bands in 873 bp and 5700 bp. To study the accurate cloning procedure, the plasmid was sequenced and its authenticity was confirmed. Also the expected protein band (31.6 kDa) was observed in SDS-PAGE analysis. Conclusion: DNA fragment encoding the full-length IGFBP3 protein was accurately cloned in the pET-11a expression vector and the recombinant plasmid transformed to E. coli BL21 (DE3) expression host. Results of the SDS-PAGE analysis verified that recombinant IGFBP3 (31.6 kDa) are successfully expressed under the control of T7 promoter. As we shown pET-11a can be successfully used for expression of the IGFBP3 protein. PMID:25878991

  1. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of a Highly Thermostable Amylase Gene of Thermotoga petrophila into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Asma; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; ud Din, Zia; Aftab, Saima; Iqbal, Irfana; ul Haq, Ikram

    2016-02-01

    A putative α-amylase gene of Thermotoga petrophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-21a (+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal expression of the α-amylase using various parameters, such as pH, temperature, time of induction and addition of an inducer. The optimum temperature and pH for the maximum expression of α-amylase were 22 °C and 7.0 pH units, respectively. Purification of the recombinant enzyme was carried out by heat treatment method, followed by ion exchange chromatography with 34.6-fold purification having specific activity of 126.31 U mg(-1) and a recovery of 56.25%. Molecular weight of the purified α-amylase, 70 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 100 °C temperature and at pH of 7.0. The enzyme activity was increased in the presence of metal ions especially Ca(+2) and decreased in the presence of EDTA indicating that the α-amylase was a metalloenzyme. However, addition of 1% Tween 20, Tween 80 and β-mercaptoethanol constrained the enzyme activity to 87, 96 and 89%, respectively. No considerable effect of organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, acetone and n-butanol) was observed on enzyme activity. With soluble starch as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was 73.8 U mg(-1). The α-amylase enzyme was active to hydrolyse starch forming maltose. PMID:26526464

  2. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is induced during protein expression in E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-{sup 13}C-gluconate and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}Cl provide a carbonyl-amide protein backbone labeling scheme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enrichment pattern is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. -- Abstract: The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-{sup 13}C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and {sup 15}N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression.

  3. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax. PMID:24430302

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins. PMID:23827209

  5. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  6. High overexpression and purification of optimized bacterio-opsin from Halobacterium Salinarum R1 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kahaki, Fatemeh Abarghooi; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Memari, Hamid Rajabi; Mofid, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    The purple membrane of Halobacterium Salinarum carries out a protein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR), which is a model for structure-function studies of membrane proteins. The heterologous expression of integral membrane proteins (IMPS) is difficult. In this study, we reported the heterologous overexpression of bacterio-opsin (bO) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Bacterio-opsin expression is facilitated by using mistic, a membrane protein from Bacillus subtilis in E. coli BL21 (DE3) membranes. The optimized bO gene was cloned in fusion to the C-terminus of mistic in pET 30a (+) and contains an oct-histidine in C-terminal to facilitate purification. Different medium, temperature, and induction time were used to optimize protein overexpression. The highest expression was obtained from the Terrific Broth (TB) medium at 18 °C with an IPTG concentration of 0.1 mM. The final purified bR was 192 ± 1 mg/L which has an important value for the production of membrane proteins in E. coli. PMID:25123363

  7. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Adhesins.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Brian D; Torres, Alfredo G

    2014-06-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbria) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this article have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26103974

  8. Emerging Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Kinue; Girão, Dennys M.; Girão, Valéria B.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.; Vaz, Tânia M.I.; Moreira, Fabiana C.; Chinarelli, Silvia H.; Vieira, Mônica A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of nonenteropathogenic serogroups carrying eae but lacking the enteropathogenic E. coli adherence factor plasmid and Shiga toxin DNA probe sequences were isolated from patients (children, adults, and AIDS patients) with and without diarrhea in Brazil. Although diverse in phenotype and genotype, some strains are potentially diarrheagenic. PMID:15504277

  9. Whole-cell hydroxylation of n-octane by Escherichia coli strains expressing the CYP153A6 operon.

    PubMed

    Gudiminchi, Rama Krishna; Randall, Charlene; Opperman, Diederik J; Olaofe, Oluwafemi A; Harrison, Susan T L; Albertyn, Jacobus; Smit, Martha S

    2012-12-01

    CYP153A6 is a well-studied terminal alkane hydroxylase which has previously been expressed in Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli by using the pCom8 plasmid. In this study, CYP153A6 was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) by cloning the complete operon from Mycobacterium sp. HXN-1500, also encoding the ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin, into pET28b(+). LB medium with IPTG as well as auto-induction medium was used to express the proteins under the T7 promoter. A maximum concentration of 1.85 μM of active CYP153A6 was obtained when using auto-induction medium, while with IPTG induction of LB cultures, the P450 concentration peaked at 0.6-0.8 μM. Since more biomass was produced in auto-induction medium, the specific P450 content was often almost the same, 0.5-1.0 μmol P450 g (DCW)⁻¹, for both methods. Analytical scale whole-cell biotransformations of n-octane were conducted with resting cells, and it was found that high P450 content in biomass did not necessarily result in high octanol production. Whole cells from LB cultures induced with IPTG gave higher specific and volumetric octanol formation rates than biomass from auto-induction medium. A maximum of 8.7 g octanol L (BRM)⁻¹ was obtained within 24 h (0.34 g L (BRM)⁻¹  h⁻¹) with IPTG-induced cells containing only 0.20 μmol P450 g (DCW)⁻¹, when glucose (22 g L (BRM)⁻¹) was added for cofactor regeneration. PMID:22410745

  10. Complete Genomic and Lysis-Cassette Characterization of the Novel Phage, KBNP1315, which Infects Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Seok; Jang, Ho Bin; Kim, Ki Sei; Kim, Tae Hwan; Im, Se Pyeong; Kim, Si Won; Lazarte, Jassy Mary S; Kim, Jae Sung; Jung, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a major pathogen that causes avian colibacillosis and is associated with severe economic losses in the chicken-farming industry. Here, bacteriophage KBNP1315, infecting APEC strain KBP1315, was genomically and functionally characterized. The evolutionary relationships of KBNP1315 were analyzed at the genomic level using gene (protein)-sharing networks, the Markov clustering (MCL) algorithm, and comparative genomics. Our network analysis showed that KBNP1315 was connected to 30 members of the Autographivirinae subfamily, which comprises the SP6-, T7-, P60-, phiKMV-, GAP227- and KP34-related groups. Network decomposition suggested that KBNP1315 belongs to the SP6-like phages, but our comparison of putative encoded proteins revealed that key proteins of KBNP1315, including the tail spike protein and endolysin, had relative low levels of amino acid sequence similarity with other members of the SP6-like phages. Thus KBNP1315 may only be distantly related to the SP6-like phages, and (based on the difference in endolysin) its lysis mechanism may differ from theirs. To characterize the lytic functions of the holin and endolysin proteins from KBNP1315, we expressed these proteins individually or simultaneously in E. coli BL21 (DE3) competent cell. Interestingly, the expressed endolysin was secreted into the periplasm and caused a high degree of host cell lysis that was dose-dependently delayed/blocked by NaN3-mediated inhibition of the SecA pathway. The expressed holin triggered only a moderate inhibition of cell growth, whereas coexpression of holin and endolysin enhanced the lytic effect of endolysin. Together, these results revealed that KBNP1315 appears to use a pin-holin/signal-arrest-release (SAR) endolysin pathway to trigger host cell lysis. PMID:26555076

  11. Complete Genomic and Lysis-Cassette Characterization of the Novel Phage, KBNP1315, which Infects Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Seok; Jang, Ho Bin; Kim, Ki Sei; Kim, Tae Hwan; Im, Se Pyeong; Kim, Si Won; Lazarte, Jassy Mary S.; Kim, Jae Sung; Jung, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a major pathogen that causes avian colibacillosis and is associated with severe economic losses in the chicken-farming industry. Here, bacteriophage KBNP1315, infecting APEC strain KBP1315, was genomically and functionally characterized. The evolutionary relationships of KBNP1315 were analyzed at the genomic level using gene (protein)-sharing networks, the Markov clustering (MCL) algorithm, and comparative genomics. Our network analysis showed that KBNP1315 was connected to 30 members of the Autographivirinae subfamily, which comprises the SP6-, T7-, P60-, phiKMV-, GAP227- and KP34-related groups. Network decomposition suggested that KBNP1315 belongs to the SP6-like phages, but our comparison of putative encoded proteins revealed that key proteins of KBNP1315, including the tail spike protein and endolysin, had relative low levels of amino acid sequence similarity with other members of the SP6-like phages. Thus KBNP1315 may only be distantly related to the SP6-like phages, and (based on the difference in endolysin) its lysis mechanism may differ from theirs. To characterize the lytic functions of the holin and endolysin proteins from KBNP1315, we expressed these proteins individually or simultaneously in E. coli BL21 (DE3) competent cell. Interestingly, the expressed endolysin was secreted into the periplasm and caused a high degree of host cell lysis that was dose-dependently delayed/blocked by NaN3-mediated inhibition of the SecA pathway. The expressed holin triggered only a moderate inhibition of cell growth, whereas coexpression of holin and endolysin enhanced the lytic effect of endolysin. Together, these results revealed that KBNP1315 appears to use a pin-holin/signal-arrest-release (SAR) endolysin pathway to trigger host cell lysis. PMID:26555076

  12. Purification and Characterization of Catechol 1,2-Dioxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. Y64 Strain and Escherichia coli Transformants.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Milase, R N

    2015-12-01

    This study intends to purify and characterize catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C1,2O) of phenol-degrading Acinetobacter sp. Y64 and of E. coli transformant. Acinetobacter sp. Y64 was capable of degrading 1000 mg/L of phenol within 14 ± 2 h at 30 °C, 160 rpm and pH of 7. One C1,2O of 36 kDa was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Hitrap QFF column chromatograph with 49% recovery and a 10.6-fold increase in purity. Purified Y64 C1,2O had temperature and pH optimum at 37 °C and pH 7.7 respectively with the Michaelis constant of 17.53 µM and the maximal velocity of 1.95 U/mg, respectively. The presence of Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) enhanced the activity of Y64 C1,2O while other compounds such as Ca(2+), and EDTA had an inhibitory effect. 80% of C1,2O activity remained using 4-nitrocatechol as substrate while 2% remained using 3-methylcatechol compared with that using catechol. Y64 catA gene encoding C1,2O was amplified using PCR cloned into pET22b vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 (pLysS) after transformation. Purified and cloned Y64 C1,2O show no significant differences in the biochemical properties. The phylogenetic tree based on the protein sequences indicates that these C1,2Os possess a common ancestry. PMID:26563518

  13. Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Recombinant Human Interferon Beta Production by Escherichia coli Using the Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: The periplasmic overexpression of recombinant human interferon beta (rhIFN-β)-1b using a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was optimized in shake flasks using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken Design (BBD). Objectives: This study aimed to predict and develop the optimal fermentation conditions for periplasmic expression of rhIFN-β-1b in shake flasks whilst keeping the acetate excretion as the lowest amount and exploit the best results condition for rhIFN-β in a bench top bioreactor. Materials and Methods: The process variables studied were the concentration of glucose as carbon source, cell density prior the induction (OD 600 nm) and induction temperature. Ultimately, a three-factor three-level BBD was employed during the optimization process. The rhIFN-β production and the acetate excretion served as the evaluated responses. Results: The proposed optimum fermentation condition consisted of 7.81 g L-1 glucose, OD 600 nm prior induction 1.66 and induction temperature of 30.27°C. The model prediction of 0.267 g L-1 of rhIFN-β and 0.961 g L-1 of acetate at the optimum conditions was verified experimentally as 0.255 g L-1 and 0.981 g L-1 of acetate. This agreement between the predicted and observed values confirmed the precision of the applied method to predict the optimum conditions. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the RSM is an effective method for the optimization of recombinant protein expression using synthetic genes in E. coli. PMID:26034535

  14. Designing a whole-cell biotransformation system in Escherichia coli using cytochrome P450 from Streptomyces peucetius.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Pramod; Oh, Tae-Jin; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-06-01

    A biotransformation system was designed to co-express CYP107P3 (CSP4), cytochrome P450, from Streptomyces peuceticus, along with CamA (putidaredoxin reductase) and CamB (putidaredoxin) from Pseudomonas putida, the necessary reducing equivalents, in a class I type electron-transfer system in E. coli BL21 (DE3). This was carried out using two plasmids with different selection markers and compatible origins of replication. The study results showed that this biotransformation system was able to mediate the O-dealkylation of 7-ethoxycumarin. PMID:18259876

  15. Comparative analysis of envelope proteomes in Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-04-01

    Recent genome comparisons of E. coli B and K-12 strains have indicated that the makeup of the cell envelopes in these two strains is quite different. Therefore, we analyzed and compared the envelope proteomes of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655. A total of 165 protein spots, including 62 nonredundant proteins, were unambiguously identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Of these, 43 proteins were conserved between the two strains, whereas 4 and 16 strain-specific proteins were identified only in E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655, respectively. Additionally, 24 proteins showed more than 2-fold differences in intensities between the B and K-12 strains. The reference envelope proteome maps showed that E. coli envelope mainly contained channel proteins and lipoproteins. Interesting proteomic observations between the two strains were as follows: (i) B produced more OmpF porin with a larger pore size than K-12, indicating an increase in the membrane permeability; (ii) B produced higher amounts of lipoproteins, which facilitates the assembly of outer membrane beta-barrel proteins; and (iii) motility- (FliC) and chemotaxis-related proteins (CheA and CheW) were detected only in K-12, which showed that E. coli B is restricted with regard to migration under unfavorable conditions. These differences may influence the permeability and integrity of the cell envelope, showing that E. coli B may be more susceptible than K-12 to certain stress conditions. Thus, these findings suggest that E. coli K-12 and its derivatives will be more favorable strains in certain biotechnological applications, such as cell surface display or membrane engineering studies. PMID:22534293

  16. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, K V; Ianenko, A S

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases. PMID:25474901

  17. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases. PMID:25508680

  18. Recombinant production of mecasermin in E. coli expression system.

    PubMed

    Jafari, S; Babaeipour, V; Seyedi, H A Eslampanah; Rahaie, M; Mofid, M R; Haddad, L; Namvaran, M M; Fallah, J

    2014-01-01

    Human Insulin-like growth factor 1 (hIGF-1) consists of 70 amino acids in a single chain with three intermolecular disulfide bridges possessing valuable therapeutic effects. To date, numerous variants of specifically engineered hIGF-1 have been produced so as to improve hIGF-1 biological activity, stability and stronger binding to IGF-1 receptor. Mecasermin is one of the modified variants with one amino acid substitution near the N-terminal (T4I) approved for the treatment of growth failure diabetes, wound healing, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. No scientific report for recombinant production of mecasermin in Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system has been sofar reported. In the present study, we therefore investigated the overexpression of mecasermin in two different E. coli strains in order to obtain higher yield of recombinant protein. To achieve this goal, mecasermin DNA encoding sequence was designed based on polypeptide sequence, optimized according to E. coli codon preference, and cloned in pET15b. Recombinant vector, pET15-mecasermin, transferred into two E. coli strains rigami B (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) and induced for expression in a small scale. Results revealed the E. coli Origami B (DE3) expression system was a preferable host for mecasermin production due to its high expression level being around twice as much as BL21 (DE3). Large scale mecasermin production was performed in batch culture and produced recombinant protein specifically confirmed by western blotting and mass spectroscopy. Since major part of recombinant mecasermin was expressed as inclusion body, isolation and refolding was accomplished through developed purification procedure, and finally recombinant protein was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26339260

  19. Recombinant production of mecasermin in E. coli expression system

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, S.; Babaeipour, V.; Seyedi, H.A. Eslampanah; Rahaie, M.; Mofid, M.R.; Haddad, L.; Namvaran, M.M.; Fallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Insulin-like growth factor 1 (hIGF-1) consists of 70 amino acids in a single chain with three intermolecular disulfide bridges possessing valuable therapeutic effects. To date, numerous variants of specifically engineered hIGF-1 have been produced so as to improve hIGF-1 biological activity, stability and stronger binding to IGF-1 receptor. Mecasermin is one of the modified variants with one amino acid substitution near the N-terminal (T4I) approved for the treatment of growth failure diabetes, wound healing, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. No scientific report for recombinant production of mecasermin in Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system has been sofar reported. In the present study, we therefore investigated the overexpression of mecasermin in two different E. coli strains in order to obtain higher yield of recombinant protein. To achieve this goal, mecasermin DNA encoding sequence was designed based on polypeptide sequence, optimized according to E. coli codon preference, and cloned in pET15b. Recombinant vector, pET15-mecasermin, transferred into two E. coli strains rigami B (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) and induced for expression in a small scale. Results revealed the E. coli Origami B (DE3) expression system was a preferable host for mecasermin production due to its high expression level being around twice as much as BL21 (DE3). Large scale mecasermin production was performed in batch culture and produced recombinant protein specifically confirmed by western blotting and mass spectroscopy. Since major part of recombinant mecasermin was expressed as inclusion body, isolation and refolding was accomplished through developed purification procedure, and finally recombinant protein was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26339260

  20. Production of soluble truncated spike protein of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli through refolding.

    PubMed

    Piao, Da-Chuan; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Bok, Jin-Duck; Cho, Chong-Su; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strains, from 2013 to 2014, in North American and Asian countries have greatly threatened global swine industry. Therefore, development of effective vaccines against PEDV variant strains is urgently needed. Recently, it has been reported that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of S1 domain of PEDV spike protein is responsible for binding to the 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a possible sugar co-receptor. Therefore, the NTD of S1 domain could be an attractive target for the development of subunit vaccines. In this study, the NTD spanning amino acid residues 25-229 (S25-229) of S1 domain of PEDV variant strain was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in the form of inclusion bodies (IBs). S25-229 IBs were solubilized in 20 mM sodium acetate (pH 4.5) buffer containing 8 M urea and 1 mM dithiothreitol with 95% yield. Solubilized S25-229 IBs were refolded by 10-fold flash dilution and purified by one-step cation exchange chromatography with >95% purity and 20% yield. The CD spectrum of S25-229 showed the characteristic pattern of alpha helical structure. In an indirect ELISA, purified S25-229 showed strong reactivity with mouse anti-PEDV sera. In addition, immunization of mice with 20 μg of purified S25-229 elicited highly potent serum IgG titers. Finally, mouse antisera against S25-229 showed immune reactivity with native PEDV S protein in an immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that purified S25-229 may have potential to be used as a subunit vaccine against PEDV variant strains. PMID:27260969

  1. Expression of a codon-optimised recombinant Ara h 2.02 peanut allergen in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lew, Min Han; Lim, Renee Lay Hong

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tools for peanut allergy using crude peanut extract showed low predictive value and reduced specificity for detection of peanut allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). The Ara h 2.02, an isoform of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2, contains three IgE epitope recognition sequence of 'DPYSPS' and may be a better reagent for component resolve diagnosis. This research aimed to generate a codon-optimised Ara h 2.02 gene for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and allergenicity study of this recombinant protein. The codon-optimised gene was generated by PCR using overlapping primers and cloned into the pET-28a (+) expression vector. Moderate expression of a 22.5 kDa 6xhistidine-tagged recombinant Ara h 2.02 protein (6xHis-rAra h 2.02) in BL21 (DE3) host cells was observed upon induction with 1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The insoluble recombinant protein was purified under denaturing condition using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) affinity chromatography and refolded by dialysis in decreasing urea concentration, amounting to a yield of 74 mg/l of expression culture. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunoblot analysis confirmed the production of the recombinant 6xHis-rAra h 2.02. The refolded recombinant 6xHis-rAra h 2.02, with or without adjuvant, was able to elicit comparable level of allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 in sensitised Balb/c mice. In addition, the specific IgE antibodies raised against the recombinant protein were able to recognise the native Ara h 2 protein, demonstrating its allergenicity and potential as a reagent for diagnosis and therapeutic study. PMID:26411458

  2. Highly Effective Renaturation of a Streptokinase from Streptococcus pyogenes DT7 as Inclusion Bodies Overexpressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sy Le Thanh; Quyen, Dinh Thi; Vu, Hong Diep

    2014-01-01

    The streptokinase (SK) is emerging as an important thrombolytic therapy agent in the treatment of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases. We reported highly effective renaturation of a SK from S. pyogeness DT7 overexpressed in E. coli, purification, and biochemical characterization. A gene coding for the SK was cloned from S. pyogeness DT7. Because accumulation of active SK is toxic to the host cells, we have expressed it in the form of inclusion bodies. The mature protein was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 DE3/pESK under the control of the strong promoter tac induced by IPTG with a level of 60% of the total cell proteins. The activity of the rSK, renatured in phosphate buffer supplemented with Triton X-100 and glycerol, was covered with up to 41 folds of its initial activity. The purified of protein was identified with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry through four peptide fragments, which showed 100% identification to the corresponding peptides of the putative SK from GenBank. Due to overexpression and highly effective renaturation of large amounts of inclusion bodies, the recombinant E. coli BL21 DE3/pESK system could be potentially applied for large-scale production of SK used in the therapy of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24883307

  3. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  4. Characterization of an Alginate Lyase, FlAlyA, from Flavobacterium sp. Strain UMI-01 and Its Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Akira; Takadono, Kohei; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Tajima, Kenji; Kobayashi, Takanori; Ojima, Takao

    2014-01-01

    A major alginate lyase, FlAlyA, was purified from the periplasmic fraction of an alginate-assimilating bacterium, Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. FlAlyA showed a single band of ~30 kDa on SDS-PAGE and exhibited the optimal temperature and pH at 55 °C and pH 7.7, respectively. Analyses for substrate preference and reaction products indicated that FlAlyA was an endolytic poly(mannuronate) lyase (EC 4.2.2.3). A gene fragment encoding the amino-acid sequence of 288 residues for FlAlyA was amplified by inverse PCR. The N-terminal region of 21 residues except for the initiation Met in the deduced sequence was predicted as the signal peptide and the following region of six residues was regarded as propeptide, while the C-terminal region of 260 residues was regarded as the polysaccharide-lyase-family-7-type catalytic domain. The entire coding region for FlAlyA was subjected to the pCold I—Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expression system and ~eight times higher yield of recombinant FlAlyA (recFlAlyA) than that of native FlAlyA was achieved. The recFlAlyA recovered in the periplasmic fraction of E. coli had lost the signal peptide region along with the N-terminal 3 residues of propeptide region. This suggested that the signal peptide of FlAlyA could function in part in E. coli. PMID:25153766

  5. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli. PMID:26004641

  6. Engineered Production of Tryprostatins in E. coli through Reconstitution of a Partial ftm Biosynthetic Gene Cluster from Aspergillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gopitkumar R; Wesener, Shane R.; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Tryprostatin A and B are indole alkaloid-based fungal products that inhibit mammalian cell cycle at the G2/M phase. They are biosynthetic intermediates of fumitremorgins produced by a complex pathway involving a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (FtmA), a prenyltransferase (FtmB), a cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (FtmC), an O-methyltransferase (FtmD), and several additional enzymes. A partial fumitremorgin biosynthetic gene cluster (ftmABCD) from Aspergillus sp. was reconstituted in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells, with or without the co-expression of an Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase gene (Cv_sfp) from Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968. Several recombinant E. coli strains produced tryprostatin B up to 106 mg/l or tryprostatin A up to 76 mg/l in the fermentation broth under aerobic condition, providing an effective way to prepare those pharmaceutically important natural products biologically. PMID:26640821

  7. Distribution and Phylogeny of Immunoglobulin-Binding Protein G in Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Its Association with Adherence Phenotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Viktor; Ohder, Barbara; Bielaszewska, Martina; Zhang, Wenlan; Fruth, Angelika; Menge, Christian; Borrmann, Erika; Middendorf, Barbara; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    eibG in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O91 encodes a protein (EibG) which binds human immunoglobulins G and A and contributes to bacterial chain-like adherence to human epithelial cells. We investigated the prevalence of eibG among STEC, the phylogeny of eibG, and eibG allelic variations and their impact on the adherence phenotype. eibG was found in 15.0% of 240 eae-negative STEC strains but in none of 157 eae-positive STEC strains. The 36 eibG-positive STEC strains belonged to 14 serotypes and to eight multilocus sequence types (STs), with serotype O91:H14/H− and ST33 being the most common. Sequences of the complete eibG gene (1,527 bp in size) from eibG-positive STEC resulted in 21 different alleles with 88.11% to 100% identity to the previously reported eibG sequence; they clustered into three eibG subtypes (eibG-α, eibG-β, and eibG-γ). Strains expressing EibG-α and EibG-β displayed a mostly typical chain-like adherence pattern (CLAP), with formation of long chains on both human and bovine intestinal epithelial cells, whereas strains with EibG-γ adhered in short chains, a pattern we termed atypical CLAP. The same adherence phenotypes were displayed by E. coli BL21(DE3) clones containing the respective eibG-α, eibG-β, and eibG-γ subtypes. We propose two possible evolutionary scenarios for eibG in STEC: a clonal development of eibG in strains with the same phylogenetic background or horizontal transfer of eibG between phylogenetically unrelated STEC strains. PMID:20547747

  8. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD. PMID:25906688

  9. Refolding and purification of Bothropstoxin-I, a Lys49-phospholipase A2 homologue, expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ward, R J; de Oliveira, A H; Bortoleto, R K; Rosa, J C; Faça, V M; Greene, L J

    2001-02-01

    Hydrolysis of phospholipids by Group II phospholipase A2 enzymes involves a nucleophilic attack on the sn-2 ester bond by the His48 residue and stabilization of the reaction intermediate by a Ca2+ ion cofactor bound to the Asp49 residue in the protein active site region. Bothropstoxin-I (BthTX-I) is a PLA(2) variant present in the venom of the snake Bothrops jararacussu which shows a Asp49 to Lys substitution and which lacks hydrolytic activity yet damages artificial membranes by a noncatalytic Ca2+-independent mechanism. In order to better characterize this unusual mechanism of membrane damage, we have established an expression system for BthTX-I in Escherichia coli. The DNA-coding sequence for BthTX-I was subcloned into the vector pET11-d, and the BthTX-I was expressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21(DE3). The native BthTX-I contains seven disulfide bonds, and a straightforward protocol has been developed to refold the recombinant protein at high protein concentration in the presence of surfactants using a size-exclusion chromatography matrix. After refolding, recovery yields of 2.5% (corresponding to 4-5 mg of refolded recombinant BthTX-I per liter of bacterial culture) were routinely obtained. After refolding, identical fluorescent and circular dichroism spectra were obtained for the recombinant BthTX-I compared to those of the native protein. Furthermore, the native and refolded recombinant protein demonstrated identical membrane-damaging properties as evaluated by measuring the release of an entrapped fluorescent marker from liposomes. PMID:11162398

  10. High-level SUMO-mediated fusion expression of ABP-dHC-cecropin A from multiple joined genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Wei, Zhiheng; Sang, Ming; Wu, Xiaolong; Wang, Mengyang; Wei, Hui; Pan, Huixin; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-09-15

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, evaluation of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A in E. coli, tandem repeats of the ABP-dHC-cecropin A gene were constructed and expressed as fusion proteins (SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) via pSUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A vectors (n = 1, 2, 3, 4). Comparison of the expression levels of soluble SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion proteins (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) suggested that BL21 (DE3)/pSUMO-3ABP-dHC-cecropin A is an ideal recombinant strain for ABP-dHC-cecropin A production. Under the selected conditions of cultivation and isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) induction, the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A was as high as 65 mg/L, with ∼21.3% of the fusion protein in soluble form. By large-scale fermentation, protein production reached nearly 300 mg/L, which is the highest yield of ABP-dHC-cecropin A reported to date. In antibacterial experiments, the efficacy was approximately the same as that of synthetic ABP-dHC-cecropin A. This method provides a novel and effective means of producing large amounts of ABP-dHC-cecropin A. PMID:27377968

  11. Expression of recombinant T-cell epitopes of major Japanese cedar pollen allergens fused with cholera toxin B subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vinh Van; Zou, Yanshuang; Kurata, Kentaro; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Peptides containing T-cell epitopes from allergens, which are not reactive to allergen-specific IgE, are appropriate candidates as antigens for specific immunotherapy against allergies. To develop a vaccine that can be used in practical application to prevent and treat Japanese cedar pollen allergy, four major T-cell epitopes from the Cry j 1 antigen and six from the Cry j 2 antigen were selected to design cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi, DNA constructs encoding artificial polypeptides of the selected epitopes. To apply cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as an adjuvant, cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi were linked and then fused to the CTB gene in tandem to construct a fusion gene, ctb-linker-cry j 1 epi- cry j 2 epi-flag. The fusion gene was introduced into a pET-28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The expressed recombinant protein was purified by a His-tag affinity column and confirmed by western blot analysis using anti-CTB and anti-FLAG antibodies. The purified recombinant protein also proved to be antigenic against anti-Cry j 1 and anti-Cry j 2 antibodies. Expression of the recombinant protein induced with 1mM IPTG reached a maximum in 3-5h, and recovery of the affinity-purified recombinant protein was approximately 120mg/L of culture medium. The present study indicates that production of sufficient amounts of recombinant protein with antigenic epitopes may be possible by recombinant techniques using E. coli or other bacterial strains for protein expression. PMID:25665505

  12. Characterization of WbiQ: An {alpha}1,2-fucosyltransferase from Escherichia coli O127:K63(B8), and synthesis of H-type 3 blood group antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, Nicholas; Styslinger, Thomas; Mei, Zhen; Han, Weiqing; Zhao, Guohui; Wang, Peng George

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WbiQ is an {alpha}1,2-fucosyltransferase from Escherichia coli O127. {yields} WbiQ demonstrates strict substrate specificity for the Gal-{beta}1,3-GalNAc acceptor. {yields} WbiQ was used to synthesize milligram scale of the H-type 3 blood group antigen. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli O127:K63(B8) possesses high human blood group H (O) activity due to its O-antigen repeating unit structure. In this work, the wbiQ gene from E. coli O127:K63(B8) was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified as a fusion protein containing an N-terminal GST affinity tag. Using the GST-WbiQ fusion protein, the wbiQ gene was identified to encode an {alpha}1,2-fucosyltransferase using a radioactivity based assay, thin-layer chromatography assay, as well confirming product formation by using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The fused enzyme (GST-WbiQ) has an optimal pH range from 6.5 to 7.5 and does not require the presence of a divalent metal to be enzymatically active. WbiQ displays strict substrate specificity, displaying activity only towards acceptors that contain Gal-{beta}1,3-GalNAc-{alpha}-OR linkages; indicating that both the Gal and GalNAc residues are vital for enzymatic activity. In addition, WbiQ was used to prepare the H-type 3 blood group antigen, Fuc-{alpha}1,2-Gal-{beta}1,3-GalNAc-{alpha}-OMe, on a milligram scale.

  13. Optimization of high cell density fermentation process for recombinant nitrilase production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Nelapati, Dhanaraj; Sathe, Sneha; Javadekar-Subhedar, Vaishali; Gaikaiwari, Raghavendra P; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrilases constitute an important class of biocatalysts for chiral synthesis. This work was undertaken with the aim to optimize nitrilase production in a host that is well-studied for protein production. Process parameters were optimized for high cell density fermentation, in batch and fed-batch modes, of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens nitrilase with a T7 promoter based expression system. Effects of different substrates, temperature and isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction on nitrilase production were studied. Super optimal broth containing glycerol but without an inducer gave best results in batch mode with 32 °C as the optimal temperature. Use of IPTG led to insoluble protein and lower enzyme activity. Optimized fed-batch strategy resulted in significant improvement in specific activity as well as volumetric productivity of the enzyme. On a volumetric basis, the activity improved 40-fold compared to the unoptimized batch process. PMID:25739996

  14. SEROLOGICAL CROSS-REACTIONS BETWEEN ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157 AND OTHER SPECIES OF THE GENUS ESCHERICHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia hermannii, a sorbitol-negative species of the genus Escherichia, has been reported to be agglutinated by Escherichia coli 0157 and four sorbitol-negative species of the genus Escherichia: . hermannii (24 isolates), Escherichia fergusonii (12 isolates), Escherichia vul...

  15. P212A Mutant of Dihydrodaidzein Reductase Enhances (S)-Equol Production and Enantioselectivity in a Recombinant Escherichia coli Whole-Cell Reaction System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyung-Gang; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, EunOk; Pandey, Bishnu Prasad; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-04-01

    (S)-Equol, a gut bacterial isoflavone derivative, has drawn great attention because of its potent use for relieving female postmenopausal symptoms and preventing prostate cancer. Previous studies have reported on the dietary isoflavone metabolism of several human gut bacteria and the involved enzymes for conversion of daidzein to (S)-equol. However, the anaerobic growth conditions required by the gut bacteria and the low productivity and yield of (S)-equol limit its efficient production using only natural gut bacteria. In this study, the low (S)-equol biosynthesis of gut microorganisms was overcome by cloning the four enzymes involved in the biosynthesis from Slackia isoflavoniconvertens into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The reaction conditions were optimized for (S)-equol production from the recombinant strain, and this recombinant system enabled the efficient conversion of 200 μM and 1 mM daidzein to (S)-equol under aerobic conditions, achieving yields of 95% and 85%, respectively. Since the biosynthesis of trans-tetrahydrodaidzein was found to be a rate-determining step for (S)-equol production, dihydrodaidzein reductase (DHDR) was subjected to rational site-directed mutagenesis. The introduction of the DHDR P212A mutation increased the (S)-equol productivity from 59.0 mg/liter/h to 69.8 mg/liter/h in the whole-cell reaction. The P212A mutation caused an increase in the (S)-dihydrodaidzein enantioselectivity by decreasing the overall activity of DHDR, resulting in undetectable activity for (R)-dihydrodaidzein, such that a combination of the DHDR P212A mutant with dihydrodaidzein racemase enabled the production of (3S,4R)-tetrahydrodaidzein with an enantioselectivity of >99%. PMID:26801575

  16. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  17. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  18. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal. PMID:16790938

  19. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  20. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  1. Dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, S G; Shaw, D C; Armarego, W L

    1988-01-01

    A dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits (Mr 27000) and a free N-terminal group. It can use NADH (Vmax./Km 3.36 s-1) and NADPH (Vmax./Km 1.07 s-1) when 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin is the second substrate, as well as quinonoid dihydro-(6H)-biopterin (Vmax./Km 0.69 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-neopterin (Vmax./Km 0.58 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-monapterin 0.66 s-1), 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin and cis-6,7-dimethyldihydro-(6H)-pterin (Vmax./Km 0.66 s-1) when NADH is the second substrate. The pure reductase has a yellow colour and contains bound FAD. The enzyme also has pterin-independent NADH and NADPH oxidoreductase activities when potassium ferricyanide is the electron acceptor. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3060113

  2. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  3. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  4. One-Step Biosynthesis of α-Keto-γ-Methylthiobutyric Acid from L-Methionine by an Escherichia coli Whole-Cell Biocatalyst Expressing an Engineered L-Amino Acid Deaminase from Proteus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Wang, Miao; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    α-Keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid (KMTB), a keto derivative of l-methionine, has great potential for use as an alternative to l-methionine in the poultry industry and as an anti-cancer drug. This study developed an environment friendly process for KMTB production from l-methionine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an engineered l-amino acid deaminase (l-AAD) from Proteus vulgaris. We first overexpressed the P. vulgaris l-AAD in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and further optimized the whole-cell transformation process. The maximal molar conversion ratio of l-methionine to KMTB was 71.2% (mol/mol) under the optimal conditions (70 g/L l-methionine, 20 g/L whole-cell biocatalyst, 5 mM CaCl2, 40°C, 50 mM Tris-HCl [pH 8.0]). Then, error-prone polymerase chain reaction was used to construct P. vulgaris l-AAD mutant libraries. Among approximately 104 mutants, two mutants bearing lysine 104 to arginine and alanine 337 to serine substitutions showed 82.2% and 80.8% molar conversion ratios, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of these mutations enhanced the catalytic activity and molar conversion ratio by 1.3-fold and up to 91.4% with a KMTB concentration of 63.6 g/L. Finally, the effect of immobilization on whole-cell transformation was examined, and the immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst with Ca2+ alginate increased reusability by 41.3% compared to that of free cell production. Compared with the traditional multi-step chemical synthesis, our one-step biocatalytic production of KMTB has an advantage in terms of environmental pollution and thus has great potential for industrial KMTB production. PMID:25531756

  5. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  6. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  7. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  8. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  9. An Innovative Cloning Platform Enables Large-Scale Production and Maturation of an Oxygen-Tolerant [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schiffels, Johannes; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schelden, Maximilian; Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny A. A.; Baumann, Marcus E. M.; Selmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Expression of multiple heterologous genes in a dedicated host is a prerequisite for approaches in synthetic biology, spanning from the production of recombinant multiprotein complexes to the transfer of tailor-made metabolic pathways. Such attempts are often exacerbated, due in most cases to a lack of proper directional, robust and readily accessible genetic tools. Here, we introduce an innovative system for cloning and expression of multiple genes in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Using the novel methodology, genes are equipped with individual promoters and terminators and subsequently assembled. The resulting multiple gene cassettes may either be placed in one vector or alternatively distributed among a set of compatible plasmids. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed tool by production and maturation of the NAD+reducing soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) in E. coli BL21Star™ (DE3). The SH (encoded in hoxFUYHI) was successfully matured by co-expression of a dedicated set of auxiliary genes, comprising seven hyp genes (hypC1D1E1A2B2F2X) along with hoxW, which encodes a specific endopeptidase. Deletion of genes involved in SH maturation reduced maturation efficiency substantially. Further addition of hoxN1, encoding a high-affinity nickel permease from C. necator, considerably increased maturation efficiency in E. coli. Carefully balanced growth conditions enabled hydrogenase production at high cell-densities, scoring mg·(Liter culture)−1 yields of purified functional SH. Specific activities of up to 7.2±1.15 U·mg−1 were obtained in cell-free extracts, which is in the range of the highest activities ever determined in C. necator extracts. The recombinant enzyme was isolated in equal purity and stability as previously achieved with the native form, yielding ultrapure preparations with anaerobic specific activities of up to 230 U·mg−1. Owing to the combinatorial power exhibited by the

  10. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA

    PubMed Central

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L.; Spychala, Caressa N.; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A.

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described. PMID:26488485

  11. Efficient production of native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Setrerrahmane, Sarra; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Guangzhi; Lv, Jing; Tan, Shuhua

    2014-09-01

    To develop an efficient and cost-effective approach for the production of small preventive peptide lunasin with correct natural N terminus, a synthetic gene was designed by OPTIMIZER & Gene Designer and cloned into pTWIN1 vector at SapI and PstI sites. Thus, lunasin was N-terminally fused to the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein linked to a chitin binding domain (CBD) with no extra residues. The resultant fusion protein was highly expressed by lactose induction in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a 7-l bioreactor and bound to a chitin affinity column. After washing the impurities, the Ssp DnaB intein mediated on-column self-cleavage was easily triggered by shifting pH and temperature to allow the native lunasin released. The final purified lunasin yielded up to 75 mg/l medium. Tricine/SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)/mass spectrometry (MS) verified the structural authenticity of the product, implying the correct cleavage at the junction between Ssp DnaB intein and lunasin. MTT assay confirmed its potent proliferation inhibitory activity to human cancer cells HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231; however, no cytotoxicity to normal human lens epithelial cell SRA01/04 and hepatoma HepG2. Taken together, we provide a novel strategy to produce recombinant native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein. PMID:25085531

  12. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  13. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  14. Escherichia coli and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, Karl A.; Goldwater, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the association of strains of Escherichia coli with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the possible role these bacteria play in this enigmatic condition. The review addresses evidence for E. coli in SIDS infants, potential sources of E. coli in the environment, colonization by commensal and pathogenic strains, the variety of currently accepted pathotypes, and how these pathotypes could compromise intestinal integrity and induce inflammation. Both intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes are compared in relation to the apparent liability in which virulence traits can be gained or lost by strains of E. coli. The way in which E. coli infections fit with current views on infant sleeping position and other SIDS risk factors is highlighted. PMID:26191064

  15. High-efficiency production of bioactive recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18 in Escherichia coli and its effects on hair follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Lintao; Huang, Zhifeng; Chen, Yu; Li, Haiyan; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    Using fusion tags, expression of recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18 (rhFGF18) in mammalian cells and Escherichia coli has been extensively used for fundamental research and clinical applications, including chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, hair growth, and neuroprotection. However, high-level rhFGF18 expression is difficult and the products are often not homogeneous. Furthermore, fusion-tagged protein has higher immunogenicity and lower bioactivity, and the removal of the fused tag is expensive. To overcome the limitations of fusion-tagged expression of protein and to prepare soluble highly bioactive rhFGF18, we have developed a rapid and efficient expression strategy. Optimized hFGF18 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into pET22b and pET3c vectors, then transformed into E. coli strains Origima (DE3) and BL21 (DE3)PlysS. The best combination of plasmid and host strain was selected, and only Origima (DE3)/pET3c-rhFGF18 was screened for high-level expressed rhFGF18. Under optimal conditions in a 30-L fermentor, the average bacterial yield and expression level of rhFGF18 of three batches were more than 652 g and 30 % respectively, after treatment with 1 mM isopropyl-thio-β-galactopyranoside for 10 h at 25 °C. The target protein was purified by CM Sepharose FF and heparin affinity chromatography. The purity of rhFGF18 was shown by HPLC to be higher than 95 %, and the yield was 155 mg/L. In vitro MTT assays demonstrated that the purified rhFGF18 could stimulate significant proliferation of NIH3T3 cells, and animal experiments showed that rhFGF18 could effectively regulate hair growth. In conclusion, this may be a better method of producing rhFGF18 to meet the increasing demand in its pharmacological application. PMID:23624709

  16. [Cloning of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin gene and extracellular expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masaharu; Kikuchi, Maho; Komoriya, Tomoe; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kouno, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that widely propagets in the soil and the gastrointestinal tract of human and animals. This bacteria causes food poisoning, gas gangrene and other various range of infectious diseases. But there is no standard diagnosis method of C. perfringens. In order to develop a new type of immunoassay for clinical purpose, we studied expression and extracellular secretion of recombinant alpha-toxin having enzyme activity in E. coli expression system. Cloning was carried out after PCR amplification from C. perfringens GAI 94074 which was clinical isolate. Three kinds of fragment were cloned using pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for ribosome binding site, signal peptide, and alpha-toxin gene respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmid transformed into TOP 10 cells and the obtained plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells. Then, the transformants were induced expression with IPTG. In conclusion, we successfully cloned, expressed and exteracellular secreted C. perfringens alpha-toxin containing signal peptide. Biologically, the obtained recombinant protein was positive for phospholipase C activity. PMID:18154441

  17. One step affinity recovery of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from cloned Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Fang, Yanan; Wang, Zhizhen; Zhang, Ling

    2015-06-01

    3α-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), from Comamonas Testosterone, catalyze reversibly the oxidoreduction of 3α-hydroxyl groups of the steroid hormones. The gene encoding 3α-HSD (hsdA) from Comamonas Testosterone was expressed in Escherchia coli BL21 (DE3). A protocol for recovering 3α-HSD based on affinity strategy was designed and employed. Deoxycholic acid was chosen as the affinity ligand, and it was linked to Sepharose 4B with the aid of the spacers as cyanuric chloride and ethanediamine. With this specific affinity medium, the enzyme recovery process consisted of only one chromatography step to capture 3α-HSD. The target protein, analyzed on HPLC Agilent SEC-5 column, was of 94% pure among the captured protein, and 98% with SDS-PAGE analysis. The yield of the expressed enzyme was 8.8% of crude extracted proteins; the recovery yield of 3α-HSD was 73.2%. 3α-HSD was revealed as a non-covalent homodimer with molecular mass of ∼56kDa by 15.0% SDS-PAGE analysis and SE-HPLC analysis. The desorption constant Kd and the theoretical maximum absorption Qmax on the affinity medium were 4.5μg/g medium and 21.3mg/g medium, respectively. PMID:25913427

  18. Preparation and characterization of a novel chimeric protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiping; Wei, Ruili; Cheng, Jinwei

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI) is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3), and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future. PMID:18769489

  19. Mechanism of Sperm Immobilization by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vijay; Sandhu, Ravneet; Kaur, Siftjit; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Sarwal, Abha; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.; Singh, Shravan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To explore the influence of Escherichia coli on the motility of human spermatozoa and its possible mechanism. Methods. Highly motile preparations of spermatozoa from normozoospermic patients were coincubated with Escherichia coli for 4 hours. At 1, 2 and 4 hours of incubation, sperm motility was determined. The factor responsible for sperm immobilization without agglutination was isolated and purified from filtrates. Results. This report confirms the immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrates sperm immobilization factor (SIF) excreted by E. coli. Further this factor was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel permeation chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. Purified SIF (56 kDa) caused instant immobilization without agglutination of human spermatozoa at 800 μg/mL and death at 2.1 mg/mL. Spermatozoa incubated with SIF revealed multiple and profound alterations involving all superficial structures of spermatozoa as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion. In conclusion, these results have shown immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrate a factor (SIF) produced and secreted by E. coli which causes variable structural damage as probable morphological correlates of immobilization. PMID:20379358

  20. Diagnosisand Investigation of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nataro, J P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-01

    Although most Escherichia coli are harmless commensals of the human intestine, certain specific, highly-adapted E. coli strains are capable of causing urinary tract, systemic or enteric/diarrheagenic infection. Diarrheagenic E coli are divided into six distinct categories, or pathotypes, each with a distinct pathogenic scheme (Table 1). Combined, diarrheagenic E coli have emerged as perhaps the most important enteric pathogens of man. In the developing world, the E coli categories account for more cases of gastroenteiltis among infants than any other cause (1) In addition, E coli are also the most common cause of traveller's diarrhea, which afflicts more than one million travellers to the developing world annually (1). Enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) are the cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which has become a major foodborne threat in many parts of the developed world (2). Table 1 Categories of Diarrheagenic E. coli Category Toxins Invasion Virulence plasmid Adhesin Clinical syndrome ETEC LT, ST - Many CFA/I, CFA/II, CFA/IV, others Watery diarrhea EPEC - + 60 MDa Bundle-forming pilus Watery diarrhea of infants EHEC SLT-1, SLT-2 - 60 MDa( a ) Intimin, Fimbriae( a ) Hemorrhagic colitis, HUS EAEC EAST1( a ) ? 65 MDa( a ) AAF/I, AAF/I Watery, persistent diarrhea EIEC EIET( a ) +++ 140 MDa Ipa's(?) Watery diarrhea, dysentery DAEC ? ? ? F1845( a ) Watery diarrhea ( a )Role in pathogenesis unproven. PMID:21390758

  1. Escherichia coli bacteriuria and contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Hooton, T M; Hillier, S; Johnson, C; Roberts, P L; Stamm, W E

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of contraceptive method on the occurrence of bacteriuria and vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli in 104 women who were evaluated prior to having sexual intercourse, the morning after intercourse, and 24 hours later. After intercourse, the prevalence of E coli bacteriuria increased slightly in oral contraceptive users but dramatically in both foam and condom users and diaphragm-spermicide users. Twenty-four hours later, the prevalence of bacteriuria remained significantly elevated only in the latter two groups. Similarly, vaginal colonization with E coli was more dramatic and persistent in users of diaphragm-spermicide and foam and condoms. Vaginal colonization with Candida species, enterococci, and staphylococci also increased significantly in diaphragm-spermicide users after intercourse. We conclude that use of the diaphragm with spermicidal jelly or use of a spermicidal foam with a condom markedly alters normal vaginal flora and strongly predisposes users to the development of vaginal colonization and bacteriuria with E coli. PMID:1859519

  2. Adhesion behaviors of Escherichia coli on hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Takahashi, Shohei; Yokoi, Taishi; Inoue, Chihiro; Ioku, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Optimum design of support materials for microorganisms is required for the construction of bioreactors. However, the effects of support materials on microorganisms are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli (E. coli) on hydroxyapatite (HA), polyurethane (PU), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), and carbon (Carbon) to obtain basic knowledge for the design of support materials. The total metabolic activity and number of E. coli adhering on the samples followed the order of HA ≈ Carbon>PVC>PU. On the other hand, the water contact angle of the pellet surfaces followed the order of HAcoli. The results implied that HA has a potential as a support material for microorganisms used in bioreactors. PMID:26838837

  3. Escherichia coli in retail processed food.

    PubMed Central

    Pinegar, J. A.; Cooke, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    Four thousand two hundred and forty six samples of retail processed food were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli. Overall 12% of samples contained this organism, cakes and confectionery being more frequently contaminated (28%) than meat and meat based products (9%). Contamination was more frequent in the summer months than in the colder weather and 27% of the contaminated foods contained greater than 10(3) E. coli/g. E. coli from meat and meat based products were more commonly resistant to one or more antibiotics (14%) than were confectionery strains (1%). The significance of these findings in relation to the E. coli population of the human bowel is discussed. PMID:3894508

  4. Escherichia coli in retail processed food.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, J A; Cooke, E M

    1985-08-01

    Four thousand two hundred and forty six samples of retail processed food were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli. Overall 12% of samples contained this organism, cakes and confectionery being more frequently contaminated (28%) than meat and meat based products (9%). Contamination was more frequent in the summer months than in the colder weather and 27% of the contaminated foods contained greater than 10(3) E. coli/g. E. coli from meat and meat based products were more commonly resistant to one or more antibiotics (14%) than were confectionery strains (1%). The significance of these findings in relation to the E. coli population of the human bowel is discussed. PMID:3894508

  5. Vaginal Lactobacillus isolates inhibit uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Atassi, Fabrice; Brassart, Dominique; Grob, Philipp; Graf, Federico; Servin, Alain L

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activities of Lactobacillus jensenii KS119.1 and KS121.1, and Lactobacillus gasserii KS120.1 and KS124.3 strains isolated from the vaginal microflora of healthy women, against uropathogenic, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains IH11128 and 7372 involved in recurrent cystitis. We observed that some of the Lactobacillus isolates inhibited the growth and decreased the viability of E. coli IH11128 and 7372. In addition, we observed that adhering Lactobacillus strains inhibited adhesion of E. coli IH11128 onto HeLa cells, and inhibited internalization of E. coli IH11128 within HeLa cells. PMID:16553843

  6. FTIR nanobiosensors for Escherichia coli detection

    PubMed Central

    Greppi, Gianfranco; Marongiu, Maria Laura; Roggero, Pier Paolo; Ravindranath, Sandeep P; Mauer, Lisa J; Schibeci, Nicoletta; Perria, Francesco; Piccinini, Massimo; Innocenzi, Plinio; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Summary Infections due to enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (Escherichia coli) have a low incidence but can have severe and sometimes fatal health consequences, and thus represent some of the most serious diseases due to the contamination of water and food. New, fast and simple devices that monitor these pathogens are necessary to improve the safety of our food supply chain. In this work we report on mesoporous titania thin-film substrates as sensors to detect E. coli O157:H7. Titania films treated with APTES ((3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane) and GA (glutaraldehyde) were functionalized with specific antibodies and the absorption properties monitored. The film-based biosensors showed a detection limit for E. coli of 1 × 102 CFU/mL, constituting a simple and selective method for the effective screening of water samples. PMID:23019542

  7. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-associated exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Rodney A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and blood stream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many but not all of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic and Vat to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  8. Production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Tomohisa; Sonoda, Hiroyuki; Kumada, Yoichi; Yamaji, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a host widely used in the industrial production of recombinant proteins. However, the expression of heterologous proteins in E. coli often encounters the formation of inclusion bodies, which are insoluble and nonfunctional protein aggregates. For the successful production of antibody fragments, which includes single-chain variable fragments (scFvs), we describe here the modification of linker, signal, and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, the coexpression of cytoplasmic and periplasmic chaperones, and a method for fed-batch cultivation with exponential feed. PMID:22907360

  9. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  10. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  11. Large plasmids of avian Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Doetkott, D M; Nolan, L K; Giddings, C W; Berryhill, D L

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid DNA of 30 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens was extracted and examined using techniques designed to isolate large plasmids. This plasmid DNA was examined for the presence of certain known virulence-related genes including cvaC, traT, and some aerobactin-related sequences. Seventeen of the 30 isolates contained from one to four plasmids greater than 50 kb in size. Eleven of these 17 strains possessed plasmids greater than 100 kb in size. Therefore, E. coli isolates of chickens frequently contain large plasmids, and many of these plasmids are likely to contain virulence-related sequences. PMID:8980827

  12. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of the porcine β defensin 2 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-li; Zhao, Yan-cong; Song, Xiao-yan; Huang, Xian-xian; Zhao, Wei-dong

    2013-06-01

    Porcine β defensin 2(pBD2)is a cationic 37-amino acid antimicrobial peptide with disulfide bonds. Synthetic pBD2 had broad antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria, and thus pBD2 could be a good candidate as a bactericidal agent for pigs. This study reported the successful recombinant expression of pBD2 in Escherichia coli and analysis of its antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity, salt-tolerance and thermal stability as well. The pBD2 gene, obtained by RT-PCR using the tongue total RNA as a template and cloned into pET30a expression vector, was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) plysS. The recombinant pBD2 was expressed after induction by IPTG and purified by His tag affinity column with 95% purity. The recombinant pBD2 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive S. aureus and Gram-negative E. coli including the multi-resistant E. coli. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of recombinant pBD2 against tested bacteria was 10 μg/mL, and the recombinant pBD2 could kill 50% E. coli at 14.39 μg/mL and S. aureus at 21.1 μg/mL. In addition, pBD2 showed low hemolytic activity, salt-tolerance and thermal stability, the properties would be important for its application in practice. PMID:22973850

  13. Novel compound for identifying Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, W D; Rippey, S R; Clavet, C R; Kelley-Reitz, D J; Burkhardt, W

    1988-01-01

    A new chromogenic compound, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl-beta-D-glucuronide, was found to be useful for the rapid, specific, differential identification of Escherichia coli in the sanitary analysis of shellfish and wastewater. Of 1,025 presumptively positive colonies (blue) and 583 presumptively negative colonies (nonblue), only 1% false-negative and 5% false-positive results were found. PMID:3046494

  14. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In United States, it is estimated that non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause more illnesses than STEC O157:H7, and the majority of cases of non-O157 STEC infections is due to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, referred to as the top six non-O157 STEC. The diseas...

  15. Draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli LCT-EC106.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianzhi; Pu, Fei; Yang, Rentao; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang; Guo, Na; Jiang, Xuege; Zhao, Jiao; Liu, Changting

    2012-08-01

    Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most E. coli strains are harmless, but some serotypes can cause serious food poisoning in humans. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli LCT-EC106, which was isolated from CGMCC 1.2385. PMID:22843582

  16. Expression and single-step purification of mercury transporter (merT) from Cupriavidus metallidurans in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Senthil, K; Gautam, P

    2010-11-01

    The mercury transporter, merT, from Cupriavidus metallidurans was cloned into pRSET-C and expressed in various E. coli hosts. Expression of merT gene failed in common expression hosts like E. coli BL21(DE3), E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS and E. coli GJ1158 due to expression induced toxicity. The protein was successfully expressed in E. coli C43(DE3) as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were solubilized with Triton X-100 detergent. The detergent solubilized protein with N-terminal His-tag was purified in a single-step by immobilized metal affinity chromatography with a yield of 8 mg l(-1). PMID:20574829

  17. Natural plasmid transformation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Suh-Der; Fang, Suh-Sen; Chen, Mei-Jye; Chien, Jun-Yi; Lee, Chih-Chun; Tsen, Darwin Han-Lin

    2002-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli does not have a natural transformation process, strains of E. coli can incorporate extracellular plasmids into cytoplasm 'naturally' at low frequencies. A standard method was developed in which stationary phase cells were concentrated, mixed with plasmids, and then plated on agar plates with nutrients which allowed cells to grow. Transformed cells could then be selected by harvesting cells and plating again on selective agar plates. Competence developed in the lag phase, but disappeared during exponential growth. As more plasmids were added to the cell suspension, the number of transformants increased, eventually reaching a plateau. Supercoiled monomeric or linear concatemeric DNA could transform cells, while linear monomeric DNA could not. Plasmid transformation was not related to conjugation and was recA-independent. Most of the E. coli strains surveyed had this process. All tested plasmids, except pACYC184, could transform E. coli. Insertion of a DNA fragment containing the ampicillin resistance gene into pACYC184 made the plasmid transformable. By inserting random 20-base-pair oligonucleotides into pACYC184 and selecting for transformable plasmids, a most frequent sequence was identified. This sequence resembled the bacterial interspersed medium repetitive sequence of E. coli, suggesting the existence of a recognition sequence. We conclude that plasmid natural transformation exists in E. coli. PMID:12065899

  18. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass. PMID:27223822

  19. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  20. Mechanisms of Emerging Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed A.; Steiner, Ted S.

    2002-04-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli organisms are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless commensals, a few types have emerged that are capable of disrupting the normal physiology of the human gut, producing illness ranging from watery diarrhea to fatal hemorrhagic colitis. Diarrheagenic E. coli cause infection by a variety of complex mechanisms, some of which are incompletely understood. These include adherence, elaboration of toxigenic mediators, invasion of the intestinal mucosa, and transportation of bacterial proteins into the host cells. Specific components of the host-microbial interaction that cause damage have been identified, increasing our understanding of the mechanisms of diarrhea. This article reviews some of the recent findings about the pathogenesis and infectious processes involved in three emerging pathotypes of this fascinating gram-negative bacterium. PMID:11927041

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Croxen, Matthew A; Finlay, B Brett

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a remarkable and diverse organism. This normally harmless commensal needs only to acquire a combination of mobile genetic elements to become a highly adapted pathogen capable of causing a range of diseases, from gastroenteritis to extraintestinal infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream and central nervous system. The worldwide burden of these diseases is staggering, with hundreds of millions of people affected annually. Eight E. coli pathovars have been well characterized, and each uses a large arsenal of virulence factors to subvert host cellular functions to potentiate its virulence. In this Review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms that are used by various E. coli pathovars and how they cause disease in humans. PMID:19966814

  2. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  3. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  4. Action of sodium deoxycholate on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    D'Mello, A.; Yotis, W.W.

    1987-08-01

    Sodium deoxycholate is used in a number of bacteriological media for the isolation and classification of gram-negative bacteria from food and the environment. Initial experiments to study the effect of deoxycholate on the growth parameters of Escherichia coli showed an increase in the lag time constant and generation time and a decrease in the growth rate constant total cell yield of this microorganisms. Cell fractionation studies indicated that sodium deoxycholate at levels used in bacteriological media interferes with the incorporation of (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into the cold-trichloroacetic acid-soluble, ethanol-soluble, and trypsin-soluble cellular fractions of E. coli. Finally, sodium deoxycholate interfered with the flagellation and motility of Proteus mirabilis and E. coli. It would appear then that further improvement of the deoxycholate medium may be in order.

  5. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  6. Cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic human growth hormone in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Mozhdeh; Berenjian, Aydin; Hemmati, Shiva; Nezafat, Navid; Ghoshoon, Mohammad Bagher; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve high-level production of the human growth hormone (hGH) in the prokaryotic expression system. In this regard, we performed cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic hGH gene in BL21 (DE3) strain of E. coli. The hGH production was determined by SDS-PAGE and western blotting techniques, and then the protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. To gain insight into the effect of different nutrients on the growth of E. coli and hGH production, in a preliminary assessment nine different types of the basal medium were analyzed. The highest growth of E. coli and hGH production were observed in TB and SOB media. Accordingly, design of experiments was employed for screening the most significant nutrients, and central composite face design was applied for the optimization. The optimum medium consisted of yeast extract (10 g/L), tryptone (10 g/L), and K2HPO4 (2 g/L). The optimum hGH concentration was 391 mg/L, which was 3-fold higher than the hGH concentration in the LB basal medium (119 mg/L). This production rate is the highest hGH concentration reported in the IPTG-inducible expression systems. PMID:25380986

  7. COMPARATIVE RESISTANCE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI TO CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium were inactivated by free chlorine and monochloramine. ndigenous E. coli and enterococci in wastewater effluents were also inactivated. elective bacteriological media specifically designed for the enumeration of the target...

  8. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers. PMID:18392982

  9. Logarithmic Sensing in Escherichia coli Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Jiang, Lili; Tu, Yuhai; Wu, Mingming

    2009-01-01

    We studied the response of swimming Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in a comprehensive set of well-controlled chemical concentration gradients using a newly developed microfluidic device and cell tracking imaging technique. In parallel, we carried out a multi-scale theoretical modeling of bacterial chemotaxis taking into account the relevant internal signaling pathway dynamics, and predicted bacterial chemotactic responses at the cellular level. By measuring the E. coli cell density profiles across the microfluidic channel at various spatial gradients of ligand concentration grad[L] and the average ligand concentration [L]¯near the peak chemotactic response region, we demonstrated unambiguously in both experiments and model simulation that the mean chemotactic drift velocity of E. coli cells increased monotonically with grad [L]/[L]¯ or ∼grad(log[L])—that is E. coli cells sense the spatial gradient of the logarithmic ligand concentration. The exact range of the log-sensing regime was determined. The agreements between the experiments and the multi-scale model simulation verify the validity of the theoretical model, and revealed that the key microscopic mechanism for logarithmic sensing in bacterial chemotaxis is the adaptation kinetics, in contrast to explanations based directly on ligand occupancy. PMID:19289068

  10. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  11. Cyanide degradation by an Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Figueira, M M; Ciminelli, V S; de Andrade, M C; Linardi, V R

    1996-05-01

    Chemical formation of a glucose-cyanide complex was necessary for metabolic degradation of cyanide at concentrations up to 50.0 mg/L by a strain of Escherichia coli isolated from gold extraction circuit liquids. Ammonia accumulating during the culture log phase as the sole nitrogen by-product was further utilized for bacterial growth. Washed (intact) cells, harvested at different periods of bacterial growth on cyanide, consumed oxygen in presence of cyanide. These findings suggest that metabolism of cyanide involved a dioxygenase enzyme that converted cyanide directly to ammonia, without the formation of cyanate. PMID:8640610

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Orchestrated host engagement.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known "classical" virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and "novel" virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  13. Engineering the Escherichia coli Fermentative Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orencio-Trejo, M.; Utrilla, J.; Fernández-Sandoval, M. T.; Huerta-Beristain, G.; Gosset, G.; Martinez, A.

    Fermentative metabolism constitutes a fundamental cellular capacity for industrial biocatalysis. Escherichia coli is an important microorganism in the field of metabolic engineering for its well-known molecular characteristics and its rapid growth. It can adapt to different growth conditions and is able to grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Through the use of metabolic pathway engineering and bioprocessing techniques, it is possible to explore the fundamental cellular properties and to exploit its capacity to be applied as industrial biocatalysts to produce a wide array of chemicals. The objective of this chapter is to review the metabolic engineering efforts carried out with E. coli by manipulating the central carbon metabolism and fermentative pathways to obtain strains that produce metabolites with high titers, such as ethanol, alanine, lactate and succinate.

  14. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  15. Gas signatures from Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli-inoculated human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gaseous headspace above naïve Escherichia Coli (E. coli) cultures and whole human blood inoculated with E. coli were collected and analyzed for the presence of trace gases that may have the potential to be used as novel, non-invasive markers of infectious disease. Methods The naïve E. coli culture, LB broth, and human whole blood or E. coli inoculated whole blood were incubated in hermetically sealable glass bioreactors at 37°C for 24 hrs. LB broth and whole human blood were used as controls for background volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The headspace gases were collected after incubation and analyzed using a gas chromatographic system with multiple column/detector combinations. Results Six VOCs were observed to be produced by E. coli-infected whole blood while there existed nearly zero to relatively negligible amounts of these gases in the whole blood alone, LB broth, or E. coli-inoculated LB broth. These VOCs included dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS2), ethanol, acetaldehyde, methyl butanoate, and an unidentified gas S. In contrast, there were several VOCs significantly elevated in the headspace above the E. coli in LB broth, but not present in the E. coli/blood mixture. These VOCs included dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), methyl propanoate, 1-propanol, methylcyclohexane, and unidentified gases R2 and Q. Conclusions This study demonstrates 1) that cultivated E. coli in LB broth produce distinct gas profiles, 2) for the first time, the ability to modify E. coli-specific gas profiles by the addition of whole human blood, and 3) that E. coli-human whole blood interactions present different gas emission profiles that have the potential to be used as non-invasive volatile biomarkers of E. coli infection. PMID:23842518

  16. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  17. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future. PMID:20803141

  18. Functional expression of a valencene dioxygenase from Pleurotus sapidus in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zelena, Kateryna; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-03-01

    Valencene dioxygenase (ValOx) from the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus converted the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene to the valuable grapefruit flavour (+)-nootkatone and to nootkatols through intermediate hydroperoxides. Expression of the enzyme was carried out in the cytosol and periplasm of Escherichia coli. The heterologous production led to high yields of inclusion bodies. The poor yield of soluble recombinant protein was improved by various strategies including cold shock expression, chaperone co-expression, and employment of mutant E. coli strains. Up to 60 mg of the biologically active, soluble ValOx was produced by cold shock under control of the cspA promoter at 8 °C in the BL21(DE3)Star strain and co-expression of the E. coli trigger factor. The recombinant enzyme, purified using the N-terminal His tag, showed the catalytic properties of the wild-type enzyme, as was confirmed by the LC-MS analysis of hydroperoxide intermediates and GC-MS analysis of the volatile products. PMID:22264428

  19. Escherichia coli biofilm: development and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G; Sharma, S; Sharma, P; Chandola, D; Dang, S; Gupta, S; Gabrani, R

    2016-08-01

    Escherichia coli biofilm consists of a bacterial colony embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which protects the microbes from adverse environmental conditions and results in infection. Besides being the major causative agent for recurrent urinary tract infections, E. coli biofilm is also responsible for indwelling medical device-related infectivity. The cell-to-cell communication within the biofilm occurs due to quorum sensors that can modulate the key biochemical players enabling the bacteria to proliferate and intensify the resultant infections. The diversity in structural components of biofilm gets compounded due to the development of antibiotic resistance, hampering its eradication. Conventionally used antimicrobial agents have a restricted range of cellular targets and limited efficacy on biofilms. This emphasizes the need to explore the alternate therapeuticals like anti-adhesion compounds, phytochemicals, nanomaterials for effective drug delivery to restrict the growth of biofilm. The current review focuses on various aspects of E. coli biofilm development and the possible therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of biofilm-related infections. PMID:26811181

  20. Discrepancies in the enumeration of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ray, B; Speck, M L

    1973-04-01

    Stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli were enumerated by the pour plate method on Trypticase soy agar containing 0.3% yeast extract (TSYA), violet red-bile agar, and desoxycholate-lactose agar, and by the most-probable-number method in Brilliant Green-bile broth and lauryl sulfate broth. Maximum counts were assumed to be those on TSYA. In general, numbers detected were lower with the selective solid media and higher with the selective liquid media. Inhibitory effects, especially on selective solid media varied with the strains of E. coli. The lower detection on selective solid media was partly due to the stress induced in some cells by the temperature of the melted media used in the pour plate method. These cells apparently failed to repair and form colonies in the selective media. Improved detection on the selective solid media was achieved by using 1% nonfat milk solids, 1% peptone, or 1% MgSO(4).7H(2)O in the dilution blanks. Higher detection on selective agar media was effected by surface plating or by surface-overlay plating of the cells. The surface-overlay method appeared to be superior for the direct enumeration of E. coli in foods. PMID:4572980

  1. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela Kr

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  2. [Population genomic researches of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Wu, Y R; Yang, R F; Cui, Y J

    2016-06-01

    Population genomics, an interdiscipline of genomics and population genetics, is booming in recent years with the rapid growth number of deciphered genomes and revolutionizes the understanding of bacterial population diversity and evolution dynamics. It also largely improves the prevention and control of infectious disease through providing more accurate genotyping and source-tracing results and more comprehensive characteristics of emerging pathogens. In this review, taking one of the best characterized bacteria, Escherichia coli, as model, we reviewed the phylogenetic relationship across its five major populations (designated A, B1, B2, D and E); and summarized researches on molecular mutation rate, selection signals, and patterns of adaptive evolution. We also described the application of population genomics in responding against large-scale outbreaks of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli O104:H4. These results indicated that, although being a novel discipline, population genomics has played an important role in deciphering bacterial population structures, exploring evolutionary patterns and combating emerging infectious diseases. PMID:27256740

  3. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela KR

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  4. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  5. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), also known as verocytotoxin-producing E. coli, are important food-borne pathogens responsible for outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). STEC that cause HC and HUS are also referred to as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (E...

  6. Virulence Gene Regulation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mellies, Jay L; Barron, Alex M S

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia colicauses three types of illnesses in humans: diarrhea, urinary tract infections, and meningitis in newborns. The acquisition of virulence-associated genes and the ability to properly regulate these, often horizontally transferred, loci distinguishes pathogens from the normally harmless commensal E. coli found within the human intestine. This review addresses our current understanding of virulence gene regulation in several important diarrhea-causing pathotypes, including enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic,enterotoxigenic, and enteroaggregativeE. coli-EPEC, EHEC, ETEC and EAEC, respectively. The intensely studied regulatory circuitry controlling virulence of uropathogenicE. coli, or UPEC, is also reviewed, as is that of MNEC, a common cause of meningitis in neonates. Specific topics covered include the regulation of initial attachment events necessary for infection, environmental cues affecting virulence gene expression, control of attaching and effacing lesionformation, and control of effector molecule expression and secretion via the type III secretion systems by EPEC and EHEC. How phage control virulence and the expression of the Stx toxins of EHEC, phase variation, quorum sensing, and posttranscriptional regulation of virulence determinants are also addressed. A number of important virulence regulators are described, including the AraC-like molecules PerA of EPEC, CfaR and Rns of ETEC, and AggR of EAEC;the Ler protein of EPEC and EHEC;RfaH of UPEC;and the H-NS molecule that acts to silence gene expression. The regulatory circuitry controlling virulence of these greatly varied E. colipathotypes is complex, but common themes offerinsight into the signals and regulators necessary forE. coli disease progression. PMID:26443571

  7. Efficient production of indigoidine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuchao; Gage, David; Zhan, Jixun

    2015-08-01

    Indigoidine is a bacterial natural product with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Its bright blue color resembles the industrial dye indigo, thus representing a new natural blue dye that may find uses in industry. In our previous study, an indigoidine synthetase Sc-IndC and an associated helper protein Sc-IndB were identified from Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982 and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BAP1 to produce the blue pigment at 3.93 g/l. To further improve the production of indigoidine, in this work, the direct biosynthetic precursor L-glutamine was fed into the fermentation broth of the engineered E. coli strain harboring Sc-IndC and Sc-IndB. The highest titer of indigoidine reached 8.81 ± 0.21 g/l at 1.46 g/l L-glutamine. Given the relatively high price of L-glutamine, a metabolic engineering technique was used to directly enhance the in situ supply of this precursor. A glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) was amplified from E. coli and co-expressed with Sc-indC and Sc-indB in E. coli BAP1, leading to the production of indigoidine at 5.75 ± 0.09 g/l. Because a nitrogen source is required for amino acid biosynthesis, we then tested the effect of different nitrogen-containing salts on the supply of L-glutamine and subsequent indigoidine production. Among the four tested salts including (NH4)2SO4, NH4Cl, (NH4)2HPO4 and KNO3, (NH4)2HPO4 showed the best effect on improving the titer of indigoidine. Different concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 were added to the fermentation broths of E. coli BAP1/Sc-IndC+Sc-IndB+GlnA, and the titer reached the highest (7.08 ± 0.11 g/l) at 2.5 mM (NH4)2HPO4. This work provides two efficient methods for the production of this promising blue pigment in E. coli. PMID:26109508

  8. Enzymatic Manufacture of Deoxythymidine-5'-Triphosphate with Permeable Intact Cells of E. coli Coexpressing Thymidylate Kinase and Acetate Kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao; Qian, Yahui; Ding, Qingbao; Ou, Ling

    2015-12-28

    A one-pot process of enzymatic synthesis of deoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate (5'-dTTP) employing whole cells of recombinant Escherichia coli coexpressing thymidylate kinase (TMKase) and acetate kinase (ACKase) was developed. Genes tmk and ack from E. coli were cloned and inserted into pET28a(+), and then transduced into E. coli BL21 (DE3) to form recombinant strain pTA in which TMKase and ACKase were simultaneously overexpressed. It was found that the relative residual specific activities of TMKase and ACKase, in pTA pretreated with 20 mM ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) at 25°C for 30 min, were 94% and 96%, respectively. The yield of 5'-dTTP reached above 94% from 5 mM deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dTMP) and 15 mM acetyl phosphate catalyzed with intact cells of pTA pretreated with EDTA. The process was so effective that only 0.125 mM adenosine-5'- triphosphate was sufficient to deliver the phosphate group from acetyl phosphate to dTMP and dTDP. PMID:26370798

  9. Phosphoglucomutase Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Sankar; Schwartz, Maxime

    1971-01-01

    Bacteria with strongly depressed phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity are found among the mutants of Escherichia coli which, when grown on maltose, accumulate sufficient amylose to be detectable by iodine staining. These pgm mutants grow poorly on galactose but also accumulate amylose on this carbon source. Growth on lactose does not produce high amylose but, instead, results in the induction of the enzymes of maltose metabolism, presumably by accumulation of maltose. These facts suggest that the catabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is strongly depressed in pgm mutants, although not completely abolished. Anabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is also strongly depressed, since amino acid- or glucose-grown pgm mutants are sensitive to phage C21, indicating a deficiency in the biosynthesis of uridine diphosphoglucose or uridine diphosphogalactose, or both. All pgm mutations isolated map at about 16 min on the genetic map, between purE and the gal operon. PMID:4942754

  10. Structure of common pili from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, J C; Ou, J T

    1979-01-01

    Several important properties of the common pili from Escherichia coli are discussed. These pili were resistant to the gentle Folin-Ciocalteau reagent methods for protein detection and were not readily solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate. They were found to contain a reducing sugar but not peptidoglycan. The pilin had multiple conformations in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, and the appearance of multiple bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels did not necessarily indicate heterogeneity of the preparation. The ilus subunit was found to be a different protein than outer membrane III, which has the same apparent molecular weight. In addition, we conformed the results of Brinton (Trans. N.Y. Acad. Sci 27:1003-1054, 1965): that there is a dramatic change in the properties of pili after they are heated at pH values below 2. Images PMID:37233

  11. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  12. Selective translation during stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Isabella; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial stress response, a strategy to cope with environmental changes, is generally known to operate on the transcriptional level. Here, we discuss a novel paradigm for stress adaptation at the post-transcriptional level, based on the recent discovery of a stress-induced modified form of the translation machinery in Escherichia coli that is generated by MazF, the toxin component of the toxin–antitoxin (TA) module mazEF. Under stress, the induced endoribonuclease MazF removes the 3′-terminal 43 nucleotides of the 16S rRNA of ribosomes and, concomitantly, the 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) of specific transcripts. This elegant mechanism enables selective translation due to the complementary effect of MazF on ribosomes and mRNAs, and also represents the first example of functional ribosome heterogeneity based on rRNA alteration. PMID:22939840

  13. Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme: purification and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Snapka, R.M.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Researchers have purified large quantities of Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme to apparent homogeneity and have studied its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 36,800 and a S/sub 20,w//sup 0/ of 3.72 S. Amino acid analysis revealed an apparent absence of tryptophan, a low content of aromatic residues, and the presence of no unusual amino acids. The N terminus is arginine. The purified enzyme contained up to 13% carbohydrate by weight. The carbohydrate was composed of mannose, galactose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine. The enzyme is also associated with RNA containing uracil, adenine, guanine, and cytosine with no unusual bases detected.

  14. Glucose-lactose diauxie in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Loomis, W F; Magasanik, B

    1967-04-01

    Growth of Escherichia coli in medium containing glucose, at a concentration insufficient to support full growth, and containing lactose, is diauxic. A mutation in the gene, CR, which determines catabolite repression specific to the lac operon, was found to relieve glucose-lactose but not glucose-maltose diauxie. Furthermore, a high concentration of lactose was shown to overcome diauxie in a CR(+) strain. Studies on the induction of beta-galactosidase by lactose suggested that glucose inhibits induction by 10(-2)m lactose. Preinduction of the lac operon was found to overcome this effect. The ability of glucose to prevent expression of the lac operon by reducing the internal concentration of inducer as well as by catabolite repression is discussed. PMID:5340309

  15. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  16. Oxygen sensitivity of an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Adler, H; Mural, R; Suttle, B

    1992-04-01

    Genetic evidence indicates that Oxys-6, an oxygen-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli AB1157, is defective in the region of the hemB locus. Oxys-6 is capable of growth under aerobic conditions only if cultures are initiated at low-inoculum levels. Aerobic liquid cultures are limited to a cell density of 10(7) cells per ml by the accumulation of a metabolically produced, low-molecular-weight, heat-stable material in complex organic media. Both Oxys-6 and AB1157 cells produce the material, but only aerobic cultures of the mutant are inhibited by it. The material is produced by both intact cells and cell extracts in complex media. This reaction also occurs when the amino acid L-lysine is substituted for complex media. PMID:1551829

  17. Oxygen sensitivity of an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, H; Mural, R; Suttle, B

    1992-01-01

    Genetic evidence indicates that Oxys-6, an oxygen-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli AB1157, is defective in the region of the hemB locus. Oxys-6 is capable of growth under aerobic conditions only if cultures are initiated at low-inoculum levels. Aerobic liquid cultures are limited to a cell density of 10(7) cells per ml by the accumulation of a metabolically produced, low-molecular-weight, heat-stable material in complex organic media. Both Oxys-6 and AB1157 cells produce the material, but only aerobic cultures of the mutant are inhibited by it. The material is produced by both intact cells and cell extracts in complex media. This reaction also occurs when the amino acid L-lysine is substituted for complex media. Images PMID:1551829

  18. Genetic Analysis of an Escherichia coli Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lennette, Evelyne T.; Apirion, David

    1971-01-01

    A mutant strain of Escherichia coli that fails to recover from prolonged (72 hr) starvation also fails to grow at 43 C. Extracts of this mutant strain show an increased ribonuclease II activity as compared to extracts of the parental strain, and stable ribonucleic acid is degraded to a larger extent in this strain during starvation. Ts+ transductants and revertants were tested for all the above-mentioned phenotypes. All the Ts+ transductants and revertants tested behaved like the Ts+ parental strain, which suggests that all the observed phenotypes are caused by a single sts (starvation-temperature sensitivity) mutation. The reversion rate from sts− to sts+ is rather low but is within the range of reversion rates for other single-site mutations. Three-point transduction crosses located this sts mutation between the ilv and rbs genes. The properties of sts+/sts− merozygotes suggested that the Ts− phenotype of this mutation is recessive. PMID:4945197

  19. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P.; Dimmic, Matt; Hubisz, Melissa; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence for positive selection, such as the enigmatic rhs elements and transposases. Based on structural evidence, we hypothesize that the selection acting on transposases is related to the genomic conflict between transposable elements and the host genome. PMID:17675366

  20. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  1. gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, I; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kilobase DNA fragment carrying antibiotic resistance markers was inserted into the gltB gene of Escherichia coli previously cloned in a multicopy plasmid. Replacement of the chromosomal gltB+ gene by the gltB225::omega mutation led to cells unable to synthesize glutamate synthase, utilize growth rate-limiting nitrogen sources, or derepress their glutamine synthetase. The existence of a gltBDF operon encoding the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of glutamate synthase and a regulatory peptide (gltF) at 69 min of the E. coli linkage map was deduced from complementation analysis. A plasmid carrying the entire gltB+D+F+ operon complemented cells for all three of the mutant phenotypes associated with the polar gltB225::omega mutation in the chromosome. By contrast, plasmids carrying gltB+ only complemented cells for glutamate synthase activity. A major tricistronic mRNA molecule was detected from Northern (RNA blot) DNA-RNA hybridization experiments with DNA probes containing single genes of the operon. A 30,200-dalton polypeptide was identified as the gltF product, the lack of which was responsible for the inability of cells to use nitrogen-limiting sources associated with gltB225::omega. Images PMID:2448295

  2. Thiol-sensitive genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Javor, G T

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1-thioglycerol on the expression of genes of Escherichia coli was investigated. Pulse-labeled proteins from aerobically growing, 1-thioglycerol-treated E. coli were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and their radioactivities were compared with those of identical proteins from nontreated cells. The first 10 min of exposure to thiol stimulated the synthesis of 10% of the observed proteins and inhibited the production of 16% of the proteins. After 30 min of growth with thiol, the synthesis of 44% of the observed proteins was inhibited and synthesis of 18% of the proteins was stimulated. In general, the expression of genes of carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and protein biosynthesis were inhibited, while nucleic acid synthetic and repair gene expressions showed mixed responses. Synthesis of transport proteins was not affected. Transient stimulation of oxidative-stress proteins and sustained stimulation of the expressions of trxB, ompA, and ompB genes and those of several unidentified gene products were also observed. Whether these complex responses merely reflect adjustments by cellular subsystems to a suddenly reducing environment or whether they are manifestations of a reductive-stress regulon will have to await genetic analysis of this phenomenon. Images PMID:2676982

  3. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  4. Escherichia coli mutants deficient in exonuclease VII.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J W; Richardson, C C

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli having reduced levels of exonuclease VII activity have been isolated by a mass screening procedure. Nine mutants, five of which are known to be of independent origin, were obtained and designated xse. The defects in these strains lie at two or more loci. One of these loci, xseA, lies in the interval between purG and purC; it is 93 to 97% co-transducible with guaA. The order of the genes in this region is purG-xseA guaA,B-purC. The available data do not allow xseA to be ordered with respect to guaA,B. Exonuclease VII purified from E. coli KLC3 xseA3 is more heat labile than exonuclease VII purified from the parent, E. coli PA610 xse+. Therefore, xseA is the structural gene for exonuclease VII. Mutants with defects in the xseA gene show increased sensitivity to nalidixic acid and have an abnormally high frequency of recombination (hyper-Rec phenotype) as measured by the procedure of Konrad and Lehlman (1974). The hyper-Rec character of xseA strains is approximately one-half that of the polAex1 mutant defective in the 5' leads to 3' hydrolytic activity of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I. The double mutant, polAex1 xseA7, is twice as hyper-Rec as the polAex1 mutant alone. The xseA- strains are slightly more sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation than the parent strain. Bacteriophages T7, fd, and lambdared grow normally in xseA- strains. Images PMID:320198

  5. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made in deciphering its mechanisms of pathogenicity. However, the molecular bases that characterize the phenotypic properties of this pathotype are still not well resolved. A review of studies focused on E. coli populations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presented here and we discuss about the putative role of this species on each IBD subtype. Given the relevance of AIEC in CD pathogenesis, we present the latest research findings concerning AIEC host-microbe interactions and pathogenicity. We also review the existing data regarding the prevalence and abundance of AIEC in CD and its association with other intestinal diseases from humans and animals, in order to discuss the AIEC disease- and host-specificity. Finally, we highlight the fact that dietary components frequently found in industrialized countries may enhance AIEC colonization in the gut, which merits further investigation and the implementation of preventative measures. PMID:25133024

  6. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  7. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  8. The N-degradome of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Humbard, Matthew A.; Surkov, Serhiy; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Jenkins, Lisa M.; Maurizi, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The N-end rule is a conserved mechanism found in Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes for marking proteins to be degraded by ATP-dependent proteases. Specific N-terminal amino acids (N-degrons) are sufficient to target a protein to the degradation machinery. In Escherichia coli, the adaptor ClpS binds an N-degron and delivers the protein to ClpAP for degradation. As ClpS recognizes N-terminal Phe, Trp, Tyr, and Leu, which are not found at the N terminus of proteins translated and processed by the canonical pathway, proteins must be post-translationally modified to expose an N-degron. One modification is catalyzed by Aat, an enzyme that adds leucine or phenylalanine to proteins with N-terminal lysine or arginine; however, such proteins are also not generated by the canonical protein synthesis pathway. Thus, the mechanisms producing N-degrons in proteins and the frequency of their occurrence largely remain a mystery. To address these issues, we used a ClpS affinity column to isolate interacting proteins from E. coli cell lysates under non-denaturing conditions. We identified more than 100 proteins that differentially bound to a column charged with wild-type ClpS and eluted with a peptide bearing an N-degron. Thirty-two of 37 determined N-terminal peptides had N-degrons. Most of the proteins were N-terminally truncated by endoproteases or exopeptidases, and many were further modified by Aat. The identities of the proteins point to possible physiological roles for the N-end rule in cell division, translation, transcription, and DNA replication and reveal widespread proteolytic processing of cellular proteins to generate N-end rule substrates. PMID:23960079

  9. Expression and efficient secretion of a functional chitinase from Chromobacterium violaceum in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living β-proteobacterium found in tropical and subtropical regions. The genomic sequencing of C. violaceum ATCC 12472 has revealed many genes that underpin its adaptability to diverse ecosystems. Moreover, C. violaceum genes with potential applications in industry, medicine and agriculture have also been identified, such as those encoding chitinases. However, none of the chitinase genes of the ATCC 12472 strain have been subjected to experimental validation. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) hydrolyze the β-(1,4) linkages in chitin, an abundant biopolymer found in arthropods, mollusks and fungi. These enzymes are of great biotechnological interest as potential biocontrol agents against pests and pathogens. This work aimed to experimentally validate one of the chitinases from C. violaceum. Results The open reading frame (ORF) CV2935 of C. violaceum ATCC 12472 encodes a protein (439 residues) that is composed of a signal peptide, a chitin-binding domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases. The ORF was amplified by PCR and cloned into the expression vector pET303/CT-His. High levels of chitinolytic activity were detected in the cell-free culture supernatant of E. coli BL21(DE3) cells harboring the recombinant plasmid and induced with IPTG. The secreted recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography on a chitin matrix and showed an apparent molecular mass of 43.8 kDa, as estimated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. N-terminal sequencing confirmed the proper removal of the native signal peptide during the secretion of the recombinant product. The enzyme was able to hydrolyze colloidal chitin and the synthetic substrates p-nitrophenyl-β-D-N,N’-diacetylchitobiose and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-N,N’,N”-triacetylchitotriose. The optimum pH for its activity was 5.0, and the enzyme retained ~32% of its activity when heated to 60°C for 30

  10. A DNA structural atlas for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A G; Jensen, L J; Brunak, S; Staerfeldt, H H; Ussery, D W

    2000-06-16

    We have performed a computational analysis of DNA structural features in 18 fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes using models for DNA curvature, DNA flexibility, and DNA stability. The structural values that are computed for the Escherichia coli chromosome are significantly different from (and generally more extreme than) that expected from the nucleotide composition. To aid this analysis, we have constructed tools that plot structural measures for all positions in a long DNA sequence (e.g. an entire chromosome) in the form of color-coded wheels (http://www.cbs.dtu. dk/services/GenomeAtlas/). We find that these "structural atlases" are useful for the discovery of interesting features that may then be investigated in more depth using statistical methods. From investigation of the E. coli structural atlas, we discovered a genome-wide trend, where an extended region encompassing the terminus displays a high of level curvature, a low level of flexibility, and a low degree of helix stability. The same situation is found in the distantly related Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that the phenomenon is biologically relevant. Based on a search for long DNA segments where all the independent structural measures agree, we have found a set of 20 regions with identical and very extreme structural properties. Due to their strong inherent curvature, we suggest that these may function as topological domain boundaries by efficiently organizing plectonemically supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, we find that in practically all the investigated eubacterial and archaeal genomes, there is a trend for promoter DNA being more curved, less flexible, and less stable than DNA in coding regions and in intergenic DNA without promoters. This trend is present regardless of the absolute levels of the structural parameters, and we suggest that this may be related to the requirement for helix unwinding during initiation of transcription, or perhaps to the previously observed

  11. Biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Boyacioglu, Olcay; Sharma, Manan; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Goktepe, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a bacteriophage cocktail (EcoShield™) that is specific against Escherichia coli O157:H7 was evaluated against a nalidixic acid-resistant enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 RM4407 (EHEC) strain on leafy greens stored under either (1) ambient air or (2) modified atmosphere (MA; 5% O2/35% CO2/60% N2). Pieces (~2 × 2 cm2) of leafy greens (lettuce and spinach) inoculated with 4.5 log CFU/cm2 EHEC were sprayed with EcoShield™ (6.5 log PFU/cm2). Samples were stored at 4 or 10°C for up to 15 d. On spinach, the level of EHEC declined by 2.38 and 2.49 log CFU/cm2 at 4 and 10°C, respectively, 30 min after phage application (p ≤ 0.05). EcoShield™ was also effective in reducing EHEC on the surface of green leaf lettuce stored at 4°C by 2.49 and 3.28 log units in 30 min and 2 h, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). At 4°C under atmospheric air, the phage cocktail significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lowered the EHEC counts in one day by 1.19, 3.21 and 3.25 log CFU/cm2 on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce, respectively compared with control (no bacteriophage) treatments. When stored under MA at 4°C, phages reduced (p ≤ 0.05) EHEC populations by 2.18, 3.50 and 3.13 log CFU/cm2, on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce. At 10°C, EHEC reductions under atmospheric air storage were 1.99, 3.90 and 3.99 log CFU/cm2 (p ≤ 0.05), while population reductions under MA were 3.08, 3.89 and 4.34 logs on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce, respectively, compared with controls (p ≤ 0.05). The results of this study showed that bacteriophages were effective in reducing the levels of E. coli O157:H7 on fresh leafy produce, and that the reduction was further improved when produce was stored under the MA conditions. PMID:23819107

  12. Energetics of glycylglycine transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cowell, J L

    1974-10-01

    The transport system for glycylglycine in Escherichia coli behaves like a shock-sensitive transport system. The initial rate of transport is reduced 85% by subjecting whole cells to osmotic shock, and glycylglycine is not transported by membrane vesicles. The energetics of transport was studied with strain ML 308-225 and its mutant DL-54, which is deficient in Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-stimulated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3) activity. It is concluded that active transport of glycylglycine, like other shock-sensitive transport systems, has an obligatory requirement for phosphate bond energy, but not for respiration or the energized state of the membrane. The major evidence for this conclusion is as follows. (i) Uptake of glycylglycine is severely inhibited by arsenate. (ii) Oxidizable energy sources such as d-lactate, succinate, and ascorbate, which is mediated by N-methylphenazinium methylsulfate, cannot serve as energy sources for the transport of glycylglycine in DL-54, which lacks oxidative phosphorylation. (iii) When energy is supplied only from adenosine-5'-triphosphate produced by glycolysis (anaerobic transport assays with glucose as the energy source in DL-54), substantial uptake of glycylglycine is observed. (iv) When the Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase activity is absent but substrate-level phosphorylations and electron transport are operating (glucose as the energy source in DL-54), transport of glycylglycine shows significant resistance to the uncouplers, dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. PMID:4278690

  13. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  14. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  15. ESCHERICHIA COLI Gene Induction by Alkylation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Michael R.; Nguyen, Dinh C.; Beard, K. Christopher

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased β-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes. PMID:3080354

  16. Routes for fructose utilization by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, H L

    2001-07-01

    There are three main routes for the utilization of fructose by Escherichia coli. One (Route A) predominates in the growth of wild-type strains. It involves the functioning of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system (PTS) and a fructose operon, mapping at min. 48.7, containing genes for a membrane-spanning protein (fruA), a 1-phosphofructose kinase (fruK) and a diphosphoryl transfer protein (fruB), under negative regulation by a fruR gene mapping at min. 1.9. A second route (Route B) also involves the PTS and membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a variety of sugars possessing the 3,4,5-D-arabino-hexoseconfiguration but with primary specificity for mannose(manXYZ), mannitol (mtlA) and glucitol (gutA) and which, if over-produced, can transport also fructose. A third route (Route C), functioning in mutants devoid of Routes A and B, does not involve the PTS: fructose diffuses into the cell via an isoform (PtsG-F) of the major glucose permease of the PTS and is then phosphorylated by ATP and a manno(fructo)kinase (Mak+) specified by a normally cryptic 1032 bp ORF (yajF) of hitherto unknown function (Mak-o), mapping at min. 8.8 and corresponding to a peptide of 344 amino acids. Conversion of the Mak-o to the Mak+ phenotypeinvolves an A24D mutation in a putative regulatory region. PMID:11361065

  17. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  18. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  19. The Escherichia coli divisome: born to divide.

    PubMed

    Natale, Paolo; Pazos, Manuel; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Septation in Escherichia coli involves complex molecular mechanisms that contribute to the accuracy of bacterial division. The proto-ring, a complex made up by the FtsZ, FtsA and ZipA proteins, forms at the beginning of the process and directs the assembly of the full divisome. Central to this complex is the FtsZ protein, a GTPase able to assemble into a ring-like structure that responds to several modulatory inputs including mechanisms to position the septum at midcell. The connection with the cell wall synthesising machinery stabilizes the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane. Although a substantial amount of evidence supports this description, many details on how individual divisome elements are structured or how they function are subjected to controversial interpretations. We discuss these discrepancies arising from incomplete data and from technical difficulties imposed by the small size of bacteria. Future work, including more powerful imaging and reconstruction technologies, will help to clarify the missing details on the architecture and function of the bacterial division machinery. PMID:23962168

  20. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  1. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  2. Kasugamycin-dependent mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, E R

    1978-01-01

    Kasugamycin-dependent mutants have been isolated from Escherichia coli B. They were obtained through mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate or nitrosoguanidine in conjunction with an antibiotic underlay technique. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, dependent mutants were obtained at a frequency of about 3% of survivors growing up in the selection. In the case of ethyl methane sulfonate, the corresponding value was 1%. Nineteen mutants showing a kasugamycin-dependent phenotype were studied. In terms of response to various temperatures and antibiotic concentrations, they were very heterogeneous, although most fell into two general classes. Genetic analysis indicated that in at least some cases, the kasugamycin-dependent phenotype was the product of two mutations. Two-dimensional gel electropherograms revealed alterations in the ribosomal proteins of seven mutants. One mutant had an alteration in protein S13, and one had an alteration in protein L14. Three showed changes in protein S9. Each of two mutants had changes in two proteins, S18 and L11. Three of these mutants additionally had protein S18 occurring in a partly altered, partly unaltered form. Images PMID:363701

  3. Molecular Serotyping of Escherichia coli O111:H8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate Escherichia coli serotyping is critical for pathogen diagnosis and surveillance of non-O157 shiga-toxigenic strains, however, few laboratories have this capacity. The molecular serotyping protocol described in this paper targets the somatic and flagellar antigens of E. coli O111:H8 used in...

  4. Properties and Transport Behavior among 12 Different Environmental Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a commonly used indicator organism for detecting the presence of fecal-borne pathogenic microorganisms in water supplies. The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism has led to numerous studies looking at cell properties and transport behavior of this microorganism. In man...

  5. Complete Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli JF733.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Gabriele R M; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wertz, John E; Friehs, Karl

    2016-01-01

    ITALIC! Escherichia coliJF733 is a strain with a long history in research on membrane proteins and processes. However, tracing back the strain development raises some questions concerning the correct genotype of JF733. Here, we present the complete draft genome of ITALIC! E. coliJF733 in order to resolve any remaining uncertainties. PMID:27103723

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Myophage Murica

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Joseph N.; Lancaster, Jacob C.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Murica is an rv5-like myophage that infects enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic E. coli strains are responsible for many intestinal diseases, and phages that infect these bacteria may prove useful in preventing severe health issues. The following is a report of the complete genome sequence of Murica and its important features. PMID:26430048

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Myophage Murica.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Joseph N; Lancaster, Jacob C; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Murica is an rv5-like myophage that infects enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic E. coli strains are responsible for many intestinal diseases, and phages that infect these bacteria may prove useful in preventing severe health issues. The following is a report of the complete genome sequence of Murica and its important features. PMID:26430048

  8. Complete Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli JF733

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Gabriele R. M.; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Wertz, John E.; Friehs, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli JF733 is a strain with a long history in research on membrane proteins and processes. However, tracing back the strain development raises some questions concerning the correct genotype of JF733. Here, we present the complete draft genome of E. coli JF733 in order to resolve any remaining uncertainties. PMID:27103723

  9. EFFECT OF MANURE ON ESCHERICHIA COLI ATTACHMENT TO SOIL FRACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli are commonly used as indicators of fecal contamination in the environment. Attachment of bacteria to soil and sediment is an important retardation factor of bacterial transport with runoff water. Despite the fact that E. coli are derived exclusively from feces/manure, the effect of ...

  10. Efficient Process Development of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (rh-GCSF) Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Khanchezar, Sirwan; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Pesaran Hagi Abbas, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The protein hormone granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) stimulates the production of white blood cells and plays an important role in medical treatment of cancer patients. Methods: An efficient process was developed for heterologous expression of the human GCSF in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The feeding rate was adjusted to achieve the maximum attainable specific growth rate under critical value. In this method, specific growth rate was maintained at the maximum value of 0.55 h-1 at the beginning of feeding to 0.4 h-1 at the induction time. Recombinant human GCSF (rh-GCSF) was produced as inclusion body. At first, inclusion bodies were released by cell disruption and then washed, solubilized and refolded. Finally, the rh-GCSF was purified by cation exchange chromatography. Results: Obviouly, higher specific growth rate decreases process time and consequently increases productivity. The final concentration of biomass and GCSF was achieved 126 g DCW.l-1 and 32.1 g.l-1. Also, the final specific yield (YP/X) and total productivity of rh-GCSF were obtained 254 mg.g-1 DCW and 1.83 g.l-1.h-1, respectively. According to the available data, this is one of the highest YP/X and productivity that has been reported for any human protein which is expressed in E. coli. Recovery yield of purification process was %40 and purity of recombinant protein was over than 99%. The circular dichroism spectra of purified rh-GCSF, Neupogen® and PD-Grastim showed that all proteins have a similar secondary structure. Conclusion: Modified exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch cultivation of recombinant E. coli, results in minimum fed-batch duration and maximum productivity. PMID:25864815

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  12. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot pen soils are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM)....

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Escherichia coli 8739 in apple juice by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Evrendilek, G A; Zhang, Q H; Richter, E R

    1999-07-01

    The effect of high voltage pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and generic E. coli 8739 in apple juice was investigated. Fresh apple juice samples inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli 8739 were treated by PEF with selected parameters including electric field strength, treatment time, and treatment temperature. Samples were exposed to bipolar pulses with electric field strengths of 30, 26, 22, and 18 kV/cm and total treatment times of 172, 144, 115, and 86 micros. A 5-log reduction in both cultures was determined by a standard nonselective medium spread plate laboratory procedure. Treatment temperature was kept below 35 degrees C. Results showed no difference in the sensitivities of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli 8739 against PEF treatment. PEF is a promising technology for the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli 8739 in apple juice. PMID:10419274

  14. The Melibiose Transporter of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Oliver; Lin, Yibin; Granell, Meritxell; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Cladera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We examine the role of Lys-377, the only charged residue in helix XI, on the functional mechanism of the Na+-sugar melibiose symporter from Escherichia coli. Intrinsic fluorescence, FRET, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy reveal that replacement of Lys-377 with either Cys, Val, Arg, or Asp disables both Na+ and melibiose binding. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations extending up to 200–330 ns reveal that Lys-377 (helix XI) interacts with the anionic side chains of two of the three putative ligands for cation binding (Asp-55 and Asp-59 in helix II). When Asp-59 is protonated during the simulations, Lys-377 preferentially interacts with Asp-55. Interestingly, when a Na+ ion is positioned in the Asp-55-Asp-59 environment, Asp-124 in helix IV (a residue essential for melibiose binding) reorients and approximates the Asp-55-Asp-59 pair, and all three acidic side chains act as Na+ ligands. Under these conditions, the side chain of Lys-377 interacts with the carboxylic moiety of these three Asp residues. These data highlight the crucial role of the Lys-377 residue in the spatial organization of the Na+ binding site. Finally, the analysis of the second-site revertants of K377C reveals that mutation of Ile-22 (in helix I) preserves Na+ binding, whereas that of melibiose is largely abolished according to spectroscopic measurements. This amino acid is located in the border of the sugar-binding site and might participate in sugar binding through apolar interactions. PMID:25971963

  15. Systematic Mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yisheng; Durfee, Tim; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Qiu, Yu; Frisch, David; Winterberg, Kelly M.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput method has been developed for the systematic mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli genome. The system is based on in vitro transposition of a modified Tn5 element, the Sce-poson, into linear fragments of each open reading frame. The transposon introduces both positive (kanamycin resistance) and negative (I-SceI recognition site) selectable markers for isolation of mutants and subsequent allele replacement, respectively. Reaction products are then introduced into the genome by homologous recombination via the λRed proteins. The method has yielded insertion alleles for 1976 genes during a first pass through the genome including, unexpectedly, a number of known and putative essential genes. Sce-poson insertions can be easily replaced by markerless mutations by using the I-SceI homing endonuclease to select against retention of the transposon as demonstrated by the substitution of amber and/or in-frame deletions in six different genes. This allows a Sce-poson-containing gene to be specifically targeted for either designed or random modifications, as well as permitting the stepwise engineering of strains with multiple mutations. The promiscuous nature of Tn5 transposition also enables a targeted gene to be dissected by using randomly inserted Sce-posons as shown by a lacZ allelic series. Finally, assessment of the insertion sites by an iterative weighted matrix algorithm reveals that these hyperactive Tn5 complexes generally recognize a highly degenerate asymmetric motif on one end of the target site helping to explain the randomness of Tn5 transposition. PMID:15262929

  16. Routes of quinolone permeation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J S; Georgopapadakou, N H

    1988-01-01

    The uptake of quinolone antibiotics by Escherichia coli was investigated by using fleroxacin (RO 23-6240, AM 833) as a prototype compound. The uptake of fleroxacin was reduced and its MIC was increased in the presence of magnesium. Quinolones induced lipopolysaccharide release, increased cell-surface hydrophobicity and outer membrane permeability to B-lactams, and sensitized cells to lysis by detergents. These effects were also antagonized by magnesium and were very similar to those seen with EDTA and gentamicin. MICs of quinolones in portin-deficient strains were increased relative to those of the parent strain, consistent with a porin pathway of entry. However, MICs were further increased in the presence of magnesium; the size of the additional increase showed a positive correlation with quinolone hydrophobicity in an OmpF- OmpC- OmpA- strain. When quinolones were mixed with divalent cations in solution, changes in quinolone fluorescence suggestive of metal chelation were observed. The addition of fleroxacin to a cell suspension resulted in a rapid initial association of fluorescence with cells, followed by a brief decrease and a final time-dependent linear increase in cell-associated fluorescence. We interpret these results as representing chelation of outer membrane-bound magnesium by fleroxacin and other quinolones, dissociation of the quinolone-magnesium complex from the outer membrane, and diffusion of the quinolone through both porins and exposed lipid domains on the outer membrane. For a given quinolone, the contribution of the porin and nonporin pathways to total uptake is influenced by the hydrophobicity of the quinolone. PMID:3132091

  17. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently. PMID:17057960

  18. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  19. Serological cross-reactions between Escherichia coli O157 and other species of the genus Escherichia.

    PubMed

    Rice, E W; Sowers, E G; Johnson, C H; Dunnigan, M E; Strockbine, N A; Edberg, S C

    1992-05-01

    The antigenic relatedness of Escherichia coli O157 and four sorbitol-negative species of the genus Escherichia was examined. Isolates of Escherichia hermannii, E. fergusonii, E. vulneris, and E. blattae were tested in the tube agglutination assay by using polyclonal antisera and in the slide agglutination assay by using latex reagents. Only four isolates (17%) of E. hermannii exhibited serological cross-reactivity. PMID:1583138

  20. Serological cross-reactions between Escherichia coli O157 and other species of the genus Escherichia.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, E W; Sowers, E G; Johnson, C H; Dunnigan, M E; Strockbine, N A; Edberg, S C

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic relatedness of Escherichia coli O157 and four sorbitol-negative species of the genus Escherichia was examined. Isolates of Escherichia hermannii, E. fergusonii, E. vulneris, and E. blattae were tested in the tube agglutination assay by using polyclonal antisera and in the slide agglutination assay by using latex reagents. Only four isolates (17%) of E. hermannii exhibited serological cross-reactivity. PMID:1583138

  1. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the world’s best-characterized organisms, as it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere; in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix, primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces, and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this book chapter, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  2. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  3. Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A

    1989-01-01

    Verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a newly recognized group of enteric pathogens which are increasingly being recognized as common causes of diarrhea in some geographic settings. Outbreak studies indicate that most patients with VTEC infection develop mild uncomplicated diarrhea. However, a significant risk of two serious and potentially life-threatening complications, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome, makes VTEC infection a public health problem of serious concern. The main reservoirs of VTEC appear to be the intestinal tracts of animals, and foods of animal (especially bovine) origin are probably the principal sources for human infection. The term VT refers to a family of subunit exotoxins with high biological activity. Individual VTEC strains elaborate one or both of at least two serologically distinct, bacteriophage-mediated VTs (VT1 and VT2) which are closely related to Shiga toxin and are thus also referred to as Shiga-like toxins. The holotoxins bind to cells, via their B subunits, to a specific receptor which is probably the glycolipid, globotriosyl ceramide (Gb3). Binding is followed by internalization of the A subunit, which, after it is proteolytically nicked and reduced to the A1 fragment, inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells by inactivating 60S ribosomal subunits through selective structural modification of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The mechanism of VTEC diarrhea is still controversial, and the relative roles of locally acting VT and "attaching and effacing adherence" of VTEC to the mucosa have yet to be resolved. There is increasing evidence that hemolytic uremic syndrome and possibly hemorrhagic colitis result from the systemic action of VT on vascular endothelial cells. The role of antitoxic immunity in preventing the systemic complications of VTEC infection is being explored. Antibiotics appear to be contraindicated in the treatment of VTEC infection. The most common VTEC serotype associated

  4. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  5. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  6. Recent advances in adherence and invasion of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Anjana; Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Colonization of the host epithelia by pathogenic Escherichia coli is influenced by the ability of the bacteria to interact with host surfaces. Because the initial step of an E. coli infection is to adhere, invade, and persist within host cells, some strategies used by intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli to infect host cell are presented. Recent findings This review highlights recent progress understanding how extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains express specific adhesins/invasins that allow colonization of the urinary tract or the meninges, while intestinal E. coli strains are able to colonize different regions of the intestinal tract using other specialized adhesins/invasins. Finally, evaluation of, different diets and environmental conditions regulating the colonization of these pathogens is discussed. Summary Discovery of new interactions between pathogenic E. coli and the host epithelial cells unravels the need of more mechanistic studies that can provide new clues in how to combat these infections. PMID:25023740

  7. Virulence attributes of Escherichia coli isolated from dairy heifer feces.

    PubMed

    Cray, W C; Thomas, L A; Schneider, R A; Moon, H W

    1996-12-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from 1,305 (of 6,894) fecal samples collected during the 1991-1992 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Health Monitoring System, Diary Heifer Evaluation Project were tested for virulence attributes associated with human enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and the enterotoxin commonly associated with diarrhoea in newborn calves. Single, random isolates from each heifer were hybridized to probes derived from the 60 mDa EHEC plasmid (CVD 419), E. coli attaching and effacing gene (eae), Shiga-like toxin (slt) genes I and II, and E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin a (STaP). Seventy-seven of the 1305 isolates (5.9%) were slt-positive. Most (81.8%) slt-positive E. coli were also CVD 419 and eae-positive. Only 2 of the slt-positive E. coli isolates were STaP-positive. PMID:9008347

  8. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Warren, René L.; Freeman, John D.; Levesque, Roger C.; Smailus, Duane E.; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli σ70 (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes. PMID:18701636

  9. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  10. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E. ); Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T. . Dept. of Genetics); Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D. ); Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru )

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  11. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  12. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  13. Characterization of pili associated with Escherichia coli O18ac.

    PubMed Central

    Wevers, P; Picken, R; Schmidt, G; Jann, B; Jann, K; Golecki, J R; Kist, M

    1980-01-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli O18ac isolated from the stool sample of a patient with diarrhea was found to agglutinate human erythrocytes. From the results presented it is suggested that this hemagglutination is mediated by pili. Isolated pilus preparations agglutinated human erythrocytes, whereas pilus-negative mutants did not. The serological and chemical analyses indicate that the pili associated with E. coli O18ac are distinct from other types found with E. coli. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6111534

  14. The quantitative and condition-dependent Escherichia coli proteome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander; Kochanowski, Karl; Vedelaar, Silke; Ahrné, Erik; Volkmer, Benjamin; Callipo, Luciano; Knoops, Kèvin; Bauer, Manuel; Aebersold, Ruedi; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Measuring precise concentrations of proteins can provide insights into biological processes. Here, we use efficient protein extraction and sample fractionation and state-of-the-art quantitative mass spectrometry techniques to generate a comprehensive, condition-dependent protein abundance map of Escherichia coli. We measure cellular protein concentrations for 55% of predicted E. coli genes (>2300 proteins) under 22 different experimental conditions and identify methylation and N-terminal protein acetylations previously not known to be prevalent in bacteria. We uncover system-wide proteome allocation, expression regulation, and post-translational adaptations. These data provide a valuable resource for the systems biology and broader E. coli research communities. PMID:26641532

  15. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  16. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa Mohamed M; Mohamed, Zienat Kamel; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa Fouad; Moussa, Tarek A A; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2012-05-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important enteric pathogens that cause a wide variety of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly in children. Escherichia coli isolates cultured from 243 diarrheal stool samples obtained from Libyan children and 50 water samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genes characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). The DEC were detected in 21 (8.6%) children with diarrhea; 10 (4.1%) cases were identified as EAEC, 3 (1.2%) as EPEC, and 8 (3.3%) were ETEC; EHEC, and EIEC were not detected. All DEC were grouped phylogenetically by PCR with the majority (> 70%) identified as phylogenetic groups A and B1. The EAEC isolates were also tested for eight genes associated with virulence using PCR. Multi-virulence (≥ 3 virulence factors) was found in 50% of EAEC isolates. Isolated EAEC possessed different virulence traits and belonged to different phylogenetic groups indicating their heterogeneity. PMID:22556089

  17. Molecular Characterization of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mostafa Mohamed M.; Mohamed, Zienat Kamel; Klena, John D.; Ahmed, Salwa Fouad; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2012-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important enteric pathogens that cause a wide variety of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly in children. Escherichia coli isolates cultured from 243 diarrheal stool samples obtained from Libyan children and 50 water samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genes characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). The DEC were detected in 21 (8.6%) children with diarrhea; 10 (4.1%) cases were identified as EAEC, 3 (1.2%) as EPEC, and 8 (3.3%) were ETEC; EHEC, and EIEC were not detected. All DEC were grouped phylogenetically by PCR with the majority (> 70%) identified as phylogenetic groups A and B1. The EAEC isolates were also tested for eight genes associated with virulence using PCR. Multi-virulence (≥ 3 virulence factors) was found in 50% of EAEC isolates. Isolated EAEC possessed different virulence traits and belonged to different phylogenetic groups indicating their heterogeneity. PMID:22556089

  18. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of food-borne illness in the United States; however, recent reports have shown that non-O157 STEC serogroups contribute to more illnesses than O157:H7. Illness caused by non-O157 STEC strains are generally less severe than tho...

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick; Fanning, Séamus

    2016-09-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1-positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  20. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increase in resistance rates to trimehtoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) in isolates of Escherichia coli has become a matter of increasing concern. This has been particularly true in reference to community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI). This study utilized sewage i...

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P.; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1–positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  2. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  3. Isolation of an Lc-specific Escherichia coli bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Fralick, J A; Diedrich, D L; Casey-Wood, S

    1990-01-01

    We isolated an OmpF-specific bacteriophage whose host range mutant, SQ108h2, requires the presence of the Lc porin for its attachment and which can be used to screen or select for Lc-defective mutants among Escherichia coli K-12 strains lysogenic for the PA-2 converting phage. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1689719

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Causing Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Medina, Anicia M.; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Sangil, Anna; Gascon, Joaquim; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Vila, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the presence of virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causing traveler's diarrhea. Among 52 ETEC isolates, the most common toxin type was STh, and the most frequent colonization factors (CFs) were CS21, CS6, and CS3. On the other hand, the nonclassical virulence factors EAST1 and EatA were frequently present. PMID:23224092

  6. Identification of the Escherichia coli Nicotinic Acid Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehl, Ryan A.; Kinsland, Cynthia; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2000-01-01

    The gene (ybeN) coding for nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase, an NAD(P) biosynthetic enzyme, has been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible adenylation of nicotinate mononucleotide and shows product inhibition. The rate of adenylation of nicotinate mononucleotide is at least 20 times faster than the rate of adenylation of nicotinamide mononucleotide. PMID:10894752

  7. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  12. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  13. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  14. Effects of low concentrations of antibiotics on Escherichia coli adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Vosbeck, K; Mett, H; Huber, U; Bohn, J; Petignat, M

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics may influence the adhesion of Escherichia coli SS142 to human epithelioid tissue culture cells. This report shows that these effects are not limited to E. coli SS142 or to our tissue culture system. Most of the 10 E. coli strains studied showed decreased adhesion to Intestine 407 tissue culture cells after growth in 25% of the minimum inhibitory concentration of streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprimsulfametrole, chloramphenicol, and clindamycin. Nalidixic acid at 25% of the minimum inhibitory concentration caused an increase of adhesion. The hemagglutinating activity of the five hemagglutinating strains and the adhesiveness of E. coli SS142 to human buccal cells were similarly affected by low concentrations of the above-mentioned antibiotics. We conclude that E. coli adhesion to human epithelioid tissue culture cells is a valid model of bacterial adhesion because of its high accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:7051972

  15. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  16. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  17. The cobalamin (coenzyme B12) biosynthetic genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J G; Roth, J R

    1995-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Escherichia coli synthesizes cobalamin (coenzyme B12) only when provided with the complex intermediate cobinamide. Three cobalamin biosynthetic genes have been cloned from Escherichia coli K-12, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The three genes form an operon (cob) under the control of several promoters and are induced by cobinamide, a precursor of cobalamin. The cob operon of E. coli comprises the cobU gene, encoding the bifunctional cobinamide kinase-guanylyltransferase; the cobS gene, encoding cobalamin synthetase; and the cobT gene, encoding dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase. The physiological roles of these sequences were verified by the isolation of Tn10 insertion mutations in the cobS and cobT genes. All genes were named after their Salmonella typhimurium homologs and are located at the corresponding positions on the E. coli genetic map. Although the nucleotide sequences of the Salmonella cob genes and the E. coli cob genes are homologous, they are too divergent to have been derived from an operon present in their most recent common ancestor. On the basis of comparisons of G+C content, codon usage bias, dinucleotide frequencies, and patterns of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions, we conclude that the cob operon was introduced into the Salmonella genome from an exogenous source. The cob operon of E. coli may be related to cobalamin synthetic genes now found among non-Salmonella enteric bacteria. PMID:7592411

  18. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  19. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  20. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in raw and cooked food.

    PubMed

    Norazah, A; Rahizan, I; Zainuldin, T; Rohani, M Y; Kamel, A G

    1998-03-01

    A total of 402 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from a variety of food samples and screened for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). Screening was carried out using 15 specific monovalent antisera from Murex Diagnostic Limited. A total of 19 E. coli isolates were serotyped as EPEC. The EPEC strains were shown to belong to 8 serotypes. Eight out of 19 EPEC strains belonged to serotype 018C:K77 (B21). Seventeen out of 19 of the EPEC strains were isolated from cooked food. The presence of E. coli in cooked food is an indicator of fecal contamination and a sign of unhygienic food handling. The presence of EPEC in food could be a potential source of food-borne outbreak. Hygiene training for every food-handler is a necessity. PMID:9740276

  1. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  2. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Prevalence in Laboratory Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Swennes, Alton G.; Buckley, Ellen M.; Madden, Carolyn M.; Byrd, Charles P.; Donocoff, Rachel S.; Rodriguez, Loretta; Parry, Nicola M. A.; Fox, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit-origin enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) causes substantial diarrhea-associated morbidity and has zoonotic potential. A culture-based survey was undertaken to ascertain its prevalence. EPEC was isolated from 6/141 (4.3%) commercially-acquired laboratory rabbits. Three of these did not have diarrhea or EPEC-typical intestinal lesions; they instead had background plasmacytic intestinal inflammation. Asymptomatically infected rabbits may function as EPEC reservoirs. PMID:23391439

  3. Resistance and virulence factors of Escherichia coli isolated from chicken.

    PubMed

    Pavlickova, Silvie; Dolezalova, Magda; Holko, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Chicken meat has become an important part of the human diet and besides contamination by pathogenic Escherichia coli there is a risk of antibiotic resistance spreading via the food chain. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of resistance against eight antibiotics and the presence of 14 virulence factors among 75 Escherichia coli strains isolated from chicken meat in the Czech Republic after classification into phylogenetic groups by the multiplex PCR method. More than half of strains belonged to A phylogroup, next frequently represented was B1 phylogroup, which suggests the commensal strains. The other strains were classified into phylogroups B2 and D, which had more virulence factors. Almost half of all E. coli strains were resistant to at least one of eight-tested antibiotics. A multidrug resistance was observed in 13% of strains. The most prevalent virulence genes were iucD, iss and tsh. None of genes encoding toxins was detected. Most of E. coli strains isolated from chicken meat can be considered as nonpathogenic on the basis of analysis of virulence factors, antibiotic resistance and phylogroups assignment. It can provide a useful tool for prediction of a potential risk from food contaminated by E. coli. PMID:25844863

  4. Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase in Escherichia coli: periplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Benov, L; Chang, L Y; Day, B; Fridovich, I

    1995-06-01

    Cu,ZnSOD purified from Escherichia coli has been used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The resultant antiserum was found to recognize a single band on Western blots of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electropherograms, and that single band coincided with the position of the Cu,ZnSOD. Ultrathin sections of fixed E. coli were treated with the antibody followed by protein A bearing 10-nm gold particles. Electron microscopy revealed that Cu,ZnSOD was largely localized in the periplasm in polar bays. PMID:7786035

  5. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force. PMID:26310235

  6. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  7. Reduction of methionine sulfoxide to methionine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ejiri, S I; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1979-01-01

    L-Methionine-dl-sulfoxide can support the growth of an Escherichia coli methionine auxotroph, suggesting the presence of an enzyme(s) capable of reducing the sulfoxide to methionine. This was verified by showing that a cell-free extract of E. coli catalyzes the conversion of methionine sulfoxide to methionine. This reaction required reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and a generating system for this compound. The specific activity of the enzyme increased during logarithmic growth and was maximal when the culture attained a density of about 10(9) cells per ml. PMID:37234

  8. Properties and biosynthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, J E; Reed, R; Taylor, F R; Jackson, M B

    1979-01-01

    The lipid phase transition of Escherichia coli phospholipids containing cyclopropane fatty acids was compared with the otherwise homologous phospholipids lacking cyclopropane fatty acids. The phase transitions (determined by scanning calorimetry) of the two preparations were essentially identical. Infection of E. coli with phage T3 inhibited cyclopropane fatty acid formation over 98%, whereas infection with mutants which lack the phage coded S-adenosylmethionine cleavage enzyme had no effect on cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis. These data indicate that S-adenosylmethionine is the methylene in cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis. PMID:374358

  9. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  10. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  11. Dexamethazone protects against Escherichia coli induced sickness behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Hanaa-Mansour, A; Hassan, Wedad A; Georgy, Gehan S

    2016-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infection results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to the release of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in blood that can lead to multiple organ failure, shock, and potentially death. Other impact, LPS exposure produces robust increase in anxiety-like behavior, suppression of locomotor, exploratory activity, and reduced social behavior. The therapeutic use of glucocorticoids in septic shock remains one of the first-aid approaches for their anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of dexamethazone (DEX), the most commonly used corticosteroid, against Escherichia coli (E. coli) immunohistochemical changes and neurobehavioral dysfunction. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups; (1) Control group (2) E. coli infected group, where animals received 0.2 ml of 24 h growth of E. coli suspension in nutrient broth containing approximately 1.8×10(8) cfu/ml i.p for once, 48 h before sacrificing (3) DEX (20 mg/kg, i.p, 3 days) treated group (4) DEX and E. coli treated group. The results revealed that DEX significantly protected animals against most E. coli-induced behavioral deficits, reduced signs of cognitive impairment. DEX also reduced the LPS-evoked rise in C-reactive protein (CRP), Interferon gamma (IFγ), as well as, expression of Caspase-3. In conclusion, DEX provides neuroprotection against E. coli-associated neurobehavioral and immunological changes via its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26541583

  12. Pathotyping blaCTX-M Escherichia coli from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Choudhary, Suman; Schierack, Peter; Wieler, Lothar H.; Olayemi, Albert B.; Anjum, Muna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli have become the enterobacteriaceae species most affected by extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in view of the emergence of CTX-M-type ESBLs. These CTX-M-positive E. coli have been reported in numerous regions worldwide. Virulence determinants of already reported CTX-M-positive E. coli were investigated. Methodology: To gain insights into the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we assessed serogroup, susceptibility pattern and diversity of virulence profiles within a collection of nine blaCTX-M-positive E. coli strains and their virulent determinant using miniaturized DNA microarray techniques. The nine ESBL-positive E. coli isolates were from eight male and one female patient(s) selected for study based on previous work. Virulence potential was inferred by detection of 63 virulence factor (VF) genes. Results: Four (44.4%) of the 9 E. coli isolates exhibited the same set of core characteristics: serotype O8:Hnt, while all were positive for OXA-1, ciprofloxacin resistance. Five of the isolates exhibited highly similar (91% to 100%) VF profiles. Conclusion: The findings describe a broadly disseminated, blaCTX-M-positive and virulent E. coli serogroup with highly homogeneous virulence genotypes, suggesting recent emergence in this zone. Understanding how this clone has emerged and successfully disseminated within the hospital and community, including across national boundaries, should be a public health priority. PMID:24265928

  13. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  14. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H.; Hung, Albert M.; Graves, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism. PMID:26914334

  15. Purification of DNA for bacterial productivity estimates. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Burnison, B.K.; Nuttley, D.J. )

    1990-02-01

    (methyl-{sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled DNA from natural populations of aquatic bacteria was completely separated from RNA and protein by hydroxylapatite chromatography. The procedure was validated by monitoring increases in Escherichia coli cell count, A{sup 550}, DNA concentration, and thymidine incorporation into DNA isolated by the proposed technique. The procedure can be used in the field and does not rely on the use of acid-base hydrolysis or volatile organic solvents.

  16. Genetic Analysis of the Maltose A Region in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Dolph; Hofnung, Maurice; Schwartz, Maxime

    1969-01-01

    The genetic map of the maltose A locus of Escherichia coli contains at least three closely linked genes, malT, malP, and malQ. The order of these genes is established by deletion mapping. MalP and malQ, the presumed structural genes for maltodextrin phosphorylase and amylomaltase, belong to the same operon. MalT may be a regulator gene involved in the positive control of this operon. PMID:4891257

  17. ¹³C-metabolic flux analysis for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yu; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is used here to study the effects of the knockout of such genes as pgi, zwf, gnd, ppc, pck, pyk, and lpdA on the metabolic changes in Escherichia coli cultivated under aerobic condition. The metabolic regulation mechanisms were clarified by integrating such information as fermentation data, gene expression, enzyme activities, and metabolite concentrations as well the result of (13)C-MFA. PMID:25178796

  18. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Mukherjee, Partha P.; Retterer, Scott T.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2011-06-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogenous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  19. Occurrence of Escherichia coli in Wild Cottontail Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, R; Glantz, P J; Anthony, R G

    1977-03-01

    Free-ranging cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) from two areas in central Pennsylvania were sampled over a 4-year period. Large numbers of coliforms were isolated from the intestinal tracts of these animals; in 136 of the 141 rabbits sampled, Escherichia coli was found to be a major component of the alimentary flora. Four serogroups (O7, O77, O73, and O103) were predominant among the isolates and were considered resistant coliflora of this species of cottontail rabbit. PMID:16345208

  20. Role of threonine dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli threonine degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, R; Kapoor, V; Newman, E B

    1977-01-01

    Threonine was used as nitrogen source by Escherichia coli K-12 through a pathway beginning with the enzyme threonine dehydrogenase. The 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate formed was converted to glycine, and the glycine was converted to serine, which acted as the actual nitrogen donor. The enzyme formed under anaerobic conditions and known as threonine deaminase (biodegradative) is less widespread than threonine dehydrogenase and may be involved in energy metabolism rather than in threonine degradation per se. PMID:334738

  1. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogeneous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  2. Comparison of three types of biochar for removal of Escherichia coli from agricultural runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an infectious type of bacteria that infects over 5,000 people per year in the United States, sometimes leading to death. Since cattle can produce more than 104 Escherichia coli (E. coli) per gram of feces, and biochar is a material with physical prop...

  3. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  4. Analysis of plasmids cloned from a virulent avian Escherichia coli and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha.

    PubMed

    Wooley, R E; Gibbs, P S; Dickerson, H W; Brown, J; Nolan, L K

    1996-01-01

    Three of four plasmids from a virulent wild-type avian Escherichia coli were cloned or transformed into an avirulent laboratory recipient E. coli DH5 alpha and tested for the ability to confer a virulence phenotype. The three plasmids transformed into E. coli DH5 alpha were 5, 6, and 56 kb. A fourth plasmid of 64 kb was not successfully transformed. Parameters used to measure virulence included presence of type 1 pili and a smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, motility, production of Colicin V, resistance to host complement, and embryo lethality. The 5-kb plasmid encoded for ampicillin resistance, whereas the 6-kb plasmid encoded for tetracycline resistance. The 56-kb plasmid encoded for streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline resistance. Twelve-day embryos inoculated with 467 colony-forming units of E. coli DH5 alpha containing the 56-kb plasmid had increased death rates (45%) in the embryo lethality assay and a decreased weight of surviving embryos with cranial hemorrhages as compared with embryos inoculated with similar amounts of E. coli DH5 alpha (0%) and phosphate-buffered saline (0%). Embryos inoculated with the wild-type virulent E. coli had 90% deaths. The 56-kb plasmid also had homology with a probe for Colicin V production (cvaC). No differences in LPS layer, complement resistance, motility, Colicin V activity, type 1 pili, cell-free supernatant proteins, or outer membrane proteins were observed in the transformants when compared with nontransformed E. coli DH5 alpha. PMID:8883780

  5. Escherichia coli heme oxygenase modulates host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Maharshak, Nitsan; Ryu, Hyungjin Sally; Fan, Ting-Jia; Onyiah, Joseph C.; Schulz, Stephanie; Otterbein, Sherrie L.; Wong, Ron; Hansen, Jonathan; Otterbein, Leo E; Carroll, Ian; Plevy, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mammalian heme oxygenase-1 and exposure of animals to carbon monoxide ameliorates experimental colitis. When enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, are exposed to low iron conditions, they express an heme oxygenase-like enzyme, chuS, and metabolize heme into iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide. Given the abundance of enteric bacteria residing in the intestinal lumen, we hypothesized that commensal intestinal bacteria may be a significant source of carbon monoxide, with the consequence that enteric bacteria expressing chuS and other heme oxygenase -like molecules suppress inflammatory immune responses through release of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide exposed mice have altered enteric bacterial composition and increased E. coli 16S and chuS DNA by real-time PCR. Moreover, severity of experimental colitis correlates with increased E. coli chuS expression in IL-10 deficient mice. To explore functional roles, E. coli were genetically modified to overexpress chuS or the chuS gene was deleted. Co-culture of chuS-overexpressing E. coli with bone marrow derived macrophages results in decreased IL-12 p40 and increased IL-10 secretion compared to wild-type or chuS-deficient E. coli. Mice infected with chuS-overexpressing E. coli have increased levels of hepatic carbon monoxide and decreased serum IL-12 p40 compared to mice infected with chuS-deficient E. coli. Thus, carbon monoxide alters the composition of the commensal intestinal microbiota and expands E. coli populations harboring the chuS gene. These bacteria are capable of attenuating innate immune responses through expression of chuS. Bacterial heme oxygenase -like molecules and bacterial-derived carbon monoxide may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory conditions. PMID:26146866

  6. Expression of the Serratia marcescens lipoproteins gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, N; Nakamura, K; Inouye, M

    1981-01-01

    The lipoprotein gene (lpp) of Serratia marcescens was cloned in a lambda phage vector (K. Nakamura and M. Inouye, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77: 1369-1373, 1980). This lpp gene was recloned in plasmid vectors pBR322 and pSC101. When a lipoprotein-deficient (lpp) mutant of Escherichia coli was transformed with pBR322 carrying the S. marcescens lpp gene, cells became nonleaky for ribonuclease, resistant to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and sensitive to globomycin. The lipoprotein was found exclusively in the outer membrane fraction. These results indicate that the S. marcescens lipoprotein was normally secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane, modified, and assembled in the E. coli outer membrane. The amount of the free-form lipoprotein produced in this system was three times higher than that produced in lpp + C. coli cells, whereas there was no difference in the amount of the bound-form lipoprotein. On the other hand, lpp E. coli cells which harbored pSC101 carrying the S. marcescens lpp gene produced only one-third of the free-form lipoprotein produced in lpp E. coli cells which harbored pSC101 carrying the E. coli lpp gene. One of the major factors causing this difference in efficiency of gene expression between the lpp genes of S. marcescens and E. coli appears to be a deletion mutation at the transcription termination region found in the cloned S. marcescens lpp gene. The functional half-life of the S. marcescens lpp messenger ribonucleic acid in E. coli was found to be found half that of the E. coli lpp messenger ribonucleic acid. Images PMID:7016834

  7. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of a soluble protein from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation, and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. In addition, the purification procedure serves as an example of how to use classical protein purifications methods, which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  8. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  9. Escherichia coli sequence type 131: epidemiology and challenges in treatment.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Zubair A; Doi, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    Escherichia coli ST131 has emerged as a global epidemic, multidrug-resistant clone of E. coli causing extra-intestinal infections. It is now highly prevalent among fluoroquinolone-resistant and CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli isolates worldwide. Humans are likely the primary reservoir of ST131. Factors associated with its acquisition include residence in long-term care facilities and recent receipt of antimicrobial agents. E. coli ST131 causes a wide array of infections ranging from cystitis to life-threatening sepsis. Fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are no longer adequate options for empiric therapy when E. coli ST131 is suspected from risk factors and local epidemiology. Expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are options to treat serious non-ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 infections, while carbapenems are indicated for ESBL-producing infections. There is a growing interest in reevaluating oral agents including fosfomycin and pivmecillinam for less serious infections such as uncomplicated cystitis. PMID:24694052

  10. Bacteriophage cocktail significantly reduces Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Chandi D.; Parks, Adam; Abuladze, Tamar; Li, Manrong; Woolston, Joelle; Magnone, Joshua; Senecal, Andre; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Foods contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 cause more than 63,000 foodborne illnesses in the United States every year, resulting in a significant economic impact on medical costs and product liabilities. Efforts to reduce contamination with E. coli O157:H7 have largely focused on washing, application of various antibacterial chemicals, and gamma-irradiation, each of which has practical and environmental drawbacks. A relatively recent, environmentally-friendly approach proposed for eliminating or significantly reducing E. coli O157:H7 contamination of foods is the use of lytic bacteriophages as biocontrol agents. We found that EcoShield™, a commercially available preparation composed of three lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the levels of the bacterium in experimentally contaminated beef by ≥ 94% and in lettuce by 87% after a five minute contact time. The reduced levels of bacteria were maintained for at least one week at refrigerated temperatures. However, the one-time application of EcoShield™ did not protect the foods from recontamination with E. coli O157:H7. Our results demonstrate that EcoShield™ is effective in significantly reducing contamination of beef and lettuce with E. coli O157:H7, but does not protect against potential later contamination due to, for example, unsanitary handling of the foods post processing. PMID:23275869

  11. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  12. Interaction of Escherichia coli and Soil Particles in Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Richard William; Collins, Robert Peter; Bremer, Philip James

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale model system was developed to investigate the transport mechanisms involved in the horizontal movement of bacteria in overland flow across saturated soils. A suspension of Escherichia coli and bromide tracer was added to the model system, and the bromide concentration and number of attached and unattached E. coli cells in the overland flow were measured over time. Analysis of the breakthrough curves indicated that the E. coli and bromide were transported together, presumably by the same mechanism. This implied that the E. coli was transported by advection with the flowing water. Overland-flow transport of E. coli could be significantly reduced if the cells were preattached to large soil particles (>45 μm). However, when unattached cells were inoculated into the system, the E. coli appeared to attach predominantly to small particles (<2 μm) and hence remained unattenuated during transport. These results imply that in runoff generated by saturation-excess conditions, bacteria are rapidly transported across the surface and have little opportunity to interact with the soil matrix. PMID:16672484

  13. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  14. EcoCyc: A comprehensive view of Escherichia coli biology

    PubMed Central

    Keseler, Ingrid M.; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Collado-Vides, Julio; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Johnson, D. Aaron; Krummenacker, Markus; Nolan, Laura M.; Paley, Suzanne; Paulsen, Ian T.; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Shearer, Alexander Glennon; Karp, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    EcoCyc (http://EcoCyc.org) provides a comprehensive encyclopedia of Escherichia coli biology. EcoCyc integrates information about the genome, genes and gene products; the metabolic network; and the regulatory network of E. coli. Recent EcoCyc developments include a new initiative to represent and curate all types of E. coli regulatory processes such as attenuation and regulation by small RNAs. EcoCyc has started to curate Gene Ontology (GO) terms for E. coli and has made a dataset of E. coli GO terms available through the GO Web site. The curation and visualization of electron transfer processes has been significantly improved. Other software and Web site enhancements include the addition of tracks to the EcoCyc genome browser, in particular a type of track designed for the display of ChIP-chip datasets, and the development of a comparative genome browser. A new Genome Omics Viewer enables users to paint omics datasets onto the full E. coli genome for analysis. A new advanced query page guides users in interactively constructing complex database queries against EcoCyc. A Macintosh version of EcoCyc is now available. A series of Webinars is available to instruct users in the use of EcoCyc. PMID:18974181

  15. Virulence of Shigella flexneri Hybrids Expressing Escherichia coli Somatic Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gemski, P.; Sheahan, D. G.; Washington, O.; Formal, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    The genes controlling either Escherichia coli somatic antigen 8 or 25 were conjugally transferred to virulent Shigella flexneri 2a recipients to determine whether the aquisition of these antigens would affect the virulence of the resulting hybrid. A high proportion of such hybrids were found to be rough and hence were avirulent. Some smooth S. flexneri hybrids which replaced their native group antigens with E. coli factor 25 were still virulent in the animal models employed. All S. flexneri O-8 hybrids were uniformly avirulent. Our finding, that S. flexneri hybrids with the chemically divergent E. coli O-8 repeat unit are avirulent whereas some hybrids with the chemically related O-25 repeat unit retain virulence, suggests that the chemical composition and structure of the O side chain of somatic antigens may represent one determining factor for bacterial penetration of mucosal epithelial cells, the primary step in the pathogenesis of bacillary dysentery. Images PMID:4569915

  16. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  17. Reconstruction of a chromatic response system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Yoshimi; Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shunsuke; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2016-07-14

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Cyanobacteria have evolved photoperception systems for efficient photosynthesis, and some histidine kinases are known to function as photosensors. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct the photoperception system in Escherichia coli to make an easily controllable ON/OFF switch for gene expressions. For this purpose, a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme was expressed with phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing enzymes in E. coli which carries a G-box-controlled reporter gene. We succeeded to endow E. coli with a gene activation switch that is regulated in a light-color dependent manner. The possibility of such a switch for the development of synthetic biology is pointed out. PMID:27246537

  18. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  19. Effect of tannins on the in viro growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and in vivo growth of generic Escherichia coli excreted from steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of commercially available chestnut and mimosa tannins in vitro (experiment 1) or in vivo (experiment 2) on the growth or recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7 or generic fecal E. coli was evaluated. In experiment 1, the mean growth rate of E. coli O157:H7, determined via the measurement o...

  20. Global dissemination of a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clone

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Skippington, Elizabeth; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Peters, Kate M.; Davies, Mark; Rogers, Benjamin A.; Dougan, Gordon; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Upton, Mathew; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Schembri, Mark A.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant (MDR) clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with several factors, including resistance to fluoroquinolones, high virulence gene content, the possession of the type 1 fimbriae FimH30 allele, and the production of the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we used genome sequencing to examine the molecular epidemiology of a collection of E. coli ST131 strains isolated from six distinct geographical locations across the world spanning 2000–2011. The global phylogeny of E. coli ST131, determined from whole-genome sequence data, revealed a single lineage of E. coli ST131 distinct from other extraintestinal E. coli strains within the B2 phylogroup. Three closely related E. coli ST131 sublineages were identified, with little association to geographic origin. The majority of single-nucleotide variants associated with each of the sublineages were due to recombination in regions adjacent to mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The most prevalent sublineage of ST131 strains was characterized by fluoroquinolone resistance, and a distinct virulence factor and MGE profile. Four different variants of the CTX-M ESBL–resistance gene were identified in our ST131 strains, with acquisition of CTX-M-15 representing a defining feature of a discrete but geographically dispersed ST131 sublineage. This study confirms the global dispersal of a single E. coli ST131 clone and demonstrates the role of MGEs and recombination in the evolution of this important MDR pathogen. PMID:24706808

  1. Plasmid replicon typing of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Johnson, Sara J; Logue, Catherine M; White, David G; Doetkott, Curt; Nolan, Lisa K

    2007-03-01

    Despite the critical role of plasmids in horizontal gene transfer, few studies have characterized plasmid relatedness among different bacterial populations. Recently, a multiplex PCR replicon typing protocol was developed for classification of plasmids occurring in members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, a simplified version of this replicon typing procedure which requires only three multiplex panels to identify 18 plasmid replicons is described. This method was used to screen 1,015 Escherichia coli isolates of avian, human, and poultry meat origin for plasmid replicon types. Additionally, the isolates were assessed for their content of several colicin-associated genes. Overall, a high degree of plasmid variability was observed, with 221 different profiles occurring among the 1,015 isolates examined. IncFIB plasmids were the most common type identified, regardless of the source type of E. coli. IncFIB plasmids occurred significantly more often in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) and retail poultry E. coli (RPEC) than in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and avian and human fecal commensal E. coli isolates (AFEC and HFEC, respectively). APEC and RPEC were also significantly more likely than UPEC, HFEC, and AFEC to possess the colicin-associated genes cvaC, cbi, and/or cma in conjunction with one or more plasmid replicons. The results suggest that E. coli isolates contaminating retail poultry are notably similar to APEC with regard to plasmid profiles, with both generally containing multiple plasmid replicon types in conjunction with colicin-related genes. In contrast, UPEC and human and avian commensal E. coli isolates generally lack the plasmid replicons and colicin-related genes seen in APEC and RPEC, suggesting limited dissemination of such plasmids among these bacterial populations. PMID:17277222

  2. Effective medicinal plants against enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang; Lortheeranuwat, Amornrat; Jeeju, Wanpen; Sririrak, Trechada; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Supawita, Thanomjit

    2004-09-01

    The stimulating effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the production of verocytotoxin (VT) by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been claimed. The purpose of this study was to find an alternative, but bioactive medicine for the treatment of this organism. Fifty-eight preparations of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 38 medicinal plant species commonly used in Thailand to cure gastrointestinal infections were tested for their antibacterial activity against different strains of Escherichia coli, including 6 strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Escherichia coli O26:H11, Escherichia coli O111:NM, Escherichia coli O22; 5 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from bovine; and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. Inhibition of growth was primarily tested by the paper disc agar diffusion method. Among the medicinal plants tested, only 8 species (21.05%) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Acacia catechu, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Psidium guajava, Punica granatum, Quercus infectoria, Uncaria gambir, and Walsura robusta demonstrated antibacterial activity with inhibition zones ranging from 7 to 17 mm. The greatest inhibition zone against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (RIMD 05091083) was produced from the ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the agar microdilution method and agar dilution method in petri dishes with millipore filter. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Quercus infectoria and aqueous extract of Punica granatum were highly effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 with the best MIC and MBC values of 0.09, 0.78, and 0.19, 0.39 mg/ml, respectively. These plant species may provide alternative but bioactive medicines for the treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection. PMID:15261962

  3. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2012-01-01

    Feedlot pen soil is a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM). A feedlot pen was identified in which naturally occurring E. coli O157:H7 was prevalent and evenly distributed in the FSM. Forty plots 3 by 3 m were randomly assigned such that five plots of each of the solarization times of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks were examined. Temperature loggers were placed 7.5 cm below the surface of each plot, and plots to be solarized were covered with clear 6-mil polyethylene. At each sampling time, five FSM samples were collected from each of five solarized and five unsolarized plots. E. coli concentrations and E. coli O157:H7 presence by immunomagnetic separation and plating were determined for each FSM sample. Initial percentages of E. coli O157:H7-positive samples in control and solarized FSM were 84 and 80%, respectively, and did not differ (P > 0.05). E. coli O157:H7 was no longer detectable by 8 weeks of solarization, but was still detected in unsolarized FSM at 10 weeks. The average initial concentration of E. coli in FSM was 5.56 log CFU/g and did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). There was a 2.0-log decrease of E. coli after 1 week of solarization, and a >3.0-log reduction of E. coli by week 6 of solarization (P, 0.05). E. coli levels remained unchanged in unsolarized FSM (P > 0.05). Daily peak FSM temperatures were on average 8.7°C higher for solarized FSM compared with unsolarized FSM, and reached temperatures as high as 57°C. Because soil solarization reduces E. coli O157:H7, this technique may be useful for reduction of persistence and transmission of this pathogen in cattle production, in addition to remediation of E. coli O157:H7-contaminated soil used to grow food crops. PMID:22221349

  4. Bioremediation of trace cobalt from simulated spent decontamination solutions of nuclear power reactors using E. coli expressing NiCoT genes.

    PubMed

    Raghu, G; Balaji, V; Venkateswaran, G; Rodrigue, A; Maruthi Mohan, P

    2008-12-01

    Removal of radioactive cobalt at trace levels (approximately nM) in the presence of large excess (10(6)-fold) of corrosion product ions of complexed Fe, Cr, and Ni in spent chemical decontamination formulations (simulated effluent) of nuclear reactors is currently done by using synthetic organic ion exchangers. A large volume of solid waste is generated due to the nonspecific nature of ion sorption. Our earlier work using various fungi and bacteria, with the aim of nuclear waste volume reduction, realized up to 30% of Co removal with specific capacities calculated up to 1 microg/g in 6-24 h. In the present study using engineered Escherichia coli expressing NiCoT genes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (RP) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans F-199 (NA), we report a significant increase in the specific capacity for Co removal (12 microg/g) in 1-h exposure to simulated effluent. About 85% of Co removal was achieved in a two-cycle treatment with the cloned bacteria. Expression of NiCoT genes in the E. coli knockout mutant of NiCoT efflux gene (rcnA) was more efficient as compared to expression in wild-type E. coli MC4100, JM109 and BL21 (DE3) hosts. The viability of the E. coli strains in the formulation as well as at different doses of gamma rays exposure and the effect of gamma dose on their cobalt removal capacity are determined. The potential application scheme of the above process of bioremediation of cobalt from nuclear power reactor chemical decontamination effluents is discussed. PMID:18949474

  5. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon. PMID:27081680

  6. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  7. Comparative Genomic Indexing Reveals the Phylogenomics of Escherichia coli Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Muna F.; Lucchini, Sacha; Thompson, Arthur; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Woodward, Martin J.

    2003-01-01

    The Escherichia coli O26 serogroup includes important food-borne pathogens associated with human and animal diarrheal disease. Current typing methods have revealed great genetic heterogeneity within the O26 group; the data are often inconsistent and focus only on verotoxin (VT)-positive O26 isolates. To improve current understanding of diversity within this serogroup, the genomic relatedness of VT-positive and -negative O26 strains was assessed by comparative genomic indexing. Our results clearly demonstrate that irrespective of virulence characteristics and pathotype designation, the O26 strains show greater genomic similarity to each other than to any other strain included in this study. Our data suggest that enteropathogenic and VT-expressing E. coli O26 strains represent the same clonal lineage and that VT-expressing E. coli O26 strains have gained additional virulence characteristics. Using this approach, we established the core genes which are central to the E. coli species and identified regions of variation from the E. coli K-12 chromosomal backbone. PMID:12874348

  8. Escherichia coli β-Lactamases: What Really Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Singh, Nambram S.; Virdi, Jugsharan S.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to diverse pathotypes have increasingly been recognized as a major public health concern. The β-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully to treat infections caused by pathogenic E. coli. However, currently, the utility of β-lactams is being challenged severely by a large number of hydrolytic enzymes – the β-lactamases expressed by bacteria. The menace is further compounded by the highly flexible genome of E. coli, and propensity of resistance dissemination through horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread. Successful management of infections caused by such resistant strains requires an understanding of the diversity of β-lactamases, their unambiguous detection, and molecular mechanisms underlying their expression and spread with regard to the most relevant information about individual bacterial species. Thus, this review comprises first such effort in this direction for E. coli, a bacterial species known to be associated with production of diverse classes of β-lactamases. The review also highlights the role of commensal E. coli as a potential but under-estimated reservoir of β-lactamases-encoding genes. PMID:27065978

  9. Role of peripheral pooling in porcine Escherichia coli sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Teule, G.J.; von Lingen, A.; Verwey von Vught, M.A.; Kester, A.D.; Mackaay, R.C.; Bezemer, P.D.; Heidenal, G.A.; Thijs, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    In anesthesized pigs the effects of E. coli (2 X 10(8)/kg) on hemodynamics and red cell distribution were studied. After injection of 99m-Tc red cells (15 mCi), regional radioactivity was followed during 3 hours. Gated bloodpool studies were performed to measure end-diastolic volumes (EDV). Escherichia coli E. coli was infused in 14 pigs, while 7 animals served as controls. E. coli resulted in an early increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Systemic arterial pressure decreased gradually, while cardiac output did not change significantly. The gated studies revealed that especially left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) declined, to 50% of the basal value. Regional radioactivity did not change over lungs, liver and abdomen. Splenic activity declined markedly. Over the hindlimb a significant increase (29 +/- 8%) was observed. It is concluded that E. coli infusion in pigs induces a hemodynamic pattern similar to human sepsis. The decrease in LVEDV is probably related to peripheral pooling and a change in right ventricle (RV) performance.

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  11. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  12. Attachment of Escherichia coli and enterococci to particles in runoff.

    PubMed

    Soupir, Michelle L; Mostaghimi, Saied; Dillaha, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Association of Escherichia coli and enterococci with particulates present in runoff from erodible soils has important implications for modeling the fate and transport of bacteria from agricultural sources and in the selection of management practices to reduce bacterial movement to surface waters. Three soils with different textures were collected from the Ap horizon (silty loam, silty clay loam, and loamy fine sand), placed in portable box plots, treated with standard cowpats, and placed under a rainfall simulator. Rainfall was applied to the plots until saturation-excess flow occurred for 30 min, and samples were collected 10, 20, and 30 min after initiation of the runoff event. The attachment of E. coli and enterococci to particles present in runoff was determined by a screen filtration and centrifugation procedure. Percentage of E. coli and enterococci attached to particulates in runoff ranged from 28 to 49%, with few statistically significant differences in attachment among the three soils. Similar partitioning release patterns were observed between E. coli and enterococci from the silty loam (r = 0.57) and silty clay loam soils (r = 0.60). At least 60% of all attached E. coli and enterococci were associated particles within an 8- to 62-microm particle size category. The results indicate that the majority of fecal bacteria attach to and are transported with manure colloids in sediment-laden flow regardless of the soil texture. PMID:20400597

  13. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H.; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  14. Escherichia coli O157 and other Shiga toxin producting E. coli: detection by immunomagnetic particle-based assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), including E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC cause hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome and are important food-borne pathogens that can contaminate various types of food. The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service declared E. coli O157:H7 a...

  15. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  16. Production and characterization of hirudin variant-1 by SUMO fusion technology in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wuguang; Cai, Xueting; Gu, Zhenghua; Huang, Yuzheng; Xia, Binbin; Cao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Hirudin is the most potent non-covalent inhibitor of thrombin. Several expression systems have been used to produce recombinant hirudin for pharmaceutical purposes. However, high expression of active hirudin in Escherichia coli cytoplasm has not been successful owing to the fact that heterogenetic small peptide is easily degraded in the cell. To solve this problem, we constructed a recombinant form of the hirudin variant-1 (HV1) as a fusion protein with the small ubiquitin-related modifier gene (SUMO) by use of over-lap PCR. The fusion gene His(6)-SUMO-HV1 was highly expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) in which the SUMO-HV1 accounts for over 30% of the soluble fraction. The fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and cleaved by a SUMO-specific protease Ulp1 to release the HV1 with natural N-terminal. The recombinant HV1 (rHV1) was further purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and then by Q anion-exchange chromatography. N-terminal sequencing result demonstrated the purified rHV1 had the same N-terminal sequence as the native hirudin. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified rHV1 protein was 6939.161 Da, which was similar to the theoretical molecular weight of rHV1 6,944 Da. The Chromozym TH assay result showed that the anti-thrombin activity of purified rHV1 was 8,800 ATU/mg and comparable to the specific activity of native hirudin. PMID:22371262

  17. Enhancement of human gamma-interferon production in recombinant E. coli using batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rasoul; Maghsoudi, Nader; Farnoud, Amir Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Development of inexpensive and simple culture media and appropriate induction conditions are always favorable for industry. In this research, chemical composition and stoichiometric data for gamma-interferon production and recombinant Escherichia coli growth were used in order to achieve a simple medium and favorable induction conditions. To achieve this goal, the effects of medium composition and induction conditions on the production of gamma-interferon were investigated in batch culture of E. coli BL21 (DE3) [pET3a-ifngamma]. These conditions were considered as suitable conditions for the production of gamma-interferon: 2.5x M9 medium, supplemented with a mixture of amino acids (milligram per liter), including glutamic acid 215, aspartic acid 250, lysine 160, and phenylalanine 90, and induction at late-log phase (OD(600) = 4.5). Under these conditions, dry cell weight of 6 +/- 0.2 g/l and gamma-interferon concentration of 2.15 +/- 0.1 g/l were obtained. Later, without changing the concentration ratio of amino acids and glucose, the effect of increase in the primary glucose concentration on productivity of gamma-interferon was investigated. It was found that 25 g/l glucose will result in maximum attainable biomass and recombinant human gamma-interferon. At improved conditions, a dry cell weight of 14 +/- 0.2 g/l, concentration and overall productivity of gamma-interferon 4.2 +/- 0.1 g/l and 420 +/- 10 mg/l h, respectively, were obtained. PMID:19655276

  18. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists. PMID:27499290

  19. Widespread antibiotic resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Shigella species

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghabadi, Azam Fatahi; Ajami, Ali; Fadaei, Reza; Zandieh, Masoud; Heidari, Elham; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Ataei, Behrooz; Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance of enteric pathogens particularly Shigella species, is a critical world-wide problem and monitoring their resistant pattern is essential, because the choice of antibiotics is absolutely dependent on regional antibiotic susceptibility patterns. During summer 2013, an unusual increase in number of diarrheal diseases was noticed in Isfahan, a central province of Iran. Therefore, the antibiotic resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Shigella species isolated were evaluated. Materials and Methods: According to the guideline on National Surveillance System for Foodborn Diseases, random samples from patients with acute diarrhea were examined in local laboratories of health centers and samples suspicious of Shigella spp. were further assessed in referral laboratory. Isolated pathogens were identified by standard biochemical and serologic tests and antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out by disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 1086 specimens were obtained and 58 samples suspicious of Shigella were specifically evaluated. The most prevalent isolated pathogen was Shigella sonnei (26/58) followed by E. coli (25/58) and Shigella flexneri (3/58). A large number of isolated bacteria were resistant to co-trimoxazole (Shigella spp: 100%, E. coli: 80%), azithromycin (Shigella spp: 70.4%, E. coli: 44.0%), ceftriaxone (Shigella spp: 88.9%, E. coli: 56.0%) and cefixime (Shigella spp: 85.2%, E. coli: 68.0%). About88.3% of S. sonnei isolates, one S. flexneri isolate, and 56% of E. coli strains were resistant to at least three antibiotic classes (multidrug resistant). Conclusion: Due to high levels of resistance to recommended and commonly used antibiotics for diarrhea, continuous monitoring of antibiotic resistance seems essential for determining best options of empirical therapy. PMID:25002896

  20. Virulence and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from rooks.

    PubMed

    Kmet, Vladimir; Drugdova, Zuzana; Kmetova, Marta; Stanko, Michal

    2013-01-01

    With regard to antibiotic resistance studies in various model animals in the urban environment, the presented study focused on the rook, many behavioural and ecological aspects of which are important from an epidemiological point of view. A total of 130 Escherichia coli strains isolated from rook faeces during a two-year period (2011-2012) were investigated for antibiotic resistance and virulence. Resistance to ampicillin (60%) and streptomycin (40%) were the most frequent, followed by resistance to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin-22% and enrofloxacin-24%), tetracycline (18%), cotrimoxazol (17%) and florfenicol (14%). Ceftiofur resistance occured in 10.7% of strains and cefquinom resistance in 1.5% of strains. Twenty-five E.coli strains with a higher level of MICs of cephalosporins (over 2mg/L of ceftazidime and ceftriaxon) and fluoroquinolones were selected for detection of betalactamase genes (CTX-M, CMY), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnrS, integrase 1, and for APEC (avian pathogenic E.coli) virulence factors (iutA, cvaC, iss, tsh, ibeA, papC, kpsII). Genes of CTX-M1, CMY-2, integrase 1, papC, cvaC, iutA were detected in one strain of E.coli, and qnrS, integrase 1, iss, cvaC, tsh were detected in another E.coli. DNA microarray revealed the absence of verotoxin and enterotoxin genes and pathogenicity islands. The results show that rooks can serve as a reservoir of antibiotic-resistant E. coli with avian pathogenic virulence factors for the human population, and potentially transmit such E.coli over long distances. PMID:23772573

  1. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  2. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: detection and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins, referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) are important food-borne pathogens that cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). E. coli O157:H7 is a common cause of STEC infection; ho...

  3. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  4. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  5. coliBASE: an online database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Khan, Arshad M.; Pallen, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed coliBASE, a database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics available online at http://colibase.bham.ac.uk. Unlike other E.coli databases, which focus on the laboratory model strain K12, coliBASE is intended to reflect the full diversity of E.coli and its relatives. The database contains comparative data including whole genome alignments and lists of putative orthologous genes, together with numerous analytical tools and links to existing online resources. The data are stored in a relational database, accessible by a number of user-friendly search methods and graphical browsers. The database schema is generic and can easily be applied to other bacterial genomes. Two such databases, CampyDB (for the analysis of Campylobacter spp.) and ClostriDB (for Clostridium spp.) are also available at http://campy.bham.ac.uk and http://clostri.bham.ac.uk, respectively. An example of the power of E.coli comparative analyses such as those available through coliBASE is presented. PMID:14681417

  6. Development of functionalised polyelectrolyte capsules using filamentous Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied microorganisms and finds multiple applications especially as tool in the heterologous production of interesting proteins of other organisms. The heterologous expression of special surface (S-) layer proteins caused the formation of extremely long E. coli cells which leave transparent tubes when they divide into single E. coli cells. Such natural structures are of high value as bio-templates for the development of bio-inorganic composites for many applications. In this study we used genetically modified filamentous Escherichia coli cells as template for the design of polyelectrolyte tubes that can be used as carrier for functional molecules or particles. Diversity of structures of biogenic materials has the potential to be used to construct inorganic or polymeric superior hybrid materials that reflect the form of the bio-template. Such bio-inspired materials are of great interest in diverse scientific fields like Biology, Chemistry and Material Science and can find application for the construction of functional materials or the bio-inspired synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. Results Genetically modified filamentous E. coli cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde and coated with alternating six layers of the polyanion polyelectrolyte poly(sodium-4styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and polycation polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine-hydrochloride) (PAH). Afterwards we dissolved the E. coli cells with 1.2% sodium hypochlorite, thus obtaining hollow polyelectrolyte tubes of 0.7 μm in diameter and 5–50 μm in length. For functionalisation the polyelectrolyte tubes were coated with S-layer protein polymers followed by metallisation with Pd(0) particles. These assemblies were analysed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Conclusion The thus constructed new material offers possibilities for diverse applications like novel catalysts or metal

  7. Determinants that increase the serum resistance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P W; Robinson, M K

    1980-01-01

    The rfb locus, determining biosynthesis of O8-specific lipopolysaccharide side chains, was transferred to a rough mutant of Escherichia coli; recombinants producing a complete lipopolysaccharide were more resistant to the complement-mediated bactericidal action of human serum than the rough recipient. Inheritance of the his-linked genes for K27 antigen production did not alter the response to serum. The serum resistance of strains carrying O8 side chains, but not of strains with incomplete lipopolysaccharides, was further increased by inheritance of plasmids R1 and NR1.20 PMID:6995340

  8. DNA probes for identification of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, T A; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R; Wood, P K; Morris, J G

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-one Escherichia coli strains belonging to all known invasive O serogroups were tested with two distinct invasiveness probes (pMR17 and pSF55). All 54 Sereny test-positive strains and 5 strains that lost Sereny positivity during storage hybridized with both probes. Probe-positive strains carried a 120- to 140-megadalton plasmid, did not produce lysine decarboxylase, and, with the exception of certain serotypes, were nonmotile. Motile strains of serotype O144:H25 were for the first time characterized as invasive by hybridization with the probes. PMID:3312292

  9. An engineered eukaryotic protein glycosylation pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valderrama-Rincon, Juan D; Fisher, Adam C; Merritt, Judith H; Fan, Yao-Yun; Reading, Craig A; Chhiba, Krishan; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Aebi, Markus; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2012-05-01

    We performed bottom-up engineering of a synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli for the production of eukaryotic trimannosyl chitobiose glycans and the transfer of these glycans to specific asparagine residues in target proteins. The glycan biosynthesis was enabled by four eukaryotic glycosyltransferases, including the yeast uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine transferases Alg13 and Alg14 and the mannosyltransferases Alg1 and Alg2. By including the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase PglB from Campylobacter jejuni, we successfully transferred glycans to eukaryotic proteins. PMID:22446837

  10. Causes, prevention and treatment of Escherichia coli infections.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract and can cause healthcare-associated infections. The organism is most frequently responsible for urinary tract infections and it is the bacterium most often implicated in the cause of diarrhoea in people travelling overseas. In recent years, a strain called Ecoli O157 has gained notoriety for causing foodborne infection, which can have severe health consequences, especially in young children. This article describes the range of different infections caused by Ecoli in healthcare settings and the community and discusses the characteristics of the different strains of the bacteria that explain variations in their pathogenicity. PMID:20441035

  11. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. III. Clonal Frames

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Bridges, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    PCR fragments, 1500-bp, from 15 previously sequenced regions in the Escherichia coli chromosome have been compared by restriction analysis in a large set of wild (ECOR) strains. Prior published observations of segmental clonality are confirmed: each of several sequence types is shared by a number of strains. The rate of recombinational replacement and the average size of the replacements are estimated in a set of closely related strains in which a clonal frame is dotted with occasional stretches of DNA belonging to other clones. A clonal hierarchy is described. Some new comparative sequencing data are presented. PMID:1979037

  12. Global Properties of the Metabolic Map of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounis, Christos A.; Karp, Peter D.

    2000-01-01

    The EcoCyc database characterizes the known network of Escherichia coli small-molecule metabolism. Here we present a computational analysis of the global properties of that network, which consists of 744 reactions that are catalyzed by 607 enzymes. The reactions are organized into 131 pathways. Of the metabolic enzymes, 100 are multifunctional, and 68 of the reactions are catalyzed by >1 enzyme. The network contains 791 chemical substrates. Other properties considered by the analysis include the distribution of enzyme subunit organization, and the distribution of modulators of enzyme activity and of enzyme cofactors. The dimensions chosen for this analysis can be employed for comparative functional analysis of complete genomes. PMID:10779499

  13. Dual genetic selection of synthetic riboswitches in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a genetic selection strategy to engineer synthetic riboswitches that can chemically regulate gene expression in Escherichia coli. Riboswitch libraries are constructed by randomizing the nucleotides that potentially comprise an expression platform and fused to the hybrid selection/screening marker tetA-gfpuv. Iterative ON and OFF selections are performed under appropriate conditions that favor the survival or the growth of the cells harboring the desired riboswitches. After the selection, rapid screening of individual riboswitch clones is performed by measuring GFPuv fluorescence without subcloning. This optimized dual genetic selection strategy can be used to rapidly develop synthetic riboswitches without detailed computational design or structural knowledge. PMID:24549616

  14. Biochemical and cultural characteristics of invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R M; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical characteristics of 97 invasive Escherichia coli strains of different O serogroups were studied. Considered as a group, the behavior of the strains was quite variable. However, none of them decarboxylated lysine and all but seven strains, belonging to the O124 serogroup, were nonmotile. The growth of 25 strains obtained on MacConkey, salmonella-shigella, xylose-lysine-desoxycholate, and Hektoen enteric agars was compared. MacConkey and Hektoen enteric agars yielded the highest average growth for these strains, whereas salmonella-shigella agar had the lowest average counts. PMID:6991526

  15. In Vivo study of naturally deformed Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tavaddod, Sharareh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A combination of light-microscopy and image processing has been applied to study naturally deformed Escherichia coli under in vivo condition and at the order of sub-pixel high-resolution accuracy. To classify deflagellated non-dividing E. coli cells to the rod-shape and bent-shape, a geometrical approach has been applied. From the analysis of the geometrical data which were obtained of image processing, we estimated the required effective energy for shaping a rod-shape to a bent-shape with the same size. We evaluated the energy of deformation in the naturally deformed bacteria with minimum cell manipulation, under in vivo condition, and with minimum influence of any external force, torque and pressure. Finally, we have also elaborated on the possible scenario to explain how naturally deformed bacteria are formed from initial to final-stage. PMID:27026097

  16. Polarity effects in the lactose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Altman, Sidney

    2004-05-21

    An intergenic RNA segment between lacY and lacA of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli is cleaved by RNase P, an endoribonuclease. The cleavage of the intergenic RNA was ten times less efficient than cleavage of a tRNA precursor in vitro. Fragments of the RNase P cleavage product are detectable in vivo in the wild-type strain but not in a mutant strain at the restrictive temperature. The cleavage product that contains lacA in the wild-type strain was quickly degraded. When this intergenic segment was cloned upstream of a reporter gene, the expression of the reporter gene was also inhibited substantially in wild-type E.coli, but not in a temperature sensitive mutant strain in RNase P at the restrictive temperature. These results support data regarding the natural polarity between lacZ versus lacA, the downstream gene. PMID:15123418

  17. Involvement of DNA superhelicity in minichromosome maintenance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Whitford, W G; Helmstetter, C E

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented that Escherichia coli minichromosomes are harbored at superhelical densities which are lower than those measured for other E. coli plasmids but are comparable to that of the chromosome. When introduced into gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants, minichromosomes were much more unstable than in strains with normal or increased supercoiling properties; in fact, certain minichromosome derivatives could not be introduced into top gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants. These observations were unique to minichromosomes, since the maintenance of plasmids which did not replicate from oriC was not altered in these mutants. Analyses of minichromosomes of identical sizes but with different restriction fragment orientations suggested that supercoiling-dependent alterations in promoter-terminator functions, as well as direct effects of supercoiling on replication, may play a role in the observed minichromosome instability. Images PMID:2981821

  18. Engineering Escherichia coli Cell Factories for n-Butanol Production.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianrui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The production of n-butanol, as a widely applied solvent and potential fuel, is attracting much attention. The fermentative production of butanol coupled with the production of acetone and ethanol by Clostridium (ABE fermentation) was once one of the oldest biotechnological processes, ranking second in scale behind ethanol fermentation. However, there remain problems with butanol production by Clostridium, especially the difficulty in genetically manipulating clostridial strains. In recent years, many efforts have been made to produce butanol using non-native strains. Until now, the most advanced effort was the engineering of the user-friendly and widely studied Escherichia coli for butanol production. This paper reviews the current progress and problems relating to butanol production by engineered E. coli in terms of prediction using mathematical models, pathway construction, novel enzyme replacement, butanol toxicity, and tolerance engineering strategies. PMID:25662903

  19. Global Analysis of Extracytoplasmic Stress Signaling in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Nomane, Yanoura; Reymond, Nancie; Barbet, Romain; Jacquet, Eric; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Jacq, Annick; Bouloc, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The Bae, Cpx, Psp, Rcs, and σE pathways constitute the Escherichia coli signaling systems that detect and respond to alterations of the bacterial envelope. Contributions of these systems to stress response have previously been examined individually; however, the possible interconnections between these pathways are unknown. Here we investigate the dynamics between the five stress response pathways by determining the specificities of each system with respect to signal-inducing conditions, and monitoring global transcriptional changes in response to transient overexpression of each of the effectors. Our studies show that different extracytoplasmic stress conditions elicit a combined response of these pathways. Involvement of the five pathways in the various tested stress conditions is explained by our unexpected finding that transcriptional responses induced by the individual systems show little overlap. The extracytoplasmic stress signaling pathways in E. coli thus regulate mainly complementary functions whose discrete contributions are integrated to mount the full adaptive response. PMID:19763168

  20. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Plunkett, G; Bloch, C A; Perna, N T; Burland, V; Riley, M; Collado-Vides, J; Glasner, J D; Rode, C K; Mayhew, G F; Gregor, J; Davis, N W; Kirkpatrick, H A; Goeden, M A; Rose, D J; Mau, B; Shao, Y

    1997-09-01

    The 4,639,221-base pair sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 is presented. Of 4288 protein-coding genes annotated, 38 percent have no attributed function. Comparison with five other sequenced microbes reveals ubiquitous as well as narrowly distributed gene families; many families of similar genes within E. coli are also evident. The largest family of paralogous proteins contains 80 ABC transporters. The genome as a whole is strikingly organized with respect to the local direction of replication; guanines, oligonucleotides possibly related to replication and recombination, and most genes are so oriented. The genome also contains insertion sequence (IS) elements, phage remnants, and many other patches of unusual composition indicating genome plasticity through horizontal transfer. PMID:9278503

  1. Studies on Resistance Transfer Factor Deoxyribonucleic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard P.; Falkow, Stanley

    1970-01-01

    A variant of the derepressed R factor, R1, which does not contain any of the drug resistance markers, and represents, in large part, the resistance transfer factor (RTF) was studied in Escherichia coli. RTF deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was specifically labeled in a female cell after conjugation. Physical characterization of the molecule showed that RTF possessed an average molecular weight of 50 × 106 daltons and a buoyant density of 1.709 g/cm3. By comparison to R1, we calculate that the region of DNA carrying the drug resistance genes is therefore about 20% of the R1 molecule and has a buoyant density of approximately 1.716 g/cm3. These results support the hypothesis that the single species of R-factor DNA observed in E. coli represents a composite of the 1.709 and 1.716 g/cm3 replicons seen in Proteus. PMID:4919749

  2. Two proline porters in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Stalmach, M E; Grothe, S; Wood, J M

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective at putP and putA lack proline transport via proline porter I and proline dehydrogenase activity, respectively. They retain a proline uptake system (proline porter II) that is induced during tryptophan-limited growth and are sensitive to the toxic L-proline analog, 3,4-dehydroproline. 3,4-Dehydroproline-resistant mutants derived from a putP putA mutant lack proline porter II. Auxotrophic derivatives derived from putP+ or putP bacteria can grow if provided with proline at low concentration (25 microM); those derived from the 3,4-dehydroproline-resistant mutants require high proline for growth (2.5 mM). We conclude that E. coli, like Salmonella typhimurium, possesses a second proline porter that is inactivated by mutations at the proP locus. PMID:6355059

  3. Cellulosic hydrolysate toxicity and tolerance mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Tirzah Y; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Gill, Ryan T

    2009-01-01

    The sustainable production of biofuels will require the efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. A key barrier involves the creation of growth-inhibitory compounds by chemical pretreatment steps, which ultimately reduce the efficiency of fermentative microbial biocatalysts. The primary toxins include organic acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds. Weak acids enter the cell and dissociate, resulting in a drop in intracellular pH as well as various anion-specific effects on metabolism. Furan derivatives, dehydration products of hexose and pentose sugars, have been shown to hinder fermentative enzyme function. Phenolic compounds, formed from lignin, can disrupt membranes and are hypothesized to interfere with the function of intracellular hydrophobic targets. This review covers mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance for these compounds with a specific focus on the important industrial organism Escherichia coli. Recent efforts to engineer E. coli for improved tolerance to these toxins are also discussed. PMID:19832972

  4. Bleomycin Sensitivity in Escherichia coli is Medium-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Brown, William; Marinus, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a glycopeptide antibiotic and anti-tumor agent that targets primarily the furanose rings of DNA and in the presence of ferrous ions produces oxidative damage and DNA strand breaks. Escherichia coli cells growing in broth medium and exposed to low concentrations of BLM contain double-strand breaks and require homologous recombination to survive. To a lesser extent, the cells also require the abasic (AP) endonucleases associated with base excision repair, presumably to repair oxidative damage. As expected, there is strong induction of the SOS system in treated cells. In contrast, E. coli cells growing in glucose or glycerol minimal medium are resistant to the lethal action of BLM and do not require either homologous recombination functions or AP-endonucleases for survival. DNA ligase activity, however, is needed for cells growing in minimal medium to resist the lethal effects of BLM. There is weak SOS induction in such treated cells. PMID:22438905

  5. The action of beta-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) on allolactose.

    PubMed

    Huber, R E; Wallenfels, K; Kurz, G

    1975-09-01

    The parameters involved in the action of beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) (Escherichia coli) on allolactose, the natural inducer of lac operon in E. coli, were studied. At low allolactose concentrations only galactose and glucose were formed, while at high allolactose concentrations transgalactolytic oligosaccharides were also produced. Detectable amounts of lactose were not formed. The V and Km values (49.6 U/mg and 0.00120 M, respectively) indicated that allolactose is as good if not a better substrate of beta-galactosidase as lactose. The pH optimum with allolactose (7.8-7.9) as well as its activation by K+ (as compared to activation by Na+) were similar to the case with lactose as substrate. The alpha-anomer of allolactose was hydrolyzed about two times as rapidly as was the beta-anomer. PMID:241475

  6. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of human and nonhuman Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Parveen, S; Hodge, N C; Stall, R E; Farrah, S R; Tamplin, M L

    2001-02-01

    Estuarine waters receive fecal pollution from a variety of sources, including humans and wildlife. Escherichia coli is one of several fecal coliform bacteria that inhabit the intestines of many warm-blooded animals that sometimes contaminate water. Its presence does not specifically implicate human fecal input, therefore it is necessary to differentiate contamination sources to accurately assess health risks. E. coli were isolated from human sources (HS) and nonhuman sources (NHS) in the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve and analyzed for fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), O-serogroup, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. For FAME and PFGE analyses, there was no relationship between profile and isolate source. Human source PFGE profiles were less diverse than NHS isolates, and conversely for FAME. In contrast, O-serogrouping showed less diversity for HS vs. NHS isolates, and the predominant HS O-serogroups differed significantly (P < 0.01) from those of NHS isolates. PMID:11228989

  8. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K; Leclerc, Joseph E; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A

    2011-12-13

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  9. Deactivation of Escherichia coli by the plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, R. E. J.; Stoffels, E.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we present a parameter study on deactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by means of a non-thermal plasma (plasma needle). The plasma needle is a small-sized (1 mm) atmospheric glow sustained by radio-frequency excitation. This plasma will be used to disinfect heat-sensitive objects; one of the intended applications is in vivo deactivation of dental bacteria: destruction of plaque and treatment of caries. We use E. coli films plated on agar dishes as a model system to optimize the conditions for bacterial destruction. Plasma power, treatment time and needle-to-sample distance are varied. Plasma treatment of E. coli films results in formation of a bacteria-free void with a size up to 12 mm. 104-105 colony forming units are already destroyed after 10 s of treatment. Prolongation of treatment time and usage of high powers do not significantly improve the destruction efficiency: short exposure at low plasma power is sufficient. Furthermore, we study the effects of temperature increase on the survival of E. coli and compare it with thermal effects of the plasma. The population of E. coli heated in a warm water bath starts to decrease at temperatures above 40°C. Sample temperature during plasma treatment has been monitored. The temperature can reach up to 60°C at high plasma powers and short needle-to-sample distances. However, thermal effects cannot account for bacterial destruction at low power conditions. For safe and efficient in vivo disinfection, the sample temperature should be kept low. Thus, plasma power and treatment time should not exceed 150 mW and 60 s, respectively.

  10. Emergence of imipenem resistance in clinical Escherichia coli during therapy.

    PubMed

    Oteo, Jesús; Delgado-Iribarren, Alberto; Vega, Dolores; Bautista, Verónica; Rodríguez, María Cruz; Velasco, María; Saavedra, José María; Pérez-Vázquez, María; García-Cobos, Silvia; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Campos, José

    2008-12-01

    The molecular epidemiology and the mechanisms of resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from two patients infected by imipenem-resistant strains are reported in this study. From one patient, three closely related consecutive isolates of E. coli were recovered; the first was carbapenem-susceptible but acquired imipenem resistance after treatment with ertapenem, and the third isolate was again imipenem-susceptible. An additional imipenem-resistant isolate was recovered from another patient who received imipenem. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with XbaI. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conditions were used to amplify several beta-lactamase genes coding for carbapenemases, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated AmpC; the E. coli ampC gene promoter was also amplified and sequenced. Primers OmpF-F/OmpF-R and OmpC-F/OmpC-R were used to amplify the ompF and ompC genes. The outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles were studied by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Imipenem-resistant E. coli isolates did not produce carbapenemases but lacked the two major OMPs OmpF and OmpC and had ampC promoter mutations; in addition, one of the imipenem-resistant isolates produced the CMY-2 cephalosporinase, whilst the other produced the new CTX-M-67 ESBL. Carbapenem resistance in this study was associated with lack of expression of OmpF and OmpC porins. Additional mechanisms of beta-lactam resistance, such as plasmid-mediated AmpC and ESBL production, were also found. Development of carbapenem resistance in a CTX-M-67-producing E. coli is first described in this study. PMID:18775649

  11. Fecal leukocytes in children infected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Erik H; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ecker, Lucie; Cabello, Martin; Durand, David; Barletta, Francesca; Molina, Margarita; Gil, Ana I; Huicho, Luis; Lanata, Claudio F; Cleary, Thomas G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and quantity of fecal leukocytes in children infected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and to compare these levels between diarrhea and control cases. We analyzed 1,474 stool samples from 935 diarrhea episodes and 539 from healthy controls of a cohort study of children younger than 2 years of age in Lima, Peru. Stools were analyzed for common enteric pathogens, and diarrheagenic E. coli isolates were studied by a multiplex real-time PCR. Stool smears were stained with methylene blue and read by a blinded observer to determine the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field (L/hpf). Fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 11.8% (110/935) of all diarrheal episodes versus 1.1% (6/539) in controls (P < 0.001). Among stool samples with diarrheagenic E. coli as the only pathogen isolated (excluding coinfection), fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 8.5% (18/212) of diarrhea versus 1.3% (2/157) of control samples (P < 0.01). Ninety-five percent of 99 diarrheagenic E. coli diarrhea samples were positive for fecal lactoferrin. Adjusting for the presence of blood in stools, age, sex, undernutrition, and breastfeeding, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) isolation as a single pathogen, excluding coinfections, was highly associated with the presence of fecal leukocytes (>10 L/hpf) with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 15.51; P < 0.05). Although diarrheagenic E. coli was isolated with similar frequencies in diarrhea and control samples, clearly it was associated with a more inflammatory response during symptomatic infection; however, in general, these pathogens elicited a mild inflammatory response. PMID:21325554

  12. Dynamic Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli to Inclusion Body Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz; Fernando, Lawrence P.; Salazar, Mary Alice; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used intensively for recombinant protein production, but one key challenge with recombinant E. coli is the tendency of recombinant proteins to misfold and aggregate into insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs). IBs contain high concentrations of inactive recombinant protein that require recovery steps to salvage a functional recombinant protein. Currently, no universally effective method exists to prevent IB formation in recombinant E. coli. In this study, DNA microarrays were used to compare the E. coli gene expression response dynamics to soluble and insoluble recombinant protein production. As expected and previously reported, the classical heat-shock genes had increased expression due to IB formation, including protein folding chaperones and proteases. Gene expression levels for protein synthesis-related and energy-synthesis pathways were also increased. Many transmembrane transporter and corresponding catabolic pathways genes had decreased expression for substrates not present in the culture medium. Additionally, putative genes represented over one-third of the genes identified to have significant expression changes due to IB formation, indicating many important cellular responses to IB formation still need to be characterized. Interestingly, cells grown in 3% ethanol had significantly reduced gene expression responses due to IB formation. Taken together, these results indicate that IB formation is complex, stimulates the heat-shock response, increases protein and energy synthesis needs, and streamlines transport and catabolic processes, while ethanol diminished all of these responses. PMID:24338599

  13. Competition between congenic Escherichia coli K-12 strains in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Onderdonk, A; Marshall, B; Cisneros, R; Levy, S B

    1981-01-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli to colonize the large bowels of animals is related to many factors inherent to the intestinal environment and the bacterium. The use of germfree mice eliminates the competition between E. coli and the other microflora and allows most E. coli strains to colonize. We found that E. coli K-12 strains differing in chromosomal antibiotic resistance could monoassociate in germfree mice in large numbers. However, when two or more strains were in competition with each other, we detected quantitative differences in the abilities of the strains to colonize. The order of colonizing ability was as follows: nalidixic acid resistance greater than streptomycin resistance greater than rifampin resistance. We also found that a nalidixic acid-resistant strain bearing plasmid pBR322 colonized less efficiently and at lower levels when in competition with the nalidixic acid-resistant strain. Studies of the membrane proteins of the various strains indicated that changes in membrane proteins occurred concomitantly with altered resistance to antimicrobial agents. These results suggest that chromosomally linked alterations in antimicrobial sensitivity may also reflect changes in membrane proteins and a decreased ability to colonize mammalian intestines in otherwise isogenic bacterial strains. Images PMID:7012037

  14. Modeling Escherichia coli removal in constructed wetlands under pulse loading.

    PubMed

    Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Adhikari, Umesh; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Harrigan, Timothy; Reinhold, Dawn M

    2014-03-01

    Manure-borne pathogens are a threat to water quality and have resulted in disease outbreaks globally. Land application of livestock manure to croplands may result in pathogen transport through surface runoff and tile drains, eventually entering water bodies such as rivers and wetlands. The goal of this study was to develop a robust model for estimating the pathogen removal in surface flow wetlands under pulse loading conditions. A new modeling approach was used to describe Escherichia coli removal in pulse-loaded constructed wetlands using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS). Several ANFIS models were developed and validated using experimental data under pulse loading over two seasons (winter and summer). In addition to ANFIS, a mechanistic fecal coliform removal model was validated using the same sets of experimental data. The results showed that the ANFIS model significantly improved the ability to describe the dynamics of E. coli removal under pulse loading. The mechanistic model performed poorly as demonstrated by lower coefficient of determination and higher root mean squared error compared to the ANFIS models. The E. coli concentrations corresponding to the inflection points on the tracer study were keys to improving the predictability of the E. coli removal model. PMID:24231031

  15. Magnetically-Actuated Escherichia coli System for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Brown, E.; Pérez-Guzman, L.; Peace, C.; Pierce, C.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Technologies that control matter at the nano- and micro-scale are crucial for developing new engineered materials and devices. While the more traditional approaches for such manipulations often depend on lithographic fabrication, they can be expanded upon by taking advantage of the biological systems within a living cell which also operate on the nano- and micro- scale. In this study, a system is being developed to functionalize a targeted location on the surface of a chip with the protein AmCyan from transformed Escherichia coli cells. Using established methods in molecular biology where a plasmid with the amcyan gene sequence is inserted into the cell, E. coli are engineered to express the AmCyan protein on their outer surface. In order to transport the cells to the targeted location, the transformed E. coli are labeled with superparamagnetic micro-beads which exert directed forces on the cells in an external field. Preliminary results of the protein expression on E. coli, the transport of the cell through weak magnetic fields to targeted locations and the potential to transfer protein from the cell to the chip surface will be presented.

  16. Pathogenesis of Shiga-toxin producing escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Melton-Celsa, Angela; Mohawk, Krystle; Teel, Louise; O'Brien, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are food-borne pathogens that cause hemorrhagic colitis and a serious sequela, the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The largest outbreaks of STEC are due to a single E. coli serotype, O157:H7, although non-O157 serotypes also cause the same diseases. Two immunologically distinct Stxs are found in E. coli, Stx1 and Stx2. The Stxs are AB₅ toxins that halt protein synthesis in the host cell, a process that may lead to an apoptotic cell death. Stx-mediated damage to renal glomerular endothelial cells is hypothesized as the precipitating event for HUS. A subset of STEC referred to as the enterohemorrhagic E. coli has the capacity to intimately attach to and efface intestinal epithelial cells, a pathology called the A/E lesion. The A/E lesion is mediated by the adhesin intimin, its bacterially encoded receptor, Tir, and effectors secreted through a type III secretion system. The proteins needed for the A/E lesion are encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement or LEE. There are several animal models for STEC infection, but no one model fully represents the spectrum of STEC illness. Currently there is no cure for STEC infection, and therapies are based mainly on alleviating symptoms. However, chimeric or humanized monoclonal antibodies have been developed that neutralize the Stxs, and those therapies may be able to prevent the development of HUS in an STEC-infected patient. PMID:21915773

  17. High-level fed-batch fermentative expression of an engineered Staphylococcal protein A based ligand in E. coli: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kangwa, Martin; Yelemane, Vikas; Polat, Ayse Nur; Gorrepati, Kanaka Durga Devi; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    The major platform for high level recombinant protein production is based on genetically modified microorganisms like Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to its short dividing time, ability to use inexpensive substrates and additionally, its genetics is comparatively simple, well characterized and can be manipulated easily. Here, we investigated the possibilities of finding the best media for high cell density fermentation, by analyzing different media samples, focusing on improving fermentation techniques and recombinant protein production. Initial fermentation of E. coli BL21 DE3:pAV01 in baffled flasks showed that high cell density was achieved when using complex media, Luria-Bertani (LB) and Terrific medium broth (TB) (10 and 14 g/L wet weight, respectively), as compared to mineral media M9, modified minimal medium (MMM) and Riesenberg mineral medium (RM) (7, 8 and 7 g/L, respectively). However, in fed-batch fermentation processes when using MMM after 25 h cultivation, it was possible to yield an optical density (OD600) of 139 corresponding to 172 g/L of wet biomass was produced in a 30 L TV Techfors-S Infors HT fermenter, with a computer controlled nutrient supply (glucose as a carbon source) delivery system, indicating nearly 1.5 times that obtained from TB. Upon purification, a total of 1.65 mg/g of protein per gram cell biomass was obtained and the purified AviPure showed affinity for immunoglobulin. High cell density fed batch fermentation was achieved by selecting the best media and growth conditions, by utilizing a number of fermentation parameters like media, fermentation conditions, chemical concentrations, pO2 level, stirrer speed, pH level and feed media addition. It is possible to reach cell densities higher than shake flasks and stirred tank reactors with the improved oxygen transfer rate and feed. PMID:26556030

  18. Translocation and thermal inactivation of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in non-intact beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared translocation of genetically-marked strains of serotype O157:H7 Escherichia coli (ECOH) to non-O157:H7 Shiga-Toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) following blade tenderization of beef subprimals and the subsequent lethality of these pathogens following cooking of steaks prepared from ...

  19. Mild gut inflammation modulates the proteome of intestinal Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Sara; Alpert, Carl; Engst, Wolfram; Klopfleisch, Robert; Loh, Gunnar; Bleich, André; Blaut, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Using interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10(-/-) ) and wild-type mice monoassociated with either the adherent-invasive Escherichia coli UNC or the probiotic E. coli Nissle, the effect of a mild intestinal inflammation on the bacterial proteome was studied. Within 8 weeks, IL-10(-/-) mice monoassociated with E. coli UNC exhibited an increased expression of several proinflammatory markers in caecal mucosa. Escherichia coli Nissle-associated IL-10(-/-) mice did not do so. As observed previously for E. coli from mice with acute colitis, glycolytic enzymes were downregulated in intestinal E. coli UNC from IL-10(-/-) mice. In addition, the inhibitor of vertebrate C-type lysozyme, Ivy, was upregulated on messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level in E. coli Nissle from IL-10(-/-) mice compared with E. coli UNC from these mice. Higher expression of Ivy in E. coli Nissle correlated with an improved growth of this probiotic strain in the presence of lysozyme-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). By overexpressing Ivy, we demonstrated that Ivy contributes to a higher lysozyme resistance of E. coli, supporting the role of Ivy as a potential fitness factor. However, deletion of Ivy did not alter the growth phenotype of E. coli Nissle in the presence of lysozyme-EDTA, suggesting the existence of additional lysozyme inhibitors that can take over the function of Ivy. PMID:23855897

  20. Cleaving yeast and Escherichia coli genomes at a single site

    SciTech Connect

    Koob, M.; Szybalski, W. )

    1990-10-12

    The 15-megabase pair Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the 4.7-megabase pair Escherichia coli genomes were completely cleaved at a single predetermined site by means of the Achilles' heel cleavage (AC) procedure. The symmetric lac operator (lacO{sub s}) was introduced into the circular Escherichia coli genome and into one of the 16 yeast chromosomes. Intact chromosomes from the resulting strains were prepared in agarose microbeads and methylated with Hha I (5{prime}-GCGC) methyltransferase (M{center dot}Hha I) in the presence of lac repressor (LacI). All Hae II sites ({prime}-{sub G}{sup A}GCGC{sub C}{sup T}) with the exception of the one in lacO{sub s}, which was protected by LacI, were modified and thus no longer recognized by Hae II. After inactivation of M{center dot}Hha I and LacI, Hae II was used to completely cleave the chromosomes specifically at the inserted lacO{sub s}. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using the AC approach to efficiently extend the specificity of naturally occurring restriction enzymes and create new tools for the mapping and precise molecular dissection of multimegabase genomes.

  1. Induction of SOS genes of Escherichia coli by chromium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Llagostera, M.; Garrido, S.; Guerrero, R.; Barbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of several SOS genes of Escherichia coli such as recA, umuC, and sfiA by hexavalent (K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/, K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, and CrO/sub 3/) and trivalent (CrCl/sub 3/, Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, and (CH/sub 3/COO)/sub 3/Cr) compounds of chromium was studied. Induction was measured as ..beta..-galactosidase activity, using lacZ gene fusions under the control region of different SOS genes. The hexavalent chromium forms induced the genes responsible for massive synthesis of RecA protein, error-prone repair, and inhibition of cell division. On the other hand, the trivalent chromium compounds were unable to induce any of the SOS genes tested. Individual assay of hexavalent chromium compounds showed that K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ was a stronger inducing agent of those three SOS genes tested than K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, which, in turn, was stronger than CrO/sub 3/. All this data led to the conclusion that hexavalent chromium compounds, but not trivalent, are proficient agents of induction of the SOS system and can produce indirect mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

  2. The Model [NiFe]-Hydrogenases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sargent, F

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, hydrogen metabolism plays a prominent role in anaerobic physiology. The genome contains the capability to produce and assemble up to four [NiFe]-hydrogenases, each of which are known, or predicted, to contribute to different aspects of cellular metabolism. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and roles of the E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, respiratory Hyd-1 isoenzyme has become one of the most important paradigm systems for understanding an important class of oxygen-tolerant enzymes, as well as providing key information on the mechanism of hydrogen activation per se. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, Hyd-2 isoenzyme has emerged as an unusual, bidirectional redox valve able to link hydrogen oxidation to quinone reduction during anaerobic respiration, or to allow disposal of excess reducing equivalents as hydrogen gas. The membrane-bound, cytoplasmically oriented, Hyd-3 isoenzyme is part of the formate hydrogenlyase complex, which acts to detoxify excess formic acid under anaerobic fermentative conditions and is geared towards hydrogen production under those conditions. Sequence identity between some Hyd-3 subunits and those of the respiratory NADH dehydrogenases has led to hypotheses that the activity of this isoenzyme may be tightly coupled to the formation of transmembrane ion gradients. Finally, the E. coli genome encodes a homologue of Hyd-3, termed Hyd-4, however strong evidence for a physiological role for E. coli Hyd-4 remains elusive. In this review, the versatile hydrogen metabolism of E. coli will be discussed and the roles and potential applications of the spectrum of different types of [NiFe]-hydrogenases available will be explored. PMID:27134027

  3. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  4. Escherichia coli ghosts promote innate immune responses in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Kudela, Pavol; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Koller, Verena Juliana; Mildner, Michael; Tschachler, Erwin; Lubitz, Werner

    2010-09-10

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) as non-living bacterial envelopes devoid of cytoplasmic content with preserved and intact inner and outer membrane structures of their living counterparts have been used to study the ability of their surface components for the induction of antimicrobial peptides and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human primary keratinocytes (KCs). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that incubation of KCs with BGs generated from wild-type Escherichia coli induced the mRNA expression of antimicrobial psoriasin (S100A7c) in a BGs particle concentration-dependent manner. Using immunoblot analysis we showed that BGs generated from the flagellin-deficient (ΔFliC) E. coli strain NK9375 were as effective as its isogenic wild-type (wt) E. coli strain NK9373 to induce psoriasin expression when normalized to BG particles being taken up by KCs. However, results obtained from endocytic activity of KCs reflect that internalization of BGs is greatly dependent on the presence of flagellin on the surface of BGs. Moreover, BGs derived from wt E. coli NK9373 strongly induced the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, compared to ΔFliC E. coli NK9375 BGs. Taken together, obtained data demonstrate that non-living BGs possessing all bacterial bio-adhesive surface properties in their original state while not posing any infectious threat have the capacity to induce the expression of innate immune modulators and that these responses are partially dependent on the presence of flagellin. PMID:20696136

  5. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  6. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  7. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  8. Fast-tumbling bicelles constructed from native Escherichia coli lipids.

    PubMed

    Liebau, Jobst; Pettersson, Pontus; Zuber, Philipp; Ariöz, Candan; Mäler, Lena

    2016-09-01

    Solution-state NMR requires small membrane mimetic systems to allow for acquiring high-resolution data. At the same time these mimetics should faithfully mimic biological membranes. Here we characterized two novel fast-tumbling bicelle systems with lipids from two Escherichia coli strains. While strain 1 (AD93WT) contains a characteristic E. coli lipid composition, strain 2 (AD93-PE) is not capable of synthesizing the most abundant lipid in E. coli, phosphatidylethanolamine. The lipid and acyl chain compositions were characterized by (31)P and (13)C NMR. Depending on growth temperature and phase, the lipid composition varies substantially, which means that the bicelle composition can be tuned by using lipids from cells grown at different temperatures and growth phases. The hydrodynamic radii of the bicelles were determined from translational diffusion coefficients and NMR spin relaxation was measured to investigate lipid properties in the bicelles. We find that the lipid dynamics are unaffected by variations in lipid composition, suggesting that the bilayer is in a fluid phase under all conditions investigated here. Backbone glycerol carbons are the most rigid positions in all lipids, while head-group carbons and the first carbons of the acyl chain are somewhat more flexible. The flexibility increases down the acyl chain to almost unrestricted motion at its end. Carbons in double bonds and cyclopropane moieties are substantially restricted in their motional freedom. The bicelle systems characterized here are thus found to faithfully mimic E. coli inner membranes and are therefore useful for membrane interaction studies of proteins with E. coli inner membranes by solution-state NMR. PMID:27317394

  9. Scale-up of Escherichia coli growth and recombinant protein expression conditions from microwell to laboratory and pilot scale based on matched k(L)a.

    PubMed

    Islam, R S; Tisi, D; Levy, M S; Lye, G J

    2008-04-01

    Fermentation optimization experiments are ideally performed at small scale to reduce time, cost and resource requirements. Currently microwell plates (MWPs) are under investigation for this purpose as the format is ideally suited to automated high-throughput experimentation. In order to translate an optimized small-scale fermentation process to laboratory and pilot scale stirred-tank reactors (STRs) it is necessary to characterize key engineering parameters at both scales given the differences in geometry and the mechanisms of aeration and agitation. In this study oxygen mass transfer coefficients are determined in three MWP formats and in 7.5 L and 75 L STRs. k(L)a values were determined in cell-free media using the dynamic gassing-out technique over a range of agitation conditions. Previously optimized culture conditions at the MWP scale were then scaled up to the larger STR scales on the basis of matched k(L)a values. The accurate reproduction of MWP (3 mL) E. coli BL21 (DE3) culture kinetics at the two larger scales was shown in terms of cell growth, protein expression, and substrate utilization for k(L)a values that provided effective mixing and gas-liquid distribution at each scale. This work suggests that k(L)a provides a useful initial scale-up criterion for MWP culture conditions which enabled a 15,000-fold scale translation in this particular case. This work complements our earlier studies on the application of DoE techniques to MWP fermentation optimization and in so doing provides a generic framework for the generation of large quantities of soluble protein in a rapid and cost-effective manner. PMID:17969169

  10. High-Efficiency Expression of TAT-bFGF Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli and the Effect on Hypertrophic Scar Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuechao; Tian, Haishan; Tang, Lu; Zheng, Long; Zheng, Lulu; Yang, Ting; Yu, Bingjie; Wang, Zhitao; Lin, Peng; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor family that has effects on wounding healing and neuro-protection. However, it is difficult to use bFGF to treat diseases that are separated by physiological barriers, such as the dermal barrier and blood brain barrier. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve bFGF’s penetration ability, we fused the recombinant human fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) gene with TAT. We constructed a pET3c vector that contained the recombinant bFGF gene and successfully expressed this gene in the E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLsS. The fusion protein was purified using CM Sepharose FF and heparin affinity chromatography. The purity of the TAT-rhbFGF was greater than 95%, as detected by SDS-PAGE. An in vitro MTT trial revealed that the modified bFGF significantly promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. The cell penetration trial and the mouse skin penetration trial demonstrated that the fusion protein had certain penetration abilities. The animal experiments confirmed that TAT-rhbFGF was effective in the treatment of the hypertrophic scars. Conclusions/Significance We have successfully expressed and purified a TAT-rhbFGF fusion protein in this study. Our results have shown that the fusion protein had a greater ability to penetrate the dermal skin layer. TAT-rhbFGF improved the physical appearance of hypertrophic scars. TAT-rhbFGF may be a potential fusion protein in the treatment of dermal disorders, including hypertrophic scar. PMID:25706539

  11. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  14. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  15. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position. PMID:27332118

  16. Characterization of the YdeO Regulon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:25375160

  17. Escherichia coli bacteria detection by using graphene-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Afroozeh, Abdolkarim; Zeinalinezhad, Alireza; Nikoukar, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer honeycombs. A larger detection area and higher sensitivity can be provided by graphene-based nanosenor because of its 2D structure. In addition, owing to its special characteristics, including electrical, optical and physical properties, graphene is known as a more suitable candidate compared to other materials used in the sensor application. A novel model employing a field-effect transistor structure using graphene is proposed and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of graphene are employed to model the sensing mechanism. This biosensor can detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, providing high levels of sensitivity. It is observed that the graphene device experiences a drastic increase in conductance when exposed to E. coli bacteria at 0-10(5) cfu/ml concentration. The simple, fast response and high sensitivity of this nanoelectronic biosensor make it a suitable device in screening and functional studies of antibacterial drugs and an ideal high-throughput platform which can detect any pathogenic bacteria. Artificial neural network and support vector regression algorithms have also been used to provide other models for the I-V characteristic. A satisfactory agreement has been presented by comparison between the proposed models with the experimental data. PMID:26435280

  18. Pet, an Autotransporter Enterotoxin from Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eslava, Carlos; Navarro-García, Fernando; Czeczulin, John R.; Henderson, Ian R.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Nataro, James P.

    1998-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging cause of diarrheal illness. Clinical data suggest that diarrhea caused by EAEC is predominantly secretory in nature, but the responsible enterotoxin has not been described. Work from our laboratories has implicated a ca. 108-kDa protein as a heat-labile enterotoxin and cytotoxin, as evidenced by rises in short-circuit current and falls in tissue resistance in rat jejunal tissue mounted in an Ussing chamber. Here we report the genetic cloning, sequencing, and characterization of this high-molecular-weight heat-labile toxin. The toxin (designated the plasmid-encoded toxin [Pet]) is encoded on the 65-MDa adherence-related plasmid of EAEC strain 042. Nucleotide sequence analysis suggests that the toxin is a member of the autotransporter class of proteins, characterized by the presence of a conserved C-terminal domain which forms a β-barrel pore in the bacterial outer membrane and through which the mature protein is transported. The Pet toxin is highly homologous to the EspP protease of enterohemorrhagic E. coli and to EspC of enteropathogenic E. coli, an as yet cryptic protein. In addition to its potential role in EAEC infection, Pet represents the first enterotoxin within the autotransporter class of secreted proteins. We hypothesize that other closely related members of this class may also produce enterotoxic effects. PMID:9632580

  19. Shiga Toxin (Verotoxin)-Producing Escherichia coli in Japan.

    PubMed

    Terajima, Jun; Iyoda, Sunao; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo

    2014-10-01

    A series of outbreaks of infection with Shiga toxin (verocytotoxin)-producing Escherichia coli or enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 occurred in Japan in 1996, the largest outbreak occurring in primary schools in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture, where more than 7,500 cases were reported. Although the reason for the sudden increase in the number of reports of EHEC isolates in 1996 is not known, the number of reports has grown to more than 3,000 cases per year since 1996, from an average of 105 reports each year during the previous 5-year period (1991-1995). Despite control measures instituted since 1996, including designating Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection as a notifiable disease, and nationwide surveillance effectively monitoring the disease, the number of reports remains high, around 3,800 cases per year. Serogroup O157 predominates over other EHEC serogroups, but isolation frequency of non-O157 EHEC has gone up slightly over the past few years. Non-O157 EHEC has recently caused outbreaks where consumption of a raw beef dish was the source of the infection, and some fatal cases occurred. Laboratory surveillance comprised prefectural and municipal public health institutes, and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases has contributed to finding not only multiprefectural outbreaks but recognizing sporadic cases that could have been missed as an outbreak without the aid of molecular subtyping of EHEC isolates. This short overview presents recent information on the surveillance of EHEC infections in Japan. PMID:26104366

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for the Production of Xylonate

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yujin; Xian, Mo; Zou, Huibin; Zhang, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Xylonate is a valuable chemical for versatile applications. Although the chemical synthesis route and microbial conversion pathway were established decades ago, no commercial production of xylonate has been obtained so far. In this study, the industrially important microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce xylonate from xylose. Through the coexpression of a xylose dehydrogenase (xdh) and a xylonolactonase (xylC) from Caulobacter crescentus, the recombinant strain could convert 1 g/L xylose to 0.84 g/L xylonate and 0.10 g/L xylonolactone after being induced for 12 h. Furthermore, the competitive pathway for xylose catabolism in E. coli was blocked by disrupting two genes (xylA and xylB) encoding xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase. Under fed-batch conditions, the finally engineered strain produced up to 27.3 g/L xylonate and 1.7 g/L xylonolactone from 30 g/L xylose, about 88% of the theoretical yield. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli strain has a promising perspective for large-scale production of xylonate. PMID:23861757

  1. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  2. Metabolomic and transcriptomic stress response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jozefczuk, Szymon; Klie, Sebastian; Catchpole, Gareth; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Cuadros-Inostroza, Alvaro; Steinhauser, Dirk; Selbig, Joachim; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2010-01-01

    Environmental fluctuations lead to a rapid adjustment of the physiology of Escherichia coli, necessitating changes on every level of the underlying cellular and molecular network. Thus far, the majority of global analyses of E. coli stress responses have been limited to just one level, gene expression. Here, we incorporate the metabolite composition together with gene expression data to provide a more comprehensive insight on system level stress adjustments by describing detailed time-resolved E. coli response to five different perturbations (cold, heat, oxidative stress, lactose diauxie, and stationary phase). The metabolite response is more specific as compared with the general response observed on the transcript level and is reflected by much higher specificity during the early stress adaptation phase and when comparing the stationary phase response to other perturbations. Despite these differences, the response on both levels still follows the same dynamics and general strategy of energy conservation as reflected by rapid decrease of central carbon metabolism intermediates coinciding with downregulation of genes related to cell growth. Application of co-clustering and canonical correlation analysis on combined metabolite and transcript data identified a number of significant condition-dependent associations between metabolites and transcripts. The results confirm and extend existing models about co-regulation between gene expression and metabolites demonstrating the power of integrated systems oriented analysis. PMID:20461071

  3. Biofilm and fluoroquinolone resistance of canine Escherichia coli uropathogenic isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen involved in urinary tract infection (UTI). Virulence of strains may differ, and may be enhanced by antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, resulting in increased morbidity and recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity of E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI, by using fluorescent in situ hybridization, and its association with virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance. Findings The proportion of biofilm-producing isolates significantly increased with the length of incubation time (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance at all incubation time points and was independent of the media used (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was not associated with cnf1, hly, pap and sfa genes (P > 0.05), but was significantly associated with afa, aer and the β-lactamase genes (P < 0.05). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing significant association between biofilm production and fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI. Biofilm formation may contribute to UTI treatment failure in dogs, through the development of bacterial reservoirs inside bladder cells, allowing them to overcome host immune defenses and to establish recurrent infections. PMID:25099929

  4. Lactobacillus prophylaxis for diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, M L; Levine, M M; Black, R E; Robins-Browne, R M; Cisneros, L A; Drusano, G L; Lanata, C F; Saah, A J

    1981-01-01

    In vitro and animal experiments indicated that lactobacilli might prevent Escherichia coli from colonizing the intestine and may produce substances counteracting enterotoxin. Lactinex, a commercial preparation of dried Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. bulgaricus, is marketed for uncomplicated diarrhea. Preliminary experiments in nonfasting volunteers indicated that lactobacilli in this preparation colonized the small intestine for up to 6 h. To evaluate the protective efficacy of Lactinex, a double-blind randomized study was carried out in which 48 volunteers (23 receiving Lactinex and 25 receiving placebos) were challenged with E. coli strains that produced heat-stable or heat-labile enterotoxins or both. No significant differences between the two groups were noted with respect to attack rate, incubation period, duration of diarrhea, volume and number of liquid stools, and coproculture yields. These data suggest that this lactobacillus preparations does not prevent or alter the course of enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea in adults. Lack of efficacy occurred despite efforts to maximize small bowel colonization, including administration of Lactinex in milk and in a 6-hour-interval regimen during 36 h before and 96 h after challenge. PMID:6792978

  5. Thiols, recA induction and radiosensitivity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naslund, M; Anderstam, B; Granath, F; Ehrenberg, L

    1996-01-01

    Induction by gamma-radiation, UV radiation or hydroxyurea of RecA gene product synthesis in Escherichia coli, monitored as beta-D-galactosidase in recA-lacZ fusion strains, was shown to be inhibited if 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) was added before treatment with the inducing agents. If cysteine (Cys) at low concentrations was added at the same time as MEA it counteracted the action of MEA. The effect of MEA may be described as a competitive inhibition of an inducing or conducting effect of Cys. In E. coli GE499 (uvrA+), complete inhibition by 30-mmol dm-3 MEA of recA induction was associated with about five times higher radio-resistence. Both of these effects of MEA were completely reversed by 0.3-mmol dm-3 Cys. As shown in parallel experiments with E. coli GE500 (uvrA-), these effects of MEA and Cys were shown to be independent of excision-repair proficiency. Treatment of bacteria with MEA and/or Cys was shown not to lead to increased intracellular concentrations of these thiols. Instead, treatment with them appeared to provoke conspicuous increases in glutathione levels, which are, however, probably not directly involved in the studied action of MEA and Cys. PMID:8601760

  6. Discrepancies in the Enumeration of Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, B.; Speck, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli were enumerated by the pour plate method on Trypticase soy agar containing 0.3% yeast extract (TSYA), violet red-bile agar, and desoxycholate-lactose agar, and by the most-probable-number method in Brilliant Green-bile broth and lauryl sulfate broth. Maximum counts were assumed to be those on TSYA. In general, numbers detected were lower with the selective solid media and higher with the selective liquid media. Inhibitory effects, especially on selective solid media varied with the strains of E. coli. The lower detection on selective solid media was partly due to the stress induced in some cells by the temperature of the melted media used in the pour plate method. These cells apparently failed to repair and form colonies in the selective media. Improved detection on the selective solid media was achieved by using 1% nonfat milk solids, 1% peptone, or 1% MgSO4.7H2O in the dilution blanks. Higher detection on selective agar media was effected by surface plating or by surface-overlay plating of the cells. The surface-overlay method appeared to be superior for the direct enumeration of E. coli in foods. PMID:4572980

  7. Unconventional initiator tRNAs sustain Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Samhita, Laasya; Shetty, Sunil; Varshney, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Of all tRNAs, initiator tRNA is unique in its ability to start protein synthesis by directly binding the ribosomal P-site. This ability is believed to derive from the almost universal presence of three consecutive G-C base (3G-C) pairs in the anticodon stem of initiator tRNA. Consistent with the hypothesis, a plasmid-borne initiator tRNA with one, two, or all 3G-C pairs mutated displays negligible initiation activity when tested in a WT Escherichia coli cell. Given this, the occurrence of unconventional initiator tRNAs lacking the 3G-C pairs, as in some species of Mycoplasma and Rhizobium, is puzzling. We resolve the puzzle by showing that the poor activity of unconventional initiator tRNAs in E. coli is because of competition from a large pool of the endogenous WT initiator tRNA (possessing the 3G-C pairs). We show that E. coli can be sustained on an initiator tRNA lacking the first and third G-C pairs; thereby reducing the 3G-C rule to a mere middle G-C requirement. Two general inferences following from our findings, that the activity of a mutant gene product may depend on its abundance in the cell relative to that of the WT, and that promiscuous initiation with elongator tRNAs has the potential to enhance phenotypic diversity without affecting genomic integrity, have been discussed. PMID:22829667

  8. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  9. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ran; Tian, Gui-Qiao; Shen, Hong-Jie; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Zeaxanthin is a high-value carotenoid that is used in nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and animal feed industries. Zeaxanthin is chemically synthesized or purified from microorganisms as a natural product; however, increasing demand requires development of alternative sources such as heterologous biosynthesis by recombinant bacteria. For this purpose, we molecularly engineered Escherichia coli to optimize the synthesis of zeaxanthin from lycopene using fusion protein-mediated substrate channeling as well as by the introduction of tunable intergenic regions. The tunable intergenic regions approach was more efficient compared with protein fusion for coordinating expression of lycopene β-cyclase gene crtY and β-carotene 3-hydroxylase gene crtZ. The influence of the substrate channeling effect suggests that the reaction catalyzed by CrtZ is the rate-limiting step in zeaxanthin biosynthesis. Then Pantoea ananatis, Pantoea agglomerans and Haematococcus pluvialis crtZ were compared. Because P. ananatis crtZ is superior to that of P. agglomerans or H. pluvialis for zeaxanthin production, we used it to generate a recombinant strain of E. coli BETA-1 containing pZSPBA-2(P37-crtZPAN) that produced higher amounts of zeaxanthin (11.95 ± 0.21 mg/g dry cell weight) than other engineered E. coli strains described in the literature. PMID:25533633

  10. Binding of type 1-piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Venegas, M F; Navas, E L; Gaffney, R A; Duncan, J L; Anderson, B E; Schaeffer, A J

    1995-01-01

    To better understand the interactions involved in bacterial adherence and the role of mucus in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, we developed a system to study the binding of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, HB101/pWRS1-17, expressing type 1 pili, to vaginal mucus collected from 28 women. Bacteria bound to differing extents to all specimens examined, and preincubation of bacteria with mannose inhibited binding by 50 to 89%. Additionally, all mucus samples showed reactivity with anti-mannose antibody, and the levels of reactivity correlated with the levels of bacterial binding, suggesting that the mannose-terminal saccharides present on these glycoproteins are the receptors for the binding of type 1-piliated bacteria. Mucus specimens collected over periods of 5 days and 12 weeks exhibited significant variation in bacterial binding, indicating temporal differences in the ability of vaginal mucus to act as a receptor for type 1-piliated E. coli. The results show that vaginal mucus can bind bacteria and may thus influence the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of the vaginal and urinary tract epithelium by E. coli. PMID:7822005

  11. 2DBase: 2D-PAGE database of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vijayendran, Chandran; Burgemeister, Sebastian; Friehs, Karl; Niehaus, Karsten; Flaschel, Erwin

    2007-11-23

    We present a web-based integrated proteome database, termed 2DBase of Escherichia coli which was designed to store, compare, analyse, and retrieve various information obtained by 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The main objectives of this database are (1) to provide the features for query and data-mining applications to access the stored proteomics data (2) to efficiently compare the specific protein spots present in the comparable proteome maps and (3) to analyse the data with the integrated classification for cellular functions of gene products of E. coli. This database currently contains 12 gels consisting of 1185 protein spots information in which 723 proteins were identified and annotated. Individual protein spots in the existing gels can be displayed, queried, analyzed, and compared in a tabular format based on various functional categories enabling quick and subsequent analyses. Our database satisfies the requirement to be a federated 2-DE database by accomplishing various tasks through a web interface providing access to a relational database system. The 2DBase of E. coli database can be accessed at http://2dbase.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/. PMID:17904107

  12. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  13. Reduction of aerobic acetate production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, W R; Liao, J C

    1997-01-01

    Acetate excretion by Escherichia coli during aerobic growth on glucose is a major obstacle to enhanced recombinant protein production. We report here that the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors influencing acetate excretion. Flux analysis of E. coli central metabolic pathways predicts that increasing the fraction of carbon flux through the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) pathway and the glyoxylate bypass reduces acetate production. We tested this prediction by overexpressing PPC and deregulating the glyoxylate bypass by using a fadR strain. Results show that the acetate yield by the fadR strain with PPC overexpression is decreased more than fourfold compared to the control, while the biomass yield is relatively unaffected. Apparently, the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors that influence acetate excretion. These results confirm the prediction of our flux analysis and further suggest that E. coli is not fully optimized for efficient utilization of glucose. PMID:9251207

  14. Epidemiological studies of congo red Escherichia coli in broiler chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, M E; Berkhoff, H A; Corbett, W T

    1992-01-01

    This prospective cohort study was designed to confirm the association between Congo red binding Escherichia coli (CREC) and E. coli air sacculitis in commercial broilers. It was also designed to evaluate CREC as an air sacculitis risk factor and to explore the CREC relationship to other air sacculitis risk factors (poultry house temperature, air-ammonia levels, and presence of other diseases). In addition, this study was used to assess a possible role of the broiler-breeder flocks and hatchers in the spread of CREC air sacculitis. Congo red E. coli-associated airsacculitis risk was based on CREC exposure of the chicks in the hatchers. Breeder flocks with greater than 30 CREC colonies/plate from hatcher air sampling tests were placed in the high risk group; flocks with less than five CREC colonies/plate were placed in the low risk group. Increased risks of death due to air sacculitis (RR = 2.26), and increased death rates due to CREC air sacculitis (RR = 9.45) in high-risk flocks, identified CREC as an important air sacculitis risk factor. The attributable risk percent of CREC airsacculitis from hatcher exposure of CREC was 89.4%, pointing to the hatcher as the source of CREC infection. The association of specific broiler-breeder flocks to high levels of CREC in the hatchers, and subsequent air sacculitis, suggests that the broiler-breeders are the ultimate source of CREC. PMID:1423058

  15. Survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in estuarine environments.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, M W; Kator, H

    1988-12-01

    Survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in estuarine waters was compared over a variety of seasonal temperatures during in situ exposure in diffusion chambers. Sublethal stress was measured by both selective-versus-resuscitative enumeration procedures and an electrochemical detection method. E. coli and Salmonella spp. test suspensions, prepared to minimize sublethal injury, were exposed in a shallow tidal creek and at a site 7.1 km further downriver. Bacterial die-off and sublethal stress in filtered estuarine water were inversely related to water temperature. Salmonella spp. populations exhibited significantly less die-off and stress than did E. coli at water temperatures of less than 10 degrees C. Although the most pronounced reductions (ca. 3 log units) in test bacteria occurred during seasonally warm temperatures in the presence of the autochthonous microbiota, 10(2) to 10(4) test cells per ml remained after 2 weeks of exposure to temperatures of greater than 15 degrees C. Reductions in test bacteria were associated with increases in the densities of microflagellates and plaque-forming microorganisms. These studies demonstrated the survival potential of enteric bacteria in estuarine waters and showed that survival was a function of interacting biological and physical factors. PMID:3066291

  16. Production of 2-methyl-1-butanol in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cann, Anthony F; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress has been made in the production of higher alcohols by harnessing the power of natural amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Here, we describe the first strain of Escherichia coli developed to produce the higher alcohol and potential new biofuel 2-methyl-1-butanol (2MB). To accomplish this, we explored the biodiversity of enzymes catalyzing key parts of the isoleucine biosynthetic pathway, finding that AHAS II (ilvGM) from Salmonella typhimurium and threonine deaminase (ilvA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum improve 2MB production the most. Overexpression of the native threonine biosynthetic operon (thrABC) on plasmid without the native transcription regulation also improved 2MB production in E. coli. Finally, we knocked out competing pathways upstream of threonine production (DeltametA, Deltatdh) to increase its availability for further improvement of 2MB production. This work led to a strain of E. coli that produces 1.25 g/L 2MB in 24 h, a total alcohol content of 3 g/L, and with yields of up to 0.17 g 2MB/g glucose. PMID:18758769

  17. Microaerobic Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew S.; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W.; Le, Thao Q.; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process. PMID:24584248

  18. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kay, Emily J; Yates, Laura E; Terra, Vanessa S; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  19. Fitness, Stress Resistance, and Extraintestinal Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Gros, Pierre-Alexis; Laouénan, Cédric; Clermont, Olivier; Le Nagard, Hervé; Picard, Bertrand; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The extraintestinal virulence of Escherichia coli is dependent on numerous virulence genes. However, there is growing evidence for a role of the metabolic properties and stress responses of strains in pathogenesis. We assessed the respective roles of these factors in strain virulence by developing phenotypic assays for measuring in vitro individual and competitive fitness and the general stress response, which we applied to 82 commensal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains previously tested in a mouse model of sepsis. Individual fitness properties, in terms of maximum growth rates in various media (Luria-Bertani broth with and without iron chelator, minimal medium supplemented with gluconate, and human urine) and competitive fitness properties, estimated as the mean relative growth rate per generation in mixed cultures with a reference fluorescent E. coli strain, were highly diverse between strains. The activity of the main general stress response regulator, RpoS, as determined by iodine staining of the colonies, H2O2 resistance, and rpoS sequencing, was also highly variable. No correlation between strain fitness and stress resistance and virulence in the mouse model was found, except that the maximum growth rate in urine was higher for virulent strains. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of virulence factors was the only independent factor explaining the virulence in mice. At the species level, growth capacity and stress resistance are heterogeneous properties that do not contribute significantly to the intrinsic virulence of the strains. PMID:23690401

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae prepilin export studied in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, B; Taha, M K; Pugsley, A P; Marchal, C

    1991-01-01

    The pilE gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 and a series of pilE-phoA gene fusions were expressed in Escherichia coli. The PhoA hybrid proteins were shown to be located in the membrane fraction of the cells, and the prepilin product of the pilE gene was shown to be located exclusively in the cytoplasmic membrane. Analysis of the prepilin-PhoA hybrids showed that the first 20 residues of prepilin can function as an efficient export (signal) sequence. This segment of prepilin includes an unbroken sequence of 8 hydrophobic or neutral residues that form the N-terminal half of a 16-residue hydrophobic region of prepilin. Neither prepilin nor the prepilin-PhoA hybrids were processed by E. coli leader peptidase despite the presence of two consensus cleavage sites for this enzyme just after this hydrophobic region. Comparisons of the specific molecular activities of the four prepilin-PhoA hybrids and analysis of their susceptibility to proteolysis by trypsin and proteinase K in spheroplasts allow us to propose two models for the topology of prepilin in the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. The bulk of the evidence supports the simplest of the two models, in which prepilin is anchored in the membrane solely by the N-terminal hydrophobic domain, with the extreme N terminus facing the cytoplasm and the longer C terminus facing the periplasm. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1938955

  1. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress.

    PubMed

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F; Robinson, Jonathan L; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. PMID:27207837

  2. [Improving 3-dehydroshikimate production by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fei; Chen, Wujiu; Jia, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-10-01

    In the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway 3-dehydroshikimate (DHS) is a key intermediate. As a potent antioxidant and important feedstock for producing a variety of important industrial chemicals, such as adipate and vanillin, DHS is of great commercial value. Here, in this study, we investigated the effect of the co-expression of aroFFBR (3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase mutant with tyrosine feedback-inhibition resistance) and tktA (Transketolase A) at different copy number on the production of DHS. The increased copy number of aroFFBR and tktA would enhance the production of DHS by the fold of 2.93. In order to further improve the production of DHS, we disrupted the key genes in by-product pathways of the parent strain Escherichia coli AB2834. The triple knockout strain of ldhA, ackA-pta and adhE would further increase the production of DHS. The titer of DHS in shake flask reached 1.83 g/L, 5.7-fold higher than that of the parent strain E. coli AB2834. In 5-L fed-batch fermentation, the metabolically engineered strain produced 25.48 g/L DHS after 62 h. Metabolically engineered E. coli has the potential to further improve the production of DHS. PMID:25726580

  3. Colibri: a functional data base for the Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Médigue, C; Viari, A; Hénaut, A; Danchin, A

    1993-01-01

    Several data libraries have been created to organize all the data obtained worldwide about the Escherichia coli genome. Because the known data now amount to more than 40% of the whole genome sequence, it has become necessary to organize the data in such a way that appropriate procedures can associate knowledge produced by experiments about each gene to its position on the chromosome and its relation to other relevant genes, for example. In addition, global properties of genes, affected by the introduction of new entries, should be present as appropriate description fields. A data base, implemented on Macintosh by using the data base management system 4th Dimension, is described. It is constructed around a core constituted by known contigs of E. coli sequences and links data collected in general libraries (unmodified) to data associated with evolving knowledge (with modifiable fields). Biologically significant results obtained through the coupling of appropriate procedures (learning or statistical data analysis) are presented. The data base is available through a 4th Dimension runtime and through FTP on Internet. It has been regularly updated and will be systematically linked to other E. coli data bases (M. Kroger, R. Wahl, G. Schachtel, and P. Rice, Nucleic Acids Res. 20(Suppl.):2119-2144, 1992; K. E. Rudd, W. Miller, C. Werner, J. Ostell, C. Tolstoshev, and S. G. Satterfield, Nucleic Acids Res. 19:637-647, 1991) in the near future. Images PMID:8246843

  4. Temperature Control of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sinensky, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The higher the growth temperature of Escherichia coli cultures the greater is the proportion of saturated fatty acids in the bacterial phospholipids. When fatty acids are exogenously supplied to E. coli, higher growth temperatures will likewise increase the relative incorporation of saturated fatty acids into phospholipids. One of the steps in the utilization of fatty acids for phospholipid biosynthesis is, therefore, temperature-controlled. The temperature effect observed in vivo with mixtures of 3H-oleate and 14C-palmitate is demonstrable in vitro by using mixtures of the coenzyme A derivative of these fatty acids for the acylation of α-glycerol phosphate to lysophosphatidic and phosphatidic acids. In E. coli extracts, the relative rates of transacylation of palmityl and oleyl coenzyme A vary as a function of incubation temperature in a manner which mimics the temperature control observed in vivo. The phosphatidic acid synthesized in vitro shows a striking enrichment of oleate at the β position analogous to the positional specificity observed in phospholipids synthesized in vivo. PMID:4324806

  5. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  6. Protein secretion controlled by a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blanchin-Roland, S; Masson, J M

    1989-03-01

    The inability of Escherichia coli to secrete proteins in growth medium is one of the major drawbacks in its use in genetic engineering. A synthetic gene, homologous to the one coding for the kil peptide of pColE1, was made and cloned under the control of the lac promoter, in order to obtain the inducible secretion of homologous or heterologous proteins by E. coli. The efficiency of this synthetic gene to promote secretion was assayed by analysing the production and secretion of two proteins, the R-TEM1 beta-lactamase, and the alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis. This latter protein was expressed in E. coli from its gene either on the same plasmid as the kil gene or on a different plasmid. The primary effect of the induction of the kil gene is the overproduction of the secreted proteins. When expressed at a high level, the kil gene promotes the overproduction of all periplasmic proteins and the total secretion in the culture medium of both the beta-lactamase or the alpha-amylase. This secretion is semi-selective for most periplasmic proteins are not secreted. The kil peptide induces the secretion of homologous or heterologous proteins in two steps, first acting on the cytoplasmic membrane, then permeabilizing the outer membrane. This system, which is now being assayed at the fermentor scale, is the first example of using a synthetic gene to engineer a new property into a bacterial strain. PMID:2652141

  7. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  8. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  9. Epithelial cell invasion by bovine septicemic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, M J; Lara, J C; Moseley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Little is known regarding the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli-induced septicemic colibacillosis of calves. To understand the mechanism by which these strains penetrate the intestinal epithelium and gain access to the bloodstream, we examined the potential of bovine septicemic E. coli to invade cultured epithelial cells. By using a gentamicin survival assay, we demonstrated bacterial invasion of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Transcytosis of polarized MDCK cell monolayers was also observed, but only when bacteria were added to the basolateral surface. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of intracellular organisms which appeared to be within membrane-bound vacuoles. The bovine septicemic isolate used in this study expressed the fimbrial adhesion CS31A. To examine the role of CS31A-mediated adherence in invasion and transcytosis of MDCK cell monolayers, a CS31A-deficient mutant was constructed by suicide vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis. Although nonadherent, the mutant showed a level of invasion similar to that of the wild-type parent. E. coli DH5 alpha carrying the cloned CS31A determinant was noninvasive. These findings suggest that expression of CS31A is neither required nor sufficient to mediate invasion. Images PMID:7903284

  10. Properties of a Clostridium thermocellum Endoglucanase Produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W H; Gräbnitz, F; Staudenbauer, W L

    1986-06-01

    A cellulase gene of Clostridium thermocellum was transferred to Escherichia coli by molecular cloning with bacteriophage lambda and plasmid vectors and shown to be indentical with the celA gene. The celA gene product was purified from extracts of plasmid-bearing E. coli cells by heat treatment and chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl. It was characterized as a thermophilic endo-beta-1,4-glucanase, the properties of which closely resemble those of endoglucanase A previously isolated from C. thermocellum supernatants. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme purified from E. coli exhibited two protein bands with molecular weights of 49,000 and 52,000. It had a temperature optimum at 75 degrees C and was stable for several hours at 60 degrees C. Endoglucanase activity was optimal between pH 5.5 and 6.5. The enzyme was insensitive against end product inhibition by glucose and cellobiose and remarkably resistant to the denaturing effects of detergents and organic solvents. It was capable of degrading, in addition to cellulosic substrates, glucans with alternating beta-1,4 and beta-1,3 linkages such as barley beta-glucan and lichenan. PMID:16347088

  11. Rapid Method for Escherichia coli in the Cuyahoga River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, Amie M.G.

    2007-01-01

    This study is a continuation of a previous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project in cooperation with the National Park Service at Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Brecksville, Ohio. A rapid (1-hour) method for detecting Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water was tested and compared to the standard (24-hour) method for determining E. coli concentrations. Environmental data were collected to determine turbidity, rainfall, and streamflow at the time of sampling. In the previous study (2004-5), data collected were used to develop predictive models to determine recreational water quality in the river at two sites within the park. Data collected during this continued study (2006) were used to test these models. At Jaite, a centrally located site within the park, the model correctly predicted exceedances or nonexceedances of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency maximum for recreational water quality in 80 percent of samples. At Old Portage, a site near the upstream boundary of the park, the model correctly predicted recreational water quality in 58 percent of samples. All of the data collected in 2004-6 will be used to develop more accurate models for use in future studies. Analysis and discussion of model results are scheduled to be included in an upcoming USGS Scientific Investigations Report.

  12. Identification of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains from Avian Organic Fertilizers

    PubMed Central

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Gazal, Luis Eduardo; Medeiros, Leonardo P.; Nishio, Erick K.; Kobayashi, Renata K. T.; Nakazato, Gerson

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%), three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%), 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%), but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections. PMID:25170683

  13. Mechanisms of acid resistance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J; Smith, M P; Chapin, K C; Baik, H S; Bennett, G N; Foster, J W

    1996-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic strains of Escherichia coli must pass through the acidic gastric barrier to cause gastrointestinal disease. Taking into account the apparent low infectious dose of enterohemorrhagic E. coli, 11 O157:H7 strains and 4 commensal strains of E. coli were tested for their abilities to survive extreme acid exposures (pH 3). Three previously characterized acid resistance systems were tested. These included an acid-induced oxidative system, an acid-induced arginine-dependent system, and a glutamate-dependent system. When challenged at pH 2.0, the arginine-dependent system provided more protection in the EHEC strains than in commensal strains. However, the glutamate-dependent system provided better protection than the arginine system and appeared equally effective in all strains. Because E. coli must also endure acid stress imposed by the presence of weak acids in intestinal contents at a pH less acidic than that of the stomach, the ability of specific acid resistance systems to protect against weak acids was examined. The arginine- and glutamate-dependent systems were both effective in protecting E. coli against the bactericidal effects of a variety of weak acids. The acids tested include benzoic acid (20 mM; pH 4.0) and a volatile fatty acid cocktail composed of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids at levels approximating those present in the intestine. The oxidative system was much less effective. Several genetic aspects of E. coli acid resistance were also characterized. The alternate sigma factor RpoS was shown to be required for oxidative acid resistance but was only partially involved with the arginine- and glutamate-dependent acid resistance systems. The arginine decarboxylase system (including adi and its regulators cysB and adiY) was responsible for arginine-dependent acid resistance. The results suggest that several acid resistance systems potentially contribute to the survival of pathogenic E. coli in the different acid stress environments of

  14. Modification of emodin and aloe-emodin by glycosylation in engineered Escherihia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Koirala, Niranjan; Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Jung, Hye Jin; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Glycosyltransferase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 (YjiC) was used for enzymatic modification of emodin and aloe-emodin in vitro and in vivo. In order to increase the availability of UDP-glucose, three genes involved in the production of precursors of NDP-sugar in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) viz. D-glucose phosphate isomerase (pgi), D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (zwf), and UDP-sugar hydrolase (ushA) were deleted and glucose-1-phosphate urididyltransferase (galU) gene was over expressed. To improve the yield of the products; substrate, time and media parameters were optimized, and the production was scaled up using a 3 L fermentor. The maximum yield of glycosylated products of emodin (emodin-O-β-D-glucoside) and aloe-emodin (aloe-emodin-O-β-D-glucoside) were approximately 144 µM (38 mg/L) and 168 µM (45 mg/L) respectively, representing almost 72 % and 84 % bioconversion of emodin and aloe-emodin when 200 µM of emodin and aloe-emodin were supplemented in the culture. Additionally, the emodin and aloe emodin major glycosylated products exhibited the highest stability at pH 8.0 and the stability of products was up to 70 °C and 60 °C respectively. Furthermore, the biological activities of emodin and its major glucoside (P1) were compared and their anti-cancer activities were assayed in several cancer cell lines. The results demonstrate that YjiC has the capacity to catalyze the glycosylation of these aromatic compounds and that glycosylation of anthraquinones enhances their aqueous solubility while retaining their biological activities. PMID:25663173

  15. Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Fecal Samples in Meat Goats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Ray; Madden, Uford; Brooks-Walter, Alexis

    2004-01-01

    Studies have reported the isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli)O157:H7 from pork, lamb and poultry products, and from other animals including deer, horses, dogs, birds and humans. There is limited or no information on the presence of the organism in goats. The objectives of this study were to determine if E. coli O157:H7 was naturally occurring…

  16. Diet, fecal microbiome and Escherichia coli O157:H7 shedding in beef Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli, such as E. coli O157:H7, are foodborne zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe illness and death in humans. The gastrointestinal tract of ruminant animals has been identified as a primary habitat for E. coli O157:H7, and in cattle the terminal gastrointestinal tra...

  17. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  18. Proteomic differences between Escherichia coli strains that cause transient versus persistent intramammary infections [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature and lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli can cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that enable certain strains of E. coli to cause a p...

  19. Escherichia coli O157:H7, diet, and fecal microbiome in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli, such as E. coli O157:H7, are foodborne zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe illness and death in humans. The gastrointestinal tract of ruminant animals has been identified as a primary habitat for E. coli O157:H7, and in cattle the terminal gastrointestinal tra...

  20. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  1. SURVIVAL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 IN DAIRY CATTLE FEED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cattle feed waters from two dairy farms were used in a study to determine the survival characteristics of the bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli )157:H7 and wild-type E. coli. The E. coli 0157:H7 inoculum consisted of a consortium of isolates obtained from dairy cattle. Fresh ma...

  2. Dietary interactions and interventions affecting Escherichia coli 0157 colonization and shedding in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157 is an important foodborne pathogen affecting human health and the beef cattle industry. Contamination of carcasses at slaughter is correlated to the prevalence of E. coli O157 in cattle feces. Many associations have been made between dietary factors and E. coli O157 prevalenc...

  3. Diet, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and cattle: A review after 10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli are commensal bacteria that can account for up to 1% of the bacterial population of the gut. Ruminant animals are reservoirs of the pathogenic bacteria E. coli O157:H7, and approximately 30% of feedlot cattle shed E. coli O157:H7. Feedlot and high-producing dairy cattle are fed hi...

  4. Diet, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, and cattle, a review after 10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli are commensal bacteria that can account for up to 1% of the bacterial population of the gut. Ruminant animals are reservoirs of the pathogenic bacteria E. coli strain O157:H7 and approximately 30% of feedlot cattle shed E. coli O157:H7. Feedlot and high-producing dairy cattle are ...

  5. A glimpse of Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival in soils from eastern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) is an important food-borne pathogen, which continues to be a major public health concern worldwide. It is known that E. coli O157:H7 survive in soil environment might result in the contamination of fresh produce or water source. To investigate how the soils...

  6. Mouse in vivo neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga toxin 2 with monoclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) food contaminations pose serious health and food safety concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing E. coli has been identified as the major cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the most severe di...

  7. Resistance of various shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance of thirty two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and six major serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin- producing E. coli (STEC) plus E. coli O104 was tested against Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water using two different methods; modified AOAC 955.16 sequential inoculation method and minim...

  8. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 strains in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 serogroups are known to cause serious diseases in human. However, research on the persistence of E. coli non-O157 serogroups in preharvest environment is limited. In the current study, we compared the survival behavior of E. coli O157 to that ...

  9. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance to enrofloxacin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in dog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming a serious problem both for pets and humans (zoonosis) due to the close contact and to the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Canine E. coli represents a good experimental model useful to study this pathology. Moreover, as des...

  10. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 reduces growth, Shiga toxin expression, release and thus cytotoxicity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mashkoor; Guenther, Sebastian; Schierack, Peter; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased release or production of Shiga toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) after exposure to antimicrobial agents, the role of antimicrobial agents in EHEC mediated infections remains controversial. Probiotics are therefore rapidly gaining interest as an alternate therapeutic option. The well-known probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) was tested in vitro to determine its probiotic effects on growth, Shiga toxin (Stx) gene expression, Stx amount and associated cytotoxicity on the most important EHEC strains of serotype O104:H4 and O157:H7. Following co-culture of EcN:EHEC in broth for 4 and 24 h, the probiotic effects on EHEC growth, toxin gene expression, Stx amount and cytotoxicity were determined using quantitative real time-PCR, Stx-ELISA and Vero cytotoxicity assays. Probiotic EcN strongly reduced EHEC numbers (cfu) of O104:H4 up to (68%) and O157:H7 to (72.2%) (p<0.05) in LB broth medium whereas the non-probiotic E. coli strain MG1655 had no effect on EHEC growth. The level of stx expression was significantly down-regulated, particularly for the stx2a gene. The stx down-regulation in EcN co-culture was not due to reduced numbers of EHEC. A significant inhibition in Stx amounts and cytotoxicity were also observed in sterile supernatants of EcN:EHEC co-cultures. These findings indicate that probiotic EcN displays strong inhibitory effects on growth, Shiga toxin gene expression, amount and cytotoxicity of EHEC strains. Thus, EcN may be considered as a putative therapeutic candidate, in particular against EHEC O104:H4 and O157:H7. PMID:25465158

  11. Biosynthesis of two quercetin O-diglycosides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    An, Dae Gyun; Yang, So Mi; Kim, Bong Gyu; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Various flavonoid glycosides are found in nature, and their biological activities are as variable as their number. In some cases, the sugar moiety attached to the flavonoid modulates its biological activities. Flavonoid glycones are not easily synthesized chemically. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to synthesize quercetin 3-O-glucosyl (1→2) xyloside and quercetin 3-O-glucosyl (1→6) rhamnoside (also called rutin) using two uridine diphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) in Escherichia coli. To synthesize quercetin 3-O-glucosyl (1→2) xyloside, sequential glycosylation was carried out by regulating the expression time of the two UGTs. AtUGT78D2 was subcloned into a vector controlled by a Tac promoter without a lacI operator, while AtUGT79B1 was subcloned into a vector controlled by a T7 promoter. UDP-xyloside was supplied by concomitantly expressing UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (ugd) and UDP-xyloside synthase (UXS) in the E. coli. Using these strategies, 65.0 mg/L of quercetin 3-O-glucosyl (1→2) xyloside was produced. For the synthesis of rutin, one UGT (BcGT1) was integrated into the E. coli chromosome and the other UGT (Fg2) was expressed in a plasmid along with RHM2 (rhamnose synthase gene 2). After optimization of the initial cell concentration and incubation temperature, 119.8 mg/L of rutin was produced. The strategies used in this study thus show promise for the synthesis of flavonoid diglucosides in E. coli. PMID:26931782

  12. Escherichia coli and the Emergence of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2011-12-01

    The creation of the "Phage group" by M. Delbrück, S. E. Luria, and A. D. Hershey in 1940 at Cold Spring Harbor played a crucial role in the development of molecular biology. In the 1940s, working with Escherichia coli and its viruses, Luria and Delbrück discovered the spontaneous nature of bacterial mutations and Hershey described recombination in bacteriophages and demonstrated with M. Chase that the genetic material that infects bacteria is DNA. At the same time, S. Benzer defined the structure of a functional genetic unit and J. Lederberg and E. Tatum discovered sexual recombination between bacteria. Some years later, Lederberg's group discovered extrachromosomal particles, the plasmids, and a novel way of genetic transfer through bacteriophages, called transduction. In 1949, at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, A. Lwoff uncovered the mechanism of lysogeny. Shortly afterwards, F. Jacob and E. Wollman unraveled the mechanism of the sexual process in E. coli and established the circularity of the bacterial chromosome. In the 1960s, J. Monod and F. Jacob, by genetic analysis of the E. coli lactose system, proposed the operon model for gene regulation and introduced the concept of messenger RNA. The elucidation of the double helix structure of DNA in 1953 by F. Crick and J. Watson had major consequences: the establishment of the copying mechanism (Meselson and Stahl), the discovery of the nature of the genetic code (S. Brenner) leading to its deciphering. E. coli and its phages were instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology based on the discovery of the restriction-modification system by W. Arber. PMID:26442505

  13. Production of bioactive chicken follistatin315 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Choi, Rocky; Park, Sung Kwon; Kim, Yong Soo

    2014-12-01

    Follistatin (FST) binds to myostatin (MSTN), a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Inhibition of MSTN activity by FST treatment has shown to enhance muscle growth as well as ameliorate symptoms of muscular dystrophy in animal models, illustrating the potential of FST as an agent to enhance muscle growth in animal agriculture or to treat muscle wasting conditions or disease in humans. Therefore, we designed a study to produce biologically active recombinant chicken FST315 (chFST315) in an Escherichia coli host. Since FST contains multiple intramolecular disulfide bonds, we expressed chFST315 protein in either a system that utilizes a periplasmic expression strategy, or a genetically modified E. coli system (SHuffle strain) that is capable of disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm. Periplasmic expression of chFST315 using the pMAL-p5x vector system, which was designed to express maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein, failed to produce a soluble recombinant protein. However, cytoplasmic expression of chFST315 using pMAL-c5x vector in SHuffle E. coli strain resulted in a soluble expression of the recombinant protein (MBP-chFST315). Combination of heparin and amylose resin affinity chromatography yielded about 6 mg/L purified MBP-chFST315. The purified MBP-chFST315 showed binding affinity to MSTN and activin in a pull-down assay, as well as inhibited MSTN and activin activity in an in vitro reporter gene assay. In conclusion, results of the study demonstrate that for the first time a recombinant, biologically active FST molecule can be produced in a soluble form in E. coli. The ability to produce FST in a cost-effective system is expected to allow us to investigate the potentials of FST as an agent to improve skeletal muscle growth of meat producing animals via suppression of MSTN. PMID:25411099

  14. Engineering an Escherichia coli platform to synthesize designer biodiesels.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Michael; Niraula, Narayan; Yarrabothula, Akshitha; Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-04-20

    Biodiesels, fatty acid esters (FAEs), can be synthesized by condensation of fatty acid acyl CoAs and alcohols via a wax ester synthase in living cells. Biodiesels have advantageous characteristics over petrodiesels such as biodegradability, a higher flash point, and less emission. Controlling fatty acid and alcohol moieties are critical to produce designer biodiesels with desirable physiochemical properties (e.g., high cetane number, low kinematic viscosity, high oxidative stability, and low cloud point). Here, we developed a flexible framework to engineer Escherichia coli cell factories to synthesize designer biodiesels directly from fermentable sugars. In this framework, we designed each FAE pathway as a biodiesel exchangeable production module consisting of acyl CoA, alcohol, and wax ester synthase submodules. By inserting the FAE modules in an engineered E. coli modular chassis cell, we generated E. coli cell factories to produce targeted biodiesels (e.g., fatty acid ethyl (FAEE) and isobutyl (FAIbE) esters) with tunable and controllable short-chain alcohol moieties. The engineered E. coli chassis carrying the FAIbE production module produced 54mg/L FAIbEs with high specificity, accounting for>90% of the total synthesized FAEs and ∼4.7 fold increase in FAIbE production compared to the wildtype. Fed-batch cultures further improved FAIbE production up to 165mg/L. By mixing ethanol and isobutanol submodules, we demonstrated controllable production of mixed FAEEs and FAIbEs. We envision the developed framework offers a flexible, alternative route to engineer designer biodiesels with tunable and controllable properties using biomass-derived fermentable sugars. PMID:26953744

  15. Source and regulation of flux variability in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic responses are essential for the adaptation of microorganisms to changing environmental conditions. The repertoire of flux responses that the metabolic network can display in different external conditions may be quantified applying flux variability analysis to genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results A procedure is developed to classify and quantify the sources of flux variability. We apply the procedure to the latest Escherichia coli metabolic reconstruction, in glucose minimal medium, with an additional constraint to account for the mechanism coordinating carbon and nitrogen utilization mediated by α-ketoglutarate. Flux variability can be decomposed into three components: internal, external and growth variability. Unexpectedly, growth variability is the only significant component of flux variability in the physiological ranges of glucose, oxygen and ammonia uptake rates. To obtain substantial increases in metabolic flexibility, E. coli must decrease growth rate to suboptimal values. This growth-flexibility trade-off gives a straightforward interpretation to recent work showing that most overall cell-to-cell flux variability in a population of E. coli can be attained sampling a small number of enzymes most likely to constrain cell growth. Importantly, it provides an explanation for the global reorganization occurring in metabolic networks during adaptations to environmental challenges. The calculations were repeated with a pathogenic strain and an old reconstruction of the commensal strain, having less than 50% of the reactions of the latest reconstruction, obtaining the same general conclusions. Conclusions In E. coli growing on glucose, growth variability is the only significant component of flux variability for all physiological conditions explored. Increasing flux variability requires reducing growth to suboptimal values. The growth-flexibility trade-off operates in physiological and evolutionary adaptations, and provides an

  16. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Other E. coli Strains Share Physiological Properties Associated with Intestinal Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli isolates(72 commensal and 10 O157:H7 isolates) were compared with regard to physiological and growth parameters related to their ability to survive and persist in the gastrointestinal tract and found to be similar. We propose that in nonhuman hosts E. coli O157:H7 strains function ...

  17. Atypical biogroups of Escherichia coli found in clinical specimens and description of Escherichia hermannii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Davis, B R; Steigerwalt, A G; Riddle, C F; McWhorter, A C; Allen, S D; Farmer, J J; Saitoh, Y; Fanning, G R

    1982-04-01

    DNA relatedness was used to define the biochemical boundaries of Escherichia coli. A large number of biochemically atypical strains were shown to belong to biogroups of E. coli. These included strains negative in reactions for indole, all three decarboxylases, D-mannitol, lactose, or methyl red and strains positive in reactions for H2S, urea, citrate, KCN, adonitol, myo-inositol, or phenylalanine deaminase. Frequency and source data are presented for these atypical E. coli biogroups. One group of KCN-positive, cellobiose-positive, yellow-pigmented strains was 84 to 91% interrelated but only 35 to 45% related to E. coli. The name Escherichia hermannii sp. nov. is proposed for this group of organisms that was formerly called Enteric Group 11 by the Enteric Section, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA. Twenty-nine strains of E. hermannii have been isolated in the United States from a variety of clinical sources, principally wounds, sputum, and stools. Three additional strains were isolated from food. E. hermannii strains are gram-negative, oxidase-negative, fermentative, motile rods. In addition to yellow pigment and positive KCN and cellobiose tests, the biochemical reactions characteristic of 32 strains of E. hermannii were as follows: gas from D-glucose, acid from D-glucose, maltose, D-xylose, L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, and D-mannitol; no acid from adonitol or inositol; variable acid production from lactose and sucrose; positive tests for indole, methyl red, and mucate; negative tests for Voges-Proskauer. Simmons citrate, H2S, urea, phenylalanine deaminase, and gelatin hydrolysis; negative or delayed test for L-lysine decarboxylase and negative test for L-arginine dihydrolase; and positive test for ornithine decarboxylase. E. hermannii strains were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, and carbenicillin and sensitive to other commonly used antibiotics. Wounds account for almost 50% of human isolates of E. hermannii, followed by sputum or lung isolates (ca. 25

  18. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  19. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis. PMID

  20. Expression of V(H)-linker-V(L) orientation-dependent single-chain Fv antibody fragment derived from hybridoma 2E6 against aflatoxin B1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Ye, Yang; Chen, Weifeng; Wang, Xiaohong; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a toxic secondary metabolic product, which threatens human and animal health. Antibody is a key factor for immunoassay against toxic stuff like AFB1, and single-chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) has become a popular format of genetically engineered antibody. In this study, four hybridoma cell lines against AFB1 were obtained, and then scFvs 2E6 derived from hybridoma cell line 2E6 were constructed in different V(H)/V(L) orientations. Subsequently, scFvs 2E6 were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) mainly in the form of inclusion body. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA were employed to characterize scFvs 2E6. The results revealed that the yield of inclusion body of scFvs 2E6 in either V(H)/V(L) orientation was similar; however, only the scFv in V(H)-linker-V(L) orientation showed anti-AFB1 bioactivity after refolding. The present study underscores the importance of choosing optimal V(H)/V(L) orientation for scFv construction, and scFv may be favorable for immunoassays in food industry. PMID:25540048

  1. Improved genetically modified Escherichia coli strain for prescreening antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Bartus, H R; Mirabelli, C K; Auerbach, J I; Shatzman, A R; Taylor, D P; Johnson, R K; Rosenberg, M; Crooke, S T

    1984-01-01

    Clinical experience suggests that drugs that interact with and damage DNA are useful in cancer chemotherapy (H. Umezawa , p. 43-72, in V. T. DeVita , Jr., and H. Busch [ed.], Methods in Cancer Research; Cancer Drug Development, vol. XVI, 1979). Prescreening systems for antitumor agents in natural products require assays that are exquisitely sensitive, since the active components are often produced in quantities of micrograms per milliliter or less. One assay used to identify agents that interact with DNA is the biochemical induction assay, utilizing Escherichia coli BR 513 (R. K. Elespuru and R. J. White, Cancer Res. 43:2819-2830, 1983). In this paper we describe a genetic modification of strain BR 513 that displays an expanded spectrum of activity. This strain may provide an improved prescreen for detecting natural products that interact with DNA. PMID:6203484

  2. SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Tobias; Lewis, Kim; Vulić, Marin

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:20011100

  3. Kinetics of minichromosome replication in Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Leonard, A C; Hucul, J A; Helmstetter, C E

    1982-02-01

    Replication control of the minichromosome pAL2 was found to differ from that of the chromosome in synchronously dividing populations of Escherichia coli B/r. Initiation of minichromosome replication took place at an increasing rate throughout synchronous growth. No coupling to initiation of chromosome replication was detected. Minichromosome replication was further examined in a dnaA5(Ts) temperature-sensitive initiation mutant. When cultures held at nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees C) for 60 min were shifted to permissive temperature (25 degrees C), initiation of both pAL2 and chromosome replication ensued in two waves spaced 25 to 35 min apart. Evidence is presented that minichromosomes terminate replication by passing slowly through a series of dimeric intermediate forms before reaching the closed circular monomeric form. The consequence of this slow passage as a rate-limiting step in the initiation reaction is discussed. PMID:7035432

  4. Coordinate initiation of chromosome and minichromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, C E; Leonard, A C

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli minichromosomes harboring as little as 327 base pairs of DNA from the chromosomal origin of replication (oriC) were found to replicate in a discrete burst during the division cycle of cells growing with generation times between 25 and 60 min at 37 degrees C. The mean cell age at minichromosome replication coincided with the mean age at initiation of chromosome replication at all growth rates, and furthermore, the age distributions of the two events were indistinguishable. It is concluded that initiation of replication from oriC is controlled in the same manner on minichromosomes and chromosomes over the entire range of growth rates and that the timing mechanism acts within the minimal oriC nucleotide sequence required for replication. Images PMID:3301802

  5. Kinetics of minichromosome replication in Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Hucul, J A; Helmstetter, C E

    1982-01-01

    Replication control of the minichromosome pAL2 was found to differ from that of the chromosome in synchronously dividing populations of Escherichia coli B/r. Initiation of minichromosome replication took place at an increasing rate throughout synchronous growth. No coupling to initiation of chromosome replication was detected. Minichromosome replication was further examined in a dnaA5(Ts) temperature-sensitive initiation mutant. When cultures held at nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees C) for 60 min were shifted to permissive temperature (25 degrees C), initiation of both pAL2 and chromosome replication ensued in two waves spaced 25 to 35 min apart. Evidence is presented that minichromosomes terminate replication by passing slowly through a series of dimeric intermediate forms before reaching the closed circular monomeric form. The consequence of this slow passage as a rate-limiting step in the initiation reaction is discussed. PMID:7035432

  6. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26586402

  7. Selection of quiescent Escherichia coli with high metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Sonderegger, Marco; Schümperli, Michael; Sauer, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Sustained metabolic activity in non-growing, quiescent cells can increase the operational life-span of bio-processes and improve process economics by decoupling production from cell growth. Because of the ill-defined molecular nature of this phenotype, we developed selection protocols for the evolution of quiescent Escherichia coli mutants that exhibit high metabolic activity in ammonium starvation-induced stationary phase. The best enrichment procedures were continuously or discontinuously fed ammonium-limited chemostat cultures with a very low dilution rate of 0.03 h(-1). After 40 generations of selection, improved mutants with up to doubled catabolic rates in stationary phase were isolated. The metabolically most active clones were identified by screening for high specific glucose uptake rates during ammonium starvation-induced stationary phase in deep-well microtiter plates. PMID:15721805

  8. Expanding the genetic code of Escherichia coli with phosphotyrosine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chenguang; Ip, Kevan; Söll, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications in nature. However, the site-specific incorporation of O-phosphotyrosine into proteins in vivo has not yet been reported. Endogenous phosphatases present in cells can dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine as a free amino acid or as a protein residue. Therefore, we deleted the genes of five phosphatases from the genome of Escherichia coli with the aim of stabilizing phosphotyrosine. Together with an engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase) and an elongation factor Tu variant, we were able to cotranslationally incorporate O-phosphotyrosine into the superfolder green fluorescent protein at a desired position in vivo. This system will facilitate future studies of tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:27477338

  9. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). PMID:24742948

  10. Implications of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli genomics for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2015-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality caused by diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. Despite a wealth of research elucidating the mechanisms of disease, the immunological responses and vaccine development, ETEC is still relatively uncharacterized when it comes to regulation of virulence and detailed immune mechanisms. The recent emergence of next-generation sequencing now offers the possibility to screen genomes of ETEC strains isolated globally to identify novel vaccine targets in addition to those already established. In this review, we discuss how recent findings on ETEC genomics using novel sequencing techniques will aid in finding novel protective antigens that can be used in vaccine approaches. PMID:25540974

  11. Chromosome segregation control by Escherichia coli ObgE GTPase.

    PubMed

    Foti, James J; Persky, Nicole S; Ferullo, Daniel J; Lovett, Susan T

    2007-07-01

    Escherichia coli cells depleted of the conserved GTPase, ObgE, show early chromosome-partitioning defects and accumulate replicated chromosomes in which the terminus regions are colocalized. Cells lacking ObgE continue to initiate replication, with a normal ratio of the origin to terminus. Localization of the SeqA DNA binding protein, normally seen as punctate foci, however, was disturbed. Depletion of ObgE also results in cell filamentation, with polyploid DNA content. Depletion of ObgE did not cause lethality, and cells recovered fully after expression of ObgE was restored. We propose a model in which ObgE is required to license chromosome segregation and subsequent cell cycle events. PMID:17578452

  12. Adaptive Reversion of a Frameshift Mutation in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J.; Foster, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Mutation rates are generally thought not to be influenced by selective forces. This doctrine rests on the results of certain classical studies of the mutations that make bacteria resistant to phages and antibiotics. We have studied a strain of Escherichia coli which constitutively expresses a lacI-lacZ fusion containing a frameshift mutation that renders it Lac(-). Reversion to Lac(+) is a rare event during exponential growth but occurs in stationary cultures when lactose is the only source of energy. No revertants accumulate in the absence of lactose, or in the presence of lactose if there is another, unfulfilled requirement for growth. The mechanism for such mutation in stationary phase is not known, but it requires some function of RecA which is apparently not required for mutation during exponential growth. PMID:1916241

  13. Evidence of histidine phosphorylation in isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Roberston, E.F.; Hoyt, J.C.; Reeves, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    Escherichia coli isocitrate lyase can be phosphorylated in vitro in an ATP-dependent reaction. Partially purified extracts were incubated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by a Western blot and autoradiography. Radioactivity was associated with the lyase only when blotting was performed under alkaline conditions. This suggests that phosphate groups are attached to the lyase via an acid-labile P-N bond rather than a more stable P-O bond. Treatment of the lyase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, a histidine modifying agent, blocks incorporation of /sup 32/P-phosphate. Treatment with phosphoramidate, a histidine phosphorylating agent, alters the isoelectric point of the lyase suggesting that the enzyme can be phosphorylated at histidine residues. Loss of catalytic activity after treatment with potato acid phosphatase indicates that isocitrate lyase activity may be modulated by phosphorylation.

  14. A series of template plasmids for Escherichia coli genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Deb, Shalini S; Reshamwala, Shamlan M S; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic engineering strategies often employ multi-copy episomal vectors to overexpress genes. However, chromosome-based overexpression is preferred as it avoids the use of selective pressure and reduces metabolic burden on the cell. We have constructed a series of template plasmids for λ Red-mediated Escherichia coli genome engineering. The template plasmids allow construction of genome integrating cassettes that can be used to integrate single copies of DNA sequences at predetermined sites or replace promoter regions. The constructed cassettes provide flexibility in terms of expression levels achieved and antibiotics used for selection, as well as allowing construction of marker-free strains. The modular design of the template plasmids allows replacement of genetic parts to construct new templates. Gene integration and promoter replacement using the template plasmids are illustrated. PMID:27071533

  15. Escherichia coli produces linoleic acid during late stationary phase.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitch, H D; Sklan, D; Chace, D H; Stevens, R D; Fridovich, I

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli produces linoleic acid in the late stationary phase. This was the case whether the cultures were grown aerobically or anaerobically on a supplemented glucose-salts medium. The linoleic acid was detected by thin-layer chromatography and was measured as the methyl ester by gas chromatography. The linoleic acid methyl ester was identified by its mass spectrum. Lipids extracted from late-stationary-phase cells generated thiobarbituric acid-reactive carbonyl products when incubated with a free radical initiator. In contrast, extracts from log-phase or early-stationary-phase cells failed to do so, in accordance with the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acid only in the stationary-phase cells. PMID:8366020

  16. Intramolecular dynamics of structure of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, Vladimir M.; Mjakinnik, Igor V.; Volkova, Alena N.

    1995-01-01

    The luminescent analysis with nano- and millisecond time resolution of intramolecular dynamics of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase was carried out. The effect of pH within the range 7.2 - 9.0, thermal inactivation, limited proteolysis by trypsin, binding of pyrophosphate, interconversion of enzyme and apoenzyme, the replacement of Zn2+ and Mg2+ in the active site by Cd2+ and Ni2+ on the spectral and kinetic parameters of luminescence was investigated. The essential changes of the level of nano- and millisecond dynamics of protein structure were found to correlate with the shift of enzymatic activity. The importance of small- and large-scale flexibility of protein structure for the act of enzymatic catalysis realization was shown.

  17. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis. PMID:26621912

  18. High-resolution structure of the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Noeske, Jonas; Wasserman, Michael R.; Terry, Daniel S.; Altman, Roger B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome is highly dependent on the ionic conditions in the cellular environment, but the roles of ribosome solvation remain poorly understood. Moreover, the function of modifications to ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins are unclear. Here we present the structure of the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure reveals details of the ribosomal subunit interface that are conserved in all domains of life, and suggest how solvation contributes to ribosome integrity and function. The structure also suggests how the conformation of ribosomal protein uS12 likely impacts its contribution to messenger RNA decoding. This structure helps to explain the phylogenetic conservation of key elements of the ribosome, including posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications and should serve as a basis for future antibiotic development. PMID:25775265

  19. Structure of the Cyclomodulin Cif from Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.; Jubelin, G; Taieb, F; Nougayrède, J; Oswald, E; Stebbins, C

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved a sophisticated arsenal of virulence factors to modulate host cell biology. Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) use a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) to inject microbial proteins into host cells. The T3SS effector cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) produced by EPEC and EHEC is able to block host eukaryotic cell-cycle progression. We present here a crystal structure of Cif, revealing it to be a divergent member of the superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a common catalytic triad. Mutation of these conserved active site residues abolishes the ability of Cif to block cell-cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate that irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors do not abolish the Cif cytopathic effect, suggesting that another enzymatic activity may underlie the biological activity of this virulence factor.

  20. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Guanosine Tetraphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Merlie, John P.; Pizer, Lewis I.

    1973-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis has been reported to be subject to stringent control in Escherichia coli. We present evidence that demonstrates a strict correlation between guanosine tetraphosphate accumulation and inhibition of phospholipid synthesis. In vivo experiments designed to examine the pattern of phospholipid labeling with 32P-inorganic phosphate and 32P-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate suggest that regulation must occur at the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase step. Assay of phospholipid synthesis by cell-free extracts and semipurified preparations revealed that guanosine tetraphosphate inhibits at least two enzymes specific for the biosynthetic pathway, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase as well as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatidyl transferase. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the stringent control of lipid synthesis as well as regulation of steady-state levels of phospholipid in growing cells. Images PMID:4583220