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1

Microsatellite instability in esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

The frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI), a result of defective mismatch repair during DNA replication, has been reported inconsistently in primary esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC). Using a panel of 15 markers, the primary aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of MSI in a well-characterized series of 27 primary EADCs, defined according to strict clinicopathologic criteria. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the following microsatellite repeat loci: D2S123, D10S197, D2S119, D11S904, D2S147, D3S1764, D7S1830, D7S1805, D2S434, D9S299, BAT25, BAT26, D5S346, D17S250, and TGF-beta-RII. Tumors were classified as microsatellite-stable (MSS) when no alterations were seen in tumor DNA compared to matched normal tissues, low-level MSI (MSI-L) when 1-5 of 15 markers were altered, and high-level MSI (MSI-H) when more than five markers were altered. Using these stringent criteria, 9/27 (33%) tumors were MSS, 18/27 (67%) tumors were MSI-L, and no tumor was MSI-H. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated cell nuclear expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins (both hMLH1 and hMSH2) in 78% (21/27) of tumors. No associations were seen between MSI and immunohistochemical expression of hMLH1, hMSH2, alterations in p53 or MBD4, tumor grade, pathologic stage, or patient survival. In conclusion, the finding of low levels of MSI in most tumors suggests an inherent baseline genomic instability, and potentially increased susceptibility to mutations during the progression of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:15279904

Evans, Susan C; Gillis, Amy; Geldenhuys, Laurette; Vaninetti, Nadine M; Malatjalian, Dickran A; Porter, Geoffrey A; Guernsey, Duane L; Casson, Alan G

2004-08-30

2

Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium  

Cancer.gov

An international consortium with epidemiologic studies of Barrett's Esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Analyses so far have included alcohol consumption, anthropometry, cigarette smoking, excess risk models, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, reproductive factors, and genome-wide studies to identify susceptibility loci associated with Barrett’s esophagus and/or adenocarcinomas of the esophagus.

3

Curative Resection for Esophageal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Objective To document what can be accomplished with surgical resection done according to the classical principles of surgical oncology. Methods One hundred consecutive patients underwent en bloc esophagectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma. No patient received pre- or postoperative chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Tumor depth and number and location of involved lymph nodes were recorded. A lymph node ratio was calculated by dividing the number of involved nodes by the total number removed. Follow-up was complete in all patients. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 40 months, with 23 patients surviving 5 years or more. Results The overall actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 52%. Survival rates by American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) stage were stage 1 (n = 26), 94%; stage 2a (n = 11), 65%; stage 2b (n = 13), 65%; stage 3 (n = 32), 23%; and stage 4 (n = 18), 27%. Sixteen tumors were confined to the mucosa, 16 to the submucosa, and 13 to the muscularis propria, and 55 were transmural. Tumor depth and the number and ratio of involved nodes were predictors of survival. Metastases to celiac (n = 16) or other distant node sites (n = 26) were not associated with decreased survival. Local recurrence was seen in only one patient. Latent nodal recurrence outside the surgical field occurred in 9 patients and systemic metastases in 31. Tumor depth, the number of involved nodes, and the lymph node ratio were important predictors of systemic recurrence. The surgical death rate was 6%. Conclusion Long-term survival from adenocarcinoma of the esophagus can be achieved in more than half the patients who undergo en bloc resection. One third of patients with lymph node involvement survived 5 years. Local control is excellent after en bloc resection. The extent of disease associated with tumors confined to the mucosa and submucosa provides justification for more limited and less morbid resections. PMID:11573045

Hagen, Jeffrey A.; DeMeester, Steven R.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Chandrasoma, Para; DeMeester, Tom R.

2001-01-01

4

Recent developments in esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is characterized by 6 striking features: increasing incidence, male predominance, lack of preventive measures, opportunities for early detection, demanding surgical therapy and care, and poor prognosis. Reasons for its rapidly increasing incidence include the rising prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux and obesity, combined with the decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The strong male predominance remains unexplained, but hormonal influence might play an important role. Future prevention might include the treatment of reflux or obesity or chemoprevention with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or statins, but no evidence-based preventive measures are currently available. Likely future developments include endoscopic screening of better defined high-risk groups for EAC. Individuals with Barrett esophagus might benefit from surveillance, at least those with dysplasia, but screening and surveillance strategies need careful evaluation to be feasible and cost-effective. The surgery for EAC is more extensive than virtually any other standard procedure, and postoperative survival, health-related quality of life, and nutrition need to be improved (eg, by improved treatment, better decision-making, and more individually tailored follow-up). Promising clinical developments include increased survival after preoperative chemoradiotherapy, the potentially reduced impact on health-related quality of life after minimally invasive surgery, and the new endoscopic therapies for dysplastic Barrett esophagus or early EAC. The overall survival rates are improving slightly, but poor prognosis remains a challenge. PMID:23818335

Lagergren, Jesper; Lagergren, Pernilla

2013-01-01

5

Surgical treatment of primary esophageal adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the biocharacteristics of primary esophageal adenocarcinoma (PEAC) and factors influencing patients’ prognosis\\u000a and to find rational surgical indications and combined therapy. Methods: To analyze the clinical material of 106 patients\\u000a with PEAC and compared with that of patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC). Results: The overall resectability,\\u000a morbidity and 30-day mortality rates of PEAC were 92.5%, 23.5%

Yong-gang Wang; Da-wei Zhang; Liang-jun Wang; Ru-gang Zhang; De-chao Zhang; Gui-yu Cheng; Ke-lin Sun; Ping-jun Meng

1999-01-01

6

Strategies to improve outcomes in esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Esophageal adenocarcinoma is one of the fastest rising cancers in Western society. Incidence has increased by 600% within the last 30 years. Rates of diagnosis and death run parallel due to the poor prognosis and a lack of effective treatments. Potentially curative treatments are followed by high rates of disease recurrence. For the majority of patients, who present with advanced disease, we have no effective treatment. We discuss the key areas of progress in this demanding field and offer our views on the direction of future research and treatment. PMID:24621143

Cowie, Andrew; Noble, Fergus; Underwood, Timothy

2014-06-01

7

Notch signaling drives stemness and tumorigenicity of esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Esophageal adenocarcinoma ranks sixth in cancer mortality in the world and its incidence has risen dramatically in the Western population over the last decades. Data presented herein strongly suggest that Notch signaling is critical for esophageal adenocarcinoma and underlies resistance to chemotherapy. We present evidence that Notch signaling drives a cancer stem cell phenotype by regulating genes that establish stemness. Using patient-derived xenograft models, we demonstrate that inhibition of Notch by gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSI) is efficacious in downsizing tumor growth. Moreover, we demonstrate that Notch activity in a patient's ultrasound-assisted endoscopic-derived biopsy might predict outcome to chemotherapy. Therefore, this study provides a proof of concept that inhibition of Notch activity will have efficacy in treating esophageal adenocarcinoma, offering a rationale to lay the foundation for a clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of GSI in esophageal adenocarcinoma treatment. PMID:25164006

Wang, Zhiqiang; Da Silva, Thiago G; Jin, Ke; Han, Xiaoqing; Ranganathan, Prathibha; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Bai, Feng; Li, Bin; Fei, Dennis Liang; Weaver, Kelly; Carpio, Rodrigo Vasquez-Del; Moscowitz, Anna E; Koshenkov, Vadim P; Sanchez, Lilly; Sparling, Lynne; Pei, Xin-Hai; Franceschi, Dido; Ribeiro, Afonso; Robbins, David J; Livingstone, Alan S; Capobianco, Anthony J

2014-11-01

8

Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett’s-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett’s cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

2014-01-01

9

Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett's-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett's cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian Lp

2014-11-15

10

Endoscopic assessment and management of early esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Esophageal carcinoma affects more than 450000 people worldwide and the incidence is rapidly increasing. In the United States and Europe, esophageal adenocarcinoma has superseded esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in its incidence. Esophageal cancer has a high mortality rates secondary to the late presentation of most patients at advanced stages. Endoscopic screening is recommended for patients with multiple risk factors for cancer in Barrett’s esophagus. These risk factors include chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, advanced age, male sex, white race, cigarette smoking, and obesity. The annual risk of esophageal cancer is approximately 0.25% for patients without dysplasia and 6% for patients with high-grade dysplasia. Twenty percent of all esophageal adenocarcinoma in the United States is early stage with disease confined to the mucosa or submucosa. The significant morbidity and mortality of esophagectomy make endoscopic treatment an attractive option. The American Gastroenterological Association recommends endoscopic eradication therapy for patients with high-grade dysplasia. Endoscopic modalities for treatment of early esophageal adenocarcinoma include endoscopic resection techniques and endoscopic ablative techniques such as radiofrequency ablation, photodynamic therapy and cryoablation. Endoscopic therapy should be precluded to patients with no evidence of lymphovascular invasion. Local tumor recurrence is low after endoscopic therapy and is predicted by poor differentiation of tumor, positive lymph node and submucosal invasion. Surgical resection should be offered to patients with deep submucosal invasion. PMID:25132925

Hammoud, Ghassan M; Hammad, Hazem; Ibdah, Jamal A

2014-01-01

11

Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

2015-03-13

12

Biomarkers in the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal (Barrett) adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Since the early 1970s, a dramatic change has occurred in the epidemiology of esophageal malignancy in both North America and Europe: the incidence of adenocarcinomas of the lower esophagus and esophagogastric junction is increasing. Several lifestyle factors are implicated in this change, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd). Primary esophageal adenocarcinomas are thought to arise from Barrett esophagus, an acquired condition in which the normal esophageal squamous epithelium is replaced by a specialized metaplastic columnar-cell-lined epithelium. Today, gerd is recognized as an important risk factor in Barrett esophagus. Progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive adenocarcinoma is reflected histologically by the metaplasia–dysplasia–carcinoma sequence. Although several molecular alterations associated with progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive adenocarcinoma have been identified, relatively few will ultimately have clinical application. Currently, the histologic finding of high-grade dysplasia remains the most reliable predictor of progression to invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma. However other promising molecular biomarkers include aneuploidy; 17p loss of heterozygosity, which implicates the TP53 tumour suppressor gene; cyclin D1 protein overexpression; and p16 alterations. It is anticipated that models incorporating combinations of objective scores of sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors (that is, age, sex, body mass index), severity of gerd, endoscopic and histologic findings, and a panel of biomarkers will be developed to better identify patients with Barrett esophagus at increased risk for malignant progression, leading to more rational endoscopic surveillance and screening programs. PMID:17576439

Williams, L.J.; Guernsey, D.L.; Casson, A.G.

2006-01-01

13

Biomarkers in the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal (Barrett) adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Since the early 1970s, a dramatic change has occurred in the epidemiology of esophageal malignancy in both North America and Europe: the incidence of adenocarcinomas of the lower esophagus and esophagogastric junction is increasing. Several lifestyle factors are implicated in this change, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Primary esophageal adenocarcinomas are thought to arise from Barrett esophagus, an acquired condition in which the normal esophageal squamous epithelium is replaced by a specialized metaplastic columnar-cell-lined epithelium.Today, gerd is recognized as an important risk factor in Barrett esophagus. Progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive adenocarcinoma is reflected histologically by the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. Although several molecular alterations associated with progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive adenocarcinoma have been identified, relatively few will ultimately have clinical application. Currently, the histologic finding of high-grade dysplasia remains the most reliable predictor of progression to invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma. However other promising molecular biomarkers include aneuploidy; 17p loss of heterozygosity, which implicates the TP53 tumour suppressor gene; cyclin D1 protein overexpression; and p16 alterations. It is anticipated that models incorporating combinations of objective scores of sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors (that is, age, sex, body mass index), severity of gerd, endoscopic and histologic findings, and a panel of biomarkers will be developed to better identify patients with Barrett esophagus at increased risk for malignant progression, leading to more rational endoscopic surveillance and screening programs. PMID:17576439

Williams, L J; Guernsey, D L; Casson, A G

2006-02-01

14

Epigenetic Patterns in the Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) arises after normal squamous mu- cosa undergoes metaplasia to specialized columnar epithelium (intestinal metaplasia or Barrett's esophagus), which can then ultimately progress to dysplasia and subsequent malignancy. Epigenetic studies of this model have thus far been limited to the DNA methylation analysis of a few genes. In this study, we analyzed a panel of 20 genes using

Cindy A. Eads; Reginald V. Lord; Kumari Wickramasinghe; Tiffany I. Long; Soudamini K. Kurumboor; Leslie Bernstein; Jeffrey H. Peters; Steven R. DeMeester; Tom R. DeMeester; Kristin A. Skinner; Peter W. Laird

2001-01-01

15

Regulation of CDX2 expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Reflux of acidic gastric contents and bile acids into the lower esophagus has been identified to have a central role in esophageal malignancy and is reported to upregulate caudal-related homologue 2 (CDX2), a regulatory gene involved in embryonic development and axial patterning of the alimentary tract. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of CDX2 in a well-defined series of human esophageal tissues, comprising reflux-induced esophagitis, premalignant Barrett esophagus (BE), and primary esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC). To explore potential molecular regulatory mechanisms, we also studied the expression of beta-catenin, SOX9, and CDX2 promoter methylation in esophageal tissues, in addition to the effect of bile acids and nitric oxide (NO) on CDX2 expression in the normal human esophageal cell line Het1A. Relative to matched normal esophageal epithelia, CDX2 was overexpressed in esophagitis (37% for RNA; cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in 48% of tissues), a high proportion (91%) of BE tissues, and in EADC (57% for RNA; cell nuclear immunopositivity in 80%). An association with beta-catenin expression was seen, but not with SOX9 or CDX2 promoter methylation. In Het1A cells, CDX2 was upregulated following exposure to bile acids and NO, alone and in combination. These results further implicate CDX2 and beta-catenin in the molecular pathogenesis of human EADC. The observed synergistic effect of NO on the efficacy of bile acid-induction of CDX2 suggests a novel role for NO in modulating the development of the Barrett phenotype and esophageal adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:19415720

Vaninetti, Nadine; Williams, Lara; Geldenhuys, Laurette; Porter, Geoffrey A; Guernsey, Duane L; Casson, Alan G

2009-10-01

16

Gastroesophageal Reflux in Relation to Adenocarcinomas of the Esophagus: A Pooled Analysis from the Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON)  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues. Methods Detailed information on heartburn and regurgitation symptoms and covariates were available from five BEACON case-control studies of EA and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJA). We conducted single-study multivariable logistic regressions followed by random-effects meta-analysis. Stratified analyses, meta-regressions, and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Results Five studies provided 1,128 EA cases, 1,229 EGJA cases, and 4,057 controls for analysis. All summary estimates indicated positive, significant associations between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA. Increasing heartburn duration was associated with increasing EA risk; odds ratios were 2.80, 3.85, and 6.24 for symptom durations of <10 years, 10 to <20 years, and ?20 years. Associations with EGJA were slighter weaker, but still statistically significant for those with the highest exposure. Both frequency and duration of heartburn/regurgitation symptoms were independently associated with higher risk. We observed similar strengths of associations when stratified by age, sex, cigarette smoking, and body mass index. Conclusions This analysis indicates that the association between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA is strong, increases with increased duration and/or frequency, and is consistent across major risk factors. Weaker associations for EGJA suggest that this cancer site has a dissimilar pathogenesis or represents a mixed population of patients. PMID:25075959

Cook, Michael B.; Corley, Douglas A.; Murray, Liam J.; Liao, Linda M.; Kamangar, Farin; Ye, Weimin; Gammon, Marilie D.; Risch, Harvey A.; Casson, Alan G.; Freedman, Neal D.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Wu, Anna H.; Bernstein, Leslie; Nyrén, Olof; Pandeya, Nirmala; Whiteman, David C.; Vaughan, Thomas L.

2014-01-01

17

Dietary supplement use and risk of neoplastic progression in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a prospective study.  

PubMed

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) and its precursor condition, Barrett's esophagus, has risen rapidly in the United States for reasons that are not fully understood. Therefore, we evaluated the association between use of supplemental vitamins and minerals and risk of neoplastic progression of Barrett's esophagus and EA. The Seattle Barrett's Esophagus Program is a prospective study based on 339 men and women with histologically confirmed Barrett's esophagus. Participants underwent baseline and periodic follow-up exams, which included endoscopy and self-administered questionnaires on diet, supplement use, and lifestyle characteristics. Use of multivitamins and 4 individual supplements was calculated using time-weighted averages of reported use over the observational period. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for each endpoint: EA, tetraploidy, and aneuploidy. During a mean follow-up of 5 yr, there were 37 cases of EA, 42 cases of tetraploidy, and 34 cases of aneuploidy. After controlling for multiple covariates including diet, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, obesity, and smoking, participants who took 1 or more multivitamin pills/day had a significantly decreased risk of tetraploidy [HR = 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.08-0.47) and EA (HR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.15-0.99] compared to those not taking multivitamins. Significant inverse associations were also observed between risk of EA and supplemental vitamin C (> or = 250 mg vs. none: HR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.11-0.58) and vitamin E (> or = 180 mg vs. none: HR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.10-0.60). In this cohort study, use of multivitamins and single antioxidant supplements was associated with a significantly reduced risk of EA and markers of neoplastic progression among individuals with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:18444134

Dong, Linda M; Kristal, Alan R; Peters, Ulrike; Schenk, Jeannette M; Sanchez, Carissa A; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Blount, Patricia L; Odze, Robert D; Ayub, Kamran; Reid, Brian J; Vaughan, Thomas L

2008-01-01

18

Lifetime risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the lifetime risk of development of esophageal adenocarcinoma and/or high-grade dysplasia in patients diagnosed with Barrett’s esophagus. METHODS: Data were extracted from the United Kingdom National Barrett’s Oesophagus Registry on date of diagnosis, patient age and gender of 7877 patients from who had been registered from 35 United Kingdom centers. Life expectancy was evaluated from United Kingdom National Statistics data based upon gender and age at year at diagnosis. These data were then used with published estimates of annual adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia incidences from meta-analyses and large population-based studies to estimate overall lifetime risk of development of these study endpoints. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus was 61.6 years in males and 67.3 years in females. The mean life expectancy at diagnosis was 23.1 years in males, 20.7 years in females and 22.2 years overall. Using data from published meta-analyses, the lifetime risk of development of adenocarcinoma was between 1 in 8 and 1 in 14 and the lifetime risk of high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma was 1 in 5 to 1 in 6. Using data from 3 large recent population-based cohort studies the lifetime risk of adenocarcinoma was between 1 in 10 and 1 in 37 and of the combined end-point of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma was between 1 in 8 and 1 in 20. Age at Barrett’s esophagus diagnosis is reducing and life expectancy is increasing, which will partially counter-balance lower annual cancer incidence. CONCLUSION: There is a significant lifetime risk of development of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25071359

Gatenby, Piers; Caygill, Christine; Wall, Christine; Bhatacharjee, Santanu; Ramus, James; Watson, Anthony; Winslet, Marc

2014-01-01

19

Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity  

E-print Network

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation ...

Lander, Eric S.

20

Obesity and lifestyle risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the association of obesity with esophageal adenocarcinoma, and with the precursor lesions Barrett esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This case-control study included cases with GERD (n = 142), Barrett esophagus (n = 130), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 57). Controls comprised 102 asymptomatic individuals. Using logistic regression methods, we compared obesity rates between cases and controls adjusting for differences in age, gender, and lifestyle risk factors. Relative to normal weight, obese individuals were at increased risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma (Odds Ratio [OR] 4.67, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.27-17.9). Diets high in vitamin C were associated with a lower risk for GERD (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.19-0.87), Barrett esophagus (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.98), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.77). For the more established risk factors, we confirmed that smoking was a significant risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, and that increased liquor consumption was associated with GERD and Barrett esophagus. In light of the current obesity epidemic, esophageal adenocarcinoma incidence rates are expected to continue to increase. Successful promotion of healthy body weight and diets high in vitamin C may substantially reduce the incidence of this disease. PMID:16984526

Veugelers, P J; Porter, G A; Guernsey, D L; Casson, A G

2006-01-01

21

Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes in the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal (Barrett) adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the hypothesis that aberrations of DNA repair contribute to susceptibility for the progression of gastro- esophageal reflux disease (GERD) into Barrett esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC), we studied the frequency of polymorphisms of selected DNA repair genes in patients with GERD (n ¼ 126), BE (n ¼ 125) and EADC (n ¼ 56) enrolled in a 2-year

Alan G. Casson; Zuoyu Zheng; Susan C. Evans; Paul J. Veugelers; Geoffrey A. Porter; Duane L. Guernsey

22

Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Barrett Metaplasia and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Using Two-dimensional Liquid Mass Mapping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophageal adenocarcinoma, currently the seventh lead- ing cause of cancer-related death, has been associated with the presence of Barrett metaplasia. The malignant potential of Barrett metaplasia is evidenced by ultimate progression of this condition to invasive adenocarcinoma. We utilized liquid phase separation of proteins with chro- matofocusing in the first dimension and nonporous re- verse phase HPLC in the second

Jia Zhao; Andrew C. Chang; Chen Li; Kerby A. Shedden; Dafydd G. Thomas; David E. Misek; Arun Prasad Manoharan; Thomas J. Giordano; David G. Beer; David M. Lubman

2007-01-01

23

Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer (EC) ranks sixth in cancer death. To explore its genetic origins, we performed exomic sequencing on 11 adenocarcinomas (EAC) and 12 squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) from the United States. Interestingly, inactivating mutations of NOTCH1 were identified in 21% of ESCCs but not in EACs. There was a substantial disparity in the spectrum of mutations, with more indels in ESCCs, A:T>C:G transversions in EACs, and C:G>G:C transversions in ESCCs (p<0.0001). Notably, NOTCH1 mutations were more frequent in North American ESCCs (11 of 53 cases) than in ESCCs from China (1 of 48 cases). A parallel analysis found that most mutations in EACs were already present in matched Barrett’s esophagus (BE). These discoveries highlight key genetic differences between EAC and ESCC, American and Chinese ESCC, and suggest that NOTCH1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the esophagus. Finally, we provide a genetic basis for the evolution of EACs from BE. PMID:22877736

Agrawal, Nishant; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Hutfless, Susan M.; Wang, Yuxuan; David, Stefan; Cheng, Yulan; Twaddell, William S.; Latt, Nyan L.; Shin, Eun J.; Wang, Li-Dong; Wang, Liang; Yang, Wancai; Velculescu, Victor E.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Meltzer, Stephen J.

2012-01-01

24

Clinical implications of p53 tumor suppressor gene mutation and protein expression in esophageal adenocarcinomas: Results of a ten-year prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study was undertaken to characterize the spectrum of p53 alterations (mutations and protein expression) in surgically resected esophageal adenocarcinomas, and to correlate molecular alterations with clinicopathologic findings and outcome. Methods: Between 1991 and 2001, 91 consecutive patients with esophageal adenocarcinomas underwent subtotal esophagectomy. No patient received induction therapy. Strict clinicopathologic criteria were used to define primary esophageal adenocarcinomas.

Alan G. Casson; Susan C. Evans; Amy Gillis; Geoffrey A. Porter; Paul Veugelers; S. Jane Darnton; Duane L. Guernsey; Pierre Hainaut

2003-01-01

25

Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

2015-03-31

26

TGM2 A Cell Surface Marker in Esophageal Adenocarcinomas  

PubMed Central

Introduction Esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) are aggressive cancers that are increasing in incidence and associated with a poor prognosis. The identification of highly expressed genes in EAC relative to metaplastic Barrett’s esophagus (BE) may provide new targets for novel early cancer detection strategies using endoscopically administered, fluorescently labeled peptides. Methods Gene expression analysis of BE and EACs were used to identify the cell surface marker transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) as overexpressed in cancer. The expression of two major isoforms of TGM2 was determined by qRT-polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort of 128 EACs. Protein expression was confirmed by tissue microarrays and immunoblot analysis of EAC cell lines. TGM2 DNA copy number was assessed using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and confirmed by qPCR. TGM2 expression in neoadjuvantly treated EACs and following small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown in cisplatin-treated EAC cells was used to determine its possible role in chemoresistance. Results TGM2 is overexpressed in 15 EACs relative to 26 BE samples. Overexpression of both TGM2 isoforms was confirmed in 128 EACs and associated with higher tumor stage, poor differentiation, and increased inflammatory and desmoplastic response. Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry confirmed elevated TGM2 protein expression in EAC. Single nucleotide polymorphism and qPCR analysis revealed increased TGM2 gene copy number as one mechanism underlying elevated TGM2 expression. TGM2 was highly expressed in resistant EAC after patient treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy/radiation suggesting a role for TGM2 in chemoresistance. Conclusion TGM2 may be a useful cell surface biomarker for early detection of EAC. PMID:24828664

Leicht, Deborah T.; Kausar, Tasneem; Wang, Zhuwen; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Wang, Thomas D.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew C.; Lin, Lin; Beer, David G.

2014-01-01

27

Area-Level Attributes and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registries  

PubMed Central

Purpose To examine the associations between area-level socioeconomic attributes and stage of esophageal adenocarcinoma diagnoses in 16 SEER cancer registries during 2000-2007. Methods Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression models to assess the relationship between distant-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma and individual, census tract, and county-level attributes. Results Among cases with data on birthplace, no significant association was seen between reported birth within versus outside the United States and distant-stage cancer (adjusted OR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.85-1.22). Living in an area with a higher percentage of residents born outside the United States than the national average was associated with distant-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma; census tract level: >11.8%, (OR=1.10, 95% CI:1.01–1.19), county level: >11.8%, (OR=1.14, 95% CI:1.05-1.24). No association was observed between median household income and distant-stage cancer at either census tract or county levels. Conclusion The finding of greater odds of distant-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma among cases residing in SEER areas with higher proportion of non-U.S. Natives suggests local areas where esophageal cancer control efforts might be focused. Missing data at the individual level was a limitation of the present study. Furthermore, inconsistent associations with foreign birth at individual- versus area-levels cautions against using area-level attributes as proxies for case attributes. PMID:24244745

Ghazarian, Armen A.; Murphy, Megan A.; Khan, Maria R.; Saksvig, Brit I.; Altekruse, Sean F.

2013-01-01

28

Effect of aspirin treatment on the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a rat experimental model.  

PubMed

Aspirin has been proposed in recent years as a candidate for chemoprevention of adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in an experimental model of esophageal adenocarcinoma. An animal model of gastroenteroesophageal reflux was established using Wistar rats undergoing esophagojejunostomy with gastric preservation. Following surgery, rats were divided into three groups: i) control (vehicle); ii) ASA 50 mg/kg/day; and iii) ASA 5 mg/kg/day. Four months after surgery, the surviving animals were sacrificed and the rat esophagi were assessed for histological and biochemical [prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4 ) levels] analysis. As in the control rats, those receiving aspirin treatment showed no decrease in inflammation grade, extent of ulcerated esophageal mucosa, length of intestinal metaplasia in continuity with anastomosis, presence of intestinal metaplasia beyond anastomosis, severity of dysplasia or incidence of adenocarcinoma. In contrast, aspirin-treated rats showed decreased esophageal tissue levels of PGE2 and increased LXA4, significantly in the high-dose aspirin group (p=0.008 and p=0.01, respectively). In this rat model of gastroesophageal reflux, the administration of aspirin modified esophageal tissue levels of PGE2 and LXA4, but was not effective in preventing the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24737143

Esquivias, Paula; Cebrián, Carmelo; Morandeira, Antonio; Santander, Sonia; Ortego, Javier; García-González, María Asunción; Lanas, Angel; Piazuelo, Elena

2014-06-01

29

Chemoradiotherapy is effective for primary esophageal adenosquamous cell carcinoma but ineffective for the metastatic adenocarcinoma component.  

PubMed

A 62-year-old man was referred to our hospital with dysphagia. Blood examination revealed significantly elevated serum CA19-9 levels but normal CEA and SCC levels. Imaging uncovered thoracic esophageal cancer with lung and bone metastasis, and subsequent endoscopic biopsy specimens of the primary esophageal tumor showed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent palliative chemoradiotherapy, but died due to progression of multiple metastases and increasing serum CA19-9 levels. Autopsy revealed adenocarcinoma in multiple metastatic foci, although the squamous component had disappeared in the primary and metastatic lesions. Therefore, we concluded that the adenocarcinoma component of adenosquamous cell carcinoma was refractory to chemoradiotherapy. PMID:25748154

Nozaki, Yasutoshi; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hori, Yumiko; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Kato, Motohiko; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Morii, Eiichi; Takehara, Tetsuo

2015-01-01

30

Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Physical activity has been inversely associated with risk of several cancers. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the association between physical activity and risk of esophageal cancer (esophageal adenocarcinoma [EAC] and/or esophageal squamous cell carcinoma [ESCC]). Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of bibliographic databases and conference proceedings from inception through February 2013 for observational studies that examined associations between recreational and/or occupational physical activity and esophageal cancer risk. Summary adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using the random-effects model. Results The analysis included 9 studies (4 cohort, 5 case–control) reporting 1,871 cases of esophageal cancer among 1,381,844 patients. Meta-analysis demonstrated that the risk of esophageal cancer was 29% lower among the most physically active compared to the least physically active subjects (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.89), with moderate heterogeneity (I2?=?47%). On histology-specific analysis, physical activity was associated with a 32% decreased risk of EAC (4 studies, 503 cases of EAC; OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.55-0.85) with minimal heterogeneity (I2?=?0%). There were only 3 studies reporting the association between physical activity and risk of ESCC with conflicting results, and the meta-analysis demonstrated a null association (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.21-5.64). The results were consistent across study design, geographic location and study quality, with a non-significant trend towards a dose–response relationship. Conclusions Meta-analysis of published observational studies indicates that physical activity may be associated with reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Lifestyle interventions focusing on increasing physical activity may decrease the global burden of EAC. PMID:24886123

2014-01-01

31

Biomarkers may help predict progression of Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

A series of microRNA expression signatures that may help to define progression of the precancerous condition Barrett's esophagus into esophageal adenocarcinoma was reported recently in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston.

32

Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Its Rare Association with Barrett’s Esophagus in Henan, China  

PubMed Central

Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased sharply in Western Europe and United States over the past three decades. Nearly all cases of EAC in the west are thought to be associated with Barrett’s esophagus (BE) at the time of diagnosis. Regions in the Henan province of China have one of world’s highest incidences of esophageal cancer, yet recent temporal trends in the relative rates of EAC with respect to esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC), as well as its association with Barrett’s esophagus (BE), have not been reported. In this report, we present large-scale longitudinal clinical and histological data on 5401 esophageal cancers (EC) patients diagnosed during the recent 10-year period (2002–2011) at Henan Cancer Hospital, China. All 217 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) patients from these 5401 EC patients were examined to better understand the relationship between Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and EAC. We found that EAC was relatively rare and accounted for approximately 5% of all esophageal cancers each year during 2002–2011. There is no evidence of significant temporal trends in the rate of EAC relative to ESCC. Only 10 out of 217 (4.6%) EAC cases were detected to have any evidence of Barrett’s esophagus. This result raises the possibility of a different etiological basis for EAC in China motivating more detailed epidemiological, clinical and molecular characterization of EAC in China in order to better understand the neoplastic development of EAC. PMID:25333822

Yao, Lena; Li, Xiaohong; Reid, Brian; Self, Steve; Ma, Jie; Chang, Yuxi; Feng, Shixian; de Dieu Tapsoba, Jean; Sun, Xin; Sun, Xibin

2014-01-01

33

Antidiabetic drug metformin inhibits esophageal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

Esophageal carcinoma is the eighth most common cancer worldwide and the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths, with one of the worst prognoses of any form of cancer. Treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced cancer incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study therefore evaluated the effects of metformin on the proliferation, in vitro and in vivo, of human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells, as well as the microRNAs associated with the antitumor effects of metformin. Metformin inhibited the proliferation of the esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines OE19, OE33, SK-GT4 and OACM 5.1C, blocking the G0 to G1 transition in the cell cycle. This was accompanied by strong reductions in G1 cyclins, especially cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk6, and decreases in retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation. In addition, metformin reduced the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, as well as angiogenesis-related proteins, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2. Metformin also markedly altered microRNA expression. Treatment with metformin of athymic nude mice bearing xenograft tumors reduced tumor proliferation. These findings suggest that metformin may have clinical use in the treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25709052

Fujihara, Shintaro; Kato, Kiyohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Iwama, Hisakazu; Nishioka, Tomoko; Chiyo, Taiga; Nishiyama, Noriko; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu

2015-05-01

34

Associations between genetic polymorphisms of Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, p53 and susceptibility to esophageal adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this exploratory case–control study were to evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of selected Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes are associated with the risk of developing primary esophageal adenocarcinoma, and to investigate potential associations between genotypes and p53 tumor suppressor gene alterations. Cases comprised 45 patients with surgically resected esophageal adenocarcinomas, defined according to strict clinico-pathologic criteria. PCR-based

A. G Casson; Z Zheng; D Chiasson; K MacDonald; D. C Riddell; J. R Guernsey; D. L Guernsey; J McLaughlin

2003-01-01

35

Expression of the putative stem cell marker Musashi-1 in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

The cancer stem cell theory states that cancers contain tumor-forming cells that have the ability to self-renew as well as give rise to cells that differentiate. Cancer stem cells have been identified in several solid tumors, but stem cells in normal human esophagus or in Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma have not been reported. Musashi-1 is expressed by the crypt base columnar cells identified as intestinal stem cells. In other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, local inflammation of the tunica mucosa may be an initiating factor of alteration of focal tissue 'niches,' where dormant stem cells locate. The present study investigated whether Musashi-1 is expressed in the esophagus and its relation to immune inflammation of the mucosa in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. A total of 41 esophageal tissue specimens from 41 patients were studied. Of these, 15 were esophageal adenocarcinoma, 17 were Barrett's esophagus (10 intestinal metaplasia and 7 dysplasia), and 9 were normal squamous esophagus tissue specimens from patients without esophageal pathology. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies to Musashi-1 and to a set of cell type-specific markers. A multiplexed tandem polymerase chain reaction method was used to measure the relative mRNA expression levels of Musashi-1 and the specific dendritic cell marker dendritic cell-specific intercellular molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing nonintegrin. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of small numbers of Musashi-1+ cells scattered in the connective tissue stroma and within the epithelium in cardiac-type glands in biopsies from patients without Barrett's esophagus. Musashi-1 expression was present in Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and in dysplastic Barrett's in which the majority of epithelial cells in individual glands expressed this antigen. Expression of Musashi-1 was highest in esophageal adenocarcinoma, where it was most intense in glands that displayed features of early stages of adenocarcinoma formation. In contrast, Musashi-1 staining level was weaker in glands that displayed features of advanced adenocarcinoma. Double immunostaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen showed low proliferation in the vast majority of Musashi-1+ cells. Musashi-1 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in esophageal adenocarcinoma than in normal esophagus or Barrett's esophagus tissues. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in both Barrett's tissues and adenocarcinoma tissues. Expression of the putative stem cell marker Musashi-1 is absent in normal squamous epithelium, weak in esophageal cardiac-type glands and Barrett's esophagus, and markedly increased in adenocarcinoma, especially in glands displaying features of early cancer development. Musashi-1 expressing cells may be significant in the etiology of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma, and perhaps even a cell of origin for this disease. We speculate that immune inflammation occurring in Barrett's esophagus alters the mucosal microenvironment in a manner which is favorable to the activation of dormant stem cells. PMID:20459440

Bobryshev, Y V; Freeman, A K; Botelho, N K; Tran, D; Levert-Mignon, A J M; Lord, R V N

2010-09-01

36

Whole-miRNome profiling identifies prognostic serum miRNAs in esophageal adenocarcinoma: the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection status.  

PubMed

Cell free circulating microRNAs (cfmiRNAs) have been recognized as robust and stable biomarkers of cancers. However, little is known about the prognostic significance of cfmiRNAs in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). In this study, we explored whether specific cfmiRNA profiles could predict EA prognosis and whether Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status could influence the association between cfmiRNAs and EA survival outcome. We profiled 1075 miRNAs in pooled serum samples from 30 EA patients and 30 healthy controls. The most relevant cfmiRNAs were then assessed for their associations with EA survival in an independent cohort of 82 patients, using Log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression models. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used for cfmiRNA profiling. HP infection status was determined by immunoblotting assay. We identified a panel of 18 cfmiRNAs that could distinguish EA patients from healthy subjects (P = 3.0E-12). In overall analysis and in HP-positive subtype patients, no cfmiRNA was significantly associated with EA prognosis. In HP-negative patients, however, 15 cfmiRNAs were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) (all P < 0.05). A combined 2-cfmiRNA (low miR-3935 and high miR-4286) risk score was constructed; that showed greater risk for worse OS (HR = 2.22, P = 0.0019) than individual cfmiRNA alone. Patients with high-risk score had >10-fold increased risk of death than patients with low risk score (P = 0.0302; HR = 10.91; P = 0.0094). Our findings suggest that dysregulated cfmiRNAs may contribute to EA survival outcome and HP infection status may modify the association between cfmiRNAs and EA survival. PMID:25381453

Zhai, Rihong; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Liu, Geoffrey; Kulke, Mathew H; Wain, John C; Christiani, David C

2015-01-01

37

A quantitative investigation of fucosylated serum glycoproteins with application to esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Although glycoproteomic studies provide unique opportunities for cancer research, it has been necessary to develop specific methods for analysis of oncologically interesting glycoproteins. We describe a general, multimethodological approach for quantitative glycoproteomic analysis of fucosylated glycoproteins in human blood serum. A total of 136 putative fucosylated glycoproteins were identified with very high confidence in three clinically relevant sample pools (N=5 for each), with a mean CV of 3.1% observed for replicate analyses. Two samples were collected from subjects diagnosed with esophagus disease states, high-grade dysplasia plus esophageal adenocarcinoma, while the third sample was representative of a disease-free condition. Some glycoproteins, observed to be significantly upregulated in esophageal adenocarcinoma, i.e. more than twofold higher than in the disease-free condition, are briefly discussed. Further investigation will be necessary to validate these findings; however, the method itself is demonstrated to be an effective tool for quantitative glycoproteomics of clinical samples. PMID:20446296

Mann, Benjamin; Madera, Milan; Klouckova, Iveta; Mechref, Yehia; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Hickey, Robert J; Hammoud, Zane T; Novotny, Milos V

2010-06-01

38

Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma using chitosan-coated gold/gold sulfide (CS-GGS) nanoparticles. A rat esophagoduodenal anastomosis model was used for the in vivo ablation study, and three human esophageal cell lines were used to study the response of cancer cells and benign cells to near infrared light after treatment with CS-GGS. The results indicate that both cancerous tissue and cancer cells took up more gold nanoparticles and were completely ablated after exposure to near infrared light. The benign tissue and noncancerous cells showed less uptake of these nanoparticles, and remained viable after exposure to near infrared light. CS-GGS nanoparticles could provide an optimal endoluminal therapeutic option for near infrared light ablation of esophageal cancer. PMID:23818775

Li, Yan; Gobin, Andre M; Dryden, Gerald W; Kang, Xinqin; Xiao, Deyi; Li, Su Ping; Zhang, Guandong; Martin, Robert CG

2013-01-01

39

Role of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Barrett’s esophagus, a pre-malignant condition that can lead to esophageal adenocarcinoma, is characterized by histological changes in the normal squamous epithelium of the esophagus. Numerous molecular changes occur during the multistage conversion of Barrett’s metaplasia to dysplasia and frank adenocarcinoma. Epigenetic changes, especially changes in DNA methylation are widespread during this process. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to occur at promoters of tumor suppressor genes, adhesion molecules and DNA repair genes during Barrett’s esophagus. These epigenetic alterations can be used as molecular biomarkers for risk stratification and early detection of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We also show that genome wide analysis of methylation surprisingly reveals that global hypomethylation and not hypermethylation is the dominant change during Barrett’s metaplasia. The transformation of Barrett’s esophagus to frank adenocarcinoma is in turn characterized by much smaller wave of selective promoter hypermethylation. These studies reveal many novel, potential targets for new therapies and illustrate the utility of incorporating these epigenetic changes as biomarkers during endoscopic surveillance interval for patients with Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:22808291

Agarwal, Archana; Polineni, Rahul; Hussein, Zulfiqar; Vigoda, Ivette; Bhagat, Tushar D; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

2012-01-01

40

Inflammatory and microRNA Gene Expression as Prognostic Classifiers of Barrett's Associated Esophageal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose Esophageal cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly forms of cancer; highlighting the need to identify biomarkers for early detection and prognostic classification. Our recent studies have identified inflammatory gene and microRNA signatures derived from tumor and nontumor tissues as prognostic biomarkers of hepatocellular, lung, and colorectal adenocarcinoma. Here, we examine the relationship between expression of these inflammatory genes and miRNA expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and patient survival. Experimental Design We measured the expression of 23 inflammation-associated genes in tumors and adjacent normal tissues from 93 patients (58 Barrett's and 35 Sporadic adenocarcinomas) by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These data were used to build an inflammatory risk model, based on multivariate Cox regression, to predict survival in a training cohort (n=47). We then determined if this model could predict survival in a cohort of 46 patients. Expression data for miRNA-375 was available for these patients and was combined with inflammatory gene expression. Results IFN?, IL-1?, IL-8, IL-21, IL-23, and PRG expression in tumor and nontumor samples were each associated with poor prognosis based on Cox regression ([Z-score]>1.5) and therefore, were used to generate an inflammatory risk score (IRS). Patients with a high IRS had poor prognosis compared to those with a low IRS in the training (P=0.002) and test (P=0.012) cohorts. This association was stronger in the group with Barrett's history. When combining with miRNA-375, the combined IRS/miR signature was an improved prognostic classifier than either one alone. Conclusion Transcriptional profiling of inflammation-associated genes and miRNA expression in resected esophageal Barrett's associated adenocarcinoma tissues may have clinical utility as predictors of prognosis. PMID:20947516

Nguyen, Giang Huong; Schetter, Aaron J.; Chou, David B.; Bowman, Elise D.; Zhao, Ronghua; Hawkes, Jason E.; Mathe, Ewy A.; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Zhao, Yiqiang; Budhu, Anuradha; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Wang, Xin Wei; Miyashita, Masao; Casson, Alan G.; Harris, Curtis C.

2010-01-01

41

Esophageal adenocarcinoma and urothelial carcinoma orbital metastases masquerading as infection.  

PubMed

Orbital metastases can masquerade as other orbital processes. We present two cases of orbital metastases, the first being the first reported adenocarcinoma of the esophagus presenting as an orbital metastasis prior to the primary being known, and the other as the first urothelial carcinoma to present as orbital cellulitis. The first patient presented with left upper eyelid pain. CT scan identified a superolateral subperiosteal fluid collection without concomitant sinus disease, which was drained in the operating room. Two weeks later repeat CT scan showed recurrent orbital subperiosteal fluid. It was drained and a biopsy showed necrotic adenocarcinoma. The second case presented with a painless right proptosis, decreased vision, and globally decreased ocular motility 3 days after bladder resection for urothelial carcinoma. CT scan demonstrated pan sinusitis with a soft tissue mass in the apex of the right orbit with extension through the superior orbital fissure. After no improvement on antibiotics endoscopic drainage was performed. Pathology revealed metastatic urothelial carcinoma within the orbital fat. PMID:25325392

Magrath, George N; Proctor, Charles M; Reardon, Wade A; Patel, Krishna G; Lentsch, Eric J; Eiseman, Andrew S

2015-02-01

42

Screening for Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: Rationale, Recent Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.  

PubMed

As the incidence and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma continue to increase, strategies to counter this need to be explored. Screening for Barrett's esophagus, which is the known precursor of a large majority of adenocarcinomas, has been debated without a firm consensus. Given evidence for and against perceived benefits of screening, the multitude of challenges in the implementation of such a strategy and in the downstream management of subjects with Barrett's esophagus who could be diagnosed by screening, support for screening has been modest. Recent advances in the form of development and initial accuracy of noninvasive tools for screening, risk assessment tools, and biomarker panels to risk stratify subjects with BE, have spurred renewed interest in the early detection of Barrett's esophagus and related neoplasia, particularly with the advent of effective endoscopic therapy. In this review, we explore in depth the potential rationale for screening for Barrett's esophagus, recent advances that have the potential of making screening feasible, and also highlight some of the challenges that will have to be overcome to develop an effective approach to improve the outcomes of subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24887058

Sami, Sarmed S; Ragunath, Krish; Iyer, Prasad G

2015-04-01

43

Genomic catastrophes frequently arise in esophageal adenocarcinoma and drive tumorigenesis.  

PubMed

Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) incidence is rapidly increasing in Western countries. A better understanding of EAC underpins efforts to improve early detection and treatment outcomes. While large EAC exome sequencing efforts to date have found recurrent loss-of-function mutations, oncogenic driving events have been underrepresented. Here we use a combination of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and single-nucleotide polymorphism-array profiling to show that genomic catastrophes are frequent in EAC, with almost a third (32%, n=40/123) undergoing chromothriptic events. WGS of 22 EAC cases show that catastrophes may lead to oncogene amplification through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (MYC and MDM2) or breakage-fusion-bridge (KRAS, MDM2 and RFC3). Telomere shortening is more prominent in EACs bearing localized complex rearrangements. Mutational signature analysis also confirms that extreme genomic instability in EAC can be driven by somatic BRCA2 mutations. These findings suggest that genomic catastrophes have a significant role in the malignant transformation of EAC. PMID:25351503

Nones, Katia; Waddell, Nicola; Wayte, Nicci; Patch, Ann-Marie; Bailey, Peter; Newell, Felicity; Holmes, Oliver; Fink, J Lynn; Quinn, Michael C J; Tang, Yue Hang; Lampe, Guy; Quek, Kelly; Loffler, Kelly A; Manning, Suzanne; Idrisoglu, Senel; Miller, David; Xu, Qinying; Waddell, Nick; Wilson, Peter J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Anderson, Matthew; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Wood, Scott; Simpson, Peter T; Reid, Lynne E; Krause, Lutz; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I; Lord, Reginald V; Nancarrow, Derek; Phillips, Wayne A; Gotley, David; Smithers, B Mark; Whiteman, David C; Hayward, Nicholas K; Campbell, Peter J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Barbour, Andrew P

2014-01-01

44

MicroRNA Signature Characterizes Primary Tumors That Metastasize in an Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Rat Model  

PubMed Central

Objective To establish a miRNA signature for metastasis in an animal model of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Background The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has dramatically increased and esophageal cancer is now the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Mortality rates remain high among patients with advanced stage disease and esophagectomy is associated with high complication rates. Hence, early identification of potentially metastatic disease would better guide treatment strategies. Methods The modified Levrat’s surgery was performed to induce EAC in Sprague-Dawley rats. Primary EAC and distant metastatic sites were confirmed via histology and immunofluorescence. miRNA profiling was performed on primary tumors with or without metastasis. A unique subset of miRNAs expressed in primary tumors and metastases was identified with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) along with upstream and downstream targets. miRNA-linked gene expression analysis was performed on a secondary cohort of metastasis positive (n=5) and metastasis negative (n=28) primary tumors. Results The epithelial origin of distant metastasis was established by IF using villin (VIL1) and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) antibodies. miRNome analysis identified four down-regulated miRNAs in metastasis positive primary tumors compared to metastasis negative tumors: miR-92a-3p (p=0.0001), miR-141-3p (p=0.0022), miR-451-1a (p=0.0181) and miR133a-3p (p=0.0304). Six target genes identified in the top scoring networks by IPA were validated as significantly, differentially expressed in metastasis positive primary tumors: Ago2, Akt1, Kras, Bcl2L11, CDKN1B and Zeb2. Conclusion In vivo metastasis was confirmed in the modified Levrat’s model. Analysis of the primary tumor identified a distinctive miRNA signature for primary tumors that metastasized. PMID:25826212

Zaidi, Ali H.; Saldin, Lindsey T.; Kelly, Lori A.; Bergal, Linda; Londono, Ricardo; Kosovec, Juliann E.; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Kasi, Pashtoon M.; Shetty, Amit A.; Keane, Timothy J.; Thakkar, Shyam J.; Huleihel, Luai; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Badylak, Stephen F.; Jobe, Blair A.

2015-01-01

45

NADPH oxidase NOX5-S and nuclear factor ?B1 mediate acid-induced microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 expression in Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma cells.  

PubMed

The mechanisms of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not known. Cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E? (PGE?) has been shown to be important in esophageal tumorigenesis. We have shown that COX-2 mediates acid-induced PGE? production. The prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) responsible for acid-induced PGE2 production in BE, however, is not known. We found that microsomal PGES1 (mPGES1), mPGES2, and cytosolic PGES (cPGES) were present in FLO EA cells. Pulsed acid treatment significantly increased mPGES1 mRNA and protein levels but had little or no effect on mPGES2 or cPGES mRNA. Knockdown of mPGES1 by mPGES1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked acid-induced increase in PGE2 production and thymidine incorporation. Knockdown of NADPH oxidase, NOX5-S, a variant lacking calcium-binding domains, by NOX5 siRNA significantly inhibited acid-induced increase in mPGES1 expression, thymidine incorporation, and PGE2 production. Overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased the luciferase activity in FLO cells transfected with a nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) in vivo activation reporter plasmid pNF-?B-Luc. Knockdown of NF-?B1 p50 by p50 siRNA significantly decreased acid-induced increase in mPGES1 expression, thymidine incorporation, and PGE? production. Two novel NF-?B binding elements, GGAGTCTCCC and CGGGACACCC, were identified in the mPGES1 gene promoter. We conclude that mPGES1 mediates acid-induced increase in PGE? production and cell proliferation. Acid-induced mPGES1 expression depends on activation of NOX5-S and NF-?B1 p50. Microsomal PGES1 may be a potential target to prevent or treat EA. PMID:23439561

Zhou, Xiaoxu; Li, Dan; Resnick, Murray B; Wands, Jack; Cao, Weibiao

2013-05-01

46

Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma diagnosed by narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy.  

PubMed

A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital for detailed examination of a protuberant lesion in long-segment Barrett's esophagus (LSBE). Under white light endoscopy (WLE) the lesion appeared as a protuberant lesion with a rough surface and was diagnosed as 0-IIa-type tumor suspected to be a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. A regular villous pattern was shown in the background mucosa of the LSBE by narrow-band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME). However, a slightly irregular villous pattern was observed on the lateral side of the main lesion. Therefore, a 0-IIa-type tumor was estimated to have a flatly lateral extension component (i.e. 0-IIb spreading). The 0-IIb spreading was unclear when using WLE, but could be diagnosed by NBI-ME based on the surface pattern differences. Markings were placed outside the edge of the flatly lateral extension, and endoscopic submucosal dissection was carried out.The pathological diagnosis of the protuberant lesion with flatly lateral spreading was well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The macroscopic type was 0-IIa+IIb, 45 × 43 mm in size. The invasion depth was T1a (deep muscularis mucosae). Lymphatic and venous invasions were negative; horizontal and vertical margins were negative. In conclusion, NBI-ME was useful for the diagnosis of the flatly lateral extension of this 0-IIa+IIb esophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. Further investigations with many cases are necessary. PMID:23617675

Takahashi, Akiko; Oyama, Tsuneo

2013-05-01

47

Smad4 loss in esophageal adenocarcinoma is associated with an increased propensity for disease recurrence and poor survival.  

PubMed

Previously regarded as a rare neoplasm, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has risen rapidly in recent decades. It is often discovered late in the disease process and has a dismal prognosis. Current prognostic markers including clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings have limited utility and do not consider the biology of this deadly disease. Genome-wide analyses have identified SMAD4 inactivation in a subset of tumors. Although Smad4 has been extensively studied in other gastrointestinal malignancies, its role in esophageal adenocarcinoma remains to be defined. Herein, we show, in a large cohort of esophageal adenocarcinomas, Smad4 loss by immunohistochemistry in 21 of 205 (10%) tumors and that Smad4 loss correlated with increased postoperative recurrence (P=0.040). Further, patients whose tumors lacked Smad4 had shorter time to recurrence (TTR) (P=0.007) and poor overall survival (OS) (P=0.011). The median TTR and OS of patients with Smad4-negative tumors was 13 and 16 months, respectively, as compared with 23 and 22 months, respectively, among patients with Smad4-positive tumors. In multivariate analyses, Smad4 loss was a prognostic factor for both TTR and OS, independent of histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, tumor stage, and lymph node status. Considering Smad4 loss correlated with postoperative locoregional and/or distant metastases, Smad4 was also assessed in a separate cohort of 5 locoregional recurrences and 43 metastatic esophageal adenocarcinomas. In contrast to primary tumors, a higher prevalence of Smad4 loss was observed in metastatic disease (44% vs. 10%). In summary, loss of Smad4 protein expression is an independent prognostic factor for TTR and OS that correlates with increased propensity for disease recurrence and poor survival in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma after surgical resection. PMID:25634752

Singhi, Aatur D; Foxwell, Tyler J; Nason, Katie; Cressman, Kristi L; McGrath, Kevin M; Sun, Weijing; Bahary, Nathan; Zeh, Herbert J; Levy, Ryan M; Luketich, James D; Davison, Jon M

2015-04-01

48

Epstein–Barr Virus in Gastro-Esophageal Adenocarcinomas – Single Center Experiences in the Context of Current Literature  

PubMed Central

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinomas (GC) represent a distinct and well-recognized subtype of gastric cancer with a prevalence of around 10% of all GC. In contrast, EBV has not been reported to play a major role in esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) and adenocarcinomas of the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ). We report our experiences on EBV in collections of gastro-esophageal adenocarcinomas from two surgical centers and discuss the current state of research in this field. Tumor samples from 465 primary resected gastro-esophageal adenocarcinomas (118 EAC, 73 GEJ, and 274 GC) were investigated. Presence of EBV was determined by EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBER) in situ hybridization. Results were correlated with pathologic parameters (UICC pTNM category, Her2 status, tumor grading) and survival. EBER positivity was observed in 14 cases. None of the EAC were positive for EBER. In contrast, we observed EBER positivity in 2/73 adenocarcinomas of the GEJ (2.7%) and 12/274 GC (4.4%). These were of intestinal type (seven cases) or unclassifiable (six cases), while only one case was of diffuse type according to the Lauren classification. No association between EBV and pT, pN, or tumor grading was found, neither was there a correlation with clinical outcome. None of the EBER positive cases were Her2 positive. In conclusion, EBV does not seem to play a role in the carcinogenesis of EAC. Moreover, adenocarcinomas of the GEJ show lower rates of EBV positivity compared to GC. Our data only partially correlate with previous reports from the literature. This highlights the need for further research on this distinct entity. Recent reports, however, have identified specific epigenetic and genetic alterations in EBV-associated GC, which might lead to a distinct treatment approach for this specific subtype of GC in the future. PMID:25859432

Genitsch, Vera; Novotny, Alexander; Seiler, Christian A.; Kröll, Dino; Walch, Axel; Langer, Rupert

2015-01-01

49

Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer  

PubMed Central

Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

2009-01-01

50

Role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in Barrett's cells and Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Mechanisms whereby acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. Acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to cause DNA damage in Barrett's cells. We have previously shown that NADPH oxidase NOX5-S is responsible for acid-induced H2O2 production in Barrett's cells and in EA cells. In this study we examined the role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in a Barrett's EA cell line FLO and a Barrett's cell line CP-A. We found that pulsed acid treatment significantly increased tail moment in FLO and CP-A cells and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) in FLO cells, an increase that is blocked by Ca(2+)-free medium with EGTA and thapsigargin. Acid-induced increase in tail moment was significantly decreased by NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium in FLO cells, and by blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) increase or knockdown of NOX5-S with NOX5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in FLO and CP-A cells. Acid-induced increase in histone H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by NOX5 siRNA in FLO cells. Conversely, overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased tail moment and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. We conclude that pulsed acid treatment causes DNA damage via increase of intracellular calcium and activation of NOX5-S. It is possible that in BE acid reflux increases intracellular calcium, activates NOX5-S, and increases ROS production, which causes DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:24699332

Li, Dan; Cao, Weibiao

2014-05-15

51

Prevalence of Barrett's Esophagus in first degree relatives of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Aim Aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Barrett's Esophagus (BE) in first degree relatives of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and Barrett's' high grade dysplasia (HGD). Methods After Institutional Review board approval first degree relatives of patients with EAC/HGD underwent unsedated ultrathin trans-nasal endoscopy (UUTNE) with biopsy. BE was suspected if any salmon colored epithelial tongues were seen above the gastro-esophageal junction. A diagnosis of BE was made only if biopsy from these areas confirmed columnar lined epithelium with intestinal metaplasia. Results From 23 families 47 first degree relative underwent UUTNE and one patient underwent routine upper endoscopy with sedation as part of this study. The mean age of cases was 44.4 yrs. All patients tolerated the procedure well and there were no procedure related complications. BE was suspected in 16 (34%) patients and confirmed in 13/16 (27.7%) patients. There was 4 long segment (> 3cm) and 9 short segment (<3 cm) of BE. Conclusion There is a significantly higher than expected prevalence of BE in first degree relatives of EAC/HGD patients. This should be taken in to consideration to develop further screening guidelines. Further work is need to confirm these findings. Un-sedated trans-nasal endoscopy is a safe and well-tolerated method for BE screening. PMID:21617543

Juhasz, Arpad; Mittal, Sumeet K; Lee, Tommy H; Deng, Caishu; Chak, Amitabh; Lynch, Henry T

2011-01-01

52

Esophageal cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

53

Phase I/II study of trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin and radiation for locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the overall survival for patients with locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma receiving trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin, and radiation on a Phase I-II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus without distant organ metastases and 2+/3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 6 weeks with radiation therapy (RT) 50.4 Gy. Patients received trastuzumab at dose levels of 1, 1.5, or 2 mg/kg weekly for 5 weeks after an initial bolus of 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg. Results: Nineteen patients were entered: 7 (37%) had celiac adenopathy, and 7 (37%) had retroperitoneal, portal adenopathy, or scalene adenopathy. Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) had either 3+ HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry, or an increase in HER2 gene copy number by HER2 gene amplification or high polysomy by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median survival of all patients was 24 months and the 2-year survival was 50%. Conclusions: Assessment of the effect of trastuzumab in the treatment of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma overexpressing HER2 is limited by the small number of patients in this study. Overall survival, however, was similar to prior studies without an increase in toxicity. Evaluation of HER2 status should be performed in future trials for patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus that investigate therapies targeting the HER family.

Safran, Howard [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States)]. E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org; Di Petrillo, Thomas [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Akerman, Paul [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Ng, Thomas [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Evans, Devon [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Steinhoff, Margaret [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Benton, David [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Purviance, John [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Goldstein, Lisa [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Tantravahi, Umadevi [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Kennedy, Teresa R.N. [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States)

2007-02-01

54

Endoscopic assessment of children with esophageal atresia: Lack of relationship of esophagitis and esophageal metaplasia to symptomatology  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Late complications of esophageal atresia (EA), particularly esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, are increasingly being recognized. With the exception of patients with dysphagia associated with esophageal stricture, it is unknown whether patient symptomatology can predict endoscopic findings. METHODS: Data regarding the digestive symptoms of patients who were referred to the EA multidisciplinary clinic from October 2005 to October 2008, and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic evaluation, were systematically collected. Macroscopic and histological findings were analyzed. Endoscopy was considered normal if no esophagitis, intestinal metaplasia or gastric metaplasia (GM) was discerned. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients underwent endoscopy. Eighteen had dysphagia related to an esophageal stricture needing dilation and were subsequently excluded from the analysis. Forty-five patients (26 girls) with a median age of 7.3 years (range 0.4 to 17.9 years) were evaluated. Twenty-six patients (58%) were normal at endoscopy, 14 patients (31%) had esophagitis and 16 patients (36%) had GM. No intestinal metaplasia or adenocarcinoma was detected. Six patients with abnormal endoscopy results were asymptomatic. No correlation between digestive symptoms and endoscopy results was found. CONCLUSION: The present cross-sectional study showed that symptomatology was not predictive of abnormal endoscopy in EA patients. Esophagitis or GM may be discovered, even in the absence of symptoms, suggesting that physicians cannot rely solely on symptomatology to accurately evaluate the extent of these esophageal complications in this population. PMID:20485706

Castilloux, Julie; Soglio, Dorothée Bouron-Dal; Faure, Christophe

2010-01-01

55

Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Esophageal Cancer or Stomach Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

2013-06-03

56

Exome and whole genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity  

PubMed Central

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a five-year survival rate of 15%, identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumors/normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A to C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified significantly mutated 26 genes. Of these genes, four (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and PIK3CA) have been previously implicated in EAC. The novel significantly mutated genes include chromatin modifying factors and candidate contributors: SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1, and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 reveal increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest a new hypothesis about the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway to be a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

Dulak, Austin M.; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S.; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H.; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C.; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, David; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Golub, Todd R.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Beer, David G.; Godfrey, Tony E.; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J.

2013-01-01

57

Australian clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Barrett's esophagus and early esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Barrett's esophagus (BE), a common condition, is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). There is uncertainty about the best way to manage BE as most people with BE never develop EAC and most patients diagnosed with EAC have no preceding diagnosis of BE. Moreover, there have been recent advances in knowledge and practice about the management of BE and early EAC. To aid clinical decision making in this rapidly moving field, Cancer Council Australia convened an expert working party to identify pertinent clinical questions. The questions covered a wide range of topics including endoscopic and histological definitions of BE and early EAC; prevalence, incidence, natural history, and risk factors for BE; and methods for managing BE and early EAC. The latter considered modification of lifestyle factors; screening and surveillance strategies; and medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. To answer each question, the working party systematically reviewed the literature and developed a set of recommendations through consensus. Evidence underpinning each recommendation was rated according to quality and applicability. PMID:25612140

Whiteman, David C; Appleyard, Mark; Bahin, Farzan F; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Bourke, Michael J; Brown, Ian; Chung, Adrian; Clouston, Andrew; Dickins, Emma; Emery, Jon; Eslick, Guy D; Gordon, Louisa G; Grimpen, Florian; Hebbard, Geoff; Holliday, Laura; Hourigan, Luke F; Kendall, Bradley J; Lee, Eric Yt; Levert-Mignon, Angelique; Lord, Reginald V; Lord, Sarah J; Maule, Derek; Moss, Alan; Norton, Ian; Olver, Ian; Pavey, Darren; Raftopoulos, Spiro; Rajendra, Shan; Schoeman, Mark; Singh, Rajvinder; Sitas, Freddy; Smithers, B Mark; Taylor, Andrew C; Thomas, Melissa L; Thomson, Iain; To, Henry; von Dincklage, Jutta; Vuletich, Christine; Watson, David I; Yusoff, Ian F

2015-05-01

58

Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Serum N-linked Glycans from Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Phenotypes  

PubMed Central

Three disease phenotypes, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and a set of normal control (NC) serum samples are examined using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), mass spectrometry (MS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. Samples from a total of 136 individuals were examined, including: 7 characterized as BE, 12 as HGD, 56 as EAC and 61 as NC. In typical datasets it was possible to assign ~20 to 30 glycan ions based on MS measurements. Ion mobility distributions for these ions show multiple features. In some cases, such as the [S1H5N4+3Na]3+ and [S1F1H5N4+3Na]3+ glycan ions, the ratio of intensities of high-mobility features to low-mobility features vary significantly for different groups. The degree to which such variations in mobility profiles can be used to distinguish phenotypes is evaluated for eleven N-linked glycan ions. An outlier analysis on each sample class followed by an unsupervised PCA using a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition reveals that EAC samples are separated from NC samples based on 46 features originating from the 11-glycan composite IMS distribution. PMID:23126309

Gaye, M. M.; Valentine, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Mirjankar, N.; Hammoud, Z. T.; Mechref, Y.; Lavine, B. K.; Clemmer, D. E.

2012-01-01

59

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry analysis of serum N-linked glycans from esophageal adenocarcinoma phenotypes.  

PubMed

Three disease phenotypes, Barrett's esophagus (BE), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and a set of normal control (NC) serum samples are examined using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), mass spectrometry (MS), and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. Samples from a total of 136 individuals were examined, including 7 characterized as BE, 12 as HGD, 56 as EAC, and 61 as NC. In typical data sets, it was possible to assign ?20 to 30 glycan ions based on MS measurements. Ion mobility distributions for these ions show multiple features. In some cases, such as the [S1H5N4+3Na]3+ and [S1F1H5N4+3Na]3+ glycan ions, the ratio of intensities of high-mobility features to low-mobility features vary significantly for different groups. The degree to which such variations in mobility profiles can be used to distinguish phenotypes is evaluated for 11 N-linked glycan ions. An outlier analysis on each sample class followed by an unsupervised PCA using a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition reveals that EAC samples are separated from NC samples based on 46 features originating from the 11-glycan composite IMS distribution. PMID:23126309

Gaye, M M; Valentine, S J; Hu, Y; Mirjankar, N; Hammoud, Z T; Mechref, Y; Lavine, B K; Clemmer, D E

2012-12-01

60

Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity.  

PubMed

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole-exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumor-normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole-genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A>C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified 26 significantly mutated genes. Of these genes, five (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, ARID1A and PIK3CA) have previously been implicated in EAC. The new significantly mutated genes include chromatin-modifying factors and candidate contributors SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1 and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 identifies increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway as a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

Dulak, Austin M; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, Zhongren; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Landrenau, Rodney; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Luketich, James D; Golub, Todd R; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Beer, David G; Godfrey, Tony E; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J

2013-05-01

61

Intractable Facial Pain and Numb Chin due to Metastatic Esophageal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

The etiologies of facial pain are innumerable, thus facial pain misdiagnosis and resultant mismanagement is common. Numb chin syndrome presents with hypoesthesia and/or anesthesia in the dermatomal distribution of the inferior alveolar or the mental nerve. In this case report, we will discuss a case of intractable facial pain in a 57-year-old male with a history of esophageal adenocarcinoma who was initially misdiagnosed and treated as trigeminal neuralgia. During clinical examination, the loss of sensation in the inferior alveolar nerve distribution was identified and led to the diagnosis of mandibular metastasis. The details of the clinical presentation will be discussed in the context of accurate identification and diagnosis. Focal radiation to the metastatic location along with sphenopalatine ganglion radiofrequency ablation and medication management provided significant pain relief. This case report provides additional information to the current medical knowledge and it enhances the clinical vigilance of the clinicians when they encounter similar cases. We concluded that patients with a history of neoplasms who present with atypical symptoms of facial pain should undergo further investigation with advanced imaging. Targeted treatment based on an accurate diagnosis is the foundation of pain management. PMID:25606033

Elahi, Foad; Luke, Whitney; Elahi, Fazel

2014-01-01

62

Endoscopic Resection for Synchronous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Gastric Adenocarcinoma in Early Stage Is a Possible Alternative to Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims We investigated the clinical outcomes according to the method of treatment in synchronous esophageal and gastric cancer. Methods Synchronous esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma were diagnosed in 79 patients between 1996 and 2010. We divided the patients into four groups according to treatment; Group 1 received surgical resection for both cancers or surgery for gastric cancer with chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer (n=27); Group 2 was treated by endoscopic resection with or without additional treatment (n=14); Group 3 received chemoradiotherapy only (n=18); and Group 4 received supportive care only (n=20). Results The median survival times in groups 1 and 2 were 86 and 60 months, respectively. The recurrence rate and mortality were 23% and 48%, respectively, in group 1 and 21% and 4%, respectively, in group 2. The median survival time was 12 months in group 3 and 9 months in group 4. Multivariate analysis showed that age (p<0.001) and treatment group (p=0.019) were significantly associated with death. Compared with group 1, treatment in the intensive care unit (p=0.003), loss of body weight (p=0.042), and decrease in hemoglobin (p=0.033) were worse in group 1. Conclusions Endoscopic resection for synchronous esophageal and gastric cancer could be considered as a possible alternative to surgery for early-stage cancer. PMID:25170061

Park, Se Jeong; Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Na, Shin; Park, So-Eun; Kim, Mi-Young; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho; Han, Seungbong

2015-01-01

63

Tissue and serum mesothelin are potential markers of neoplastic progression in Barrett’s–associated esophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Mesothelin is overexpressed in several malignancies and is purportedly a specific marker of malignant transformation. In this pilot study, we investigated whether tissue and serum mesothelin are potential markers of neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Methods Mesothelin expression was retrospectively evaluated in normal, BE, and EAC tissue from surgically resected esophageal specimens (n = 125). In addition, soluble mesothelin-related peptide (SMRP) levels were measured in serum. Results Normal esophageal mucosa did not express mesothelin. BE tissue with high-grade dysplasia specifically expressed mesothelin, whereas BE tissue with low-grade or without dysplasia did not. Fifty-seven (46%) EAC tumors were positive for mesothelin. EAC tumors with BE expressed mesothelin more often than those without BE (58% vs 35%, P = 0.01). SMRP levels were elevated in 70% of EAC patients (mean, 0.89 nM; range, 0.03-3.77 nM), but not in patients with acid reflux and/or BE. Conclusions Mesothelin is commonly expressed in BE-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. Based on this pilot study, a prospective study is under way to evaluate tissue and serum mesothelin are potential markers of neoplastic progression in BE and in EAC (NCT01393483). Impact Current surveillance methods in Barrett’s esophagus are invasive and neither cost-effective nor sensitive. This pilot study suggests that serum mesothelin is a marker of neoplastic transformation in BE and may provide a noninvasive method to improve identification of malignant transformation. PMID:22237988

Rizk, Nabil P.; Servais, Elliot L.; Tang, Laura H.; Sima, Camelia S.; Gerdes, Hans; Fleisher, Martin; Rusch, Valerie W.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

2012-01-01

64

Associations between genetic polymorphisms of Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, p53 and susceptibility to esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

The objectives of this exploratory case-control study were to evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of selected Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes are associated with the risk of developing primary esophageal adenocarcinoma, and to investigate potential associations between genotypes and p53 tumor suppressor gene alterations. Cases comprised 45 patients with surgically resected esophageal adenocarcinomas, defined according to strict clinico-pathologic criteria. PCR-based assays (RFLP/SSCP) were used to genotype cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 [MspI; Ile:Val], microsomal epoxide hydroxylase (mEH) (fast and slow alleles), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1, M1 and P1. Healthy controls (n=45) from the same geographic region were matched for age, gender and smoking history. For GSTP1, the Ile/Val (a/b) and Val/Val (b/b) variants were seen at increased frequency in cases compared to controls (49% versus 27% and 15% versus 9%, respectively), although these differences achieved only borderline statistical significance (P=0.09). For mEH (exon 3), the presence of the Tyr polymorphism (slow allele) was reduced in cases (42%) compared to controls (53%; P=0.05). Predicted high mEH activity was seen more frequently in cases than controls (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.7-7.3). Polymorphism frequencies for GSTT1, GSTM1, and CYP1A1 were not statistically different between cases and controls. Cases with the GSTT1 null genotype had tumors with altered p53 more frequently than did cases with the common form of GSTT1 (25 versus 6%, respectively; P=0.08). We conclude that polymorphisms of GSTP1 and mEH may be implicated in individual susceptibility to esophageal adenocarcinoma, possibly as a result of increased Phase I activation (mEH) and impaired Phase II detoxification (GSTP1). GSTT1 may also play a role in esophageal tumorigenesis through a pathway that involves abnormalities in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. PMID:12670526

Casson, A G; Zheng, Z; Chiasson, D; MacDonald, K; Riddell, D C; Guernsey, J R; Guernsey, D L; McLaughlin, J

2003-01-01

65

MiR-145 Expression Accelerates Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Progression by Enhancing Cell Invasion and Anoikis Resistance  

PubMed Central

Background Carcinoma of the esophagus has a high case fatality ratio and is now the 6th most common cause of cancer deaths in the world. We previously conducted a study to profile the expression of miRNAs in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) pre and post induction therapy. Of the miRNAs differentially expressed post induction chemoradiation, miR-145, a known tumor suppressor miRNA, was upregulated 8-fold following induction therapy, however, its expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival. This unexpected result was explored in this current study. Methods In order to study the role of miR-145 in EAC, miRNA-145 was overexpressed in 3 EAC cell lines (OE33, FLO-1, SK-GT-4) and one ESCC cell line (KYSE-410). After validation of the expression of miR-145, hallmarks of cancer such as cell proliferation, resistance to chemotherapy drugs or anoikis, and cell invasion were analyzed. Results There were no differences in cell proliferation and 5 FU resistance between miR145 cell lines and the control cell lines. miR-145 expression also had no effect on cisplatin resistance in two of three cell lines (OE33 and FLO-1), but miR-145 appeared to protect SK-GT-4 cells against cisplatin treatment. However, there was a significant difference in cell invasion, cell adhesion and resistance to anoikis. All three EAC miR-145 cell lines invaded more than their respective controls. Similarly, OE33 and SK-GT-4 miR-145 cell lines were able to survive longer in a suspension state. Discussion While expression of miR-145 in ESCC stopped proliferation and invasion, expression of miR-145 in EAC cells enhanced invasion and anoikis resistance. Although more work is required to understand how miR-145 conveys these effects, expression of miR-145 appears to promote EAC progression by enhancing invasion and protection against anoikis, which could in turn facilitate distant metastasis. PMID:25551563

Derouet, Mathieu Francois; Liu, Geoffrey; Darling, Gail Elizabeth

2014-01-01

66

Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes in the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal (Barrett) adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

To test the hypothesis that aberrations of DNA repair contribute to susceptibility for the progression of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) into Barrett esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC), we studied the frequency of polymorphisms of selected DNA repair genes in patients with GERD (n = 126), BE (n = 125) and EADC (n = 56) enrolled in a 2-year prospective case-control study. Controls comprised 95 strictly asymptomatic healthy individuals. Using genomic DNA extracted from blood samples, we identified wild-type and polymorphic variants of XPD (Arg156Arg and Lys751Gln), XRCC1 (Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and the poly (AT) insertion/deletion of XPC (PAT). Allelic frequencies were compared between cases and controls using logistic regression to calculate age, gender, smoking and alcohol-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Patients with EADC demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of the XPC PAT homozygous variant genotype compared with asymptomatic controls (OR = 3.82; 95% CI = 1.05-13.93). Significantly reduced frequencies were seen for the XPD Lys751Gln homozygous variant genotype in patients with EADC (OR = 0.24; 95% CI = 0.07-0.88), and for the XRCC1 Arg399Gln homozygous variant genotype in patients with BE (OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.12-0.64) and GERD (OR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.12-0.66). We conclude that the malignant phenotype probably results from a summation of polymorphic nucleotide excision repair genes showing opposing effects (an increased risk of XPC versus a protective effect of XPD). The protective effect of the homozygous variant of XRCC1 Arg399Gln for GERD and BE suggests that base excision repair alterations may occur early in progression to EADC, likely in response to GERD-induced endogenous oxidative or inflammatory DNA damage. As GERD and BE are highly prevalent in the general population, this protective effect may well explain why only a fraction of individuals with GERD and BE progress into invasive EADC. PMID:15878910

Casson, Alan G; Zheng, Zuoyu; Evans, Susan C; Veugelers, Paul J; Porter, Geoffrey A; Guernsey, Duane L

2005-09-01

67

Everolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stomach or Esophageal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

2014-11-06

68

Inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrotyrosine and p53 mutations in the molecular pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated as a potential causative factor for endogenous p53 mutations in gastrointestinal malignancy. To investigate the role of NO in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC), we studied patterns of p53 mutations, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the tissue accumulation of nitrotyrosine (NTS), a stable reaction product of NO and a marker for cellular protein damage, in human premalignant and malignant esophageal epithelia. Tissues were obtained from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-induced esophagitis (n = 76), Barrett's esophagus (BE; n = 119) and primary EADC (n = 54). DNA sequencing was used to characterize p53 mutations, RT-PCR to study iNOS mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry to study NTS. Relative to self-matched normal epithelia, a progressive increase in iNOS mRNA expression was seen in GERD (30%; 23/76), BE (48%; 57/119), and EADC (63%; 34/54) tissues (P < 0.001). Among patients with EADC, elevated levels of NTS immunoreactivity were more frequent in tumors with p53 mutations (11/21; 52%) compared with tumors with wild-type p53 (9/33; 27%; P = 0.063), and specifically in tumors with p53 mutations at CpG dinucleotides (10/12; 83%) compared with non-CpG p53 mutations (1/9; 11%; P = 0.008). The increasing frequency of iNOS (mRNA) overexpression in GERD, BE and EADC supports the hypothesis that an active inflammatory process, most likely a consequence of GERD, underlies molecular progression to EADC. The highly significant association between NTS, reflecting chronic NO-induced cellular protein damage, and endogenous p53 mutations at CpG dinucleotides, provides further evidence for a molecular link between chronic inflammation and esophageal malignancy. PMID:17849424

Vaninetti, Nadine M; Geldenhuys, Laurette; Porter, Geoffrey A; Risch, Harvey; Hainaut, Pierre; Guernsey, Duane L; Casson, Alan G

2008-04-01

69

Whole Genome Expression Array Profiling Highlights Differences in Mucosal Defense Genes in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has become a major concern in Western countries due to rapid rises in incidence coupled with very poor survival rates. One of the key risk factors for the development of this cancer is the presence of Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is believed to form in response to repeated gastro-esophageal reflux. In this study we performed comparative, genome-wide expression profiling (using Illumina whole-genome Beadarrays) on total RNA extracted from esophageal biopsy tissues from individuals with EAC, BE (in the absence of EAC) and those with normal squamous epithelium. We combined these data with publically accessible raw data from three similar studies to investigate key gene and ontology differences between these three tissue states. The results support the deduction that BE is a tissue with enhanced glycoprotein synthesis machinery (DPP4, ATP2A3, AGR2) designed to provide strong mucosal defenses aimed at resisting gastro-esophageal reflux. EAC exhibits the enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling (collagens, IGFBP7, PLAU) effects expected in an aggressive form of cancer, as well as evidence of reduced expression of genes associated with mucosal (MUC6, CA2, TFF1) and xenobiotic (AKR1C2, AKR1B10) defenses. When our results are compared to previous whole-genome expression profiling studies keratin, mucin, annexin and trefoil factor gene groups are the most frequently represented differentially expressed gene families. Eleven genes identified here are also represented in at least 3 other profiling studies. We used these genes to discriminate between squamous epithelium, BE and EAC within the two largest cohorts using a support vector machine leave one out cross validation (LOOCV) analysis. While this method was satisfactory for discriminating squamous epithelium and BE, it demonstrates the need for more detailed investigations into profiling changes between BE and EAC. PMID:21829465

Nancarrow, Derek J.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Smithers, B. Mark; Gotley, David C.; Drew, Paul A.; Watson, David I.; Tyagi, Sonika; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Whiteman, David C.

2011-01-01

70

Nano-curcumin inhibits proliferation of esophageal adenocarcinoma cells and enhances the T cell mediated immune response.  

PubMed

In Western countries the incidence of the esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen at a more rapid rate than that of any other malignancy. Despite intensive therapies this cancer is associated with extreme high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, novel effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Dendritic Cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is a promising novel treatment strategy, which combined with other anti-cancer strategies has been proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), is a natural polyphenol that is known for its anti-cancer effects however, in it's free form, curcumin has poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using a highly absorptive form of curcumin, dispersed with colloidal nano-particles, named Theracurmin would be more effective against EAC cells and to analyze if this new compound affects DC-induced T cell response. As a result, we show efficient uptake of nano-curcumin by the EAC cell lines, OE33, and OE19. Moreover, nano-curcumin significantly decreased the proliferation of the EAC cells, while did not affect the normal esophageal cell line HET-1A. We also found that nano-curcumin significantly up-regulated the expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 in DCs and significantly decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from in vitro activated T cells. When we combined T cells with nano-curcumin treatment in OE19 and OE33, we found that the basic levels of T cell induced cytotoxicity of 6.4 and 4.1%, increased to 15 and 13%, respectively. In conclusion, we found that nano-curcumin is effective against EAC, sensitizes EAC cells to T cell induced cytotoxicity and decreases the pro-inflammatory signals from T cells. Combining DC immunotherapy with nano-curcumin is potentially a promising approach for future treatment of EAC. PMID:23755374

Milano, Francesca; Mari, Luigi; van de Luijtgaarden, Wendy; Parikh, Kaushal; Calpe, Silvia; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

2013-01-01

71

Nano-Curcumin Inhibits Proliferation of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells and Enhances the T Cell Mediated Immune Response  

PubMed Central

In Western countries the incidence of the esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen at a more rapid rate than that of any other malignancy. Despite intensive therapies this cancer is associated with extreme high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, novel effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Dendritic Cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is a promising novel treatment strategy, which combined with other anti-cancer strategies has been proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), is a natural polyphenol that is known for its anti-cancer effects however, in it’s free form, curcumin has poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using a highly absorptive form of curcumin, dispersed with colloidal nano-particles, named Theracurmin would be more effective against EAC cells and to analyze if this new compound affects DC-induced T cell response. As a result, we show efficient uptake of nano-curcumin by the EAC cell lines, OE33, and OE19. Moreover, nano-curcumin significantly decreased the proliferation of the EAC cells, while did not affect the normal esophageal cell line HET-1A. We also found that nano-curcumin significantly up-regulated the expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 in DCs and significantly decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from in vitro activated T cells. When we combined T cells with nano-curcumin treatment in OE19 and OE33, we found that the basic levels of T cell induced cytotoxicity of 6.4 and 4.1%, increased to 15 and 13%, respectively. In conclusion, we found that nano-curcumin is effective against EAC, sensitizes EAC cells to T cell induced cytotoxicity and decreases the pro-inflammatory signals from T cells. Combining DC immunotherapy with nano-curcumin is potentially a promising approach for future treatment of EAC. PMID:23755374

Milano, Francesca; Mari, Luigi; van de Luijtgaarden, Wendy; Parikh, Kaushal; Calpe, Silvia; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

2013-01-01

72

Prognostic Value and Targeted Inhibition of Survivin Expression in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Cancer-Adjacent Squamous Epithelium  

PubMed Central

Background Survivin is an inhibitor of apoptosis and its over expression is associated with poor prognosis in several malignancies. While several studies have analyzed survivin expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, few have focused on esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and/or cancer-adjacent squamous epithelium (CASE). The purpose of this study was 1) to determine the degree of survivin up regulation in samples of EAC and CASE, 2) to evaluate if survivin expression in EAC and CASE correlates with recurrence and/or death, and 3) to examine the effect of survivin inhibition on apoptosis in EAC cells. Methods Fresh frozen samples of EAC and CASE from the same patient were used for qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue was used for immunohistochemistry. EAC cell lines, OE19 and OE33, were transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knockdown survivin expression. This was confirmed by qRT-PCR for survivin expression and Western blot analysis of cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase 3 and survivin. Survivin expression data was correlated with clinical outcome. Results Survivin expression was significantly higher in EAC tumor samples compared to the CASE from the same patient. Patients with high expression of survivin in EAC tumor had an increased risk of death. Survivin expression was also noted in CASE and correlated with increased risk of distant recurrence. Cell line evaluation demonstrated that inhibition of survivin resulted in an increase in apoptosis. Conclusion Higher expression of survivin in tumor tissue was associated with increased risk of death; while survivin expression in CASE was a superior predictor of recurrence. Inhibition of survivin in EAC cell lines further showed increased apoptosis, supporting the potential benefits of therapeutic strategies targeted to this marker. PMID:24223792

Malhotra, Usha; Zaidi, Ali H.; Kosovec, Juliann E.; Kasi, Pashtoon M.; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Rotoloni, Christina L.; Davison, Jon M.; R, Clint; Irvin; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Nason, Katie S.; Kelly, Lori A.; Gibson, Michael K.; Jobe, Blair A.

2013-01-01

73

Assessment of Familiality, Obesity, and Other Risk Factors for Early Age of Cancer Diagnosis in Adenocarcinomas of the Esophagus and Gastro-esophageal Junction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND AIMS Adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction are postulated to be complex genetic diseases. Combined influences of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility likely influence the age at which these cancers develop. The aim of this study was to determine whether familiality and other recognized risk factors are associated with the development of these cancers at an earlier age. METHODS A structured validated questionnaire was utilized to collect self reported data on gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms, risk factors for Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and family history, including age of cancer diagnosis in affected relatives from probands with BE, adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, or adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, at five tertiary care academic hospitals. Medical records of all relatives reported to be affected were requested from hospitals providing this cancer care to confirm family histories. Familiality of BE/cancer, obesity (defined as body mass index > 30), gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms, and other risk factors were assessed for association with a young age of cancer diagnosis. RESULTS A total of 356, 216 non-familial and 140 familial, cancers were studied. The study population consisted of 292 (82%) men and 64 (18%) women. Mean age of cancer diagnosis was no different comparing familial and non-familial cancers, 62.6 yrs vs. 61.9 yrs, p = 0.70. There were also no significant differences in symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, body mass index, race, gender, and smoking history between familial and non-familial cancers. Mean age of cancer diagnosis was significantly younger comparing those who were obese one year prior to diagnosis with those who were non-obese, mean age 58.99 yrs vs. 63.6 yrs, p = 0.008. Multivariable modeling of age at cancer diagnosis showed that obesity 1 year before diagnosis was associated with a younger age of cancer diagnosis (p=0.005) after adjustment for heartburn and regurgitation duration. CONCLUSIONS Obesity is associated with the development of esophageal and gastro-esophageal junctional adenocarcinomas at an earlier age. Familial cancers arise at the same age as non-familial cancers and have a similar risk factor profile. PMID:19491834

Chak, Amitabh; Falk, Gary; Grady, William M.; Kinnard, Margaret; Elston, Robert; Mittal, Sumeet; King, James F.; Willis, Joseph E.; Kondru, Anokh; Brock, Wendy; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

2010-01-01

74

ErbB2 signaling activates the Hedgehog pathway via PI3K-Akt in human esophageal adenocarcinoma: identification of novel targets for concerted therapy concepts.  

PubMed

The Hedgehog pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several tumor types, including esophageal cancer. In our study, we show an expression of the ligand Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and its downstream mediator Gli-1 in primary resected adenocarcinoma tissue by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR in fifty percent of the cases, while matching healthy esophagus mucosa was negative for both proteins. Moreover, a functionally important regulation of Gli-1 by ErbB2-PI3K-mTORC signaling as well as a Gli-1-dependent regulation of Ihh in the ErbB2 amplified esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line OE19 was observed. Treatment of OE19 cells with the Her2 antibody trastuzumab, the PI3K-mTORC1 inhibitor NVP BEZ235 (BEZ235) or the knockdown of Akt1 resulted in a downregulation of Gli-1 and Ihh as well as in a reduction of viable OE19 cells in vitro. Interestingly, the Hedgehog receptor Smo, which acts upstream of Gli-1, was not expressed in OE19 cells and in the majority of primary human esophageal adenocarcinoma, suggesting a non-canonical upregulation of Gli-1 expression by the ErbB2-PI3K axis. To translate our findings into a therapeutic concept, we targeted ErbB2-PI3K-mTORC1 by trastuzumab and BEZ235, combining both compounds with the Gli-1/2 inhibitor GANT61. The triple combination led to significantly stronger reduction of tumor cell viability than cisplatinum or each biological alone. Therefore, concomitant blockage of the ErbB2-PI3K pathway and the Hedgehog downstream mediator Gli-1 may provide a new therapeutic strategy for esophageal cancer. PMID:25435423

Kebenko, Maxim; Drenckhan, Astrid; Gros, Stephanie J; Jücker, Manfred; Grabinski, Nicole; Ewald, Florian; Grottke, Astrid; Schultze, Alexander; Izbicki, Jakob R; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Wellbrock, Jasmin; Fiedler, Walter

2015-02-01

75

Polymorphism at the 3'-UTR of the thymidylate synthase gene: A potential predictor for outcomes in Caucasian patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative chemoradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that TS3'UTR polymorphisms predict outcomes in 146 Caucasian patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: DNA was extracted from hematoxylin-and-eosin stained histologic slides of normal esophageal or gastric mucosa sections from paraffin blocks of esophagectomy specimens. Genotypes of the TS3'UTR polymorphism were determined by polymerase chain reaction for a 6-bp insertion. The genotype groups (0bp/0bp, 6bp/0bp, and 6bp/6bp) were compared for clinical features and overall survival, recurrence-free-survival, locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis control. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to find independent predictors for the stated outcomes. Results: There was a trend of association between 6bp/6bp genotype and a decreased risk of local regional recurrence (hazards ratio = 0.211, 95% confidence interval = 0.041-1.095, p = 0.06) compared with other genotypes. There was a trend that patients with 6bp/6bp genotype had a higher 3-year probability of LRC compared with patients with the other two genotypes combined (p = 0.07); however, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The null hypotheses were not rejected in this study, probably owing to small sample size or the single gene examined. Prospective studies with adequate statistical power analyzing a family of genes involved in the 5-fluorouracil metabolism are needed to assess genetic determinants of treatment-related outcomes in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Liu Hongji [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang Luo [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wu, Tsung-Teh [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Correa, Arlene M. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Roth, Jack A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-03-01

76

Evaluating the effect of four extracts of avocado fruit on esophageal squamous carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines in comparison with peripheral blood mononuclear cells.  

PubMed

Most patients with gastrointestinal cancers refer to the health centers at advanced stages of the disease and conventional treatments are not significantly effective for these patients. Therefore, using modern therapeutic approaches with lower toxicity bring higher chance for successful treatment and reduced adverse effects in such patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of avocado fruit extracts on inhibition of the growth of cancer cells in comparison with normal cells. In an experimental study, ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and petroleum extracts of avocado (Persea americana) fruit were prepared. Then, the effects if the extracts on the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated in comparison with the control group using the MTT test in the cell culture medium. Effects of the four extracts of avocado fruit on three cells lines of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and colon adenocarcinoma were tested. The results showed that avocado fruit extract is effective in inhibition of cancer cell growth in comparison with normal cells (P<0.05). Avocado fruit is rich in phytochemicals, which play an important role in inhibition of growth of cancer cells. The current study for the first time demonstrates the anti-cancer effect of avocado fruit extracts on two cancers common in Iran. Therefore, it is suggested that the fruit extracts can be considered as appropriate complementary treatments in treatment of esophageal and colon cancers. PMID:24901722

Vahedi Larijani, Laleh; Ghasemi, Maryam; AbedianKenari, Saeid; Naghshvar, Farshad

2014-01-01

77

C-Met Inhibitor AMG 337, Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Esophageal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

2015-01-16

78

Three-Gene Immunohistochemical Panel Adds to Clinical Staging Algorithms to Predict Prognosis for Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive disease with poor long-term survival. Despite growing knowledge of its biology, no molecular biomarkers are currently used in routine clinical practice to determine prognosis or aid clinical decision making. Hence, this study set out to identify and validate a small, clinically applicable immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for prognostication in patients with EAC. Patients and Methods We recently identified eight molecular prognostic biomarkers using two different genomic platforms. IHC scores of these biomarkers from a UK multicenter cohort (N = 374) were used in univariate Cox regression analysis to determine the smallest biomarker panel with the greatest prognostic power with potential therapeutic relevance. This new panel was validated in two independent cohorts of patients with EAC who had undergone curative esophagectomy from the United States and Europe (N = 666). Results Three of the eight previously identified prognostic molecular biomarkers (epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR], tripartite motif-containing 44 [TRIM44], and sirtuin 2 [SIRT2]) had the strongest correlation with long-term survival in patients with EAC. Applying these three biomarkers as an IHC panel to the validation cohort segregated patients into two different prognostic groups (P < .01). Adjusting for known survival covariates, including clinical staging criteria, the IHC panel remained an independent predictor, with incremental adverse overall survival (OS) for each positive biomarker (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.40 per biomarker; P = .02). Conclusion We identified and validated a clinically applicable IHC biomarker panel, consisting of EGFR, TRIM44, and SIRT2, that is independently associated with OS and provides additional prognostic information to current survival predictors such as stage. PMID:23509313

Ong, Chin-Ann J.; Shapiro, Joel; Nason, Katie S.; Davison, Jon M.; Liu, Xinxue; Ross-Innes, Caryn; O'Donovan, Maria; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Biermann, Katharina; Shannon, Nicholas; Worster, Susannah; Schulz, Laura K.E.; Luketich, James D.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.; Hardwick, Richard H.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

2013-01-01

79

Statin use is associated with a reduction in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma: a case control study.  

PubMed

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is increasing significantly throughout the developed world. As yet, there are no proven chemopreventive strategies. In laboratory studies, aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins have promising chemopreventive actions. Several observational studies support a protective effect of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but there are only limited clinical data exploring the potential protective effect of statins. We conducted a case-control study examining aspirin and statin use in patients with EAC. Cancer cases were compared against age-sex-matched controls attending for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Risk factor and drug exposure were established using standardized interviews. Logistic regression was used to compare statin exposure and correct for confounding factors. A total of 112 cases and 448 controls were enrolled. Statin use was associated with a significantly lower incidence of EAC (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.92). Aspirin use was also associated with apparent protection against EAC (odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.92), and a significantly greater effect was seen with the combination of statin plus aspirin (odds ratio 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.67). There was a significant trend for greater risk reduction with longer duration and higher doses of statin use. Simvastatin comprised the majority of statin use, but similar effects were seen with simvastatin and non-simvastatin agents. In this observational study, patients regularly using statins or aspirin had a lower incidence of EAC. Statins may have clinically useful effects in preventing the development of EAC. PMID:22989236

Beales, I L P; Vardi, I; Dearman, L; Broughton, T

2013-01-01

80

Prediagnostic plasma vitamin C and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a Chinese population123  

PubMed Central

Background: China has some of the highest incidence rates for gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in the world. Prospective studies suggested that vitamin C may reduce risks; however, associations are unclear because of limited sample size. Objective: The objective was to examine the relation between prediagnostic plasma vitamin C and the risk of GA and ESCC. Design: A case-cohort study was used to assess the association between prediagnostic plasma vitamin C and incidence of GA (n = 467) and ESCC (n = 618) in the General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial. With the use of multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated the HRs and 95% CIs. We also conducted a meta-analysis of the literature up to 1 October 2012 on the relation between circulating vitamin C and gastric cancer incidence. Two cohort studies and the current study were included to assess the body of evidence. Results: For GA, each 20-?mol/L increase in plasma vitamin C was associated with a 14% decrease in risk (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.96). Compared with individuals with low plasma vitamin C concentrations (?28 ?mol/L), those with normal concentrations (>28 ?mol/L) had a 27% reduced risk of GA (HR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94). No association between vitamin C concentrations and ESCC was seen. Meta-analysis showed that the risk of incident GA among those with the highest concentration of plasma vitamin C was 31% lower (random-effects-pooled-odds ratio 0.69; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.89) than those in the lowest category. Conclusion: Our data provide evidence that higher circulating vitamin C was associated with a reduced risk of incident GA, but no association was seen for ESCC. PMID:24025629

Freedman, Neal D; Fan, Jin-Hu; Qiao, You-Lin; Dawsey, Sanford M; Taylor, Philip R; Abnet, Christian C

2013-01-01

81

A Phase I/II Study of Genasense (G3139) in Combination With Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Patients With Advanced Esophageal, Gastro-Esophageal Junction and Gastric Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

2013-05-15

82

Familial trends of inheritance in gastro esophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's adenocarcinoma: 20 families.  

PubMed

We reported four families with familial Barrett's esophagus (FBE) in 1993. This follow-up study includes an additional 16 families with FBE, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and BE-related adenocarcinoma (BEAC) highlighting the familial trends of inheritance. A retrospective survey of endoscopic and histopathological reports on 95 confirmed cases of BE from 1975 to 2005 was performed and a detailed family history was obtained. Five representative pedigrees from a total of 20 are discussed here. These 20 families represent one of the largest cohorts studied over three decades from a single institution. Familial BE is more common than previously thought and the prevalence of GERD, BE and BEAC in these families is distinctly higher than with sporadic cases. The conditions appear to be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion with incomplete penetrance. Hence diligence in taking family history with BE patients is critical since the endoscopic screening of relatives is warranted in FBE. Earlier diagnosis and surveillance of FBE should hopefully improve outcomes. PMID:17227311

Sappati Biyyani, R S; Chessler, L; McCain, E; Nelson, K; Fahmy, N; King, J

2007-01-01

83

Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

2015-03-05

84

Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

2015-04-01

85

Principal component analysis of dietary and lifestyle patterns in relation to risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose To perform pattern analyses of dietary and lifestyle factors in relation to risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. Methods We evaluated risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and other gastric cancers (OGA) using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Connecticut, New Jersey, and western Washington state. Dietary/lifestyle patterns were created using principal component analysis (PCA). Impact of the resultant scores on cancer risk was estimated through logistic regression. Results PCA identified six patterns: meat/nitrite, fruit/vegetable, smoking/alcohol, legume/meat alternate, GERD/BMI, and fish/vitamin C. Risk of each cancer under study increased with rising meat/nitrite score. Risk of EA increased with increasing GERD/BMI score, and risk of ESCC rose with increasing smoking/alcohol score and decreasing GERD/BMI score. Fruit/vegetable scores were inversely associated with EA, ESCC, and GCA. Conclusions PCA may provide a useful approach for summarizing extensive dietary/lifestyle data into fewer interpretable combinations that discriminate between cancer cases and controls. The analyses suggest that meat/nitrite intake is associated with elevated risk of each cancer under study, while fruit/vegetable intake reduces risk of EA, ESCC, and GCA. GERD/obesity were confirmed as risk factors for EA and smoking/alcohol as risk factors for ESCC. PMID:21435900

Silvera, Stephanie A. Navarro; Mayne, Susan T; Risch, Harvey A.; Gammon, Marilie D; Vaughan, Thomas; Chow, Wong-Ho; Dubin, Joel A; Dubrow, Robert; Schoenberg, Janet; Stanford, Janet L; West, A. Brian; Rotterdam, Heidrun; Blot, William J

2011-01-01

86

Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

2014-03-17

87

Esophageal Carcinoma in African Americans: A Five-Decade Experience  

PubMed Central

Background Esophageal cancer accounts for a considerable proportion of carcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract in African Americans. Our aim was to describe the epidemiology of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) among African Americans in the last five decades. Methods A total of 601 records of patients with documented esophageal cancer between 1959 and 2007 at Howard University Hospital were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, clinical stage and histological findings were reviewed. The change in prevalence of the disease and the interaction between main risk factors with tumor stage of the patients were assessed over the years of this study. Result A total of 552 patients (91.8%) had ESCC while 49 patients (8.2%) had EA. The mean age at diagnosis was 60.1 and 60.6 years for ESCC and EA, respectively (P = 0.8). The peak incidence was in the 1980–1989 decade. Out of 136 ESCC patients with TNM staging information, 130 (95.6%) were diagnosed in stage 2 and above. The majority (73%) of the ESCC were in the mid- and upper third of the esophagus and associated with smoking and alcohol exposure. The majority (81%) of the EA were in the mid- and lower third. The most common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (77.7%), and weight loss (31.9%). Conclusion ESCC is the predominant esophageal cancer in African Americans and diagnosed in late stages, and its diagnosis in our institution has decreased since 1990. A combination of genetic factors, environmental influences (e.g., those related to diet), and the deleterious changes associated with smoking and alcohol consumption, and differences in tumor histology, are the obvious parameters that should be the focus of future studies, and early diagnosis at an earlier stage should be considered among blacks. PMID:21847566

Nouri, Zahra; Nouraie, Mehdi; Razjouyan, Hadi; Lee, Edward E.; Dowlati, Ehsan; El-Seyed, El-Waleed; Laiyemo, Adeyinka; Brim, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T.

2012-01-01

88

The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer  

PubMed Central

The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. PMID:24281163

Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

2010-01-01

89

Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... be found on the NCI Funded Research Portfolio Web site. A genome-wide association study of esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus identified three new susceptibility loci for their development. Published October 2013. [ PubMed Abstract ] HER2 protein expression ...

90

Epigenetics in esophageal cancers.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancers are a challenging upper gastrointestinal tract tumor entity for interdisciplinary oncology. For the two main histotypes, namely esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and Barrett's adenocarcinomas, several genetic aberrations have been shown to contribute to carcinogenesis and progression as well as to represent potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention. This is paralleled by growing insight into epigenetic alterations of esophageal cancers. Studies involving the analyses of human tissue specimens predominantly describe altered patterns of miRNA expression, DNA methylation patterns, and histone marks levels. This review provides a critical update on this increasing knowledge of epigenetic alteration in esophageal cancers by specifically focusing on the translational aspects of epigenetic analyses from human tissue specimens. PMID:24816987

Ahrens, Theresa D; Werner, Martin; Lassmann, Silke

2014-06-01

91

Imaging of uncommon esophageal malignancies.  

PubMed

Malignant esophageal neoplasms other than squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma are uncommon and include endocrine tumors, lymphoid malignancies, melanoma, malignant stromal tumors, and secondary tumors (metastases). Imaging, though not diagnostic in many cases, helps in selecting the appropriate treatment strategy by determining the anatomic extent of the tumor and locoregional and distant spread. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the imaging features of these uncommon esophageal malignancies. PMID:24635682

Tirumani, H; Rosenthal, M H; Tirumani, S H; Shinagare, A B; Krajewski, K M; Ramaiya, N H

2014-03-17

92

Immune signaling and regulation in esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on signaling pathways that can be targeted with immunotherapy; the role of micro-RNAs in the immune response to esophageal cancer; and the association between obesity, the immune system, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25266011

Calpe, Silvia; Compare, Debora; Mari, Luigi; Nardone, Gerardo; Parikh, Kaushal

2014-09-01

93

Epidemiology of esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer (EsC) is one of the least studied and deadliest cancers worldwide because of its extremely aggressive nature and poor survival rate. It ranks sixth among all cancers in mortality. In retrospective studies of EsC, smoking, hot tea drinking, red meat consumption, poor oral health, low intake of fresh fruit and vegetables, and low socioeconomic status have been associated with a higher risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Barrett’s esophagus is clearly recognized as a risk factor for EsC, and dysplasia remains the only factor useful for identifying patients at increased risk, for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in clinical practice. Here, we investigated the epidemiologic patterns and causes of EsC. Using population based cancer data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program of the United States; we generated the most up-to-date stage distribution and 5-year relative survival by stage at diagnosis for 1998-2009. Special note should be given to the fact that esophageal cancer, mainly adenocarcinoma, is one of the very few cancers that is contributing to increasing death rates (20%) among males in the United States. To further explore the mechanism of development of EsC will hopefully decrease the incidence of EsC and improve outcomes. PMID:24039351

Zhang, Yuwei

2013-01-01

94

Efficacy and histopathological esophageal wall damage of biodegradable esophageal stents for treatment of severe refractory esophageal anastomotic stricture in a child with long gap esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

A case in which a self-expandable biodegradable (BD) esophageal stent was used for a refractory esophageal anastomotic stricture (EAS) in a 5-year-old female is presented. The patient underwent closure of a tracheoesophageal fistula and gastrostomy in the neonatal period. Esophagoesophagostomy was performed at 18 months of age after a multistaged extrathoracic esophageal elongation procedure. The patient developed refractory EAS and required repeated esophageal balloon dilation. Four sessions of esophageal BD stenting were performed from the age of 5-8 years. Each BD stenting allowed her to eat chopped food, but the anastomotic stricture recurred 4-7 months after the procedure. No major complications were observed, though transient chest pain and dysphagia were observed after each stenting. Finally, at 8 years of age, EAS resection and esophagoesophageal anastomosis were performed. The resected specimens showed thickened scar formation at the EAS lesion, while the degree of esophageal wall damage, both at the proximal and distal ends of the stricture, was slight. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of this kind of treatment and assessment of damage to the esophageal wall microscopically. The advantages and problems of the use of BD stents in children are discussed. PMID:25399341

Okata, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Bitoh, Yuko; Yokoi, Akiko; Nishijima, Eiji; Maeda, Kosaku; Yoshida, Makiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Azuma, Takeshi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

2014-12-01

95

Enhancement of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and theaflavin-3-3'-digallate induced apoptosis by ascorbic acid in human lung adenocarcinoma SPC-A-1 cells and esophageal carcinoma Eca-109 cells via MAPK pathways.  

PubMed

Tea polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and theaflavin-3-3'-digallate (TF3) are two prospective compounds in cancer prevention and treatment. Ascorbic acid (Vc) is essential to a healthy diet as well as being a highly effective antioxidant. In this work, the effects of the combination of EGCG or TF3 with Vc on the apoptosis and caspases-3/9 activities in human lung adenocarcinoma SPC-A-1 cells and esophageal carcinoma Eca-109 cells were determined. Furthermore, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways in the apoptosis induced by TF3 or EGCG together with Vc were studied using three MAPK inhibitors (ERK inhibitor PD98059, JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580). Our results showed that Vc could enhance the EGCG and TF3 induced apoptosis in SPC-A-1 and Eca-109 cells, and this effect involved the activation of caspase-3 and 9. EGCG, TF3 and Vc could activate MAPK pathways respectively, and each compound activated different MAPK subfamilies in different cells. This may explain the enhancement of EGCG and TF3 induced apoptosis by Vc in SPC-A-1 and Eca-109 cells, and will ultimately aid the design of more effective anti-cancer treatments. PMID:23892041

Gao, Ying; Li, Wei; Jia, Lingyan; Li, Bo; Chen, Yi Charlie; Tu, Youying

2013-08-23

96

Adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and simultaneous integrated boost for resected high-risk adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and gastro-esophageal junction  

PubMed Central

Purpose Multimodality therapy leads to improved outcomes for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) over surgery alone. At our institution, adjuvant chemoradiation (chemoRT) using IMRT and SIB is standard of care for resected high-risk disease. In this study, we review our experience with a recent cohort of patients treated in this manner. Methods and materials We identified 18 patients with resected T3 and/or N1 adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and GEJ who received adjuvant chemoRT. A large elective volume (PTV1) and a smaller high-risk volume (PTV2) were irradiated simultaneously using IMRT and an SIB technique. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Relevant clinical outcomes are reported. Results The median dose to 95% of PTV1 was 3747cGy and to 95% of PTV2 was 4876cGy. All RT was given in a median of 28 daily fractions. Four patients did not complete chemotherapy. At a median follow up of 952 days from the start of RT, 7 of 18 patients were dead; of these, 3 had developed local recurrence only; 3 had developed both local and distant recurrence; 1 died of a late toxicity, without recurrence. OS was 88% at 1year, 76% at 2 years and 58% at 3 years. Freedom from local recurrence was 88% at 1 year, 82% at 2 years and 82% at 3 years. Freedom from distant recurrence was 72% at 1 year, 67% at 2 years and 56% at 3 years. Toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions Adjuvant concurrent chemoRT with IMRT and SIB is feasible for resected high-risk adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and GEJ. Our results describe how modern treatment techniques can be employed as part of a treatment paradigm that is neither commonly used nor commonly described in the literature. PMID:23398690

2013-01-01

97

Esophageal Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

98

Radiation sensitivity of esophageal adenocarcinoma: the contribution of the RNA-binding protein RNPC1 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest to radioresistance.  

PubMed

Radiation combined with chemotherapy (neo-CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for the treatment of esophageal cancer, either as neoadjuvant therapy in multimodal protocols or as primary therapy. Unfortunately, ~60% of patients demonstrate little or no response to neo-CRT. Accordingly, understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to therapy may underpin significant advances through the identification of nonresponders either before or early in treatment. We previously identified the RNPC1 gene, which is important in stabilizing p21, as being upregulated in the tumors of esophageal cancer patients who had a poor response to neo-CRT. We hypothesize that RNPC1 contributes to resistance to radiation therapy through a p21-mediated cell cycle accumulation/arrest mechanism. Analysis revealed that p53 and RNPC1 expression were highest in the JH-EsoAd1 cell line and lowest in OE19 cells. This was associated with accumulation of cells in G?/G?. p21 expression, which was highest in OE19 cells and lowest in OE33 cells, was associated with relative intrinsic sensitivity to radiation. OE33 cells were transfected with a plasmid (pCMV6-AC-GFP) encoding a C-terminal GFP-tagged RNPC1, and overexpression was confirmed by qPCR and fluorescence microscopy. Overexpression of RNPC1-GFP resulted in significantly increased levels of the p21 transcript and protein through a direct physical interaction between the RNPC1 protein and the p21 transcript. Furthermore, RNPC1 overexpression led to significant G?/G? cell cycle accumulation and significantly enhanced cellular resistance to radiation. We conclude that RNPC1 contributes to tumor resistance to radiotherapy, which likely occurs through a p21-mediated G?/G? accumulation mechanism. Therefore, RNPC1 may represent a potential therapeutic target for enhancing tumor sensitivity to radiation. PMID:22214381

Hötte, Gijsbert J; Linam-Lennon, Niamh; Reynolds, John V; Maher, Stephen G

2012-03-01

99

No role for glutathione S-transferase genotypes in Caucasian esophageal squamous cell or adenocarcinoma etiology: an European case–control study  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying and monitoring high-risk patients can aid the prevention of esophageal cancer (EC). The interaction of environmental risk factor exposure and genetic susceptibility may contribute to the etiology of EC. Biotransformation enzymes such as Glutathione S-Transferases (GSTs ) detoxify mutagenic and genotoxic compounds and therefore control the rate of detoxification of carcinogens. Functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for GSTs alter their enzyme activity in vitro, and were reported to modify EC risk in Asians. We hypothesized that altered enzyme activity GST genotypes influence the susceptibility for esophageal adeno- (EAC) and squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in Caucasians. Methods We performed a case–control study including 440 Caucasian patients with EC and 592 healthy Caucasian controls matched for age and sex. Functional polymorphisms were selected and genotypes were determined in GST classes Alpha, Mu, Theta and Pi by means of polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes were classified into predicted high, intermediate and low enzyme activity categories based on in vitro activity data. The distribution of the activity genotypes were compared between patients with EAC or ESCC, and controls. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by logistic regression analyses. Gene-gene interactions were tested and for comparison purposes, the predicted low and intermediate activity genotypes were combined. Genotypes with similar risks for EAC or ESCC were combined and analyzed for multiplicative effects. Results Our analyses includes 327 patients with EAC and 106 patients with ESCC. Low or intermediate activity enzyme genotypes for GSTM1, GSTA1, GSTP1 I105V and A114V as well as for GSTT1, did not significantly modify the risk for ESCC or EAC in our Dutch population. Conclusion Functional genotypes in GST genes are not involved in EAC or ESCC susceptibility in Caucasians, in contrast to results on ESCC from Asia or Africa. PMID:23731957

2013-01-01

100

Changing pattern of esophageal cancer incidence in New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:Multiple reports indicate that esophageal adenocarcinoma incidence has increased during the past 20 yr, especially in non-Hispanic white men. We retrospectively reviewed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cases in our heterogeneous state population to determine the effect of ethnicity on histology.METHODS:We searched the New Mexico Tumor Registry for all cases of esophageal cancer from 1973 to 1997. Inclusion criteria included

Kenneth J Vega; M Mazen Jama

2000-01-01

101

Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.  

PubMed

Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

2014-12-21

102

Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia  

PubMed Central

Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

2014-01-01

103

Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P?esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing dysphagia, and recurrent strictures. PMID:23947919

Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

2014-01-01

104

Columbia study reveals origins of esophageal cancer:  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have identified the critical early cellular and molecular events that give rise to a type of esophageal cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma, the fastest-rising solid tumor in the United States. The findings, published online today in Cancer Cell, challenge conventional wisdom regarding the origin and development of this deadly cancer and its precursor lesion, Barrett’s esophagus, and highlight possible targets for new clinical therapies.

105

Surgical treatment of primary esophageal small-cell carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the clinical biocharacteristics of primary esophageal small-cell carcinoma (PESC) and factors influencing\\u000a prognosis and to find rational indications for combination therapy. Methods: To analyze the clinical materials of 47 patients\\u000a who had undergone an operation with PESC and to compare it with those patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC)\\u000a or primary esophageal adenocarcinoma (PEAC). Results: The overall

Yong-gang Wang; Liang-jun Wang; De-chao Zhang; Ru-gang Zhang; Da-wei Zhang

2000-01-01

106

Diagnostic correlation between the expression of the DNA repair enzyme N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase and esophageal adenocarcinoma onset: a retrospective pilot study.  

PubMed

EAC in its early stages, when it can potentially be cured, is rarely symptomatic and is associated with high mortality rates because in part of late-stage diagnosis. Given that DNA repair is an important contributory factor of early-stage malignancy, our study focused on the expression of the base excision repair enzyme N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) in EAC disease onset. MPG messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from a maximum of 72 patient samples. Immunohistochemistry was further utilized for the detection of MPG protein, and semiquantitative analysis performed using an H-score approach was carried out on a total of 130 archival tissue samples of different esophageal pathologies. Nuclear localized MPG protein was detected in all nonmalignant tissues derived from the enterohepatic system, with H-score values of 3.9-5.5 ± 0.4-1.0. In cancerous tissues derived from the enterohepatic system, a 9.5-fold increase in the level of MPG mRNA expression was specifically observed in the malignant regions located within the esophagus region. Further analysis revealed a 9- and 14-fold increase in MPG mRNA expression in EAC tumor, node, metastasis stages II and III, respectively, suggesting MPG expression to correlate with EAC disease progression. Immunohistochemistry analysis further showed a sevenfold significant increase in MPG protein expression in EAC tissues. Intriguingly, there was a fivefold significant decrease in nuclear localized MPG protein expression in tissues derived from Barrett's esophagus and low-grade dysplasia. Such findings highlight a complex regulatory pattern governing DNA glycosylase base excision repair initiation, as normal tissue undergoes Barrett's metaplasia and later dedifferentiates to EAC. Indeed, disease-stage-specific alterations in the expression of MPG may highlight a potential role for MPG in determining EAC onset and thus potentially be of clinical relevance for early disease detection and increased patient survival. PMID:23137018

Zaïr, Z M; Johnson, G E; Griffiths, A P; Jenkins, G J

2013-08-01

107

Herpetic esophagitis  

SciTech Connect

Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

1981-12-01

108

Cyclooxygenase 2 expression in Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma: Ex vivo induction by bile salts and acid exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Barrett's esophagus (BE) results from chronic, severe gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is involved in chronic inflammation and epithelial cell growth. We investigated COX-2 expression in BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma to explore a potential relation between COX-2 expression and metaplasia or carcinogenesis. Methods: Endoscopic mucosal biopsy specimens of Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (n =

Vivian N. Shirvani; Rodica Ouatu-Lascar; Baljeet S. Kaur; M. Bishr Omary; George Triadafilopoulos

2000-01-01

109

Birthplace and esophageal cancer incidence patterns among Asian-Americans.  

PubMed

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the United States has risen rapidly over the last 30 years, whereas the incidence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has fallen dramatically. In contrast, parts of Asia have extremely high rates of squamous cell carcinoma, but virtually no adenocarcinoma. Within the United States, Asian-Americans as a whole, have low rates of esophageal adenocarcinoma and higher rates of squamous cell carcinoma. It is unclear what the patterns are for those Asians born in the United States. The relative influence of ethnicity and environment on the incidence of esophageal cancer in this population is unknown. We identified all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma from the California Cancer Registry 1988-2004, including 955 cases among 6 different Asian ethnicities. Time trends were examined using Joinpoint software to calculate the annual percentage changes in regression models. Rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma varied substantially among different Asian ethnic groups, but squamous cell carcinoma was much more common than adenocarcinoma in both foreign-born and US-born Asian-Americans. Rates of squamous cell carcinoma were slightly higher among US-born Asian men (4.0 per 100,000) compared with foreign-born Asian men (3.2 per 100,000) and White men (2.2 per 100,000), P = 0.03. Rates of adenocarcinoma were also slighter higher among US-born Asian men (1.2 per 100,000) compared with foreign-born Asian men (0.7 per 100,000), P = 0.01. Rates of squamous cell carcinoma decreased for both US-born and foreign-born Asians during this period, whereas adenocarcinoma remained low and stable. These results provide better insight into the genetic and environmental factors affecting the changing incidence of esophageal cancer histologies in the United States and Asia. PMID:25487184

Kim, J Y; Winters, J K; Kim, J; Bernstein, L; Raz, D; Gomez, S L

2014-12-01

110

Difficult esophageal atresia: trick and treat.  

PubMed

Although most patients with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) may benefit from "standard" management, which is deferred emergency surgery, some may present unexpected elements that change this paradigm. Birth weight, associated anomalies, and long gap can influence the therapeutic schedule of the patients with EA/TEF and can make their treatment tricky. As a consequence, detailed information on these aspects gives the power to develop a decision-making process as correct as possible. In this article, we will review the most important factors influencing the treatment of patients with EA/TEF and will share our experience on the diagnostic and therapeutic tips that may provide pivotal help in the management of such patients. PMID:25459010

Conforti, Andrea; Morini, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

2014-10-01

111

Lung Adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Home Cancers Selected for Study Lung Adenocarcinoma Lung Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: November 19, 2012 What is lung cancer? Lung cancer accounts for more deaths than any other cancer in both men and women, about 28 percent of all cancer deaths. In

112

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancers, version 1.2015.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is more common in North America and Western European countries, originating mostly in the lower third of the esophagus, which often involves the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Recent randomized trials have shown that the addition of preoperative chemoradiation or perioperative chemotherapy to surgery significantly improves survival in patients with resectable cancer. Targeted therapies with trastuzumab and ramucirumab have produced encouraging results in the treatment of advanced or metastatic EGJ adenocarcinomas. Multidisciplinary team management is essential for patients with esophageal and EGJ cancers. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Esophageal and EGJ Cancers discusses management of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and EGJ. PMID:25691612

Ajani, Jaffer A; D'Amico, Thomas A; Almhanna, Khaldoun; Bentrem, David J; Besh, Stephen; Chao, Joseph; Das, Prajnan; Denlinger, Crystal; Fanta, Paul; Fuchs, Charles S; Gerdes, Hans; Glasgow, Robert E; Hayman, James A; Hochwald, Steven; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Ilson, David H; Jaroszewski, Dawn; Jasperson, Kory; Keswani, Rajesh N; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Korn, W Michael; Leong, Stephen; Lockhart, A Craig; Mulcahy, Mary F; Orringer, Mark B; Posey, James A; Poultsides, George A; Sasson, Aaron R; Scott, Walter J; Strong, Vivian E; Varghese, Thomas K; Washington, Mary Kay; Willett, Christopher G; Wright, Cameron D; Zelman, Debra; McMillian, Nicole; Sundar, Hema

2015-02-01

113

Neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer is increasing in incidence more than any other visceral malignancy in North America. Adenocarcinoma has become the most common cell type. Surgery remains the primary treatment modality for locoregional disease. Overall survival with surgery alone has been dismal, with metastatic disease the primary mode of treatment failure after an R0 surgical resection. Cure rates with chemotherapy or radiation therapy alone have been disappointing as well. For these reasons, over the last decade multi-modality treatment has gained increasing acceptance as the standard of care. This review examines the present data and role of neoadjuvant treatment using chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25320656

Shah, Rachit D; Cassano, Anthony D; Neifeld, James P

2014-10-15

114

[Columnar-celled metaplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus in inhabitants of the Leningrad oblast (by the data of esophagogastroduodenoscopy)].  

PubMed

The article presents an analysis of results of 24 384 endoscopic examinations of the upper gastrointestinal tract in population of the Leningrad oblast with symptoms of gastric dyspepsia during the period from 2007 to 2011. The detection of the columnar-celled metaplasia was 1.1%, adenocarcinoma of the esophagus--0.045%. Esophageal adenocarcinoma occurred in 3.95% of cases of the column-celled esophagus. Barrett's esophagus was revealed in males more often than in women (56.5% and 54.5% respectively). The peak incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in males was at the age from 46 to 60 years (36.4% of patients), in females--from 61 to 75 years (27.3% of patients). Intestinal metaplasia was detected in 72.7% of cases with esophageal adenocarcinoma: The diagnosis of long and short segment of column-celled esophagus revealed no significant difference in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:23488270

Vasilevski?, D I; Silant'ev, D S; Mikhaleva, K V; Priadko, A S; Filin, A V; Vorob'ev, S L; Mednikov, S N; Luft, A V; Kulagin, V I; Bagnenko, S F

2012-01-01

115

Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased significantly in rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization compared with rats with EGDA only. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1 (5.8 ± 1.9 vs 3.4 ± 1.3, P < 0.01), c-Myc (6.4 ± 1.7 vs 3.7 ± 1.2, P < 0.01), and Bax (8.6 ± 1.6 vs 5.1 ± 1.3, P < 0.01) were significantly increased, whereas the mRNA level of Bcl-2 (0.6 ± 0.3 vs 0.8 ± 0.3, P < 0.01) was significantly reduced in rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization compared with rats with EGDA only. CONCLUSION: Esophageal H. pylori colonization increases esophagitis severity, and facilitates the development of BE and EAC with the augmentation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in esophageal mucosa. PMID:25400455

Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

2014-01-01

116

Eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathologic disease of increasing prevalence. Because EoE is a chronic disease, its prevalence will continue to increase. Antigen triggers, including food and aeroallergens, drive eosinophilic and T helper cell type 2 inflammation, resulting in subepithelial fibrosis; this esophageal remodeling is the likely underlying pathogenesis for complications of narrowing, rigidity, and food impactions. Management includes dietary antigen elimination and topical corticosteroids. Long-term therapy and repeated endoscopy are often needed; consideration must be given to maintenance regimens and side effects. This review describes the clinical features, treatment options, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of EoE. PMID:25459582

Aceves, Seema S

2015-02-01

117

Esophageal Surgery for Malignant Disease in the Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Neoplasms of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction are aggressive tumors that often present at an advanced stage, and\\u000a that historically have been associated with poor survival despite therapy. 16,470 Americans are diagnosed with and 14,280\\u000a die of esophageal cancer annually, and the incidence is increasing. In fact, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC)\\u000a has increased in the last 25 years,

Philip A. Rascoe; John C. Kucharczuk

118

The Miscellaneous Mystery of Esophageal Cancer: New pathogenetic and clinical insights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophageal cancer is the 8th most common type of malignancy and the 6th most\\u000acommon cause of cancer mortality in the world. Worldwide more than 400,000\\u000apatients are newly diagnosed with esophageal cancer each year. The majority of\\u000apatients (>90%) is diagnosed with the two most common histological subtypes:\\u000asquamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Esophageal squamous\\u000acell

B. A. Grotenhuis

2010-01-01

119

Lung Adenocarcinoma  

MedlinePLUS

... quit smoking, your risk decreases over time. Secondary risk factors include age, family history, and exposure to secondhand smoke, mineral and metal dust, asbestos, or radon. What characterizes lung adenocarcinoma? This ...

120

Molecular pathways: pathogenesis and clinical implications of microbiome alteration in esophagitis and Barrett esophagus.  

PubMed

Esophageal adenocarcinoma is preceded by the development of reflux-related intestinal metaplasia or Barrett esophagus, which is a response to inflammation of the esophageal squamous mucosa, reflux esophagitis. Gastroesophageal reflux impairs the mucosal barrier in the distal esophagus, allowing chronic exposure of the squamous epithelium to the diverse microbial ecosystem or microbiome and inducing chronic inflammation. The esophageal microbiome is altered in both esophagitis and Barrett esophagus, characterized by a significant decrease in gram-positive bacteria and an increase in gram-negative bacteria in esophagitis and Barrett esophagus. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a major structure of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria, can upregulate gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines via activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 and NF-?B pathway. The potential impact of LPS on reflux esophagitis may be through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter via inducible nitric oxide synthase and by delaying gastric emptying via cyclooxygenase-2. Chronic inflammation may play a critical role in the progression from benign to malignant esophageal disease. Therefore, analysis of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation in the esophagus may help to identify biomarkers in patients with Barrett esophagus for neoplastic progression and provide insight into molecular events suitable for therapeutic intervention in prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma development in patients with reflux esophagitis and Barrett esophagus. PMID:22344232

Yang, Liying; Francois, Fritz; Pei, Zhiheng

2012-04-15

121

Molecular Pathways: Pathogenesis and clinical implications of microbiome alteration in esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus  

PubMed Central

Esophageal adenocarcinoma is preceded by the development of reflux-related intestinal metaplasia or Barrett’s esophagus which is a response to inflammation of the esophageal squamous mucosa, reflux esophagitis. Gastroesophageal reflux impairs the mucosal barrier in the distal esophagus, allowing chronic exposure of the squamous epithelium to the diverse microbial ecosystem or microbiome, and inducing chronic inflammation. The esophageal microbiome is altered in both esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, characterized by a significant decrease in Gram-positive bacteria and an increase in Gram-negative bacteria in esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a major structure of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria, can up-regulate gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines via activation of the TLR4 and NF-kB pathway. The potential impact of LPS on reflux esophagitis may be through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter via iNOS and by delaying gastric emptying via COX-2. Chronic inflammation may be play a critical role in the progression from benign to malignant esophageal disease. Therefore analysis of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation in the esophagus may help to identify biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus patients for neoplastic progression and provide insight into molecular events suitable for therapeutic intervention in prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma development in patients with reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22344232

Yang, Liying; Francois, Fritz; Pei, Zhiheng

2013-01-01

122

Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

MedlinePLUS

... is to complete a test called an esophageal pH test. In this test, a very thin tube is placed through the nose into the esophagus and stomach, or a temporary sensor is placed in the esophagus via endoscopy. Both allow levels of acid in the esophagus to be monitored ...

123

The changing profile of esophageal cancer presentation and its implication for diagnosis.  

PubMed Central

CONTEXT: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is rising and has surpassed squamous cell carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To determine how the increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma alters the classic clinical presentation and the implications of these changes for diagnosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: A five-year retrospective review (1991-1996) was made. PARTICIPANTS: All patients were identified by a computerized registry search with a diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical presentation; duration of symptoms; and correlation with diagnosis, pathology, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: One-hundred-eight (35%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma and 199 (65%) had adenocarcinoma. Dysphagia and weight loss were more common among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (93% and 68%), when compared to adenocarcinoma (79% and 53%). Twenty-one percent of adenocarcinoma patients had other symptoms presentation, including gastroesophageal reflux disease. Once dysphagia was present, there was no correlation between the duration.of symptoms and survival. However, cancers detected in patients who presented with reflux symptoms without dysphagia showed an improved prognosis over patients who presented with both. CONCLUSIONS: Esophageal adenocarcinoma has surpassed squamous cell carcinoma. Gastroesophageal reflux was associated with an earlier stage of presentation compared to the "classic" presentation of esophageal cancer. PMID:17595930

Gibbs, John F.; Rajput, Ashwani; Chadha, Krishdeep S.; Douglas, Wade G.; Hill, Hank; Nwogu, Chukwumere; Nava, Hector R.; Sabel, Michael S.

2007-01-01

124

[Long-term survival of a patient with esophageal metastasis from breast cancer treated with esophagectomy].  

PubMed

Esophageal metastasis from breast cancer is rarely observed. We encountered a case of long-term survival after esophageal metastasis from breast cancer that was treated with esophagectomy. A 79-year-old woman developed dysphagia 26 years after radical mastectomy. Endoscopic examination revealed stenosis at the mid-thoracic esophagus. An esophageal biopsy led to a diagnosis of undifferentiated cancer. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a massive tumor in the esophagus, but no distant metastases. Esophagectomy was performed with the suspicion of primary or metastatic esophageal cancer. Histopathologically, the excised tumor was an adenocarcinoma, which had histopathological features similar to that of the breast cancer. Accordingly, the adenocarcinoma was diagnosed as esophageal metastasis of the breast cancer. The patient is still alive 8 years after the esophagectomy. PMID:25731410

Kawabata, Ryohei; Kimura, Yutaka; Kawase, Tomono; Kamigaki, Shunji; Yamamura, Jun; Nakamura, Yukio; Munakata, Satoru; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ohzato, Hiroki

2014-11-01

125

Esophageal pH monitoring  

MedlinePLUS

pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

126

Abnormal enteric nerve morphology in atretic esophagus of fetal rats with adriamycin-induced esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

Gastroesophageal reflux is common in children after successful repair of esophageal atresia (EA), and may be related to a congenital neuronal abnormality of the esophagus. This study employed a fetal rat model of adriamycin-induced EA to investigate whether the innervation of the esophagus is abnormal in EA. The fetal rats were divided into four groups: (1) normal controls; (2) a saline-injected controls; (3) adriamycin administered but without the development of EA; and (4) adriamycin-induced EA. The distal esophageal segments were immunostained with a general neural marker, protein gene product 9.5 (PGP). Immunoreactivity per cross-sectional area (/xsa) was measured with an image analyzer. The extent of the esophageal circumference encircled by PGP-stained nerve tissue was assessed. While there was no significant difference in PGP immunoreactivity/xsa between the groups, the near-complete ring of nerve tissue along the plane of the myenteric plexus was replaced by clusters of nerve tissue in the atretic group (normal vs EA, P = 0. 001, Mann-Whitney U test). The abnormal distribution of nerve tissue in the atretic esophagus may be contributing factor in the esophageal dysmotility seen in EA. PMID:9914345

Cheng, W; Bishop, A E; Spitz, L; Polak, J M

1999-01-01

127

Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

128

Bacteremia with esophageal dilation  

Microsoft Academic Search

(GUMMI BEARS)Background: Antibiotic prophylaxis has been recommended for selected patients undergoing esophageal stricture dilation because of a reported high rate of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of bacteremia after esophageal dilatation in a large series and the source of the organisms recovered. Methods: Blood cultures and oral temperatures were obtained before esophageal dilation and

Douglas B. Nelson; Steven J. Sanderson; Miguel M. Azar

1998-01-01

129

Lymph Node Metastases in Esophageal Carcinoma: An Endoscopist's View  

PubMed Central

One of the most important prognostic factors in esophageal carcinoma is lymph node metastasis, and in particular, the number of affected lymph nodes, which influences long-term outcomes. The esophageal lymphatic system is connected longitudinally and transversally; thus, the pattern of lymph node metastases is very complex. Early esophageal cancer frequently exhibits skipped metastasis, and minimal surgery using sentinel node navigation cannot be performed. In Korea, most esophageal cancer cases are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), although the incidence of adenocarcinoma has started to increase recently. Most previous reports have failed to differentiate between SCC and adenocarcinoma, despite the fact that the Union for International Cancer Control (7th edition) and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging systems both consider these separately because they differ in cause, biology, lymph node metastasis, and outcome. Endoscopic tumor resection is an effective and safe treatment for lesions with no associated lymph node metastasis. Esophageal mucosal cancer confined to the lamina propria is an absolute indication for endoscopic resection, and a lesion that has invaded the muscularis mucosae can be cured by local resection if invasion to the lymphatic system has not occurred. PMID:25505718

Cho, Jin Woong; Jang, Jae Young; Shin, Sung Kwan; Choi, Kee Don; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Sang Gyun; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeon, Seong Woo; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Gwang Ha; Jee, Sam Ryong; Lee, Wan Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

2014-01-01

130

Current management of esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Management of esophageal cancer has evolved since the two last decades. Esophagectomy remains the primary treatment for early stage esophageal cancer although its specific role in superficial cancers is still under debate since the development of endoscopic mucosal treatment. To date, there is strong evidence to consider that locally advanced cancers should be recommended for a multimodal treatment with a neoadjuvant chemotherapy or a combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery. For locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma or for a part of adenocarcinoma, some centers have proposed treating with definitive CRT to avoid related-mortality of surgery. In case of persistent or recurrent disease, a salvage esophagectomy remains a possible option but this procedure is associated with higher levels of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Despite the debate over what constitutes the best surgical approach (transthoracic versus transhiatal), the current question is if a minimally procedure could reduce the periopertive morbidity and mortality without jeopardizing the oncological results of surgery. Since the last decade, minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) or hybrid operations are being done in up to 30% of procedures internationally. There are some consistent data that MIE could decrease the incidence of the respiratory complications and decrease the length of hospital-stay. Nowadays, oncologic outcomes appear equivalent between open and minimally invasive procedures but numerous phase III trials are ongoing. PMID:24868443

Thomas, Pascal Alexandre

2014-01-01

131

Multiple esophageal rings: an association with eosinophilic esophagitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophagitis may present endoscopically with erythema, edema, loss of vascular pattern, friability, and ulceration of the esophageal mucosa. Left untreated, chronic esophagitis may result in stricture formation. The presence of multiple concentric rings involving the entire esophagus has been cited as a chronic form of esophagitis. We present a case of an 8-yr-old boy with multiple concentric esophageal rings and

Constantinos G. Siafakas; Charlotte K. Ryan; Marilyn R. Brown; Tracie L. Miller

2000-01-01

132

Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... may be needed. There are different types of treatment for patients with esophageal cancer. Different types of ... started treatment. Patients have special nutritional needs during treatment for esophageal cancer. Many people with esophageal cancer ...

133

Endoscopic findings of adenocarcinoma arising from short-segment Barrett's esophagus.  

PubMed

Adenocarcinoma arising from short-segment Barrett's esophagus (SSBE) is rare in Japan, although the incidence of this condition is increasing in Western countries. Four cases of early adenocarcinoma arising from SSBE were diagnosed and treated at Niigata-prefectural Yoshida Hospital. All patients were male, variously 55, 71, 73 and 79 years of age. All four patients had long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease, although one patient had erosive esophagitis and three patients did not have erosive esophagitis. Three patients were diagnosed as having Helicobacter pylori-free stomach. All adenocarcinomas occurred close to the squamocolumnar junction. Patients with SSBE should undergo detailed endoscopic examination of the squamocolumnar junction in order to detect early adenocarcinoma arising from SSBE. PMID:15242504

Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Atsuo; Sekine, Atsuo; Tamiya, Yoichi; Oyamatsu, Manabu; Watanabe, Hidenobu

2004-08-01

134

Esophageal lichen planus.  

PubMed

Esophageal lichen planus is an underrecognized condition, with fewer than 50 cases reported to date. Unlike cutaneous lichen planus, esophageal lichen planus occurs almost exclusively in middle-aged or older women who also have oral involvement. It commonly involves the proximal esophagus and manifests as progressive dysphagia and odynophagia. Endoscopic findings can include lacy white papules, pinpoint erosions, desquamation, pseudomembranes, and stenosis. Histologic features of esophageal lichen planus have only rarely been illustrated. They differ from those of cutaneous disease in several respects, including the presence of parakeratosis, epithelial atrophy, and lack of hypergranulosis. Correct diagnosis of esophageal lichen planus is difficult but bears important therapeutic implications. It is typically a chronic and relapsing condition that can require systemic or local immunosuppressive therapy and repeated endoscopic dilatations for esophageal strictures. Esophageal lichen planus may have malignant potential, as evidenced by 3 patients who developed squamous carcinoma of the esophagus after longstanding disease. PMID:18517264

Chandan, Vishal S; Murray, Joseph A; Abraham, Susan C

2008-06-01

135

Cigarette smoking, body mass index, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancers by P53 overexpression.  

PubMed

A number of risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers have emerged, yet little is known whether risk factors map to molecular tumor markers such as overexpression of the tumor suppressor TP53. Using a US multicenter, population-based case-control study (170 cases of esophageal adenocarcinomas, 147 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas, 220 non-cardia gastric adenocarcinomas, and 112 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas), we examined whether the risk associated with cigarette smoking, body mass index (BMI), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use varied by P53 overexpression. We defined P53 overexpression through immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded tumor tissues, using cutpoints based on percent of cells positive. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess differences between each case group (defined by tumor subtype and P53 expression) and the control group by risk factors. The proportion of cases overexpressing P53 by tumor subtype was 72% for esophageal adenocarcinoma, 69% for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, 52% for non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma, and 67% for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. For most tumor subtypes, we found little difference in risk factors by tumor P53 overexpression. For non-cardia gastric cancer however, an association with cigarette smoking was suggested for tumors that do not overexpress P53, whereas larger BMI was related to adenocarcinomas that overexpress P53 versus no overexpression. Overall, this study did not find a clear relationship between P53 protein overexpression and the known risk factors for subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancers. Further research on these tumors is needed to identify molecular markers associated with variations in the risk factor profiles. PMID:18989634

Figueroa, Jonine D; Terry, Mary Beth; Gammon, Marilie D; Vaughan, Thomas L; Risch, Harvey A; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Kleiner, David E; Bennett, William P; Howe, Christine L; Dubrow, Robert; Mayne, Susan T; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chow, Wong-Ho

2009-04-01

136

Intramural Ganglion Structures in Esophageal Atresia: A Morphologic and Immunohistochemical Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction and Aim. Disorders of esophageal motility causing dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux are frequent in survivors to esophageal atresia (EA) and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the histologic and immunohistochemical features in both esophageal atretic segments to further understand the nature of the motor disorders observed in these patients. Material and Methods. Esophageal specimens from 12 newborns with EA/TEF and 5 newborns dead of unrelated causes were examined. The specimens were fixed in 5% buffered formalin, included in paraffin and cut in 5 micron sections that were stained with hematoxilin and eosin (H and E), and immunohistochemical stainings for Actin, S-100 protein, Neurofilament, Neuron-Specific-Enolase, Chromogranin A and Peripherin were evaluated under the microscope. Results. In controls, the distribution of the neural elements was rather homogenous at both levels of the esophagus. In contrast, the atretic segments showed quantitative and qualitative differences between them with sparser nervous tissue in the distal one in comparison with the proximal one and with controls. Conclusions. These results further support the assumption that histomorphological alterations of the muscular and nervous elements within the esophageal wall might contribute to esophageal dysmotility in patients surviving neonatal operations for EA/TEF. PMID:20041008

Zuccarello, Biagio; Spada, Antonella; Turiaco, Nunzio; Villari, Daniela; Parisi, Saveria; Francica, Isabella; Fazzari, Carmine; Pederiva, Federica; Tovar, Juan A.

2009-01-01

137

Esophageal duplication cyst.  

PubMed

Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital mediastinal cyst. Most of these cysts become symptomatic in childhood and only rare cases remain asymptomatic until adolescence. They may produce symptoms due to esophageal and respiratory system compression, rupture, and infection. A 25-year-old man presented with pulmonary infection and bronchiectasis that did not improve with medical treatment. A diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst was made intraoperatively. PMID:24757179

Bagheri, Reza; Asnaashari, Amir Mohammad Hashem; Afghani, Reza

2015-03-01

138

Stomach-Esophageal Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Stomach and esophageal cancers are close in anatomical location and have been combined into one project within TCGA. Although they are two separate cancer types, TCGA is collecting samples from various anatomic subsites along the esophageal and gastric tracts for analysis.

139

Functional esophageal disorders  

PubMed Central

The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or pathological reflux, defined by evidence of reflux esophagitis or abnormal acid exposure time during ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Management is largely empirical, although efficacy of psychopharmacological agents and psychological or behavioral approaches has been established for serveral of the functional esophageal disorders. As gastroesophageal reflux disease overlaps in presentation with most of these disorders and because symptoms are at least partially provoked by acid reflux events in many patients, antireflux therapy also plays an important role both in diagnosis and management. Further understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for symptoms is a priority for future research efforts, as is the consideration of treatment outcome in a broader sense than reduction in esophageal symptoms alone. Likewise, the value of inclusive rather than restrictive diagnostic criteria that encompass other gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms should be examined to improve the accuracy of symptom-based criteria and reduce the dependence on objective testing.???Keywords: globus; rumination; chest pain; esophageal motility disorders; esophageal spasm; gastroesophageal reflux disease; Rome II PMID:10457042

Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

1999-01-01

140

Drug-induced esophagitis.  

PubMed

Drug-induced esophagitis is being recognized increasingly in the past few years. Since 1970 more than 650 cases have been reported worldwide caused by 30 or more medications. We have reviewed these cases with a view to classifying this disease based on underlying pathological mechanism. Drug-induced esophageal injury tends to occur at the anatomical site of narrowing, with the middle third behind the left atrium predominating (75.6%). The disease is broadly classified into two groups. The first group being transient and self-limiting as exemplified by the tetracycline group induced injury (65.8%). The second is the persistent esophagitis group, often with stricture, with two distinct entities: (i) patients on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents whose injury is aggravated by gastroesophageal reflux (21.8%) (reflux aggravated); and (ii) patients with potasium chloride and quinidine sulphate induced injury (12.4%) (persistent drug injury). Severe esophageal injury has been reported in some women taking biphosphonates as treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Endoscopic findings in such patients with esophageal injury generally suggested a chemical esophagitis, with erosions or ulcerations and exudative inflammation accompanied by thickening of the esophageal wall. Most cases of medication-induced esophageal injury heal without intervention within a few days. Thus, the most important aspect of therapy is to make the correct diagnosis and then to avoid reinjury with the drug. When possible, potentially caustic oral medications should be discontinued. PMID:19392845

Zografos, G N; Georgiadou, D; Thomas, D; Kaltsas, G; Digalakis, M

2009-01-01

141

Eosinophilic esophagitis: an autoimmune esophageal disorder.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal inflammatory disease associated with esophageal dysfunction resulting from severe inflammation. The incidence and prevalence of EoE have been increasing in the past decade; however, the reason for this increase is unclear. There is a chronic inflammatory infiltrate that is present in EoE which promotes inflammation, symptoms, and dysfunction. In addition to eosinophils, interleukin (IL)-5 expressing T cells, B cells, eotaxin-3, IL-13, and IgE-bearing mast cells are present in EoE and are thought to contribute to the disease process. Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory and modulate multiple aspects of the immune response. Eosinophils produce a wide range of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. Once activated, eosinophils release granule components, which are toxic to a variety of tissues. Transforming growth factor ?1 is a pro-fibrotic molecule produced by epithelial and inflammatory cells, is overexpressed in EoE, and plays a role in esophageal remodeling. Fibrous remodeling in EoE could be associated with symptoms of dysphagia and may explain and predict future esophageal strictures and dysmotility. EoE is a complex disease involving multiple activation pathways, a large number of cells, and various inflammatory molecules. It, along with other atopic disease, is becoming increasingly prevalent and has an important genetic load and may represent as an immunological tolerance disorder of the GI tract. PMID:25499460

Malhotra, Neha; Levine, Jeremiah

2014-12-01

142

Esophageal atresia: metaplasia, Barrett.  

PubMed

Barrett's esophagus is characterized by the replacement of squamous epithelium by columnar epithelium that is intestinal metaplasia-positive or -negative in the distal esophagus. Gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is frequent and prolonged in esophageal atresia, probably plays a major role in the development of Barrett's esophagus through repeated mucosal damage. Long-term acid exposure contributes to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus of intestinal type, but its effect on gastric metaplasia is less well defined. Recent studies have suggest that metaplasia arises in about 15% of patients with esophageal atresia, with a lag time to developing metaplasia from initial surgical correction of about 10 years. Preliminary data from an ongoing multicenter study including 88 patients with esophageal atresia aged 15-19 years showed gastric metaplasia in 42% of patients (29 fundic and 7 cardial metaplasia), while one patient presented intestinal metaplasia. Esophageal mucosal abnormalities can be observed in esophageal atresia patients at endoscopy despite the absence of symptoms. Whether prolonged, aggressive, acid suppression is beneficial in these situations remains to be determined. Barrett's metaplasia can be removed by endoscopic mucosal resection or destroyed with endoscopic ablative techniques, such as photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. The risk of developing esophageal carcinoma is still a controversial issue as only a few clinical cases have been reported in young adults with esophageal atresia. As late complications of esophageal atresia, particularly esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, are increasingly being recognized, long-time systematic follow up of the esophageal mucosa including multistage biopsies is therefore required even in asymptomatic patients. PMID:23679037

Schneider, A; Michaud, L; Gottrand, F

2013-01-01

143

The Current State of Cancer Gene Therapy and Its Application in Esophageal Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in molecular genetics have accelerated the understanding of the genetic basis of many diseases. This is particularly true for esophageal adenocarcinoma with its well-defined premalignant lesions. At the same time, remarkable progress in recombinant DNA technology has enabled the development of molecular treatments for inherited disorders, infectious diseases and cancer. In recent years, especially the development of gene therapy

Christianne J. Buskens; Willem A. Marsman; Piter J. Bosma; J. Jan B. van Lanschot

2005-01-01

144

Epidemiology of Esophageal Cancer in Japan and China  

PubMed Central

In preparation for a collaborative multidisciplinary study of the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, the authors reviewed the published literature to identify similarities and differences between Japan and China in esophageal cancer epidemiology. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histologic type, while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma remains extremely low in both countries. Numerous epidemiologic studies in both countries show that alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are contributing risk factors for ESCC. There are differences, however, in many aspects of esophageal cancer between Japan and China, including cancer burden, patterns of incidence and mortality, sex ratio of mortality, risk factor profiles, and genetic variants. Overall incidence and mortality rates are higher in China than in Japan, and variation in mortality and incidence patterns is greater in China than in Japan. During the study period (1987–2000), the decline in age-adjusted mortality rates was more apparent in China than in Japan. Risk factor profiles differed between high- and low-incidence areas within China, but not in Japan. The association of smoking and drinking with ESCC risk appears to be weaker in China than in Japan. Genome-wide association studies in China showed that variants in several chromosome regions conferred increased risk, but only genetic variants in alcohol-metabolizing genes were significantly associated with ESCC risk in Japan. A well-designed multidisciplinary epidemiologic study is needed to examine the role of diet and eating habits in ESCC risk. PMID:23629646

Lin, Yingsong; Totsuka, Yukari; He, Yutong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Qiao, Youlin; Ueda, Junko; Wei, Wenqiang; Inoue, Manami; Tanaka, Hideo

2013-01-01

145

Advances in targeted therapies and new promising targets in esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer, comprising squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Notably, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased at an alarming rate in the Western world. Unfortunately, the standard first-line chemo-radiotherapeutic approaches are toxic and of limited efficacy in the treatment of a significant number of cancer patients. The molecular analysis of cancer cells has uncovered key genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying the development and progression of tumors. These discoveries have paved the way for the emergence of targeted therapy approaches. This review will highlight recent progress in the development of targeted therapies in esophageal cancer. This will include a review of drugs targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and other kinases in esophageal cancer. Additional studies will be required to develop a rational integration of these targeted agents with respect to histologic types of esophageal cancer and the optimal selection of cancer patients who would most likely benefit from targeted therapy. Identification of AURKA and AXL as key molecular players in esophageal tumorigenesis and drug resistance strongly justifies the evaluation of the available drugs against these targets in clinical trials. PMID:25593196

Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

2015-01-01

146

Advances in targeted therapies and new promising targets in esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer, comprising squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Notably, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased at an alarming rate in the Western world. Unfortunately, the standard first-line chemo-radiotherapeutic approaches are toxic and of limited efficacy in the treatment of a significant number of cancer patients. The molecular analysis of cancer cells has uncovered key genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying the development and progression of tumors. These discoveries have paved the way for the emergence of targeted therapy approaches. This review will highlight recent progress in the development of targeted therapies in esophageal cancer. This will include a review of drugs targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and other kinases in esophageal cancer. Additional studies will be required to develop a rational integration of these targeted agents with respect to histologic types of esophageal cancer and the optimal selection of cancer patients who would most likely benefit from targeted therapy. Identification of AURKA and AXL as key molecular players in esophageal tumorigenesis and drug resistance strongly justifies the evaluation of the available drugs against these targets in clinical trials. PMID:25593196

Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

2015-01-30

147

Iatrogenic Perforation of Upper Pouch in Pure Esophageal Atresia: A Rare Complication and Review of Literature  

PubMed Central

Iatrogenic perforation of the neonate's pharynx and esophagus with normal anatomy was first described by Eklöf et al in 1968. It typically occurs in severely premature neonates who have undergone repeated traumatic attempts at endotracheal intubation or passage of orogastric tubes. It may also mimic esophageal atresia (EA). Perforation of upper pouch in tracheoesophageal fistula with EA was rarely reported. We report a 1,400?g (32 weeks) neonate with pure EA and iatrogenic perforation of upper pouch due to use of catheter for diagnostic radiography.

Parelkar, Sandesh; Mundada, Dinesh; Joshi, Prashant; Sanghvi, Beejal; Kapadnis, Satish; Oak, Sanjay

2013-01-01

148

Esophageal Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NCI Web site . Tests that may detect (find) esophageal cancer are being studied: Esophagoscopy A ... of the lower part of the esophagus may detect early Barrett esophagus . This procedure may be used ...

149

Understanding Esophageal Manometry  

MedlinePLUS

... Screen4coloncancer.org About Colonoscopy Facts About Common Colon Cancer Screening Tests PATIENTS Understanding Esophageal Manometry The Esophagus The esophagus is a muscular tube that connects your throat to your stomach. With each swallow, the esophagus ...

150

Esophageal Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... risk of esophageal cancer: Tobacco and alcohol use Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is strongly linked with all ... broccoli, and cauliflower) may lower the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Some ...

151

Esophageal Rupture in a Patient With Idiopathic Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Idiopathic eosinophilic esophagitis is an extremely rare condition with fewer than 20 cases described in the literature. We present a case presenting as an emergency with esophageal perforation that eventually required subtotal esophagectomy.

Peter J Riou; Andrew G Nicholson; Ugo Pastorino

1996-01-01

152

Risk Factors for Esophageal Candidiasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of gastric acid inhibitors as predisposing factors for Candida esophagitis is unknown. A retrospective case-control study of esophageal candidiasis was conducted in human immunodeficiency\\u000a virus (HIV)-negative patients diagnosed from January 1991 to December 1997. The diagnosis of esophageal candidiasis was always\\u000a made on the basis of endoscopic and histological criteria. Fifty-one patients were diagnosed with esophageal candidiasis,\\u000a 15

A. Chocarro Martínez; F. Galindo Tobal; G. Ruiz-Irastorza; A. González López; F. Alvarez Navia; C. Ochoa Sangrador; M. I. Martín Arribas

2000-01-01

153

Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Strictures, Impactions, Dysphagia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic esophagitis, long known to be a feature of acid reflux, has recently been described in patients with food allergies and macroscopically furrowed esophagus. The pathophysiology and optimal management of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is unclear. We describe our clinical experience related to eosinophilic esophagitis and obstructive symptoms in children and propose etiopathogenesis and management guidelines. Twelve children with obstructive

Seema Khan; Susan R. Orenstein; Carlo Di Lorenzo; Samuel A. Kocoshis; Philip E. Putnam; Luther Sigurdsson; Theresa M. Shalaby

2003-01-01

154

Surgical Treatment for Esophageal Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophageal cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to cure. The prognosis remains unsatisfactory despite significant advances in surgical techniques and perioperative management. The optimal treatment strategy for localized esophageal cancer has not yet been established. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment for esophageal cancer, and curative resection is the most important surgery. Extended esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy

Hiroyuki Kato; Minoru Fukuchi; Tatsuya Miyazaki; Masanobu Nakajima; Naritaka Tanaka; Takanori Inose; Hitoshi Kimura; Ahmad Faried; Kana Saito; Makoto Sohda; Yasuyuki Fukai; Norihiro Masuda; Ryokuhei Manda; Hitoshi Ojima; Katsuhiko Tsukada; Hiroyuki Kuwano

2007-01-01

155

Systemic treatment of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma in elderly patients  

PubMed Central

This article explores the treatment of cancer of the stomach and of the lower esophagus in older individuals. The incidence of both malignancies increases with age and, at present, the biology of the diseases, including sensitivity to chemotherapy, does not seem to change with age. The treatment of these cancers in patients 70 and over includes assessment of life expectancy secondary to physiologic age and evaluation of the individual’s tolerance to stress. For this purpose a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is the best validated instrument. For individuals whose life expectancy without cancer exceeds that with cancer, the estimate of the risk of chemotherapy complications may reveal those patients in need of additional care and those patients in whom the risk of treatment may exceed the potential benefits. All older individuals receiving chemotherapy may need adjustment of the doses to the glomerular filtration rate, support with myelopoietic growth factors, and special care to prevent severe and irreversible neurotoxicity. PMID:25642340

2015-01-01

156

Combinatorial Chemoprevention Reveals a Novel Smoothened Independent Role of GLI1 in Esophageal Carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Reflux-induced injury promotes esophageal adenocarcinoma, one of the most rapidly increasing, highly lethal cancers in Western countries. Here we investigate the efficacy of a combinatorial chemoprevention strategy for esophageal adenocarcinoma and characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms. Specifically, our approach involves the use of Ursodeoxycholic acid (Urso) due to its ability to decrease injury-inducing bile salts in combination with Aspirin to mitigate the consequences of injury. We find that Urso-Aspirin combination reduces the risk of adenocarcinoma in-vivo in animals with reflux, decreases the proliferation of esophageal adenocarcinoma cells and down-regulates a key cell cycle regulator, CDK2. Mechanistically, using cell growth, luciferase-reporter, expression and ChIP assays, we identify GLI1, a Hedgehog-regulated transcription factor, as a novel target of Urso-Aspirin combination. We demonstrate that GLI1 is upregulated during esophageal carcinogenesis and GLI1 can bind to the CDK2 promoter and activate its expression. While the Urso-Aspirin combination downregulates GLI1, the GLI1 overexpression not only abrogates the effect of this combination on proliferation but it also restores CDK-2 expression. These findings support that the chemopreventive effect of the Urso-Aspirin combination occurs, at least in part, via a novel GLI1-CDK2-dependent mechanism. To further understand the regulation of CDK2 by GLI1, both pharmacologic and RNAi-mediated approaches demonstrate that GLI1 is a transcriptional activator of CDK2 and this regulation occurs independent of Smoothened, the central transducer of the Hedgehog canonical pathway. Collectively, these results identify a novel GLI1-to-CDK2 pathway in esophageal carcinogenesis, which is a bona fide target for effective combinatorial chemoprevention with Urso and Aspirin. PMID:20647328

Rizvi, Sumera; DeMars, Cathrine J.; Comba, Andrea; Gainullin, Vladimir; Rizvi, Zaheer; Almada, Luciana L.; Wang, Kenneth; Lomberk, Gwen; Fernández-Zapico, Martin E.; Buttar, Navtej S.

2010-01-01

157

Genetic landscape of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest cancers. We performed exome sequencing on 113 tumor-normal pairs, yielding a mean of 82 non-silent mutations per tumor, and 8 cell lines. The mutational profile of ESCC closely resembles those of squamous cell carcinomas of other tissues but differs from that of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation were mutated in 99% of cases by somatic alterations of TP53 (93%), CCND1 (33%), CDKN2A (20%), NFE2L2 (10%) and RB1 (9%). Histone modifier genes were frequently mutated, including KMT2D (also called MLL2; 19%), KMT2C (MLL3; 6%), KDM6A (7%), EP300 (10%) and CREBBP (6%). EP300 mutations were associated with poor survival. The Hippo and Notch pathways were dysregulated by mutations in FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 or FAT4 (27%) or AJUBA (JUB; 7%) and NOTCH1, NOTCH2 or NOTCH3 (22%) or FBXW7 (5%), respectively. These results define the mutational landscape of ESCC and highlight mutations in epigenetic modulators with prognostic and potentially therapeutic implications. PMID:25151357

Gao, Yi-Bo; Chen, Zhao-Li; Li, Jia-Gen; Hu, Xue-Da; Shi, Xue-Jiao; Sun, Zeng-Miao; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Zi-Ran; Li, Zi-Tong; Liu, Zi-Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Da; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Cheng-Cheng; Yao, Ran; Wang, Su-Ya; Wang, Pan; Sun, Nan; Zhang, Bai-Hua; Dong, Jing-Si; Yu, Yue; Luo, Mei; Feng, Xiao-Li; Shi, Su-Sheng; Zhou, Fang; Tan, Feng-Wei; Qiu, Bin; Li, Ning; Shao, Kang; Zhang, Li-Jian; Zhang, Lan-Jun; Xue, Qi; Gao, Shu-Geng; He, Jie

2014-10-01

158

Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

The association of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal cancer is well known. The carcinogenic properties of the gastroduodenal contents may also lead to cancer in target organs for GERD especially considering that they do not have intrinsic protective mechanisms as found in the esophagus. This review focuses on the putative relation between GERD and non-esophageal cancer. Most of the papers reviewed are far from ideal to prove the relationship of extra-esophageal cancer and GERD since a small number of patients is presented, most do not control cases based on tobacco usage and obesity, and the diagnosis of GERD is variable, not always from an objective measurement such as pH monitoring but relying on symptoms in most reports. Nevertheless, head and neck and lung cancer have a growing incidence parallel to GERD and a shift towards non-smoking, female gender and adenocarcinoma (compared to squamous cell carcinoma) is arising, similar to the example of esophageal cancer with the exception of the female gender. PMID:25624714

Herbella, Fernando AM; Neto, Sebastião Pannocchia; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Figueiredo, Licia Caldas

2015-01-01

159

Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

The association of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal cancer is well known. The carcinogenic properties of the gastroduodenal contents may also lead to cancer in target organs for GERD especially considering that they do not have intrinsic protective mechanisms as found in the esophagus. This review focuses on the putative relation between GERD and non-esophageal cancer. Most of the papers reviewed are far from ideal to prove the relationship of extra-esophageal cancer and GERD since a small number of patients is presented, most do not control cases based on tobacco usage and obesity, and the diagnosis of GERD is variable, not always from an objective measurement such as pH monitoring but relying on symptoms in most reports. Nevertheless, head and neck and lung cancer have a growing incidence parallel to GERD and a shift towards non-smoking, female gender and adenocarcinoma (compared to squamous cell carcinoma) is arising, similar to the example of esophageal cancer with the exception of the female gender. PMID:25624714

Herbella, Fernando A M; Neto, Sebastião Pannocchia; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Figueiredo, Licia Caldas

2015-01-21

160

Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula  

PubMed Central

Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula (EED) are rare. The estimated incidence is about 1:500,000/year. EED usually result from a combination of esophageal obstruction, functional or mechanical and a point of weakness of the muscularis propria. Most of the symptoms are unspecific, but dysphagia is most common. Chest radiograph, barium esophagogram, endoscopy and manometry are diagnostic tools. The treatment methods are conservative medical therapy, myotomy, diverticulectomy and fundoplication. In addition, endoscopic pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin injection are a good alternative for symptomatic patients with motility disorders who are unfit for or unwilling to undergo surgery. PMID:25422668

Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Masinaeinezhad, Nosratollah; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza

2014-01-01

161

Two Cases of Esophageal Eosinophilia: Eosinophilic Esophagitis or Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease?  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

2014-01-01

162

Recurrent Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma after esophagectomy  

PubMed Central

Background Esophagectomy is considered the gold standard for the treatment of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and for noninvasive adenocarcinoma (ACA) of the distal esophagus. If all of the metaplastic epithelium is removed, the patient is considered "cured". Despite this, BE has been reported in patients who have previously undergone esophagectomy. It is often debated whether this is "new" BE or the result of an esophagectomy that did not include a sufficiently proximal margin. Our aim was to determine if BE recurred in esophagectomy patients where the entire segment of BE had been removed. Methods Records were searched for patients who had undergone esophagectomy for cure at our institution. Records were reviewed for surgical, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. The patients in whom we have endoscopic follow-up are the subjects of this report. Results Since 1995, 45 patients have undergone esophagectomy for cure for Barrett's dysplasia or localized ACA. Thirty-six of these 45 patients underwent endoscopy after surgery including 8/45 patients (18%) with recurrent Barrett's metaplasia or neoplasia after curative resection. Conclusion Recurrent Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma after esophagectomy was common in our patients who underwent at least one endoscopy after surgery. This appears to represent the development of metachronous disease after complete resection of esophageal disease. Half of these patients have required subsequent treatment thus far, either repeat surgery or photodynamic therapy. These results support the use of endoscopic surveillance in patients who have undergone "curative" esophagectomy for Barrett's dysplasia or localized cancer. PMID:15327696

Wolfsen, Herbert C; Hemminger, Lois L; DeVault, Kenneth R

2004-01-01

163

Esophageal Rings and Webs  

MedlinePLUS

... determine if you have a ring or a web, your doctor may order one of these tests: Barium swallow test. This allows the radiologist to ... contribute to the development of esophageal rings and webs, your doctor probably will order a blood test for iron levels and, if you are deficient, ...

164

21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is...

2013-04-01

165

21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is...

2011-04-01

166

21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is...

2014-04-01

167

21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is...

2010-04-01

168

21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is...

2012-04-01

169

21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2011-04-01

170

21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2012-04-01

171

21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2010-04-01

172

21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2014-04-01

173

21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2013-04-01

174

A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy  

PubMed Central

Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

Chahla, Elie; Cheesman, Antonio; Hammami, Muhammad; Taylor, Jason R.; Poddar, Nishant; Garrett, Robert W.; Alkaade, Samer

2015-01-01

175

Is Radiation Therapy Needed in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma?  

PubMed Central

There have been very few treatment-related studies specifically addressing adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Studies addressing esophageal cancer have a larger percentage of patients with GEJ adenocarcinomas than do the primary gastric trials. Studies of surgery alone have shown high local failure rates for both esophageal and gastric cancers, and for both anatomic sites the addition of radiation therapy has been shown to decrease the local failure rate and improve survival. Chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery has also been shown to be of value in both anatomic sites. Combining all three treatment modalities, surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, is likely to produce the best overall outcomes for patients with this disease, which is rapidly increasing in incidence. PMID:19343142

2008-01-01

176

An Overview of Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease affecting both children and adults. The condition is characterized by an eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal epithelium. Symptoms of esophageal dysfunction include dysphagia, food impaction and symptoms mimicking gastroesophageal reflux disease. Endoscopic examination typically reveals mucosal fragility, ring or corrugated mucosa, longitudinal furrows, whitish plaques or a small caliber esophagus. Histologic findings of >15 eosinophils per high-power field is the diagnostic hallmark of EoE. An elimination diet, topical corticosteroids or endoscopic dilation for fibrostenotic disease serve as effective therapeutic option. PMID:25368745

Park, Hyojin

2014-01-01

177

Long-term respiratory complications of congenital esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula: an update.  

PubMed

Despite early surgical repair, congenital esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (EA ± TEF) has long-term effects on respiratory and gastrointestinal function. This review updates summarizes research published since 2003 on long-term respiratory complications in patients with a history of EA ± TEF. Pulmonary hypoplasia appears to not be rare in patients with EA ± TEF. Tracheomalacia is common and is associated with respiratory symptoms in childhood. Aspiration, associated with esophageal dysmotility and/or gastroesophageal reflux, may lead to reduced pulmonary function and bronchiectasis. Pulmonary function is generally normal, although lower than in control patients, and restrictive defects tend to be commoner than obstructive defects. Abnormal airway reactivity is common and, along with respiratory symptoms, is associated with atopy. However, the inflammatory profile in EA ± TEF patients based on bronchial biopsies and exhaled nitric oxide differs from typical allergic asthma. Recent studies suggest that in older patients, respiratory symptoms tend to be associated with atopy, but abnormal lung function tends to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux and with chest wall abnormalities. Early detection and management of aspiration may be important to help prevent decrements in pulmonary function and serious long-term complications in EA ± TEF patients. PMID:23679034

Kovesi, T

2013-01-01

178

Management of patients with combined tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and duodenal atresia  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Patients with combined esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and duodenal atresia (DA) pose a rare management challenge. PRESENTATION OF CASE Three patients with combined esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and duodenal atresia safely underwent a staged approach inserting a gastrostomy tube and repairing the EA/TEF first followed by a duodenoduodenostomy within one week. None of the patients suffered significant pre- or post-operative complications and our follow-up data (between 12 and 24 months) suggest that all patients eventually outgrow their reflux and respiratory symptoms. DISCUSSION While some authors support repair of all defects in one surgery, we recommend a staged approach. A gastrostomy tube is placed first for gastric decompression before TEF ligation and EA repair can be safely undertaken. The repair of the DA can then be performed within 3–7 days under controlled circumstances. CONCLUSION A staged approach of inserting a gastrostomy tube and repairing the EA/TEF first followed by a duodenoduodenostomy within one week resulted in excellent outcomes. PMID:25460495

Nabzdyk, Christoph S.; Chiu, Bill; Jackson, Carl-Christian; Chwals, Walter J.

2014-01-01

179

Prognostic significance of differentially expressed miRNAs in esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression has been found to promote carcinogenesis, but little is known about the role of miRNAs in esophageal cancer. In this study, we selected 10 miRNAs and analyzed their expression in 10 esophageal cancer cell lines and 158 tissue specimens using Northern blotting and in situ hybridization, respectively. We found that Let-7g, miR-21, and miR-195p were expressed in all 10 cell lines, miR-9 and miR-20a were not expressed in any of the cell lines, and miR-16-2, miR-30e, miR-34a, miR-126, and miR-200a were expressed in some of the cell lines but not others. In addition, transient transfection of miR-34a inhibited c-Met and cyclin D1 expression and esophageal cancer cell proliferation, whereas miR-16-2 suppressed RAR-?2 expression and increased tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, we found that miR-126 expression was associated with tumor cell de-differentiation and lymph node metastasis, miR-16-2 was associated with lymph node metastasis, and miR-195p was associated with higher pathologic disease stages in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that miR-16-2 expression and miR-30e expression were associated with shorter overall and disease-free survival in all esophageal cancer patients. In addition, miR-16-2, miR-30e, and miR-200a expression were associated with shorter overall and disease-free survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients; however, miR-16-2, miR-30e, and miR-200a expression was not associated with overall or disease-free survival in squamous cell carcinoma patients. Our data indicate that further evaluation of miR-30e and miR-16-2 as prognostic biomarkers is warranted in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, the role of miR-34a in esophageal cancer also warrants further study. PMID:20309880

Hu, Yuxin; Correa, Arlene M.; Hoque, Ashraful; Guan, Baoxiang; Ye, Fei; Huang, Jie; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wu, Tsung Teh; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Xu, Xiao-chun

2010-01-01

180

Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas  

PubMed Central

Infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a real enigma. On one hand, it is one of the most deadly of all of the solid malignancies. On the other hand, the neoplastic glands can be remarkably well-differentiated, and it can be difficult to distinguish between a reactive non-neoplastic gland and a gland of invasive adenocarcinoma. In this review, we will present diagnostic criteria that one can “hang your hat on” when establishing the diagnosis of infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We will also review clinically important features of the disease, and, with the impending incorporation of molecular genetics into everyday practice, we will emphasize clinical applications of cancer genetics. PMID:25441308

Hruban, Ralph H.; Klimstra, David S.

2015-01-01

181

Biology of Telomeres: Importance in Etiology of Esophageal Cancer And As Therapeutic Target  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of telomeres, the mechanisms implicated in their maintenance, and their role in the etiology as well as the treatment of human esophageal cancer. We will also discuss the role of telomeres in the maintenance/preservation of genomic integrity, the consequences of telomere dysfunction, and the various factors that may affect telomere health in esophageal tissue predisposing it to oncogenesis. Recent findings There has been growing evidence that telomeres, which can be affected by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, contribute to genomic instability, oncogenesis, as well as proliferation of cancer cells. Summary Telomeres are the protective DNA-protein complexes at chromosome ends. Telomeric DNA undergoes progressive shortening with age leading to cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. If senescence/apoptosis is prevented as a consequence of specific genomic changes, continued proliferation leads to very short (i.e. dysfunctional) telomeres that can potentially cause genomic instability thus increasing the risk for activation of telomere maintenance mechanisms and oncogenesis. Like many other cancers, esophageal cancer cells have short telomeres and elevated telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres in most cancer cells. Homologous recombination, which is implicated in the alternate pathway of telomere elongation, is also elevated in Barrett’s-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. Evidence from our laboratory indicates that both telomerase and homologous recombination contribute to telomere maintenance, DNA repair, and the ongoing survival of esophageal cancer cells. This indicates that telomere maintenance mechanisms may potentially be targeted to make esophageal cancer cells static. The rate at which telomeres in healthy cells shorten is determined by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including those associated with lifestyle. Avoidance of factors that may directly or indirectly injure esophageal tissue including its telomeric and other genomic DNA can not only reduce the risk of development of esophageal cancer but may also have positive impact on overall health and lifespan. PMID:24090770

Pal, Jagannath; Gold, Jason S.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Shammas, Masood A.

2013-01-01

182

Role of preoperative tracheobronchoscopy in newborns with esophageal atresia: A review.  

PubMed

Preoperative tracheobronchoscopy (TBS) in the diagnostic assessment of newborns affected by esophageal atresia (EA) was described in 1981. Nevertheless, the value of the procedure is actually much debated; only a few studies have clearly explored the advantages of TBS and this procedure is not yet routinely included in the diagnostic and therapeutic assessment in many international pediatric surgery settings. Routine preoperative TBS is a safe procedure that enables the accurate examination of the tracheobronchial tree, the visualization of tracheoesophageal fistula and the diagnosis of tracheomalacia or associated respiratory anomalies. When a distal fistula is found, its occlusion with a Fogarty balloon catheter improves mechanical ventilation and facilitates surgical repair. This review provides a detailed overview on the use of TBS in newborns with EA, focusing on technical aspects, anesthesiological management, indications and limits. The benefits and risks of the procedure are also compared with alternative diagnostic tools, such as an esophageal contrast study, computed tomography scan and ultrasound. PMID:25324919

Parolini, Filippo; Boroni, Giovanni; Stefini, Stefania; Agapiti, Cristina; Bazzana, Tullia; Alberti, Daniele

2014-10-16

183

Role of preoperative tracheobronchoscopy in newborns with esophageal atresia: A review  

PubMed Central

Preoperative tracheobronchoscopy (TBS) in the diagnostic assessment of newborns affected by esophageal atresia (EA) was described in 1981. Nevertheless, the value of the procedure is actually much debated; only a few studies have clearly explored the advantages of TBS and this procedure is not yet routinely included in the diagnostic and therapeutic assessment in many international pediatric surgery settings. Routine preoperative TBS is a safe procedure that enables the accurate examination of the tracheobronchial tree, the visualization of tracheoesophageal fistula and the diagnosis of tracheomalacia or associated respiratory anomalies. When a distal fistula is found, its occlusion with a Fogarty balloon catheter improves mechanical ventilation and facilitates surgical repair. This review provides a detailed overview on the use of TBS in newborns with EA, focusing on technical aspects, anesthesiological management, indications and limits. The benefits and risks of the procedure are also compared with alternative diagnostic tools, such as an esophageal contrast study, computed tomography scan and ultrasound. PMID:25324919

Parolini, Filippo; Boroni, Giovanni; Stefini, Stefania; Agapiti, Cristina; Bazzana, Tullia; Alberti, Daniele

2014-01-01

184

Radiochemotherapy of esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

Cancer of the esophagus continues to be a threat to public health. The common practice is esophagectomy for surgically resectable tumors and radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable tumors. However, local regional tumor control and overall survival of esophageal cancer patients after the standard therapies remain poor, approximately 30% of patients treated with surgery only will develop local recurrence, and 50% to 60% patients treated with radiochemotherapy only fail local regionally due to persistent disease or local recurrence. Esophagectomy after radiochemotherapy or preoperative radiochemotherapy has increased the complete surgical resection rate and local regional control without a significant survival benefit. Induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative radiochemotherapy has produced encouraging results. In addition to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors, involvement of celiac axis nodes, number of positive lymph nodes after preoperative radiochemotherapy, incomplete pathologic response, high metabolic activity on positron emission tomography scan after radiochemotherapy, and incomplete surgical resection are factors associated with a poor outcome. Radiochemotherapy followed by surgery is associated with significant adverse effects, including treatment-related pneumonitis, postoperative pulmonary complications, esophagitis and pericarditis. The incidence and severity of the adverse effects are associated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy dosimetric factors. Innovative treatment strategies including physically and biologically molecular targeted therapy is needed to improve the treatment outcome of patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:17545853

Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D; Komaki, Ritsuko

2007-06-01

185

Critical role for the receptor tyrosine kinase EPHB4 in esophageal cancers.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer incidence is increasing and has few treatment options. In studying receptor tyrosine kinases associated with esophageal cancers, we have identified EPHB4 to be robustly overexpressed in cell lines and primary tumor tissues. In total, 94 squamous cell carcinoma, 82 adenocarcinoma, 25 dysplasia, 13 Barrett esophagus, and 25 adjacent or unrelated normal esophageal tissues were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. EPHB4 expression was significantly higher in all the different histologic categories than in adjacent normal tissues. In 13 esophageal cancer cell lines, 3 of the 9 SCC cell lines and 2 of the 4 adenocarcinomas expressed very high levels of EPHB4. An increased gene copy number ranging from 4 to 20 copies was identified in a subset of the overexpressing patient samples and cell lines. We have developed a novel 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced mouse model of esophageal cancer that recapitulates the EPHB4 expression in humans. A specific small-molecule inhibitor of EPHB4 decreased cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner in 3 of the 4 cell lines tested. The small-molecule inhibitor and an EPHB4 siRNA also decreased cell migration (12%-40% closure in treated vs. 60%-80% in untreated), with decreased phosphorylation of various tyrosyl-containing proteins, EphB4, and its downstream target p125FAK. Finally, in a xenograft tumor model, an EPHB4 inhibitor abrogated tumor growth by approximately 60% compared with untreated control. EphB4 is robustly expressed and potentially serves as a novel biomarker for targeted therapy in esophageal cancers. PMID:23100466

Hasina, Rifat; Mollberg, Nathan; Kawada, Ichiro; Mutreja, Karun; Kanade, Geetanjali; Yala, Soheil; Surati, Mosmi; Liu, Ren; Li, Xiuqing; Zhou, Yue; Ferguson, Benjamin D; Nallasura, Vidya; Cohen, Kenneth S; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Mueller, Jeffery; Kanteti, Rajani; El Hashani, Essam; Kane, Dorothy; Shimada, Yutaka; Lingen, Mark W; Husain, Aliya N; Posner, Mitchell C; Waxman, Irving; Villaflor, Victoria M; Ferguson, Mark K; Varticovski, Lyuba; Vokes, Everett E; Gill, Parkash; Salgia, Ravi

2013-01-01

186

Comparison of outcomes according to the operation for type A esophageal atresia  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose was to evaluate outcomes according to different operative strategies of type A esophageal atresia (EA). Methods All patients who underwent surgery for type A EA between 1980 and 2011 were included. Patients were divided into 2 groups: E-E group included patients who received esophageal end-to-end anastomosis, whereas E-G group included patients who received esophago-gastric tube anastomosis. Results Twenty-two patients were included. The median gestational age was 37.5 weeks. The median birth weight was 2.5 kg. Twenty-one patients underwent gastrostomy as initial procedures, and one patient underwent primary esophageal end-to-end anastomosis. The median gap between both esophageal ends was six vertebral distance (VD). Seven patients underwent primary anastomosis of the esophagus, and 14 patients underwent gastric replacement. Three patients (13.6%) had anastomotic leakage and 10 patients (45.5%) had anastomotic stenosis. Most of the patients (90.9%) had gastroesophageal reflux, but only two patients required antireflux surgery. The median VD was significantly shorter in E-E group than in E-G group (3 VD vs. 6 VD). Stenosis was significantly more often in E-E group, but there was no significant difference in leakage and reflux symptoms. Conclusion The treatment for type A EA can include E-E anastomosis or E-G anastomosis, depending on the length of the end-to-end interval after performing gastrostomy. Appropriate tension and blood flow in the anastomosis site are essential for preventing postoperative stenosis and leakage, and esophageal replacement with gastric tube is believed to be feasible and safe in cases where excessive tension is present. PMID:24761413

Huh, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Park, Kwi-Won

2014-01-01

187

Glossopexy as an alternative to aortopexy in infants with repaired esophageal atresia and upper airway obstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Purpose: Clinical manifestations of airway obstruction in infants with repaired esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA\\/TEF) are attributed conventionally to tracheomalacia. In the current study, the authors tested the hypothesis that a retrodisplacement of the tongue (glossoptosis), by causing a functional upper airway obstruction (obstructive apnea\\/hypopnea), may play a role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory problems. Methods: The records

Francesco Cozzi; Francesco Morini; Alessandra Casati; Daniela Camanni; Augusto Zani; Denis A. Cozzi

2002-01-01

188

Value of functional imaging by PET in esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

In esophageal cancer, functional imaging using PET can provide important additional information beyond standard staging techniques that may eventually lead to therapeutic consequences. The most commonly used tracer is fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which has high avidity for both squamous cell cancer and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The value of FDG-PET is limited in early esophageal cancer, whereas additional information is provided in 15% to 20% of locally advanced tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment is currently the standard of care in locally advanced esophageal cancer in most countries because randomized studies have shown a significant survival benefit. Because responders and nonresponders have a significantly different prognosis, functional imaging to tailor preoperative treatment would be of interest. Metabolic imaging using FDG-PET is an established method of response evaluation in clinical trials. The value of metabolic response evaluation is known to depend on the histologic subtype and the type of preoperative treatment delivered. An association of FDG-PET-based metabolic response with clinical response and prognosis was shown for absolute standardized uptake value (SUV) or a decrease of SUV levels before, during, and after therapy. However, contradictory findings exist in the literature and prospective validation is missing. Additionally, no consensus exists on time points or cutoff levels for metabolic response evaluation. Furthermore, correct prediction of a posttherapeutic pathologic complete remission is currently not possible using FDG-PET. Of high interest is early response monitoring during preoperative chemotherapy, with potential subsequent therapy modification. This tailored approach still needs validation in prospective multicenter trials. PMID:25691614

Schmidt, Thomas; Lordick, Florian; Herrmann, Ken; Ott, Katja

2015-02-01

189

21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. ...Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical...

2014-04-01

190

21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. ...Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical...

2012-04-01

191

21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. ...Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical...

2013-04-01

192

21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. ...Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical...

2011-04-01

193

21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. ...Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical...

2010-04-01

194

Caustic ingestion and esophageal function  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment.

S. Cadranel; C. Di Lorenzo; P. Rodesch; A. Piepsz; H. R. Ham

1990-01-01

195

Editorial: Where Are You and How Do We Find You? The Dilemma of Identifying Barrett's Epithelium Before Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in white males has been increasing steadily over the past decade. However, attempts to identify the precursor lesion, intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus, or early in-situ cancers have been dismal, with no increase in the diagnosis of early cancers over 9 years of follow-up, as noted in the study by Cooper et al. Important predictors

Roy K H Wong; Sean F Altekruse

2009-01-01

196

Src Mutation Induces Acquired Lapatinib Resistance in ERBB2-Amplified Human Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma Models  

PubMed Central

ERBB2-directed therapy is now a routine component of therapy for ERBB2-amplified metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. However, there is little knowledge of the mechanisms by which these tumors develop acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. To investigate this question we sought to characterize cell line models of ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma with acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. We generated lapatinib-resistant (LR) subclones from an initially lapatinib-sensitive ERBB2-amplified esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line, OE19. We subsequently performed genomic characterization and functional analyses of resistant subclones with acquired lapatinib resistance. We identified a novel, acquired SrcE527K mutation in a subset of LR OE19 subclones. Cells with this mutant allele harbour increased Src phosphorylation. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Src resensitized these subclones to lapatinib. Biochemically, Src mutations could activate both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in the lapatinib-treated LR OE19 cells. Ectopic expression of Src E527K mutation also was sufficient to induce lapatinib resistance in drug-naïve cells. These results indicate that pathologic activation of Src is a potential mechanism of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal cancer. Although Src mutation has not been described in primary tumor samples, we propose that the Src hyperactivation should be investigated in the settings of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25350844

Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Jihun; Pectasides, Eirini; Fox, Cameron; Hong, Seung-Woo; Ma, Qiuping; Wong, Gabrielle S.; Peng, Shouyong; Stachler, Matthew D.; Thorner, Aaron R.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Bass, Adam J.

2014-01-01

197

Esophageal cancer: A Review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, staging workup and treatment modalities  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer is a serious malignancy with regards to mortality and prognosis. It is a growing health concern that is expected to increase in incidence over the next 10 years. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histological type of esophageal cancer worldwide, with a higher incidence in developing nations. With the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity in developed nations, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has dramatically increased in the past 40 years. Esophageal cancer is staged according to the widely accepted TNM system. Staging plays an integral part in guiding stage specific treatment protocols and has a great impact on overall survival. Common imaging modalities used in staging include computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography scans. Current treatment options include multimodality therapy mainstays of current treatment include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Tumor markers of esophageal cancer are an advancing area of research that could potentially lead to earlier diagnosis as well as playing a part in assessing tumor response to therapy. PMID:24834141

Napier, Kyle J; Scheerer, Mary; Misra, Subhasis

2014-01-01

198

Esophageal cancer management controversies: Radiation oncology point of view  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer treatment has evolved from single modality to trimodality therapy. There are some controversies of the role, target volumes and dose of radiotherapy (RT) in the literature over decades. The present review focuses primarily on RT as part of the treatment modalities, and highlight on the RT volume and its dose in the management of esophageal cancer. The randomized adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) trial, intergroup trial (INT 0116) enrolled 559 patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction. They were randomly assigned to surgery plus postoperative CRT or surgery alone. Analyses show robust treatment benefit of adjuvant CRT in most subsets for postoperative CRT. The Chemoradiotherapy for Oesophageal Cancer Followed by Surgery Study (CROSS) used a lower RT dose of 41.4 Gray in 23 fractions with newer chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel to achieve an excellent result. Target volume of external beam radiation therapy and its coverage have been in debate for years among radiation oncologists. Pre-operative and post-operative target volumes are designed to optimize for disease control. Esophageal brachytherapy is effective in the palliation of dysphagia, but should not be given concomitantly with chemotherapy or external beam RT. The role of brachytherapy in multimodality management requires further investigation. On-going studies of multidisciplinary treatment in locally advanced cancer include: ZTOG1201 trial (a phase II trial of neoadjuvant and adjuvant CRT) and QUINTETT (a phase III trial of neoadjuvant vs adjuvant therapy with quality of life analysis). These trials hopefully will shed more light on the future management of esophageal cancer. PMID:25132924

Tai, Patricia; Yu, Edward

2014-01-01

199

Esophageal cancer management controversies: Radiation oncology point of view.  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer treatment has evolved from single modality to trimodality therapy. There are some controversies of the role, target volumes and dose of radiotherapy (RT) in the literature over decades. The present review focuses primarily on RT as part of the treatment modalities, and highlight on the RT volume and its dose in the management of esophageal cancer. The randomized adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) trial, intergroup trial (INT 0116) enrolled 559 patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction. They were randomly assigned to surgery plus postoperative CRT or surgery alone. Analyses show robust treatment benefit of adjuvant CRT in most subsets for postoperative CRT. The Chemoradiotherapy for Oesophageal Cancer Followed by Surgery Study (CROSS) used a lower RT dose of 41.4 Gray in 23 fractions with newer chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel to achieve an excellent result. Target volume of external beam radiation therapy and its coverage have been in debate for years among radiation oncologists. Pre-operative and post-operative target volumes are designed to optimize for disease control. Esophageal brachytherapy is effective in the palliation of dysphagia, but should not be given concomitantly with chemotherapy or external beam RT. The role of brachytherapy in multimodality management requires further investigation. On-going studies of multidisciplinary treatment in locally advanced cancer include: ZTOG1201 trial (a phase II trial of neoadjuvant and adjuvant CRT) and QUINTETT (a phase III trial of neoadjuvant vs adjuvant therapy with quality of life analysis). These trials hopefully will shed more light on the future management of esophageal cancer. PMID:25132924

Tai, Patricia; Yu, Edward

2014-08-15

200

Temporal evolution in caveolin 1 methylation levels during human esophageal carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Background Esophageal cancer ranks eighth among frequent cancers worldwide. Our aim was to investigate whether and at which neoplastic stage promoter hypermethylation of CAV1 is involved in human esophageal carcinogenesis. Methods Using real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP), we examined CAV1 promoter hypermethylation in 260 human esophageal tissue specimens. Real-time RT-PCR and qMSP were also performed on OE33 esophageal cancer cells before and after treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC). Results CAV1 hypermethylation showed highly discriminative ROC curve profiles, clearly distinguishing esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) from normal esophagus (NE) (EAC vs. NE, AUROC?=?0.839 and p?esophageal carcinomas and is associated with early neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:24885118

2014-01-01

201

Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery  

SciTech Connect

The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

1986-06-01

202

White specks in the esophageal mucosa: an endoscopic manifestation of non-reflux eosinophilic esophagitis in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundWhite specks in the esophageal mucosa have been observed in children with eosinophilic esophagitis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between white specks in the esophageal mucosa and allergic (non-reflux) eosinophilic esophagitis.

Joel R Lim; Sandeep K Gupta; Joseph M Croffie; Marian D Pfefferkorn; Jean P Molleston; Mark R Corkins; Mary M Davis; Philip P Faught; Steven J Steiner; Joseph F Fitzgerald

2004-01-01

203

Malakoplakia and colorectal adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed Central

We report a case of malakoplakia in association with colonic adenocarcinoma. Tumour-associated malakoplakia in the gastrointestinal tract is a rare finding, generally confined to the colon. It may be locally aggressive, with invasion of pericolic tissues, but is always located adjacent to the tumour. This contrasts with the often more diffuse, multifocal distribution of colonic malakoplakia in association with other pathologies. Images Figure PMID:9135837

Bates, A. W.; Dev, S.; Baithun, S. I.

1997-01-01

204

Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptom assessment in subjects with malignant dysphagia receiving esophageal stents.  

PubMed

Concerns remain over the ability to stent across of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and the effects of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux. Thus, the aim of this study was to demonstrate minimal quality-of-life (QOL) side effects in patients undergoing esophageal stenting across the LES. An Institutional Review Board-approved prospective clinical trial evaluated the results of the Gastrointestinal Symptom questionnaire that includes a validated GE reflux disease (GERD) assessment (GERD-HRQL) and a dysphagia assessment. Consecutive patients were enrolled in this clinical trial, with 81 per cent male, 19 per cent female, median age of 62 years, with adenocarcinoma of the GE junction as their diagnosis. The median dysphagia score was 3 (only liquids can be tolerated) prestent and was improved to a median score of 0 (ability to eat all foods) poststent (P = 0.01). The median GERD score was 0 (none) prestent and did not change with a median score of 0 (none) poststent (P = 0.2). All GERD-related questions were unchanged prestent and poststent in all categories, specifically: frequency of GERD, time of day of reflux, pain behind breastbone, and pain medications. There was also no difference in regurgitation frequency (median prestent 1 vs poststent 0, P = 0.08), texture (prestent 2 [semisolid] vs poststent 1 [liquid]). There was only a statistical change in the ability to belch (prestent 0 [no ability] to poststent 1 [ability]), P = 0.02) and the ability to vomit. Esophageal stenting across the GE junction for dysphagia relief in esophageal malignancies does not adversely effect a patient's QOL in regard to reflux-related symptoms. PMID:25513927

North, D Alan; Schlegel, Melissa; Martin, Robert C G

2014-12-01

205

Anti-reflux surgery for patients with esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is almost constant in esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). These patients resist medical treatment and require antireflux surgery quite often. The present review examines why this happens, the long-term consequences of GER and the main indications and results of fundoplication in this particular group of patients. The esophagus of EA/TEF patients is malformed and has abnormal extrinsic and intrinsic innervation and, consequently, deficient sphincter function and dysmotility. These anomalies are permanent. Fifty percent of patients overall have GER, and one-fifth have Barrett's metaplasia. Close to 100%, GER of pure and long-gap cases require fundoplication. In the long run, these patients have 50-fold higher risk of carcinoma than the control population. GER in EA/TEF does not respond well to dietary, antacid, or prokinetic medication. Surgery is necessary in protracted anastomotic stenoses, in pure and long-gap cases, and when there is an associated duodenal atresia. It should be indicated as well in other symptomatic cases when conservative treatment fails. However, confection of a suitable wrap is anatomically difficult in this condition as shown by a failure rate of 30% that is also explained by the persistence for life of the conditions facilitating GER. PMID:23679031

Tovar, J A; Fragoso, A C

2013-01-01

206

Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula  

MedlinePLUS

... baby is just a few days old. How long will my baby be sick? In uncomplicated cases, ... future? Babies born with esophageal atresia sometimes have long-term problems, the most common of which is ...

207

Caustic ingestion and esophageal function  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

1990-02-01

208

Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

209

47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false EAS Encoder. 11.32 Section 11.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Equipment Requirements § 11.32 EAS Encoder. (a) EAS Encoders must at a minimum be capable...

2013-10-01

210

47 CFR 11.18 - EAS Designations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...EAS Designations. 11.18 Section 11.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.18 EAS Designations. (a) National Primary (NP) is a source of EAS Presidential...

2010-10-01

211

47 CFR 11.18 - EAS Designations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...EAS Designations. 11.18 Section 11.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.18 EAS Designations. (a) National Primary (NP) is a source of EAS Presidential...

2014-10-01

212

47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false EAS Encoder. 11.32 Section 11.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Equipment Requirements § 11.32 EAS Encoder. (a) EAS Encoders must at a minimum be capable...

2014-10-01

213

47 CFR 11.18 - EAS Designations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...EAS Designations. 11.18 Section 11.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.18 EAS Designations. (a) National Primary (NP) is a source of EAS Presidential...

2013-10-01

214

47 CFR 11.18 - EAS Designations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...EAS Designations. 11.18 Section 11.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.18 EAS Designations. (a) National Primary (NP) is a source of EAS Presidential...

2011-10-01

215

47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false EAS Encoder. 11.32 Section 11.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Equipment Requirements § 11.32 EAS Encoder. (a) EAS Encoders must at a minimum be capable...

2012-10-01

216

47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false EAS Encoder. 11.32 Section 11.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Equipment Requirements § 11.32 EAS Encoder. (a) EAS Encoders must at a minimum be capable...

2011-10-01

217

47 CFR 11.18 - EAS Designations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...EAS Designations. 11.18 Section 11.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.18 EAS Designations. (a) National Primary (NP) is a source of EAS Presidential...

2012-10-01

218

Epidemiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergy-associated disease defined clinically by esophagus-related symptoms in combination with a dense esophageal eosinophilia, both of which are unresponsive to prolonged acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Over the last two decades EoE has increasingly been recognized in various geographical areas (mostly industrialized countries) with high socioeconomic development. The prevalence rate is increasing and reaches up to 50 patients per 100,000 inhabitants in some indicator regions. Whether this increased prevalence is due to a real increase in incidence, a result of increased awareness by health care providers or because of the nonfatal nature of EoE adding more and more cases to the patient pool is still a matter of controversy. Several studies have consistently demonstrated a male predominance in EoE, with a male-to-female risk ratio of 3:1. The average age at diagnosis ranges between 30 and 50 years and suggests that EoE is a disease of the middle-aged man. It can affect patients of every race, but the disease is more common among Caucasians. In both children and adults, EoE has been clearly associated with allergies to food and aeroallergens, and most EoE patients present with a personal allergic background (e.g. asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis or oral allergy syndrome). In conclusion, knowledge of epidemiologic parameters of EoE is crucial for identifying risk factors as well as pathogenic mechanisms, planning preventive measures and determining optimal treatment strategies. PMID:24603379

Hruz, Petr

2014-01-01

219

Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An emerging problem with unique esophageal features  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEosinophilic esophagitis is an inflammatory condition in which there is dense eosinophilic infiltration of the surface lining of the esophagus. Reports of eosinophilic esophagitis pertain almost exclusively to pediatric populations. However, eosinophilic esophagitis is emerging as a clinical affliction of adults. This report describes the clinical and endoscopic findings of eosinophilic esophagitis in the largest cohort of adult patients reported

Jon W Potter; Kia Saeian; Benson T Massey; Richard A Komorowski; Reza Shaker; Walter J Hogan

2004-01-01

220

An uncommon cause of corrosive esophageal injury  

E-print Network

We present an unusual case of corrosive esophageal injury following liquid glue ingestion. The endoscopic findings were tissue sloughing and blackened appearance of the esophagogastric junction, due to caustic esophageal injuries following ingestion of glue containing toluene.

Fabio Pace; Salvatore Greco; Stefano Pallotta; Daniela Bossi; Emilio Trabucchi; Gabrielle Bianchi Porro; Fabio Pace; Salvatore Greco; Stefano Pallotta; Clinical Science; Daniela Bossi; Emilio Trabucchi; Clinical Science Department

2007-01-01

221

Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients  

MedlinePLUS

Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as (EoE) is a chronic disease that occurs in both children and adults resulting in inflammation ...

222

21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid,...

2010-04-01

223

21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2011-04-01

224

21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2012-04-01

225

21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2013-04-01

226

21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal...

2014-04-01

227

Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) polymorphism and susceptibility to esophageal cancer: an updated meta-analysis of 27 studies.  

PubMed

Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) polymorphisms are known to play a crucial role in the development and metastasis of malignant diseases including esophageal cancer. However, the results of previous studies investigating the association between CYP1A1 polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis of 27 eligible studies, encompassing 4,215 esophageal cancer cases and 6,339 control subjects, pooled the odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) to assess this association. The effects of ethnicity (Caucasian and Asian) and histopathology type (esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and esophageal adenocarcinoma) were considered in subgroup analyses. A significant association was observed between the CYP1A1 Ile/Val gene polymorphism and esophageal cancer in all of the genetic models (Ile/Val vs. Ile/Ile, OR?=?1.41, 95 % CI?=?1.25-1.58; Val/Val vs. Ile/Ile, OR?=?1.94, 95 % CI?=?1.34-2.82; Ile/Val?+?Val/Val vs. Ile/Ile, OR?=?1.49, 95 % CI?=?1.33-1.66). The subgroup analysis based on ethnicity showed that the association between the CYP1A1 Ile/Val polymorphism and esophageal cancer existed in Asian and Caucasian populations. However, no association was observed between the CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism and esophageal cancer in either subgroup or in the overall population. These results suggested that the CYP1A1 Ile/Val polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, whereas the CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism may not have increased susceptibility to esophageal cancer. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25048966

Gong, Feng-Feng; Lu, Shan-Shan; Hu, Cai-Yun; Qian, Zhen-Zhong; Feng, Fang; Wu, Yi-Le; Yang, Hui-Yun; Sun, Ye-Huan

2014-10-01

228

New and emerging combination therapies for esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer comprises two different histological forms – squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC). While the incidence of AC has increased steeply in Western countries during the last few years, the incidence of SCC is fairly stable. Both forms differ in pathogenesis and response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Plenty of studies have evaluated new chemotherapy combination regimens in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative setting. In addition, new radiation and chemoradiation protocols have been investigated. Finally, molecular-targeted therapy has been included in several new randomized prospective trials. Therefore, this review presents new data on this topic and critically discusses promising approaches towards a more effective treatment in a disease with a grim prognosis. PMID:23869177

Wiedmann, Marcus W; Mössner, Joachim

2013-01-01

229

Esophageal rupture complicated by acute pericarditis.  

PubMed

Esophageal perforation is a serious condition with a high mortality rate. Delayed detection of esophageal perforation may result in devastating complications such as mediastinitis and pericarditis. Esophageal perforation is rarely due to aspiration of foreign bodies. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old male patient with complicated esophageal perforation due to ingestion of a chicken bone, whose first signs are considered to be acute non-specific pericarditis. PMID:25490302

Duman, Hakan; Bak?rc?, Eftal Murat; Karada?, Zakir; U?urlu, Yavuz

2014-10-01

230

Esophageal pathology: a brief guide and atlas.  

PubMed

This article contains a brief atlas for esophageal dysphagia, with an emphasis on endoscopic evaluation. Dysphagia refers to an abnormality with food propulsion, and it may be caused by oropharyngeal or esophageal disorders. Radiological modalities, endoscopy, and manometry play an important role in both the diagnosis and management of esophageal disorders. PMID:24262958

Chokhavatia, Sita; Alli-Akintade, Latifat; Harpaz, Noam; Stern, Richard

2013-12-01

231

Esophageal motor function: technical aspects of manometry.  

PubMed

High-resolution manometry (HRM) has advanced the understanding of esophageal peristaltic mechanisms and has simplified esophageal motor testing. In this article the technical aspects of HRM are addressed, focusing on test protocols, in addition to concerns and pitfalls in performing esophageal motor studies. Specifically, catheter positioning, equipment-related artifacts, basal data acquisition, adequate swallows, and provocative maneuvers are discussed. PMID:25216901

Gyawali, C Prakash; Patel, Amit

2014-10-01

232

RFID EAS (electronic article surveillance),  

E-print Network

3 RFID EAS (electronic article surveillance), (half duplex), (full duplex), Sequential 3.1 RFID RFID 3.1 RFID 1 RFID 1 RFID 0 1 RFID RFID ( EAS) #12;80 3.1 RFID EAS 1) (interrogator) 2) (security element) RFID

Kovintavewat, Piya

233

Endoscopic diagnosis of cervical esophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa with conventional and narrow-band images  

PubMed Central

AIM: To compare the diagnostic yield of heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) in the cervical esophagus with conventional imaging (CI) and narrow-band imaging (NBI). METHODS: A prospective study with a total of 760 patients receiving a CI examination (mean age 51.6 years; 47.8% male) and 760 patients undergoing NBI examination (mean age 51.2 years; 45.9% male). The size of HGM was classified as small (1-5 mm), medium (6-10 mm), or large (> 1 cm). A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain demographic characteristics, social habits, and symptoms likely to be related to cervical esophageal HGM, including throat symptoms (globus sensation, hoarseness, sore throat, and cough) and upper esophageal symptoms (dysphagia and odynophagia) at least 3 mo in duration. The clinicopathological classification of cervical esophageal HGM was performed using the proposal by von Rahden et al. RESULTS: Cervical esophageal HGM was found in 36 of 760 (4.7%) and 63 of 760 (8.3%) patients in the CI and NBI groups, respectively (P = 0.007). The NBI mode discovered significantly more small-sized HGM than CI (55% vs 17%; P < 0.0001). For the 99 patients with cervical esophageal HGM, biopsies were performed in 56 patients; 37 (66%) had fundic-type gastric mucosa, and 19 had antral-type mucosa. For the clinicopathological classification, 77 patients (78%) were classified as HGM?I?(asymptomatic carriers); 21 as HGM II (symptomatic without morphologic changes); and one as HGM III (symptomatic with morphologic change). No intraepithelial neoplasia or adenocarcinoma was found. CONCLUSION: NBI endoscopy detects more cervical esophageal HGM than CI does. Fundic-type gastric mucosa constitutes the most common histology. One-fifth of patients have throat or dysphagic symptoms. PMID:24415878

Cheng, Chi-Liang; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Liu, Nai-Jen; Tang, Jui-Hsiang; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Tsui, Yi-Ning

2014-01-01

234

Tissue-specific cadherin CDH17 is a useful marker of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas with higher sensitivity than CDX2.  

PubMed

Cadherin 17 (CDH17) is a cell adhesion molecule expressed in intestinal epithelium and transcriptionally regulated by CDX2. We compared the usefulness of CDH17 as an immunohistochemical intestinal marker to that of CDX2 in gastrointestinal and extragastrointestinal carcinomas and nonneoplastic tissues. Nonneoplastic intestinal and pancreatic duct epithelia were CDH17-positive. Most esophageal (79%), gastric (86%), and colonic (99%) adenocarcinomas were CDH17-positive/CDX2-positive, whereas 1% of colonic, 18% of esophageal, and 10% of gastric adenocarcinomas were CDH17-negative/CDX2-negative. Rare colonic, esophageal, and gastric adenocarcinomas were CDH17-positive/CDX2-negative (1%, 3%, and 4%, respectively), and none were CDH17-negative/CDX2-positive. Diffuse CDH17 was also observed in all metastatic colon carcinomas, 20% of which were only focally CDX2-positive. Of intestinal low-grade neuroendocrine tumors, 74% coexpressed CDX2 and CDH17. CDH17 was also positive in 12% of pancreatic and 24% of bronchial neuroendocrine tumors, all of which were CDX2-negative. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas were more frequently CDH17-positive than CDX2-positive (50% vs 27%, 53% vs 27%). One (2%) hepatocellular carcinoma was CDH17-positive/CDX2-negative. Nine percent of non-small cell lung cancers and 7% of endometrial carcinomas were CDH17-positive, whereas 3% of lung, 5% of endometrial, 3% of ovarian, and 2% of breast carcinomas were CDX2-positive. Thus, CDH17 is slightly more sensitive than CDX2 when detecting gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22904132

Panarelli, Nicole C; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Yeh, Matthew M; Liu, Yifang; Chen, Yao-Tseng

2012-08-01

235

[Esophageal diseases: GERD, Barrett, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].  

PubMed

At Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2014, developments in esophageal disease were presented. Highlights include: the usefulness of impedancemetry to diagnose reflux disease, or the effectiveness of PPIs for treating non-cardiac chest pain. Concerning Barrett's esophagus, its prevalence is identical in patients with and without reflux symptoms, Barrett segments less than 1cm probably do not require follow-up, and in older patients with long-segment Barrett, initial endoscopies overlooked up to 2% of significant lesions. Regarding achalasia, surgical myotomy is no more effective than endoscopic dilation and may even be less effective than peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). In terms of eosinophilic esophagitis, it is important to systematically take biopsies in patients with dysphagia so that cases of eosinophilic esophagitis are not overlooked. In addition, for this condition, routine endoscopic dilations not only do not seem useful in improving the course of the disease, but could also worsen the response to medical treatment. PMID:25294266

Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

2014-09-01

236

Esophageal fistula associated with intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Fifty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Ten patients developed esophageal fistula. Perforations were found in the bronchus (four), major vessels (four), pericardium (one), and mediastinum (one). The frequency of fistula occurrence in these patients was not remarkably different from that in 30 other patients treated only with greater than or equal to 50 Gy external irradiation. From the time of the development of esophageal fistula, intracavitary irradiation did not seem to accelerate the development of fistula. The fistulas in our ten patients proved to be associated with tumor, deep ulcer (created before intracavitary irradiation), chemotherapy, infection, and trauma rather than the direct effect of intracavitary irradiation.

Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

1986-05-01

237

The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-? to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

2014-01-01

238

Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement  

PubMed Central

A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a prerequisite for complete esophageal replacement. Novel approaches need to be designed to allow for peristalsis and vascularization in the engineered esophagus. Although esophageal tissue engineering potentially offers a real alternative to conventional treatments for severe esophageal disease, important barriers remain that need to be addressed. PMID:23322987

Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

2012-01-01

239

Therapeutic and Radiosensitizing Effects of Armillaridin on Human Esophageal Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Background. Armillaridin (AM) is isolated from Armillaria mellea. We examined the anticancer activity and radiosensitizing effect on human esophageal cancer cells. Methods. Human squamous cell carcinoma (CE81T/VGH and TE-2) and adenocarcinoma (BE-3 and SKGT-4) cell lines were cultured. The MTT assay was used for cell viability. The cell cycle was analyzed using propidium iodide staining. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential was measured by DiOC6(3) staining. The colony formation assay was performed for estimation of the radiation surviving fraction. Human CE81T/VGH xenografts were established for evaluation of therapeutic activity in vivo. Results. AM inhibited the viability of four human esophageal cancer cell lines with an estimated concentration of 50% inhibition (IC50) which was 3.4–6.9??M. AM induced a hypoploid cell population and morphological alterations typical of apoptosis in cells. This apoptosis induction was accompanied by a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. AM accumulated cell cycle at G2/M phase and enhanced the radiosensitivity in CE81T/VGH cells. In vivo, AM inhibited the growth of CE81T/VGH xenografts without significant impact on body weight and white blood cell counts. Conclusion. Armillaridin could inhibit growth and enhance radiosensitivity of human esophageal cancer cells. There might be potential to integrate AM with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer treatment. PMID:23864890

Chi, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Yu-Jen

2013-01-01

240

Expression analysis of miRNA and target mRNAs in esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

We aimed to investigate miRNAs and related mRNAs through a network-based approach in order to learn the crucial role that they play in the biological processes of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC)-related miRNA and gene expression data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were selected. Target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and their regulatory networks were constructed. Differentially expressed miRNA analysis selected four miRNAs associated with EAC and ESCC, among which hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-202 were shared by both diseases. hsa-miR-202 was reported for the first time to be associated with esophageal cancer in the present study. Differentially expressed miRNA target genes were mainly involved in cancer-related and signal-transduction pathways. Functional categories of these target genes were related to transcriptional regulation. The results may indicate potential target miRNAs and genes for future investigations of esophageal cancer. PMID:25098614

Meng, X.R.; Lu, P.; Mei, J.Z.; Liu, G.J.; Fan, Q.X.

2014-01-01

241

Expression analysis of miRNA and target mRNAs in esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

We aimed to investigate miRNAs and related mRNAs through a network-based approach in order to learn the crucial role that they play in the biological processes of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC)-related miRNA and gene expression data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were selected. Target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and their regulatory networks were constructed. Differentially expressed miRNA analysis selected four miRNAs associated with EAC and ESCC, among which hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-202 were shared by both diseases. hsa-miR-202 was reported for the first time to be associated with esophageal cancer in the present study. Differentially expressed miRNA target genes were mainly involved in cancer-related and signal-transduction pathways. Functional categories of these target genes were related to transcriptional regulation. The results may indicate potential target miRNAs and genes for future investigations of esophageal cancer. PMID:25098614

Meng, X R; Lu, P; Mei, J Z; Liu, G J; Fan, Q X

2014-09-01

242

Columnar metaplasia in the esophageal remnant after esophagectomy: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Barrett's metaplasia is a well-recognized risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is believed to develop in response to the injurious effects of gastroesophageal reflux. Following subtotal esophagectomy and reconstruction with a gastric conduit, many patients experience profound reflux into the remnant esophagus. Barrett's-like epithelium has been described in these patients, and they have been identified as a potential human model in which to study the early events in the development of metaplasia. This phenomenon also raises clinical concerns about the long-term fate of the esophageal remnant following surgery and the potential for further malignant change. This systematic review summarizes the literature on the prevalence and timing of Barrett's metaplasia occurring after esophagectomy, reviews the evidence regarding risk factors and malignant progression in such patients, and considers the implications for clinical practice. PMID:24224923

Dunn, L J; Shenfine, J; Griffin, S M

2015-01-01

243

Endoscopic methods in the treatment of early-stage esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Most patients with early esophageal cancer restricted to the mucosa may be offered endoscopic therapy, which is similarly effective, less invasive and less expensive than esophagectomy. Selection of appropriate relevant treatment and therapy methods should be performed at a specialized center with adequate facilities. The selection of an endoscopic treatment method for high-grade dysplasia and early-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma requires that tumor infiltration is restricted to the mucosa and that there is no neighboring lymph node metastasis. In squamous cell carcinoma, this treatment method is accepted in cases of tumors invading only up to the lamina propria of mucosa (m2). Tumors treated with the endoscopic method should be well or moderately differentiated and should not invade lymphatic or blood vessels. When selecting endoscopic treatments for these lesions, a combination of endoscopic resection and endoscopic ablation methods should be considered. PMID:25097676

2014-01-01

244

Sloughing Esophagitis: A Not So Common Entity  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Sloughing esophagitis, also known as esophagitis dissecans superficialis, is a very rare and underdiagnosed entity with unknown incidence rate. It can be associated with bullous dermatoses and medications such as central nervous system depressants and those causing esophageal injury. CASE REPORT: A 55-years-old woman was recovering from renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis when she developed dysphagia and odynophagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy was performed for suspected bullous pemphigus and confirmed sloughing esophagitis. She improved with intravenous steroids. CONCLUSIONS: Sloughing Esophagitis should enter our differential diagnosis more frequently. It is mostly a benign, self-limiting process but when associated with bullous dermatoses will require steroid treatment. PMID:25598761

Akhondi, Hossein

2014-01-01

245

Photodynamic therapy for esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment that uses a photosensitizing drug that is administered to the patient, localized to a tumor, and then activated with a laser to induce a photochemical reaction to destroy the cell. PDT using porfimer sodium followed by excimer dye laser irradiation is approved as a curative treatment for superficial esophageal cancer in Japan. While endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is currently more popular for esophageal cancer, there is evidence to support PDT as an alternative treatment and as a salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). A photosensitizing agent has also been developed that requires a shorter sun shade period after administration, and studies are currently underway to establish an esophageal cancer indication for this next-generation PDT in Japan. PMID:25333005

Hatogai, Ken; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Yoda, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

2014-01-01

246

Adenocarcinoma of the sphenoid sinus  

PubMed Central

Adenocarcinomas of the sphenoid sinus are exceptional. In this paper, we report a new case with a review of the literature. Our patient was a 45-year-old man who presented with isolated retro orbital headache. CT and MRI suspected a malignat tumor of the sphenoid sinus. The patient underwent a debulking surgery. The final pathology carried out the diagnosis of primary adenocarcinoma. The patient died several months later from radiotherapy complications. Even if adenocarcinomas of the sphenoid sinus are exceptional, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sphenoid sinus masses. The prognosis is poor. PMID:25469178

Darouassi, Youssef; Chihani, Mehdi; Touati, Mohamed Mliha; Nadour, Karim; Ammar, Haddou; Bouaity, Brahim

2014-01-01

247

Ellagic acid inhibits proliferation and induced apoptosis via the Akt signaling pathway in HCT-15 colon adenocarcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Chemoprevention is regarded as one of the most promising and realistic approaches in the prevention of human cancer. Ellagic acid (EA) has been known for its chemopreventive activity against various cancers and numerous investigations have shown its apoptotic activity both in vivo and in vitro. The present study was focused to elucidate the anticancerous effect and the mode of action of EA against HCT-15 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue assay at different concentrations. EA also promoted cell cycle arrest substantially at G2/M phase in HCT-15 cells. The activities of alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were decreased upon EA treatment, which shows the antiproliferative and the cytotoxic effects, respectively. The production of reactive oxygen intermediates, which were examined by 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA), increased with time, after treatment with EA. In further studies, EA inhibited proliferation-associated markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1. The induction of apoptosis was accompanied by a strong inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway by EA. The expression of PI3K and pAkt was down-regulated in EA-treated cells, compared to normal cells. Further, EA promoted the expression of Bax, caspase-3, and cytochrome c, and suppression of Bcl-2 activity in HCT-15 cells that was determined by western blot analysis. Increased annexin V apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation also accompanied EA-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, EA increased the production of ROS, decreased cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis in HCT-15 cells, and thus can be used as an agent against colon cancer. PMID:25355159

Umesalma, Syed; Nagendraprabhu, Ponnuraj; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

2015-01-01

248

Study finds molecular 'signature' for rapidly increasing form of esophageal cancer  

Cancer.gov

During the past 30 years, the number of patients with cancers that originate near the junction of the esophagus and stomach has increased approximately 600 percent in the United States. The first extensive probe of the DNA of these esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) has revealed that many share a distinctive mix-up of letters of the genetic code, and found more than 20 mutated genes that had not previously been linked to the disease. The research, led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute, and other research centers, may offer clues to why EAC rates have risen so sharply.

249

Analysis of thermal effects in endoscopic nanocarriers-based photodynamic therapy applied to esophageal diseases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we propose a predictive model that allows the study of thermal effects produced when the optical radiation interacts with an esophageal or stomach disease with gold nanoparticles embedded. The model takes into account light distribution in the tumor tissue by means of a Monte Carlo method. Mie theory is used to obtain the gold nanoparticles optical properties and the thermal model employed is based on the bio-heat equation. The complete model was applied to two types of tumoral tissue (squamous cell carcinoma located in the esophagus and adenocarcinoma in the stomach) in order to study the thermal effects induced by the inclusion of gold nanoparticles.

Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Wilfert, O.; Hudcova, L.; Poliak, J.; Barcik, P.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

2014-02-01

250

Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) and Her2 in Adenocarcinomas of the Esophagus  

PubMed Central

Her2 overexpression and amplification can be found in a significant subset of esophageal adenocarcinomas. The activity of Her2 has been shown to be modulated by molecular chaperones such as HSP90. We analyzed expression/amplification data for HSP90 and Her2 on 127 primary resected esophageal adenocarcinomas in order to evaluate a possible relationship between these two molecules. HSP90 expression determined by immunohistochemistry was observed in various levels. Thirty nine (39) tumors (30.7%) were classified as Her2-positive according to their immunoreactivity and amplification status. There was a significant correlation between HSP90 expression and Her2-status (p = 0.008). This could also be demonstrated by quantitative protein expression analysis with reverse phase protein arrays (r = 0.9; p < 0.001). Her2-status was associated withpT-category (p = 0.041), lymph node metastases (p = 0.049) and tumor differentiation (p = 0.036) with a higher percentage of cases with negative Her2 status in lower tumor stagesA negative Her2-status was also associated with better survival in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.001 and p = 0.014). For HSP90, no associations between clinical and pathological parameters were found. The observed association between HSP90 expression and Her2 suggests a co-regulation of these molecules in at least a subset of esophageal adenocarcinomas. Anti-HSP90 drugs, which recently have been introduced in cancer treatment, may also be an option for these tumors by targeting HSP90 alone or in combination with Her2. PMID:24978439

Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Feith, Marcus; Walch, Axel; Langer, Rupert

2014-01-01

251

Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

2012-12-28

252

Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump  

SciTech Connect

Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

1989-11-01

253

[Ocular metastasis heralding gastric adenocarcinoma].  

PubMed

Ocular metastasis is a rare presenting feature of gastric adenocarcinoma. We report a 48-year-old woman who presented with a decrease in visual acuity of the right eye leading to the discovery of an ocular metastasis. Diagnostic work-up identified a gastric adenocarcinoma with pulmonary metastases. She received four cycles of chemotherapy combining epirubicin, cisplatin and fluorouracil. The patient died 6 months after the diagnosis of respiratory failure. PMID:20554090

Chekrine, T; Tawfiq, N; Bouchbika, Z; Benchakroun, N; Jouhadi, H; Sahraoui, S; Benider, A

2010-10-01

254

Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience  

PubMed Central

AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). METHODS: The medical records of all patients diagnosed with EoE between January 2002 and July 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Esophageal biopsies were reexamined by an experienced pathologist to confirm the diagnosis (? 15 eos/hpf per current guidelines). Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients who did not receive dilation therapy and those who did. Demographics, clinical history, the use of pharmacologic therapy, endoscopic and pathology findings, and the number of biopsies and dilations carried out, if any, and their locations were recorded for each patient. The dilation group was further examined based on the interval between diagnosis and dilation, and whether or not a complication occurred. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were identified with EoE and 22 (36%) of them underwent esophageal dilations for stricture/narrowing. The peak eos/hpf was significantly higher in patients who received a dilation (P = 0.04). Four (18% of pts.) minor complications occurred: deep mucosal tear 1, and small mucosal tears 3. There were no cases of esophageal perforations. Higher peak eos/hpf counts were not associated with increased risk of complications. CONCLUSION: Esophageal dilation appears to be a safe procedure in EoE patients, carrying a low complication rate. No correlation was found between the peak of eosinophil count and complication rate. Complications can occur independently of the histologic features. The long-term outcome of EoE treatment, with or without dilation, needs to be determined. PMID:25071351

Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

2014-01-01

255

Obesity and related risk factors in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Over recent decades, the incidence of cancers of the gastroesophageal junction, including gastric cardia tumors, has increased markedly. This is a trend that has been well documented, especially in studies from the USA and northern Europe that have also demonstrated a concomitant rise in the ratio of cardia to distal gastric cancers. The rise in the prevalence of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has been paralleled by the worldwide obesity epidemic, with almost all epidemiological studies reporting increased body mass index and obesity increase the risk of cardia cancer development. However, the strength of this association is less marked than the link between obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma, and the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Other possible confounders of the relationship between obesity and cardia cancer include the decline in Helicobacter pylori infection and the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors, although these have rarely been controlled for in case-control and cohort studies investigating associations between obesity and cardia cancer. We review these epidemiological trends and discuss proposed mechanisms for the association, drawing attention to controversies over the difficulty of defining cardia cancer. The relative paucity of high-quality epidemiological studies from other regions of the world should prompt further investigation of this issue, especially in populations undergoing rapid socioeconomic change. PMID:25209115

Olefson, Sidney; Moss, Steven F

2015-01-01

256

Endoscopic Stenting and Clipping for Anastomotic Stricture and Persistent Tracheoesophageal Fistula after Surgical Repair of Esophageal Atresia in an Infant  

PubMed Central

Anastomotic stricture (AS) and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) are two complications of surgical repair of esophageal atresia (EA). Therapeutic endoscopic modalities include stenting, tissue glue, and clipping for TEF and endoscopic balloon dilation bougienage and stenting for esophageal strictures. We report herein a two-month infant with both EA and TEF who benefited from a surgical repair for EA, at the third day of life. Two months later he experienced deglutition disorders and recurrent chest infections. The esophagogram showed an AS and a TEF confirmed with blue methylene test at bronchoscopy. A partially covered self-expanding metal type biliary was endoscopically placed. Ten weeks later the stent was removed. This allows for easy passage of the endoscope in the gastric cavity but a persistent recurrent fistula was noted. Instillation of contrast demonstrated a fully dilated stricture but with a persistent TEF. Then we proceeded to placement of several endoclips at the fistula site. The esophagogram confirmed the TEF was obliterated. At 12 months of follow-up, he was asymptomatic. Stenting was effective to alleviate the stricture but failed to treat the TEF. At our knowledge this is the second case of successful use of endoclips placement to obliterate recurrent TEF after surgical repair of EA in children. PMID:25580132

Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Benaired, Amine; Khelifaoui, Ahmed

2014-01-01

257

Phenotype analysis of Polish patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida associated with esophageal atresia and choanal atresia caused by EFTUD2 gene mutations.  

PubMed

We present the phenotype of three unrelated Polish patients with MFD type Guion-Almeida confirmed by EFTUD2 mutations. In all of our patients, dysmorphic craniofacial features, microcephaly, thumb abnormalities, psychomotor and speech delay were described. In addition, among other major defects, esophageal atresia (EA) in one patient and choanal atresia in two of them were present. Three different mutations in EFTUD2 gene were found in presented patients. Our observations confirm the clinical heterogeneity of mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida and its connection with major congenital defects such as esophageal atresia and choanal atresia. PMID:25387991

Smigiel, Robert; Bezniakow, Natalia; Jakubiak, Aleksandra; B?och, Micha?; Patkowski, Dariusz; Obersztyn, Ewa; Sasiadek, Maria M

2015-05-01

258

The role of gastrostomy in the staged operation of esophageal atresia  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The aim of this study is to recommend criteria for selection of patients who benefited from the use of gastrostomy rather than emergency fistula closure during the staged operation of esophageal atresia (EA). Materials and Methods: Between August 2004 and July 2006, 75 cases of EA, were consecutively operated. Nineteen out of 75 (25%) underwent routine gastrostomy because they required a type of staged operation: Group I: Five cases with pure atresia had gastrostomy and esophagostomy; Group II: Six with severe pneumonia and congenital heart disease (Waterson class C) had gastrostomy and conservative management; Group III: Eight with long gap EA (2-4 vertebras); four out of 8 cases underwent primary anastomosis with tension and the other four had delayed primary anastomosis plus primary gastrostomy. Results: GI: Only three cases survived after esophageal substitution; GII: Three out of six cases with severe pneumonia (fistula size: f > 2.5 mm) underwent emergency fistula closure with only one survival, but all (f < 2.5 mm) recovered without complication, GIII: Four patients with long gap and primary anastomosis with tension developed anastomotic leakage; they required gastrostomy following the leakage, except for those with delayed primary anastomosis, and all of them recovered without early complications. Conclusion: All the cases with long gap, although two esophageal ends can be reached with tension, should undergo delayed primary closure with primary gastrostomy. Those were brought with Waterson class C and the fistula size greater than 2.5 mm should undergo emergency fistula closure; however, if fistula size was less than 2.5 mm, it is better to be delayed by primary gastrostomy for stabilization. In this study, we had a better outcome with gastric tube for substitution than colon interposition in infants. PMID:20177478

Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid; Davani, Sam Zeraatian Nejad; Sabet, Babak; Forutan, Hamid Reza; Sharifian, Maryam

2008-01-01

259

Esophageal atresia: a critical review of management at a single center in Algeria.  

PubMed

The purpose was to study the outcomes and factors affecting the survival of esophageal atresia in our center. A retrospective analysis of 86 cases of esophageal atresia (EA) over a 10-year period was performed with 46 boys and 42 girls. Demographic data, birth weight, gestational age, consanguinity, incidence of associated anomalies, place of delivery, history of feeding, and outcomes were studied. EA with distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was the commonest type with 58/86 (67%). The percentage of patients with at least one associated anomaly was 52/86 (60%), with 7/86 (8%) who are from consanguineous parents; most commonly associated anomalies were cardiac 13/86 (15%). The average gestational age and birth weight were 36 ± 2 weeks and 2300 ± 570?g, respectively. Survival rates for the patients according to the Waterston classification was 80% in group A, 58% in group B, and 25% in group C (three patients died before surgery). Prematurity, the gap between the two ends of the esophagus, and preoperative respiratory status were the most significant factors affecting the survival. Late complication of EA/TEF include respiratory symptoms, especially in the first year, associating tracheomalacia and bronchopulmonary infections in about 24/45 (53%), recurrence of TEF 3/45 (7%), esophageal stricture 26/45 (58%), and gastroesophageal reflux 22/45 (49%). The high incidence of delayed diagnosis, low birth weight, and lack of advanced neonatological management are important contributory factors to the poor outcome. The frequency of late complications highlights the need for multidisciplinary clinics to follow these children's. PMID:24467412

Bouguermouh, D; Salem, A

2015-04-01

260

Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guo Xiaomao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01

261

Role of Proton Pump Inhibitor on Esophageal Carcinogenesis and Pancreatic Acinar Cell Metaplasia Development: An Experimental In Vivo Study  

PubMed Central

Chronic gastro-duodenal reflux in the esophagus is a major risk for intestinal metaplasia and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma. A role for chronic use of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the increased incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western countries has been previously suggested. The aim of this work was to study the effect of chronic administration of omeprazole (a proton pump inhibitor) per os in a model of reflux induced esophageal carcinogenesis. One week after esophago-gastro-jejunostomy, 115 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive 10 mg/Kg per day of omeprazole or placebo, 5 days per week. The esophago-gastric specimens were collected 28±2 weeks after randomization and analyzed in a blinded fashion. Mortality and esophageal metaplasia rates did not differ between the two groups (p?=?0.99 for mortality, p?=?0.36 for intestinal metaplasia and p?=?0.66 for multi-layered epithelium). Gastric pancreatic acinar cell metaplasia (PACM) was more frequently observed in PPI-treated rats (p?=?0.003). Severe ulcer lesions significantly prevailed in the placebo group (p?=?0.03). Locally invasive esophageal epithelial neoplasia were observed in 23/39 PPI-treated versus 14/42 placebo-animals (p?=?0.03). In conclusion, chronic omeprazole treatment improved the healing of esophageal ulcerative lesions. Locally invasive neoplastic lesions and PACM prevailed among PPI-treated animals. However, neither an effect on the overall mortality nor on the incidence of pre-neoplastic lesions was observed in this work. PMID:25415190

Dall’Olmo, Luigi; Fassan, Matteo; Dassie, Elisa; Scarpa, Marco; Realdon, Stefano; Cavallin, Francesco; Cagol, Matteo; Battaglia, Giorgio; Pizzi, Marco; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Franceschinis, Erica; Pasut, Gianfranco; Rugge, Massimo; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Realdon, Nicola; Castoro, Carlo

2014-01-01

262

Appropriateness of Using Patient-Derived Xenograft Models for Pharmacologic Evaluation of Novel Therapies for Esophageal/Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancers  

PubMed Central

The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs) as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR), and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55) in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32). Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04) and older patients (p=0.01). Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers. PMID:25826681

Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Starmans, Maud H. W.; Navab, Roya; Chen, Zhuo; Girgis, Hala; Eng, Lawson; Espin-Garcia, Osvaldo; Shen, Xiaowei; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Tsao, Ming-Sound; El-Zimaity, Hala; Der, Sandy D.; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G.; Darling, Gail E.; Boutros, Paul C.

2015-01-01

263

FAP related periampullary adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION The risk of periampullary neoplasia in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is significantly increased compared to the general population. PRESENTATION OF CASE We herein report the case of a 47-year-old woman with classic familial adenomatous polyposis with a history of total proctocolectomy for FAP who presented with an ulcerous ampullary lesion 8 years after primary colorectal surgery. Interestingly, the patient had not enrolled to optimal postoperative upper endoscopy follow-up. The patient underwent a Whipple procedure. Histology demonstrated a T2N0 ampullary adenocarcinoma. DISCUSSION Periampullary disease in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis occurs increasingly, especially in the subset of patients without proper endoscopic follow-up. Current recommendations concerning upper endoscopy and appropriate management are herein discussed; the importance of optimal postoperative endoscopy after total proctocolectomy in the FAP setting is discussed. CONCLUSION Periampullary cancer carries a significant risk in patients with FAP and proper endoscopic follow-up should be applied in this special patient group in order to manage ampullary manifestations of the disease in a timely manner. PMID:23792481

Mantas, Dimitrios; Charalampoudis, Petros; Nikiteas, Nikolaos

2013-01-01

264

Preexisting oncogenic events impact trastuzumab sensitivity in ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Patients with gastric and esophageal (GE) adenocarcinoma tumors in which the oncogene ERBB2 has been amplified are routinely treated with a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and the ERBB2-directed antibody trastuzumab; however, the addition of trastuzumab, even when tested in a selected biomarker-positive patient population, provides only modest survival gains. To investigate the potential reasons for the modest impact of ERBB2-directed therapies, we explored the hypothesis that secondary molecular features of ERBB2-amplified GE adenocarcinomas attenuate the impact of ERBB2 blockade. We analyzed genomic profiles of ERBB2-amplified GE adenocarcinomas and determined that the majority of ERBB2-amplified tumors harbor secondary oncogenic alterations that have the potential to be therapeutically targeted. These secondary events spanned genes involved in cell-cycle regulation as well as phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Using ERBB2-amplified cell lines, we demonstrated that secondary oncogenic events could confer resistance to ERBB2-directed therapies. Moreover, this resistance could be overcome by targeting the secondary oncogene in conjunction with ERBB2-directed therapy. EGFR is commonly coamplified with ERBB2, and in the setting of ERBB2 amplification, higher EGFR expression appears to mark tumors with greater sensitivity to dual EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitors. These data suggest that combination inhibitor strategies, guided by secondary events in ERBB2-amplified GE adenocarcinomas, should be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25401468

Kim, Jihun; Fox, Cameron; Peng, Shouyong; Pusung, Mark; Pectasides, Eirini; Matthee, Eric; Hong, Yong Sang; Do, In-Gu; Jang, Jiryeon; Thorner, Aaron R.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Rustgi, Anil K.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Zhou, Zhongren; Tang, Ping; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Lee, Jeeyun; Bass, Adam J.

2014-01-01

265

Endoscopic restoration of esophageal continuity in caustic burn  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total obliteration of the esophageal lumen after caustic ingestion is an uncommon event. Esophageal continuity was reestablished using endoscopic resection of scar tissue followed by serial dilatations.

Anies Mahomed; Anver Mahomed; George Youngson

1997-01-01

266

Fragility of the esophageal mucosa: A pathognomonic endoscopic sign of primary eosinophilic esophagitis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Primary eosinophilic esophagitis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus, evokes recurrent dysphagia. Endoscopy is often unremarkable, and no consensus exists regarding management of resultant dysphagia. The response of a series of patients with primary eosinophilic esophagitis to dilation is reported together with a description of a possibly pathognomonic sign: fragile esophageal mucosa, for which the term “crêpe-paper” mucosa

Alex Straumann; Livio Rossi; Hans-Uwe Simon; Pius Heer; Hans-Peter Spichtin; Christoph Beglinger

2003-01-01

267

A case of esophageal stricture after corrosive esophagitis successfully treated by frequent endoscopic balloon dilation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 14-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital for treatment of abdominal pain after an attempt to commit suicide by swallowing a caustic soda solution. Severe esophageal stricture following corrosive esophagitis occurred 2 weeks after admission. First, we tried to dilate the stenotic esophagus by using an esophageal bougie, but it was not effective and was also painful, and the

Tomokazu Matsuyama; Satoshi Aiko; Yutaka Yoshizumi; Yoshiaki Sugiura; Tadaaki Maehara

2004-01-01

268

Experimental esophagitis induced by acid and pepsin in rabbits mimicking human reflux esophagitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: The lack of appropriate animal models might explain the paucity of information on the mechanisms of mucosal damage and defense in reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to develop a model of esophagitis in rabbits mimicking human reflux esophagitis. Methods: New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgery for placement of a plastic tube into the cervical

Angel Lanas; Yolanda Royo; Javier Ortego; M. Molina; R. Sáinz

1999-01-01

269

Intestinal interposition for benign esophageal disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Various options exist for intestinal interposition for benign, but debilitating, end-stage esophageal disorders. Principally,\\u000a the stomach, colon, or jejunum is used for esophageal replacement. Much debate exists regarding the ideal esophageal replacement\\u000a option. The conduit choice must be tailored to the individual patient. Unlike malignant processes, the conduit choice for\\u000a benign disorders must be sufficiently durable and functional. Colonic

Racquel Smith Bueno; Carlos Galvani; Santiago Horgan

2008-01-01

270

Surgical treatment of superficial esophageal cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The worldwide incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) is increasing. The aim of this study is to review the systematic surgical outcomes of esophagectomy for SEC.Data sources  Only manuscripts written in English and written between 1980 and 2003 were selected from MEDLINE. The keywords consisting of superficial esophageal cancer, early esophageal cancer, and early stage or superficial stage or stage I

Mitsuo Tachibana; Shoichi Kinugasa; Muneaki Shibakita; Yasuhito Tonomoto; Shinji Hattori; Ryoji Hyakudomi; Hiroshi Yoshimura; Dipok Kumar Dhar; Naofumi Nagasue

2006-01-01

271

Corrosive esophagitis caused by ingestion of picosulfate.  

PubMed

Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ki Joo; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

2015-01-01

272

Corrosive Esophagitis Caused by Ingestion of Picosulfate  

PubMed Central

Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

2015-01-01

273

Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma  

E-print Network

Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, ...

Lander, Eric S.

274

Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

Atsumi, Kazushige [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimura, Hidetaka [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsuki, Takaomi [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-04-01

275

Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the colon.  

PubMed

Hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) is a rare extrahepatic adenocarcinoma that morphologically and immunophenotypically mimics hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with an extensive cancer history who presented with right-sided abdominal pain and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, and was ultimately diagnosed with colon adenocarcinoma. She underwent sigmoidectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Approximately 1?month after completion of chemotherapy, positron emission tomography showed presence of a 1.8?cm×1.4?cm mesenteric lymph node. She underwent treatment with chemotherapy and radiation followed by lymph node resection. Pathological findings from the lymph node were consistent with poorly differentiated carcinoma with hepatocellular differentiation. When compared with pathology from the colonic resection, both specimens showed histomorphological features and immunohistochemical profiles consistent with hepatocellular differentiation. Given these findings, a diagnosis of HAC of the colon with metastasis to a mesenteric lymph node was made. PMID:25883249

Armaghani, Avan; Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Daily, Karen

2015-01-01

276

Management of esophageal stricture after complete circular endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) permits removal of esophageal epithelial neoplasms en bloc, but is associated with esophageal stenosis, particularly when ESD involves the entire circumference of the esophageal lumen.\\u000a We examined the effectiveness of systemic steroid administration for control of postprocedural esophageal stricture after\\u000a complete circular ESD.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Seven patients who underwent wholly circumferential ESD for superficially extended esophageal squamous cell

Hajime Isomoto; Naoyuki Yamaguchi; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Tomayoshi Hayashi; Hitoshi Nishiyama; Ken Ohnita; Fuminao Takeshima; Saburo Shikuwa; Shigeru Kohno; Kazuhiko Nakao

2011-01-01

277

Structural and numerical changes of chromosome X in patients with esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

Esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is a relatively common birth defect often associated with additional congenital anomalies such as vertebral, anal, cardiovascular, renal and limb defects, the so-called VACTERL association. Yet, little is known about the causal genetic factors. Rare case reports of gastrointestinal anomalies in children with triple X syndrome prompted us to survey the incidence of structural and numerical changes of chromosome X in patients with EA/TEF. All available (n=269) karyotypes of our large (321) EA/TEF patient cohort were evaluated for X-chromosome anomalies. If sufficient DNA material was available, we determined genome-wide copy number profiles with SNP array and identified subtelomeric aberrations on the difficult to profile PAR1 region using telomere-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. In addition, we investigated X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns and mode of inheritance of detected aberrations in selected patients. Three EA/TEF patients had an additional maternally inherited X chromosome. These three female patients had normal random XCI patterns. Two male EA/TEF patients had small inherited duplications of the XY-linked SHOX (Short stature HOmeoboX-containing) locus. Patients were small for gestational age at birth (EA/TEF and no duplications of the SHOX gene were reported so far in these patients. As normal patterns of XCI were seen, overexpression of X-linked genes that escape XCI, such as the SHOX gene, could be pathogenic by disturbing developmental pathways. PMID:24398799

Brosens, Erwin; de Jong, Elisabeth M; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Eussen, Bert H; D'haene, Barbara; De Baere, Elfride; Verdin, Hannah; Poddighe, Pino J; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; Brooks, Alice S; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

2014-09-01

278

Esophageal inflammatory pseudotumor mimicking malignancy.  

PubMed

A 54-year-old man with a complaint of dysphagia was found to have a prominent stricture in the proximal esophagus. A biopsy of the stenotic area indicated sarcoma, leading to subtotal esophagectomy. The surgically removed esophagus demonstrated a well-defined intramural mass, consisting of a mixture of fibroblastic cells with bland cytological appearances and inflammatory cells. Reflux esophagitis which was present distal to the stricture seemed to play a role in the development of this inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:11201363

Kurihara, K; Mizuseki, K; Ichikawa, M; Okada, K; Miyata, Y

2001-01-01

279

Gastric adenocarcinoma associated with isolated granulomatous gastritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Granulomatous gastritis is a rarely observed pathological diagnosis. This condition often mimics gastric adenocarcinoma clinically, resulting in gastric resection. However, granulomatous gastritis has long been viewed as a benign process not observed in association with adenocarcinoma of the stomach. This article describes a patient with granulomatous gastritis occurring in close proximity to an area of superficially invading gastric adenocarcinoma.

Christopher Newton; Lucien Nochomovitz; Jonathan M. Sackier

1998-01-01

280

The management of eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathologic, chronic esophageal inflammatory disease resistant to acid suppressive therapy and is associated with variable symptoms indicative of upper gastrointestinal dysfunction. Per current guidelines established by The International Group of Eosinophil Researchers (TIGERS), the diagnosis is made in symptomatic patients after a biopsy that confirms a peak eosinophil level of ?15 eosinophils/high-powered field (HPF). The esophagus is distinguished by pronounced tissue eosinophilia in which dietary antigens are key inciting factors for disease pathogenesis; EoE being reversed by elimination of triggering food allergens suggests that the disease is mediated in part by allergic sensitization to foods. Moreover, experimental EoE in mice can be induced not only via food exposure but also via aeroallergen exposure. Consistent with an allergic etiology rather than an acid-induced esophagitis, swallowed glucocorticoids are effective for the treatment of EoE. Evaluation by an allergist is a recommended part of the diagnostic workup, especially for management of allergic comorbidities. Clinical practice for the evaluation of patients with EoE mainly relies on prick skin tests due to the ease and validation of these tests in the context of immediate hypersensitivity. However, both atopy patch testing and serum IgE testing have been used in EoE. Herein, we reviewed the basic clinical features of EoE with a focus on the approach to diagnosing causative food allergens and to dietary therapy. PMID:24565538

Greenhawt, Matthew; Aceves, Seema S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Rothenberg, Marc E

2013-01-01

281

Epidemiological studies of esophageal cancer in the era of genome-wide association studies  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer (EC) caused about 395000 deaths in 2010. China has the most cases of EC and EC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in China. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histologic type (90%-95%), while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) remains extremely low in China. Traditional epidemiological studies have revealed that environmental carcinogens are risk factors for EC. Molecular epidemiological studies revealed that susceptibility to EC is influenced by both environmental and genetic risk factors. Of all the risk factors for EC, some are associated with the risk of ESCC and others with the risk of EAC. However, the details and mechanisms of risk factors involved in the process for EC are unclear. The advanced methods and techniques used in human genome studies bring a great opportunity for researchers to explore and identify the details of those risk factors or susceptibility genes involved in the process of EC. Human genome epidemiology is a new branch of epidemiology, which leads the epidemiology study from the molecular epidemiology era to the era of genome wide association studies (GWAS). Here we review the epidemiological studies of EC (especially ESCC) in the era of GWAS, and provide an overview of the general risk factors and those genomic variants (genes, SNPs, miRNAs, proteins) involved in the process of ESCC. PMID:25133033

Wang, An-Hui; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Bo; He, Yi-Xuan; Fang, Ye-Xian; Yan, Yong-Ping

2014-01-01

282

Severe complications caused by dissolution of latex with consequent self-disintegration of esophageal plastic tubes.  

PubMed

A case of decisive material degeneration of an esophageal Celestin tube is described: a 50-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus received a Celestin tube for palliative endoscopic treatment and 8 months later presented with suddenly occurring complete dysphagia. Dissolution of the latex layer in the proximal as well as the distal part of the tube had caused self-disintegration of the Celestin tube and had liberated the monofilament nylon coil which completely obstructed the lumen of the tube. Endoscopic tube removal was only possible by careful attachment of a balloon catheter and peroral extraction after insufflation with contrast medium up to 5 atm. A Medline-based review of the literature revealed different but predominantly severe complications (perforation, hemorrhage, obstruction, and peritonitis) based on material fatigue of the latex layer in esophageal Celestin tubes. At least 6 months after placement of a Celestin tube, regular fluoroscopic controls should be performed to detect early disintegration of the tube. Indication for the placement of Celestin tubes in patients with benign esophageal strictures and longer life expectancy should be assessed very critically. PMID:10989999

Löser, C

2000-09-01

283

Laparoscopic approach to benign esophageal disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The technique of laparoscopic surgery (LS) has taken rapid strides over the past decade. Though the biliary tract has been the main focus of LS, the surgical treatment of benign esophageal disease is an area of growing interest. In this article we outline our experience using LS in the treatment of benign esophageal diseases. Material and Methods: From March

K. P. Balsara; C. R. Shah; N. H. Patell; H. Shah; B. Jamaiwar; P. Gupta

284

Cololaryngostomy procedure in caustic esophageal burns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study presented herein was undertaken to report an original case of cololaryngostomy operation in caustic esophageal burns. Cololaryngostomy application to a chronic caustic esophageal burn case is reported with a detailed literature review of the topic. For the first time in the world, the larynx was used for the integrity of the gastrointestinal system by applying a cololaryngostomy procedure

Hayrettin Cebeci; Melih Paksoy; As?m Kaytaz; Ethem Unal

2002-01-01

285

Cololaryngostomy procedure in caustic esophageal burns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study presented herein was undertaken to report an original case of cololaryngostomy operation in caustic esophageal burns. Cololaryngostomy application to a chronic caustic esophageal burn case is reported with a detailed literature review of the topic. For the first time in the world, the larynx was used for the integrity of the gastrointestinal system by applying a cololaryngostomy procedure

Hayrettin Cebeci; Melih Paksoy; Asim Kaytaz; Ethem Unal

286

ACG Practice Guidelines: Esophageal Reflux Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations and technical advances have enhanced our understanding and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recognition of the prevalence and importance of patients with endoscopy-negative reflux disease as well as those refractory to proton pump inhibitor therapy have led to an increasing need for objective tests of esophageal reflux. Guidelines for esophageal reflux testing are developed under the auspices of

Ikuo Hirano; Joel E. Richter

2007-01-01

287

Retained esophageal foreign bodies in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foreign-body (FB) ingestion is common in children. Retained FBs in the esophagus can produce serious complications. We report five children with retained esophageal FBs: one presented with massive hematemesis due to an esophago-carotid fistula and the others had FB impaction above esophageal strictures. The hazards of impaction of small FBs above the strictures and delayed referral are highlighted.

B. Ravi Shankar; S. K. Yachha; B. C. Sharma; B. Singh; T. S. Mahant; V. K. Kapoor

1996-01-01

288

High-resolution EUS in children with eosinophilic “allergic” esophagitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The pathophysiology of dysphagia associated with eosinophilic esophagitis is unknown. This study investigated possible anatomic alterations in children with eosinophilic esophagitis in comparison with healthy children by using high-resolution EUS to precisely measure individual tissue layers of the esophagus. Methods: Children with eosinophilic esophagitis (n = 11) and control children (n = 8) without esophagitis were prospectively evaluated by

Victor L. Fox; Samuel Nurko; Jonathan E. Teitelbaum; Kamran Badizadegan; Glenn T. Furuta

2003-01-01

289

Unusual Presentation of a Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms. PMID:22679417

Orlicka, Katarzyna; Maynard, Stéphanie; Bouin, Mickael

2012-01-01

290

Esophageal lung resection and prosthesis placement in a preterm neonate.  

PubMed

This report describes a successful outcome in a preterm baby with an esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula, who initially underwent a primary esophageal repair; but a persistent nonexpanding lung on the side of surgery led to further investigations. A further diagnosis of an esophageal lung resulted in pneumonectomy and prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis to prevent post-pneumonectomy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis in a neonate with the condition of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula and associated esophageal lung. PMID:25829674

Parida, Lalit; Pal, Kamalesh; Buainain, Hussah A; Al-Umran, Khalid U

2015-01-01

291

[Non-neoplastic esophageal stenosis: not always so benign].  

PubMed

Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare pathology whose etiology is unknown, but which is frequently associated with three highly prevalent entities: esophageal reflux disease, esophageal candidosis and alcoholic esophagitis. With conservative treatment the course of these pathologies is usually benign. However, some severe cases are resistant to conservative treatment and may require more aggressive management. We here present the case of patient suffering from a severe esophagitis complicated by chronic mediastinitis with life-threatening repercussions, requiring esophagectomy as treatment. PMID:24088236

Lorenz, Julie; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuilleumier, Henri; Schwab, Marcos

2013-10-01

292

Assessment of invasion in lung adenocarcinoma classification, including adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classification of adenocarcinoma has undergone recent evaluation to better align histological classification with clinical outcomes. One terminology, in particular, that of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), has been debated for many decades. Although initial discussion surrounded the cell-of-origin of this tumor, more recent confusion has been generated from the use of this term both as a pattern of growth within an otherwise

Alain C Borczuk

2012-01-01

293

Survival Effect of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy Before Esophagectomy for Patients With Esophageal Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) before definitive surgery for esophageal cancer remains controversial. This study used a large population-based database to assess the effect of NeoRT on survival for patients treated with definitive surgery. Methods and Materials: The overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival for patients with Stage T2-T4, any N, M0 (cT2-T4M0) esophageal cancer who had undergone definitive surgery between 1998 and 2004 were analyzed by querying the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results database. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and univariate comparisons were made using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards survival regression multivariate analysis was performed with NeoRT, T stage (T2 vs. T3-T4), pathologic nodal status (pN0 vs. pN1), number of nodes dissected (>10 vs. {<=}10), histologic type (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), age (<65 vs. {>=}65 years), and gender as covariates. Results: A total of 1,033 patients were identified. Of these, 441 patients received NeoRT and 592 underwent esophagectomy alone; 77% were men, 67% had adenocarcinoma, and 72% had Stage T3-T4 disease. The median OS and cause-specific survival were both significantly greater for patients who received NeoRT compared with esophagectomy alone (27 vs. 18 months and 35 vs. 21 months, respectively, p <0.0001). The 3-year OS rate was also significantly greater in the NeoRT group (43% vs. 30%). On multivariate analysis, NeoRT, age <65 years, adenocarcinoma histologic type, female gender, pN0 status, >10 nodes dissected, and Stage T2 disease were all independently correlated with increased OS. Conclusion: These results support the use of NeoRT for patients with esophageal cancer. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

Schwer, Amanda L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)], E-mail: amanda.schwer@uchsc.edu; Ballonoff, Ari; McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); D'Agostino, Ralph B. [Department of Biostatistical Science, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2009-02-01

294

Human Epididymis Protein 4 (HE4) is Upregulated in Gastric and Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas  

PubMed Central

Upper gastrointestinal neoplasia in the esophagus, stomach and pancreas is associated with the formation of pre-neoplastic metaplasias. We have previously reported the up-regulation of Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) in all metaplasias in the stomach of humans and mice. We have now sought to evaluate the expression of HE4 in metaplasias/pre-neoplastic precursors and cancers of the human stomach, pancreas and esophagus. Tissue microarrays for gastric cancers, pancreatic cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma were stained with antibodies against HE4. Immunostaining was quantified by digital imaging and the results were evaluated to assess expression in metaplasias, expression in cancer pathological subtypes and the effects of expression on survival in cancer patients. In gastric cancer patients from Korea, HE4 was detected in 74% of intestinal and 90% of diffuse cancers, while in a gastric cancer cohort from Johns Hopkins HE4 was detected 74% of intestinal type and 92% of diffuse cancers. Nevertheless, in both cohorts there was no impact of HE4 expression on overall survival. In the esophagus, we observed expression of HE4 in scattered endocrine cells within Barrett’s esophagus samples, but Barrett’s columnar metaplasias and HE4 was detected in only 2% of esophageal adenocarcinomas. Finally, in the pancreas, HE4 expression was not observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, but 46.8% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas expressed HE4 expression. Still, we did not observe any influence of HE4 expression on survival. The results suggest that HE4 is up-regulated during gastric and pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23084584

O’Neal, Ryan L.; Nam, Ki Taek; LaFleur, Bonnie J.; Barlow, Brittney; Nozaki, Koji; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Woo Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang; Shi, Chanjuan; Maitra, Anirban; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Washington, M. Kay; Rifai, Wael El; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Goldenring, James R.

2012-01-01

295

MicroRNA Expression Differentiates Squamous Epithelium from Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Current strategies fail to identify most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) before the disease becomes advanced and incurable. Given the dismal prognosis associated with EAC, improvements in detection of early-stage esophageal neoplasia are needed. Aims We sought to assess whether differential expression of microRNAs could discriminate between squamous epithelium, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and EAC. Methods We analyzed microRNA expression in a discovery cohort of human endoscopic biopsy samples from 36 patients representing normal squamous esophagus (n=11), BE (n=14), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC (n=11). RNA was assessed using microarrays representing 847 human microRNAs followed by qRT-PCR verification of nine microRNAs. In a second cohort (n=18), qRT-PCR validation of five miRNAs was performed. Expression of 59 microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature was assessed in our training cohort. Known esophageal cell lines were used to compare miRNA expression to tissue miRNAs. Results After controlling for multiple comparisons, we found 34 miRNAs differentially expressed between squamous esophagus and BE/EAC by microarray analysis. However, miRNA expression did not reliably differentiate non-dysplastic BE from EAC. In the validation cohort, all five microRNAs selected for qRT-PCR validation differentiated between squamous samples and BE/EAC. Microarray results supported 14 of the previously reported microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature. Cell lines did not generally reflect miRNA expression found in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate that miRNAs differ between squamous esophageal epithelium and BE/EAC, but do not distinguish between BE and EAC. We suggest prospective evaluation of miRNAs in patients at high risk for EAC. PMID:23925817

Garman, Katherine S.; Owzar, Kouros; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Westfall, Kristen; Anderson, Blair R.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Diehl, Anna Mae; Provenzale, Dawn; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

2013-01-01

296

Proximal gastric cancers resected via a transabdominal-only approach. Results and comparisons to distal adenocarcinoma of the stomach.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to compare the outcome of patients with proximal gastric cancer (PGC) treated by a transabdominal-only resection to that of patients with distal gastric cancer (DGC). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been suggested that PGC is inherently more aggressive than DGC. The worse survival of PGC compared with that of DGC may be in part, because of the difficulty distinguishing PGC from distal esophageal adenocarcinoma. By defining a subset of PGC resected using an transabdominal-only approach, one may discriminate true PGC from distal esophageal adenocarcinoma. This subset of patients is a more appropriate comparison group when analyzing outcome relative to patients with DGC. METHODS: A review of the prospective database for gastric adenocarcinoma at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between July 1985 and August 1995 identified 98 patients with PGC resection via a transabdominal-only approach. Of these, 65 underwent proximal gastrectomy and 33 underwent total gastrectomy. For DGC, 258 required a distal gastrectomy and 71 required total gastrectomy. RESULTS: The overall 5-year survival of patients with PGC was 42% (median survival, 47 months), whereas the 5-year survival for patients with DGC was 61% (median survival, 106 months, p = 0.03). Within each stage, there were no significant survival differences, but in all stages, survival was better for patients with DGC. More important, the site of the primary tumor appears to affect survival, with a worse outcome as the tumor moves proximally. CONCLUSIONS: Despite excluding distal esophageal cancers, survival for patients with PGC remains worse than for those with DGC. Late stage of presentation could not explain this difference. It appears that PGCs are inherently more aggressive than are DGCs. In addition, site of the primary tumor appears to affect outcome, with a trend toward a worse outcome as the tumor moves proximally. PMID:9230808

Harrison, L E; Karpeh, M S; Brennan, M F

1997-01-01

297

EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

Wagner, Howard A.

2010-01-01

298

Helicobacter pylori Protection Against Reflux Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Background and Aim Negative association has been reported between presence of Helicobacter pylori and developing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its complications. The aim of this study was to determine whether H. pylori (HP) can be protective against GERD in an African American (AA) population. Methods From 2004 to 2007, we studied 2,020 cases; esophagitis (58), gastritis (1,558), both esophagitis and gastritis (363) and a normal control group (41). We collected their pathology and endoscopy unit reports. HP status was determined based on staining of gastric biopsy. Results HP data was available for 79 % (1,611) of the cases. The frequency of HP positivity in gastritis patients was 40 % (506), in esophagitis patients 4 % and in normal controls 34 % (11), while HP was positive in 34 % of the patients with both esophagitis and gastritis. After adjusting for effects of age and sex, odds ratio of HP was 0.06 (95 % CI 0.01–0.59; P value = 0.01) for the esophagitis group versus the normal group. Conclusions Our results show H. pylori has a significant negative association with esophagitis in AAs which may point to a protective role of H. pylori in the pathogenesis of esophagitis. In addition, H. pylori may be the reason for the low GERD complications in AAs. PMID:23010740

Entezari, Omid; Nouraie, Mehdi; Dowlati, Ehsan; Frederick, Wayne; Woods, Alfreda; Lee, Edward; Brim, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T.; Ghadyari, Firoozeh; Kamangar, Farin; Razjouyan, Hadie

2013-01-01

299

A segregation analysis of Barrett's esophagus and associated adenocarcinomas.  

PubMed

Familial aggregation of esophageal adenocarcinomas, esophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas, and their precursor Barrett's esophagus (BE) has been termed familial BE (FBE). Numerous studies documenting increased familial risk for these diseases raise the hypothesis that there may be an inherited susceptibility to the development of BE and its associated cancers. In this study, using segregation analysis for a binary trait as implemented in S.A.G.E. 6.0.1, we analyzed data on 881 singly ascertained pedigrees to determine whether FBE is caused by a common environmental or genetic agent and, if genetic, to identify the mode of inheritance of FBE. The inheritance models were compared by likelihood ratio tests and Akaike's A Information Criterion. Results indicated that random environmental and/or multifactorial components were insufficient to fully explain the familial nature of FBE, but rather, there is segregation of a major type transmitted from one generation to the next (P < 10(-10)). An incompletely dominant inheritance model together with a polygenic component fits the data best. For this dominant model, the estimated penetrance of the dominant allele is 0.1005 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.0587-0.1667] and the sporadic rate is 0.0012 (95% CI, 0.0004-0.0042), corresponding to a relative risk of 82.53 (95% CI, 28.70-237.35) or odds ratio of 91.63 (95% CI, 32.01-262.29). This segregation analysis provides epidemiologic evidence in support of one or more rare autosomally inherited dominant susceptibility allele(s) in FBE families and, hence, motivates linkage analyses. PMID:20200424

Sun, Xiangqing; Elston, Robert; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Falk, Gary; Grady, William M; Kinnard, Margaret; Mittal, Sumeet K; Willis, Joseph E; Markowitz, Sanford; Brock, Wendy; Chak, Amitabh

2010-03-01

300

Evaluation of aortopexy in the management of severe tracheomalacia after esophageal atresia repair.  

PubMed

Severe tracheomalacia (TM) is a difficult problem in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. We reviewed our experience with aortopexy and other interventions for severe TM in this population. With review ethics board approval, a retrospective review of TM in postoperative EA patients was conducted (1989-2010). Demographics, perinatal, and surgical information regarding EA repair was collected. TM infants were analyzed for symptomatology, clinical severity, investigations, interventions, and outcomes. Data are presented as proportions or median(range). One hundred and thirty-two EA patients were reviewed. Most had type C atresia (87.3%), and 18 patients (13.6%) died. Twenty-five patients (18.9%) had TM of whom five (20%) died. Median symptom onset was 18 days (0-729) after EA repair, with stridor (64%) or retractions/distress (44%) being most frequent. Four and two patients had airway obstruction or cardiorespiratory arrest, respectively. Median time from symptom onset to investigations was 11 days; these were most commonly rigid bronchoscopy (56%) and fluoroscopy (36%). Ten patients (40%) had severe TM on bronchoscopy. Six underwent aortopexy, one fundoplication, and three were treated medically. Length of hospital stay (LOS) post-aortopexy was 13 days (5-60), and ventilation time was 2 days (0-9). LOS was 60.5 (1-69) days postdiagnosis in non-aortopexy patients. Readmission rates for respiratory issues were significantly less in the aortopexy (median 0 vs. 5; P?=?0.048) group over 2-year follow up after discharge. Complications of aortopexy included transfusion (1) and temporary diaphragmatic paresis (1), and one mortality secondary to severe congenital cardiac anomalies. Our experience suggests that aortopexy is safe and effective for the treatment of severe TM. It is associated with reduced LOS compared with other treatment strategies and few complications or long-term sequelae. PMID:24446971

Kay-Rivest, E; Baird, R; Laberge, J-M; Puligandla, P S

2015-04-01

301

Dilated Intercellular Spaces of Esophageal Epithelium in Nonerosive Reflux Disease Patients with Physiological Esophageal Acid Exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:It has been demonstrated that dilation of intercellular spaces of esophageal epithelium is a marker of tissue injury in GERD patients with a pathological esophageal acid exposure time. To evaluate the relationship among ultrastructural changes, acid esophageal exposure, and GERD symptoms, intercellular space diameters have been assessed in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients with\\/without abnormal acid exposure time.METHODS:Following a pharmacological

Renato Caviglia; Mentore Ribolsi; Nicola Maggiano; Armando M Gabbrielli; Sara Emerenziani; Michele Pier Luca Guarino; Simone Carotti; Fortunéé Irene Habib; Carla Rabitti; Michele Cicala

2005-01-01

302

Role of advanced diagnostics for eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), diagnostic tests aid in the identification of pathophysiologic consequences and accurate detection of the disease. The EoE Endoscopic Reference Score (EREFS) classifies and grades the severity of the five major endoscopically identified esophageal features of EoE (edema, rings, exudates, furrows and strictures). The EREFS may be useful in the evaluation of disease severity and as an objective outcome of response to therapy. pH monitoring identifies the presence of abnormal degrees of acid exposure in the esophagus that characterizes gastroesophageal reflux disease. The presence of acid reflux, however, does not indicate that the reflux is responsible for esophageal eosinophilia. Esophageal manometry has not demonstrated a characteristic abnormality with sufficient sensitivity to make the test of diagnostic value in clinical practice. On the other hand, manometric characteristics of esophageal pressurization and longitudinal muscle dysfunction may help identify important pathophysiologic consequences of EoE. Esophageal impedance testing has demonstrated increased baseline mucosal impedance that correlates with increased epithelial permeability in EoE. Reduced mucosal integrity may provide intraluminal allergens access to antigen-presenting cells, serving as an early event in the pathogenesis of EoE. The functional luminal impedance probe (FLIP) provides quantitative assessment of esophageal mural compliance, a physiologic correlate of remodeling in EoE. Studies using FLIP have associated reductions in esophageal distensibility in EoE with the important outcome of food impaction risk. Finally, confocal endomicroscopy, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and novel eosinophil-enhancing contrast agents are emerging methods that may allow for in vivo visualization of esophageal eosinophilic inflammation, thereby improving the detection and understanding of this emerging disease. PMID:24603385

Hirano, Ikuo

2014-01-01

303

Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease  

PubMed Central

Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

2014-01-01

304

Esophageal melanocytosis in oral opium consumption.  

PubMed

Esophageal melanocytosis is a rare and benign condition, characterized by melanocytic proliferation of the esophageal squamous epithelium with heavy melanin deposition. The etiology and pathogenesis has not been exactly known but it seems to be a chronic stimulus such as gastroesophageal reflux. This condition is very rare and about 35 cases have been reported so far, most of which have been from India and Japan. Herein, we present a case of esophageal melanocytosis in a patient with long history of oral opium consumption. To the best of our knowledge, such a history has not been reported. PMID:24719715

Geramizadeh, Bita; Asadian, Fatemeh; Taghavi, Alireza

2014-01-01

305

[Palliative endoscopic therapy of esophageal carcinoma].  

PubMed

Endoscopic insertion of esophageal bridging tubes provides palliative therapy in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma. Indications are tumor stenoses and esophago-bronchial fistulae. In 138 patients endoscopical application of bridging tubes was performed: 51 esophageal, 42 cardiac and 24 gastric carcinoma, six tumor stenoses caused by bronchial carcinoma and 15 esophago-bronchial fistulae. Letality rate was 8,5%, which is significantly less compared to operative methods. Average survival time of 120 days after implantation seems not to be prolonged despite marked improvement of symptoms, especially of dysphagia. PMID:6201422

Lux, G; Riemann, J F; Groitl, H

1984-03-22

306

Dietary therapies for eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a prevalent chronic esophageal disorder. Since the condition was first described, its pathophysiology has been known to have an immune-allergic origin, but the high response rate to dietary therapies based on feeding patients exclusively with amino acid-based elemental formulas (with complete elimination of table foods) has clearly established EoE as a particular form of food allergy. Nevertheless, the management of EoE in clinical practice remains widely heterogeneous, with topical steroids being a therapeutic mainstay. However, a growing body of evidence points to dietary therapy as an effective treatment option for both children and adults with EoE, as this approach is capable of achieving a sustained symptomatic and histological response without resorting to drugs. This article reviews the available data on the major types of dietary therapy for EoE, including elemental formula diets, skin allergy testing-directed elimination diets and empirical elimination diets based on common food allergens. PMID:24236700

Arias, Angel; Lucendo, Alfredo J

2014-01-01

307

Adenocarcinoma of the anal ducts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The records of 21 patients treated for adenocarcinoma of the anal ducts between 1943 and 1982 were reviewed. The patients\\u000a were followed until death or current status in April 1987. The median follow-up period was eight months (range, 3 to 144 months).\\u000a Fifteen patients had an erroneous diagnosis made at first physician visit resulting in a media doctor's delay of

S. Lindkaer Jensen; M. H. Shokouh-Amiri; K. Hagen; H. Harling; O. Vagn Nielsen

1988-01-01

308

Genome profiling of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human cancers. It displays many different chromosomal abnormalities and mutations. By using 244 K high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) we studied the genome alterations of 39 fine-needle aspirations from pancreatic adenocarcinoma and eight human adenocarcinoma pancreatic cell lines. Using both visual inspection and GISTIC analysis, recurrent losses were observed on 1p, 3p, 4p, 6, 8p, 9, 10, 11q, 15q, 17, 18, 19p, 20p, 21, and 22 and comprised several known or suspected tumor suppressor genes such as ARHGEF10, ARID1A, CDKN2A/B, FHIT, PTEN, RB1, RUNX1-3, SMAD4, STK11/LKB1, TP53, and TUSC3. Heterozygous deletion of the 1p35-p36 chromosomal region was identified in one-third of the tumors and three of the cell lines. This region, commonly deleted in human cancers, contains several tumor suppressor genes including ARID1A and RUNX3. We identified frequent genetic gains on chromosome arms 1q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7q, 8q, 12q, 15q, 18q, 19q, and 20q. Amplifications were observed in 16 tumors. AKT2, CCND3, CDK4, FOXA2, GATA6, MDM2, MYC, and SMURF1 genes were gained or amplified. The most obvious amplification was located at 18q11.2 and targeted the GATA6 gene, which plays a predominant role in the initial specification of the pancreas and in pancreatic cell type differentiation. In conclusion, we have identified novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:21412932

Birnbaum, David J; Adélaïde, José; Mamessier, Emilie; Finetti, Pascal; Lagarde, Arnaud; Monges, Geneviève; Viret, Frédéric; Gonçalvès, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Iovanna, Juan; Giovannini, Marc; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

2011-06-01

309

Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from pre-malignant Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently-mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon-resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from two key transition points in the development of malignancy; benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE, n=66), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 were stage-specific, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barrett’s esophagus in a novel non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24952744

Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J.; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L.; Anderson, Charlotte L.; Carvalho, Benilton; O’Donovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J.; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

2014-01-01

310

Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis.  

PubMed

Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes, but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from premalignant Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from 2 key transition points in the development of malignancy: benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (NDBE; n=66) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD; n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 mutations occurred in a stage-specific manner, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barrett's esophagus in a new non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24952744

Weaver, Jamie M J; Ross-Innes, Caryn S; Shannon, Nicholas; Lynch, Andy G; Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L; Anderson, Charlotte L; Carvalho, Benilton; O'Donovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D; Edwards, Paul A W; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

2014-08-01

311

47 CFR 11.61 - Tests of EAS procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests of EAS procedures. 11.61 Section 11.61 ...COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Tests § 11.61 Tests of EAS procedures. (a) EAS Participants...

2010-10-01

312

47 CFR 11.61 - Tests of EAS procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...of EAS procedures. 11.61 Section 11.61 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Tests § 11.61 Tests of EAS procedures. (a) EAS Participants shall conduct tests at...

2012-10-01

313

47 CFR 11.41 - Participation in EAS.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Participation in EAS. 11.41 Section 11.41 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.41 Participation in EAS. (a) All EAS Participants specified in § 11.11...

2011-10-01

314

47 CFR 11.41 - Participation in EAS.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Participation in EAS. 11.41 Section 11.41 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.41 Participation in EAS. All EAS Participants specified in § 11.11 are...

2012-10-01

315

47 CFR 11.41 - Participation in EAS.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Participation in EAS. 11.41 Section 11.41 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.41 Participation in EAS. All EAS Participants specified in § 11.11 are...

2013-10-01

316

47 CFR 11.61 - Tests of EAS procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...of EAS procedures. 11.61 Section 11.61 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Tests § 11.61 Tests of EAS procedures. (a) EAS Participants shall conduct tests at...

2014-10-01

317

47 CFR 11.61 - Tests of EAS procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of EAS procedures. 11.61 Section 11.61 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Tests § 11.61 Tests of EAS procedures. (a) EAS Participants shall conduct tests at...

2013-10-01

318

47 CFR 11.41 - Participation in EAS.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Participation in EAS. 11.41 Section 11.41 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.41 Participation in EAS. All EAS Participants specified in § 11.11 are...

2014-10-01

319

47 CFR 11.41 - Participation in EAS.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Participation in EAS. 11.41 Section 11.41 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.41 Participation in EAS. (a) All EAS Participants specified in § 11.11...

2010-10-01

320

47 CFR 11.61 - Tests of EAS procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tests of EAS procedures. 11.61 Section 11.61 ...COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Tests § 11.61 Tests of EAS procedures. (a) EAS Participants...

2011-10-01

321

Esophageal atresia in newborns: a wide spectrum from the isolated forms to a full VACTERL phenotype?  

PubMed Central

Background VATER association was first described in 1972 by Quan and Smith as an acronym which identifies a non-random co-occurrence of Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Tracheoesophageal fistula and/or Esophageal atresia, Radial dysplasia. It is even possible to find out Cardiovascular, Renal and Limb anomalies and the acronym VACTERL was adopted, also, embodying Vascular, as single umbilical artery, and external genitalia anomalies. Methods Data on patients with esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between January 2003 and January 2013 were evaluated for the contingent occurrence of typical VACTERL anomalies (VACTERL-type) and non tipical VACTERL anomalies (non-VACTERL-type). The inclusion criterion was the presence of EA with or without TEF plus two or more of the following additional malformations: vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiovascular defects, renal anomalies and lower limb deformities, like radial dysplasia. Results Among 52 patients with EA/TEF, 20 (38,4%) had isolated EA and 7 (21,8%) had a recognized etiology such a syndrome and therefore were excluded. Among 32 infants with EA and associated malformations, 15 (46,8%) had VACTERL association. The most common anomalies were congenital heart defects (73,3%), followed by vertebral anomalies (66,6%). Many patients also had additional non-VACTERL-type defects. Single umbilical artery was the most common one followed by nervous system abnormalities and anomalies of toes. Between the groups of infants with VACTERL type and non-VACTERL-type anomalies, there are several overlapping data regarding both the tipically described spectrum and the most frequently reported non-VACTERL-type malformations. Thus, it is possible to differentiate infants with a full phenotype (VACTERL full phenotype) and patients that do not meet all the criteria mentioned above, but with some homologies with the first group (VACTERL partial phenotype). Conclusion The high frequency of non-VACTERL-type anomalies encountered in full and partial phenotype patients would suggest the need for an extension of the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of VACTERL association and also for pre- and post-operative management and follow-up in the short and long term. PMID:23842449

2013-01-01

322

Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-two patients with esophageal carcinoma had no local recurrence after external and intracavitary radiation treatment, but all developed ulcers in the field of intracavitary irradiation. Ten were linear ulcers that appeared 3-12 months after radiation treatment (mean, 5.3 months); the other 12 were the long circumferential type and appeared 1-8 months after irradiation (mean, 3.7 months). Esophagobronchial fistulae developed in two cases in which deep ulcer had been found between the completion of external irradiation and the beginning of intracavitary irradiation. In these cases with deep ulcer, intracavitary irradiation should not be done. For patients receiving intracavitary radiation, the total dosage should be less than 20 Gy.

Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

1984-08-01

323

Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency  

PubMed Central

Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

2015-01-01

324

Establishing Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Accurate and Reliable Tool to Diagnose and Monitor Esophageal Cancer in a Rat Model  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of esophageal cancer in the Levrat model of end-to-side esophagojejunostomy. Background The Levrat model has proven utility in terms of its ability to replicate Barrett’s carcinogenesis by inducing gastroduodenoesophageal reflux (GDER). Due to lack of data on the utility of non-invasive methods for detection of esophageal cancer, treatment efficacy studies have been limited, as adenocarcinoma histology has only been validated post-mortem. It would therefore be of great value if the validity and reliability of MRI could be established in this setting. Methods Chronic GDER reflux was induced in 19 male Sprague-Dawley rats using the modified Levrat model. At 40 weeks post-surgery, all animals underwent endoscopy, MRI scanning, and post-mortem histological analysis of the esophagus and anastomosis. With post-mortem histology serving as the gold standard, assessment of presence of esophageal cancer was made by five esophageal specialists and five radiologists on endoscopy and MRI, respectively. Results The accuracy of MRI and endoscopic analysis to correctly identify cancer vs. no cancer was 85.3% and 50.5%, respectively. ROC curves demonstrated that MRI rating had an AUC of 0.966 (p<0.001) and endoscopy rating had an AUC of 0.534 (p?=?0.804). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI for identifying cancer vs. no-cancer was 89.1% and 80% respectively, as compared to 45.5% and 57.5% for endoscopy. False positive rates of MRI and endoscopy were 20% and 42.5%, respectively. Conclusions MRI is a more reliable diagnostic method than endoscopy in the Levrat model. The non-invasiveness of the tool and its potential to volumetrically quantify the size and number of tumors likely makes it even more useful in evaluating novel agents and their efficacy in treatment studies of esophageal cancer. PMID:24705451

Kosovec, Juliann E.; Zaidi, Ali H.; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Kasi, Pashtoon M.; Cothron, Kyle; Thompson, Diane V.; Lynch, Edward; Jobe, Blair A.

2014-01-01

325

Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?  

PubMed Central

Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

2013-01-01

326

Understanding EA Dynamics via Population Fitness Distributions  

E-print Network

Understanding EA Dynamics via Population Fitness Distributions Elena Popovici epopovic of understanding how the fitness distribution of an EA population changes over time. 1 Introduction and Background Although a sense of the importance of population fitness distributions is deeply ingrained

George Mason University

327

Managing EAS system and medical implant interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic article surveillance (EAS) anti-theft systems use electromagnetic fields to prevent unauthorized removal of items. With over one million systems installed worldwide, EAS systems are a part of the \\

J. Vanderpool; O. S. Giles

2002-01-01

328

Management of refractory Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims Whereas most children and adults respond to traditional EoE treatments, such as exclusion of dietary allergens or the use of topical steroids, a small fraction may not. Methods Based on clinical experiences and review of the literature, the aim of this work is to provide practical advice to care for ‘refractory’ patients with EoE. Results The approach to this type of patient continues to evolve and decision-making should consider a number of issues including the patient's age, lack of complete understanding of the natural history of this disease, risks of monitoring and side effects of treatments. Next, one needs to define the term refractory, in that this can refer either to persistent symptoms, or to continued inflammation in the face of presumably effective drug or diet therapy. Before considering alternative treatments, it is important to rule out any other cause of persistent symptoms. For instance, could they be related to an occult esophageal narrowing not identified at the time of endoscopy? Esophagrams may be necessary to identify localized or longitudinal narrowing that could be amenable to dilation. If symptoms and inflammation are persistent and no narrowing is appreciated, an elemental diet can be considered but the long term use of this in older children and adults may be difficult. Prednisone or systemic steroids may be indicated to induce remission but side effects and complications associated with chronic use are limiting. Finally, the use of immunosuppression or biological agents has been reported in case reports and studies; use of these may be limited by side effects or the need to utilize compassionate use protocols. Conclusions As the scope of esophageal eosinophilia continues to evolve, the clinical and molecular characterization of new clinical phenotypes will be important so that new therapeutic targets can be identified. PMID:24603397

Mukkada, Vincent A.; Furuta, Glenn T.

2014-01-01

329

[The new classification of lung adenocarcinoma].  

PubMed

The new, interdisciplinary IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung adenocarcinoma has achieved a considerable impact since its publication in the year 2011. It separates tumours into preinvasive, minimally invasive and invasive subtypes. The preinvasive lesions atypical, adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) together with the minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), have an excellent prognosis after complete resection with 100 % survival. It enables a reproducible tumour grading by the determination of the predominant histological growth pattern which could be confirmed in several follow-up studies. Thereby the mixed subtype was eliminated which formerly represented about 80 % of all adenocarcinomas. Similarly, the terms bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma and bronchioloalveolar tumour growth were eliminated because they represented several distinct entities, specifically the in-situ lesions AAH and ACIS as well as the non-in-situ/invasive tumours like minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA) and invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma (IMA). Although the classification is based on data from tumour resections it accommodates the fact that most tumours are diagnosed on biopsies and cytological specimens and includes recommendations for an efficient work-up to preserve tissue for molecular testing. Furthermore, the morphological analysis may provide hints for molecular changes including mutations with therapeutic relevance that may enable targeted molecular diagnostics. This review presents essentials facts of the new classification that will be part of the next WHO classification of lung tumors and its follow-up publications. PMID:24150851

Petersen, I

2013-10-01

330

Evaluation of Esophageal Motor Function With High-resolution Manometry  

PubMed Central

For several decades esophageal manometry has been the test of choice to evaluate disorders of esophageal motor function. The recent introduction of high-resolution manometry for the study of esophageal motor function simplified performance of esophageal manometry, and revealed previously unidentified patterns of normal and abnormal esophageal motor function. Presentation of pressure data as color contour plots or esophageal pressure topography led to the development of new tools for analyzing and classifying esophageal motor patterns. The current standard and still developing approach to do this is the Chicago classification. While this methodical approach is improving our diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders, it currently does not address all motor abnormalities. We will explore the Chicago classification and disorders that it does not address. PMID:23875094

2013-01-01

331

Nonlinear analysis of EAS clusters  

E-print Network

We apply certain methods of nonlinear time series analysis to the extensive air shower clusters found earlier in the data set obtained with the EAS-1000 Prototype array. In particular, we use the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to compute the correlation dimension of samples in the vicinity of the clusters. The validity of the results is checked by surrogate data tests and some additional quantities. We compare our conclusions with the results of similar investigations performed by the EAS-TOP and LAAS groups.

M. Yu. Zotov; G. V. Kulikov; Yu. A. Fomin

2002-07-09

332

Obligate progression precedes lung adenocarcinoma dissemination  

PubMed Central

Despite its clinical importance, very little is known about the natural history and molecular underpinnings of lung cancer dissemination and metastasis. Here we employed a genetically-engineered mouse model of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma in which cancer cells are fluorescently marked to determine whether dissemination is an inherent ability or a major acquired phenotype during lung adenocarcinoma metastasis. We find very little evidence for dissemination from oncogenic Kras-driven hyperplasias or most adenocarcinomas. p53 loss is insufficient to drive dissemination but rather enables rare cancer cells in a small fraction of primary adenocarcinomas to gain alterations that drive dissemination. Molecular characterization of disseminated tumors cells indicates that down-regulation of the transcription factor Nkx2-1 precedes dissemination. Finally, we show that metastatic primary tumors possess a highly proliferative sub-population of cells with characteristics matching those of disseminating cells. We propose that dissemination is a major hurdle during the natural course of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis. PMID:24740995

Caswell, Deborah R.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Yang, Dian; Chiou, Shin-Heng; Cheemalavagu, Shashank; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Connolly, Andrew; Winslow, Monte M.

2014-01-01

333

Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique  

SciTech Connect

Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

Zelenak, Kamil, E-mail: zelenak@mfn.s [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia); Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav [University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia)

2010-06-15

334

Activation of GATA binding protein 6 (GATA6) sustains oncogenic lineage-survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma  

E-print Network

Gene amplification is a tumor-specific event during malignant transformation. Recent studies have proposed a lineage-dependency (addiction) model of human cancer whereby amplification of certain lineage transcription factors ...

Lin, Lin

335

Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Serum Nlinked Glycans from Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Phenotypes  

E-print Network

component analysis INTRODUCTION Recently, Isailovic et al. showed that patients with liver cancer, liver: ion mobility, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, glycans, cancer, genetic algorithm, principal to be highly connected.3 Ultimately, as in other forms of cancer, the early diagnosis (preferably

Clemmer, David E.

336

Ultrasonographic prediction of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To study the value of ultrasonographic prediction of the esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: All 207 cases were examined by ultrasonography and endoscopy, and classified according to the Child-Pugh score. The valuable ultrasonographic variables were selected to form regression formulae to predict the esophageal varices degrees in patients with liver cirrhosis. RESULTS: The esophageal varices degree

Xiao-Hong Zhang; Yu-Feng Zhang; Fang-Qin Ning; Shao-Ji Yang

337

Caustic esophageal strictures in children: 30 years’ experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many children in developing countries continue to sustain caustic esophageal injures. The first line of treatment is dilatation, unless contraindicated, where 60% to 80% success rate is expected. In cases of failure, esophageal replacement is the only hope for achieving normal swallowing. Over the last 30 years, more than 850 cases of esophageal replacement were done in the Pediatric Surgery

Alaa F Hamza; Sameh Abdelhay; Hatem Sherif; Tarek Hasan; Hisham Soliman; Ashraf Kabesh; Ibraheem Bassiouny; Ahmed F Bahnassy

2003-01-01

338

Molecular and cellular features of esophageal cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 70 cell lines were established from esophageal cancer, including 15 TE-series cell lines established by the authors. This article reviews molecular and cellular features of esophageal cancer cells from studies using these cell lines as well as primary tumors. The subjects reviewed include primary cultures of normal epithelium of the esophagus and of esophageal tumors, their growth and

Tetsuro Nishihira; Yu Hashimoto; Masafumi Katayama; Shozo Mori; Toshio Kuroki

1993-01-01

339

Chronic esophageal foreign bodies in pediatric patients: a retrospective review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Chronic esophageal foreign bodies (CEFB) are associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality in adults. However, the presentation, management and outcome of chronic esophageal foreign bodies in children are not well described. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of children with chronic esophageal foreign bodies admitted to the Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, between May

Robert Sean Miller; J. Paul Willging; Michael J. Rutter; Korpong Rookkapan

2004-01-01

340

MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

2015-03-11

341

MAL hypermethylation is a tissue-specific event that correlates with MAL mRNA expression in esophageal carcinoma  

PubMed Central

MAL promoter hypermethylation was examined in 260 human esophageal specimens using real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). MAL hypermethylation showed highly discriminative ROC curve profiles which clearly distinguished esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) from both esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) and normal esophagus (NE). Both MAL methylation frequency and normalized methylation value (NMV) were significantly higher in Barrett's esophagus (BE), dysplastic BE, and EAC than in ESCC or in NE. Among matched NE and EAC samples, MAL NMVs in EAC were significantly higher than in corresponding NE. There was a significant correlation between MAL hypermethylation and BE segment length. Treatment with 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine reversed MAL methylation and reactivated MAL mRNA expression in OE33 EAC cells. MAL mRNA levels in EACs with unmethylated MAL were significantly higher than in EACs with methylated MAL. MAL hypermethylation is a common, tissue-specific event in human EAC and correlates with clinical neoplastic progression risk factors. PMID:24088706

Jin, Zhe; Cheng, Yulan; Gao, Yan; Feng, Xianling; Dong, Ming; Cao, Ziyi; Chen, Si; Yu, Huimin; Zhao, Zhenfu; Zhang, Xiaojing; Liu, Jie; Mori, Yuriko; Fan, Xinmin; Meltzer, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

342

DOE/EA-1570 ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-print Network

(DOE/EA-1570) provides information and analysis of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities Agreement with the DOE. The program would generate neutrinos at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, for analysis in proposed detectors at Fermilab and at a Far Detector Facility proposed to be built near the Ash River

Quigg, Chris

343

Use of glucagon in relieving esophageal food bolus impaction in the era of eosinophilic esophageal infiltration.  

PubMed

Esophageal food bolus impaction may require an urgent endoscopy. Glucagon is often administered to promote spontaneous passage of the food bolus. Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia, and food impaction is often the presenting symptom. Our study was aimed at determining the effectiveness of glucagon in relieving esophageal foreign body obstruction in general and in the setting of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration (EEI). A retrospective chart review was performed using the ICD codes and the emergency department database of adult patients presenting with symptoms of esophageal food bolus impaction from July 2004 to October 2010. Response to glucagon was defined as symptomatic relief of obstruction prior to endoscopic intervention. A total of 213 episodes of esophageal food bolus obstruction in 192 patients were identified during the study period. Glucagon was given in 125 cases of which 41 had a response (32.8 %). A total of 170 episodes had an Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed either during the impaction event or at a later date. Of the 60 patients' biopsies, 45 had received glucagon (17 with EEI, 28 without EEI). None of the 17 episodes with EEI as compared to 8 of the 28 without EEI responded to glucagon (0 % vs. 28.5 %, p = 0.017). Glucagon is effective in about one third of patients with esophageal food bolus impaction, which is consistent with historical data. Patients with EEI appear less likely to respond to glucagon. PMID:23203568

Thimmapuram, Jayaram; Oosterveen, Scott; Grim, Rodney

2013-06-01

344

A novel laparoscopic approach for severe esophageal stenosis due to reflux esophagitis: how to do it.  

PubMed

We herein report our technique for laparoscopic esophageal myotomy combined with Collis gastroplasty and Nissen fundoplication for severe esophageal stenosis. Our patient had experienced vomiting since childhood, and his dysphagia had gradually worsened. He was referred to our department for surgery because of resistance to pneumatic dilation. He was diagnosed with a short esophagus based on the findings of a preoperative upper gastrointestinal series and GI endoscopy. After exposing the abdominal esophagus, esophageal myotomy around the esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) was undertaken to introduce an esophageal bougie into the stomach. Then, stapled wedge gastroplasty was performed, and a short and loose Nissen fundoplication was performed. In addition, the bulging mucosa after myotomy was patched using the Dor method. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Most patients with esophageal stricture require subtotal esophagectomy. Laparoscopic surgery for patients with benign esophageal stricture refractory to repeated pneumatic dilation is challenging. However, our current procedure might abrogate the need for invasive esophagectomy for the surgical management of severe esophageal stenosis. PMID:24647633

Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

2015-02-01

345

Esophageal perception and noncardiac chest pain.  

PubMed

Symptoms arising from the esophagus are produced generally in one of two ways: through stimulation of chemosensitive-nociceptors (eg, through excess esophageal exposure to refluxed gastric acid or the resulting inflammation arising in acid-damaged tissue) or through stimulation of mechanosensitive nociceptors (eg, through repeated deformation or distension of the esophageal wall resulting from peristaltic or lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction). These symptoms are usually attributed in most patients to such well recognized conditions as reflux esophagitis, achalasia,etc. that subsequently result in the delivery of specific and effective treatment.However, a subset of patients exists in which the etiology of "similar-sounding symptoms" remains obscure and their responses to standard specific treatments poor. Now recognized as among this group of patients are those with visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity is not itself a disease but a definable aberrant sensory response (allodynia or hyper-algesia) to end-organ stimulation. Such an aberrant sensory response is neither specific for nor limited to the esophagus, and the etiopathogenesis for its development within this organ is unknown. Nonetheless, esophageal symptoms as a manifestation of visceral hypersensitivity are increasingly recognized and worthy of attention because they identify a disorder that responds to treatment aimed at the end organ's nociceptors or their neuroanatomic pathways within the CNS. PMID:15062434

Orlando, Roy C

2004-03-01

346

Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction  

PubMed Central

Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

2013-01-01

347

Initial experience with thoracoscopic esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula repair: lessons learned and technical considerations to achieve success.  

PubMed

The minimally invasive surgical (MIS) repair of esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is challenging and requires advanced endoscopic skills. The purpose of this study was to provide insight in successfully introducing the MIS repair based on the initial cases performed by a single pediatric surgeon and review of the experience of others. A retrospective review of all MIS TEF repairs performed by a single surgeon was conducted. Data gathered included patient demographics, technical details of repair including operative time, short- and long-term postoperative morbidity, length of stay, and follow-up. Eight cases (seven Type C, one Type D) were selected for MIS repair based on the judgment of the surgeon with consideration of adequate patient size, stability, type of associated anomalies, and expected length of esophageal gap. Operative time was an average of 207 minutes and there was one conversion to open for successful repair. There were no leaks and only one patient required a single anastomotic dilation at 19 months of age. There were two postoperative pneumothoraces of which one required bronchoscopic laser fistula ablation. Length of stay was an average of 16 days and length of follow-up is a median of 219 days. MIS repair of EA/TEF can be done successfully but requires careful patient selection, advanced MIS skills and meticulous attention to operative technique. PMID:25760202

Robie, Daniel K

2015-03-01

348

Longterm survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary adenocarcinomas  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to identify predictors for longterm survival following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic and other periampullary adenocarcinomas. Methods Clinicopathological factors were compared between short-term (<5 years) and longterm (?5 years) survival groups. Rates of actual 5-year and actuarial 10-year survival were determined. Results There were 109 (21.8%) longterm survivors among a sample of 501 patients. Patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma represented 76.1% of the longterm survivors. Favourable factors for longterm survival included female gender, lack of jaundice, lower blood loss, classical PD, absence of postoperative bleeding or intra-abdominal abscess, non-pancreatic primary cancer, earlier tumour stage, smaller tumour size (?2 cm), curative resection, negative lymph node involvement, well-differentiated tumours, and absence of perineural invasion. Independent factors associated with longterm survival were diagnosis of primary tumour, jaundice, intra-abdominal abscess, tumour stage, tumour size, radicality, lymph node status and cell differentiation. The prognosis was best for ampullary adenocarcinoma, for which the rate of actual 5-year survival was 32.8%, and poorest for pancreatic head adenocarcinoma, for which actual 5-year survival was only 6.5%. Conclusions The majority of longterm survivors after PD for periampullary adenocarcinomas are patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma. The longterm prognosis in pancreatic head adenocarcinoma remains dismal. PMID:23472708

Chen, Shih-Chin; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shin-E

2013-01-01

349

Inactivation of GSK3? and activation of NF-?B pathway via Axl represents an important mediator of tumorigenesis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl has been described as an oncogene, and its deregulation has been implicated in the progression of several human cancers. While the role of Axl in esophageal adenocarcinoma has been addressed, there is no information about its role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current report, we identified, for the first time, deregulation of Axl expression in OSCC. Axl is consistently overexpressed in OSCC cell lines and human tumor samples, mainly in advanced stages of the disease. Blockage of Axl gene expression by small interfering RNA inhibits cell survival, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and esophageal tumor growth in vivo. Additionally, repression of Axl expression results in Akt-dependent inhibition of pivotal genes involved in the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) pathway and in the induction of glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) activity, resulting in loss of mesenchymal markers and induction of epithelial markers. Furthermore, treatment of esophageal cancer cells with the Akt inhibitor wortmannin inhibits NF-?B signaling, induces GSK3? activity, and blocks OSCC cell proliferation in an Axl-dependent manner. Taken together, our results establish a clear role for Axl in OSCC tumorigenesis with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:25568334

Paccez, Juliano D; Duncan, Kristal; Vava, Akhona; Correa, Ricardo G; Libermann, Towia A; Parker, M Iqbal; Zerbini, Luiz F

2015-03-01

350

Genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death where essentially all cases are histologically esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West. Globally, ESCC is 2.4 times more common among men than women and recently it has been suggested that sex hormones may be associated with the risk of ESCC. We examined the association between genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic genes and ESCC risk in a population from north central China with high-incidence rates. A total of 1026 ESCC cases and 1452 controls were genotyped for 797 unique tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 51 sex hormone metabolic genes. SNP-, gene- and pathway-based associations with ESCC risk were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and geographical location and the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was determined through use of permutation for pathway- and gene-based associations. No associations were observed for the overall sex hormone metabolic pathway (P = 0.14) or subpathways (androgen synthesis: P = 0.30, estrogen synthesis: P = 0.15 and estrogen removal: P = 0.19) with risk of ESCC. However, six individual genes (including SULT2B1, CYP1B1, CYP3A7, CYP3A5, SHBG and CYP11A1) were significantly associated with ESCC risk (P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the sex hormone metabolic pathway is consistent with a potential association with risk of ESCC. These positive findings warrant further evaluation in relation to ESCC risk and replication in other populations. PMID:23358850

Hyland, Paula L.

2013-01-01

351

Eosinophilic esophagitis: a clinicopathological review.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is considered to be a chronic antigen-driven disease whereby food and/or aeroallergens induce a chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the esophagus, resulting in pathological hyperplasia of the epithelia and muscular layers, and fibrosis of the lamina propria (referred to collectively as remodelling) and the symptoms of dysphagia and food impaction. EoE shares features with other atopic conditions of asthma and atopic dermatitis, such as a TH2 cytokine milieu and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate of eosinophils, mast cells and lymphocytes. Relatively distinct features include the strong male predominance amongst adult patients, and the expression of the eosinophil chemokine eotaxin 3. Current first line treatments such as strict dietary modification and corticosteroids fail many patients. Looking forward, clarification of distinct genotype/phenotype associations, determining the reversibility of remodelling following treatment, and the development of new pharmacotherapies that target fibrotic pathways (as opposed to eosinophilic inflammation per se) or specifically improve barrier integrity appear relevant. PMID:25200122

Philpott, Hamish; Nandurkar, Sanjay; Thien, Francis; Gibson, Peter R; Royce, Simon G

2015-02-01

352

Adenoma, adenocarcinoma and mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma arising in a small lesion of the colon.  

PubMed

A unique tumor measuring 8 x 8 x 5 mm and composed of adenoma, adenocarcinoma and mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma arising in the ascending colon is reported. The mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma, in which adenocarcinomatous and carcinoid components intermingled, originated in the mucosa, penetrated the muscularis mucosa and extended into the submucosa. Immunohistochemically, carcinoid cells were positive for neuroendocrine markers and adenocarcinoma cells were intracytoplasmicly positive for carcinoembryonic antigen. Ultrastructurally, membrane-bound electron dense granules varying in shape, size and electron density were detected in the cytoplasm of carcinoid cells. No mutations of p53 and k-ras genes were detected in adenomatous, adenocarcinomatous or mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma components. The morphological appearances of the present case strongly suggests the histogenesis of this tumor in an adenoma-adenocarcinoma-carcinoid tumor sequence. PMID:12828611

Jiao, Yu-Fei; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Arai, Tomio; Sugai, Tamotsu; Uesugi, Noriuki; Habano, Wataru; Suzuki, Masamichi; Tazawa, Hideki; Goukon, Yuji

2003-07-01

353

Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of esophageal cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Precise tumor-staging is critical in the management of early esophageal caner. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows the endoscopist a view beyond the esophageal wall which opens the door to a variety of new gastroenterologic techniques. Endoscopic mucosal resection, laser photoablation and photodynamic therapy may be successfully employed in early esophageal cancer management. Combination radiation therapy and chemotherapy have shown better responses in advanced cancer. Expandable metallic stents may also provide palliation with inoperable esophageal cancer. The efficacy of EUS in the management of esophageal cancer is critically reviewed.

Trowers, Eugene A.

2000-05-01

354

Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

2013-01-01

355

Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

Shah, Pari M.

2015-01-01

356

Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma.

Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

1985-08-01

357

Endocytoscopic observation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

The endocytoscopy system (ECS), adapted for clinical use in 2003, is an ultra-high-power magnifying endoscope that allows observations at the cell level. ECS is based on the technology of light-contact microscopy. The most evident use of ECS is for real-time, high-resolution diagnosis of nuclear abnormalities, mainly in patients with esophageal cancer. Up to now, three different types of ECS have been available. This diagnostic tool makes it possible to omit histological examination of biopsy samples in approximately 84% of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, as evidence for both an increase of cell density and nuclear abnormalities is considered to be convincing proof that a lesion is malignant. Here we describe the features of ECS and the background that led to its development, and review the published literature pertaining to the observation of esophageal neoplasms using ECS. PMID:20078658

Kumagai, Youichi; Kawada, Kenro; Yamazaki, Shigeru; Iida, Michio; Ochiai, Takanori; Momma, Kumiko; Odajima, Hajime; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Tetsuo; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Takubo, Kaiyo

2010-01-01

358

Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to review the clinical features and estimate the long-term survival of patients with colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated a significantly increased risk of colorectal carcinoma in patients with Crohns disease. METHODS: The authors reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 30 patients with Crohn's disease admitted to The Mount Sinai Hospital between 1960 and 1989 in whom colorectal adenocarcinoma developed. All patients were operated on and follow-up was complete for all patients to 10 years after operation, to the time of death, or to the closing date of the study in December 1989. RESULTS: The 30 patients in the series had 33 colorectal adenocarcinomas; three patients (10%) presented with two synchronous cancers. The patients were relatively young (mean age, 53 years) and had long-standing Crohn's disease (duration >20 years in 87%). The 5-year actuarial survival was 44% for the overall series: 100% for stage A, 86% for stage B, 60% for stage C. All five patients with excluded bowel tumor died of large bowel cancer within 2.4 years; by contrast, the actuarial 5-year survival for patients with in-continuity tumors was 56%. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease are similar to the features of cancer in ulcerative colitis, including young age, multiple neoplasms, long duration of disease, and greater than a 50% 5-year survival rate (without excluded loops). These observations suggest the advisability of surveillance programs for Crohn's disease of the colon similar to those for ulcerative colitis of comparable duration and extent. PMID:8597513

Ribeiro, M B; Greenstein, A J; Sachar, D B; Barth, J; Balasubramanian, S; Harpaz, N; Heimann, T M; Aufses, A H

1996-01-01

359

ING1 and p53 tumor suppressor gene alterations in adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to characterize molecular alterations of the recently reported candidate tumor suppressor gene, ING1, and to explore the relationship between ING1 and p53 in a well-defined series of adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction (AdEGJ). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays were used to characterize ING1 and p53 alterations, relative to histologically normal esophageal mucosa. Two tumors were found to have ING1 mutations: one novel missense mutation (AGC(Ser)-->ATC(Ile)) at codon 147, and one silent mutation (TCG(Ser)-->TCA(Ser)) at codon 173. Reduced expression of the two major alternatively spliced ING1 messenger RNA variants, p47(ING1a) and p33(ING1b) was variable, but was reduced (1.2-10-fold) in 12 of 19 AdEGJs compared to normal esophageal epithelium. No association between p53 and ING1 alterations was apparent. We conclude that reduced ING1 expression is frequently associated with AdEGJ tumorigenesis, further supporting its role as a tumor suppressor gene, and that ING1 expression is independent of p53 status. PMID:12637159

Hara, Yasuo; Zheng, Zuoyu; Evans, Susan C; Malatjalian, Dickran; Riddell, D Christie; Guernsey, Duane L; Wang, Li Dong; Riabowol, Karl; Casson, Alan G

2003-03-20

360

Advances in clinical management of eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsy specimens, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histological features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (with a current incidence of 1 new case per 10,000 per year and prevalence of 0.5 to 1 case per 1000 per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids, such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and nondirected empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenotic complications of EoE. There are a number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment end points, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines; EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

Dellon, Evan S; Liacouras, Chris A

2014-12-01

361

Short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of babies operated on for low-risk esophageal atresia: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Data on the neurodevelopmental outcome of esophageal atresia (EA) survivors are scarce, controversial, and based on small samples. This is an observational prospective longitudinal study on a selected cohort of low-risk EA survivors. We considered a low-risk EA survivor a patient with the following characteristics: gestational age >32 weeks, no long gap, no genetic or chromosomic anomaly associated with neurodevelopmental delay, and no further major surgical congenital anomalies. Infants were evaluated with scales derived from the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - 3rd Edition at 6 and 12 months, with a score of 100 considered normal for each scale. Analysis of variance was used to assess differences of cognitive and motor development. Linear regression was used to assess the impact of the following clinical and sociodemographic variables: gender, birthweight, gestational age, length of hospital stay, number of surgeries and number of esophageal dilatations during first hospitalization, days of mechanical ventilation, weight at follow up, number of surgeries and esophageal dilatations at follow up, parental age, educational level, and socioeconomic status. Thirty children form the object of the study. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) cognitive scale's score was 93.7 (7.5) and 98.2 (9.6) at 6 and 12 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The mean (SD) motor scale's score was 97.6 (9.3) and 98.0 (12.1) at 6 and 12 months, respectively (P = n.s.). Children with a body weight <5° percentile at 12 months showed a mean (SD) cognitive score significantly lower when compared with those with a body weight >5° percentile: 88.8 (6.3) and 100.5 (8.9), respectively. At 12 months, children with unemployed mothers had a mean (SD) motor score significantly lower when compared with those in the other socioeconomic classes: 87.7 (9.8) and 100.6 (12.4), respectively. In conclusion, parents of babies operated on for low-risk EA can be reassured about neurodevelopmental outcome at least up to 1 year of age. When offering a multidisciplinary follow-up program, underweight patients should deserve particular attention to promote their quality of life and support their global development. PMID:23980587

Aite, L; Bevilacqua, F; Zaccara, A; Ravà, L; Valfrè, L; Conforti, A; Braguglia, A; Bagolan, P

2014-01-01

362

Etiology, diagnosis and treatment of infectious esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Infectious esophagitis may be caused by fungal, viral, bacterial or even parasitic agents. Risk factors include antibiotics and steroids use, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, malignancies and immunodeficiency syndromes including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Acute onset of symptoms such as dysphagia and odynophagia is typical. It can coexist with heartburn, retrosternal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. Abdominal pain, anorexia, weight loss and even cough are present sometimes. Infectious esophagitis is predominantly caused by Candida species. Other important causes include cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus infection. PMID:24868280

Kierzkiewicz, Maciej

2013-01-01

363

Grade 1 microtia, wide anterior fontanel and novel type tracheo-esophageal fistula in methimazole embryopathy.  

PubMed

Carbimazole (CMZ) and its active metabolite methimazole (MMI) are antithyroid medications, which can result in MMI/CMZ embryopathy in susceptible individuals. The incidence of birth defects related to MMI/CMZ embryopathy remains unclear as several epidemiologic studies failed to prove a correlation, despite positive case-control studies and numerous case reports. Malformations reported in exposed individuals and commonly recognized as MMI/CMZ embryopathy include cutis aplasia of the scalp, choanal atresia, esophageal atresia (EA), tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF), persistent vitelline duct, athelia/hypothelia, and subtle facial dysmorphisms including sparse or arched eyebrows. Here, we report on individuals with early pregnancy exposure to MMI, with microtia and various other anomalies associated with MMI embryopathy, suggesting that microtia is also seen with increased frequency after prenatal MMI exposure. Additional unusual malformations among our patients include a previously unreported type of TEF with three separate esophageal pouches and a fistula connecting the middle pouch to the trachea in one child, and absence of the gall bladder in another. An enlarged anterior fontanel was seen in three patients, and clinodactyly of the fifth finger was noted in three. The similarities between our three patients with microtia after MMI exposure and the two previously reported with microtia after CMZ exposure support the concept of microtia being related to the MMI/CMZ exposure. Recognition of microtia as a manifestation of MMI/CMZ embryopathy will likely increase the number of diagnosed cases and thus affect ascertainment. We propose diagnostic criteria for MMI/CMZ embryopathy, including the presence of at least one major characteristic finding. PMID:21344626

Gripp, Karen W; Kuryan, Ranita; Schnur, Rhonda E; Kothawala, Murtuza; Davey, Lauren R; Antunes, Michael J; Reichard, Kirk W; Schneider, Adele; Hall, Bryan D

2011-03-01

364

Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: distinguishing features from gastroesophageal reflux disease: a study of 41 patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults is a recently described entity occurring in young males with dysphagia, in whom esophageal biopsies show eosinophilic infiltration. This study defines the clinical and histological features of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, distinguishing it from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal biopsies from patients with dysphagia or esophagitis were reviewed blindly, and assessed for: epithelial eosinophil counts, presence of

Jeremy R Parfitt; James C Gregor; Neville G Suskin; Hani A Jawa; David K Driman

2006-01-01

365

Catumaxomab for Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients With Gastric Adenocarcinomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type II Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type III Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

2014-12-17

366

HER2 status in Barrett’s esophagus & esophageal cancer: a meta analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The oncogenic potential of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) is well known in the context of breast cancer however; its relationship with the development of Barrett’s Esophagus (BE) and Esophageal Cancer (EC) is unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the overall prevalence and survival of HER2+ in BE & EC. Patients and methods Several databases were searched including article reference lists. Inclusion criteria required that studies measured HER2 positivity in subjects with BE or EC. Results 33 studies were included in the meta-analysis (10 BE & 23 EC studies). The prevalence of HER2+ was found to be 24% (95% CI: 15-36%) in BE and 26% (95% CI: 19-34%) in EC. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had a higher ER of 32% (95% CI: 20-48%) in comparison with adenocarcinoma (ADC) with an ER of 21% (95% CI: 14-32%). Sub group analyses showed a high geographical variance, Asia was found to be the highest prevalent area with an ER 42% (95% CI: 22-64%). The difference in survival rate between groups HER2- & HER2+ was found to be 7 months. Conclusions Our results highlight a high prevalence of HER2+ in subjects with adenocarcinoma. HER2+ appears to decrease the survival time of EC patients. PMID:24490040

Gowryshankar, Ashwini; Nagaraja, Vinayak

2014-01-01

367

Risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers in Shanxi Province, China: A case-control study  

PubMed Central

Objective Smoking and alcohol consumption explain little of the risk for upper-gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer in China, where over half of all cases in the world occur. Methods We evaluated questionnaire-based risk factors for UGI cancers in a case-control study from Shanxi Province, China, including 600 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), 599 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCA), 316 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA), and 1514 age- and gender-matched controls. Results Ever smoking and ever use of any alcohol were not associated with risk of UGI cancer; only modest associations were observed between ESCC risk and highest cumulative smoking exposure, as well as GNCA risk and beer drinking. While several associations were noted for socioeconomic and some dietary variables with one or two UGI cancers, the strongest and most consistent relations for all three individual UGI cancers were observed for consumption of scalding hot foods (risk increased 150% to 219% for daily vs never users) and fresh vegetables and fruits (risk decreased 48% to 70% for vegetables and 46% to 68% for fruits, respectively, for high vs low quartiles). Conclusion This study confirms the minor role of tobacco and alcohol in UGI cancers in this region, and highlights thermal damage as a leading etiologic factor. PMID:21846596

GAO, Ying; HU, Nan; HAN, Xiao You; DING, Ti; GIFFEN, Carol; GOLDSTEIN, Alisa M; TAYLOR, Philip R

2011-01-01

368

Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma showing Bcl-2 expression.  

PubMed

Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma represents a rare histological variant of prostatic carcinoma with features of a papillary lesion at cystoscopy. There are conflicts regarding the existence, origin, staging, grading, treatment and clinical behavior of this tumor. The aim of the present study is to examine the expression of Bcl-2 and p53 in prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma and to evaluate its origin by analyzing prostate specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase, cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen expressions. The results confirmed the expression of prostate specific antigen and prostate specific acid phosphatase in prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The demonstrated expression of Bcl-2 was predominant in the better-differentiated tumor. Bcl-2 expression appears not to be associated with neuroendocrine differentiation as assessed by chromogranin A reactivity. Thus, the first case of a prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma showing Bcl-2 expression is presented. The tumor was negative for p53. PMID:15379952

Tulunay, Ozden; Orhan, Diclehan; Baltaci, Sümer; Gögü?, Cagatay; Müftüoglu, Yusuf Z

2004-09-01

369

Primary peritoneal adenocarcinoma causes pleural effusion  

PubMed Central

Context: The most common malignancies associated with malignant pleural effusions are carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract, ovary and lymphomas. Primary peritoneal adenocarcinoma is a very rare cause of malignant pleural effusion. Case Report: A 72-year old female patient presented to us with shortness of breath for the last 2 months. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) scan of her-thorax revealed only bilateral pleural effusion with absence of any mass lesion or any mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A cytologic examination of pleural fluid revealed adenocarcinoma cells. A CECT of her abdomen and pelvis revealed heterogenous thickening of omentum with nodular appearances and small amount of ascites. Her ovaries were normal and no other mass lesion was detected. A histological examination of a peritoneal lesion was suggestive of adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: The patient was diagnosed with a rare case of primary peritoneal adenocarcinoma with bilateral pleural effusion. PMID:22574304

Shameem, Mohammad; Akhtar, Jamal; Baneen, Ummul; Bhargava, Rakesh; Ahmed, Zuber; Sharma, Prakhar; Khan, Nafees Ahmad; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem

2010-01-01

370

Promoter hypermethylation of CDH13 is a common, early event in human esophageal adenocarcinogenesis and correlates with clinical risk factors.  

PubMed

Although the CDH13 gene has been shown to undergo epigenetic silencing by promoter methylation in many types of tumors, hypermethylation of this gene in Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinogenesis has not been studied. Two hundred fifty-nine human esophageal tissues were therefore examined for CDH13 promoter hypermethylation by real-time methylation-specific PCR. CDH13 hypermethylation showed discriminative receiver-operator characteristic curve profiles, sharply demarcating esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and normal esophagus (NE) (p < 0.0001). CDH13 normalized methylation values (NMV) were significantly higher in Barrett's esophagus (BE), dysplastic BE (D) and EAC than in NE (p < 0.0000001). CDH13 hypermethylation frequency was 0% in NE but increased early during neoplastic progression, rising to 70% in BE, 77.5% in D and 76.1% in EAC. Both CDH13 hypermethylation frequency and its mean NMV were significantly higher in BE with than without accompanying EAC. In contrast, only 5 (19.2%) of 26 ESCCs exhibited CDH13 hypermethylation. Furthermore, both CDH13 hypermethylation frequency and its mean NMV were significantly higher in EAC than in ESCC, as well as in BE or D vs. ESCC. Interestingly, mean CDH13 NMV was significantly lower in short-segment than in long-segment BE, a known clinical risk factor for neoplastic progression. Similarly, BE segment length was significantly lower in specimens with unmethylated than with methylated CDH13 promoters. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of OE33 EAC and KYSE220 ESCC cells reduced CDH13 methylation and increased CDH13 mRNA expression. These findings suggest that hypermethylation of CDH13 is a common, tissue-specific event in human EAC, occurs early during BE-associated neoplastic progression, and correlates with known clinical neoplastic progression risk factors. PMID:18729198

Jin, Zhe; Cheng, Yulan; Olaru, Alexandru; Kan, Takatsugu; Yang, Jian; Paun, Bogdan; Ito, Tetsuo; Hamilton, James P; David, Stefan; Agarwal, Rachana; Selaru, Florin M; Sato, Fumiaki; Abraham, John M; Beer, David G; Mori, Yuriko; Shimada, Yutaka; Meltzer, Stephen J

2008-11-15

371

Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration heralding fallopian tube adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

The objective of this paper is to describe an 81-year-old woman with subacute cerebellar degeneration due to fallopian tube adenocarcinoma. Serum anti-Yo antibodies were used to screen for pelvic malignancy. Their presence led to a meticulous search, which included bilateral salpingoophorectomy. Subsequently an occult fallopian tube adenocarcinoma was discovered. This case report highlights the diagnostic value of antineuroneal antibodies in females with subacute neurologic impairment in the form of paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:11328418

Levite, R; Fishman, A; Kesler, A; Altaras, M; Gadoth, N

2001-01-01

372

Periampullary Adenocarcinoma: Diagnosis and Survival After Pancreaticoduodenectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Periampullary adenocarcinomas arise within 2 cm of the major papilla in the duodenum. They arise from different tissues in\\u000a the periampullary region: the head\\/neck\\/uncinate process of the pancreas, the distal common bile duct, the duodenum, and the\\u000a ampulla of Vater. Pancreatic cancer is the most common periampullary adenocarcinoma, followed by distal bile duct cancers,\\u000a ampullary cancers, and duodenal cancers (Jemal

Kanika A. Bowen; Taylor S. Riall

373

Ureteral metastasis of a prostatic adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

The ureter is a rare location of metastasis for any kind of primary tumour. The first case of truly ureteral metastasis was described by Stow in 1909. Regarding prostatic metastasis, the frequency is much lower with only 43 cases reported in the last century. We present a case of an exceedingly rare ureteral metastasis of a prostatic adenocarcinoma. In spite of its low incidence, it should be considered in patients with ureteral obstruction and concurrent prostatic adenocarcinoma.

Otta, Renan Javier; Gordillo, Carlos; Fernández, Inmaculada

2015-01-01

374

Nonlinear analysis of EAS clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

We apply certain methods of nonlinear time series analysis to the extensive\\u000aair shower clusters found earlier in the data set obtained with the EAS-1000\\u000aPrototype array. In particular, we use the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to\\u000acompute the correlation dimension of samples in the vicinity of the clusters.\\u000aThe validity of the results is checked by surrogate data tests and some

M. Yu. Zotov; G. V. Kulikov; Yu. A. Fomin

2002-01-01

375

Eosinophilic esophagitis: asthma of the esophagus?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is rapidly emerging as a distinct disease entity in both pediatric and adult gastroenterology. The typical clinical presentation includes solid food dysphagia in young men who have an atopic predisposition. Food impaction necessitating endoscopic intervention is common. EE should be suspected, in particular, in patients with unexplained dysphagia or those with no response to antacid or anti-acid

AMINDRA S. ARORA; Kiyoshi Yamazaki

2004-01-01

376

Perception of Syllable Stress in Esophageal Speech.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ten esophageal speakers and ten normal speakers produced repetitions of the disyllable /mama/ using five different conditions of syllable stress. Nine normal listeners judged both relative and absolute syllable stress. Reliable judgments were made of the syllable stress, and speakers were able to effect systematic changes in listener perceptions…

Walker, Christopher Niles; Morris, Hughlett L.

1988-01-01

377

Postoperative Intensive Care Treatment after Esophageal Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article is to give a short review of problems associated with the intensive care treatment of patients after esophageal resection. Pulmonary dysfunction, supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, anastomotic leakage and mental disorders are the topics covered. Systemic inflammatory reaction and sepsis is the linking topic between these specific complications. Pulmonary dysfunction having an incidence of up to 40% is

Dirk L. Stippel; K. Tobias E. Beckurts

2004-01-01

378

Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing  

PubMed Central

The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

2009-01-01

379

A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

2012-01-01

380

Benign esophageal lesions: Endoscopic and pathologic features  

PubMed Central

Benign esophageal lesions have a wide spectrum of clinical and pathologic features. Understanding the endoscopic and pathologic features of esophageal lesions is essential for their detection, differential diagnosis, and management. The purpose of this review is to provide updated features that may help physicians to appropriately manage these esophageal lesions. The endoscopic features of 2997 patients are reviewed. In epithelial lesions, the frequency of occurrence was in the following order: glycogenic acanthosis, heterotopic gastric mucosa, squamous papilloma, hyperplastic polyp, ectopic sebaceous gland and xanthoma. In subepithelial lesions, the order was as follows: hemangioma, leiomyoma, dysphagia aortica and granular cell tumor. Most benign esophageal lesions can be diagnosed according to their endoscopic appearance and findings on routine biopsy, and submucosal lesions, by endoscopic resection. Management is generally based upon the confidence of diagnosis and whether the lesion causes symptoms. We suggest endoscopic resection of all granular cell tumors and squamous papillomas because, while rare, these lesions have malignant potential. Dysphagia aortica should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia in the elderly. PMID:25632181

Tsai, Shu-Jung; Lin, Ching-Chung; Chang, Chen-Wang; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Shieh, Tze-Yu; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Chen, Ming-Jen

2015-01-01

381

Minimal Invasive Surgery for Esophageal Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thoracoscopic esophagectomy is only established in some centers and affords a cervical anastomosis because intrathoracic anastomosis as a routine is technically too difficult. Laparoscopic mobilisation of the stomach (gastrolysis) is an important contribution for minimal invasive surgery of esophageal cancer. This procedure reduces the stress of the two cavity operation for the patient and allows the construction of a comparable

A. H. Hölscher; Ch. Gutschow

2004-01-01

382

47 CFR 11.44 - EAS message priorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...message priorities. 11.44 Section 11.44 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.44 EAS message priorities. (a) A national activation of the EAS for a...

2011-10-01

383

47 CFR 11.44 - EAS message priorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...message priorities. 11.44 Section 11.44 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.44 EAS message priorities. (a) A national activation of the EAS for a...

2010-10-01

384

Influence of endoscopic submucosal dissection on esophageal motility  

PubMed Central

AIM: To assess esophageal motility after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). METHODS: Twelve patients (6 men and 6 women) aged 53-64 years (mean age, 58 years) who underwent regular examination 3-12 mo after esophageal ESD for neoplasms of the esophageal body were included in this study. The ESD procedure was performed under deep sedation using a combination of propofol and fentanyl, and involved a submucosal injection to lift the lesion and use of a dual-knife and an insulated-tip knife to create a circumferential incision around the lesion extending into the submucosa. Esophageal motility was examined using a high-resolution manometry system. Dysphagia was graded using a five-point scale according to the Mellow and Pinkas scoring system. Patient symptoms and the results of esophageal manometry were then analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 1 patient had grade 2 dysphagia, 1 patient had grade 1 dysphagia, and 3 patients complained of sporadic dysphagia. Ineffective esophageal motility was observed in 5 of 6 patients with above semi-circumference of resection extension. Of these 5 patients, 1 patient complained of grade 2 dysphagia (with esophageal stricture), one patient complained of grade 1 dysphagia, and 3 patients complained of sporadic dysphagia. Normal esophageal body manometry was observed in all 6 patients with below semi-circumference of resection extension. The 6 patients with normal esophageal motility did not complain of dysphagia. CONCLUSION: Extensive esophageal ESD may cause esophageal dysmotility in some patients, and might also have an influence on dysphagia although without esophageal stricture. PMID:23922477

Bu, Bao-Guo; Linghu, En-Qiang; Li, Hui-Kai; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Guo, Rong-Bin; Peng, Li-Hua

2013-01-01

385

Hydraulically controlled magnetic bougienage for correction of long-gap esophageal atresia  

E-print Network

About one in 4000 babies in the United States is born with their esophageal disconnected and separated by a gap, which is called esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia with a relatively short gap can be directly corrected ...

Noh, Minkyun

2014-01-01

386

Home self-dilatation for esophageal strictures.  

PubMed

Esophageal strictures secondary to caustic ingestion, head and neck radiation and at the anastomosis post-esophagectomy tend to be refractory to one or several dilatations. One option for these strictures is home self-dilatation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of home self-dilatation for a refractory esophageal stricture. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients from 1997 to 2009 that performed home self-dilatation for an esophageal stricture. Patients with proximal strictures without tortuosity or a shelf proximal to the stricture were selected for self-dilatation. The patients were taught self-dilatation by the surgeon and an experienced nurse, and an appropriate sized Maloney dilator was provided to the patient and returned when no longer needed. There were 16 patients (11 male and 5 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 38-78). The stricture was related to the anastomosis after esophagectomy in 12 patients, caustic injury in 3 patients and cervical chemoradiotherapy in 1 patient. Prior to initiation of self-dilatation patients had a median of four endoscopic dilatations. Self-dilatation was done with a Maloney dilator ranging in size from 45 to 60 French. The median duration of self-dilatation was 16 weeks. No patient had a perforation or complication related to self-dilatation. No patient required stenting or repetitive endoscopic dilatations because of failure of self-dilatation. Strictures recurred in two patients after cessation of self-dilatation and both responded to endoscopic dilatation followed by additional self-dilatation. Self-dilatation effectively resolves refractory esophageal strictures. It was well tolerated, and there were no complications in this series. Home self-dilatation should be considered the treatment of choice in appropriate patients with refractory esophageal strictures in the cervical esophagus. PMID:23387392

Zehetner, J; DeMeester, S R; Ayazi, S; Demeester, T R

2014-01-01

387

Stomal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.  

PubMed Central

Malignant change occurring at the site of a stoma in two patients with proved Crohn's disease is described. Patients with ulcerative colitis have an increased risk of colonic malignancy and Crohn's disease is also associated with both small and large bowel carcinoma. Most previous reports of stomal carcinoma have been associated with ulcerative colitis although Crohn's disease seems to carry a greater risk of associated small bowel carcinomas. This is the first report of stomal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. Epithelial dysplasia is associated with gastrointestinal carcinomas in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and a dysplasia-carcinoma sequence has been suggested as the origin of these tumours. In both our patients with stomal adenocarcinoma, dysplasia was identified in adjacent tissues, which suggests a similar mechanism. Malignant change should be suspected if epithelial dysplasia is discovered in a biopsy specimen from the mucosa of an ileostomy in Crohn's disease, and this risk is increased if the dysplasia is of a high grade. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2253921

Sherlock, D J; Suarez, V; Gray, J G

1990-01-01

388

Targeting metastatic upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas  

PubMed Central

Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tumors, including adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, and biliary tree, have traditionally been difficult to treat with cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. There has been little drug development success in treating these cancers over the last 20 years, perhaps a reflection of a combination of the aggressive biology of these tumors, the void in effective and specific drug development for these varied tumors, and the lack of properly designed, biologically-based clinical trials. Recently, so called “targeted agents” have risen to the forefront in the care of cancer patients and have made strong impacts in many areas of oncology, particularly gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), colon, breast, and lung cancers. Unfortunately, slow progress has been made using such agents in upper GI tumors. However, more recently, trials in some tumor types have demonstrated gains in progression free survival and overall survival. In this review, we discuss the drugs and pathways that have been most successful in the treatment of upper GI tumors and present the relevant data supporting their use for each tumor site. Additionally, we will explore a few novel pathways that may prove effective in the treatment of upper GI malignancies in the near future. PMID:21611088

Spratlin, Jennifer L; Chu, Quincy; Koski, Sheryl; King, Karen; Mulder, Karen

2011-01-01

389

Esophageal perforation post pneumatic dilatation for achalasia managed by esophageal stenting  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 82 Final Diagnosis: Achalasia Symptoms: Nocturnal regurgtation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Esophageal stenting Specialty: Gastroenterology • Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Pneumatic dilatation is one of the most effective methods for treating achalasia. Esophageal perforation is the most serious complication after pneumatic dilatation and has been reported to occur in the range of 1 to 4.3%. The appropriate management of esophageal perforation can range from conservative medical treatment to surgical intervention. Case Report: We report a case of an 82-year-old male who had an 8 month history of dysphagia for solid and liquids, a 10 lb weight loss and nocturnal regurgitation. The diagnosis of achalasia was established by endoscopic; barium and manometric criteria. He underwent a pneumatic dilation with a 30 mm Rigiflex balloon. A confined or limited esophageal perforation projecting into the mediastinum and located 1–2 cm above the diaphragm was confirmed by a gastrografin swallow study performed immediately after the procedure. There was some accompanying epigastric abdominal pain. Patient was treated later that day by placing a fully covered metallic esophageal stent in addition to antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor, and fasting. Patient was discharged home 3 days later able to eat liquid-soft foods. Follow up endoscopy 2 weeks later and a gastrografin swallow showed a completely healed perforation and the stent was removed. Symptomatically he has done well, with no dysphagia or heartburn at six and twelve months follow up. Conclusions: Early esophageal stenting for esophageal perforation after pneumatic dilation for achalasia is a treatment option which accelerates healing shortens recovery period, as well as decreasing hospital stay and costs. PMID:24349606

Elhanafi, Sherif; Othman, Mohamed; Sunny, Joseph; Said, Sarmad; Cooper, Chad J.; Alkhateeb, Haider; Quansah, Raphael; McCallum, Richard

2013-01-01

390

Genetic Features of Metachronous Esophageal Cancer Developed in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma or Breast Cancer Long-Term Survivors: An Exploratory Study  

PubMed Central

Background Development of novel therapeutic drugs and regimens for cancer treatment has led to improvements in patient long-term survival. This success has, however, been accompanied by the increased occurrence of second primary cancers. Indeed, patients who received regional radiotherapy for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL) or breast cancer may develop, many years later, a solid metachronous tumor in the irradiated field. Despite extensive epidemiological studies, little information is available on the genetic changes involved in the pathogenesis of these solid therapy-related neoplasms. Methods Using microsatellite markers located in 7 chromosomal regions frequently deleted in sporadic esophageal cancer, we investigated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in 46 paired (normal and tumor) samples. Twenty samples were of esophageal carcinoma developed in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors: 14 squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) and 6 adenocarcinomas (EADC), while 26 samples, used as control, were of sporadic esophageal cancer (15 ESCC and 11 EADC). Results We found that, though the overall LOH frequency at the studied chromosomal regions was similar among metachronous and sporadic tumors, the latter exhibited a statistically different higher LOH frequency at 17q21.31 (p = 0.018). By stratifying for tumor histotype we observed that LOH at 3p24.1, 5q11.2 and 9p21.3 were more frequent in ESCC than in EADC suggesting a different role of the genetic determinants located nearby these regions in the development of the two esophageal cancer histotypes. Conclusions Altogether, our results strengthen the genetic diversity among ESCC and EADC whether they occurred spontaneously or after therapeutic treatments. The presence of histotype-specific alterations in esophageal carcinoma arisen in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors suggests that their transformation process, though the putative different etiological origin, may retrace sporadic ESCC and EADC carcinogenesis. PMID:25611972

Boldrin, Elisa; Rumiato, Enrica; Fassan, Matteo; Cappellesso, Rocco; Rugge, Massimo; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Ruol, Alberto; Alfieri, Rita; Cagol, Matteo; Castoro, Carlo; Amadori, Alberto; Saggioro, Daniela

2015-01-01

391

A Phase II Study of a Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiation Regimen With Selective Surgical Salvage for Resectable Locoregionally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Initial Reporting of RTOG 0246  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% ({alpha} = 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results: Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was {>=}T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions: In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%-82%).

Swisher, Stephen G., E-mail: sswisher@mdanderson.org [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Headquarters, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wu, Tsung T. [Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-04-01

392

Robot assisted thoracoscopic resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Esophageal leiomyoma represents the most common benign esophageal tumor. Robot-assisted thoracoscopic surgery has provided ability to remove it successfully using a minimally invasive approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 63-year old female with history of chronic chest pain presented with an esophageal mass on chest CT and endoscopic ultrasound. Robot-assisted surgery was performed using three robot arms, a camera and an assistant port. A 10 cm leiomyoma was enucleated and removed through a 2 cm myotomy. Completion endoscopy confirmed integrity of the esophagus. Patient's chest pain resolved postoperatively, and she was discharged on postoperative day 3. DISCUSSION Our case describes successful removal of the giant esophageal leiomyoma (10 cm) by robot assisted minimally invasive resection through a 2 cm myotomy. CONCLUSION Use of robot allows for removal of large esophageal leiomyoma. The improved dexterity and patient outcome offered by robot suggests its potential as the mainstay technique for giant esophageal leiomyoma removal. PMID:25460487

Compean, Steven D.; Gaur, Puja; Kim, Min P.

2014-01-01

393

Esophageal Involvement in Scleroderma: Clinical, Endoscopic, and Manometric Features  

PubMed Central

Aim. To evaluate characteristics of esophageal involvement in scleroderma. Methods. The study was prospective and concerned 194 patients with a definite systemic sclerosis. Gastroesophageal endoscopy and esophageal manometry were performed in all the cases. Results. Symptoms were present in 118 cases (60.8%); they were signs of GERD or dysphagia, respectively, in 94 (48.4%) and 91 patients (46.9%). Reflux esophagitis was found in 73 cases (37.6%); it was mild or moderate in 47 cases (24.2%) and severe or complicated in the remaining cases. Manometry revealed a lower esophageal sphincter incompetence and esophageal motor disorders, respectively, in 118 (60.8%) and 157 cases (80.9%). Presence of these late was not related to age, duration, or skin extension of the disease, but with clinical complaint and/or mucosal damage. Conclusion. Esophageal involvement is frequent during scleroderma. Manometry is the most sensible examination and could be a screening procedure. PMID:22389793

Lahcene, M.; Oumnia, N.; Matougui, N.; Boudjella, M.; Tebaibia, A.; Touchene, B.

2011-01-01

394

Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

1986-07-01

395

Risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the lung  

SciTech Connect

The relation between various risk factors and adenocarcinoma of the lung was evaluated in a case-control study. Subjects were selected from the Colorado Central Cancer Registry from 1979-1982 in the Denver metropolitan area. A total of 102 (50 males and 52 females) adenocarcinoma case interviews and 131 (65 males and 66 females) control interviews were completed. The control group consisted of persons with cancers of the colon and bone marrow. The risk estimates associated with cigarette smoking were significantly elevated among males (odds ratio (OR) = 4.49) and females (OR = 3.95) and were found to increase significantly (p less than 0.01) with increasing levels of cigarette smoking for both males and females. For adenocarcinoma in females, the age- and smoking-adjusted odds ratios at different levels of passive smoke exposure followed an increasing overall trend (p = 0.05). After additional adjustment for potential confounders, prior cigarette use remained the most significant predictor of risk of adenocarcinoma among males and females. Analysis restricted to nonsmoking females revealed a risk of adenocarcinoma of 1.68 (95% confidence interval (Cl) = 0.39-2.97) for passive smoke exposure of four or more hours per day. Neither sex showed significantly elevated risk for occupational exposures, although males bordered on significance (OR = 2.23, 95% Cl = 0.97-5.12). The results suggest the need to develop cell type-specific etiologic hypotheses.

Brownson, R.C.; Reif, J.S.; Keefe, T.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Pritzl, J.A.

1987-01-01

396

De Novo Esophageal Carcinoma in Post-liver Transplant Patient  

PubMed Central

De novo esophageal malignancy following liver transplantation is very rare. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma following liver transplant is closely associated with history of alcohol intake and tobacco chewing. We report on a 45-year-old man, chronic tobacco chewer and alcoholic who underwent liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis and developed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 23 months following the procedure. He was treated surgically and has had a tumor-free survival after 34 months of regular follow-up. PMID:25426286

Tank, A. H.; Sutariya, V. K.; Modi, P. R.

2014-01-01

397

The role of pepsin in acid injury to esophageal epithelium  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:The development of reflux esophagitis in humans is a process resulting from esophageal exposure to refluxed gastric contents. There is no doubt that damage to the esophageal epithelium requires exposure to gastric acid; however, the role of refluxed pepsin as contributor to this damage seems to be underappreciated.METHODS:The role of physiological concentrations of pepsin was examined in Ussing chambered rabbit

Nelia A. Tobey; S. Seraj Hosseini; Canan Caymaz-Bor; Holly R. Wyatt; Geraldine S. Orlando; Roy C. Orlando

2001-01-01

398

Expandable stents for iatrogenic perforation of esophageal malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of patients with iatrogenic perforation of esophageal cancers is controversial. We reviewed the management\\u000a of perforated esophageal malignancies at a single institution with a large volume of patients with esophageal cancer. Cases\\u000a of iatrogenic perforation of the esophagus occurring during a 3-year period were identified from the hospital endoscopy database.\\u000a Inpatient and outpatient records were reviewed, and subjects

Russell E. White; Caesar Mungatana; Mark Topazian

2003-01-01

399

Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

If 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is to be a useful diagnostic tool, it must reliably discriminate gastroesophageal reflux patients despite daily variations in distal esophageal acid exposure. To address this issue, we studied 53 subjects (14 healthy normals, 14 esophagitis patients, and 25 patients with atypical symptoms) with two ambulatory pH tests performed within 10 days of each other. Intrasubject

G. J. Wiener; T. M. Morgan; J. B. Copper; D. O. Castell; J. W. Sinclair; J. E. Richter

1988-01-01

400

Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio  

E-print Network

Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio 1. Send completed form to Mail Stop; Emergency Alert System Radio Instructions The EAS radio operates in a similar fashion as weather radios Maroon Alert (Red LED flashing) or the weekly test (Amber light solid) move switch to reset and then back

401

The history of lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer and the future prospects for esophageal cancer surgery.  

PubMed

I would herein like to look back upon surgery for esophageal cancer, particularly on lymphadenectomy, and to speculate a little on the future prospects for esophageal surgery. There are two schools of thought on lymphadenectomy in esophageal cancer: one believes in en bloc esophagectomy, which is commonly performed in Western countries; the other believes in three-field lymphadenectomy, which is commonly performed in Japan. We esophageal surgeons at Kurume University have contributed to some advances in three-field lymphadenectomy. For example, we initiated functional mediastinal dissection to ensure patient safety, and we proposed the lymph node compartment theory to assess the clinical importance of regional nodes. Oncological surgery has progressed in terms of its safety, radicality and functional preservation, leading to improved quality-of-life for patients after surgery. This then evolved to the current development of multimodal and individualized tailor-made treatments. I believe that surgery for esophageal cancer will become bipolarized in the future. One strand will evolve as salvage surgery for residual or recurrent tumors, which non-surgical therapies have failed to cure, and the other strand will evolve as less invasive surgery, adjuvant surgery, for cancers at the relatively early stage, for which micro-metastasis can be cured by non-surgical therapies. PMID:24519395

Fujita, Hiromasa

2015-02-01

402

What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... small intestine adenocarcinoma? What should you ask your doctor about small intestine adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have ... Staging Treating Small Intestine Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Small Intestine Cancer ...

403

Mapping the Hallmarks of Lung Adenocarcinoma with Massively Parallel Sequencing  

E-print Network

Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for more than 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal ...

Lander, Eric S.

404

Esophageal cancer: Recent advances in screening, targeted therapy, and management  

PubMed Central

The incidence of esophageal cancer remains on the rise worldwide and despite aggressive research in the field of gastrointestinal oncology, the survival remains poor. Much remains to be defined in esophageal cancer, including the development of an effective screening tool, identifying a good tumor marker for surveillance purposes, ways to target esophageal cancer stem cells as well as circulating tumor cells, and developing minimally invasive protocols to treat early-stage disease. The goal of this chapter is to highlight some of the recent advances and ongoing research in the field of esophageal cancer. PMID:25395880

Gaur, Puja; Kim, Min P.; Dunkin, Brian J.

2014-01-01

405

Evaluation and treatment of esophageal varices in the cirrhotic patient.  

PubMed

Portal hypertension is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in liver cirrhosis. Complications of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients include esophageal and gastric varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy, ascites, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension. The hepatic venous pressure gradient should be at least 10 mmHg for esophageal varices to appear, and more than 12 mmHg for acute esophageal variceal bleeding. This article reviews the pathophysiology responsible for portal hypertension and its complications, and the treatments used for esophageal varices in the setting of primary and secondary prophylaxis and during active bleeding. PMID:23516775

Ashkenazi, Eyal; Kovalev, Yulia; Zuckerman, Eli

2013-02-01

406

Well-differentiated adenocarcinoma-bronchioloalveolar carcinoma-in situ adenocarcinoma: a conundrum.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, considerable changes have been made to the classification of pulmonary adenocarcinoma, mainly with respect to the classification of small solitary tumors. The main goal seems to have been the identification of tumors that not only follow an indolent clinical course but that can also be treated more conservatively. Thus, the most important change to the classification of lung adenocarcinoma was proposed for a tumor no greater than 3.0 cm in size with a pure lepidic growth pattern and lacking stromal, vascular, or pleural invasion, which should now be categorized as in situ adenocarcinoma. At the same time, a category of minimally invasive adenocarcinoma was proposed for tumors with a predominantly lepidic growth pattern, <3 cm in size, and with <5 mm invasion in greatest dimension in any 1 focus. What is interesting about all these developments is the fact that all the publications on this issue have been presented under the terms of small adenocarcinomas or bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Unfortunately, the literature reviews that have proposed the change in nomenclature to in situ adenocarcinoma have not offered a more in-depth assessment of these neoplasms. More recently, a publication of a large series of cases of small adenocarcinomas has offered a different view and underscored some of the important issues that need to be taken into account before a serious change in the nomenclature can be considered. PMID:23939151

Weissferdt, Annikka; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar A

2013-09-01

407

Mucin pattern reflects the origin of the adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: a retrospective clinical and laboratorial study  

PubMed Central

Background Mucin immunoexpression in adenocarcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus (BE) may indicate the carcinogenesis pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate resected specimens of adenocarcinoma in BE for the pattern of mucins and to correlate to the histologic classification. Methods Specimens were retrospectively collected from thirteen patients who underwent esophageal resection due to adenocarcinoma in BE. Sections were scored for the grade of intestinal metaplasia. The tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry for MUC2 and MUC5AC antibodies. Results Eleven patients were men. The mean age was 61 years old (varied from 40 to 75 years old). The tumor size had a mean of 4.7 ± 2.3 cm, and the extension of BE had a mean of 7.7 ± 1.5 cm. Specialized epithelium with intestinal metaplasia was present in all adjacent mucosas. Immunohistochemistry for MUC2 showed immunoreactivity in goblet cells, while MUC5AC was extensively expressed in the columnar gastric cells, localizing to the surface epithelium and extending to a variable degree into the glandular structures in BE. Tumors were classified according to the mucins in gastric type in 7/13 (MUC5AC positive) and intestinal type in 4/13 (MUC2 positive). Two tumors did not express MUC2 or MUC5AC proteins. The pattern of mucin predominantly expressed in the adjacent epithelium was associated to the mucin expression profile in the tumors, p = 0.047. Conclusion Barrett's esophagus adenocarcinoma shows either gastric or intestinal type pattern of mucin expression. The two types of tumors developed in Barrett's esophagus may reflect the original cell type involved in the malignant transformation. PMID:19272137

Szachnowicz, Sergio; Cecconello, Ivan; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Iriya, Kiyoshi; El Ibrahim, Roberto; Takeda, Flávio Roberto; Corbett, Carlos Eduardo Pereira; Vaz Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana

2009-01-01

408

Stepwise progression of pulmonary adenocarcinoma—clinical and molecular implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stepwise progression of pulmonary adenocarcinoma is described from the viewpoint of both pathology and molecular biology.\\u000a Pulmonary adenocarcinoma develops to invasive carcinoma through atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. The Noguchi classification is well correlated with this sequential histological progression.\\u000a On the other hand, in terms of molecular biology, p16 gene inactivation, EGFR mutation and KRAS

Masayuki Noguchi

2010-01-01

409

Primary Gastric Malignant Melanoma Mimicking Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

We report a case of primary gastric malignant melanoma that was diagnosed after curative resection but initially misdiagnosed as adenocarcinoma. A 68-year-old woman was referred to our department for surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma presenting as a polypoid lesion with central ulceration located in the upper body of the stomach. The preoperative diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic biopsy. We performed laparoscopic total gastrectomy, and the final pathologic evaluation led to the diagnosis of primary gastric malignant melanoma without a primary lesion detected in the body. To the best of our knowledge, primary gastric malignant melanoma is extremely rare, and this is the first case reported in our country. According to the literature, it has aggressive biologic activity compared with adenocarcinoma, and curative resection is the only promising treatment strategy. In our case, the patient received an early diagnosis and underwent curative gastrectomy with radical lymphadenectomy, and no recurrence was noted for about two years. PMID:25580362

Cho, Jun-Min; Lee, Chang Min; Jang, You-Jin; Park, Sung-Soo; Park, Seong-Heum; Kim, Seung-Joo; Mok, Young-Jae; Kim, Chong-Suk; Lee, Ju-Han

2014-01-01

410

Urachal mucinous adenocarcinoma: a case report.  

PubMed

Adenocarcinomas account for 0.5-2% of all bladder cancers. Urachal carcinoma is a rare neoplasm which represents 0.01% of all cancers in adults and account for one third of bladder adenocarcinomas. A 65-year-old white man with an urachal mucinous adenocarcinoma is reported. None of the known predisposing risk factors for bladder cancer -such as tobacco use and professional exposure to chemicals -were identified in his past medical history. The patient suffered from multiple sclerosis for almost 11 years and in the last 6 years he was treated with low doses of mitoxantrone. He underwent a partial cystectomy and en block excision of the umbilical ligament and remains disease-free after one year. The development of this rare neoplasm should not be clearly dissociated from multiple sclerosis, either aetiologically sharing an unidentified common causative factor or due to its treatment with mitoxantrone. PMID:18067216

Kountourakis, P; Ardavanis, A; Mantzaris, I; Mitsaka, D; Rigatos, G

2007-01-01

411

Eosinophils in the Esophagus—Peptic or Allergic Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Case Series of Three Patients with Esophageal Eosinophilia  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Scattered eosinophils in the distal esophagus traditionally provide the hallmark for peptic esophagitis, but the upper limit of eosinophils and the longitudinal extent of peptic inflammation along the esophagus are unknown. Recently, adults and children with upper intestinal symptoms and >20 eosinophils\\/high-power field (eos\\/HPF) have been given the diagnosis of allergic esophagitis. Standardized diagnostic criteria for allergic esophagitis are lacking

Peter Ngo; Glenn T. Furuta; Donald A. Antonioli; Victor L. Fox

2006-01-01

412

Pathologic classification of adenocarcinoma of lung.  

PubMed

Recently, the 1999/2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of adenocarcinoma became less useful from a clinical standpoint as most adenocarcinomas belonged to the mixed subtype and the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) gave rise to much confusion among clinicians. For these reasons a new adenocarcinoma classification was introduced in 2011 by a joint working group of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). This represents an international, multidisciplinary effort joining pathologists, molecular biologists, pulmonary physicians, thoracic oncologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons. Currently, a distinction is made between pre-invasive lesions, minimally invasive and invasive lesions. The confusing term BAC is not used anymore and new subcategories include adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Several aspects of this classification are discussed with main emphasis on its correlation with imaging techniques and its impact on diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. On chest computed tomography (CT) a distinction is made between solid and subsolid nodules, the latter comprising ground glass opacities (GGO), and partly solid lesions. Several studies incorporating CT and positron emission tomographic (PET) data show a good imaging-pathologic correlation. With the implementation of screening programs early lung cancer has become a hotly debated topic and sublobar resection is currently reconsidered for early lesions without lymph node involvement. This new classification will also have an impact on the TNM classification. Thoracic surgeons will continue to play a major role in the application, evaluation and further refinement of this new adenocarcinoma classification. PMID:24006216

Van Schil, Paul E; Sihoe, Alan D L; Travis, William D

2013-10-01

413

Endoscopic submucosal dissection for malignant esophageal lesions.  

PubMed

The incidence of esophageal cancer has been increasing while the prognosis remains very poor. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was developed in Japan for en bloc resection of early gastric cancer with excellent results. The use of ESD in early squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the esophagus in Japan has been increasing with long-term results comparable to those in early gastric cancer. The use of ESD in Barrett's neoplasia in western countries has been challenged by the low complete resection rates and the risk of metachronous lesions from surrounding non-dysplastic Barrett's epithelium. Efforts to combine ESD with other treatment modalities such as radiofrequency ablation in Barrett's neoplasia and chemoradiation in SCC appear to be promising. The use of steroid therapy (local or systemic) has been demonstrated to prevent post-ESD stenosis, which is the most common complication after esophageal ESD. PMID:24659252

Hammad, Hazem; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Soetikno, Roy

2014-01-01

414

Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia  

PubMed Central

Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is one of the alternative treatment for achalasia. Due to concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), it becomes popular and widely accepted. With the endoluminal technique, submucosal tunnel was created followed by endoscopic myotomy. POEM is not only indicated in classical achalasia but also other abnormal esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, failures of endoscopic treatment or surgical attempted cases are not contraindicated for POEM. The second attempted POEM is also safe and technically feasible. Even though the legend of success of POEM is fruitful, the possible complications are very frightened. Good training and delicate practice will reduce rate of complications. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art of POEM, including indication equipments, technique and complications. This perfect procedure may become the treatment of choice of achalasia and some esophageal motility disorders in the near future. PMID:25333007

Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Chiaki; Hokierti, Chananya

2014-01-01

415

Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism  

SciTech Connect

A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

1982-08-01

416

Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Infants and Toddlers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Feeding refusal is often described in conjunction with the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) in pediatric patients;\\u000a however, there are little data regarding the specific clinical manifestations and effective management of this condition in\\u000a very young children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presentation of EE in infants and toddlers referred to the\\u000a Interdisciplinary Feeding Team Clinic

Scott P. Pentiuk; Claire Kane Miller; Ajay Kaul

2007-01-01

417

Esophagoplasty for caustic esophageal burns in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and two children with caustic esophageal strictures requiring esophagoplasty are reported. Seventy-one had a retrosternal colon transplant: two-stage esophagocolostomy in 59 and one-stage cervical anastomosis in 12. In the retrosternal group there were 2 cases of total transplant necrosis and 3 cases of terminal necrosis of the cervical end of the transplant; 12 patients developed anastomotic stenosis at

Oktay Mutaf

1992-01-01

418

Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

2014-01-01

419

Endoscopic management of impacted esophageal foreign bodies.  

PubMed

There are many reports on the endoscopic management of ingested foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract, however, little is known about the management of a specific subset of esophageal foreign bodies - impacted esophageal foreign bodies (IEFBs), especially perforating esophageal foreign bodies (PEFBs). The aim of this retrospective study on 78 cases was to report experience and outcome in the endoscopic management of the IEFBs in Chinese patients. From January 2006 to July 2011, a total of 750 patients with suspected upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies were admitted to the endoscopy center. Among these 750 patients, 78 cases that met the defined criteria of IEFBs were retrospectively enrolled in the present study, including 12 cases (12/78, 15.4%) with PEFBs. The major types of IEFBs were poultry bones (35.9%) and fish bones (17.9%). Most of the IEFBs (80.8%) were located in the upper esophagus, as were two thirds (66.7%) of the PEFBs. Foreign-body retrieval forceps were the most frequently used accessory devices. Extraction of IEFBs failed in eight patients (10.3%) during the endoscopic procedure. The difficult points in endoscopic management were PEFBs, IEFBs with sharp points, and those with impaction for more than 24 hours. IEFBs should be treated as early as possible, and their endoscopic management is safe and effective. Endoscopic management is the first choice for PEFBs when the duration of impaction is less than 24 hours and there are no abscesses outside of the esophageal tract as determined by a computed tomography scan. PMID:22973974

Chen, T; Wu, H-F; Shi, Q; Zhou, P-H; Chen, S-Y; Xu, M-D; Zhong, Y-S; Yao, L-Q

2013-01-01

420

Pharyngo-Esophageal Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The radiologic characteristics of pharyngo-esophageal (PE) dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established,\\u000a partly because most previous studies have examined only small numbers of patients. We administered a dynamic videofluoroscopic\\u000a swallowing function study to 71 patients with idiopathic PD. Using the Hoehn and Yahr disease severity scale, patients were\\u000a subdivided into those with mild\\/moderate disease, subgroup I

Norman A. Leopold; Marion C. Kagel

1997-01-01

421

Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.  

PubMed

The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3?mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion. PMID:25283957

Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

2015-05-01

422

EA Planning, Development and Management Process for Agile Enterprise Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we suggest an enterprise architecture (EA) development process model suitable for EA projects limited in scope and time. Several EA process models have been put forward, which have in common the idea of comprehensive EA management and development that is generic, cyclic and ongoing in a user organization. The suggested models are of varying level of abstraction.

Mirja Pulkkinen; Ari P. Hirvonen

2005-01-01

423

Is neuroendocrine differentiation useful to discriminate primary sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinomas from metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas?  

PubMed

Primary sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (ITAC) are defined on the basis of their morphological similarities to colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRA). Thus, differential diagnosis with sinonasal metastasis of CRA could be a real challenge. Neuroendocrine differentiation has been variably described in several types of adenocarcinomas and notably in ITACs and CRAs. In a series of 25 ITACs and 25 lymph node metastasis of CRAs (nmCRA), we analysed neuroendocrine differentiation by immunohistochemistry with anti-chromogranin A and synaptophysin antibodies. Neuroendocrine differentiation (chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positivity) was significantly different (p=0.0002) in ITACs (72%) and in nmCRAs (20%). In conclusion, presence of neuroendocrine cells seems more in favour of a sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinoma, than metastatic CRA. This immunohistochemical study could be useful in difficult cases and should be an interesting complement in a clinical discussion. PMID:25294889

Projetti, Fabrice; Serrano, Elie; Vergez, Sebastien; Bissainthe, Anne-Charlotte; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle

2015-01-01

424

The MicroRNAs, MiR-31 and MiR-375, as Candidate Markers in Barrett's Esophageal Carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

There is a critical need to identify molecular markers that can reliably aid in stratifying esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus. MicroRNAs (miRNA/miR) are one such class of biomolecules. In the present cross-sectional study, we characterized miRNA alterations in progressive stages of neoplastic development, i.e., metaplasia–dysplasia–adenocarcinoma, with an aim to identify candidate miRNAs potentially associated with progression. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) as an agnostic discovery platform, followed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) validation in a total of 20 EACs, we identified 26 miRNAs that are highly and frequently deregulated in EACs (?4-fold in >50% of cases) when compared to paired normal esophageal squamous (nSQ) tissue. We then assessed the 26 EAC-derived miRNAs in laser microdissected biopsy pairs of Barrett's metaplasia (BM)/nSQ (n = 15), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/nSQ (n = 14) by qPCR, to map the timing of deregulation during progression from BM to HGD and to EAC. We found that 23 of the 26 candidate miRNAs were deregulated at the earliest step, BM, and therefore noninformative as molecular markers of progression. Two miRNAs, miR-31 and –31*, however, showed frequent downregulation only in HGD and EAC cases suggesting association with transition from BM to HGD. A third miRNA, miR-375, showed marked downregulation exclusively in EACs and in none of the BM or HGD lesions, suggesting its association with progression to invasive carcinoma. Taken together, we propose miR-31 and –375 as novel candidate microRNAs specifically associated with early- and late-stage malignant progression, respectively, in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22302717

Leidner, Rom S.; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Leahy, Patrick; Chen, Yanwen; Bednarchik, Beth; Streppel, Mirte; Canto, Marcia; Wang, Jean S.; Maitra, Anirban; Willis, Joseph; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Adams, Mark D.; Chak, Amitabh; Guda, Kishore

2012-01-01

425

HER2-positive, trastuzumab-resistant metastatic esophageal cancer presenting with brain metastasis after durable response to dual HER2 blockade: a case report  

PubMed Central

We here report a case of a patient diagnosed with human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-amplified esophageal adenocarcinoma. The patient responded well to trastuzumab-based chemotherapy initially, but progressed with liver metastases. Her treatment was then switched to dual HER2 blockade with both trastuzumab and lapatinib in combination with capecitabine. She tolerated therapy and responded remarkably well with radiographic resolution of liver metastases. Unfortunately, she developed multiple brain metastases in the absence of extracranial progression. Discordant negative expression of HER2 and subclonal mutations in brain lesions were discovered, which, at least in part, explained her brain metastases in the presence of capecitabine and lapatinib, as both agents are known to be able to cross the blood brain barrier. The potential mechanism for dual HER2 blockade is discussed in the context of HER2-positive, trastuzumab-resistant, advanced esophageal cancer. The incidence of brain metastasis in advanced gastro-esophageal cancer has been reported to be extremely low, but is expected to increase with more effective systemic therapy. The intratumoral heterogeneity between the metastases, local recurrences and the primary tumor is definitely noteworthy. PMID:25436131

Gelbspan, Deborah; Weitz, David; Markman, Maurie; Quan, Walter

2014-01-01

426

A novel approach to cancer staging: application to esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

A novel 3-step random forests methodology involving survival data (survival forests), ordinal data (multiclass forests), and continuous data (regression forests) is introduced for cancer staging. The methodology is illustrated for esophageal cancer using worldwide esophageal cancer collaboration data involving 4627 patients. PMID:19502615

Blackstone, Eugene H.; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn; Rice, Thomas W.

2009-01-01

427

Nonoperative management of esophageal strictures following esophagomyotomy for achalasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optimal management of reflux-induced esophageal strictures that occur after esophagomytomy for achalasia is uncertain. This paper presents our experience with the nonsurgical treatment of postesophagomyotomy strictures in achalasia patients using endoscopic dilation and gastric acid suppression. Six patients with achalasia who had undergone prior esophagomyotomy subsequently developed recurrent dysphagia and were found to have an esophageal stricture. Esophagrams typically

Henry P. Parkman; Carrie P. Ogorek; Arthur D. Harris; Sidney Cohen

1994-01-01

428

Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Red on Microscopy, White on Endoscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis, a chronic TH2-type inflammatory disease, is uniform dysphagia attacks. Histology reveals a dense mucosal infiltration with eosinophils. Unfortunately, endoscopic findings are often unremarkable or misleading. This study characterizes the endoscopic manifestations of eosinophilic esophagitis and analyzes the nature and clinical features of the frequently observed white alterations. Methods: Thirty adult patients (22 males,

Alex Straumann; Hans-Peter Spichtin; Kathleen A. Bucher; Pius Heer; Hans-Uwe Simon

2004-01-01

429