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  1. Esophagus Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common problem with the esophagus is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It happens when a band of muscle at ... into the esophagus and irritate it. Over time, GERD can cause damage to the esophagus. Other problems ...

  2. Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Splittgerber, Mark; Velanovich, Vic

    2015-06-01

    Although there are many unanswered questions with Barrett esophagus, we can safely say that the incidence is increasing, chemoprevention strategies for the prevention of Barrett metaplasia and its progression to adenocarcinoma may be in the offing, surveillance should be considered for all patients who are discovered to have Barrett esophagus, RFA is the treatment of choice for those with HGD and strongly considered in those with LGD, EMR should be the treatment of choice for patients with nodular high-grade Barrett esophagus, and, finally, vagal-sparing esophagectomy reserved for patients with persistent HGD or a strong suspicion of carcinoma, with consideration of a concomitant fundoplication. PMID:25965132

  3. Barrett esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... your esophagus: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a special laser device, called an esophageal balloon, along with a drug called Photofrin. Other procedures use different types of high energy to destroy the precancerous tissue. Surgery to remove ...

  4. Barrett esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 138. Ferri FF. Barrett esophagus. ... FF ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:202-203. Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela ...

  5. [Barrett's esophagus].

    PubMed

    Kouzu, T; Yoshimura, S; Onuma, E K; Hishikawa, E; Arima, M

    1998-09-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) has recently gained the interest of Japanese physicians. In BE, the squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus is replaced by metaplastic columnar epithelium. This intestinal metaplasia usually occurs as a complication of severe reflux esophagitis and its association with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is well established. In 1950 Norman Barrett described a tubular, intrathoracic structure that appeared to be the esophagus, except that the distal portion was lined with columnar epithelium. Although he believed that the distal portion was not the esophagus, the condition in which the distal esophagus is lined with columnar epithelium became known as BE. From animal and clinical studies, the intestinal metaplasia is generally believed to arise from multipotential stem cells located in the basal layer of the squamous epithelium and at the base of the glandular epithelium. Evidence for a genetic basis underlying the dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence is now being accumulated. It is known that gastric acid reflux as well as bile reflux can cause distal esophagitis. Therefore, treatment with a proton pump inhibitor alone may not be sufficient therapy for all patients. Antireflux surgery can cause regression of BE in up to 50% of patients. Overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates for patients with adenocarcinoma arising from BE after surgical resection is reported to be 63%, 41%, and 32%, respectively. Therefore, endoscopic surveillance of patients with BE is suggested. PMID:9842539

  6. Overview of the Esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Esophagus Works Figure 1 How the Esophagus Works Esophageal and Swallowing Disorders Overview of the Esophagus Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) Hiatus Hernia Abnormal Propulsion of Food Achalasia ...

  7. Esophagus Cancer: Palliative Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor about cancer of the esophagus? Palliative therapy for cancer of the esophagus Palliative therapy is ... therapy Electrocoagulation Laser ablation Argon plasma coagulation Radiation therapy External-beam radiation can often help relieve some ...

  8. [Barrett's esophagus in children].

    PubMed

    Ida, Shinobu

    2005-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a condition of esophageal dysplasia in which the tubular esophagus is lined with columnar instead of squamous mucosa--not with just any type of columnar mucosa, but with a specialized type with goblet cells. It is considered to be an acquired phenomenon secondary to acid exposure from gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). This report shows a review of BE of children and our data about BE from the study of 19 handicapped children with GER. 3 had intestinal dysplasia with goblet cells (BE). The % time of pH under 4 on 24-hour pH monitoring was significantly lower in the patients with esophagitis including BE than in them with normal esophagus. BE of our study seemed to be reversible after the surgery and anti-acid therapy. It is suggested that BE is not a rare condition even in children and biopsy specimens should be taken to establish the diagnosis. PMID:16101239

  9. Phototherapy of Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Gutta, Kumar; Laukka, Mark A.

    1994-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a common premalignant disease. The aim of this study is to determine if low dose photodynamic therapy is capable of ablating Barrett's epithelium allowing regrowth of normal squamous mucosa. Methods: Patients with specialized Barrett's esophagus of at least 3 cm length were given 1.5-1.75 mg/kg of hematoporphyrin derivative intravenously. After 48 hours, esophagoscopy and videotaping of the Barrett's was performed. A 1.0-1.5 cm cylindrical diffusing fiber delivered light of 630 nm in a dose of 150-200 J/cm using a tunable dye laser at a power of 400 mW/cm. Following entry, patients were placed on omeprazole 20 mg/day for six months. Results: Twelve patients (8 men) mean age of 62 +/- 4 have had repeat endoscopy performed at 25 +/- 2 weeks following entry. The Barrett's segment length decreased from 8+/- 1 to 5+/- 1 cm after PDT (p < 0.01) with a corresponding change in the appearance and location of the squamocolumnar junction. Six (50%) of the patients had a 4 cm or more decrease in the length of their Barrett's esophagus with normal squamous mucosa on biopsy. Adverse events included transient odynophagia, minor sunburn, and transient chest pain. Conclusions: Photodynamic therapy of Barrett's esophagus can cause a regression in length of the Barrett's segment with replacement by normal squamous epithelium.

  10. Leiomyosarcoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Pantvaidya, G H; Moonim, M T; Jambhekar, N A; Sharma, S; Deshpande, R K

    2003-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the esophagus are rare, malignant, smooth-muscle tumors. The presenting symptoms are indistinguishable from other esophageal neoplasms, though the history may be longer due to the slow growth of these tumors. Barium studies may show large intramural masses with ulceration or tracking, expansile intraluminal masses or areas of luminal narrowing. Endoscopic biopsies may give a high false negative rate especially in cases where the mucosa is intact. The treatment of choice is surgical excision. Synchronous and metachronous metastases do not preclude surgery, provided the metastases are also resectable. Prognosis is better than in patients with squamous esophageal cancer. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is controversial. We report a 40-year-old man who presented to us with dysphagia and was found to have a leiomyosarcoma of the esophagus. He was treated successfully with esophagectomy and is disease-free after 7 years. We review the literature on esophageal leiomyosarcomas and their management. PMID:12823215

  11. Diseases of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, J.R.; Holscher, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the entire range of esophaegeal diseases with regard to epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, as well as conservative and, above all, surgical treatment. The book is divided into two parts. The first describes esophaegeal cancer. The newest methods for preoperative staging, perioperative management, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy of esophageal cancer, the surgical techniques for the different types of carcinoma are covered in detail. The long-term results of surgical treatment are discussed, referring to functional results, recurrance, and survival times. The second part of the book describes benign diseases of the esophagus. New, yet proven diagnostic methods are described in detail, including from a cost-benefit perspective.

  12. Screening for Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Chan, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Wang, Kenneth K

    2015-05-01

    The large increase in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West during the past 30 years has stimulated interest in screening for Barrett's esophagus (BE), a precursor to esophageal cancer. Effective endoscopic treatments for dysplasia and intramucosal cancer, coupled with screening programs to detect BE, could help reverse the increase in the incidence of esophageal cancer. However, there are no accurate, cost-effective, minimally invasive techniques available to screen for BE, reducing the enthusiasm of gastroenterologists. Over the past 5 years, there has been significant progress in the development of screening technologies. We review existing and developing technologies, new minimally invasive imaging techniques, nonendoscopic devices for cell collection, and biomarkers that can be measured in blood or stool samples. We discuss the status of these approaches, data from clinical studies of their effects, and their anticipated strengths and weaknesses in screening. The area is rapidly evolving, and new tools will soon be ready for prime time. PMID:25701083

  13. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  14. Barrett's esophagus: endoscopic treatments II

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Bruce D.; Lightdale, Charles J.; Abrams, Julian A.; Horwhat, John D.; Chuttani, Ram; Komanduri, Srinadh; Upton, Melissa P.; Appelman, Henry D.; Shields, Helen M.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Sontag, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The following on endoscopic treatments of Barrett's esophagus includes commentaries on animal experiments on cryotherapy; indications for cryotherapy, choice of dosimetry, number of sessions, and role in Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma; recent technical developments of RFA technology and long-term effects; the comparative effects of diverse ablation procedures and the rate of recurrence following treatment; and the indications for treatment of dysplasia and the role of radiofrequency ablation. PMID:21950812

  15. Primary adenocarcinoma of cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Alrawi, S J; Winston, J; Tan, D; Gibbs, J; Loree, T R; Hicks, W; Rigual, N; Lorè, J M

    2005-06-01

    Most upper esophageal malignancies are squamous cell carcinomas, rarely adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's esophagus and very rarely adenocarcinomas from heterotopic gastric mucosa without evidence of Barrett's especially in the cervical part of the esophagus. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the polypoid type in the upper esophagus (cervical esophagus) arising from ectopic gastric mucosa, in a 60 year-old man who presented with progressive dysphagia. Accurate diagnosis by esophagogram revealed a large mass in the cervical esophagus; CAT scan showed intraluminal mass at the level of thoracic inlet, esophagogastroscopy showed a fleshy polyp (3.2cm x 3.0cm) at 20 cm from the incisors with a biopsy confirming moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with no evidence of Barrett's esophagus. Through a left cervical approach and resection of medial third of clavicle, the tumor was removed by partial esophagectomy followed by lymph node dissection, and proved to be T1NOMO, stage I (AJCC staging 6th ed.). Post operatively, the patient received chemoradiation with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in six years of follow up. It seems this tumor has a much better prognosis than adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's. To our knowledge only 19 cases have been reported in literature so far. PMID:16110768

  16. Common questions about Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Thomas G

    2014-01-15

    Barrett esophagus is a precancerous metaplasia of the esophagus that is more common in patients with chronic reflux symptoms, although it also occurs in patients without symptomatic reflux. Other risk factors include smoking, male sex, obesity, white race, hiatal hernia, and increasing age (particularly older than 50 years). Although Barrett esophagus is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, its management and the need for screening or surveillance endoscopy are debatable. The annual incidence of progression to esophageal cancer is 0.12% to 0.33%; progression is more common in patients with high-grade dysplasia and long-segment Barrett esophagus. Screening endoscopy should be considered for patients with multiple risk factors, and those who have lesions with high-grade dysplasia should undergo endoscopic mucosal resection or other endoscopic procedures to remove the lesions. Although the cost-effectiveness is questionable, patients with nondysplastic Barrett esophagus can be followed with endoscopic surveillance. Lowgrade dysplasia should be monitored or eradicated via endoscopy. Although there is no evidence that medical or surgical therapies to reduce acid reflux prevent neoplastic progression, proton pump inhibitors can be used to help control reflux symptoms. PMID:24444576

  17. Granular cell tumor of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Patel, R M; DeSota-LaPaix, F; Sika, J V; Mallaiah, L R; Purow, E

    1981-12-01

    Two cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reported and the main features of the previously reported cases are summarized. Dysphagia and substernal discomfort or pain are the most common symptoms seen and are likely to occur with lesions greater than 1 cm. in diameter. The diagnosis should be considered in adult females with an intramural mass of the esophagus. The cell of origin is still disputed. The treatment of choice, when the patient is symptomatic or the lesion greater than 1 cm. in size, is local resection. The tumor, when incidentally discovered in an asymptomatic patient, may safely be followed endoscopically. PMID:6277183

  18. Two Distinct Types of Hypercontractile Esophagus: Classic and Spastic Jackhammer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yun Soo; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-09-15

    Hypercontractile esophagus (nicknamed jackhammer esophagus) is a recently defined disease within the esophageal motility disorders classification. Responses to treatments for jackhammer esophagus have been inconsistent in previous trials, possibly due to its heterogeneous manifestation. Thus, we reviewed 10 patients diagnosed with jackhammer esophagus and compared their clinical and manometric features at baseline. Additionally, manometric and symptomatic responses after treatment with known smooth muscle relaxants, including anticholinergic drugs (cimetropium bromide and scopolamine butylbromide) and a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (sildenafil) were compared. We observed two distinct subgroups in the findings: one with hypercontractility and normal distal latencies ("classic jackhammer esophagus," n=7) and the other with hypercontractility and short distal latencies ("spastic jackhammer esophagus," n=3). The two types also differed in their responses to medications in that symptoms improved upon treatment with an anticholinergic agent in classic jackhammer esophagus patients, while spastic jackhammer esophagus was unresponsive to both the anticholinergic drugs and the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. In conclusion, hypercontractile esophagus may be a heterogeneous disease with different underlying pathophysiologies. We introduced two novel terms, "classic jackhammer esophagus" and "spastic jackhammer esophagus," to distinguish the two types. PMID:27458179

  19. Treatment of Dysplasia in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Hernandez, Javier; Cirocco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barrett esophagus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage with a 5-year survival rate of 15%. Most of these patients present de novo and are not part of a surveillance program. Endoscopic screening with improvement in recognition of early lesions may change this pattern. In the past, patients diagnosed with dysplasia and mucosal cancer were best managed by esophagectomy. Endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation have resulted in high curative rates and a shift away from esophagectomy. This pathway is supported by the literature review of esophagectomies performed for mucosal disease, as well as pathologists' interpretation of endoscopic mucosal specimens, which document the low risk of lymph node metastasis. The role of endoscopic therapy for superficial submucosal disease continues to be a challenge. PMID:24570884

  20. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jora, Charu; Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma most commonly originates from the skin; other less common extra cutaneous sites include squamous mucous membranes, uvea, retina, leptomeninges, genitourinary tract, digestive tract, biliary tract, and upper respiratory tract. Primary melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract is exceedingly rare. We are reporting a histo-pathologically proven rare case of primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus and its findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography. PMID:25829739

  1. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Jora, Charu; Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma most commonly originates from the skin; other less common extra cutaneous sites include squamous mucous membranes, uvea, retina, leptomeninges, genitourinary tract, digestive tract, biliary tract, and upper respiratory tract. Primary melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract is exceedingly rare. We are reporting a histo-pathologically proven rare case of primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus and its findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography. PMID:25829739

  2. Black esophagus syndrome associated with diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Rigolon, Riccardo; Fossà, Irene; Rodella, Luca; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis, also known as “black esophagus syndrome”, is a rare acute esophageal disease that is often associated with vomiting and upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. At present, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of this disease. We present the case of a 50-year-old white male patient with diabetic ketoacidosis suffering from acute esophageal necrosis with nausea and vomiting but without any clinical signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26881192

  3. Update on management of Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Macías-García, Fernando; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common condition that develops as a consequence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The significance of Barrett's metaplasia is that predisposes to cancer development. This article provides a current evidence-based review for the management of BE and related early neoplasia. Controversial issues that impact the management of patients with BE, including definition, screening, clinical aspects, diagnosis, surveillance, and management of dysplasia and early cancer have been assessed. PMID:27158538

  4. Metrizamide evaluation of the esophagus in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, T.; Cohen, M.D.

    1984-08-01

    Barium and conventional hypertonic water-soluble contrast media (e.g., gastrografin) are not ideal contrast agents in the evaluation of the esophagus when leakage into the mediastinum or aspiration into the lung is possible. Metrizamide (Amipaque) is water-soluble and can be well visualized in isotonic solution. Three cases are presented where metrizamide was used successfully in the evaluation of suspected esophageal perforation or tracheoesophageal fistula.

  5. [Carcinosarcoma of the esophagus - a case report].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Kunugi, Chikara; Nakadai, Jyunpei; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 79-year-old male complaining of fever, loss of appetite, cough, and a feeling of obstruction when swallowing. He was diagnosed with pneumonia and admitted as an emergency case the same day. Because an esophagus space-occupying lesion was observed on chest computed tomography(CT), in addition to evidence of pneumonia, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed. A tumor, protruding into the lumen of the esophagus, was seen in the midesophagus, 25-30 cm from the incisors. Because of the narrow lumen, only a fine caliber fiber could be passed. Biopsy results indicated only necrotic tissue, and a repeat biopsy was performed, with similar histological findings. No esophagobronchial fistulas were observed during bronchoscopy. We therefore diagnosed the patient with aspiration pneumonia, secondary to esophageal narrowing by a tumor. A preoperative diagnosis of cancer could not be made, and no distant organ metastasis was detected, but surgery was indicated because of the narrowing of the esophagus, regardless of the possibility of cancer. After the pneumonia improved, total thoracic esophagectomy was performed through a right thoracolaparotomy, plus a 3- region cervico-thoraco-abdominal lymph node dissection. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed autolysis of the superficial layer with progression to necrosis and associated inflammation. The majority of the tumor was composed of spindle-shaped atypical cells, but because a very small transitional area between squamous cell carcinoma and sarcoma was noted, a diagnosis of carcinosarcoma was made. Depth of invasion was sm3, and no regional lymph node metastasis was detected. The patient's disease was classified as pT1b(sm3)N0M0, StageI. No definite diagnosis was made preoperatively. Although carcinosarcoma of the esophagus is rare, the endoscopic findings are characteristic. We report this case with a review of the literature. PMID:25731411

  6. Two Distinct Types of Hypercontractile Esophagus: Classic and Spastic Jackhammer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun Soo; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-01

    Hypercontractile esophagus (nicknamed jackhammer esophagus) is a recently defined disease within the esophageal motility disorders classification. Responses to treatments for jackhammer esophagus have been inconsistent in previous trials, possibly due to its heterogeneous manifestation. Thus, we reviewed 10 patients diagnosed with jackhammer esophagus and compared their clinical and manometric features at baseline. Additionally, manometric and symptomatic responses after treatment with known smooth muscle relaxants, including anticholinergic drugs (cimetropium bromide and scopolamine butylbromide) and a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (sildenafil) were compared. We observed two distinct subgroups in the findings: one with hypercontractility and normal distal latencies (“classic jackhammer esophagus,” n=7) and the other with hypercontractility and short distal latencies (“spastic jackhammer esophagus,” n=3). The two types also differed in their responses to medications in that symptoms improved upon treatment with an anticholinergic agent in classic jackhammer esophagus patients, while spastic jackhammer esophagus was unresponsive to both the anticholinergic drugs and the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. In conclusion, hypercontractile esophagus may be a heterogeneous disease with different underlying pathophysiologies. We introduced two novel terms, “classic jackhammer esophagus” and “spastic jackhammer esophagus,” to distinguish the two types. PMID:27458179

  7. Barrett Esophagus: History, definition and etiopathogeny

    PubMed Central

    Gindea, C; Birla, R; Hoara, P; Caragui, A; Constantinoiu, S

    2014-01-01

    The injury of the esophageal epithelium may be determined by the reflux of the gastric acid in the esophagus. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is characterized by the replacement of the normal squamous epithelium with the columnar epithelium, when the healing of the lesion occurs. According to some studies, the incidence of the esophageal adenocarcinoma in patients with BE is of about 0,5% per year. The term Barrett’s esophagus is subjected to interpretation nowadays, so it lacks the clarity needed for the clinical and scientific communication on the subject of columnar metaplasia of the esophageal mucosa. The major pathogenetic factor in the development of BE is represented by the reflux disease. The cellular origin of BE is controversial and it represents an issue that needs to be resolved because it will have implications in the putative molecular mechanisms underlying the metaplastic process. The epigenetic or genetic changes, which alter protein expression, function, and/ or activity, in post-mitotic cells to drive transdifferentiation or in stem/ progenitor cells such that they are reprogrammed to differentiate into columnar rather than squamous cells, are driven by the inflammatory environment created by chronic reflux. In order to be able to develop better therapeutic strategies for the patients with this disease, an increasing interest in understanding the pathogenesis of BE at the cellular and molecular level presents these days. PMID:25870690

  8. Bacterial biota in the human distal esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhiheng; Bini, Edmund J.; Yang, Liying; Zhou, Meisheng; Francois, Fritz; Blaser, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    The esophagus, like other luminal organs of the digestive system, provides a potential environment for bacterial colonization, but little is known about the presence of a bacterial biota or its nature. By using broad-range 16S rDNA PCR, biopsies were examined from the normal esophagus of four human adults. The 900 PCR products cloned represented 833 unique sequences belonging to 41 genera, or 95 species-level operational taxonomic units (SLOTU); 59 SLOTU were homologous with culture-defined bacterial species, 34 with 16S rDNA clones, and two were not homologous with any known bacterial 16S rDNA. Members of six phyla, Firmicutes, Bacteroides, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria, and TM7, were represented. A large majority of clones belong to 13 of the 41 genera (783/900, 87%), or 14 SLOTU (574/900, 64%) that were shared by all four persons. Streptococcus (39%), Prevotella (17%), and Veilonella (14%) were most prevalent. The present study identified ≈56–79% of SLOTU in this bacterial ecosystem. Most SLOTU of esophageal biota are similar or identical to residents of the upstream oral biota, but the major distinction is that a large majority (82%) of the esophageal bacteria are known and cultivable. These findings provide evidence for a complex but conserved bacterial population in the normal distal esophagus. PMID:15016918

  9. The Pumping Mechanism of the Nematode Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, J. Richard; Burr, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The radial orientation of the myofilaments in the nematode esophagus raises interesting questions as to how such a structure can function as a pump. A physical model of the esophagus of Ascaris lumbricoides was developed and the membrane theory of shells applied in order to relate the observed dimensional changes to myofilament force, pressure stresses, and membrane elastic constants. By stressing the excised esophagus passively with osmotic pressure, the esophagus was shown to be elastically anisotropic with the ratio of circumferential to longitudinal elastic constants, Eψ/El ≃ 2.74. When this value was incorporated, the model predicted the ratio of the respective strains, εψ/εl, to be 0.52 during an equilibrium contraction of the esophagus. This agreed with the experimental value, 0.46 ± 0.10, measured during occasional, prolonged muscle contractions. When measured during normal pumping, on the other hand, the value of εψ/εl was 0 ± 0.10. This indicated that a nonequilibrium condition normally occurs in which a greater myofilament force per unit area of lumen membrane is not balanced by internal pressure and therefore acceleration of the lumen contents and negative intraluminal pressure occurs. The pumping action of esophagi dissected from Ascaris was observed to be normally peristaltic and periodic. Contraction was initiated by a spontaneous depolarization that propagated at 4.0 ± 0.20 cm/s along the esophageal membrane. A wave of localized increases in the internal pressure of the muscle and localized changes in external dimensions was observed. A subsequent spontaneous repolarization, which propagated at 5.8 ± 0.23 cm/s, triggered relaxation of the muscle during which the localized pressure and dimensional changes returned to resting values. A mechanism was deduced in which fluid is drawn into and moved along the lumen by the wave of contraction. During the wave of relaxation, the lumen contents are pressurized and injected into the intestine by

  10. Red flag imaging techniques in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2013-07-01

    The key to detection and treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is thorough and careful inspection of the Barrett's segment. The greatest role for red flag techniques is to help identify neoplastic lesions for targeted biopsy and therapy. High-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) can potentially improve endoscopic imaging of BE compared with standard endoscopy, but little scientific evidence supports this. The addition of autofluorescence imaging to HD-WLE and narrow band imaging increases sensitivity and the false-positive rate without significantly improving overall detection of BE-related neoplasia. PMID:23735101

  11. Chemoprevention in Barrett's Esophagus: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Muhammad H; Baruah, Anushka; Kossak, Sarah K; Buttar, Navtej S

    2015-06-01

    Chemoprevention in Barrett's esophagus is currently applied only in research settings. Identifying pathways that can be targeted by safe, pharmaceutical or natural compounds is key to expanding the scope of chemoprevention. Defining meaningful surrogate markers of cancer progression is critical to test the efficacy of chemopreventive approaches. Combinatorial chemoprevention that targets multiple components of the same pathway or parallel pathways could reduce the risk and improve the efficacy of chemoprevention. Here we discuss the role of chemoprevention as an independent or an adjuvant management option in BE-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26021201

  12. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of dysphagia needs to be chosen for the patient. This study aims to discuss the recent trends in palliation of dysphagia with promising results and the most suitable therapy for palliation of dysphagia in a given patient. A total of 64 articles that were published between years 2005 and 2015 on various modes of palliation of dysphagia in carcinoma esophagus were studied, which were mainly randomized and prospective studies. Through this study, we conclude that stents are the first choice of therapy for palliation, which is safe and cost-effective, and they can be combined with either radiotherapy or chemotherapy for long-term palliation of dysphagia with good quality of life. Radiotherapy can be used as a second-line treatment modality. PMID:27279758

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: asthma of the esophagus?

    PubMed

    Arora, Amindra S; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is rapidly emerging as a distinct disease entity in both pediatric and adult gastroenterology. The typical clinical presentation includes solid food dysphagia in young men who have an atopic predisposition. Food impaction necessitating endoscopic intervention is common. EE should be suspected, in particular, in patients with unexplained dysphagia or those with no response to antacid or anti-acid secretory therapy. Careful endoscopic and radiographic examinations reveal furrows, corrugations, rings, whitish plaques, fragile crêpe paper-like appearance, and a small-caliber esophagus. Mucosal erosion in the distal esophagus, characteristic to reflux esophagitis, is absent in EE. Marked eosinophil infiltration in the esophageal epithelia (>20 eosinophils per high-power field) is the diagnostic hallmark. Food antigens and aeroallergens may play a role in the pathogenesis of EE. The mechanisms may be dependent or independent of immunoglobulin E. Elimination diets, systemic and topical corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and, most recently, an anti-interleukin-5 monoclonal antibody have been used to treat EE. EE likely represents another example of eosinophil-associated inflammation of epithelia at the interface between external and internal milieu, similar to bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis. This review summarizes recent progress in the diagnosis and management of EE and discusses future research directions. PMID:15224275

  14. Endoscopic imaging of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Mariam; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has dramatically increased in the United States as well as Western European countries. The majority of esophageal adenocarcinomas arise from a backdrop of Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a premalignant lesion that can lead to dysplasia and cancer. Because of the increased risk of EAC, GI society guidelines recommend endoscopic surveillance of patients with BE. The emphasis on early detection of dysplasia in BE through surveillance endoscopy has led to the development of advanced endoscopic imaging technologies. These techniques have the potential to both improve mucosal visualization and characterization and to detect small mucosal abnormalities which are difficult to identify with standard endoscopy. This review summarizes the advanced imaging technologies used in evaluation of BE. PMID:26981177

  15. Do Ancillary Studies Aid Detection and Classification of Barrett Esophagus?

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2016-08-01

    Barrett esophagus is a preneoplastic condition defined by the presence of intestinal metaplasia (ie, goblet cells) in an endoscopically apparent columnar-lined esophagus. Dysplasia is the most important risk factor for cancer development among patients with Barrett esophagus; approximately 6% of patients with high-grade dysplasia progress to adenocarcinoma within 1 year. Surgical pathologists are generally expected to address 2 clinical concerns when evaluating mucosal biopsy samples from patients with suspected Barrett esophagus; they should note the presence, or absence, of goblet cells and comment on the grade of dysplasia when it is identified. Biopsy samples from patients with Barrett esophagus are categorized as negative for dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia, or positive for dysplasia; in the latter situation, the severity of dysplasia is classified as low or high grade. Several histochemical stains, immunohistochemical stains, and molecular techniques can be used to facilitate detection of goblet cells and classify dysplasia in patients with Barrett esophagus, although their added value to routine morphologic assessment is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to discuss the state of the art regarding application of ancillary studies to esophageal samples from patients with a columnar-lined esophagus. PMID:27096258

  16. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. PMID:23667744

  17. GERD, Barrett's Esophagus and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts About Common Colon Cancer Screening Tests PATIENTS GERD, Barrett's Esophagus and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer ... commonly in Caucasians as well as people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This cancer is increasing in frequency. ...

  18. What Happens After Treatment for Cancer of the Esophagus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Comes Back: Cancer Recurrence . Help for trouble swallowing, nutrition, and pain Palliative treatments are aimed at ... life. Cancer of the esophagus often causes trouble swallowing, which can lead to weight loss and weakness ...

  19. Primary Spindle Cell Malignant Melanoma of Esophagus: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    Rawandale, Nirmalkumar A.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of esophagus is usually a metastatic tumour rather than a primary tumour. Primary malignant melanoma accounts for less than 0.2% of all esophageal neoplasm. We report a case of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus in a 69-year-old male who presented with history of dysphagia since 1 month. Radiological examinations revealed polypoidal growth at lateral aspect of esophagus. Biopsy was reported as grade III squamous cell carcinoma. Video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry gave confirmed diagnosis of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus. Though a rare entity, due to its aggressive nature and poor prognosis primary malignant melanoma should be one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with polypoidal esophageal mass lesion. Despite radical surgical treatment prognosis is extremely poor. PMID:27042502

  20. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus: diagnosis, management, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J.; Harris, A.; Gillette, A.; Munoz, L.; Kashima, H.

    1984-11-01

    Nine of 168 patients (5.3%) with carcinoma of the esophagus had primary tumors in the cervical esophagus. The principal symptoms and signs of carcinoma of the cervical esophagus were dysphagia, hoarseness, neck mass, and weight loss. The esophagogram was a very reliable study, revealing the abnormality in all nine patients. The true extent of the disease was better delineated by computerized tomography which demonstrated not only the intraluminal mass but also the extraesophageal spread. Endoscopic examination of the cervical esophagus was the definitive procedure to establish the diagnosis. All nine patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy, three surviving two to five years. The major cause of death was the failure to control local disease. 14 references, 3 tables.

  1. The Role of Esophagogastroduodenoscopy Surveillance for Patients with Barrett Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Kerri

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% to 15% of patients who experience chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease have Barrett esophagus, which is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. If symptoms persist after 8 weeks of adhering to treatment and lifestyle modifications, or if alarm symptoms develop, patients should be referred for screening upper endoscopy. Those with evidence of Barrett esophagus with dysplasia should be monitored in an endoscopic surveillance program, and those with high-grade dysplasia should consider surgical treatment. PMID:27542425

  2. Variables in photodynamic therapy for Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Linda R.; Preyer, Norris W.; Buchanan, Jane; Reynolds, Daryl M.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.; Wallace, Michael B.; Gill, Kanwar R. S.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy with porfimer sodium (PS) is a treatment option for high grade dysplasia associated with Barrett's esophagus. This study sought to investigate the optical properties of Barrett's dysplasia that may be useful in light dosimetry planning and to determine the effect of PS on tissue absorption and scattering. Fiber optic reflectance spectra were collected before and 48 hours after administration of 2 mg/kg PS. Mucosal biopsies were collected at the same locations. According to Monte Carlo analysis, the fiber optic probe sampled only the mucosal layer. A mathematical fit of the reflectance spectra was performed as a function of blood volume fraction, oxygen saturation and scattering. The average calculated blood volume was 100% higher in Barrett's tissue than normal esophageal tissue. The average scattering slope from 620 to 750 nm was 26% higher for Barrett's dysplasia than normal esophageal tissue, indicating an increase in the size of scattering particles. The difference in the scattering amplitude was not statistically significant, suggesting no significant increase in the number of scattering particles. PS tissue content was determined with extraction methods. Changes in the scattering slope due to PS sensitization were observed; however they were not proportional to the extracted PS concentration.

  3. Screening for Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Chan, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Wang, Kenneth K.

    2015-01-01

    The large increase in the incidence of esophageal adeno-carcinoma in the West during the past 30 years has stimulated interest in screening for Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a precursor to esophageal cancer. Effective endoscopic treatments for dysplasia and intramucosal cancer, coupled with screening programs to detect BE, could help reverse the increase in the incidence of esophageal cancer. However, there are no accurate, cost-effective, minimally invasive techniques available to screen for BE, reducing the enthusiasm of gastroenterologists. Over the past 5 years, there has been significant progress in the development of screening technologies. We review existing and developing technologies, new minimally invasive imaging techniques, nonendoscopic devices for cell collection, and biomarkers that can be measured in blood or stool samples. We discuss the status of these approaches, data from clinical studies of their effects, and their anticipated strengths and weaknesses in screening. The area is rapidly evolving, and new tools will soon be ready for prime time. PMID:25701083

  4. Barrett’s esophagus and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Macke, Ryan A.; Nason, Katie S.; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Fujimura, Takashi; Sasaki, Shozo; Oyama, Katsunobu; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Ohta, Tetsuo; Miwa, Koichi; Zaidi, Ali; Malhotra, Usha; Atasoy, Ajlan; Foxwell, Tyler; Jobe, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Concise summaries Significant progress has been made in the last few decades using animal models to recreate the esophagitis–metaplasia–carcinoma sequence similar to that seen in human Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and EAC. More recent works focus on molecular pathways associated with intestinal metaplasia and carcinogenesis, as well as similarities between genetic mutations occurring in humans and animal models, mouse, rat, pig, rabbit, guinea pig, dog, cat, ferret, and possum. Despite the lack of a perfect model, there is still significant potential in using these models to clarify the contribution of different types of reflux (gastric, biliary, and pancreatic) to esophageal adenocarcinoma and to determine how the different types of refluxate interact. Refluxed duodenal contents cause gastric and esophageal carcinoma in rats without exposure to carcinogens, and several rat duodenal contents reflux models have been developed. BE in the animal models has well-developed goblet cells positive forMUC2, gastric pyloric-type mucins positive for MUC6, and sometimes intermingled with gastric foveolar-type mucins positive for MUC5AC. A gut regenerative cell lineage, characterized by pyloric–foveolar metaplasia followed by the appearance of goblet cells, occurs in the regenerative process in response to chronic inflammation. High animal-fat dietary intake causes severe obesity, resulting in the development of increased abdominal pressure and increased refluxate, particularly of the duodenal contents. The N-nitroso bile acid conjugates, which have mutagenecity, play an important role in Barrett’s carcinogenesis, and are stabilized by gastric acid. Experiments have been made in a rodent duodeno-esophageal reflux model using thioproline or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor to prevent the inflammation–metaplasia– adenocarcinoma sequence. Thioproline is one of the nitrite scavengers, which reduce the production of carcinogenic nitroso-compounds. Celecoxib could postpone the

  5. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in saliva and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Luigina; Grande, Rossella; Artese, Luciano; Marzio, Leonardo

    2010-10-01

    The route of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unclear and the currently suggested route is person-to-person transfer by faecal-oral and oral-oral mode. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of H. pylori in esophagus and saliva of humans. Saliva samples, mucosal biopsies from esophagus, gastric antrum and fundus were collected from 19 patients with positive Urea Breath Test (UBT). Gastric biopsies were used for H. pylori colture and antimicrobial susceptibility tests whereas saliva samples were collected to detect H. pylori with a Nested-PCR targeting 16S rRNA gene as well as esophagus biopsies which were also investigated with immunohistochemical staining. Helicobacter pylori was isolated in 18 patients both in gastric antrum and fundus. The molecular analysis, confirmed by comparative sequences evaluation, gave positive results in all saliva and esophageal samples whereas the immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of H. pylori in 15.8% (3/19) of the esophagus samples. Our data suggest that saliva and esophagus may be considered reservoirs for H. pylori in humans and emphasize the need to use more susceptible techniques for H. pylori detection, in particular in over-crowded sites. Identification of the transmission route of H. pylori is crucial in developing an effective plan of surveillance by finding new means of disease management. PMID:21213594

  6. The effect of laparoscopic fundoplication in therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Aujeský, René; Neoral, Čestmír; Vrba, Radek; Vomáčková, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Barrett's esophagus is the most significant precancer of the esophagus. Its malignization gives rise to most adenocarcinomas of the esophagus. Therefore selection of adequate therapy for this precancerous condition is of the utmost importance. Aim The authors of the work addressed the question of whether effective therapy of reflux disease alone may halt the process of malignization of Barrett's mucosa or even cause its regression. Material and methods The analyzed set comprised 50 patients with Barrett's esophagus, who in 48 cases underwent laparoscopic fundoplication and in two cases underwent an indirect antireflux procedure in the form of gastric resection with a Roux-en-Y gastrojejunal anastomosis. The effect of the procedure was evaluated by comparing preoperative and postoperative endoscopic examinations, as well as histological analysis by biopsy taken from Barrett's mucosa. Results In 19 patients (38%), Barrett's mucosa was not detected postoperatively. An improved finding in terms of disappearance of mucosal dysplasia was found in 8 (16%) patients. Findings remained unchanged in 18 (36%) patients. In 5 (10%) patients progression of the disease was discovered. Conclusions A surgical antireflux procedure, primarily in the form of laparoscopic fundoplication, is considered an effective method for treating Barrett's esophagus up to the stage of mild dysplasia. If this therapy is unsuccessful, the method of choice is local therapy, either an endoscopic mucosectomy or radiofrequency ablation. PMID:25097689

  7. Malakoplakia of the esophagus caused by human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Xie, Yu-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Jing; Sun, Tao; Tang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease probably caused by infection and characterized histologically by Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. We report a more rarely seen case esophageal malakoplakia in a 54-year-old woman. She presented with coughing while eating and drinking. Gastroscopy showed yellow nodules in the esophagus, and endoscopic ultrasonography showed a space-occupying lesion in the substratum of the esophageal mucosa. All findings highly resembled esophageal cancer. Histopathological examination finally indentified this space-occupying lesion as malakoplakia and not cancer. Immunohistochemistry showed that she had human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the esophagus, which indicates that infection was responsible for the malakoplakia. This is believed to be the first case of malakoplakia in the esophagus, and more importantly, we established that HPV infection was the initiator of esophageal malakoplakia. PMID:23236248

  8. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C R; Bertesteanu, S V G; Mirea, D; Grigore, Raluca; lonescu, Diana; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century the hypopharynx and the cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in the human population with regard to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngoesophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to the latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, and nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  9. [Endoscopic image of "black esophagus"--case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Marek; Groszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-05-01

    "Black esophagus" is a typical endoscopic manifestation of acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), a rare disease. The etiology of disease is still unclear and complicated. As a serious risk factor is responsible for a high mortality. Endoscopic black pigmentation of esophageal mucosa mainly in the distal part of esophagus is observed with histological confirmed necrotic lesions of mucosa and submucosa. The gastrointestinal bleedings are the most frequent clinical manifestation of AEN. The disease mostly affects the elderly people with poor general health status having many co-morbid conditions. The condition is often preceded by hemodynamic problems and symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux. The case of 87-year-old female is presented with many risk factors. Her general health state was poor and endoscopic image of "black esophagus" was found during urgent endoscopy performed for the reason of gastrointestinal bleeding and hemodynamic dysfunction. PMID:19606700

  10. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Rumen L; Kuhner, Mary K; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A; Galipeau, Patricia C; Paulson, Thomas G; Sather, Cassandra L; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D; Blount, Patricia L; Vaughan, Thomas L; Reid, Brian J; Maley, Carlo C

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  11. NSAIDs Modulate Clonal Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Rumen L.; Kuhner, Mary K.; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Sather, Cassandra L.; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D.; Blount, Patricia L.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Reid, Brian J.; Maley, Carlo C.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5–8 time points over 6.4–19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1–8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3–1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  12. Clinical Study of Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Barrett's Esophagus Patients.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Martinez, Jessica A; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Trowers, Eugene; Gibson, Blake A; Della'Zanna, Gary; Richmond, Ellen; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2016-07-01

    Prior research strongly implicates gastric acid and bile acids, two major components of the gastroesophageal refluxate, in the development of Barrett's esophagus and its pathogenesis. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to protect esophageal cells against oxidative stress induced by cytotoxic bile acids. We conducted a pilot clinical study to evaluate the clinical activity of UDCA in patients with Barrett's esophagus. Twenty-nine patients with Barrett's esophagus received UDCA treatment at a daily dose of 13 to 15 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The clinical activity of UDCA was assessed by evaluating changes in gastric bile acid composition and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), cell proliferation (Ki67), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) in Barrett's esophagus epithelium. The bile acid concentrations in gastric fluid were measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. At baseline, UDCA (sum of unchanged and glycine/taurine conjugates) accounted for 18.2% of total gastric bile acids. After UDCA intervention, UDCA increased significantly to account for 93.4% of total gastric bile acids (P < 0.0001). The expression of markers of oxidative DNA damage, cell proliferation, and apoptosis was assessed in the Barrett's esophagus biopsies by IHC. The selected tissue biomarkers were unchanged after 6 months of UDCA intervention. We conclude that high-dose UDCA supplementation for 6 months resulted in favorable changes in gastric bile acid composition but did not modulate selected markers of oxidative DNA damage, cell proliferation, and apoptosis in the Barrett's esophagus epithelium. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 528-33. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Brian J. Reid, p. 512. PMID:26908564

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Cancer of the Esophagus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the esophagus? What should you ask your doctor about cancer of the esophagus? It’s important for ... on treatment? Do I need to see other doctors? How much experience do you have treating this ...

  14. Antiinflammatory agents protect opossum esophagus during radiotherapy. [Cobalt 60

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Eastwood, G.L.; Libshitz, H.I.; Feldman, M.S.; Mamel, J.J.; Szwarc, I.A.

    1982-10-01

    Eighteen opossums received 2250 rad /sup 60/Co to the entire esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Animals received treatment with 600 mg aspirin, 25 mg/kg hydrocortisone, or saline before irradiation and twice daily for 1 week after irradiation. At 10 days postirradiation, animals were evaluated for signs of acute esophagitis by esophagoscopy and barium esophagram. Each animal was then killed and the esophagus removed and evaluated histologically. Animals treated with either aspirin or hydrocortisone had significantly milder esophagitis than control irradiated animals.

  15. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma to improve risk stratification and develop prevention strategies.  | Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration to enhance understanding of Barrett's esophagus and to prevent esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  16. Deterioration of muscle function in the human esophagus with age.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Hans; Pedersen, Jan; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2008-12-01

    Most studies on the effect of aging on esophageal motor function have shown that peristaltic function deteriorates with age. Esophageal motor function is traditionally studied by means of manometry and radiography. Distension of the esophagus with evaluation of active and passive mechanical parameters have become available during recent years. In this study, we did a manometric swallow analysis and used the distension method to study esophageal properties and function during aging. An impedance planimetric probe with a bag for distension was placed in the distal esophagus of 25 healthy volunteers with a median age of 35 (range 23-86) years. Distensions were done at an infusion rate of 25 ml min(-1) with and without relaxation of neuromuscular activity with butylscopolamine. The infusion was reversed when moderate pain was experienced by the subjects. Swallow-induced contraction amplitudes decreased as function of age for persons older than 40 years (P < 0.05). The total and passive tension showed an exponential increase as function of the change in radius, whereas the active tension increased until it reached a local maximum point. The maximum active tension deteriorated as a function of age after the age of 40 years (P < 0.05). Furthermore, esophagus became stiffer with age. In conclusion, age-related changes of increased stiffness and reduced primary and secondary peristalsis were found in the human esophagus with a deterioration of esophageal function after the age of 40 years. Such changes may contribute to the high prevalence of reflux disease in elderly. PMID:18461452

  17. Photodynamic Therapy for Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qumseya, Bashar J.; David, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. We describe the history of PDT, mechanics, photosensitizers for PDT in patients with esophageal disease. Finally, we discuss its utility and limitations in this setting. PMID:23423151

  18. Dietary antioxidants and risk of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus in an Australian population.

    PubMed

    Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Hughes, Maria Celia; Nagle, Christina M; Bain, Christopher J; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2013-07-01

    While dietary antioxidants are emerging as potentially modifiable risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), studies on dietary antioxidants and its precursor Barrett's esophagus (BE) are limited. The present study extends previous work on BE by investigating risks of nondysplastic BE, dysplastic BE and EAC associated with intake of antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, β-carotene, and selenium. Age and sex matched control subjects (n=577 for BE; n=1,507 for EAC) were sampled from an Australian population register. Information on demography, and well established EAC risk factors were obtained using self-administered questionnaires. Intake of antioxidants for patients newly diagnosed with nondysplastic BE (n=266), dysplastic BE (n=101), or EAC (n=299), aged 18-79 years, were obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable adjusted logistic regression models. High intake of β-carotene from food and supplement sources combined was inversely associated with risk of dysplastic BE (OR Q4 vs. Q1=0.45; 95%CI: 0.20-1.00). High intake of vitamin E from food sources (OR Q4 vs. Q1=0.43; 95%CI: 0.28-0.67), from food and supplements combined (OR Q4 vs. Q1=0.64; 95%CI: 0.43-0.96), and a high antioxidant index score were inversely associated with risk of EAC. We found no significant trends between intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium and risk of nondysplastic or dysplastic BE. However, our data suggest that a high intake of β-carotene may be associated with decreased risk of dysplastic BE. PMID:23292980

  19. Gastroscopic removal of a giant fibrovascular polyp from the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yu, Hua; Pu, Renfu; Lu, Zhongsheng

    2016-04-26

    Giant polyps in the esophagus are rarely occurring benign tumors and may contain lipomas, fibrovascular polyps, fibrolipomas or neurofibromas polyps. Clinical symptoms include dysphagia, vomiting, retrosternal pain, shortness of breath, and asthma. In some cases, the polyps are regurgitated into the oral cavity and represent a spectacular manifestation. The reported case in this study was of a 50-year-old man who complained of emesia for half a year and dysphagia for one month before being hospitalized. Occasionally, a fleshly mass reached into his mouth. The results of endoscopic ultrasonography, barium swallow in the upper digestive tract, and a computed tomography scan demonstrated a giant polyp in the esophagus, which was subsequently removed by gastroscopy. Pathological examination determined a fibrovascular polyp. PMID:27148424

  20. Gastroscopic removal of a giant fibrovascular polyp from the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Yu, Hua; Pu, Renfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Giant polyps in the esophagus are rarely occurring benign tumors and may contain lipomas, fibrovascular polyps, fibrolipomas or neurofibromas polyps. Clinical symptoms include dysphagia, vomiting, retrosternal pain, shortness of breath, and asthma. In some cases, the polyps are regurgitated into the oral cavity and represent a spectacular manifestation. The reported case in this study was of a 50‐year‐old man who complained of emesia for half a year and dysphagia for one month before being hospitalized. Occasionally, a fleshly mass reached into his mouth. The results of endoscopic ultrasonography, barium swallow in the upper digestive tract, and a computed tomography scan demonstrated a giant polyp in the esophagus, which was subsequently removed by gastroscopy. Pathological examination determined a fibrovascular polyp. PMID:27148424

  1. Perforation of esophagus and subsequent mediastinitis following mussel shell ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Hwan; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Song, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a very rare occurrence because accidental swallowing of foreign bodies is uncommon in adults. Thus, perforation due to swallowing of a foreign body and subsequent development of mediastinitis is rarely encountered by physicians. We experienced such a case and described an adult male patient who had perforated esophagus after accidentally swallowing a mussel shell. The patient visited our emergency department complaining of painful dysphagia for 4 days. A review of history revealed that he consumed a spicy seafood noodle soup containing mussel shells 4 days ago. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed the foreign body in the esophagus and pneumomediastinum was identified. We removed the mussel shell fragment using rigid esophagoscopy; explo-thoracotomy, debridement of mediastinal abscess and irrigation were performed.

  2. Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus With Unusual Endoscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Chun-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) is a rare disease with an extremely poor prognosis. We experienced a 79-year-old man with PMME who had unusual endoscopic findings. On endoscopy, an elongated lump was detected on 1 side of the vertical axis of the esophagus. The mass extended progressively for 15 cm along the esophageal longitudinal axis and invaded half of the esophageal circumference. These endoscopic findings were not characteristic of PMME, and the condition was confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemical staining. Here, we present this rare case and review the recent relevant literature regarding PMME. Doctors should be aware that PMME might present with unusual endoscopic findings. PMID:27124046

  3. Progression of Jackhammer Esophagus to Type II Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jason; Fass, Ronnie

    2016-01-31

    It has been suggested that patients with certain motility disorders may progress overtime to develop achalasia. We describe a 66 year-old woman who presented with dysphagia for solids and liquids for a period of 18 months. Her initial workup showed normal endoscopy and non-specific esophageal motility disorder on conventional manometry. Six months later, due to persistence of symptoms, the patient underwent a high resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) demonstrating jackhammer esophagus. The patient was treated with a high dose proton pump inhibitor but without resolution of her symptoms. During the last year, the patient reported repeated episodes of food regurgitation and a significant weight loss. A repeat HREM revealed type II achalasia. Multiple case reports, and only a few prospective studies have demonstrated progression from certain esophageal motility disorders to achalasia. However, this report is the first to describe a case of jackhammer esophagus progressing to type II achalasia. PMID:26717932

  4. Progression of Jackhammer Esophagus to Type II Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Jason; Fass, Ronnie

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that patients with certain motility disorders may progress overtime to develop achalasia. We describe a 66 year-old woman who presented with dysphagia for solids and liquids for a period of 18 months. Her initial workup showed normal endoscopy and non-specific esophageal motility disorder on conventional manometry. Six months later, due to persistence of symptoms, the patient underwent a high resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) demonstrating jackhammer esophagus. The patient was treated with a high dose proton pump inhibitor but without resolution of her symptoms. During the last year, the patient reported repeated episodes of food regurgitation and a significant weight loss. A repeat HREM revealed type II achalasia. Multiple case reports, and only a few prospective studies have demonstrated progression from certain esophageal motility disorders to achalasia. However, this report is the first to describe a case of jackhammer esophagus progressing to type II achalasia. PMID:26717932

  5. Biology of Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David H.; Souza, Rhonda F.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The past few years have brought new advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although knowledge of the genetic basis for these conditions has not yet translated into clinically useful biomarkers, the current pace of biomedical discovery holds endless possibilities for molecular medicine to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. This article provides a useful conceptual basis for understanding the molecular events involved in the making of Barrett’s metaplasia and in its neoplastic progression and provides a rationale for evaluating studies on the application of molecular medicine to the diagnosis and management of patients with Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21112495

  6. Palliative treatment of patients with malignant structures of esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Kuzin, M. I.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Posypanova, Anna M.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), spectral- analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different localizations and different geometry of tumor, and phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with malignant strictures of esophagus is discussed. Photodynamic therapy was carried out to four patients: with esophageal cancer (3 patients) and gastric cancer with infiltration of lower esophagus (1 patient). All patients suffered from severe dysphagia. Photosensitizer was used in a dose 1-1.5 mg/kg of weight. Usually we used 3-4 seances of laser treatment 10-30 minutes long. The accumulation of photosensitizer was controlled by LESA-5. Laser induced fluorescent image was monitored by the video-imaging system in order to control laser treatment. There were no side-effects. The results show high efficiency of photodynamic therapy. There was marked reduction of dysphagia symptoms in all cases. It seems that photodynamic therapy is a good alternative to palliative surgical treatment of patients with malignant strictures of esophagus.

  7. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy.

  8. Pathogenesis and outcomes of traumatic injuries of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Makhani, M; Midani, D; Goldberg, A; Friedenberg, F K

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injury of the esophagus is extremely uncommon. The aims of this study were to use the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study (PTOS) database to identify clinical factors predictive of esophageal trauma, and to report the morbidity and mortality of this injury. A cross-sectional review of patients presenting to 20 Level I trauma centers in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2010 was performed. We compared clinical and demographic variables between patients with and without esophageal trauma both prior to and after arrival in the emergency room (ER). Primary mechanism of injury and clinical outcomes were analyzed. There were 231 694 patients and 327 (0.14%) had esophageal trauma. Patients with esophageal trauma were considerably younger than those without this injury. The risk of esophageal trauma was markedly increased in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.62 [CI 1.98-3.47]). The risk was also increased in African Americans (OR = 4.61 [CI 3.65-5.82]). Most cases were from penetrating gunshot and stab wounds. Only 34 (10.4%) of esophageal trauma patients underwent an upper endoscopy; diagnosis was usually made by CT, surgery, or autopsy. Esophageal trauma patients were more likely to require surgery (35.8% vs. 12.5%; P < 0.001). Patients with esophageal trauma had a substantially higher mortality than those without the injury (20.5% vs. 1.4%; P < 0.005). In logistic regression modeling, traumatic injury of the esophagus (OR = 3.43 [2.50-4.71]) and male gender (OR = 1.52 [1.46-1.59]) were independently associated with mortality. For those patients with esophageal trauma, there was an association between trauma severity and mortality (OR = 1.10 [1.07-1.12]) but not for undergoing surgery within the first 24 hours of hospitalization (OR = 0.84; 0.39-1.83). Our study on traumatic injury of the esophagus is in concordance with previous studies demonstrating that this injury is rare but carries considerable morbidity (∼46%) and mortality (∼20%). The injury has a higher morbidity

  9. Breast Metastasis in Esophagus Cancer: Literature Review and Report on a Case

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Esophagus cancer metastases often involve locoregional lymph nodes, lung, bone, liver, and brain. Metastatic involvement of the breast from esophagus cancer is uncommon, but if it happened, it usually presents as a part of multiple organ distal metastases. Here we report a case of the largest metastatic esophagus cancer of the breast and the chest wall, and we review the similar reported cases. PMID:27340587

  10. Breast Metastasis in Esophagus Cancer: Literature Review and Report on a Case.

    PubMed

    Ghibour, Abdulaziz; Shaheen, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Esophagus cancer metastases often involve locoregional lymph nodes, lung, bone, liver, and brain. Metastatic involvement of the breast from esophagus cancer is uncommon, but if it happened, it usually presents as a part of multiple organ distal metastases. Here we report a case of the largest metastatic esophagus cancer of the breast and the chest wall, and we review the similar reported cases. PMID:27340587

  11. Recurrent pneumonia resulting from retained esophagus following esophageal replacement for corrosive stricture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joe, J S; Chen, H C; Peng, H C; Chang, W T

    1993-08-01

    Benign corrosive stricture of the esophagus rarely requires esophageal replacement due to failed dilatation. A patient is presented with severe esophageal stricture from corrosive injury; the native esophagus was eventually replaced with an ileocolon interposition graft. He suffered from recurrent pneumonia one year after operation. Mucocele formation from the retained esophagus with compression of the tracheobronchial tree, was diagnosed by computerized tomographic (CT) scan, and was resected. The clinical status improved dramatically after the procedure. Tracheobronchial compression by mucocele from the retained esophagus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pneumonia after esophageal replacement. PMID:8402368

  12. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Joana; Ministro, Paula; Araújo, Ricardo; Cancela, Eugénia; Castanheira, António; Silva, Américo

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the clinical case of an 87-year-old Caucasian male admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis. He had a history of intermittent dysphagia during the previous month. Endoscopic evaluation revealed an eccentric, soft esophageal lesion located 25-35 cm from the incisors, which appeared as a protrusion of the esophagus wall, with active bleeding. Biopsies were acquired. Tissue evaluation was compatible with a melanoma. After excluding other sites of primary neoplasm, the definitive diagnosis of Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus (PMME) was made. The patient developed a hospital-acquired respiratory infection and died before tumor-directed treatment could begin. Primary malignant melanoma represents only 0.1% to 0.2% of all esophageal malignant tumors. Risk factors for PMME are not defined. A higher incidence of PMME has been described in Japan. Dysphagia, predominantly for solids, is the most frequent symptom at presentation. Retrosternal or epigastric discomfort or pain, melena or hematemesis have also been described. The characteristic endoscopic finding of PMME is as a polypoid lesion, with variable size, usually pigmented. The neoplasm occurs in the lower two-thirds of the esophagus in 86% of cases. PMME metastasizes via hematogenic and lymphatic pathways. At diagnosis, 50% of the patients present with distant metastases to the liver, the mediastinum, the lungs and the brain. When possible, surgery (curative or palliative), is the preferential method of treatment. There are some reports in the literature where chemotherapy, chemohormonotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy, with or without surgery, were used with variable efficacy. The prognosis is poor; the mean survival after surgery is less than 15 mo. PMID:22180718

  13. Esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia esophagus: simultaneous or peristaltic?

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Ho; Patel, Nirali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-05-01

    Absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter are the hallmarks of achalasia esophagus. Based on the pressurization patterns, achalasia has been subdivided into three subtypes. The goal of our study was to evaluate the esophageal contraction pattern and bolus clearance in type 3 achalasia esophagus. High-resolution manometry (HRM) recordings of all patients diagnosed with achalasia esophagus in our center between the years 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Recordings of 36 patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for the characteristics of swallow-induced "simultaneous esophageal contraction." The HRM impedance recordings of 14 additional patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for bolus clearance from the impedance recording. Finally, the HRM impedance along with intraluminal ultrasound imaging was conducted in six patients to further characterize the simultaneous esophageal contractions. Among 187 achalasia patients, 30 were type 1, 121 type 2, and 36 type 3. A total of 434 swallows evaluated in type 3 achalasia patients revealed that 95% of the swallow-induced contractions met criteria for simultaneous esophageal contraction, based on the onset of contraction. Interestingly, the peak and termination of the majority of simultaneous esophageal contractions were sequential. The HRM impedance revealed that 94% of the "simultaneous contractions" were associated with complete bolus clearance. Ultrasound image analysis revealed that baseline muscle thickness of patients in type 3 achalasia is larger than normal but the pattern of axial shortening is similar to that in normal subjects. The majority of esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia are not true simultaneous contractions because the peak and termination of contraction are sequential and they are associated with complete bolus clearance. PMID:26950858

  14. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaz, Andrew M; Grady, William M; Stachler, Matthew D; Bass, Adam J

    2015-06-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) develops from Barrett's esophagus (BE), wherein normal squamous epithelia is replaced by specialized intestinal metaplasia in response to chronic gastroesophageal acid reflux. BE can progress to low- and high-grade dysplasia, intramucosal, and invasive carcinoma. Both BE and EAC are characterized by loss of heterozygosity, aneuploidy, specific genetic mutations, and clonal diversity. Given the limitations of histopathology, genomic and epigenomic analyses may improve the precision of risk stratification. Assays to detect molecular alterations associated with neoplastic progression could be used to improve the pathologic assessment of BE/EAC and to select high-risk patients for more intensive surveillance. PMID:26021206

  15. Webs of the lower esophagus: a complication of gastroesophageal reflux?

    PubMed

    Weaver, J W; Kaude, J V; Hamlin, D J

    1984-02-01

    Seven patients with webs within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction were identified from 5109 barium studies of the esophagus covering a 10-year period (incidence, 0.14%). These webs were clearly distinct from the B-ring at the gastroesophageal junction itself. Demographic, social, and clinical factors for these patients are reviewed and compared with those of 26 cervical-web patients diagnosed in the same 10-year period, 26 control thoracic esophagogram patients and 26 control cervical esophagogram patients. Five of the seven patients with lower esophageal webs had gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:6607592

  16. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  17. Global Changes in Gene Expression of Barrett's Esophagus Compared to Normal Squamous Esophagus and Gastric Cardia Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.; Hu, Nan; Rotunno, Melissa; Su, Hua; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Lemin; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Gherman, Barbara; Giffen, Carol; Dykes, Cathy; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Johnson, Kathryn M.; Acosta, Ruben D.; Young, Patrick E.; Cash, Brooks D.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), the most rapidly increasing cancer in western societies. While the prevalence of BE is increasing, the vast majority of EA occurs in patients with undiagnosed BE. Thus, we sought to identify genes that are altered in BE compared to the normal mucosa of the esophagus, and which may be potential biomarkers for the development or diagnosis of BE. Design We performed gene expression analysis using HG-U133A Affymetrix chips on fresh frozen tissue samples of Barrett's metaplasia and matched normal mucosa from squamous esophagus (NE) and gastric cardia (NC) in 40 BE patients. Results Using a cut off of 2-fold and P<1.12E-06 (0.05 with Bonferroni correction), we identified 1324 differentially-expressed genes comparing BE vs NE and 649 differentially-expressed genes comparing BE vs NC. Except for individual genes such as the SOXs and PROM1 that were dysregulated only in BE vs NE, we found a subset of genes (n = 205) whose expression was significantly altered in both BE vs NE and BE vs NC. These genes were overrepresented in different pathways, including TGF-β and Notch. Conclusion Our findings provide additional data on the global transcriptome in BE tissues compared to matched NE and NC tissues which should promote further understanding of the functions and regulatory mechanisms of genes involved in BE development, as well as insight into novel genes that may be useful as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of BE in the future. PMID:24714516

  18. Effect of Esophagus Position on Surgical Difficulty and Postoperative Morbidities After Thoracoscopic Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoya; Baba, Yoshifumi; Shigaki, Hironobu; Shiraishi, Shinya; Harada, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masayuki; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Kurashige, Junji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kosumi, Keisuke; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The objective include thoracoscopic esophagectomy for the deep-seated (left-sided) esophagus has several technical difficulties, which may affects the intraoperative or postoperative outcomes. However, no previous studies have focused on the correlation between the position of the esophagus and short-term outcome after thoracoscopic esophagectomy. Of 470 esophagectomies between April 2005 and April 2015 in Kumamoto University Hospital, 112 patients who underwent thoracoscopic esophagectomy for esophageal cancer were examined. The position of the esophagus was divided into 2 types: deep-seated esophagus or another type based on computed tomographic images in the supine position. In results, the deep-seated esophagus was associated with a longer operation time in the thorax and high incidence of severe morbidity of Clavien-Dindo classification ≥IIIb, pneumonia, and any pulmonary morbidity. The deep-seated esophagus was also an independent risk factor for severe morbidity (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.37, 95% CI: 1.307-22.03; P = 0.020), pneumonia (HR = 9.23, 95% CI: 2.150-39.60; P = 0.003), and any pulmonary morbidity (HR = 10.3, 95% CI: 2.714-38.78; P < 0.001). In conclusion, the position of the esophagus had a strong influence on the difficulty of thoracoscopic esophagectomy and the incidence of postoperative morbidities. Surgeons would be well advised to keep a careful watch perioperatively for patients with a deep-seated esophagus. PMID:27568157

  19. Barrett's esophagus and squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with psychogenic vomiting.

    PubMed

    Dessureault, Sophie; Coppola, Domenico; Weitzner, Michael; Powers, Pauline; Karl, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    We report the association of Barrett's esophagus and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the distal esophagus in a young 31-yr-old woman with a history of self-induced psychogenic vomiting. The development of intestinalized columnar mucosa and esophageal cancer in this young patient illustrates the complicated associations between human behavior and pathogenetic mechanisms involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:12630772

  20. White Paper AGA: Advanced Imaging in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prateek; Brill, Joel; Canto, Marcia; DeMarco, Daniel; Fennerty, Brian; Gupta, Neil; Laine, Loren; Lieberman, David; Lightdale, Charles; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Odze, Robert; Tokar, Jeffrey; Kochman, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced imaging technologies such as narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, i-Scan, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are readily available for use by endoscopists in routine clinical practice. In November 2014, the American Gastroenterological Association's Center for GI Innovation and Technology conducted a 2-day workshop to discuss endoscopic image enhancement technologies, focusing on their role in 2 specific clinical conditions (colon polyps and Barrett's esophagus) and on issues relating to training and implementation of these technologies (white papers). Although the majority of the studies that use enhanced imaging technologies have been positive, these techniques ideally need to be validated in larger cohorts and in community centers. As it stands today, detailed endoscopic examination with high-definition white-light endoscopy and random 4-quadrant biopsy remains the standard of care. However, the workshop panelists agreed that in the hands of endoscopists who have met the preservation and incorporation of valuable endoscopic innovation thresholds (diagnostic accuracy) with enhanced imaging techniques (specific technologies), use of the technique in Barrett's esophagus patients is appropriate. PMID:26462567

  1. Giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Ajit Harishkumar; Sharma, Sanjay; Ramachandran, Vijay; Chattopadhyay, Tushar K; Ray, Ruma

    2011-01-01

    A fibrovascular polyp is a peculiar nonepithelial tumor of the esophagus that invariably arises in the cervical esophagus at the level of the thoracic inlet and grows distally into a massive elongated, pedunculated, intraluminal lesion. Although it is a benign lesion that is eminently resectable, it is a dramatic entity owing to its tendency to cause bizarre complications such as asphyxia and sudden death when it regurgitates into the pharynx and causes laryngeal impaction. This report describes the multimodality imaging appearance of an archetypal case of a giant fibrovascular polyp in a patient with a seemingly innocuous presentation for the size of the lesion. The essential role of cross-sectional imaging in establishing a prompt diagnosis, defining the tissue elements of the mass, and delineation of the exact extent of the lesion in guiding the treatment approach is highlighted. The appearance of fibrovascular polyp in a single patient with a combination of barium swallow, multidetector computed tomography, and high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has not been reported previously. PMID:21191703

  2. Barrett's Esophagus: A Comprehensive and Contemporary Review for Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Naini, Bita V; Souza, Rhonda F; Odze, Robert D

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a summary of our current understanding of, and the controversies surrounding, the diagnosis, pathogenesis, histopathology, and molecular biology of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and associated neoplasia. BE is defined as columnar metaplasia of the esophagus. There is worldwide controversy regarding the diagnostic criteria of BE, mainly with regard to the requirement to histologically identify goblet cells in biopsies. Patients with BE are at increased risk for adenocarcinoma, which develops in a metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. Surveillance of patients with BE relies heavily on the presence and grade of dysplasia. However, there are significant pathologic limitations and diagnostic variability in evaluating dysplasia, particularly with regard to the more recently recognized unconventional variants. Identification of non-morphology-based biomarkers may help risk stratification of BE patients, and this is a subject of ongoing research. Because of recent achievements in endoscopic therapy, there has been a major shift in the treatment of BE patients with dysplasia or intramucosal cancer away from esophagectomy and toward endoscopic mucosal resection and ablation. The pathologic issues related to treatment and its complications are also discussed in this review article. PMID:26813745

  3. The Complex, Clonal, and Controversial Nature of Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Evans, James A; McDonald, Stuart A C

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BO) is a preneoplastic condition described as the replacement of the stratified squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus with one that histologically presents as a diverse mixture of metaplastic glands resembling gastric or intestinal-type columnar epithelium. The clonal origins of BO are still unclear. More recently, we have begun to investigate the relationship between the various metaplastic gland phenotypes observed in BO, how they evolve, and the cancer risk they bestow. Studies have revealed that glands along the BO segment are clonal units containing a single stem cell clone that can give rise to all the differentiated epithelial cell types in glands. Clonal lineage tracing analysis has revealed that Barrett's glands are capable of bifurcation and this facilitates clonal expansion and competition. In fact, BO in some patients appears to consist of multiple, independently initiated clones that compete with each other for space and possibly resources. This chapter discusses the concepts of clonal competition and expansion in BO and sets out to query what we know about the role of gland diversity and phenotypic evolution within this complex columnar metaplasia. PMID:27573766

  4. Barrett's Esophagus Methylation Profiles — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We propose a nested case-control study of biomarkers in the setting of BE. By bringing together research institutions with large populations of patients with BE, we will perform a multi-center study of FISH and hypermethylation markers as possible prognostic factors in BE. The centers will select from their cohorts who have progressed to HGD or to adenocarcinoma of the esophagus ("progressors"), and who also donated samples prior to the development of cancer, when their histology was felt to be benign. These subjects will be compared to individuals who have been under endoscopic surveillance, but who have not progressed to HGD or EAC ("non-progressors"). Using this approach, we hope to identify promising markers for risk stratification in BE. We expect to be able to make successful application for a prospective study of markers identified in this case-control study.

  5. Barrett's esophagus in anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pacciardi, Bruno; Cargioli, Claudio; Mauri, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic lesion that may result from long-lasting gastroesophageal reflux and it is an established precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. There are reports of an increased prevalence of BE, and eventually esophageal adenocarcinoma, in patients with eating disorders characterized by purging behaviors like those with bulimia nervosa (BN). Among patients with eating disorders, those affected by anorexia nervosa binging purging subtype (ANBP), are behaviorally very similar to those with BN, but to our knowledge there are no data in literature about BE in patients with ANBP. We present the case of a 37-year-old female with a 20-year history of ANBP in comorbidity with bipolar disorder, who developed a BE requiring multi-specialistic intervention. PMID:24753136

  6. Recent developments in pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Halland, Magnus; Katzka, David; Iyer, Prasad G

    2015-01-01

    The burden of illness from esophageal adenocarcinoma continues to rise in the Western world, and overall prognosis is poor. Given that Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a metaplastic change in the esophageal lining is a known cancer precursor, an opportunity to decrease disease development by screening and surveillance might exist. This review examines recent updates in the pathogenesis of BE and comprehensively discusses known risk factors. Diagnostic definitions and challenges are outlined, coupled with an in-depth review of management. Current challenges and potential solutions related to screening and surveillance are discussed. The effectiveness of currently available endoscopic treatment techniques, particularly with regards to recurrence following successful endotherapy and potential chemopreventative agents are also highlighted. The field of BE is rapidly evolving and improved understanding of pathophysiology, combined with emerging methods for screening and surveillance offer hope for future disease burden reduction. PMID:26074687

  7. Risk factors for neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Elizabeth F; Ang, Yeng S

    2011-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) confers a significant increased risk for development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), with the pathogenesis appearing to progress through a “metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma” (MDC) sequence. Many of the genetic insults driving this MDC sequence have recently been characterized, providing targets for candidate biomarkers with potential clinical utility to stratify risk in individual patients. Many clinical risk factors have been investigated, and associations with a variety of genetic, specific gastrointestinal and other modifiable factors have been proposed in the literature. This review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in neoplastic progression of BE to EAC and critically appraises the relative roles and contributions of these putative risk factors from the published evidence currently available. PMID:21990948

  8. Affinity Peptide for Targeted Detection of Dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Anastassiades, Costas P.; Joshi, Bishnu; Komarck, Chris M.; Piraka, Cyrus; Elmunzer, Badih J.; Turgeon, Danielle K.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Appelman, Henry; Beer, David G.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Dysplasia is a pre-malignant condition in Barrett's esophagus that is difficult to detect on screening endoscopy because of its flat architecture and patchy distribution. Peptides are promising for use as novel molecular probes that identify cell surface targets unique to disease, and can be fluorescence-labeled for detection. We aim to select and validate an affinity peptide that binds to esophageal dysplasia for future clinical studies. Methods Peptide selection was performed using phage display by removing non-specific binders using Q-hTERT (intestinal metaplasia) cells and achieving specific binding against OE33 (esophageal adenocarcinoma) cells. Selective binding was confirmed on bound phage counts, ELISA, flow cytometry, competitive inhibition, and fluorescence microscopy. On stereomicroscopy, specific peptide binding to dysplasia on endoscopically resected specimens was assessed by rigorous registration of fluorescence intensity to histology in 1 mm intervals. Results The peptide sequence SNFYMPL was selected and demonstrated preferential binding to target cells on bound phage counts, ELISA, and flow cytometry. Reducing binding was observed on competition with unlabeled peptide in a dose dependent manner, an affinity of Kd = 164 nM was measured, and peptide binding to the surface of OE33 cells was validated on fluorescence microscopy. On esophageal specimens (n=12), the fluorescence intensity (mean±SEM) in 1 mm intervals classified histologically as squamous (n=145), intestinal metaplasia (n=83), dysplasia (n=61) and gastric mucosa (n=69) was 46.5±1.6, 62.3±5.8, 100.0±9.0, and 42.4±3.0 arb units, respectively. Conclusions The peptide sequence SNFYMPL binds specifically to dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus, and can be fluorescence-labeled to target pre-malignant mucosa on imaging. PMID:20637198

  9. A two-layered mechanical model of the rat esophagus. Experiment and theory

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanhua; Gregersen, Hans; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2004-01-01

    Background The function of esophagus is to move food by peristaltic motion which is the result of the interaction of the tissue forces in the esophageal wall and the hydrodynamic forces in the food bolus. The structure of the esophagus is layered. In this paper, the esophagus is treated as a two-layered structure consisting of an inner collagen-rich submucosa layer and an outer muscle layer. We developed a model and experimental setup for determination of elastic moduli in the two layers in circumferential direction and related the measured elastic modulus of the intact esophagus to the elastic modulus computed from the elastic moduli of the two layers. Methods Inflation experiments were done at in vivo length and pressure-diameters relations were recorded for the rat esophagus. Furthermore, the zero-stress state was taken into consideration. Results The radius and the strain increased as function of pressure in the intact as well as in the individual layers of the esophagus. At pressures higher than 1.5 cmH2O the muscle layer had a larger radius and strain than the mucosa-submucosa layer. The strain for the intact esophagus and for the muscle layer was negative at low pressures indicating the presence of residual strains in the tissue. The stress-strain curve for the submucosa-mucosa layer was shifted to the left of the curves for the muscle layer and for the intact esophagus at strains higher than 0.3. The tangent modulus was highest in the submucosa-mucosa layer, indicating that the submucosa-mucosa has the highest stiffness. A good agreement was found between the measured elastic modulus of the intact esophagus and the elastic modulus computed from the elastic moduli of the two separated layers. PMID:15518591

  10. Narrow-band imaging for the computer assisted diagnosis in patients with Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kage, Andreas; Raithel, Martin; Zopf, Steffen; Wittenberg, Thomas; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Cancer of the esophagus has the worst prediction of all known cancers in Germany. The early detection of suspicious changes in the esophagus allows therapies that can prevent the cancer. Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant change of the esophagus that is a strong indication for cancer. Therefore there is a big interest to detect Barrett's esophagus as early as possible. The standard examination is done with a videoscope where the physician checks the esophagus for suspicious regions. Once a suspicious region is found, the physician takes a biopsy of that region to get a histological result of it. Besides the traditional white light for the illumination there is a new technology: the so called narrow-band Imaging (NBI). This technology uses a smaller spectrum of the visible light to highlight the scene captured by the videoscope. Medical studies indicate that the use of NBI instead of white light can increase the rate of correct diagnoses of a physician. In the future, Computer-Assisted Diagnosis (CAD) which is well known in the area of mammography might be used to support the physician in the diagnosis of different lesions in the esophagus. A knowledge-based system which uses a database is a possible solution for this task. For our work we have collected NBI images containing 326 Regions of Interest (ROI) of three typical classes: epithelium, cardia mucosa and Barrett's esophagus. We then used standard texture analysis features like those proposed by Haralick, Chen, Gabor and Unser to extract features from every ROI. The performance of the classification was evaluated with a classifier using the leaving-one-out sampling. The best result that was achieved is an accuracy of 92% for all classes and an accuracy of 76% for Barrett's esophagus. These results show that the NBI technology can provide a good diagnosis support when used in a CAD system.

  11. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx and Esophagus with Pulmonary Metastasis in a Backyard Laying Hen.

    PubMed

    Laura, Nordio; Marta, Vascellari; Giacomo, Berto; Luca, Bano

    2016-09-01

    A backyard laying hen exhibiting muscular atrophy, dyspnea, and absence of egg production was analyzed for diagnostic insights. Gross findings revealed the presence of a large ulcerated mass with irregular edges involving the caudal part of the oropharynx and the cranial part of the esophagus, occluding the lumen of the esophagus and compressing the trachea. Small nodular lesions were detected also in the lungs. Histologically, both esophageal and pulmonary masses were characterized by nests of pleomorphic epithelial cells with squamous differentiation. The diagnosis was of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus with the uncommon feature of pulmonary metastasis. PMID:27610733

  12. 8-gene Panel for Barrett's Esophagus — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Eight methylation biomarkers - p16, RUNX3, HPP1 (HGNC name TMEFF2), NELL1, TAC1, SST, AKAP12 and CDH13 - were tested in a restrospective multicenter double-blinded validation study for their accuracy in predicting neoplastic progression in Barrett's Esophagus. Hypermethylation of p16, RUNX3 and HPP1 has been show to occur in early Barrett's Esophagus-related neoplastic progression and predicts progression risk. Several of the panel (NELL1, TAC1, SST, AKAP12 and CDH13) were also shown to be methylated early and often in Barrett's Esophagus-related neoplastic progression.

  13. Potential Role of the Microbiome in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Snider, Erik J; Freedberg, Daniel E; Abrams, Julian A

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor Barrett's esophagus have been rapidly increasing in incidence for half a century, for reasons not adequately explained by currently identified risk factors such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity. The upper gastrointestinal microbiome may represent another potential cofactor. The distal esophagus has a distinct microbiome of predominantly oral-derived flora, which is altered in Barrett's esophagus and reflux esophagitis. Chronic low-grade inflammation or direct carcinogenesis from this altered microbiome may combine with known risk factors to promote Barrett's metaplasia and progression to adenocarcinoma. PMID:27068172

  14. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a "hypophrenic" diverticulum of the distal esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sam, Albert D; Chaer, Rabih A; Cintron, Jose; Teresi, Miguel; Massad, Malek G

    2005-04-01

    Distal esophageal diverticula are uncommon acquired anomalies of the distal thoracic esophagus. We report a case of an elderly man presenting with a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a distal esophageal diverticulum arising from the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a subdiaphragmatic esophageal diverticulum. We propose the term "hypophrenic diverticulum of the esophagus" for this disease entity, and we would like to bring it to the attention of readers of The American Surgeon. PMID:15943409

  15. History, Molecular Mechanisms, and Endoscopic Treatment of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Prasad, Ganapathy A.; Wang, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    This report is written as an adjunct to the American Gastroenterological Association Institute’s medical position statement and technical review on the management of Barrett’s esophagus, which will be published in the near future. Those documents will consider a number of broad questions on the diagnosis, clinical features, and management of patients with Barrett’s esophagus, and the reader is referred to the technical review for an in-depth discussion of those topics. In this report, we review historical, molecular, and endoscopic therapeutic aspects of Barrett’s esophagus that are of interest to clinicians and researchers. PMID:20080098

  16. Examination of tissue distribution of Helicobacter pylori within columnar-lined esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Demian, S E; Taillon, D; Vasudeva, R; Howden, C W

    1999-06-01

    H. pylori may colonize columnar-lined esophagus, although an etiologic role in esophageal adenocarcinoma is unproven. H. pylori can adhere to intestinal metaplasia in the stomach. This study was designed to examine if H. pylori adheres to specialized intestinal metaplasia in columnar-lined esophagus. Esophageal biopsies from patients with columnar-lined esophagus were reviewed. Patients with only gastric metaplasia were excluded. Sections with specialized intestinal metaplasia in at least one third of at least one gland were recut, stained using the Giemsa stain, and reexamined by two independent pathologists using strict criteria for adherence by H. pylori. The 209 esophageal biopsies with adequate specialized intestinal metaplasia from 58 patients were examined: H. pylori was only seen on gastric metaplasia in three patients-and never on specialized intestinal metaplasia. Within the esophagus, H. pylori adheres only to gastric metaplasia, which is not considered premalignant for esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:10389690

  17. Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Esophagus: A Case from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Kuriry, Hadi; Swied, Abdul Monem

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the esophagus are very rare, and the majority are high grade (poorly differentiated). They occur most frequently in males in their sixth and seventh decades of life. There have been no concrete data published on clinical features or on prognosis. We report a case of large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the esophagus in a 66-year-old Saudi female with progressive dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed an esophageal ulcerated mass. PMID:26600769

  18. New Strategies in Barrett’s Esophagus Integrating clonal evolutionary theory with clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian J; Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus is a condition in which the normal stratified squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus is replaced by intestinal metaplasia. For more than three decades the prevailing clinical paradigm has been that Barrett’s esophagus is a complication of symptomatic reflux disease that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma, yet no clinical strategy for cancer prevention or early detection based on this paradigm has been proven to reduce esophageal adenocarcinoma mortality in a randomized clinical trial in part because only about 5-10% of individuals with Barrett’s esophagus develop esophageal adenocarcinoma. Recent research indicates that Barrett’s metaplasia is an adaptation for mucosal defense in response to chronic reflux in most individuals. The risk of progressing to esophageal adenocarcinoma is determined by development of genomic instability and dynamic clonal evolution in the distal esophagus modulated by host and environmental risk and protective factors, including inherited genotype. The challenge in Barrett’s esophagus lies in integrating knowledge about genomic instability and clonal evolution into clinical management to increase the lifespans and quality of life of individuals with this condition. PMID:21498395

  19. New strategies in Barrett's esophagus: integrating clonal evolutionary theory with clinical management.

    PubMed

    Reid, Brian J; Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C

    2011-06-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition in which the normal stratified squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus is replaced by intestinal metaplasia. For more than three decades, the prevailing clinical paradigm has been that Barrett's esophagus is a complication of symptomatic reflux disease that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, no clinical strategy for cancer prevention or early detection based on this paradigm has been proven to reduce esophageal adenocarcinoma mortality in a randomized clinical trial in part because only about 5% to 10% of individuals with Barrett's esophagus develop esophageal adenocarcinoma. Recent research indicates that Barrett's metaplasia is an adaptation for mucosal defense in response to chronic reflux in most individuals. The risk of progressing to esophageal adenocarcinoma is determined by development of genomic instability and dynamic clonal evolution in the distal esophagus modulated by host and environmental risk and protective factors, including inherited genotype. The challenge for investigators of Barrett's esophagus lies in integrating knowledge about genomic instability and clonal evolution into clinical management to increase the lifespan and quality of life of individuals with this condition. PMID:21498395

  20. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus: changing therapeutic trends

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, C.F.; Spiro, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus is a lethal tumor because of its advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. The records of 71 patients with this disease treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1965 through 1980 have been reviewed herein. Epidermoid carcinoma was the prevailing histologic finding, and extramural penetration was present in 77 percent of the evaluable patients. Tracheal invasion and vocal cord paralysis were noted in 35 and 24 percent of the patients, respectively and were predictive of significantly decreased survival. Primary radiotherapy in doses greater than 5,000 rads produced short lived responses in 13 of 21 patients (62 percent). Surgery was performed in 45 patients (63 percent), including 35 esophagectomies for cure and palliative procedures in the 10 other patients. There were five operative deaths (11 percent), but only two followed esophageal resection (5.6 percent). Locoregional treatment failure, present in 46 of 52 evaluable patients (88 percent) at last follow-up, continues to be a major problem. Overall, the 5 year survival rate was 9.6 percent. The longest survival and best palliation was achieved with aggressive resection and immediate reconstruction using the transposed stomach (gastric pullup).

  1. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current “gold-standard” surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett’s surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett’s mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  2. A Multiscale Model Evaluates Screening for Neoplasia in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Curtius, Kit; Hazelton, William D; Jeon, Jihyoun; Luebeck, E Georg

    2015-05-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients are routinely screened for high grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) through endoscopic screening, during which multiple esophageal tissue samples are removed for histological analysis. We propose a computational method called the multistage clonal expansion for EAC (MSCE-EAC) screening model that is used for screening BE patients in silico to evaluate the effects of biopsy sampling, diagnostic sensitivity, and treatment on disease burden. Our framework seamlessly integrates relevant cell-level processes during EAC development with a spatial screening process to provide a clinically relevant model for detecting dysplastic and malignant clones within the crypt-structured BE tissue. With this computational approach, we retain spatio-temporal information about small, unobserved tissue lesions in BE that may remain undetected during biopsy-based screening but could be detected with high-resolution imaging. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and sensitivity of current screening protocols to detect neoplasia (dysplasia and early preclinical EAC) in the esophageal lining. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this model by predicting three important clinical outcomes: (1) the probability that small cancers are missed during biopsy-based screening, (2) the potential gains in neoplasia detection probabilities if screening occurred via high-resolution tomographic imaging, and (3) the efficacy of ablative treatments that result in the curative depletion of metaplastic and neoplastic cell populations in BE in terms of the long-term impact on reducing EAC incidence. PMID:26001209

  3. Barrett's esophagus in 2016: From pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Russo, Salvatore; Bertani, Lorenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Marchi, Santino

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal complications caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus (BE). BE is a premalignant condition with an increased risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The carcinogenic sequence may progress through several steps, from normal esophageal mucosa through BE to EAC. A recent advent of functional esophageal testing (particularly multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring) has helped to improve our knowledge about GERD pathophysiology, including its complications. Those findings (when properly confirmed) might help to predict BE neoplastic progression. Over the last few decades, the incidence of EAC has continued to rise in Western populations. However, only a minority of BE patients develop EAC, opening the debate regarding the cost-effectiveness of current screening/surveillance strategies. Thus, major efforts in clinical and research practice are focused on new methods for optimal risk assessment that can stratify BE patients at low or high risk of developing EAC, which should improve the cost effectiveness of screening/surveillance programs and consequently significantly affect health-care costs. Furthermore, the area of BE therapeutic management is rapidly evolving. Endoscopic eradication therapies have been shown to be effective, and new therapeutic options for BE and EAC have emerged. The aim of the present review article is to highlight the status of screening/surveillance programs and the current progress of BE therapy. Moreover, we discuss the recent introduction of novel esophageal pathophysiological exams that have improved the knowledge of the mechanisms linking GERD to BE. PMID:27158534

  4. Studying Cancer Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in genome sequencing and copy number analysis have allowed researchers to catalog the wide variety of genomic alterations that occur across diverse cancer types. For most cancer types, the lack of high-frequency alterations and the heterogeneity observed both within and between tumors suggest neoplastic progression proceeds through a branched evolutionary pathway as proposed by Nowell in 1976, as opposed to the linear pathway that has dominated medical science for the last century. To understand how cancer evolves over time and space in the body, new study designs are needed that can distinguish between alterations that develop in patients who progress to cancer from to those who don't. Here we present approaches developed in the study of Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and discuss strategies for applying the results from these analyses to address the critical clinical problems of overdiagnosis of benign disease, early detection of life-threatening cancer, and effective risk stratification. PMID:27573774

  5. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Parsons, J.T.; Vogel, S.B.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    This is an analysis of 34 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy with curative intent at the University of Florida between September 1966 and May 1985. All patients have a minimum 2-year follow-up and 28 (82%) have at least 5 years of follow-up. Patients were staged according to the recommendations of the AJCC. Patients who died within 2 years of treatment with the primary site continuously disease-free were excluded from the local control analysis; all patients were included in the analysis of complications and survival. Irradiation resulted in control of the primary lesion in 1 of 2 patients who presented with T1 lesions, in 4 of the 12 patients with T2 lesions, and 3 of 17 patients who presented with T3 lesions. One patient with a T3 lesion that recurred locally was successfully salvaged by an operation. The 5-year absolute survival rates by stage were as follows: no patients with stage I lesions survived; of 11 stage II patients, one survived; and of 16 stage III patients, three survived. Interestingly, all four of the 5-year survivors were women.

  6. Barrett’s esophagus: review of diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sappati Biyyani, Raja Shekhar; Chak, Amithab

    2013-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is an acquired condition characterized by replacement of stratified squamous epithelium by a cancer predisposing metaplastic columnar epithelium. Endoscopy with systemic biopsy protocols plays a vital role in diagnosis. Technological advancements in dysplasia detection improves outcomes in surveillance and treatment of patients with BE and dysplasia. These advances in endoscopic technology radically changed the treatment for dysplastic BE and early cancer from being surgical to organ-sparing endoscopic therapy. A multimodal treatment approach combining endoscopic resection of visible and/or raised lesions with ablation techniques for flat BE mucosa, followed by long-term surveillance improves the outcomes of BE. Safe and effective endoscopic treatment can be either tissue acquiring as in endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection or tissue ablative as with photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. Debatable issues such as durability of response, recognition and management of sub-squamous BE and optimal management strategy in patients with low-grade dysplasia and non-dysplastic BE need to be studied further. Development of safer wide field resection techniques, which would effectively remove all BE and obviate the need for long-term surveillance, is another research goal. Shared decision making between the patient and physician is important while considering treatment for dysplasia in BE. PMID:24759662

  7. Paired Exome Analysis of Barrett’s Esophagus and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stachler, Matthew D.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Peng, Shouyong; McKenna, Aaron; Agoston, Agoston T.; Odze, Robert D.; Davison, Jon M.; Nason, Katie S.; Loda, Massimo; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Stewart, Chip; Stojanov, Petar; Seepo, Sara; Lawrence, Michael S.; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Beer, David G.; Getz, Gad; Carter, Scott L.; Bass, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus, is thought to progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) through a step-wise progression with loss of CDKN2A followed by p53 inactivation and aneuploidy. Here, we present whole exome sequencing from 25 pairs of EAC and Barrett’s and five patients whose Barrett’s and tumor were extensively sampled. Our analysis revealed that oncogene amplification typically occurred as a late event and that TP53 mutations often occur early in Barrett’s progression, including in non-dysplastic epithelium. Reanalysis of additional EAC exome data revealed that the majority (62.5%) of EACs emerged following genome doubling and that tumors with genomic doubling had different patterns of genomic alterations with more frequent oncogenic amplifications and less frequent inactivation of tumor suppressors, including CDKN2A. These data suggest that many EACs emerge not through gradual accumulation of tumor suppressor alterations but rather through a more direct path whereby a TP53-mutant cell undergoes genome doubling, followed by acquisition of oncogenic amplifications. PMID:26192918

  8. Barrett’s esophagus in 2016: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Russo, Salvatore; Bertani, Lorenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Marchi, Santino

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal complications caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus (BE). BE is a premalignant condition with an increased risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The carcinogenic sequence may progress through several steps, from normal esophageal mucosa through BE to EAC. A recent advent of functional esophageal testing (particularly multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring) has helped to improve our knowledge about GERD pathophysiology, including its complications. Those findings (when properly confirmed) might help to predict BE neoplastic progression. Over the last few decades, the incidence of EAC has continued to rise in Western populations. However, only a minority of BE patients develop EAC, opening the debate regarding the cost-effectiveness of current screening/surveillance strategies. Thus, major efforts in clinical and research practice are focused on new methods for optimal risk assessment that can stratify BE patients at low or high risk of developing EAC, which should improve the cost effectiveness of screening/surveillance programs and consequently significantly affect health-care costs. Furthermore, the area of BE therapeutic management is rapidly evolving. Endoscopic eradication therapies have been shown to be effective, and new therapeutic options for BE and EAC have emerged. The aim of the present review article is to highlight the status of screening/surveillance programs and the current progress of BE therapy. Moreover, we discuss the recent introduction of novel esophageal pathophysiological exams that have improved the knowledge of the mechanisms linking GERD to BE. PMID:27158534

  9. Effects of telomerase expression on photodynamic therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Anderson, Marlys; Buttar, Navtej; WongKeeSong, Louis-Michel; Borkenhagen, Lynn; Lutzke, Lori

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been applied to Barrett's esophagus and has been shown in prospective randomized studies to eliminate dysplasia as well as decrease the occurrence of cancer. However, the therapy isnot always effective and there are issues with residual areas of Barrett's mucosa despite therapy. There has not been a good explanation for these residual areas and they seem to imply that there may exist a biological mechanisms by which these cells may be resistant to photodynamic therapy. It was our aim to determine if known abnormalities in Barrett's mucosa could be correlated with the lack of response of some of these tissues. We examined the tissue from mulitpel patients who had resonse to therapy as well as those who did not respond. We assessed the tissue for p53 mutations, inactivatino of p16, ploidy status, cell proliferation, telomerase activity, and degree of dysplasia. Interestingly, the only genetic marker than was found to be correlated with lack of reonse was p53 and telomerase activity. This suggests that cells that have lost mechanisms for cell death such as apoptosis or telomere shortengin may be more resistant to photodynamic therapy. In this study, we examined patients before and after PDT for telomerase activity.

  10. Swallowing performance after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, I.C.; Tiver, K.; Bull, C.; Gebski, V.; Langlands, A.O.

    1988-05-15

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to tabulate the incidence and etiologic factors of importance in the development of strictures after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus and to analyze the outcome of patients who develop such strictures. Eighty patients were treated with radiotherapy, 50 having radical and 30 having palliative treatment. Sixty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had adenocarcinoma, one had sarcoma, one had mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and five had undifferentiated tumors. Forty percent developed no stricture, 30% had benign fibrotic stricture, and 28% developed malignant stricture. The etiologic factors analysed included age, pretreatment swallowing score, histology and length (size) of tumor; stage of disease, dose of radiotherapy, and use of chemotherapy. None of these factors were shown to be of etiologic importance. The survival of patients who developed benign strictures was found to be significantly longer (1-year survival 88%) than those who developed no stricture (50%) or malignant stricture (19%). Using a success score for palliation of dysphagia, it was found that the majority of patients (71%) who developed a benign stricture had a moderately successful outcome--they were able to tolerate a full or soft diet and required dilatation with a median duration between dilatations of 5 months. Patients who developed a malignant stricture were palliated poorly by dilatation alone, and most required esophageal intubation.

  11. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy: Improving neoplasia detection in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Chedgy, Fergus J Q; Subramaniam, Sharmila; Kandiah, Kesavan; Thayalasekaran, Sreedhari; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is an important condition given its significant premalignant potential and dismal five-year survival outcomes of advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is therefore suggested that patients with a diagnosis of BE undergo regular surveillance in order to pick up dysplasia at an earlier stage to improve survival. Current "gold-standard" surveillance protocols suggest targeted biopsy of visible lesions followed by four quadrant random biopsies every 2 cm. However, this method of Barrett's surveillance is fraught with poor endoscopist compliance as the procedures are time consuming and poorly tolerated by patients. There are also significant miss-rates with this technique for the detection of neoplasia as only 13% of early neoplastic lesions appear as visible nodules. Despite improvements in endoscope resolution these problems persist. Chromoendoscopy is an extremely useful adjunct to enhance mucosal visualization and characterization of Barrett's mucosa. Acetic acid chromoendoscopy (AAC) is a simple, non-proprietary technique that can significantly improve neoplasia detection rates. This topic highlight summarizes the current evidence base behind AAC for the detection of neoplasia in BE and provides an insight into the direction of travel for further research in this area. PMID:27433088

  12. Current status of Barrett's esophagus research in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Yang; Cook, Michael B; Lee, Yi-Chia; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ando, Takafumi; Bhatia, Shobna; Chow, Wong-Ho; El-Omar, Emad M; Goto, Hidemi; Li, Yang-Qing; McColl, Kenneth; Reddy, Nageshwar; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sharma, Prateek; Sung, Joseph J-Y; Ghoshal, Uday; Wong, Jennie Y-Y; Wu, Justin C-Y; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek-Yu

    2011-02-01

    In Western countries, the epidemiology of esophageal cancer has changed considerably over the past decades with a rise in the ratio of adenocarcinoma to squamous cell carcinoma. Although the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux is increasing in Asia, the prevalences of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) have remained low in most Asian countries. The Asian Barrett's Consortium recently conducted a review of published studies on BE from Asia to assess the current status of BE research in Asia, and to recommend potential areas for future BE research in the region. Differences in study design, enrolled population, and endoscopic biopsy protocols used have led to substantial variability in the reported BE prevalence (0.06% to 19.9%) across Asia. In particular, some Japanese studies used diagnostic criteria that differed considerably from what was used in most Asian studies. As in Western countries, increased age, male sex, tobacco smoking, reflux symptoms, and erosive esophagitis have been found to be risk factors for BE in several case-control studies from Asia. The Prague C and M criteria, developed to provide better interobserver reliability in diagnosis and grading of BE, are currently under extensive evaluation in the Asian population. There is a need for standardized protocols for endoscopic and histopathologic diagnosis before initiating collaborative projects to identify etiologic determinants of BE and its ensuing malignant transformation. At present, data regarding the management and long-term outcome of BE are extremely limited in Asia. More studies of BE in this geographic area are warranted. PMID:21155883

  13. Advances in endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Srinivas; Sharma, Prateek

    2010-12-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is defined as abnormal specialized columnar metaplasia with intestinalization in place of the normal squamous esophageal epithelium. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a known risk factor for BE; nonetheless BE is also detected in asymptomatic individuals. Other risk factors for BE include smoking, male gender, age over 50 and obesity. Patients diagnosed with BE (without dysplasia) are recommended to undergo endoscopic surveillance every 3-5 years. Advances in imaging techniques (such as narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy) have the potential to improve the detection of dysplasia and early cancer, thus making surveillance a more cost-effective endeavor. Patients with high grade dysplasia (HGD) and early cancer have a high rate of progression to invasive adenocarcinoma and traditionally these patients were treated with esophagectomy. The rapid advancement of endoscopic therapeutic techniques along with a low risk of complications have made endoscopic therapy an acceptable alternative to an esophagectomy in patients with HGD and early cancer. Several endoscopic treatment techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection, multipolar electrocoagulation, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation have been studied for endoscopic treatment. PMID:21091894

  14. Ultrasonographic characteristics of the abdominal esophagus and cardia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gory, Guillaume; Rault, Delphine N; Gatel, Laure; Dally, Claire; Belli, Patrick; Couturier, Laurent; Cauvin, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for regurgitation and vomiting in dogs include diseases of the gastroesophageal junction. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to describe ultrasonographic characteristics of the abdominal esophagus and gastric cardia in normal dogs and dogs with clinical disease involving this region. A total of 126 dogs with no clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease and six dogs with clinical diseases involving the gastroesophageal junction were included. For seven euthanized dogs, ultrasonographic features were also compared with gross pathology and histopathology. Cardial and abdominal esophageal wall thicknesses were measured ultrasonographically for all normal dogs and effects of weight, sex, age, and stomach filling were tested. Five layers could be identified in normal esophageal and cardial walls. The inner esophageal layer was echogenic, corresponding to the cornified mucosa and glandular portion of the submucosa. The cardia was characterized by a thick muscularis, and a transitional zone between echogenic esophageal and hypoechoic gastric mucosal layers. Mean (±SD) cardial wall thicknesses for normal dogs were 7.6 mm (±1.6), 9.7 mm (±1.8), 10.8 mm (±1.6), 13.3 mm (±2.5) for dogs in the <10 kg, 10-19.9 kg, 20-29.9 kg and ≥30 kg weight groups, respectively. Mean (±SD) esophageal wall thicknesses were: 4.1 mm (±0.6), 5.1 mm (±1.3), 5.6 mm (±1), and 6.4 mm (±1.1) for the same weight groups, respectively. Measurements of wall thickness were significantly correlated with dog weight group. Ultrasonography assisted diagnosis in all six clinically affected dogs. Findings supported the use of transabdominal ultrasonography as a diagnostic test for dogs with suspected gastroesophageal disease. PMID:24629089

  15. Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of Barrett esophagus

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiong; Li, Jian-dong; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Wen-chang; Yang, Jian-quan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Barrett esophagus (BE) is considered precursor condition of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing in general population. Studies reported that metabolic syndrome (MS) or diabetes mellitus (DM) is related to increased risk of BE. Current study was to assess and better understand the relationship between MS /DM and BE. Methods: Electronic search was conducted in the database Pubmed/Medline (-December, 2015), Embase (-December, 2015), Cochrane Library (-December, 2015), and Web of Knowledge (-December, 2015). Studies included were assessed with summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and compared exposure group with control group. The heterogeneity was examined by the funnel plot and the Egger's test. Subgroup analyses and sensitive analyses were performed for the detection of possible heterogeneity and impact on stability of analysis results. Results: Twelve publications met the criteria and included 355,311 subjects were analyzed. The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82–1.38; P = 0.627). Substantial heterogeneities were detected. No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23). Conclusions: Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE. Further long-term follow-up prospective study needs to verify the current results, and definite pathophysiological mechanism needs to be further investigated and clearly elucidated. PMID:27495039

  16. Physical activity and the risk of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hilal, J; El-Serag, H B; Ramsey, D; Ngyuen, T; Kramer, J R

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity either directly or through influencing body fat may affect the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE). However, the effect of physical activity on the risk of developing BE has not been examined. We conducted a case-control study among consecutive eligible patients either scheduled for elective endoscopy or recruited from primary care clinics to undergo a study endoscopy. Study participants completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form that measures physical activity during the past 7 days. We categorized level of physical activity by low, moderate, or high and estimated metabolic equivalent minutes per week (MET min/week). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) using logistic regression models and adjusted for age, sex, race, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, Helicobacter pylori infection, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio. There were 307 cases with BE and 1724 controls (1262 from endoscopy and 462 from the primary care clinic) with IPAQ information. BE cases were more likely to be in the high-category physical activity category than controls (14.3% vs. 11.5% P = 0.08). However, there were no differences in the overall average MET min/week for walking between BE cases and controls (909 vs. 561; P = 0.16), with similar findings among those with moderate activity (1094 vs. 755, P = 0.18) or vigorous activity (784 vs. 826, P = 0.93). In multivariable logistic regression, physical activity level was not significantly associated with BE (OR = 1.19, 95% confidence interval: 0.82-1.73). Recent amount and intensity of physical activity are not associated with a reduction in the risk of BE. Studies are required to examine the long-term effects of physical activity. PMID:25715656

  17. Histochemical and ultrastructural characterization of the posterior esophagus of Bulla striata (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Oliveira, Elsa; Ferreira, Iris; Coelho, Rita; Calado, Gonçalo

    2010-12-01

    The posterior esophagus of Bulla striata, running from the gizzard to the stomach, was investigated with light and electron microscopy to obtain new data for a comparative analysis of the digestive system in cephalaspidean opisthobranchs. In this species, the posterior esophagus can be divided into two regions. In the first, the epithelium is formed by columnar cells with apical microvilli embedded in a cuticle. Many epithelial and subepithelial secretory cells are present in this region. In both, electron-lucent secretory vesicles containing filaments and a peripheral round mass of secretory material fill the cytoplasm. These acid mucus-secreting cells may also contain a few dense secretory vesicles. In the second part of the posterior esophagus, the cuticle is absent and the epithelium is ciliated. In this region, epithelial cells may contain larger lipid droplets and glycogen reserves. Subepithelial secretory cells are not present, and in epithelial secretory cells the number of dense vesicles increases, but most secretory cells still contain some electron-lucent vesicles. These cells secrete a mixture of proteins and acid polysaccharides and should be considered seromucous. The secretory cells of the posterior esophagus are significantly different from those previously reported in the anterior esophagus of this herbivorous species. PMID:20883598

  18. Biomarkers in Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma: Predictors of progression and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Chin-Ann J; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2010-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus is a well-known premalignant lesion of the lower esophagus that is characterized by intestinal metaplasia of the squamous epithelium. It is clinically important due to the increased risk (0.5% per annum) of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), which has a poor outcome unless diagnosed early. The current clinical management of Barrett’s esophagus is hampered by the lack of accurate predictors of progression. In addition, when patients develop EA, the current staging modalities are limited in stratifying patients into different prognostic groups in order to guide the optimal therapy for an individual patient. Biomarkers have the potential to improve radically the clinical management of patients with Barrett’s esophagus and EA but have not yet entered mainstream clinical practice. This is in contrast to other cancers like breast and prostate for which biomarkers are utilized routinely to inform clinical decisions. This review aims to highlight the most promising predictive and prognostic biomarkers in Barrett’s esophagus and EA and to discuss what is required to move the field forward towards clinical application. PMID:21128316

  19. Columnar-lined esophagus: time to drop the eponym of "Barrett": Historical review.

    PubMed

    Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Bani-Hani, Bayan K

    2008-05-01

    There can be few medical conditions that have been surrounded by as much confusion about their definition or terminology as columnar-lined esophagus (CLE); approximately 30 different terms and eponyms have been used to describe this condition. The history of this condition can be divided into five stages: (i) descriptive stage, 1906-1950; (ii) "argument" stage, 1950-1963; (iii) "significant" stage, 1963-1973; (iv) surveillance stage, 1973-1990; and (v) refined research stage, 1990-present. The use of the eponym "Barrett's" to describe CLE is not justified from a historical point of view. Lining of the lower esophagus by columnar epithelium was termed "Barrett's esophagus" after the presentation by Barrett in 1957. Although this finding has been attributed to Barrett, the work of others, including Tileston, Lortat-Jacob, and Allison and Johnstone, preceded Barrett's description. The historical aspects of CLE were reviewed to show how little Norman Barrett had contributed to the core concept of this condition in comparison to the contributions of other investigators, particularly the contribution of Philip Allison. Based on many discussed historical facts, we are not in favor of retaining the term "Barrett's esophagus" and we propose that CLE be henceforth referred to as "columnar-lined esophagus". PMID:18410605

  20. High level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta in scoliosis: CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koji; Kikuno, Motoyuki; Hyodoh, Hideki

    1996-05-01

    The esophagus occasionally crosses the descending aorta at an unusually high level (3-5 cm inferior to the carina) in right-sided scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to analyze the mechanism of this finding. We prospectively evaluated thoracic CT scans in 30 patients with right-sided scoliosis. We assessed the alterations in the positions of the esophagus and the descending aorta by the thoracic deformity. The descending aorta followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 26 (87%) patients. The esophagus followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 14 (47%) patients and did not in 16 (53%). The anteroposterior diameter of the thorax in the former group was significantly smaller than that in the latter (p < 0.01). High level cross of both structures was identified in 14 (47%) patients, and all of them belonged to the group in which the esophagus did not follow the scoliotic curve of the spine. The unusual high level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta occasionally seen in scoliosis is due to a difference in the positional alterations of the two structures resulting from the scoliosis. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Chen, Jianping; Sun, Kewen; Zhuang, Yun; Xu, Fu; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Hongyu; Li, Qing; Zhang, Dachuan

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the esophagus. In the majority of cases, the disease originates in the mucosal layer of the esophagus, which is similar to other types of esophageal cancer. With the development of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopic resection is possible for cases in which melanomas are limited to the mucosal and submucosal layer. However, few studies report the efficiency of ESD for PMME, and no studies perform long-term follow-up. The present study reported the case of a 71-year-old PMME patient who was successfully treated by ESD at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University (Changzhou, China) in Otober 2011, with a follow-up of >3 years conducted. PMID:27602062

  2. Propulsion Velocity and ETT on Biomagnetic Assessment of the Human Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova-Fraga, T.; Cano, E.; Bravo-Miranda, C.; De la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.; Huerta, R.

    2008-08-11

    Esophagus transit time measurement is a common clinical practical. Biomagnetic techniques and modern instrumentation can perform non invasive and functional assessments of the gastrointestinal tract. This study presents the evaluation of the esophagus transit time and propulsion velocity of a magnetic marker from the mouth to stomach using water vs. a swallow easy substance recently patented. A group of ten healthy subjects from 45 to 55 years, were evaluated in identical conditions for two times, they ingested randomly a magnetic marker in an anatomical body position of 45 deg., one times with water and the other one with a patented substance developed in order to help the subjects to swallow pills. The esophagus transit time was shorter when the subjects ingested the magnetic marker with the swallow easy substance than they ingested the magnetic marker with same quantity of water.

  3. Propulsion Velocity and ETT on Biomagnetic Assessment of the Human Esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova-Fraga, T.; Cano, E.; Bravo-Miranda, C.; Huerta, R.; De la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    Esophagus transit time measurement is a common clinical practical. Biomagnetic techniques and modern instrumentation can perform non invasive and functional assessments of the gastrointestinal tract. This study presents the evaluation of the esophagus transit time and propulsion velocity of a magnetic marker from the mouth to stomach using water vs. a swallow easy substance recently patented. A group of ten healthy subjects from 45 to 55 years, were evaluated in identical conditions for two times, they ingested randomly a magnetic marker in an anatomical body position of 45°, one times with water and the other one with a patented substance developed in order to help the subjects to swallow pills. The esophagus transit time was shorter when the subjects ingested the magnetic marker with the swallow easy substance than they ingested the magnetic marker with same quantity of water

  4. Side to Side Esophagogastrojejunoplasty in Post-corrosive Stricture of Distal Esophagus and Proximal Stomach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Pancholi, Mukesh; Patel, Gulab; Sharma, Anju

    2015-12-01

    A four years old female child presented after 2 months of ingestion of battery fluid (sulfuric acid) accidently with stricture of the distal esophagus, esophagogastric junction, and fundus as well as proximal portion of the body of the stomach. Corrosive stricture involving the distal esophagus with the proximal stomach is not a frequently encountered condition. Side to side esophagogastrojejunostomy without removal of the strictured esophagus or stomach (side to side esophagogastrojejunoplasty) can be done in such patient hence preserving the stomach which is important physiologically as a reservoir and for the secretion of gastric juices. In review of literature in search engines like MD Consult, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase and standard textbooks of surgery, we could not find such procedure had been performed till date, so that it is the innovative approach with support of literature and surgical principles. PMID:27011603

  5. The tube esophagram: a technique for obtaining a detailed double-contrast examination of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Levine, M S; Kressel, H Y; Laufer, I; Herlinger, H; Goren, R

    1984-02-01

    Although double-contrast esophagography is capable of delineating fine surface morphologic detail in the esophagus, it is not possible to obtain an optimal examination on all patients. Tube esophagography is a complementary technique that can provide a more detailed double-contrast examination of the esophagus. This procedure was performed on 45 patients in whom the routine double-contrast study was inconclusive. The tube esophagram contributed significantly to the radiologic evaluation in 33 cases, providing additional information in 23 and actually altering the final radiologic diagnosis in 10. The tube esophagram was particularly useful in depicting the distal esophagus when the initial double-contrast study was suboptimal due to inadequate distension and/or barium pooling that obscured mucosal detail in this region. The tube esophagram is a valuable adjunctive procedure that can lead to a more definitive radiologic diagnosis when the routine double-contrast examination is inconclusive. PMID:6607593

  6. [Screening for adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: yes or no, when and how?].

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Lacarta, Pedro; Lanas, Angel

    2013-10-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the main recognized risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The incidence of this cancer and its associated mortality has increased in developed countries during the last few years. Detection of EAC at earlier stages could potentially improve survival dramatically in these patients, which is especially important as mortality from EAC remains high despite the available treatments. Therefore, endoscopic surveillance is an attractive option for patients with Barrett's esophagus. Consequently, periodic endoscopic surveillance is recommended by all the International Gastroenterology Societies in an attempt to detect EAC at an early and potentially curable stage. Currently, the frequency of endoscopic surveillance and its need in Barrett's esophagus with low-grade dysplasia or without dysplasia are under discussion. This review presents the available evidence in order to assist clinicians in the decision-making process. PMID:23453559

  7. Differences in the Characteristics of Barrett's Esophagus and Barrett's Adenocarcinoma between the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Oryu, Makoto; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Yasuda, Mitsugu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    In Europe and the United States, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased 6-fold in the last 25 years and currently accounts for more than 50% of all esophageal cancers. Barrett's esophagus is the source of Barrett's adenocarcinoma and is characterized by the replacement of squamous epithelium with columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus due to chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Even though the prevalence of GERD has recently been increasing in Japan as well as in Europe and the United States, the clinical situation of Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's adenocarcinoma differs from that in Western countries. In this paper, we focus on specific differences in the background factors and pathophysiology of these lesions. PMID:23606979

  8. Optimization of light dosimetry for photodynamic therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Phan, Mary N.; Overholt, Bergein F.; Haydek, John M.

    2004-06-01

    Background and Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may be used for ablation of high grade dysplasia and/or early cancer (HGD/T1) in Barrett's esophagus. A complication of PDT is esophageal stricture. The objective of this study was to find the lowest light dose to potentially reduce the incidence of strictures while effectively ablating HGD/T1. Materials and Methods: Patients (n=113) with HGD/T1 received an intravenous injection of porfimer sodium (2 mg/kg). Three days later, laser light (630 nm) was delivered using a cylindrical diffuser inserted in a 20 mm.diameter PDT balloon. Patients were treated at light doses of 115 J/cm, 105 J/cm, 95 J/cm and 85 J/cm. The efficacy was determined by four quadrant biopsies of the treated area three months after PDT. The formation of stricture was determined by the incidence of dysphagia and the need for esophageal dilation. Strictures were considered mild if they required less than 6 dilations, and severe if 6 or more dilations were required. Efficacy and incidence of strictures were tabulated as a function of light dose. Results: Using 115 J/cm, there were 17% of patients with residual HGD/T1 after one treatment. However, when the light doses of 105 J/cm, 95 J/cm and 85 J/cm were used, the residual HGD/T1 after one PDT session was increased to 33%, 30%, and 32% respectively. The overall incidence of strictures (mild and severe) was not correlated to the light dose. However, the incidence of severe strictures was directly proportional to the light dose. Using the light dose of 115 J/cm, 15.3% of patients developed severe strictures compared to about 5% in the groups of patients who received the lower light doses. Conclusions: Decreasing the light dose below 115 J/cm doubled the rate of residual HGD/T1 after one treatment while reducing the incidence of severe strictures to one-third of cases from 115 J/cm. The results may be used to evaluate the risks and benefits of different light doses.

  9. Swallowable capsule with air channel for improved image-guided cancer detection in the esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Melville, C. David; Lung, Jonathan K. C.; Babchanik, Alexander P.; Lee, Cameron M.; Johnston, Richard S.; Dominitz, Jason A.

    2009-02-01

    A new type of endoscope has been developed and tested in the human esophagus, a tethered-capsule endoscope (TCE) that requires no sedation for oral ingestion and esophageal inspection. The TCE uses scanned red, green, and blue laser light to image the upper digestive tract using a swallowable capsule of 6.4mm in diameter and 18mm in length on a 1.4mm diameter tether. The TCE has been modified for image-guided interventions in the lower esophagus, specifically for more effective detection and measurement of the extent of Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. Three modifications have been tested in vivo: (1) weighting the capsule so it is negatively buoyant in water, (2) increasing the frame rate of 500-line images to 30 Hz (video rate), and (3) adding a 1.0mm inner diameter working channel alongside the tether for distending the lower esophagus with air pressure during endoscopy. All three modifications proved effective for more clearly visualizing the lower esophagus in the first few human subjects. The air channel was especially useful because it did not change tolerability in the first subject for unsedated endoscopy and the air easily removed bubbles obscuring tissue from the field of view. The air provided a non-invasive intervention by stimulating the mechanosensor of the lower esophageal sphincter at the precise time that the TCE was positioned for most informative imaging. All three TCE modifications proved successful for improved visualization of esophageal pathology, such as suspected Barrett's esophagus, without the use of sedation.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Chemoprevention with Proton Pump Inhibitors in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Abrams, Julian A.; Wang, Y. Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may reduce the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett’s esophagus. PPIs are prescribed for virtually all patients with Barrett’s esophagus, irrespective of the presence of reflux symptoms, and represent a de facto chemopreventive agent in this population. However, long-term PPI use has been associated with several adverse effects, and the cost-effectiveness of chemoprevention with PPIs has not been evaluated. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PPIs for the prevention of EAC in Barrett’s esophagus without reflux. Methods We designed a state-transition Markov micro-simulation model of a hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old white men with Barrett’s esophagus. We modeled chemoprevention with PPIs or no chemoprevention, with endoscopic surveillance for all treatment arms. Outcome measures were life-years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), incident EAC cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results Assuming 50 % reduction in EAC, chemoprevention with PPIs was a cost-effective strategy compared to no chemoprevention. In our model, administration of PPIs cost $23,000 per patient and resulted in a gain of 0.32 QALYs for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $12,000/QALY. In sensitivity analyses, PPIs would be cost-effective at $50,000/QALY if they reduce EAC risk by at least 19 %. Conclusions Chemoprevention with PPIs in patients with Barrett’s esophagus without reflux is cost-effective if PPIs reduce EAC by a minimum of 19 %. The identification of subgroups of Barrett’s esophagus patients at increased risk for progression would lead to more cost-effective strategies for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24795040

  11. ESGE Survey: worldwide practice patterns amongst gastroenterologists regarding the endoscopic management of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Simon J.; Neilson, Laura J.; Hassan, Cesare; Sharma, Prateek; Guy, Claire; Rees, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Barrett’s esophagus is a common condition that is widely encountered in clinical practice. This European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) survey aimed to determine practice patterns amongst European clinicians with regard to the diagnosis and management of Barrett’s esophagus. Methods: Clinicians attending the ESGE learning area at the United European Gastroenterology Week in 2014 were invited to complete a 10-question survey. This survey was programed on to two Apple iPads. Information was gathered with regard to demographics, practice settings, and diagnosis and management strategies for Barrett’s esophagus. Results: In total, 163 responses were obtained. Over half of respondents (61 %) were based in university hospitals, the majority (78 %) were aged 30 – 50 and half had more than 10 years’ experience; 66 % had attended courses on Barrett’s esophagus and more than half (60 %) used the Prague C & M classification. Advanced imaging was used by 73 % of clinicians and 72 % of respondents stated that their group practiced ablation therapy. Most (76 %) practiced surveillance for non-dysplastic Barrett’s, 6 % offered ablation therapy in some situations, and 18 % offered no intervention. For low grade dysplasia, 56 % practiced surveillance, 19 % ablated some cases and 15 % ablated all cases. In total, 32 % of clinicians referred high grade dysplasia to expert centers, with 20 % referring directly for surgery and 46 % using ablation therapy in certain cases. Endoscopic mucosal resection was the most commonly used ablation technique (44 %). Conclusions: There has been reasonable uptake of the Prague C & M classification for describing Barrett’s esophagus, and ablation is widely practiced. However, practice patterns for Barrett’s esophagus vary widely between clinicians with clear guidance and quality standards required. PMID:26793783

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for Jackhammer esophagus: to cut or not to cut the lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Ikeda, Haruo; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: With the success of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in treatment of achalasia, its successful application to other spastic esophageal motility disorders such as Jackhammer esophagus has been noted. The question of whether the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) should be included in the myotomy for Jackhammer esophagus is a topic of current debate. Here, we report our experience and results with four patients with Jackhammer esophagus treated with POEM. The clinical and manometric results are presented and their potential implications are discussed. Patients and methods: Between January 2014 and July 2015, four patients underwent POEM for treatment of Jackhammer esophagus at our center. Manometry was performed prior to and after POEM. All patients met the Chicago classification criteria for Jackhammer esophagus and received a barium esophagram and endoscopic examination before having POEM. Results: All patients had uneventful procedures without any intraoperative or post-procedure complications. Patients in which the LES was included during POEM had resolution or significant improvement in symptoms. One patient in whom the LES was preserved had resolution of chest pain but developed significant dysphagia and regurgitation. Subsequently this individual received a repeat POEM which included the LES, resulting in symptom resolution. Conclusions: POEM is a suitable treatment for patients with Jackhammer esophagus. Until there are larger-scale randomized studies, we speculate that based on our clinical experience and physiologic and manometric observations, obligatory inclusion of the LES is justified to reduce the risk of symptom development from iatrogenic ineffective esophageal motility or subsequent progression to achalasia. PMID:27274539

  13. Lung tissue flap repairs esophagus defection with an inner chitosan tube stent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Shi, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To repair the partial esophagus defect with a chitosan stent, a new esophageal prosthesis made of pulmonary tissue with vascular pedicle. METHODS: Fifteen Japanese big ear white rabbits were divided into experimental group (n = 10) and control group (n = 5). Esophagus defect in rabbits of experimental group was repaired using lung tissue flap with a chitosan tube stent, gross and histological appearance was observed at week 2, 4 and 8 after operation, and barium sulphate X-ray screen was performed at week 10 after operation. Esophagus defect of rabbits in control group was repaired using lung tissue flap with no chitosan tube stent, gross and histological appearance was observed at week 2, 4 and 8 after operation, and barium sulphate X-ray screen was performed at week 10 after operation. RESULTS: In the experimental group, 6 rabbits survived for over two weeks, the lung tissue flap healed esophageal defection, and squamous metaplasia occurred on the surface of lung tissue flap. At week 10 after operation, barium sulphate examination found that barium was fluent through the esophagus with no stricture or back stream, the creeping was good. In the control group, 4 rabbits survived for two weeks, the lung tissue flap healed esophageal defection with fibrous tissue hyperplasia, barium sulphate examination found that barium was fluent through the esophagus with a slight stricture or back stream, and the creeping was not good at week 10 after operation. CONCLUSION: Esophagus defect can be repaired using lung tissue flap with an inner chitosan tube stent. PMID:19322927

  14. Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery and Erlotinib Hydrochloride After Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cancer of the Esophagus or Gastroesophageal Junction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer

  15. Jackhammer esophagus: high-resolution manometry and therapeutic approach using peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

    PubMed

    Kandulski, A; Fuchs, K-H; Weigt, J; Malfertheiner, P

    2016-08-01

    We present the first report on peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in the treatment of jackhammer esophagus. A 34-year-old female patient was newly diagnosed with a jackhammer esophagus. After failure of medical treatment, the patient underwent POEM procedure for myotomy of the spastic segment. Postoperatively, a mild emphysema and pneumothorax occurred that required drainage and antibiotic therapy until full recovery. Discharge was possible after 5 days. Six months later, she presented with recurrent but mild pain due to a remnant spastic segment proximal to the myotomy. Endoscopic balloon dilation was performed twice within 6 weeks with full symptomatic relief of pain and mild symptoms of dysphagia. PMID:24460870

  16. The surgical treatment of cancer of the esophagus. Summary of replies to a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    París, F; Casillas, M; Zarza, A G; Padilla, J

    1979-03-01

    In an attempt to assess the different methods of treatment of tumors of the esophagus we contacted 170 surgeons (in 1975-1976). Seventy-six (45%) answered a questionnaire concerning the surgical management of esophageal tumors, the reasons for non operability and non resectability, the place of radiotherapy, the validity of palliative procedures, the exposure and type of resection for tumors at various levels in the esophagus, the technical details of the operations, the resectability and mortality rate, the anastomotic leak rate and its treatment, and the five-year survival rate after operation. The replies to the questionnaire are summarized. PMID:94320

  17. [Model studies of the involvement of nitric oxide, prostanoids, and glucoconjugates of epithelial barrier of the esophagus in the process of esophagus protection].

    PubMed

    Zaiachkivs'ka, O S; Hzhehots'kyĭ, M P; Slivovs'kyĭ, Z; Bzhozovs'kyĭ, T; Konturek, S Ia; Dzhura, O P; Iashchenko, A M

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of cytoprotection of esophagus mucous coat (EMC) under experimental damage of different origin are considered in the article. It manifested through activation of NO/NOS system and cell membrane stabilization effect of prostanoids. Morphofunctional changes and modification of expression of lectin receptors of the epithelial barrier of EMC under experimental damage of different origin and its correction by melatonin are discussed in the article. PMID:17312885

  18. Studies on the regulation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by acid in the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Banovcin, P; Halicka, J; Halickova, M; Duricek, M; Hyrdel, R; Tatar, M; Kollarik, M

    2016-07-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) is the major mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux, but the regulation of TLESR by stimuli in the esophagus is incompletely understood. We have recently reported that acid infusion in the esophagus substantially (by 75%) increased the number of meal-induced TLESR in healthy subjects. We concluded that the TLESR reflex triggered by gastric distention with meal was enhanced by the stimulation of esophageal nerves by acid. However, the possibilities that the acid infused into the esophagus acts after passing though lower esophageal sphincter in stomach to enhance TLESR, or that the acid directly initiates TLESR from the esophagus were not addressed. Here, we evaluated the effect of acid infusion into the proximal stomach on meal-induced TLESR (study 1) and the ability of acid infusion into the esophagus to initiate TLESR without prior meal (study 2). We analyzed TLESRs by using high-resolution manometry in healthy subjects in paired randomized studies. In study 1, we found that acid infusion into the proximal stomach did not affect TLESRs induced by standard meal. The number of meal-induced TLESRs following the acid infusion into the proximal stomach was similar to the number of meal-induced TLESRs following the control infusion. In study 2, we found that acid infusion into the esophagus without prior meal did not initiate TLESRs. We conclude that the increase in the meal-induced TLESRs by acid in the esophagus demonstrated in our previous study is not attributable to the action of acid in the stomach or to direct initiation of TLESR from the esophagus by acid. Our studies are consistent with the concept that the stimuli in the esophagus can influence TLESRs. The enhancement of TLESR by acid in the esophagus may contribute to pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux in some patients. PMID:25873206

  19. Endoscopic options for treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Vance, R Brooks; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the endoscopic treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) have allowed endoscopists to provide effective and durable eradication therapies. This review summarizes the available endoscopic eradication techniques for dysplasia in patients with BE including endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. PMID:26722612

  20. Effect of esophageal emptying and saliva on clearance of acid from the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.F.; Dodds, W.J.; Pelc, L.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Hogan, W.J.; Teeter, B.C.

    1984-02-02

    The clearance of acid from the esophagus and esophageal emptying in normal subjects was studied. A 15-ml bolus of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) radiolabeled with (/sup 99m/Tc)sulfur colloid was injected into the esophagus, and the subject swallowed every 30 seconds. Concurrent manometry and radionuclide imaging showed nearly complete emptying of acid from the esophagus by an immediate secondary peristaltic sequence, although esophageal pH did not rise until the first swallow 30 seconds later. Esophageal pH then returned to normal by a series of step increases, each associated with a swallow-induced peristaltic sequence. Saliva stimulation by an oral lozenge shortened the time required for acid clearance, whereas aspiration of saliva from the mouth abolished acid clearance. Saliva stimulation or aspiration did not affect the virtually complete emptying of acid volume by the initial peristaltic sequence. It was concluded that esophageal acid clearance normally occurs as a two-step process: (1) Virtually all acid volume is emptied from the esophagus by one or two peristaltic sequences, leaving a minimal residual amount that sustains a low pH, and (2) residual acid is neutralized by swallowed saliva.

  1. Effect of esophageal emptying and saliva on clearance of acid from the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.F.; Dodds, W.J.; Pelc, L.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Hogan, W.J.; Teeter, B.C.

    1984-02-02

    The clearance of acid from the esophagus and esophageal emptying in normal subjects was studied. A 15-ml bolus of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) radiolabeled with (/sup -99m/Tc)sulfur colloid was injected into the esophagus, and the subject swallowed every 30 seconds. Concurrent manometry and radionuclide imaging showed nearly complete emptying of acid from the esophagus by an immediate secondary peristaltic sequence, although esophageal pH did not rise until the first swallow 30 seconds later. Esophageal pH then returned to normal by a series of step increases, each associated with a swallow-induced peristaltic sequence. Saliva stimulation by an oral lozenge shortened the time required for acid clearance, whereas aspiration of saliva from the mouth abolished acid clearance. Saliva stimulation or aspiration did not affect the virtually complete emptying of acid volume by the initial peristaltic sequence. It was concluded that esophageal acid clearance normally occurs as a two-step process: (1) virtually all acid volume is emptied from the esophagus by one or two peristaltic sequences, leaving a minimal residual amount that sustains a low pH, and (2) residual acid is neutralized by swallowed saliva. 13 references, 3 figures.

  2. Post-ablation lymphocytic esophagitis in Barrett esophagus with high grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Thota, Prashanthi N; Gohel, Tushar; Lopez, Rocio; Gordon, Ilyssa O

    2016-06-01

    In patients who have undergone ablation therapy for treatment of Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia, histologic features of eosinophilic esophagitis, but not lymphocytic esophagitis, have been described. We evaluated for histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis and lymphocytic esophagitis and correlated with endoscopic findings in this population. A single-institution Barrett's esophagus registry was searched for patients who had received radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, or both for treatment of Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Clinical and endoscopic data were collected and biopsies were reviewed for inflammation and reactive changes at three time points: pre-intervention, first surveillance after ablation therapy, and most recent surveillance. Of the 173 patients initially identified, 102 met the inclusion criteria. Intraepithelial eosinophils were increased at first surveillance (60%, P=0.096) and last surveillance (69%, P=0.048) compared with pre-intervention (50%), although histologic evidence of post-ablation eosinophilic esophagitis was not significant. Prevalence of lymphocytic esophagitis was significantly higher at first surveillance (17%, P=0.02) and at last surveillance (43%, P<0.001), compared with pre-intervention (7%). Smoking, hyperlipidemia, and cryotherapy were identified as independent risk factors for developing histologic lymphocytic esophagitis. This is the first report that histologic evidence of lymphocytic esophagitis increased over time in patients undergoing ablation for Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Though the pathophysiology of lymphocytic esophagitis remains unknown, patients in our study with a history of smoking, hyperlipidemia, or cryotherapy were more likely to develop post-ablation lymphocytic esophagitis. PMID:26965580

  3. Fulminant phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum due to Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Ogura, Hiroshi; Seki, Masafumi; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-03-28

    We report a case of phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum in patient in an immunocompromised state. Culture of gastric juice and blood yielded Bacillus thuringiensis. This case showed that even low-virulence bacilli can cause lethal gastrointestinal phlegmonous gastritis in conditions of immunodeficiency. PMID:25834344

  4. Screening for Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: Rationale, Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Sarmed S.; Ragunath, Krish; Iyer, Prasad G.

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma continue to increase, strategies to counter this need to be explored. Screening for Barrett’s esophagus, which is the known precursor of a large majority of adenocarcinomas, has been debated without a firm consensus. Given evidence for and against perceived benefits of screening, the multitude of challenges in the implementation of such a strategy and in the downstream management of subjects with Barrett’s esophagus who could be diagnosed by screening, support for screening has been modest. Recent advances in form of development and initial accuracy of non-invasive tools for screening, risk assessment tools and biomarker panels to risk stratify subjects with BE, have spurred renewed interest in the early detection of Barrett’s esophagus and related neoplasia, particularly with the advent of effective endoscopic therapy. In this review, we explore in depth, the potential rationale for screening for Barrett’s esophagus, recent advances which have the potential of making screening feasible and also highlight some of the challenges which will have to be overcome to develop an effective approach to improve the outcomes of subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24887058

  5. Frequent methylation of eyes absent 4 gene in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hongzhi; Osborn, Neal K; Harrington, Jonathan J; Klatt, Kristie K; Molina, Julian R; Burgart, Lawrence J; Ahlquist, David A

    2005-04-01

    Most esophageal adenocarcinomas arise within Barrett's esophagus but the cause of this increasingly prevalent condition remains unknown. Early detection improves survival and discriminant screening markers for Barrett's esophagus and cancer are needed. This study was designed to explore the natural history of eyes absent 4 (EYA4) gene methylation in the neoplastic progression of Barrett's esophagus and to evaluate methylated EYA4 as a candidate marker. Aberrant promoter methylation of EYA4 was studied by methylation-specific PCR using bisulfite-treated DNA from esophageal adenocarcinomas, Barrett's esophagus, and normal epithelia, and then confirmed by sequencing. Eight cancer cell lines were treated with the demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and EYA4 mRNA expression with and without treatment was quantified by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. EYA4 hypermethylation was detected in 83% (33 of 40) of esophageal adenocarcinomas and 77% (27 of 35) of Barrett's tissues, but only in 3% (2 of 58) of normal esophageal and gastric mucosa samples (P < 0.001). The unmethylated cancer cell lines had much higher EYA4 mRNA expression than the methylated cancer cell lines. Demethylation caused by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased the mRNA expression level by a median of 3.2-fold in methylated cells, but its effect on unmethylated cells was negligible. Results indicate that aberrant promoter methylation of EYA4 is very common during tumorigenesis in Barrett's esophagus, occurs in early metaplasia, seems to be an important mechanism of down-regulating EYA4 expression, and represents an intriguing candidate marker for Barrett's metaplasia and esophageal cancer. PMID:15824152

  6. Temporal and spatial evolution of somatic chromosomal alterations: a case-cohort study of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C; Paulson, Thomas G; Sanchez, Carissa A; Arnaudo, Jessica; Liu, Karen; Sather, Cassandra L; Kostadinov, Rumen L; Odze, Robert D; Kuhner, Mary K; Maley, Carlo C; Self, Steven G; Vaughan, Thomas L; Blount, Patricia L; Reid, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    All cancers are believed to arise by dynamic, stochastic somatic genomic evolution with genome instability, generation of diversity, and selection of genomic alterations that underlie multistage progression to cancer. Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas have high levels of somatic copy number alterations. Barrett's esophagus is a risk factor for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma, and somatic chromosomal alterations (SCA) are known to occur in Barrett's esophagus. The vast majority (∼95%) of individuals with Barrett's esophagus do not progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma during their lifetimes, but a small subset develop esophageal adenocarcinoma, many of which arise rapidly even in carefully monitored patients without visible endoscopic abnormalities at the index endoscopy. Using a well-designed, longitudinal case-cohort study, we characterized SCA as assessed by single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays over space and time in 79 "progressors" with Barrett's esophagus as they approach the diagnosis of cancer and 169 "nonprogressors" with Barrett's esophagus who did not progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma over more than 20,425 person-months of follow-up. The genomes of nonprogressors typically had small localized deletions involving fragile sites and 9p loss/copy neutral LOH that generate little genetic diversity and remained relatively stable over prolonged follow-up. As progressors approach the diagnosis of cancer, their genomes developed chromosome instability with initial gains and losses, genomic diversity, and selection of SCAs followed by catastrophic genome doublings. Our results support a model of differential disease dynamics in which nonprogressor genomes largely remain stable over prolonged periods, whereas progressor genomes evolve significantly increased SCA and diversity within four years of esophageal adenocarcinoma diagnosis, suggesting a window of opportunity for early detection. PMID:24253313

  7. Expression of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Vagal Motor Neurons Innervating the Trachea and Esophagus in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ichi Matsuda, Ken; Bando, Hideki; Takanami, Keiko; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The medullary vagal motor nuclei, the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), innervate the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα), in relation to innervation of the trachea and esophagus via vagal motor nuclei in mice. AR and ERα were expressed in the rostral NA and in part of the DMV. Tracing experiments using cholera toxin B subunit demonstrated that neurons of vagal motor nuclei that innervate the trachea and esophagus express AR and ERα. There was no difference in expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between trachea- and esophagus-innervating neurons. These results suggest that sex steroid hormones may act on vagal motor nuclei via their receptors, thereby regulating functions of the trachea and esophagus. PMID:27006520

  8. Physiology of the upper segment, body, and lower segment of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry; Clavé, Pere; Farré, Ricard; Lecea, Begoña; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Ouyang, Ann; Regan, Julie; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The following discussion on the physiology of the esophagus includes commentaries on the function of the muscularis mucosa and submucosa as a mechanical antireflux barrier in the esophagus; the different mechanisms of neurological control in the esophageal striated and smooth muscle; new insights from animal models into the neurotransmitters mediating lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, peristalsis in the esophageal body (EB), and motility of esophageal smooth muscle; differentiation between in vitro properties of the lower esophageal circular muscle, clasp muscle, and sling fibers; alterations in the relationship between pharyngeal contraction and relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) in patients with dysphagia; the mechanical relationships between anterior hyoid movement, the extent of upper esophageal opening, and aspiration; the application of fluoroscopy and manometry with biomechanics to define the stages of UES opening; and nonpharmacological approaches to alter the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). PMID:24117648

  9. Patients Having Bariatric Surgery: Surgical Options in Morbidly Obese Patients with Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Braghetto, I; Csendes, A

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the currently knowledge and results observed in patients with obesity and Barrett's esophagus which were presented and discussed during the IFSO 2014 held in Montreal. In this meeting, the surgical options for the management after bariatric surgery were discussed. For this purpose, a complete revision of the available literature was done including Pubmed, Medline, Scielo database, own experience, and experts opinion. A total of 49 publications were reviewed and included in the present paper. The majority of authors agree that gastric bypass is the procedure of choice. Sleeve gastrectomy is not an absolute contraindication. Up to now, gastric bypass appears to be the best procedure for treatment of obese patients with Barrett's esophagus. Future investigations should give the definitive consensus. PMID:27167837

  10. Heterogeneous Vesicles in Mucous Epithelial Cells of Posterior Esophagus of Chinese Giant Salamander (Andrias Davidianus)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Zhong, S.; Ge, T.; Peng, S.; Yu, P.; Zhou, Z.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultra-structural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E). Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i) electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC); ii) electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC); and iii) mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC). PMID:26428885

  11. Advances in the management of Barrett’s esophagus and early esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajaypal; Chak, Amitabh

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has markedly increased in the United States over the last few decades. Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the most significant known risk factor for this malignancy. Theoretically, screening and treating early BE should help prevent EAC but the exact incidence of BE and its progression to EAC is not entirely known and cost-effectiveness studies for Barrett’s screening are lacking. Over the last few years, there have been major advances in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis and endoscopic management of BE. These developments focus on early recognition of advanced histology and endoscopic treatment of high-grade dysplasia. Advanced resection techniques now enable us to endoscopically treat early esophageal cancer. In this review, we will discuss these recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of Barrett’s esophagus and early esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26486568

  12. Laparoscopic transhiatal approach for resection of an adenocarcinoma in long-segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Kinoshita, Osamu; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma and is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is often preceded by a hiatal hernia. We describe a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in long-segment BE (LSBE) associated with a hiatal hernia that was successfully treated with a laparoscopic transhiatal approach (LTHA) without thoracotomy. The patient was a 42-year-old male who had previously undergone laryngectomy and tracheal separation to avoid repeated aspiration pneumonitis. An ulcerative lesion was found in a hiatal hernia by endoscopy and superficial esophageal cancer was also detected in the lower thoracic esophagus. The histopathological diagnosis of biopsy samples from both lesions was adenocarcinoma. There were difficulties with the thoracic approach because the patient had severe kyphosis and muscular contractures from cerebral palsy. Therefore, we performed subtotal esophagectomy by LTHA without thoracotomy. Using hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, the esophageal hiatus was divided and carbon dioxide was introduced into the mediastinum. A hernial sac was identified on the cranial side of the right crus of the diaphragm and carefully separated from the surrounding tissues. Abruption of the thoracic esophagus was performed up to the level of the arch of the azygos vein via LTHA. A cervical incision was made in the left side of the permanent tracheal stoma, the cervical esophagus was divided, and gastric tube reconstruction was performed via a posterior mediastinal route. The operative time was 175 min, and there was 61 mL of intra-operative bleeding. A histopathological examination revealed superficial adenocarcinoma in LSBE. Our surgical procedure provided a good surgical view and can be safely applied to patients with a hiatal hernia and kyphosis. PMID:26269688

  13. Caustic Injury and Stricture of the Esophagus After Long-Term Phenytoin Use

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Champeaux, Anne L.; Feldman, John C.; Richter, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with a history of epilepsy controlled with phenytoin presented for evaluation of dysphagia. History revealed the patient was taking his phenytoin daily without water. Barium esophagram showed severe stricturing of the mid-esophagus. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse gross mucosal abnormality with a thick stricture and occasional exudate. Biopsies were consistent with a drug-induced injury with lymphocytic infiltration and epithelial cell necrosis. PMID:26157921

  14. Common Variants Confer Susceptibility to Barrett's Esophagus: Insights from the First Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Palles, Claire; Findlay, John M; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Eight loci have been identified by the two genome-wide association studies of Barrett's esophagus that have been conducted to date. Esophageal adenocarcinoma cases were included in the second study following evidence that predisposing genetic variants for this cancer overlap with those for Barrett's esophagus. Genes with roles in embryonic development of the foregut are adjacent to 6 of the loci identified (FOXF1, BARX1, FOXP1, GDF7, TBX5, and ALDH1A2). An additional locus maps to a gene with known oncogenic potential (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1), but expression quantitative trait data implicates yet another gene involved in esophageal development (PBX4). These results strongly support a model whereby dysregulation of genes involved in esophageal and thoracic development increases susceptibility to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, probably by reducing anatomical antireflux mechanisms. An additional signal at 6p21 in the major histocompatibility complex also reinforces evidence that immune and inflammatory response to reflux is involved in the development of both diseases. All of the variants identified are intronic or intergenic rather than coding and are presumed to be or to mark regulatory variants. As with genome-wide association studies of other diseases, the functional variants at each locus are yet to be identified and the genes affected need confirming. In this chapter as well as discussing the biology behind each genome-wide association signal, we review the requirements for successfully conducting genome-wide association studies and discuss how progress in understanding the genetic variants that contribute to Barrett's esophagus/esophageal adenocarcinoma susceptibility compares to other cancers. PMID:27573776

  15. Curative effect of photodynamic therapy for 42 cases of moderate or late stage in esophagus cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiao-Min; Shen, Guang-Rong; Chen, Weng-Ge; Guo, Tao

    1998-11-01

    34 patients with advanced esophagus cancer and 8 cases of cancer of gastric cardia were treated by photodynamic therapy. The therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment was evaluated according the criteria used in China. CR 63.2 percent SR 11.3 percent, MR 2 percent. The total effective rate was 76.5 percent. There was no significant side effect in this group except mild skin photosensitization and pigmentation and exacerbation of pain in a few cases.

  16. Relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhabitants of China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Lu, Shan-Ming; Tian, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Hu; Xiao-YunLi; Li, De-Rui; Zheng, Zhi-Chao

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhabitants of China, which is a unique Littoral high-risk area of esophageal carcinoma in China. The poor communication and transportation in the past has made Chaoshan a relatively closed area and kept its culture and custure of old China thousand years ago. METHODS: Data on age, sex, ABO blood type and X-ray or pathological diagnose of the patients with carcinoma of esophagus or cardia were collected from the Tumor Hospital. First Affiliated Hospital, Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College; and the Central Hospital of Shantou and the Central Hospital of Jieyang. A total of 6685 patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC) and 2955 patients with cardiac cancer (CC) in Chaoshan district were retrospectively assessed for their association with ABO blood groups. RESULTS: The distribution of ABO blood groups in patients with EC or CC was similar to the normal local population in Chaoshan. However, blood group B in male patients with CC and in the patients with carcinoma in the upper third esophagus was 2.3% and 4.7% higher than the corresponding controls. The relative risk B∶O was 1.1415 (P < 0.05) and 1.2696 (P < 0.05), respectively. No relationship was found between ABO blood groups and tumor differentiation. CONCLUSION: ABO blood group B is associated with the incidence of CC in male individuals and carcinoma in the upper third esophagus. The distribution of ABO blood groups varies in the different geographical and ethnic groups. As a result, proper controls are very important for such studies. PMID:11819849

  17. The Trend in Histological Changes and the Incidence of Esophagus Cancer in Iran (2003–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Maleki, Farzad; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Salemi, Morteza; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the sixth cause of death in the world, there was a lack of population-based information on the trend and incidence rate of esophagus cancer, so this study aimed to determine the incidence and pathological changes of esophagus cancer in Iran. Methods: In this study, data were extracted from annual cancer registry reports of Iranian ministry of health between 2003 and 2008. Standardized incidence rates were calculated using the world standard population, and incidence rate was calculated by age groups, sex, and histological type. Data on epidemiologic trend and histology were analyzed using Joinpoint software package. Results: In this study, there were 18,177 recorded cases of esophagus cancer. Of all cases, 45.72% were females and 54.28% were males. Sex ratio was 1.19. The most common histological types related to squamous cell carcinoma NOS and adenocarcinoma NOS were 64.53% and 10.37%, respectively. The trend of annual changes of incidence rate significantly increased in both sexes. The annual percentage changes, the incidence rate was 7.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.3–12.6) for women and 9.6 (95% CI: 6.0–13.2) for men. The histology type of SCC, large cell, nonkeratinizing and SCC, keratinizing and SCC, NOS had a significant decreasing trend in total population (P < 0.05). Conclusions: According to this study, the trend of age-standardized incidence rate of esophagus cancer in Iran is rising. Hence, to prevent and control this cancer, it is necessary to investigate related risk factors and implement prevention programs in Iran. PMID:26955461

  18. Estimating the Esophagus Cancer Incidence Rate in Ardabil, Iran: A Capture-Recapture Method

    PubMed Central

    Khodadost, Mahmoud; Yavari, Parvin; Khodadost, Behnam; Babaei, Masoud; Sarvi, Fatemeh; Khatibi, Seyed Reza; Barzegari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate cancer registry and awareness of cancer incidence rate is essential in order to define strategies for cancer prevention and control programs. Capture-recapture methods have been recommended for reducing bias and increase the accuracy of cancer incidence estimation. Objectives: This study aimed to estimate the esophagus cancer incidence by capture-recapture method based on Ardabil population-based cancer registry data. Patients and Methods: Total new cases of esophagus cancer reported by three sources of pathology reports, medical records, and death certificates to Ardabil province cancer registry center in 2006 and 2008 were enrolled in the study. All duplicated cases between three sources were identified and removed using Excel software. Some characteristics such as name, surname, father’s name, date of birth and ICD codes related to their cancer type were used for data linkage and finding the common cases among three sources. The incidence rate per 100,000 was estimated based on capture-recapture method using the log-linear models. We used BIC, G2 and AIC statistics to select the best-fit model. Results: After removing duplicates, total 471 new cases of esophagus cancer were reported from three sources. The model with linkage between pathology reports, medical record sources and independence with the death certificates source was the best fitted model. The reported incidence rate for the years 2006 and 2008 was 18.77 and 18.51 per 100,000, respectively. In log-linear analysis, the estimated incidence rate for the years 2006 and 2008 was 49.71 and 53.87 per 100,000 populations, respectively. Conclusions: Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that none of the sources of pathology reports, death certificates and medical records individually or collectively were fully covered the incidence cases of esophagus cancer and need to apply some changes in data abstracting and case finding.

  19. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  20. The efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in caustic esophagus injury: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, Murat; Caliskan, Bahadir; Demirci, Hakan; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Kekilli, Murat; Polat, Zulfikar; Gunal, Armagan; Akinci, Melih; Uysal, Cagri; Eksert, Sami; Gurel, Hasan; Celebi, Gurkan; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, Ali Ugur; Bagci, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10). Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20). Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (n: 10). Group 4, sham operated (n: 10). Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed. PMID:24876849

  1. Poly-ε-caprolactone mesh as a scaffold for in vivo tissue engineering in rabbit esophagus.

    PubMed

    Diemer, P; Markoew, S; Le, D Q S; Qvist, N

    2015-04-01

    Repair of long-gap esophageal atresia is associated with a high degree of complications. Tissue engineering on a scaffold of a bioresorbable material could be a solution. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo tissue engineering of smooth muscle cells and epithelium on a poly-ε-caprolactone mesh in rabbit esophagus. Twenty female rabbits had a window of 0.6 × 1 cm cut in the abdominal part of the esophagus. The defect was covered with a poly-ε-caprolactone mesh. The rabbits were killed on postoperative day 28-30, and mesh with surrounding esophagus was removed for histological examination. Fifteen rabbits survived the trial period. Six had no complications and had the mesh in situ. They all had ingrowth of epithelial and smooth muscle cells and an almost completely degraded mesh. Nine rabbits developed pseudo-diverticula. It proved possible to engineer both epithelial and smooth muscle cells on the poly-ε-caprolactone mesh in spite of a fast mesh degradation. The latter may be the explanation to the development of pseudo-diverticula; this is a problem that needs attention in future experimental trials. PMID:24446895

  2. Compartmentalization of the foregut tube: developmental origins of the trachea and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Fausett, Sarah R; Klingensmith, John

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian trachea and esophagus share a common embryonic origin. They arise by compartmentalization of a single foregut tube, composed of foregut endoderm (FGE) and surrounding mesenchyme, around midgestation. Aberrant compartmentalization is thought to lead to relatively common human birth defects, such as esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF), which can prevent or disrupt a newborn infant's ability to feed and breathe. Despite its relevance to human health, morphogenesis of the anterior foregut is still poorly understood. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of trachea and esophagus formation from a common precursor, including the embryonic origin of the FGE, current models for foregut morphogenesis, relevant human birth defects, insights from rodent models, and the emerging picture of the mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal foregut compartmentalization. Recent research suggests that a number of intercellular signaling pathways and several intracellular effectors are essential for correct formation of the trachea and esophagus. Different types of defects in the formation of either ventral or dorsal foregut tissues can disrupt compartmentalization in rodent models. This implies that EA/TEF defects in humans may also arise by multiple mechanisms. Although our understanding of foregut compartmentalization is growing rapidly, it is still incomplete. Future research should focus on synthesizing detailed information gleaned from both human patients and rodent models to further our understanding of this enigmatic process. PMID:23801435

  3. Circumferential optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the swine esophagus using a micromotor balloon catheter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Liang, Kaicheng; Wang, Zhao; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a micromotor balloon imaging catheter for ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) which provides wide area, circumferential structural and angiographic imaging of the esophagus without contrast agents. Using a 1310 nm MEMS tunable wavelength swept VCSEL light source, the system has a 1.2 MHz A-scan rate and ~8.5 µm axial resolution in tissue. The micromotor balloon catheter enables circumferential imaging of the esophagus at 240 frames per second (fps) with a ~30 µm (FWHM) spot size. Volumetric imaging is achieved by proximal pullback of the micromotor assembly within the balloon at 1.5 mm/sec. Volumetric data consisting of 4200 circumferential images of 5,000 A-scans each over a 2.6 cm length, covering a ~13 cm2 area is acquired in <18 seconds. A non-rigid image registration algorithm is used to suppress motion artifacts from non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD), cardiac motion or respiration. En face OCT images at various depths can be generated. OCT angiography (OCTA) is computed using intensity decorrelation between sequential pairs of circumferential scans and enables three-dimensional visualization of vasculature. Wide area volumetric OCT and OCTA imaging of the swine esophagus in vivo is demonstrated. PMID:27570688

  4. Circumferential optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the swine esophagus using a micromotor balloon catheter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Liang, Kaicheng; Wang, Zhao; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a micromotor balloon imaging catheter for ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) which provides wide area, circumferential structural and angiographic imaging of the esophagus without contrast agents. Using a 1310 nm MEMS tunable wavelength swept VCSEL light source, the system has a 1.2 MHz A-scan rate and ~8.5 µm axial resolution in tissue. The micromotor balloon catheter enables circumferential imaging of the esophagus at 240 frames per second (fps) with a ~30 µm (FWHM) spot size. Volumetric imaging is achieved by proximal pullback of the micromotor assembly within the balloon at 1.5 mm/sec. Volumetric data consisting of 4200 circumferential images of 5,000 A-scans each over a 2.6 cm length, covering a ~13 cm(2) area is acquired in <18 seconds. A non-rigid image registration algorithm is used to suppress motion artifacts from non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD), cardiac motion or respiration. En face OCT images at various depths can be generated. OCT angiography (OCTA) is computed using intensity decorrelation between sequential pairs of circumferential scans and enables three-dimensional visualization of vasculature. Wide area volumetric OCT and OCTA imaging of the swine esophagus in vivo is demonstrated. PMID:27570688

  5. The evolution of viscous flow structures in the esophagus during tracheoesophageal speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron; Hemsing, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A laryngectomy is an invasive surgical procedure whereby the entire larynx is removed, usually as a result of cancer. Removal of the larynx renders conventional voiced speech impossible, with the most common remediation following surgery being tracheoeosphageal (TE) speech. TE speech is produced by inserting a one-way valve to connect the posterior wall of the trachea with the anterior wall of the esophagus. As air is forced up from the lungs it passes through the prosthesis and into the esophagus. The resulting esophageal pressure field incites self-sustained oscillations of the pharyngoesophageal segment (PES), which ultimately produces sound. Unfortunately, the physics of TE speech are not well understood, with up to 50% of individuals unable to produce intelligible sound. This failure can be related to a lack of understanding regarding the esophageal flow field, where all previous scientific investigations have assumed the flow is one-dimensional and steady. An experimental TE speech flow facility was constructed and particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired at the exit of the model prosthesis (entrance of the esophagus). The flow is observed to be highly unsteady, and the formation and propagation of vortical flow structures through the esophageal tract are identified. Observations regarding the influence of the flow dynamics on the esophageal pressure field and its relation to the successful production of TE speech are discussed.

  6. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Murat; Caliskan, Bahadir; Demirci, Hakan; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Kekilli, Murat; Polat, Zulfikar; Gunal, Armagan; Akinci, Melih; Uysal, Cagri; Eksert, Sami; Gurel, Hasan; Celebi, Gurkan; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, Ali Ugur; Bagci, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10). Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20). Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (n: 10). Group 4, sham operated (n: 10). Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed. PMID:24876849

  7. A functional module-based exploration between inflammation and cancer in esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nannan; Li, Chunhua; Huang, Yan; Yi, Ying; Bo, Wanlan; Li, Chunmiao; Li, Yue; Hu, Yongfei; Li, Kongning; Wang, Hong; Zhuang, Liwei; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation contributing to the underlying progression of diverse human cancers has been generally appreciated, however, explorations into the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus are still at its early stage. In our study, we presented a functional module-based approach, in combination with multiple data resource (gene expression, protein-protein interactions (PPI), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations) to decipher the underlying links. Via mapping differentially expressed disease genes, functional disease modules were identified. As indicated, those common genes and interactions tended to play important roles in linking inflammation and cancer. Based on crosstalk analysis, we demonstrated that, although most disease genes were not shared by both kinds of modules, they might act through participating in the same or similar functions to complete the molecular links. Additionally, we applied pivot analysis to extract significant regulators for per significant crosstalk module pair. As shown, pivot regulators might manipulate vital parts of the module subnetworks, and then work together to bridge inflammation and cancer in esophagus. Collectively, based on our functional module analysis, we demonstrated that shared genes or interactions, significant crosstalk modules, and those significant pivot regulators were served as different functional parts underlying the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus. PMID:26489668

  8. Somatically Acquired LINE-1 Insertions in Normal Esophagus Undergo Clonal Expansion in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCC) is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the world and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage when successful treatment is challenging. Understanding the mutational profile of this cancer may identify new treatment strategies. Because somatic retrotransposition has been shown in tumors of the gastrointestinal system, we focused on LINE-1 (L1) mobilization as a source of genetic instability in this cancer. We hypothesized that retrotransposition is ongoing in SCC patients. The expression of L1 encoded proteins is necessary for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of L1 open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p). Using immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p expression in all four SCC cases evaluated. Using L1-seq, we identified and validated 74 somatic insertions in eight tumors of the nine evaluated. Of these, 12 insertions appeared to be somatic, not genetically inherited, and sub-clonal (i.e., present in less than one copy per genome equivalent) in the adjacent normal esophagus (NE), while clonal in the tumor. Our results indicate that L1 retrotransposition is active in SCC of the esophagus and that insertion events are present in histologically NE that expands clonally in the subsequent tumor. PMID:27319353

  9. Embracing change: striated-for-smooth muscle replacement in esophagus development.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Robert S; Chihara, Daisuke; Romer, Anthony I

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport food from the oropharyngeal region to the stomach via waves of peristalsis and transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, is ensheathed by the muscularis externa (ME). However, while the ME of the gastrointestinal tract distal to the esophagus is exclusively smooth muscle, the esophageal ME of many vertebrate species comprises a variable amount of striated muscle. The esophageal ME is initially composed only of smooth muscle, but its developmental maturation involves proximal-to-distal replacement of smooth muscle with striated muscle. This fascinating phenomenon raises two important questions: what is the developmental origin of the striated muscle precursor cells, and what are the cellular and morphogenetic mechanisms underlying the process? Studies addressing these questions have provided controversial answers. In this review, we discuss the development of ideas in this area and recent work that has shed light on these issues. A working model has emerged that should permit deeper understanding of the role of ME development and maturation in esophageal disorders and in the functional and evolutionary underpinnings of the variable degree of esophageal striated myogenesis in vertebrate species. PMID:27504178

  10. Endoscopic applications of cryospray ablation therapy-from Barrett's esophagus and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash

    2016-08-25

    In the last decade, the treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus has evolved into primarily endoscopic therapy. Many techniques have become well-established to destroy or remove the mucosal lining of Barrett's esophagus. One of the newest therapies, cryospray ablation, has become a modality to treat both dysplastic Barrett's esophagus as well as esophageal carcinoma. In endoscopic applications, the cryogen used is either liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide which causes tissue destruction through rapid freeze-thaw cycles. Unlike other endoscopic ablation techniques, its unique mechanism of action and depth of tissue injury allow cryoablation to be used effectively in flat or nodular disease. It can be combined with other modalities such as endoscopic mucosal resection or radiofrequency ablation. Its esophageal applications stem well-beyond Barrett's into ablation of early carcinoma, palliative debulking of advanced carcinoma and reduction of tumor ingrowth into stents placed for dysphagia. Although there are fewer reported studies of endoscopic cryoablation in the literature compared to other endoscopic ablation methods, emerging research continues to demonstrate its efficacy as a durable ablation technology with a variety of applications. The aim of this review is to examine the pathophysiology of endoscopic cryospray ablation, describe its outcomes in Barrett's with dysplasia and esophageal carcinoma, and examine its role in other gastrointestinal applications such as hemostasis in the stomach and rectum. PMID:27621766

  11. Endoscopic applications of cryospray ablation therapy-from Barrett’s esophagus and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the treatment of dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus has evolved into primarily endoscopic therapy. Many techniques have become well-established to destroy or remove the mucosal lining of Barrett’s esophagus. One of the newest therapies, cryospray ablation, has become a modality to treat both dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus as well as esophageal carcinoma. In endoscopic applications, the cryogen used is either liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide which causes tissue destruction through rapid freeze-thaw cycles. Unlike other endoscopic ablation techniques, its unique mechanism of action and depth of tissue injury allow cryoablation to be used effectively in flat or nodular disease. It can be combined with other modalities such as endoscopic mucosal resection or radiofrequency ablation. Its esophageal applications stem well-beyond Barrett’s into ablation of early carcinoma, palliative debulking of advanced carcinoma and reduction of tumor ingrowth into stents placed for dysphagia. Although there are fewer reported studies of endoscopic cryoablation in the literature compared to other endoscopic ablation methods, emerging research continues to demonstrate its efficacy as a durable ablation technology with a variety of applications. The aim of this review is to examine the pathophysiology of endoscopic cryospray ablation, describe its outcomes in Barrett’s with dysplasia and esophageal carcinoma, and examine its role in other gastrointestinal applications such as hemostasis in the stomach and rectum. PMID:27621766

  12. Constrained Score Statistics Identify Genetic Variants Interacting with Multiple Risk Factors in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Tapsoba, Jean de Dieu; Buas, Matthew F; Risch, Harvey A; Vaughan, Thomas L

    2016-08-01

    Few gene-environment interactions (G × E) have been discovered in cancer epidemiology thus far, in part due to the large number of possible G × E to be investigated and inherent low statistical power of traditional analytic methods for discovering G × E. We consider simultaneously testing for interactions between several related exposures and a genetic variant in a genome-wide study. To improve power, constrained testing strategies are proposed for multivariate gene-environment interactions at two levels: interactions that have the same direction (one-sided or bidirectional hypotheses) or are proportional to respective exposure main effects (a variant of Tukey's one-degree test). Score statistics were developed to expedite the genome-wide computation. We conducted extensive simulations to evaluate validity and power performance of the proposed statistics, applied them to the genetic and environmental exposure data for esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus from the Barretts Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON), and discovered three loci simultaneously interacting with gastresophageal reflux, obesity, and tobacco smoking with genome-wide significance. These findings deepen understanding of the genetic and environmental architecture of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27486777

  13. Secondary Chemoprevention of Barrett’s Esophagus With Celecoxib: Results of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Piantadosi, Steven; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Weinstein, Wilfred M.; Herman, James G.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Yang, Vincent W.; Shar, Albert O.; Hawk, Ernest; Forastiere, Arlene A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Barrett’s esophagus is a premalignant condition that is a risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma, a disease whose incidence is rapidly increasing. Because aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, such as celecoxib, may decrease the risk of developing esophageal cancer, we investigated the effect of long-term administration of celecoxib in patients with Barrett’s esophagus with dysplasia. Methods Chemoprevention for Barrett’s Esophagus Trial (CBET) is a phase IIb multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial of celecoxib in patients with Barrett’s esophagus and low- or high-grade dysplasia. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with 200 mg of celecoxib or placebo, both administered orally twice daily, and then stratified by grade of dysplasia. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 48 weeks of treatment in the proportion of biopsy samples with dysplasia between the celecoxib and placebo arms. Secondary and tertiary outcomes included evaluation of changes in histology and expression levels of relevant biomarkers. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results From April 1, 2000, through June 30, 2003, 222 patients were registered into CBET, and 100 of them with low- or high-grade Barrett’s dysplasia were randomly assigned to treatment (49 to celecoxib and 51 to placebo). After 48 weeks of treatment, no difference was observed in the median change in the proportion of biopsy samples with dysplasia or cancer between treatment groups in either the low-grade (median change with celecoxib = − 0.09, interquartile range [IQR] = − 0.32 to 0.14 and with placebo = − 0.07, IQR = − 0.26 to 0.12; P = .64) or high-grade (median change with celecoxib = 0.12, IQR = − 0.31 to 0.55, and with placebo = 0.02, IQR = − 0.24 to 0.28; P = .88) stratum. No statistically significant differences in total surface area of the Barrett’s esophagus; in prostaglandin levels; in cyclooxygenase-1/2 mRNA levels

  14. Proton Pump Inhibitors Decrease Eotaxin-3 Expression in the Proximal Esophagus of Children with Esophageal Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason Y.; Zhang, Xi; Nguyen, Nathalie; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart J.; Cheng, Edaire

    2014-01-01

    Objective Besides reducing gastric acid secretion, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) suppress Th2-cytokine-stimulated expression of an eosinophil chemoattractant (eotaxin-3) by esophageal epithelial cells through acid-independent, anti-inflammatory mechanisms. To explore acid-inhibitory and acid-independent, anti-inflammatory PPI effects in reducing esophageal eosinophilia, we studied eotaxin-3 expression by the proximal and distal esophagus of children with esophageal eosinophilia before and after PPI therapy. In vitro, we studied acid and bile salt effects on IL-13-stimulated eotaxin-3 expression by esophageal epithelial cells. Design Among 264 children with esophageal eosinophilia seen at a tertiary pediatric hospital from 2008 through 2012, we identified 10 with esophageal biopsies before and after PPI treatment alone. We correlated epithelial cell eotaxin-3 immunostaining with eosinophil numbers in those biopsies. In vitro, we measured eotaxin-3 protein secretion by esophageal squamous cells stimulated with IL-13 and exposed to acid and/or bile salt media, with or without omeprazole. Results There was strong correlation between peak eosinophil numbers and peak eotaxin-3-positive epithelial cell numbers in esophageal biopsies. Eotaxin-3 expression decreased significantly with PPIs only in the proximal esophagus. In esophageal cells, exposure to acid-bile salt medium significantly suppressed IL-13-induced eotaxin-3 secretion; omeprazole added to the acid-bile salt medium further suppressed that eotaxin-3 secretion, but not as profoundly as at pH-neutral conditions. Conclusion In children with esophageal eosinophilia, PPIs significantly decrease eotaxin-3 expression in the proximal but not the distal esophagus. In esophageal squamous cells, acid and bile salts decrease Th2 cytokine-stimulated eotaxin-3 secretion profoundly, possibly explaining the disparate PPI effects on the proximal and distal esophagus. In the distal esophagus, where acid reflux is greatest, a PPI

  15. Mesoesophagus and other fascial structures of the abdominal and lower thoracic esophagus: a histological study using human embryos and fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Si Eun; Bae, Sang In; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A term "mesoesophagus" has been often used by surgeons, but the morphology was not described well. To better understand the structures attaching the human abdominal and lower thoracic esophagus to the body wall, we examined serial or semiserial sections from 10 embryos and 9 fetuses. The esophagus was initially embedded in a large posterior mesenchymal tissue, which included the vertebral column and aorta. Below the tracheal bifurcation at the fifth week, the esophagus formed a mesentery-like structure, which we call the "mesoesophagus," that was sculpted by the enlarging lungs and pleural cavity. The pneumatoenteric recess of the pleuroperitoneal canal was observed in the lowest part of the mesoesophagus. At the seventh week, the mesoesophagus was divided into the upper long and lower short parts by the diaphragm. Near the esophageal hiatus, the pleural cavity provided 1 or 2 recesses in the upper side, while the fetal adrenal gland in the left side was attached to the lower side of the mesoesophagus. At the 10th and 18th week, the mesoesophagus remained along the lower thoracic esophagus, but the abdominal esophagus attached to the diaphragm instead of to the left adrenal. The mesoesophagus did not contain any blood vessels from the aorta and to the azygos vein. The posterior attachment of the abdominal esophagus seemed to develop to the major part of the phrenoesophageal membrane with modification from the increased mass of the left fetal adrenal. After postnatal degeneration of the fetal adrenal, the abdominal esophagus might again obtain a mesentery. Consequently, the mesoesophagus seemed to correspond to a small area containing the pulmonary ligament and aorta in adults. PMID:25548720

  16. Whole-genome sequencing provides new insights into the clonal architecture of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Andrew; Cheetham, R. Keira; Northen, Helen; O’Donovan, Maria; Malhotra, Shalini; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ivakhno, Sergii; He, Miao; Weaver, Jamie M.J.; Lynch, Andy G.; Kingsbury, Zoya; Ross, Mark; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular genetic relationship between esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its precursor lesion, Barrett’s esophagus, is poorly understood. Using whole-genome sequencing on 23 paired Barrett’s esophagus and EAC samples, together with one in-depth Barrett’s esophagus case-study sampled over time and space, we have provided new insights on the following aspects: i) Barrett’s esophagus is polyclonal and highly mutated even in the absence of dysplasia; ii) when cancer develops, copy number increases and heterogeneity persists such that the spectrum of mutations often shows surprisingly little overlap between EAC and adjacent Barrett’s esophagus; and iii) despite differences in specific coding mutations the mutational context suggests a common causative insult underlying these two conditions. From a clinical perspective, the histopathological assessment of dysplasia appears to be a poor reflection of the molecular disarray within the Barrett’s epithelium and a molecular Cytosponge™ technique overcomes sampling bias and has capacity to reflect the entire clonal architecture. PMID:26192915

  17. MicroRNA Expression Differentiates Squamous Epithelium from Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Owzar, Kouros; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Westfall, Kristen; Anderson, Blair R.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Diehl, Anna Mae; Provenzale, Dawn; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current strategies fail to identify most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) before the disease becomes advanced and incurable. Given the dismal prognosis associated with EAC, improvements in detection of early-stage esophageal neoplasia are needed. Aims We sought to assess whether differential expression of microRNAs could discriminate between squamous epithelium, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and EAC. Methods We analyzed microRNA expression in a discovery cohort of human endoscopic biopsy samples from 36 patients representing normal squamous esophagus (n=11), BE (n=14), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC (n=11). RNA was assessed using microarrays representing 847 human microRNAs followed by qRT-PCR verification of nine microRNAs. In a second cohort (n=18), qRT-PCR validation of five miRNAs was performed. Expression of 59 microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature was assessed in our training cohort. Known esophageal cell lines were used to compare miRNA expression to tissue miRNAs. Results After controlling for multiple comparisons, we found 34 miRNAs differentially expressed between squamous esophagus and BE/EAC by microarray analysis. However, miRNA expression did not reliably differentiate non-dysplastic BE from EAC. In the validation cohort, all five microRNAs selected for qRT-PCR validation differentiated between squamous samples and BE/EAC. Microarray results supported 14 of the previously reported microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature. Cell lines did not generally reflect miRNA expression found in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate that miRNAs differ between squamous esophageal epithelium and BE/EAC, but do not distinguish between BE and EAC. We suggest prospective evaluation of miRNAs in patients at high risk for EAC. PMID:23925817

  18. Diagnosis of Neoplasia in Barrett’s Esophagus using Vital-dye Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Daniel P.; Parikh, Neil; Chang, Shannon; Peng, Paul; Thekkek, Nadhi; Lee, Michelle H.; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    The ability to differentiate benign metaplasia in Barrett’s Esophagus (BE) from neoplasia in vivo remains difficult as both tissue types can be flat and indistinguishable with white light imaging alone. As a result, a modality that highlights glandular architecture would be useful to discriminate neoplasia from benign epithelium in the distal esophagus. VFI is a novel technique that uses an exogenous topical fluorescent contrast agent to delineate high grade dysplasia and cancer from benign epithelium. Specifically, the fluorescent images provide spatial resolution of 50 to 100 μm and a field of view up to 2.5 cm, allowing endoscopists to visualize glandular morphology. Upon excitation, classic Barrett’s metaplasia appears as continuous, evenly-spaced glands and an overall homogenous morphology; in contrast, neoplastic tissue appears crowded with complete obliteration of the glandular framework. Here we provide an overview of the instrumentation and enumerate the protocol of this new technique. While VFI affords a gastroenterologist with the glandular architecture of suspicious tissue, cellular dysplasia cannot be resolved with this modality. As such, one cannot morphologically distinguish Barrett’s metaplasia from BE with Low-Grade Dysplasia via this imaging modality. By trading off a decrease in resolution with a greater field of view, this imaging system can be used at the very least as a red-flag imaging device to target and biopsy suspicious lesions; yet, if the accuracy measures are promising, VFI may become the standard imaging technique for the diagnosis of neoplasia (defined as either high grade dysplasia or cancer) in the distal esophagus. PMID:24893592

  19. Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (clinical): LES dysfunction, hiatal hernia, peristaltic defects

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Barrett’s esophagus, with the potential to develop into esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), is a major complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, about 50% of patients developing EAC had no known GERD beforehand. Hence, while GERD symptoms, esophagitis, and Barrett’s have a number of common determinants (esophagogastric junction (EGJ) incompetence, impaired esophageal clearance mechanisms, hiatus hernia) they also have some independent determinants. Further, although excess esophageal acid exposure plays a major role in the genesis of long-segment Barrett’s esophagus there is minimal evidence supporting this for short-segment Barrett’s. Hence, these may have unique pathophysiological features as well. Long-segment Barrett’s seems to share most, if not all, of the risk factors for esophagitis, particularly high-grade esophagitis. However, it is uncertain if EGJ function and acid clearance are more severely impaired in patients with long-segment Barrett’s compared to patients with high-grade esophagitis. With respect to short-segment Barrett’s, the acid pocket may play an important pathogenic role. Conceptually, extension of the acid pocket into the distal esophagus, also known as intra-sphincteric reflux, provides a mechanism or acid exposure of the distal esophageal mucosa without the occurrence of discrete reflux events, which are more likely to prompt reflux symptoms and lead to the development of esophagitis. Hence, intra-sphincteric reflux related to extension of the acid/no acid interface at the proximal margin of the acid pocket may be key in the development of short segment Barrett’s. However, currently this is still somewhat speculative and further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:25743453

  20. Deletion at Fragile Sites is a Common and Early Event in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Lisa A.; Kostadinov, Rumen; Barrett, Michael T.; Peiffer, Daniel A.; Pokholok, Dimitry; Odze, Robert; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Maley, Carlo C.; Reid, Brian J.; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus is a premalignant intermediate to esophageal adenocarcinoma, which develops in the context of chronic inflammation and exposure to bile and acid. We asked whether there might be common genomic alterations that could be identified as potential clinical biomarker(s) for Barrett’s esophagus by whole genome profiling. We detected copy number alterations and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at fifty-six fragile sites in 20 patients with premalignant Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Chromosomal fragile sites are particularly sensitive to DNA breaks and have been shown to be frequent sites of rearrangement or loss in many human cancers. 78% of all genomic alterations detected by array-CGH were associated with fragile sites. Copy number losses in early BE were observed at particularly high frequency at FRA3B (81%), FRA9A/C (71.4%), FRA5E (52.4%) and FRA 4D (52.4%), and at lower frequencies in other fragile sites, including FRA1K (42.9%), FRAXC (42.9%), FRA 12B (33.3%) and FRA16D (33.3%). Due to the consistency of the region of copy number loss, we were able to verify these results by quantitative PCR which detected loss of FRA3B and FRA16D, in 83% and 40% of early molecular stage BE patients respectively. LOH in these cases was confirmed via pyrosequencing at FRA3B and FRA16D (75% and 70% respectively). Deletion and genomic instability at FRA3B and other fragile sites could thus be a biomarker of genetic damage in BE patients and a potential biomarker of cancer risk. PMID:20647332

  1. Diagnosis of neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus using vital-dye enhanced fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Perl, Daniel P; Parikh, Neil; Chang, Shannon; Peng, Paul; Thekkek, Nadhi; Lee, Michelle H; Polydorides, Alexandros D; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    The ability to differentiate benign metaplasia in Barrett's Esophagus (BE) from neoplasia in vivo remains difficult as both tissue types can be flat and indistinguishable with white light imaging alone. As a result, a modality that highlights glandular architecture would be useful to discriminate neoplasia from benign epithelium in the distal esophagus. VFI is a novel technique that uses an exogenous topical fluorescent contrast agent to delineate high grade dysplasia and cancer from benign epithelium. Specifically, the fluorescent images provide spatial resolution of 50 to 100 μm and a field of view up to 2.5 cm, allowing endoscopists to visualize glandular morphology. Upon excitation, classic Barrett's metaplasia appears as continuous, evenly-spaced glands and an overall homogenous morphology; in contrast, neoplastic tissue appears crowded with complete obliteration of the glandular framework. Here we provide an overview of the instrumentation and enumerate the protocol of this new technique. While VFI affords a gastroenterologist with the glandular architecture of suspicious tissue, cellular dysplasia cannot be resolved with this modality. As such, one cannot morphologically distinguish Barrett's metaplasia from BE with Low-Grade Dysplasia via this imaging modality. By trading off a decrease in resolution with a greater field of view, this imaging system can be used at the very least as a red-flag imaging device to target and biopsy suspicious lesions; yet, if the accuracy measures are promising, VFI may become the standard imaging technique for the diagnosis of neoplasia (defined as either high grade dysplasia or cancer) in the distal esophagus. PMID:24893592

  2. Involved-field irradiation in definitive chemoradiotherapy for T4 squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Li, M.; Zhao, F.; Zhang, X.; Shi, F.; Zhu, H.; Han, A.; Zhang, Y.; Kong, L.; Yu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (ccrt) is currently a therapeutic option for locally advanced esophageal cancer. However, clinical practice differs with respect to the target volume for irradiation. The purpose of the present study was to analyze failure patterns and survival, and to determine the feasibility of using involved-field irradiation (ifi) with concurrent chemotherapy for T4 squamous cell carcinoma (scc) of the esophagus. Methods Between January 2003 and January 2013, 56 patients with clinical T4M0 scc of the esophagus received ccrt using ifi. The radiation field included the primary tumour and clinically involved lymph nodes. Target volumes and sites of failure were analyzed, as were treatment-related toxicity and survival time. Results In this 56-patient cohort, 13 patients (23.2%) achieved a complete response, and 21 (37.5%) achieved a partial response, for a total response rate of 60.7%. The major toxicities experienced were leucocytopenia and esophagitis, with 14 patients (25.0%) experiencing grade 3 toxicities. At a median follow-up of 34 months, 48 patients (85.7%) had experienced failure: 39 (69.6%) in-field, 7 (12.5%) elective nodal, and 19 (33.9%) distant. Only 1 patient (1.8%) experienced isolated elective nodal failure. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 39.3%, 21.4%, and 12.5% respectively. Conclusions For patients with T4M0 scc of the esophagus, definitive ccrt using ifi resulted in an acceptable rate of isolated elective nodal failure and an overall survival comparable to that achieved with elective nodal irradiation. A limited radiation therapy target volume, including only clinically involved lesions, would therefore be a feasible choice for this patient subgroup. PMID:27122981

  3. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  4. LINE-1 expression and retrotransposition in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Rodić, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Darbari, Isha; Abril, Gabriela; Choi, Jungbin A; Young Ahn, Ji; Cheng, Yulan; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Meltzer, Stephen J; Kazazian, Haig H

    2015-09-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common disease in which the lining of the esophagus transitions from stratified squamous epithelium to metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes individuals to developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We hypothesized that BE provides a unique environment for increased long-interspersed element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition. To this end, we evaluated 5 patients with benign BE, 5 patients with BE and concomitant EAC, and 10 additional patients with EAC to determine L1 activity in this progressive disease. After L1-seq, we confirmed 118 somatic insertions by PCR in 10 of 20 individuals. We observed clonal amplification of several insertions which appeared to originate in normal esophagus (NE) or BE and were later clonally expanded in BE or in EAC. Additionally, we observed evidence of clonality within the EAC cases; specifically, 22 of 25 EAC-only insertions were present identically in distinct regions available from the same tumor, suggesting that these insertions occurred in the founding tumor cell of these lesions. L1 proteins must be expressed for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), a protein encoded by L1, in eight of the EAC cases for which formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue was available. With immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p in all tumors evaluated. Interestingly, we also observed dim ORF1p immunoreactivity in histologically NE of all patients. In summary, our data show that somatic retrotransposition occurs early in many patients with BE and EAC and indicate that early events occurring even in histologically NE cells may be clonally expanded in esophageal adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:26283398

  5. LINE-1 expression and retrotransposition in Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T.; Rodić, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Darbari, Isha; Abril, Gabriela; Choi, Jungbin A.; Young Ahn, Ji; Cheng, Yulan; Anders, Robert A.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common disease in which the lining of the esophagus transitions from stratified squamous epithelium to metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes individuals to developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We hypothesized that BE provides a unique environment for increased long-interspersed element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition. To this end, we evaluated 5 patients with benign BE, 5 patients with BE and concomitant EAC, and 10 additional patients with EAC to determine L1 activity in this progressive disease. After L1-seq, we confirmed 118 somatic insertions by PCR in 10 of 20 individuals. We observed clonal amplification of several insertions which appeared to originate in normal esophagus (NE) or BE and were later clonally expanded in BE or in EAC. Additionally, we observed evidence of clonality within the EAC cases; specifically, 22 of 25 EAC-only insertions were present identically in distinct regions available from the same tumor, suggesting that these insertions occurred in the founding tumor cell of these lesions. L1 proteins must be expressed for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), a protein encoded by L1, in eight of the EAC cases for which formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue was available. With immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p in all tumors evaluated. Interestingly, we also observed dim ORF1p immunoreactivity in histologically NE of all patients. In summary, our data show that somatic retrotransposition occurs early in many patients with BE and EAC and indicate that early events occurring even in histologically NE cells may be clonally expanded in esophageal adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:26283398

  6. Tissue Damage in the Canine Normal Esophagus by Photoactivation with Talaporfin Sodium (Laserphyrin): A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Horimatsu, Takahiro; Muto, Manabu; Yoda, Yusuke; Yano, Tomonori; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Miyamoto, Shinichi; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment failure at the primary site after chemoradiotherapy is a major problem in achieving a complete response. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with porfimer sodium (Photofrin®) has some problems such as the requirement for shielding from light for several weeks and a high incidence of skin phototoxicity. PDT with talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin) is less toxic and is expected to have a better effect compared with Photofrin PDT. However, Laserphyrin PDT is not approved for use in the esophagus. In this preclinical study, we investigated tissue damage of the canine normal esophagus caused by photoactivation with Laserphyrin. Methodology/Principal Findings Diode laser irradiation was performed at 60 min after administration. An area 5 cm oral to the esophagogastric junction was irradiated at 25 J/cm2, 50 J/cm2, and 100 J/cm2 using a three-step escalation. The irradiated areas were evaluated endoscopically on postirradiation days 1 and 7, and were subjected to histological examination after autopsy. The areas injured by photoactivation were 52 mm2, 498 mm2, and 831 mm2 after irradiation at 25 J/cm2, 50 J/cm2, and 100 J/cm2, respectively. Tissue injury was observed in the muscle layer or even deeper at any irradiation level and became more severe as the irradiation dose increased. At 100 J/cm2 both inflammatory changes and necrosis were seen histologically in extra-adventitial tissue. Conclusions/Significance To minimize injury of the normal esophagus by photoactivation with Laserphyrin, diode laser irradiation at 25 J/cm2 appears to be safe. For human application, it would be desirable to investigate the optimal laser dose starting from this level. PMID:22719875

  7. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  8. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in esophagus: Early alteration during carcinogenesis and prognostic value

    PubMed Central

    Chianello Nicolau, Marina; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; de Pinho, Paulo Roberto Alves; Rossini, Ana; de Almeida Simão, Tatiana; Soares Lima, Sheila Coelho

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (CHRNs) in healthy and squamous cell carcinoma-affected esophagus and determine the prognostic value. METHODS We performed RT-qPCR to measure the expression of CHRNs in 44 esophageal samples from healthy individuals and in matched normal surrounding mucosa, and in tumors from 28 patients diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Next, we performed correlation analysis for the detected expression of these receptors with the habits and clinico-pathological characteristics of all study participants. In order to investigate the possible correlations between the expression of the different CHRN subunits in both healthy esophagus and tissues from ESCC patients, correlation matrices were generated. Subsequently, we evaluated whether the detected alterations in expression of the various CHRNs could precede histopathological modifications during the esophageal carcinogenic processes by using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Finally, we evaluated the impact of CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 expression on overall survival by using multivariate analysis. RESULTS CHRNA3, CHRNA5, CHRNA7 and CHRNB4, but not CHRNA1, CHRNA4, CHRNA9 or CHRNA10, were found to be expressed in normal (healthy) esophageal mucosa. In ESCC, CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 were overexpressed as compared with patient-matched surrounding non-tumor mucosa (ESCC-adjacent mucosa; P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0091, respectively). Positive correlations were observed between CHRNA3 and CHRNB4 expression in all samples analyzed. Additionally, CHRNB4 was found to be differentially expressed in the healthy esophagus and the normal-appearing ESCC-adjacent mucosa, allowing for distinguishment between these tissues with a sensitivity of 75.86% and a specificity of 78.95% (P = 0.0002). Finally, CHRNA5 expression was identified as an independent prognostic factor in ESCC; patients with high CHRNA5 expression showed an increased overall survival, in comparison with

  9. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of endoscopic low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy in the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Bruce D.; Dumot, John A.; Horwhat, J. David; Lightdale, Charles J.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Endoscopic cryotherapy is a new technique for ablation of esophageal dysplasia and neoplasia. Preliminary studies have shown it to be safe and effective for this indication. The objective of this study is to characterize safety, tolerability, and efficacy of low-pressure liquid nitrogen endoscopic spray cryotherapy ablation in a large cohort across multiple study sites. Parallel prospective treatment studies at four tertiary care academic medical centers in the U.S. assessed spray cryotherapy in patients with Barrett’s esophagus with or without dysplasia, early stage esophageal cancer, and severe squamous dysplasia who underwent cryotherapy ablation of the esophagus. All patients were contacted between 1 and 10 days after treatment to assess for side effects and complications of treatment. The main outcome measurement was the incidence of serious adverse events and side effects from treatment. Complete response for high-grade dysplasia (HGD) (CR-HGD), all dysplasia (CR-D), intestinal metaplasia (CR-IM) and cancer (CR-C) were assessed in patients completing therapy during the study period. A total of 77 patients were treated for Barrett’s high-grade dysplasia (58.4%), intramucosal carcinoma (16.9%), invasive carcinoma (13%), Barrett’s esophagus without dysplasia (9.1%), and severe squamous dysplasia (2.6%). Twenty-two patients (28.6%) reported no side effects throughout treatment. In 323 procedures, the most common complaint was chest pain (17.6%) followed by dysphagia (13.3%), odynophagia (12.1%), and sore throat (9.6%). The mean duration of any symptoms was 3.6 days. No side effects were reported in 48% of the procedures (155/323). Symptoms did not correlate with age, gender, diagnosis, or to treatment early versus late in the patient’s or site’s experience. Logit analysis showed that symptoms were greater in those with a Barrett’s segment of 6 cm or longer. Gastric perforation occurred in one patient with Marfan’s syndrome. Esophageal

  10. Mucosal bridges of the upper esophagus after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papazian, A.; Capron, J.P.; Ducroix, J.P.; Dupas, J.L.; Quenum, C.; Besson, P.

    1983-05-01

    A 47-yr-old man developed dysphagia 4 yr after mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. X-ray series, fiberoptic endoscopy, and computerized transverse tomography showed mucosal bridges in the upper esophagus. Histologically, these bridges were constituted from normal epithelium overlying a chronic inflammatory lamina propria, without evidence of Hodgkin's disease recurrence or of squamous cell carcinoma. Swallowing was improved by endoscopic electrocoagulation and Eder-Puestow dilatations. Several arguments favor the hypothesis that these mucosal bridges were the late sequelae of radiation esophagitis.

  11. Insights into esophagus tissue architecture using two-photon confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Wang, Yue; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human esophageal mucosa were evaluated using the two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy (TPLSCM), based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The distribution of epithelial cells, muscle fibers of muscularis mucosae has been distinctly obtained. Furthermore, esophageal submucosa characteristics with cancer cells invading into were detected. The variation of collagen, elastin and cancer cells is very relevant to the pathology in esophagus, especially early esophageal cancer. Our experimental results indicate that the MPM technique has the much more advantages for label-free imaging, and has the potential application in vivo in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early esophageal cancer.

  12. Color-matched and fluorescence-labeled esophagus phantom and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed “hot-spot” locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2 mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging. PMID:23403908

  13. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:27134668

  14. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Arvind J.; Smith, Michael S.; Pleskow, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett’s esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett’s esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:27134668

  15. Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayakawa, Masao; Inadomi, John M.; Takayama, Michiyo; Makino, Kanako; Iwao, Yasushi; Sugino, Yoshinori; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett’s esophagus in Japanese population. Methods Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett’s esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models. Results A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46) and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40). Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett’s esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41) and the presence of Barrett’s esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56). Conclusion Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett’s esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus in Japanese population. PMID:26225858

  16. The Genetics of Barrett's Esophagus: A Familial and Population-Based Perspective.

    PubMed

    To, Henry; Clemons, Nicholas J; Duong, Cuong P; Trainer, Alison H; Phillips, Wayne A

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is intestinal metaplasia of the lower esophagus and a precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Both are important health issues as they have rising incidences in the Western world. Improving the management of BE relies on understanding the underlying biology of this disease, but the exact biological mechanisms have been difficult to determine. BE is generally thought to be an acquired condition that develops secondarily to chronic gastroesophageal reflux. However, multiple reports of familial clustering of patients with BE and/or EAC suggest a possible inherited predisposition to BE may be driving this condition, at least in a subset of patients. Identifying the genetic variants that predispose to BE in these families would open up the possibility for blood-based screening tests that could inform decision-making in regard to surveillance strategies, particularly for relatives of patients with BE and/or EAC. Perhaps more importantly, understanding the genetic mechanisms that predispose to BE may provide valuable insights into the biology of this condition and potentially identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we review the current evidence for a genetic predisposition to BE and discuss the potential implications of these findings. PMID:26971090

  17. One shall become two: Separation of the esophagus and trachea from the common foregut tube

    PubMed Central

    Billmyre, Katherine Kretovich; Hutson, Mary; Klingensmith, John

    2016-01-01

    The alimentary and respiratory organ systems arise from a common endodermal origin, the anterior foregut tube. Formation of the esophagus from the dorsal region and the trachea from the ventral region of the foregut primordium occurs via a poorly understood compartmentalization process. Disruption of this process can result in severe birth defects, such as esophageal atresia and tracheoesphageal fistula (EA/TEF), in which the lumina of the trachea and esophagus remain connected. Here we summarize the signaling networks known to be necessary for regulating dorso-ventral patterning within the common foregut tube and cellular behaviors that may occur during normal foregut compartmentalization. We propose that dorso-ventral patterning serves to establish a lateral region of the foregut tube that is capable of undergoing specialized cellular rearrangements, culminating in compartmentalization. We review established as well as new rodent models that may be useful in addressing this hypothesis. Finally, we discuss new experimental models that could help elucidate the mechanism behind foregut compartmentalization. An integrated approach to future foregut morphogenesis research will allow for a better understanding of this complex process. PMID:25329576

  18. A novel ultrasound technique to study the biomechanics of the human esophagus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Torahiko; Kassab, Ghassan; Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Mittal, Rishi R; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to validate a novel ultrasound technique and to use it to study the circumferential stress-strain properties of the human esophagus in vivo. A manometric catheter equipped with a high-compliance bag and a high-frequency intraluminal ultrasonography probe was used to record esophageal pressure and images. Validation studies were performed in vitro followed by in vivo studies in healthy human subjects. Esophageal distensions were performed with either an isovolumic (5-20 ml of water) or with an isobaric (10-60 mmHg) technique. Sustained distension was also performed for 3 min in each subject. The circumferential wall stress and strain were calculated. In vitro studies indicate that the ultrasound technique can make measurements of the esophageal wall with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. The in vivo studies provide the necessary data to compute the Kirchhoff's stress, Green's strain, and Young's elastic modulus during esophageal distensions. The stress-strain relationship revealed a linear shape, the slope of which corresponds to the Young's modulus. During sustained distensions, we found dynamic changes of stress and strain during the period of distension. We describe and validate a novel ultrasound technique that allows measurement of biomechanical properties of the esophagus in vivo in humans. PMID:11960775

  19. Clinical significance and management of Barrett's esophagus with epithelial changes indefinite for dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Thota, Prashanthi N; Kistangari, Gaurav; Esnakula, Ashwini K; Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Liu, Xiu-Li

    2016-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is defined as the extension of salmon-colored mucosa into the tubular esophagus ≥ 1 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction with biopsy confirmation of intestinal metaplasia. Patients with BE are at increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and undergo endoscopic surveillance biopsies to detect dysplasia or early EAC. Dysplasia in BE is classified as no dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia (IND), low grade dysplasia (LGD) or high grade dysplasia (HGD). Biopsies are diagnosed as IND when the epithelial abnormalities are not sufficient to diagnose dysplasia or the nature of the epithelial abnormalities is uncertain due to inflammation or technical issues. Specific diagnostic criteria for IND are not well established and its clinical significance and management has not been well studied. Previous studies have focused on HGD in BE and led to changes and improvement in the management of BE with HGD and early EAC. Only recently, IND and LGD in BE have become focus of intense study. This review summarizes the definition, neoplastic risk and clinical management of BE IND. PMID:27602241

  20. Design of a protocol for combined laser hyperthermia-photodynamic therapy in the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    London, R A; Eichler, J; Liebetrudt, J; Ziegenhagen, L

    2000-02-01

    Photodynamic laser therapy (PDT) for esophageal cancer has recently been studied in animal and clinical trials. In several animal experiments a synergetic effect was found by simultaneously applying PDT and hyperthermia (HT). In this paper an optical fiber system is described which can be used in the esophagus for combined PDT with a 1 W dye laser and HT with a 15--40 W Nd-YAG laser. Phantoms were developed to simulate the geometry of the esophagus using cow muscle. The spatial-temporal temperature field during HT was measured. The results were compared with calculations using a coupled Monte Carlo laser transport/finite difference heat transport model using the LATIS computer program. Measurements and calculations yield a realistic description of the temperature distribution during HT under various experimental conditions. The LATIS program allows the prediction of the effects of blood perfusion for in-vivo situations. The results show that the perfusion has considerable influence on the temperature field, which must be considered for in-vivo applications.

  1. Barrett’s esophagus: Prevalence and risk factors in patients with chronic GERD in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser M; Makhlouf, Madiha M; Tawfik, Heba M; Amin, Hussein El; Ghany, Wael Abdel; El-khayat, Hisham R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and possible risk factors of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in El Minya and Assuit, Upper Egypt. METHODS: One thousand consecutive patients with chronic GERD symptoms were included in the study over 2 years. They were subjected to history taking including a questionnaire for GERD symptoms, clinical examination and upper digestive tract endoscopy. Endoscopic signs suggestive of columnar-lined esophagus (CLE) were defined as mucosal tongues or an upward shift of the squamocolumnar junction. BE was diagnosed by pathological examination when specialized intestinal metaplasia was detected histologically in suspected CLE. pH was monitored in 40 patients. RESULTS: BE was present in 7.3% of patients with chronic GERD symptoms, with a mean age of 48.3 ± 8.2 years, which was significantly higher than patients with GERD without BE (37.4 ± 13.6 years). Adenocarcinoma was detected in eight cases (0.8%), six of them in BE patients. There was no significant difference between patients with BE and GERD regarding sex, smoking, alcohol consumption or symptoms of GERD. Patients with BE had significantly longer esophageal acid exposure time in the supine position, measured by pH monitoring. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of BE in patients with GERD who were referred for endoscopy was 7.3%. BE seems to be associated with older age and more in patients with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:19630106

  2. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  3. Clinicopathological Profile of Pure Neuroendocrine Neoplasms of the Esophagus: A South Indian Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Babu Kanakasetty, Govind; Dasappa, Loknatha; Lakshmaiah, Kuntegowdanahalli Chinnagiriyappa; Kamath, Mangesh; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Mallekavu, Suresh Babu; Rajeev, Lakkavalli Krishnappa; Haleshappa, Rudresha Antapura; Kadabur Nagendrappa, Lokesh; Saldanha, Smitha Carol; Kumar, Rekha V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the esophagus are very uncommon with only a few studies published worldwide. Studies on clinical profile, management, and outcomes are very uncommon. Methods. We report the largest single institution retrospective review of 43 patients of pure esophageal NENs out of our registry of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors treated between 2005 and 2014. Data on the incidence, tumor location, clinical symptoms, stage at presentation, grading, treatment protocol, and treatment outcomes was collected and analyzed. Results. Among 1293 cases of esophageal cancers, pure esophageal NENs were diagnosed in 43 cases. The mean patient age was 55.8 years. The male : female ratio was 1.5 : 1. 81.4% of the tumors were located in the lower third of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC; G3) accounted for the vast majority of NENs (83.7%). 53.5% patients were Stage IV and 32.5% were Stage III at presentation. The combined median survival of stages II and III patients was 18.25 months, with treatment. The median survival of treated patients with metastatic disease was 6.5 months. Conclusion. Esophageal NENs most commonly were neuroendocrine carcinomas, presented in metastatic stage and were associated with poor prognosis. Grade 2 (G2) tumors had better outcomes than NEC (G3). In nonmetastatic disease, presence of lymph node metastasis and unresectable disease had poorer outcomes. PMID:27340404

  4. An Immunofluorescent Method for Characterization of Barrett’s Esophagus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Inge, Landon J.; Fowler, Aaron J.; Bremner, Ross M.

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has an overall survival rate of less than 17% and incidence of EAC has risen dramatically over the past two decades. One of the primary risk factors of EAC is Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a metaplastic change of the normal squamous esophagus in response to chronic heartburn. Despite the well-established connection between EAC and BE, interrogation of the molecular events, particularly altered signaling pathways involving progression of BE to EAC, are poorly understood. Much of this is due to the lack of suitable in vitro models available to study these diseases. Recently, immortalized BE cell lines have become commercially available allowing for in vitro studies of BE. Here, we present a method for immunofluorescent staining of immortalized BE cell lines, allowing in vitro characterization of cell signaling and structure after exposure to therapeutic compounds. Application of these techniques will help develop insight into the mechanisms involved in BE to EAC progression and provide potential avenues for treatment and prevention of EAC. PMID:25079877

  5. One shall become two: Separation of the esophagus and trachea from the common foregut tube.

    PubMed

    Billmyre, Katherine Kretovich; Hutson, Mary; Klingensmith, John

    2015-03-01

    The alimentary and respiratory organ systems arise from a common endodermal origin, the anterior foregut tube. Formation of the esophagus from the dorsal region and the trachea from the ventral region of the foregut primordium occurs by means of a poorly understood compartmentalization process. Disruption of this process can result in severe birth defects, such as esophageal atresia and tracheo-esphageal fistula (EA/TEF), in which the lumina of the trachea and esophagus remain connected. Here we summarize the signaling networks known to be necessary for regulating dorsoventral patterning within the common foregut tube and cellular behaviors that may occur during normal foregut compartmentalization. We propose that dorsoventral patterning serves to establish a lateral region of the foregut tube that is capable of undergoing specialized cellular rearrangements, culminating in compartmentalization. We review established as well as new rodent models that may be useful in addressing this hypothesis. Finally, we discuss new experimental models that could help elucidate the mechanism behind foregut compartmentalization. An integrated approach to future foregut morphogenesis research will allow for a better understanding of this complex process. PMID:25329576

  6. Differential Responses to Steroid Hormones in Fibroblasts From the Vocal Fold, Trachea, and Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Bando, Hideki; Hirota, Ryuichi; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that fibroblasts are target cells for steroids such as sex hormones and corticoids. The characteristics of fibroblasts vary among tissues and organs. Our aim in this study is to examine differences in responses to steroid hormones among fibroblasts from different cervicothoracic regions. We compared the actions of steroid hormones on cultured fibroblasts from the vocal folds, which are considered to be the primary target of steroid hormones, and the trachea and esophagus in adult male rats. Expression of steroid hormone receptors (androgen receptor, estrogen receptor α, and glucocorticoid receptor) was identified by immunofluorescence histochemistry. Androgen receptor was much more frequently expressed in fibroblasts from the vocal fold than in those from the trachea and esophagus. Cell proliferation analysis showed that administration of testosterone, estradiol, or corticosterone suppressed growth of all 3 types of fibroblasts. However, mRNA expression for extracellular matrix–associated genes, including procollagen I and III and elastin, and hyaluronic acid synthase I was elevated only by addition of testosterone to fibroblasts from the vocal fold. These results indicate that each steroid hormone exerts region-specific effects on cervicothoracic fibroblasts with different properties through binding to specific receptors. PMID:25514085

  7. Image analysis for classification of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus using endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V.; Willis, Joseph E.; Isenberg, Gerard; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and associated adenocarcinoma have emerged as a major health care problem. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography is a microscopic sub-surface imaging technology that has been shown to differentiate tissue layers of the gastrointestinal wall and identify dysplasia in the mucosa, and is proposed as a surveillance tool to aid in management of BE. In this work a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system has been demonstrated for classification of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus using EOCT. The system is composed of four modules: region of interest segmentation, dysplasia-related image feature extraction, feature selection, and site classification and validation. Multiple feature extraction and classification methods were evaluated and the process of developing the CAD system is described in detail. Use of multiple EOCT images to classify a single site was also investigated. A total of 96 EOCT image-biopsy pairs (63 non-dysplastic, 26 low-grade and 7 high-grade dysplastic biopsy sites) from a previously described clinical study were analyzed using the CAD system, yielding an accuracy of 84% for classification of non-dysplastic vs. dysplastic BE tissue. The results motivate continued development of CAD to potentially enable EOCT surveillance of large surface areas of Barrett’s mucosa to identify dysplasia. PMID:21258512

  8. CLINICAL, ENDOSCOPIC AND MANOMETRIC FEATURES OF THE PRIMARY MOTOR DISORDERS OF THE ESOPHAGUS

    PubMed Central

    MARTINEZ, Júlio César; LIMA, Gustavo Rosa de Almeida; SILVA, Diego Henrique; DUARTE, Alexandre Ferreira; NOVO, Neil Ferreira; da SILVA, Ernesto Carlos; PINTO, Pérsio Campos Correia; MAIA, Alexandre Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant incidence, diagnostic difficulties, clinical relevance and therapeutic efficacy associated with the small number of publications on the primary esophageal motor disorders, motivated the present study. Aim To determine the manometric prevalence of these disorders and correlate them to the endoscopic and clinical findings. Methods A retrospective study of 2614 patients, being 1529 (58.49%) women and 1085 (41.51%) men. From 299 manometric examinations diagnosed with primary esophageal motor disorder, were sought-clinical data (heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, odynophagia, non-cardiac chest pain, pharyngeal globe and extra-esophageal symptoms) and/or endoscopic (hiatal hernia, erosive esophagitis, food waste) that motivated the performance of manometry. Results Were found 49 cases of achalasia, 73 diffuse spasm, 89 nutcracker esophagus, 82 ineffective esophageal motility, and six lower esophageal sphincter hypertension. In relation to the correlations, it was observed that in 119 patients clinical conditions were associated with dysphagia, found in achalasia more than in other conditions; in relationship between endoscopic findings and clinical conditions there was no statistical significance between data. Conclusions The clinical and endoscopic findings have little value in the characterization of the primary motor disorders of the esophagus, showing even more the need for manometry, particularly in the preoperative period of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25861066

  9. Affinity fluorescence-labeled peptides for the early detection of cancer in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Appelman, Henry; Kwon, Rich; Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptides that affinity bind to neoplastic mucsosa are promising for use as a specific contrast agent in the detection of pre-malignant tissue in the esophagus. This method is can be used to identify expression of biological markers associated with dysplasia on endoscopic imaging as a guide for biopsy and represents a novel method for the early detection and prevention of cancer. We demonstrate the use of phage display to select affinity peptides and identify the sequence "ASYNYDA" that binds with high target-to-background ratio to dysplastic esophageal mucosa compared to that of intestinal metaplasia. Validation of preferential binding is demonstrated for neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. An optimal tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85% was found at the relative threshold of 0.60 with a target-to-background ratio of 1.81 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.87. Peptides are a novel class of ligand for targeted detection of pre-malignant mucosa for purposes of screening and surveillance.

  10. Clinical significance and management of Barrett’s esophagus with epithelial changes indefinite for dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Prashanthi N; Kistangari, Gaurav; Esnakula, Ashwini K; Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Liu, Xiu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is defined as the extension of salmon-colored mucosa into the tubular esophagus ≥ 1 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction with biopsy confirmation of intestinal metaplasia. Patients with BE are at increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and undergo endoscopic surveillance biopsies to detect dysplasia or early EAC. Dysplasia in BE is classified as no dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia (IND), low grade dysplasia (LGD) or high grade dysplasia (HGD). Biopsies are diagnosed as IND when the epithelial abnormalities are not sufficient to diagnose dysplasia or the nature of the epithelial abnormalities is uncertain due to inflammation or technical issues. Specific diagnostic criteria for IND are not well established and its clinical significance and management has not been well studied. Previous studies have focused on HGD in BE and led to changes and improvement in the management of BE with HGD and early EAC. Only recently, IND and LGD in BE have become focus of intense study. This review summarizes the definition, neoplastic risk and clinical management of BE IND. PMID:27602241

  11. Bizarre stromal cells in the esophagus: report of 2 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bal M; De Petris, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    A significant mimicker of malignancy in the esophagus is the presence of atypical/bizarre stromal cells (BSCs). Two patients, a 60-year-old woman and a 59-year-old man, with esophageal polyps at the gastroesophageal junction showed highly atypical/bizarre cells in the polyps' stroma. BSCs were admixed with inflammatory cells and had large atypical nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and variably abundant amphophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies showed that BSCs expressed vimentin whereas S-100, CD68, HMB45, CD45, Pan-cytokeratin, CK5/6, p63, CD10, EMA, MART-1, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD31, CD34, and CMV were negative. Ki-67 showed low proliferative rate (less than 1% positivity). No evidence of intracellular mucin was found after histochemical stains (AB/PAS and mucicarmine). Follow-up endoscopic mucosal resection was available in both cases and showed benign esophageal mucosa and submucosa with disappearance, in one case, or marked decrease of BSCs. Esophageal BSCs reports in the literature invariably locate them in distal esophagus polyps or masses. Awareness of BSCs, of their location and associations, may help to prevent misdiagnosis of malignancy. The literature of esophageal BSCs is reviewed and the approach to this abnormality is discussed. PMID:23714685

  12. Transcribed ultraconserved noncoding RNAs (T-UCR) are involved in Barrett's esophagus carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fassan, Matteo; Dall'Olmo, Luigi; Galasso, Marco; Braconi, Chiara; Pizzi, Marco; Realdon, Stefano; Volinia, Stefano; Valeri, Nicola; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Baffa, Raffaele; Souza, Rhonda F.; Vicentini, Caterina; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bornschein, Jan; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Croce, Carlo M.; Rugge, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) involves a metaplastic replacement of native esophageal squamous epithelium (Sq) by columnar-intestinalized mucosa, and it is the main risk factor for Barrett-related adenocarcinoma (BAc). Ultra-conserved regions (UCRs) are a class non-coding sequences that are conserved in humans, mice and rats. More than 90% of UCRs are transcribed (T-UCRs) in normal tissues, and are altered at transcriptional level in tumorigenesis. To identify the T-UCR profiles that are dysregulated in Barrett's mucosa transformation, microarray analysis was performed on a discovery set of 51 macro-dissected samples obtained from 14 long-segment BE patients. Results were validated in an independent series of esophageal biopsy/surgery specimens and in two murine models of Barrett's esophagus (i.e. esophagogastric-duodenal anastomosis). Progression from normal to BE to adenocarcinoma was each associated with specific and mutually exclusive T-UCR signatures that included up-regulation of uc.58-, uc.202-, uc.207-, and uc.223- and down-regulation of uc.214+. A 9 T-UCR signature characterized BE versus Sq (with the down-regulation of uc.161-, uc.165-, and uc.327-, and the up-regulation of uc.153-, uc.158-, uc.206-, uc.274-, uc.472-, and uc.473-). Analogous BE-specific T-UCR profiles were shared by human and murine lesions. This study is the first demonstration of a role for T-UCRs in the transformation of Barrett's mucosa. PMID:25216530

  13. Transcribed ultraconserved noncoding RNAs (T-UCR) are involved in Barrett's esophagus carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fassan, Matteo; Dall'Olmo, Luigi; Galasso, Marco; Braconi, Chiara; Pizzi, Marco; Realdon, Stefano; Volinia, Stefano; Valeri, Nicola; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Baffa, Raffaele; Souza, Rhonda F; Vicentini, Caterina; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bornschein, Jan; Nuovo, Gerard J; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Croce, Carlo M; Rugge, Massimo

    2014-08-30

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) involves a metaplastic replacement of native esophageal squamous epithelium (Sq) by columnar-intestinalized mucosa, and it is the main risk factor for Barrett-related adenocarcinoma (BAc). Ultra-conserved regions (UCRs) are a class non-coding sequences that are conserved in humans, mice and rats. More than 90% of UCRs are transcribed (T-UCRs) in normal tissues, and are altered at transcriptional level in tumorigenesis. To identify the T-UCR profiles that are dysregulated in Barrett's mucosa transformation, microarray analysis was performed on a discovery set of 51 macro-dissected samples obtained from 14 long-segment BE patients. Results were validated in an independent series of esophageal biopsy/surgery specimens and in two murine models of Barrett's esophagus (i.e. esophagogastric-duodenal anastomosis). Progression from normal to BE to adenocarcinoma was each associated with specific and mutually exclusive T-UCR signatures that included up-regulation of uc.58-, uc.202-, uc.207-, and uc.223- and down-regulation of uc.214+. A 9 T-UCR signature characterized BE versus Sq (with the down-regulation of uc.161-, uc.165-, and uc.327-, and the up-regulation of uc.153-, uc.158-, uc.206-, uc.274-, uc.472-, and uc.473-). Analogous BE-specific T-UCR profiles were shared by human and murine lesions. This study is the first demonstration of a role for T-UCRs in the transformation of Barrett's mucosa. PMID:25216530

  14. Ectopic expression of guanylyl cyclase C in adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason; Schulz, Stephanie; Haaf, Janis; Kairys, John C; Waldman, Scott A

    2002-08-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), a receptor specifically expressed in cells originating from differentiated intestinal epithelium, is a marker and therapeutic target for colorectal cancer metastases. Intestinal metaplasia, in which epithelial cells assume histological and molecular characteristics of differentiated intestinal enterocytes, is a common precursor to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach. Thus, those tumors, tissues adjacent to them, and their associated regional lymph nodes were assessed for GC-C expression by reverse transcription coupled with the PCR. GC-C mRNA was detected in five of five and eight of nine esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively. Also, GC-C mRNA was detected in three of five and six of seven tissues adjacent to, but not histologically involved in, esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively, reflecting molecular changes associated with neoplastic transformation preceding histopathological changes. In contrast, three normal gastric specimens did not express GC-C. Furthermore, GC-C mRNA was detected in 1 of 1 lymph node containing tumor cells by histopathology from a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma and in 3 of 11 lymph nodes, all of which were free of tumor cells by histopathology, from a patient with a gastroesophageal junction tumor. This is the first demonstration that GC-C is ectopically expressed by primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach and suggests that GC-C may be a sensitive and specific clinical marker and target for adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:12163327

  15. Barrett's Esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  16. Barrett's Esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding how Crohn’s Disease treatments affect children’s gut microbiome Jun 10, 2016 See additional news » Related Conditions & Diseases Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux ...

  17. BLOOD VESSELS IN GANGLIA IN HUMAN ESOPHAGUS MIGHT EXPLAIN THE HIGHER FREQUENCY OF MEGAESOPHAGUS COMPARED WITH MEGACOLON

    PubMed Central

    Adad, Sheila Jorge; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Jammal, Alessandro Adad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the existence of blood vessels within ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the human esophagus and colon. At necropsy, 15 stillborns, newborns and children up to two years of age, with no gastrointestinal disorders, were examined. Rings of the esophagus and colon were analyzed and then fixed in formalin and processed for paraffin. Histological sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and immunohistochemistry for the characterization of endothelial cells, using antibodies for anti-factor VIII and CD31. Blood vessels were identified within the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, and no blood vessels were found in any ganglia of the colon. It was concluded that the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus are vascularized, while the ganglia of the colon are avascular. Vascularization within the esophageal ganglia could facilitate the entrance of infectious agents, as well as the development of inflammatory responses (ganglionitis) and denervation, as found in Chagas disease and idiopathic achalasia. This could explain the higher frequency of megaesophagus compared with megacolon. PMID:25351549

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Inoshita, Naoko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Ueno, Masaki; Udagawa, Harushi; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from ectopic gastric mucosa (EGM) is extremely rare. We describe here two Japanese patients with adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising from EGM. Case 1 is a 62-year-old man who had slightly red EGM in the cervical esophagus on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). Because the biopsy showed atypical glands that were suspicious for adenocarcinoma, endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (pT1a MM). Lymphovascular invasion was absent, and the margins were free from carcinoma. Case 2 is a 57-year-old man who had an elevated lesion with a bleeding tendency in an area of EGM in the cervical esophagus on UGE. Adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the biopsy. Because of the presence of enlarged lymph nodes (#106recL), preoperative chemoradiotherapy was performed to reduce the size of the adenocarcinoma and lymph nodes prior to resection of the cervical esophagus and reconstruction with free jejunal grafts. Histopathological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (0-I, pT2N1M0, pStage II). In both cases, adenocarcinoma was surrounded by EGM, which led to the diagnosis of EGM-derived esophageal adenocarcinoma. Here, we report its immunohistochemical characteristics in the present cases and discuss the histogenesis. PMID:26476962

  19. Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia: Focus on current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Lekakos, Leonidas; Karidis, Nikolaos P; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Tsigris, Christos; Kouraklis, Gregory; Nikiteas, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    High-grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the critical step before invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although its natural history remains unclear, an aggressive therapeutic approach is usually indicated. Esophagectomy represents the only treatment able to reliably eradicate the neoplastic epithelium. In healthy patients with reasonable life expectancy, vagal-sparing esophagectomy, with associated low mortality and low early and late postoperative morbidity, is considered the treatment of choice for BE with HGD. Patients unfit for surgery should be managed in a less aggressive manner, using endoscopic ablation or endoscopic mucosal resection of the entire BE segment, followed by lifelong surveillance. Patients eligible for surgery who present with a long BE segment, multifocal dysplastic lesions, severe reflux symptoms, a large fixed hiatal hernia or dysphagia comprise a challenging group with regard to the appropriate treatment, either surgical or endoscopic. PMID:22072848

  20. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  1. Label-free multi-photon imaging of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Mehravar, Soroush; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Chatrath, Hemant; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Patel, Krunal; Patel, Charmi; Norwood, Robert A; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Kieu, Khanh

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic disorder where dysplastic and early cancerous changes are invisible to the naked eye and where the practice of blind biopsy is hampered by large sampling errors. Multi-photon microscopy (MPM) has emerged as an alternative solution for fast and label-free diagnostic capability for identifying the histological features with sub-micron accuracy. We developed a compact, inexpensive MPM system by using a handheld mode-locked fiber laser operating at 1560nm to study mucosal biopsies of BE. The combination of back-scattered THG, back-reflected forward THG and SHG signals generate images of cell nuclei and collagen, leading to label-free diagnosis in Barrett’s. PMID:26819824

  2. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases. PMID:24994852

  3. Effect of synthetic cationic protein on mechanoexcitability of vagal afferent nerve subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Ouyang, Ann

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by increased infiltration and degranulation of eosinophils in the esophagus. Whether eosinophil-derived cationic proteins regulate esophageal sensory nerve function is still unknown. Using synthetic cationic protein to investigate such effect, we performed extracellular recordings from vagal nodose or jugular neurons in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Nerve excitabilities were determined by comparing action potentials evoked by esophageal distensions before and after perfusion of synthetic cationic protein poly-L-lysine (PLL) with or without pretreatment with poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA), which neutralized cationic charges of PLL. Perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials in esophageal nodose C fibers but increased their responses to esophageal distension. This potentiation effect lasted for 30 min after washing out of PLL. Pretreatment with PLGA significantly inhibited PLL-induced mechanohyperexcitability of esophageal nodose C fibers. In esophageal nodose Aδ fibers, perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials. In contrast to nodose C fibers, both the spontaneous discharges and the responses to esophageal distension in nodose Aδ fibers were decreased by perfusion with PLL, which can be restored after washing out PLL for 30-60 min. Pretreatment with PLGA attenuated PLL-induced decrease in spontaneous discharge and mechanoexcitability of esophageal nodose Aδ fibers. In esophageal jugular C fibers, PLL neither evoked action potentials nor changed their responses to esophageal distension. Collectively, these data demonstrated that synthetic cationic protein did not evoke action potential discharges of esophageal vagal afferents but had distinctive sensitization effects on their responses to esophageal distension. PMID:21960520

  4. Barrett's esophagus. Correlation between mucin histochemistry, flow cytometry, and histologic diagnosis for predicting increased cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Haggitt, R. C.; Reid, B. J.; Rabinovitch, P. S.; Rubin, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    A predominance of sulfated mucin in the nongoblet columnar cells of Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium has been postulated to be a form of mild dysplasia and to indicate an increased risk of adenocarcinoma. Flow cytometry for the analysis of nuclear DNA content and cell cycle parameters has also been postulated to be an objective aid in the diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. The authors investigated the relationship among sulfated mucin, flow cytometric data, and histologic diagnosis in each of 152 biopsies from 42 patients who had Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium. Sulfated mucin, as detected by the high iron diamine-Alcian blue stain, was present in biopsies from 8 of 11 (73%) patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 7 of 9 (78%) patients whose biopsies were indefinite for dysplasia, and in 12 of 22 (55%) patients whose biopsies were negative for dysplasia (P = 0.37). Sulfated mucins predominated in 9%, 22%, and 9% of the patients, respectively (P = 0.56). Abnormal flow cytometry (aneuploidy or increased G2/tetraploid fraction) was found in all patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 3 of 9 (33%) indefinite for dysplasia, and in 1 of 22 (5%) negative for dysplasia (P = less than 0.0001). Neither the presence nor the predominance of sulfated mucin in the specialized metaplastic epithelium of Barrett's esophagus has sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity for dysplasia or carcinoma to be of value in managing patients. Abnormal flow cytometry shows excellent correlation with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma; it detects a subset of patients whose biopsies are histologically indefinite or negative for dysplasia, but who have flow cytometric abnormalities similar to those otherwise seen only in dysplasia and carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3354644

  5. Regional Variation of Distal Esophagus Distensibility Assessed Using the Functional Luminal Imaging Probe (FLIP)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Boris, Lubomyr; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variation of esophageal distensibility in normal subjects using a novel multichannel functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP). Methods Ten healthy subjects (4 male, age 21–49 years) were evaluated during endoscopy with a high-resolution impedance planimetry probe (FLIP) positioned through the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) and distal 10cm of the esophageal body. Stepwise bag distensions using 5 ml increments from 0 to 60 mL were conducted and simultaneous measurements of cross-sectional area (CSA) and the associated intrabag pressure from each subject were analyzed using a customized MATLAB™ program. The distensibility along the esophagus was determined and compared between the EGJ and interval locations at 2–5 cm and 6–10 cm above the EGJ. Results The pressure-CSA relationship was nearly linear among sites at lower pressures (0 to 7.5 mmHg) and reached a distension plateau at pressures ranging from 8 to 24 mmHg. The location of greatest distensibility was 4 cm above the EGJ. Although the CSAs of individual recording loci were not significantly different, there was a significant difference between the mean CSAs when comparing the region 2 to 5 cm proximal to EGJ to that 6 to 10 cm proximal to the EGJ. Conclusions There were significant regional differences in distensibility along the distal esophagus with lower values in the proximal part compared to more distal part. The greatest distensibility was noted to occur at about 4 cm above the EGJ in close proximity to the location of the contractile deceleration point and phrenic ampulla. PMID:23965159

  6. Exposure to gastric juice may not cause adenocarcinogenesis of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Jian-Sheng; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Chen, Yong-Zhong; Gong, Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of gastric juice on the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). METHODS: A animal model of duodenogastroesophageal reflux was established in Sprague-Dawley rats undergoing esophagoduodenostomy. The development of EAC and forestomach adenocarcinoma was investigated 40 wk after the treatment. Intraluminal pH and bile of the forestomach were measured. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in pH (t = 0.117, P = 0.925) or bile (χ2 = 0.036, P = 0.85) in the forestomach before and 40 wk after esophagoduodenostomy. There were also no significant differences between the model and controls during esophagoduodenostomy or 40 wk after esophagoduodenostomy. The incidence of intestinal metaplasia (88%) and intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia and adenocarcinoma (28%) in the esophagus in the model was higher than in the controls 40 wk after surgery (χ2 = 43.06, P < 0.001 and χ2 = 9.33, P = 0.002, respectively) and in the forestomach in the model (χ2 = 32.05, P < 0.001 and χ2 = 8.14, P = 0.004, respectively). The incidence rates of inflammation in the esophagus and forestomach were 100% and 96%, respectively (χ2 = 1.02, P = 0.31) in the model, which was higher than in the esophageal control (6.8%) (χ2 = 42.70, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Gastric juice exposure may not cause intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia or adenocarcinoma of the forestomach and may not be related to EAC. PMID:23613638

  7. Role of chemoprophylaxis with either NSAIDs or statins in patients with Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Vlachou, Erasmia; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, a poor prognosis neoplasia, has risen dramatically in recent decades. Barrett’s esophagus represents the best-known risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma development. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs through cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and prostaglandin metabolism regulation could control cell proliferation, increase cell apoptosis and regulate the expression of growth and angiogenic factors. Statins can achieve equivalent effects through prenylation and subsequently control of cellular signaling cascades. At present, epidemiological studies are small and underpowered. Their data could not justify either medication as a chemo-preventive agent. Population based studies have shown a 43% reduction of the odds of developing an esophageal adenocarcinoma, leaving out or stating a 25% reduction in patients consuming non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a 50% reduction in those patients consuming aspirin. They have also stated a 19% reduction of esophageal cancer incidence when statins have been used. Observational studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could reduce the adenocarcinoma incidence in patients with Barrett’s esophagus by 41%, while statins could reduce the risk by 43%. The cancer preventive effect has been enhanced in those patients taking a combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins (a 74% decrease). Observational data are equivocal concerning the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug subclasses. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs clearly have substantial potential for toxicity, while statins are rather safe drugs. In conclusion, both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins are promising chemopreventive agents and deserve further exploration with interventional studies. In the meanwhile, their use is justified only in patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24605249

  8. Separate primary carcinomas of the esophagus and head and neck region in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Cahan, W G; Castro, E B; Rosen, P P; Strong, E W

    1976-01-01

    From 1949 to 1972 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 60 patients with primary cancers of both the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx (OPL) and esophagus were studied. In 15, the cancers occurred synchronously, and in 68% they occurred within 2 years of each other, the longest interval being 27 years. The tongue and extrinsic larynx were the most common sites of origin together with the middle third of the esophagus. During the same period, over 7000 patients with OPL and over 1000 patients with esophageal cancers were seen at this institution. The majority of patients had a history of excessive smoking and alcohol intake. Four out of nine who had previous radiation therapy for their OPL cancer developed esophageal cancer within the therapeutic field (three after 16, 25, and 27 years). Thirty percent (18/60) had three primary cancers; one had four, of which two were in the head and neck region. Two patients survived more than 5 years; both also had a third primary cancer of the lung. There are broader implications in this study: multiple primary cancers in general, and this group in particular, give us especially valuable clues as to the oncogenic influence of environmental factors as well as cellular, organ, and also systemic susceptibility. With one cancer, one can anticipate formation in other related organs. This provides an opportunity for early diagnosis, more effective management, and improved survival. The cause and effect relationship of tobacco and alcohol must be emphasized at every opportunity and most particularly to those who have developed one cancer in the oropharyngeal-laryngeal region. PMID:1247970

  9. Automatic classification of endoscopic images for premalignant conditions of the esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetto, Davide; Gambaretto, Gloria; Grisan, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a precancerous complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease in which normal stratified squamous epithelium lining the esophagus is replaced by intestinal metaplastic columnar epithelium. Repeated endoscopies and multiple biopsies are often necessary to establish the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an imaging technique commonly used with endoscopies that enhances the contrast of vascular pattern on the mucosa. We present a computer-based method for the automatic normal/metaplastic classification of endoscopic NBI images. Superpixel segmentation is used to identify and cluster pixels belonging to uniform regions. From each uniform clustered region of pixels, eight features maximizing differences among normal and metaplastic epithelium are extracted for the classification step. For each superpixel, the three mean intensities of each color channel are firstly selected as features. Three added features are the mean intensities for each superpixel after separately applying to the red-channel image three different morphological filters (top-hat filtering, entropy filtering and range filtering). The last two features require the computation of the Grey-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM), and are reflective of the contrast and the homogeneity of each superpixel. The classification step is performed using an ensemble of 50 classification trees, with a 10-fold cross-validation scheme by training the classifier at each step on a random 70% of the images and testing on the remaining 30% of the dataset. Sensitivity and Specificity are respectively of 79.2% and 87.3%, with an overall accuracy of 83.9%.

  10. Bacterial Composition of the Human Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome Is Dynamic and Associated with Genomic Instability in a Barrett’s Esophagus Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Alevtina; Fero, Jutta; McCoy, Connor; Claywell, Brian C.; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Blount, Patricia L.; Li, Xiaohong; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Reid, Brian J.; Salama, Nina R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased nearly five-fold over the last four decades in the United States. Barrett’s esophagus, the replacement of the normal squamous epithelial lining with a mucus-secreting columnar epithelium, is the only known precursor to EAC. Like other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the esophagus hosts a variety of bacteria and comparisons among published studies suggest bacterial communities in the stomach and esophagus differ. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori in the stomach has been inversely associated with development of EAC, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. Methodology The bacterial composition in the upper GI tract was characterized in a subset of participants (n=12) of the Seattle Barrett’s Esophagus Research cohort using broad-range 16S PCR and pyrosequencing of biopsy and brush samples collected from squamous esophagus, Barrett’s esophagus, stomach corpus and stomach antrum. Three of the individuals were sampled at two separate time points. Prevalence of H. pylori infection and subsequent development of aneuploidy (n=339) and EAC (n=433) was examined in a larger subset of this cohort. Results/Significance Within individuals, bacterial communities of the stomach and esophagus showed overlapping community membership. Despite closer proximity, the stomach antrum and corpus communities were less similar than the antrum and esophageal samples. Re-sampling of study participants revealed similar upper GI community membership in two of three cases. In this Barrett’s esophagus cohort, Streptococcus and Prevotella species dominate the upper GI and the ratio of these two species is associated with waist-to-hip ratio and hiatal hernia length, two known EAC risk factors in Barrett’s esophagus. H. pylori-positive individuals had a significantly decreased incidence of aneuploidy and a non-significant trend toward lower incidence of EAC. PMID:26076489

  11. Esophagogastrectomy. A safe, widely applicable, and expeditious form of palliation for patients with carcinoma of the esophagus and cardia.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, F H; Gibb, S P; Watkins, E

    1983-01-01

    Of 262 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus or cardia seen at the Lahey Clinic between January 1970 and January 1983, 209 (79.8%) underwent surgical exploration. This report is confined to the 167 operations performed in the division of the senior author. Half of the tumors involved the esophagogastric junction with nearly equal numbers being located in the lower and upper halves of the thoracic esophagus and a relatively small number involving the cervical esophagus. The majority were adenocarcinomas of which 20 developed in a Barrett esophagus. Three of the squamous cell cancers developed in an achalasic esophagus. Of the resected tumors, 94 were classified as Stage III, 18 as Stage II, and 37 as Stage I. Esophagogastrectomy with esophagogastrostomy is the procedure of choice regardless of the level of the lesion. Of the 167 patients, 149 (89.2%) underwent resection with two deaths within 30 days of operation for a hospital mortality rate of 1.3%. There were 22 major complications (14.9%), which prolonged the hospital stay, and 14 minor complications (9.5%). Satisfactory palliation of dysphagia was achieved in 82.7% of the patients. The overall adjusted survival rate at 5 years was 21.7% +/- 7.5% (SEM) with a median survival time of 17.3 months. The 5-year adjusted survival rate according to stage was 43.4% for patients with Stage I lesions, 23.6% for Stage II lesions, and 12.8% for Stage III lesions (p = 0.0004). A multivariate analysis of risk factors involved in survival disclosed that neither age, sex, site of tumor, duration of symptoms, or cell type influenced survival, but stage of the disease had a profound effect. It is concluded that long-term survival of patients with carcinoma of the esophagus or cardia will probably not improve until early diagnosis is possible and that esophagogastrectomy by conventional techniques should be the treatment of choice until other forms of therapy prove superior to it both in terms of palliation and long

  12. Computed organ doses to an Indian reference adult during brachytherapy treatment of esophagus, breast, and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Keshavkumar, Biju

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to generate the normalized mean organ dose factors (mGy min-1 GBq-1) to healthy organs during brachytherapy treatment of esophagus, breast, and neck cancers specific to the patient population in India. This study is in continuation to the earlier published studies on the estimation of organ doses during uterus brachytherapy treatments. The results are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport through MIRD type anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing reference Indian adult with 192Ir and 60Co high dose rate sources in the esophagus, breast, and neck of the phantom. The result of this study is compared with a published computational study using voxel-based phantom model. The variation in the organ dose of this study to the published values is within 50%. PMID:22973082

  13. Occupational Exposure and the Risk of Barrett’s Esophagus: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Zeeshan; Ramsey, David; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Whitehead, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Background Case–control studies in the United States and Europe have linked occupational exposure to volatile sulfur compounds, solvents, and pesticide to increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the association between occupational exposures and the risk of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is unclear given the absence of studies in this area. Methods This is a case–control study in patients undergoing endoscopy who were either referred directly or were eligible for screening colonoscopy and recruited from primary care clinics. All participants completed a survey on (1) self-reported occupational exposures to asbestos, metal dust, organic solvents, and pesticides, and (2) self reported longest held job and job-related activities. The latter were assigned by an industrial hygienist who was blinded to the case and control status into one of 99 standard occupational categories used by the US Department of Labor. Each occupational category was then assigned an expected level of exposure to the same four classes of agents in addition to radiation. We compared the self-reported exposure and the expected occupational exposure based on the self-reported occupation between cases with definitive BE and controls without BE. We examined the associations adjusting for age, sex, race, and patient recruitment source in a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results We examined 226 cases of definitive BE and 1,424 controls without BE. There was a greater proportion of patients with self-reported asbestos exposure in cases than controls (16.2 % vs. 12.0 %; p = 0.08) but no significant differences in metal dust, organic solvents, or pesticides. The multivariate model did not show an independent association between self-reported asbestos exposure and BE. For the calculated occupational exposure, there were no significant differences between cases and controls for asbestos (29.6 % vs. 27.5 %; p = 0.5), metal dust, organic solvents, pesticides, or radiation exposure

  14. Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Esophagus with Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Brain Metastasis: A Success Story

    PubMed Central

    Vethody, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the esophagus are very rare. The majority of the patients with NECs present with metastasis. Paraneoplastic syndromes, such as syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone and watery diarrhea-hypokalemia-achlorhydria syndrome, have been reported in previous reports. Esophageal NECs are related to a poor prognosis. A 38-year-old male with the histologic diagnosis of esophageal NEC, which initially manifested as hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), later developed brain metastases. He was initially treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide followed by a partial esophagectomy in November 2009. At follow-up in February 2010, he complained of a headache that prompted imaging. MRI of the brain revealed a left frontal lobe lesion. Subsequently, he underwent a craniotomy and resection of the lesion. Pathological analysis revealed that the lesion was consistent with metastatic disease from the primary esophageal NEC. The patient underwent 40 Gy whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), followed by two weeks of stereotactic radiation (SRS) to the tumor bed for an additional 12 Gy. During this time, his tumor marker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) initially dropped but later increased, which led us to offer him radiotherapy to the remaining esophagus to be followed by localized radiation to areas immediately adjacent to the surgical site, followed by six cycles of systemic chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and irinotecan. Finally, his NSE normalized around the end of systemic chemotherapy. Surveillance imaging in 2015 - six years from initial diagnosis - showed no evidence of cancer. Of interest, treatment of the esophageal NEC also led to clinical resolution of his musculoskeletal symptoms, including his HOA. High-grade esophageal NECs are rare, aggressive, and have a poor prognosis. HOA can be a presenting sign associated with a high-grade esophageal NEC. The predominant site of metastatic

  15. Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Esophagus with Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Brain Metastasis: A Success Story.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad W; Vethody, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the esophagus are very rare. The majority of the patients with NECs present with metastasis. Paraneoplastic syndromes, such as syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone and watery diarrhea-hypokalemia-achlorhydria syndrome, have been reported in previous reports. Esophageal NECs are related to a poor prognosis. A 38-year-old male with the histologic diagnosis of esophageal NEC, which initially manifested as hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), later developed brain metastases. He was initially treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide followed by a partial esophagectomy in November 2009. At follow-up in February 2010, he complained of a headache that prompted imaging. MRI of the brain revealed a left frontal lobe lesion. Subsequently, he underwent a craniotomy and resection of the lesion. Pathological analysis revealed that the lesion was consistent with metastatic disease from the primary esophageal NEC. The patient underwent 40 Gy whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), followed by two weeks of stereotactic radiation (SRS) to the tumor bed for an additional 12 Gy. During this time, his tumor marker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) initially dropped but later increased, which led us to offer him radiotherapy to the remaining esophagus to be followed by localized radiation to areas immediately adjacent to the surgical site, followed by six cycles of systemic chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and irinotecan. Finally, his NSE normalized around the end of systemic chemotherapy. Surveillance imaging in 2015 - six years from initial diagnosis - showed no evidence of cancer. Of interest, treatment of the esophageal NEC also led to clinical resolution of his musculoskeletal symptoms, including his HOA. High-grade esophageal NECs are rare, aggressive, and have a poor prognosis. HOA can be a presenting sign associated with a high-grade esophageal NEC. The predominant site of metastatic

  16. Negative surveillance endoscopy occurs frequently in patients with short-segment non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Melson, J; Desai, V; Greenspan, M; Yau, S; Abdalla, M; Dhanekula, R; Mobarhan, S; Shapiro, D; Losurdo, J; Jakate, S

    2015-10-01

    Surveillance endoscopy of non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (NDBE) that fails to detect intestinal metaplasia (IM), or negative surveillance, is known to occur in clinical practice, although the frequency and possible outcomes in a large cohort in clinical practice is not well described. The goals of this study were to define frequency in which negative surveillance occurs and endoscopic outcomes in a screening cohort of short segment NDBE. A retrospective cohort (n = 184) of patients newly diagnosed with short segment NDBE at an outpatient academic tertiary care center between 2003 and 2011 were reviewed. Only those with one or more surveillance endoscopies were included to define a frequency of negative surveillance. Included patients were further assessed if they had two or more surveillance endoscopies and were classified into groups as sampling error or negative IM on consecutive surveillances based on the results of their surveillance endoscopies. The frequency of a negative surveillance endoscopy in all short-segment NDBE patients was 19.66% (92 endoscopic exams were negative for IM of 468 total surveillance exams). A negative surveillance endoscopy occurred in 40.76% (n = 75) patients. Sampling error occurred in 44.12% and negative IM on consecutive surveillance endoscopies in 55.88% of those with ≥ 2 surveillance endoscopies and an initially negative surveillance exam. The frequency of negative IM on consecutive surveillances was 19.00% of all patients who had two surveillance endoscopies. When the index diagnostic Barrett's esophagus segment length was < 1 cm, 32.14% (18/56) of all patients (with ≥ 2 surveillance endoscopies) had negative IM on consecutive surveillance endoscopies. Negative surveillance occurs frequently in short-segment NDBE. When an initial negative surveillance endoscopy occurs, it may be due to either a sampling error or lack of detectable IM on surveillance exam. When a <1 cm segment of NDBE is diagnosed, a significant

  17. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P < 0.001). Appetite also improved

  18. Recurrent intestinal metaplasia at the gastroesophageal junction following endoscopic eradication of dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus may not be benign

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Georgina R.; Desmond, Paul V.; Jayasekera, Chatura S.; Amico, Francesco; Williams, Richard; Macrae, Finlay A.; Taylor, Andrew C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is effective for eradicating dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus. The durability of response is reported to be variable. We aimed to determine the effectiveness and durability of RFA with or without EMR for patients with dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus. Patients and methods: Patients with dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus referred to two academic hospitals were assessed with high definition white-light endoscopy, narrow-band imaging, and Seattle protocol biopsies. EMR was performed in visible lesions. RFA was performed at 3-month intervals until complete remission of dysplasia (CR-D) and intestinal metaplasia (CR-IM) was achieved. Results: In total, 137 patients received RFA (78 with EMR); 75 with over 12 months follow-up since commencing RFA. Pretreatment histology was intramucosal cancer (IMC) 21 %, high grade dysplasia (HGD) 54 %, low grade dysplasia (LGD) 25 %. CR-D rates were 88 %, 92 %, and 100 % at 1, 2, and 3 years; CR-IM rates were 69 %, 74 %, and 81 %. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed increasing probability of achieving CR-D/CR-IM over time. Of 26 patients maintaining CR-IM for > 12 months, five relapsed with intestinal metaplasia (19 %), and three with dysplasia (12 %). Recurrences occurred in patients with prior HGD/IMC, predominantly at the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). None relapsed with cancer. Adverse events occurred in 4 % of RFA and 6.5 % of EMR procedures. Conclusions: RFA combined with EMR is effective in achieving CR-D/CR-IM in the majority of patients with dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus, with an incremental response over time. While durable in the majority, recurrent intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, frequently occurring at the GEJ, suggest long-term surveillance is warranted in high risk groups. PMID:27540572

  19. Rupture of Cervical Esophagus From Blunt Trauma With Concomitant Fracture Dislocation of C4-C5 Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Makoyo, P. Ziki

    1979-01-01

    A patient is presented who had sustained a high posterior cervical esophageal laceration (secondary to an automobile accident) with concomitant fracture of the C4 - C5 spine. It was treated by Gulbrandson conversional method. To the author's knowledge, this represents the first recorded rupture of the cervical esophagus associated with high cord lesions as a result of blunt trauma to the neck. PMID:448756

  20. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  1. Mixed adeno(neuro)endocrine carcinoma arising from the ectopic gastric mucosa of the upper thoracic esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of mixed adenoendocrine carcinoma of the upper thoracic esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa. A 64-year-old man who had been diagnosed with an esophageal tumor on the basis of esophagoscopy was referred to our hospital. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of ectopic gastric mucosa and an adjacent pedunculated lesion located on the posterior wall of the upper thoracic esophagus. Subtotal esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection was performed. A microscopic examination revealed that there was a partially intermingling component of neuroendocrine carcinoma adjacent to a tubular adenocarcinoma which was conterminous with the area of the ectopic gastric mucosa. Although the tubular adenocarcinoma was confined to the mucosa and submucosa, the neuroendocrine carcinoma had invaded the submucosaand there was vascular permeation. Each component accounted for 30% or more of the tumor, so the final histopathological diagnosis was mixed adenoendocrine carcinoma of the upper thoracic esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not performed, because the postoperative tumor stage was IA. The patient was well and had no evidence of recurrence 16 months after surgery. PMID:24139488

  2. Forkhead Box M1 Transcriptional Factor is Required for Smooth Muscle Cells during Embryonic Development of Blood Vessels and Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ustiyan, Vladimir; Wang, I-Ching; Ren, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Yufang; Snyder, Jonathan; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; Lessard, James L.; Kalin, Tanya V.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    The Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1 or Foxm1b) transcription factor (previously called HFH-11B, Trident, Win, or MPP2) is expressed in a variety of tissues during embryogenesis, including vascular, airway and intestinal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Although global deletion of Foxm1 in Foxm1−/− mice is lethal in the embryonic period due to multiple abnormalities in the liver, heart and lung, the specific role of Foxm1 in SMC remains unknown. In the present study, Foxm1 was deleted conditionally in the developing SMC (smFoxm1−/− mice). The majority of smFoxm1−/− mice died immediately after birth due to severe pulmonary hemorrhage, and structural defects in arterial wall and esophagus. Although Foxm1 deletion did not influence SMC differentiation, decreased proliferation of SMC was found in smFoxm1−/− blood vessels and esophagus. Depletion of Foxm1 in cultured SMC caused G2 arrest and decreased numbers of cells undergoing mitosis. Foxm1-deficiency in vitro and in vivo was associated with reduced expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, including cyclin B1, Cdk1-activator Cdc25b phosphatase, Polo-like 1 and JNK1 kinases, and cMyc transcription factor. Foxm1 is critical for proliferation of smooth muscle cells and is required for proper embryonic development of blood vessels and esophagus. PMID:19835856

  3. Murine and Human Tissue-Engineered Esophagus Form from Sufficient Stem/Progenitor Cells and Do Not Require Microdesigned Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L.; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Materials and Methods: Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. Results: TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. Conclusions: TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies. PMID:25298083

  4. Curative two-stage resection for synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus, colon, and liver: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Konosu, Masafumi; Shioi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Fumitaka; Katagiri, Hirokatsu; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Toshimoto; Otsuka, Koki; Koeda, Keisuke; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Mizuno, Masaru; Kimura, Yusuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cases of synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus and other organs curatively resected are rare. Presentation of case A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with bloody feces. He was diagnosed with synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus, colon, and liver. We selected a two-stage operation to safely achieve curative resection for all three cancers. The first stage of the operation comprised a laparoscopy-assisted sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection via open surgery. The patient was discharged without complications. Thirty days later, he was readmitted and thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Although pneumonia-induced pulmonary aspiration occurred as a postoperative complication, it was treated conservatively. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 24. Discussion Esophagectomy is a highly invasive procedure; thus, simultaneous surgery for plural organs, including the esophagus, may induce life-threatening, severe complications. Two-stage surgery is useful in reducing surgical stress in high-risk patients. For synchronous multiple cancers, the planning of two-stage surgery should be considered for each cancer to maintain organ function and reduce the stress and difficulty of each stage. Conclusion We successfully treated synchronous triple cancers, including esophageal cancer, by a two-stage operation. PMID:26074482

  5. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  6. Evidence for a functional role of epigenetically regulated midcluster HOXB genes in the development of Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Boyle, Shelagh; Cassidy, Andy; Castillo, Dani; Saadi, Amel; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2012-06-01

    Barrett esophagus (BE) is a human metaplastic condition that is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma. BE is characterized by a posterior intestinal-like phenotype in an anterior organ and therefore it is reminiscent of homeotic transformations, which can occur in transgenic animal models during embryonic development as a consequence of mutations in HOX genes. In humans, acquired deregulation of HOX genes during adulthood has been linked to carcinogenesis; however, little is known about their role in the pathogenesis of premalignant conditions. We hypothesized that HOX genes may be implicated in the development of BE. We demonstrated that three midcluster HOXB genes (HOXB5, HOXB6, and HOXB7) are overexpressed in BE, compared with the anatomically adjacent normal esophagus and gastric cardia. The midcluster HOXB gene signature in BE is identical to that seen in normal colonic epithelium. Ectopic expression of these three genes in normal squamous esophageal cells in vitro induces markers of intestinal differentiation, such as KRT20, MUC2, and VILLIN. In BE-associated adenocarcinoma, the activation midcluster HOXB gene is associated with loss of H3K27me3 and gain of AcH3, compared with normal esophagus. These changes in histone posttranslational modifications correlate with specific chromatin decompaction at the HOXB locus. We suggest that epigenetically regulated alterations of HOX gene expression can trigger changes in the transcriptional program of adult esophageal cells, with implications for the early stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:22603795

  7. CYR61 and TAZ Upregulation and Focal Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition May Be Early Predictors of Barrett's Esophagus Malignant Progression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Joana; Mesquita, Marta; Dias Pereira, António; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Chaves, Paula; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is the major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. It has a low but non-neglectable risk, high surveillance costs and no reliable risk stratification markers. We sought to identify early biomarkers, predictive of Barrett's malignant progression, using a meta-analysis approach on gene expression data. This in silico strategy was followed by experimental validation in a cohort of patients with extended follow up from the Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa de Francisco Gentil EPE (Portugal). Bioinformatics and systems biology approaches singled out two candidate predictive markers for Barrett's progression, CYR61 and TAZ. Although previously implicated in other malignancies and in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes, our experimental validation shows for the first time that CYR61 and TAZ have the potential to be predictive biomarkers for cancer progression. Experimental validation by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed the up-regulation of both genes in Barrett's samples associated with high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma. In our cohort CYR61 and TAZ up-regulation ranged from one to ten years prior to progression to adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus index samples. Finally, we found that CYR61 and TAZ over-expression is correlated with early focal signs of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Our results highlight both CYR61 and TAZ genes as potential predictive biomarkers for stratification of the risk for development of adenocarcinoma and suggest a potential mechanistic route for Barrett's esophagus neoplastic progression. PMID:27583562

  8. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  9. Barrett’s Esophagus and Cancer Risk: How Research Advances Can Impact Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Alzoubaidi, Durayd; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), whose incidence has increased sharply in the last 4 decades. The annual conversion rate of BE to cancer is significant, but small. The identification of patients at a higher risk of cancer therefore poses a clinical conundrum. Currently, endoscopic surveillance is recommended in BE patients, with the aim of diagnosing either dysplasia or cancer at early stages, both of which are curable with minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. There is a large variation in clinical practice for endoscopic surveillance, and dysplasia as a marker of increased risk is affected by sampling error and high interobserver variability. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by widespread indication to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In fact, it is currently difficult to formulate an accurate algorithm to confidently target the population at risk, based on the known clinical risk factors for BE and EAC. This review will focus on the clinical and molecular factors that are involved in the development of BE and its conversion to cancer and on how increased knowledge in these areas can improve the clinical management of the disease. PMID:25071900

  10. Advanced Imaging Technologies for the Detection of Dysplasia and Early Cancer in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Alberto; Cirocco, Maria; DaCosta, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett esophagus (BE) are tumors with an increasing incidence and poor prognosis. The aim of endoscopic surveillance of BE is to detect dysplasia, particularly high-grade dysplasia and intramucosal cancers that can subsequently be treated endoscopically before progression to invasive cancer with lymph node metastases. Current surveillance practice standards require the collection of random 4-quadrant biopsy specimens over every 1 to 2 cm of BE (Seattle protocol) to detect dysplasia with the assistance of white light endoscopy, in addition to performing targeted biopsies of recognizable lesions. This approach is labor-intensive but should currently be considered state of the art. Chromoendoscopy, virtual chromoendoscopy (e.g., narrow band imaging), and confocal laser endomicroscopy, in addition to high-definition standard endoscopy, might increase the diagnostic yield for the detection of dysplastic lesions. Until these modalities have been demonstrated to enhance efficiency or cost effectiveness, the standard protocol will remain careful examination using conventional off the shelf high-resolution endoscopes, combined with as longer inspection time which is associated with increased detection of dysplasia. PMID:24570883

  11. [Long-term HR-Manometry of the Esophagus: first findings in clinical use].

    PubMed

    Jell, A; Wilhelm, D; Ostler, D; Feußner, H; Hüser, N

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis of oesophageal motility disorders has been well established for many years now, although circadian gastrointestinal motility is still purely understood. So far, high-resolution manometry (HRM) is only available for short-term measurement in clinical practice to evaluate simultaneous pressure conditions throughout the esophagus. Thus, only a very limited period of time can be investigated. There is evidence that disorders in esophageal motility can cause severe discomfort and symptoms even though they only tend to occur spontaneously. When performing short-term-measurements, these often cannot be detected. Therefore, one can assume that long-term analysis of the esophageal function will provide valuable new insights, which will contribute to more effective medicamenteous and operative treatment in esophageal motility disorders. At our gastrointestinal functional diagnostic laboratory, it has been possible to perform high-resolution manometry over the period of 24 hours since June 2014. We used a manometric probe consisting of 36 pressure sensors which are connected to a mobile recording device for ambulatory measurement. This article describes our experiences in clinical use when performing long-term high-resolution manometry and discusses usability and relevance of the results in the context of the underlying esophageal motility disorder. PMID:27612220

  12. Post-ablation surveillance in Barrett's esophagus: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Matthew W; Konda, Vani J; Hart, John; Waxman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a pre-malignant condition affecting up to 15% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Neoplastic Barrett’s mucosa is defined as harboring high grade dysplasia or intra-mucosal cancer, and carries a high risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. The rising incidence of Barrett’s lesions along with the high morbidity of surgical approaches has led to the development of numerous validated endoscopic techniques capable of eradicating neoplastic mucosa in a minimally invasive manner. While there has been widespread adoption of these techniques, less is known about optimal surveillance intervals in the post-therapy period. This is due in part to limitations in current surveillance methods, questions about durability of treatment response and the risk of subendothelial progression. As we are now able to achieve organ sparing eradication of superficial neoplasia in BE, we need to also then focus our attention on how best to manage these patients after eradication is achieved. Implementing optimal surveillance practices requires additional understanding of the biology of the disease, appreciation of the limits of current tools and treatments, and exploration of the role of adjunctive technologies. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current literature surrounding post-ablation surveillance in neoplastic BE. PMID:27158198

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucosal Biopsy versus Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in Barrett's Esophagus and Related Superficial Lesions.

    PubMed

    Elsadek, Hany M; Radwan, Mamdouh M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic surveillance for early detection of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) depends usually on biopsy. The diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) in BE is rapidly growing. Objective. The aim of this study was to check the accuracy of biopsy for precise histopathologic diagnosis of dysplasia and neoplasia, compared to EMR in patients having BE and related superficial esophageal lesions. Methods. A total of 48 patients with previously diagnosed BE (36 men, 12 women, mean age 49.75 ± 13.3 years) underwent routine surveillance endoscopic examination. Biopsies were taken from superficial lesions, if present, and otherwise from BE segments. Then, EMR was performed within three weeks. Results. Biopsy based histopathologic diagnoses were nondysplastic BE (NDBE), 22 cases; low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 14 cases; high-grade dysplasia (HGD), 8 cases; intramucosal carcinoma (IMC), two cases; and invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC), two cases. EMR based diagnosis differed from biopsy based diagnosis (either upgrading or downgrading) in 20 cases (41.67%), (Kappa = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.170-0.69). Conclusions. Biopsy is not a satisfactory method for accurate diagnosis of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in BE patients with or without suspicious superficial lesions. EMR should therefore be the preferred diagnostic method in such patients. PMID:27347544

  14. Colon-interposition as replacement for the esophagus. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, D C; Zwierstra, R P; Kootstra, G; Edens, E T; van der Wagen, A; Bijleveld, C; Jonkers, A

    1981-08-01

    The longterm results of the use of colon-interposition as a substitution for the esophagus have been studied. Colon-interposition was carried out in eleven patients. There was one operative death. A second child died of an unknown cause nine years and eight months after operation. Nine patients could be studied from sixteen years and nine months to thirteen months after the operation. In six patients a satisfactory result has been achieved. One child is staying in a psychiatric infirmary. Feeding problems due to recurrent fistulae have led to growth retardation in another patient, while a third patient has regurgitation symptoms. A study of the case histories gives insight into the many early and late complications which occur in this operative procedure. The colon-interposition is a complicated procedure and should only be carried out in centers for pediatric surgery, because of its specific indication, its technique and the occurrence of complications afterwards. The development of alternative, less complicated, methods leaves a restricted indication for colon-interposition. PMID:7324572

  15. Smoking Exposure and Survival of Patients with Esophagus Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jun-jie; Jiang, Zhi-min; Chen, Yan-xian; Ye, Wei-peng; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Hui-zhong; Xie, De-rong

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known major risk factor in development of esophageal cancer, but few studies have reported the association between smoking status and prognosis of these patients. We conduct the present study to summarize current evidence. A computerized search of the PubMed and EMBASE was performed up to April 30, 2015. Eight studies, containing 4,286 patients, were analyzed. In the grouping analysis, among esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma patients, current and former smokers, compared to those who have never smoked, seemed to have a poorer prognosis (HR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.22–1.64, and HR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.92–1.97, resp.). In the subgroup analysis, adverse effects on current smoker compared with never smoker were also observed in China and the other countries (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.18–1.92, and HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.12–1.65, resp.). In the group that ever smoked, we could not get a similar result. No significantly increased risk was found in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients compared to the squamous-cell histology ones. In the smoking intensity analysis, heavy smoking was associated with poor survival in esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Our pooled results supported the existence of harmful effects of smoking on survival after esophagus cancer diagnosis. PMID:27073394

  16. Adjuvant Therapeutic Modalities in Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of Esophagus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bingwen; Li, Tao; Zhou, Qiang; Ma, Daiyuan; Chen, Yongshun; Huang, Meijuan; Peng, Feng; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Jiang; Ding, Zhenyu; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Ren, Li; Yu, Min; Gong, Youling; Li, Yanying; Chen, Longqi; Lu, You

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the treatment pattern and survival of patients receiving radical resection for primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus (PSCCE). This retrospective study included 150 patients who received radical resection of PSCCE. Data were retrieved from 4 centers in Western China. Thirty-nine of 150 patients received postoperative chemo-radiotherapy, 62 received postoperative chemotherapy, and 49 received radical resection only. The median radiation dosage was 50 Gy. The chemotherapeutic regimen was platinum-based and lasted for 2 to 6 cycles (median, 3). Median disease-free survival (mDFS) and overall survival (mOS) were 12.0 and 18.3 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that postoperative therapy did not improve survival in limited stage I (LSI) disease, whereas postoperative chemotherapy improved survival in limited stage II (LSII) disease. Relative to chemotherapy alone, chemoradiotherapy did not improve survival in patients with completely resected LSII disease. A multivariate analysis indicated an association of no postoperative chemotherapy with shorter DFS (P = 0.050) and OS (P = 0.010). Higher lymph node stage and length of disease longer than 3 cm were poor prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival in PSCCE patients with completely resected LSII disease. Adjuvant treatment with postoperative chemotherapy alone or postoperative chemo-radiotherapy does not increase survival in completely resected LSI disease. PMID:27124057

  17. DNA Damage in CD133-Positive Cells in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thanan, Raynoo; Ma, Ning; Hiraku, Yusuke; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) caused by gastroesophageal reflux is a major risk factor of Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEA), an inflammation-related cancer. Chronic inflammation and following tissue damage may activate progenitor cells under reactive oxygen/nitrogen species-rich environment. We previously reported the formation of oxidative/nitrative stress-mediated mutagenic DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-nitroguanine, in columnar epithelial cells of BE tissues and cancer cells of BEA tissues. We investigated the mechanisms of BEA development in relation to oxidative/nitrative DNA damage and stem cell hypothesis. We examined 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG formation and the expression of stem cell marker (CD133) in biopsy specimens of patients with BE and BEA by immunohistochemical analysis in comparison with those of normal subjects. CD133 was detected at apical surface of columnar epithelial cells of BE and BEA tissues, and the cytoplasm and cell membrane of cancer cells in BEA tissues. DNA lesions and CD133 were colocalized in columnar epithelial cells and cancer cells. Their relative staining intensities in these tissues were significantly higher than those in normal subjects. Our results suggest that BE columnar epithelial cells with CD133 expression in apical surface undergo inflammation-mediated DNA damage, and mutated cells acquire the property of cancer stem cells with cytoplasmic CD133 expression. PMID:27069317

  18. Esophagus cancer and occupational exposure to asbestos: results from a meta-analysis of epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Tang, S P; Wang, K Z

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between occupational asbestos exposure and esophagus cancer (EC) is not fully understood. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association. We systematically searched databases of PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science for studies with quantitative estimates of asbestos exposure and EC mortality. Pooled standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Twenty cohort studies on EC and asbestos exposure were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, occupational exposure to asbestos was associated with an excess risk of EC (SMR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.13-1.38, P < 0.001), with little evidence of heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.682). Being male, exposure to chrysotile or mixed asbestos, working at textile industry, long study follow-up (≥20 years), Asia, Europe and America cohorts with larger cohort size (>500), and high-exposure group all contribute to significantly higher SMR. Publication bias was not detected (Egger's test P-value = 0.374). This meta-analysis suggested that occupational asbestos exposure might be associated with an increased risk of EC in male. High-exposure level of asbestos could contribute to significantly higher risk of EC mortality. PMID:25758922

  19. Thoracoscopic removal of dental prosthesis impacted in the upper thoracic esophagus.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Aiolfi, Alberto; Siboni, Stefano; Rausa, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Dental appliances are the most common cause of accidental foreign body esophageal impaction, especially in the elderly population with decreased oral sensory perception. A 47-year-old man with history of oligophrenia and recurrent epileptic seizures was referred to our hospital following dislocation and ingestion of his upper dental prosthesis. Endoscopic removal and clipping of an esophageal tear had been unsuccessfully attempted. A chest CT scan confirmed entrapment of the dental prosthesis in the upper thoracic esophagus, the presence of pneumomediastinum, and the close proximity of one of the metal clasps of the prosthesis to the left subclavian artery. A video-assisted right thoracoscopy in the left lateral decubitus position was performed and the foreign body was successfully removed. The patient was then allowed to wear the retrieved prosthesis after dentistry consultation and repair of the wire clasps by a dental technician. At the 6-month follow-up visit the patient was doing very well without any trouble in swallowing. PMID:24422752

  20. [Esophageal mucoceles complicating double exclusion of the esophagus after ingestion of caustics].

    PubMed

    Chambon, J P; Robert, Y; Rémy, J; Ribet, M

    1990-01-01

    A mucocele is rarely observed after esophageal exclusion for corrosive burns. It may represent a contra-indication to esophageal conservation in case of a total gastric resection for necrosis and perforation of the stomach. To evaluate this risk, 15 patients, operated between January 1970 and december 1988, were reviewed: they underwent total gastric resection with esophageal exclusion, followed by a secondary colon transplant between the cervical esophagus and the duodenum. A plain chest film was performed for 13 patients and a CT scan for 11 patients. Mean follow-up was 5.7 years (2 months - 17 years). Four patients died, one of them after resection of a compressive esophageal mucocele. Six mucoceles were detected on 13 chest films and 7 were described on 11 CT scans. On the whole, 8 mucoceles were diagnosed on 15 patients; one of them was complicated by tracheal compression. The formation of a secondary esophageal mucocele is a late sign of incomplete destruction of the esophageal wall. It is a frequent complication of esophageal exclusion performed after total gastrectomy for corrosive burns of the stomach. It must be detected on a chest film which shows the largest dilatations or on a CT scan, which is a better investigation. When the diameter of the mucocele is equal of superior to 50 mm, it can be compressive and must be treated by resection of internal diversion. PMID:2268132

  1. [Esophageal mucoceles complicating double exclusion of the esophagus after ingestion of caustics].

    PubMed

    Chambon, J P; Robert, Y; Rémy, J; Ribet, M

    1989-01-01

    A mucocele is rarely observed after esophageal exclusion for corrosive burns. It may represent a contra-indication to esophageal conservation in case of a total gastric resection for necrosis and perforation of the stomach. To evaluate this risk, 15 patients, operated between January 1970 and December 1988, were reviewed: they underwent total gastric resection with esophageal exclusion, followed by a secondary colon transplant between the cervical esophagus and the duodenum. A plain chest film was performed for 13 patients and a CT scan for 11 patients. Mean follow-up was 5.7 years (2 months - 17 years). Four patients died, one of them after resection of a compressive esophageal mucocele. Six mucoceles were detected on 13 chest films and 7 were described on 11 CT scans. On the whole, 8 mucoceles were diagnosed on 15 patients; one of them was complicated by tracheal compression. The formation of a secondary esophageal mucocele is a late sign of incomplete destruction of the esophageal wall. It is a frequent complication of esophageal exclusion performed after total gastrectomy for corrosive burns of the stomach. It must be detected on a chest film which shows the largest dilatations or on a CT scan, which is a better investigation. When the diameter of the mucocele is equal of superior to 50 mm, it can be compressive and must be treated by resection of internal diversion. PMID:2604360

  2. Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease shares genetic background with esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Gharahkhani, Puya; Tung, Joyce; Hinds, David; Mishra, Aniket; Vaughan, Thomas L; Whiteman, David C; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-02-15

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) is a rapidly fatal cancer with rising incidence in the developed world. Most EAs arise in a metaplastic epithelium, Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is associated with greatly increased risk of EA. One of the key risk factors for both BE and EA is chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study used the linkage disequilibrium (LD) score regression and genomic profile risk scoring approaches to investigate the contribution of multiple common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the risk of GERD, and the extent of genetic overlap between GERD and BE or EA. Using LD score regression, we estimated an overall phenotypic variance of 7% (95% CI 3-11%) for GERD explained by all the genotyped SNPs. A genetic correlation of 77% (s.e. = 24%, P = 0.0012) between GERD and BE and 88% between GERD and EA (s.e. = 25%, P = 0.0004) was estimated using the LD score regression approach. Results from the genomic profile risk scoring approach, as a robustness check, were broadly similar to those from the LD score regression. This study provides the first evidence for a polygenic basis for GERD and supports for a polygenic overlap between GERD and BE, and GERD and EA. PMID:26704365

  3. Coffee or Tea, Hot or Cold, Are Not Associated With Risk of Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Krishna C; El-Serag, Hashem B; Thrift, Aaron P

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiologic data regarding coffee and tea consumption and risk of esophageal inflammation, Barrett's esophagus (BE), and adenocarcinoma are sparse and inconclusive. This study examined the association between consumption of tea or coffee with risk of BE. We conducted a cross-sectional study among US veterans, comparing 310 patients with histologically confirmed BE with 1728 individuals with no endoscopic or histopathologic features of BE (controls). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. In univariate models, we found a statistically significant association between risk of BE and consumption of coffee (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.06-1.87) or tea (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05-1.71). However, in multivariate analysis, in which models were adjusted for confounders including sex and race, we found no association between risk of BE and consumption of coffee (adjusted OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76-1.42) or tea (adjusted OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.85-1.44). These data do not support an association between consumption of coffee or tea and the risk of BE. It is unlikely that avoidance of coffee or tea will protect against BE. PMID:26681488

  4. [Use of BICAP by endoscopic route in the palliative treatment of neoplastic stenosis of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Pantuso, G; Bottino, A; Cipolla, C; Gitto, C; Farro, G; Talarico, F; Latteri, M; Florena, M

    1990-12-01

    Over the years the palliative treatment of neoplastic stenosis of the esophagus in patients who cannot be operated has seen a variation of endoscopic methods which aimed to reopen the alimentary canal either using simple dilatation, or the insertion of endoprostheses, or sclerosing injection or antiblastic therapy, or lastly using disobstructive laser therapy. In particular, the use of Neodymium YAG laser in endoscopic therapy for the deobstruction of neoplastic esophageal stenosis is currently widely used. More recently deobstruction of the stenosis may also be achieved using bipolar diathermocoagulation with BICAP following esophageal dilatation. Recent comparative studies of the use of BICAP and laser therapy in the treatment of neoplastic esophageal stenosis have tended to reveal the complementary characteristics of the two techniques. The present paper reports the Authors' experience in this respect which has been satisfactory with regard to both methods, in line with the findings of other studies. In the study of two groups of 8 patients treated with BICAP and laser therapy respectively, recanalisation was obtained in 100% of cases with good functional results in 75% of patients treated with BICAP and 87.5% of those receiving laser therapy. The time interval between one treatment session and the next in relation to the efficacy of the therapy was similar in both methods and ranged from a minimum of 4 weeks to a maximum of 12 weeks. Complications were scarce in both groups. PMID:1708116

  5. Smoking Exposure and Survival of Patients with Esophagus Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jun-Jie; Jiang, Zhi-Min; Chen, Yan-Xian; Ye, Wei-Peng; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Hui-Zhong; Xie, De-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known major risk factor in development of esophageal cancer, but few studies have reported the association between smoking status and prognosis of these patients. We conduct the present study to summarize current evidence. A computerized search of the PubMed and EMBASE was performed up to April 30, 2015. Eight studies, containing 4,286 patients, were analyzed. In the grouping analysis, among esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma patients, current and former smokers, compared to those who have never smoked, seemed to have a poorer prognosis (HR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.22-1.64, and HR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.92-1.97, resp.). In the subgroup analysis, adverse effects on current smoker compared with never smoker were also observed in China and the other countries (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.18-1.92, and HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.12-1.65, resp.). In the group that ever smoked, we could not get a similar result. No significantly increased risk was found in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients compared to the squamous-cell histology ones. In the smoking intensity analysis, heavy smoking was associated with poor survival in esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Our pooled results supported the existence of harmful effects of smoking on survival after esophagus cancer diagnosis. PMID:27073394

  6. RTOG phase I study on fast neutron teletherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Davis, R.B.; Olson, M.H.; Cohen, L.; Raghaven, V.; Griffin, T.W.; Rogers, C.C.; Al-Abdulla, A.S.M.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Davis, L.W.

    1983-04-01

    From August, 1977, though January, 1981, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Goup sponsored a Pase I study (RTOG 77-09) on the use of fast neutrons for treating inoperable squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus. A total of 39 evaluable patients were treated with curative intent using either fast neutrons alone or in combination with low LET irradiation as part of a mixed beam fractionation scheme. Actuarial survival curves are presented for both the ''neutrons alone'' and the ''mixed beam'' treatment goups. There was no significant survival difference between these goups of patients. The projected survival at two years is less than 10%, which is comparable weth megavoltage photon results for an unselected series of patients. The size of the primary lesion and the initial Karnofsky performance status were found to be the most important prognostic indications for prolonged survival. Sixteen of 39 patients were felt to have achieved local clearance of their tumor at some time during their follow-up with the median time until a local recurrence being 17 months. Treatment related complications and patterns of metastatic spread are discussed. In general, it appeared that the response of large tumors to neutron irradiation resulted in necrosis and fistula formation. In many cases this was accompanied by persistent/ recurrent tumor within the high dose radiation volume.

  7. Esophageal cancer diagnosed by high-resolution manometry of the esophagus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, RONGBEI; CHU, HUA; XU, FEI; CHEN, SHUJIE

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female who presented with a history of dysphagia for 5 months and regurgitation for 1 week was referred to the Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital (Hangzhou, China) for further evaluation, since the gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasound performed in local hospitals did not reveal the presence of cancer. High-resolution manometry (HRM) of the esophagus was performed to determine the patient's condition, and revealed an abnormal high-pressure zone that was located 33 cm from the incisor and did not relax upon swallowing. Synchronous waves were observed, and the pressure of the esophageal lumen was found to increase with secondary synchronous peristaltic waves. The lower esophageal sphincter was 39 cm from the incisor and relaxed upon swallowing. The abnormal high-pressure zone could have been caused by an obstruction, and therefore an upper gastrointestinal series (barium swallow) test and gastroscopy were recommended to further pinpoint the cause. Following the two examinations, mid-esophageal cancer was considered as a possible diagnosis. A biopsy was performed and the final diagnosis was that of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The findings of the present study suggest that, for patients with evident symptoms of esophageal motor dysfunction without significant gastroscopy findings, HRM is recommended. PMID:27123076

  8. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-02-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis.

  9. Hyaluronan distribution in the normal epithelium of esophagus, stomach, and colon and their cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Tammi, M.; Guo, H.; Tammi, R.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of hyaluronan (HA) in normal gastrointestinal wall and in tumors originating from their epithelium was studied using a specific probe prepared from cartilage proteoglycan (bHABC, biotinylated hyaluronan binding complex). The normal stratified squamous epithelium of esophagus showed an intense HA staining in the basal and lower intermediate layers, whereas the simple epithelia in the stomach and large intestine were HA negative. Esophageal in situ carcinomas expressed HA also in the cell layers close to the luminal surface, in regions normally negative. Most of the invasive squamous cell carcinomas maintained their HA expression, but in very poorly differentiated types the tumor parenchyma was devoid of HA. In both gastric and colonic adenocarcinomas the tumor parenchyma showed no HA. The stromal tissue was intensely HA positive in all tumors. Cancer cells invading the intestinal smooth muscle were surrounded by copious amounts of HA, whereas the muscular layer was otherwise very poor in HA staining. These results show that relatively well differentiated carcinoma cells themselves retain the high or low HA expression pattern of their original epithelium, whereas tumors stimulate HA deposition in the surrounding stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8669472

  10. Post-ablation surveillance in Barrett's esophagus: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stier, Matthew W; Konda, Vani J; Hart, John; Waxman, Irving

    2016-05-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a pre-malignant condition affecting up to 15% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Neoplastic Barrett's mucosa is defined as harboring high grade dysplasia or intra-mucosal cancer, and carries a high risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. The rising incidence of Barrett's lesions along with the high morbidity of surgical approaches has led to the development of numerous validated endoscopic techniques capable of eradicating neoplastic mucosa in a minimally invasive manner. While there has been widespread adoption of these techniques, less is known about optimal surveillance intervals in the post-therapy period. This is due in part to limitations in current surveillance methods, questions about durability of treatment response and the risk of subendothelial progression. As we are now able to achieve organ sparing eradication of superficial neoplasia in BE, we need to also then focus our attention on how best to manage these patients after eradication is achieved. Implementing optimal surveillance practices requires additional understanding of the biology of the disease, appreciation of the limits of current tools and treatments, and exploration of the role of adjunctive technologies. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current literature surrounding post-ablation surveillance in neoplastic BE. PMID:27158198

  11. Brief report: the length of newly diagnosed Barrett's esophagus may be decreasing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Alsarraj, A; El-Serag, H B

    2015-07-01

    Few studies have examined the temporal trends of length in newly diagnosed Barrett's esophagus (BE) and arrived at conflicting results. The aim of this study was to identify whether there has been a change over time in the length of BE at the time of diagnosis. This is a retrospective, single-center, observational study from Houston, Texas on newly diagnosed BE between 2008 and 2013. All cases were defined by the presence of endoscopically visible BE and histologic confirmation of intestinalized columnar epithelium with goblet cells. The length of BE was measured using the Prague classification. We examined temporal changes in 1-year intervals in the length of BE at the time of diagnosis. Both the frequency and mean length of BE at diagnosis seemed to decrease over time from February 2008 to July 2013. The proportion of patients diagnosed with BE ≥3 cm per year declined during the study period, while the proportion of patients with BE ≥1 and <3 cm increased, and those with <1 cm remained stable. The mean age and the gender of patients diagnosed with BE ≥3 cm did not differ significantly by BE length or year of diagnosis. The mean length of newly diagnosed BE may be decreasing as a result of a decline in BE ≥3 cm. These observations cannot be explained by changes in age and gender. PMID:24708395

  12. Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging of Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfa; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; zhou, Guangzhao; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2014-01-01

    The electron density resolution is 1000 times higher for synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast CT imaging than conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, with which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. In the present study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagus and esophageal carcinoma specimens. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall-- mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The surface of the mucous layer was smooth. In esophageal carcinoma, because of tumor tissue infiltration, the submucosa layer was absent, which indicated destruction of the submucosa. The boundary between normal tissue and tumor was comparatively fuzzy, the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall was indistinct. The surface of the mucous layer was rugose. The technology might be helpful in tumor staging of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24939041

  13. Barrett's esophagus and cancer risk: how research advances can impact clinical practice.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Alzoubaidi, Durayd; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), whose incidence has increased sharply in the last 4 decades. The annual conversion rate of BE to cancer is significant, but small. The identification of patients at a higher risk of cancer therefore poses a clinical conundrum. Currently, endoscopic surveillance is recommended in BE patients, with the aim of diagnosing either dysplasia or cancer at early stages, both of which are curable with minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. There is a large variation in clinical practice for endoscopic surveillance, and dysplasia as a marker of increased risk is affected by sampling error and high interobserver variability. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by widespread indication to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In fact, it is currently difficult to formulate an accurate algorithm to confidently target the population at risk, based on the known clinical risk factors for BE and EAC. This review will focus on the clinical and molecular factors that are involved in the development of BE and its conversion to cancer and on how increased knowledge in these areas can improve the clinical management of the disease. PMID:25071900

  14. Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes for Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shugeng; Li, Jiagen; Feng, Xiaoli; Shi, Susheng; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) is an extremely rare disease with poor prognosis. We summarized and analyzed the characteristics of 17 PMME patients (with average age of 57.5 ± 10.3 years) who had received surgical resection in our center. The majority (13/17, 76.5%) of the patients were male. The percentage of patients with smoking and alcohol consumption was 41.2% and 23.5%, respectively. The preoperative diagnosis rate was 35.3%. Lymph node metastasis mainly involved the mid-lower mediastinal and upper abdominal area. Primary tumors that invaded beyond the submucosa layer (T2–T4) had much higher tendency of lymph node metastasis than those restricted to the submucosa layer (T1) (6/8, 75.0% vs. 3/9, 33.3%, p = 0.086). The 1-year and 5-year survival rate of the patients was 51% and 10%, respectively, with median survival time being 18.1 months. Survival analysis showed that TNM stage was a predictor for PMME prognosis (median survival time of 47.3 months vs. 8.0 months for stage I/II vs. stage III, respectively, p = 0.018), and multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed the independence of its prognostic value [HR (95% CI): 5.678 (1.125–28.658), p = 0.035]. PMID:27033424

  15. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. PMID:25591866

  16. Medication Usage and the Risk of Neoplasia in Patients with Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dang M.; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Henderson, Louise; Stein, Daniel; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Sampliner, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Experimental evidence indicates that proton pump inhibitors (PPI), non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAID)/aspirin and statins can protect patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) from developing neoplasias. However, only limited data are available on chemoprevention in patients with BE. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed using data from patients with documented BE. Prescription information was collected from pharmacy records. Cox regression analyses were performed to examine the association between prescriptions for PPI, NSAID/aspirin or statins and the risk of developing esophageal dysplasia or adenocarcinoma during follow-up (from 1982 to 2005). Results We examined data from 344 patients diagnosed with BE (mean age 61 years, 90.4% Caucasian, 94.2% male). After BE diagnosis, 67.2% of the patients were prescribed PPI for a mean duration of 5.1 years; 49.1% were prescribed NSAID for a mean duration of 3.6 years and 25.3% were prescribed statins for a mean duration of 2.8 years. During 2,620 patient-years following BE diagnosis, high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma developed in 33 patients. PPI treatment after BE diagnosis was associated with a reduced risk of high-grade dysplasia or cancer; this association persisted after adjustment for gender, age, and the length of BE at time of the diagnosis. NSAID and/or aspirin therapy were associated with a non-significant trend toward lower incidence of high-grade dysplasia or esophageal cancer. Conclusions PPI therapy reduces the risk of neoplasms in patients with BE. NSAID/aspirin appear to reduce cancer risk whereas statin use is not significantly associated with the risk of neoplasia in patients with BE. PMID:19523538

  17. Nitric oxide suppresses a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl- current in smooth muscle cells of opossum esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Vogalis, F; Goyal, R K

    1998-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) hyperpolarizes visceral smooth muscles. Using the patch-clamp technique, we investigated the possibility that NO-mediated hyperpolarization in the circular muscle of opossum esophagus results from the suppression of a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl- current. Smooth muscle cells were dissociated from the circular layer and bathed in high-K+ Ca(2+)-EGTA-buffered solution. Macroscopic ramp currents were recorded from cell-attached patches. Contaminating K(+)-channel currents were blocked with tetrapentylammonium chloride (200 microM) added to all solutions. Raising bath Ca2+ concentration above 150 nM in the presence of A-23187 (10 microM) activated a leak current (IL-Ca) with an EC50 of 1.2 microM at -100 mV. The reversal potential (Erev) of IL-Ca (-8.5 +/- 1.8 mV, n = 8) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from Erev of the background current (+4.2 +/- 1.2 mV, n = 8). Equimolar substitution of 135 mM Cl- in the pipette solution with gluconate significantly shifted Erev of IL-Ca to +16.6 +/- 3.4 mV (n = 4) (P < 0.05 compared with background), whereas replacement of total Na+ with Tris+ suppressed IL-Ca but did not affect Erev (-15 +/- 3 mV, n = 3; P > 0.05). IL-Ca was inhibited by DIDS (500 microM). Diethylenetriamine-NO adduct (200 microM), a NO donor, and 8-bromo-cGMP (200 microM) suppressed IL-Ca by 59 +/- 15% (n = 5) and 62 +/- 21% (n = 4) at -100 mV, respectively. We conclude that in opossum esophageal smooth muscle NO-mediated hyperpolarization may be produced by suppression of a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl(-)-permeable conductance via formation of cGMP. PMID:9612270

  18. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the esophagus: clinical characteristics and prognostic evaluation of 49 cases with surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Han-Yu; Ni, Peng-Zhi; Wang, Yun-Cang; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinicopathological features and optimum treatment of esophageal neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) are hardly known due to its rarity. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to analyze the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with surgically resected esophageal NEC. Methods We collected clinicopathological data on consecutive limited disease stage esophageal NEC patients who underwent esophagectomy with regional lymphadenectomy in West China Hospital from January 2007 to December 2013. Results A total of forty-nine patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of the patients was 58.4±8.2 years with male predominance. Fifty-five percent of the esophageal NEC were located in the middle thoracic esophagus. Histologically, 28 (57.1%) patients were found to be small cell NECs. Fifty-one percent of the patients were found to have lymph node metastasis. According to the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 9 patients were at stage I, 21 patients stage II, and 19 patients stage III. Twenty-six patients (53.1%) received adjuvant therapy. After a median follow-up of 44.8 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 35.2–50.4 months], the median survival time of the patients was 22.4 months (95% CI, 14.0–30.8 months). The 1-year and 3-year survival rates for the whole cohort patients were 74.9% and 35.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, TNM staging, lymph node metastasis and adjutant therapy significantly influenced survival time. In multivariate analysis, TNM staging was the only independent prognostic factor. Conclusions Esophageal NEC has a poor prognosis. The 2009 AJCC TNM staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma may also fit for esophageal NEC. Surgery combined with adjuvant therapy may be a good option for treating limited disease stage esophageal NEC. Further prospective studies defining the optimum therapeutic regimen for esophageal NEC are needed.

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia-like change of the esophageal submucosal glands is associated with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Braxton, David R; Nickleach, Dana C; Liu, Yuan; Farris, Alton B

    2014-08-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) protect the squamous epithelium from insults such as gastroesophageal reflux disease by secreting mucins and bicarbonate. We have observed metaplastic changes within the SMG acini that we have termed oncocytic glandular metaplasia (OGM), and necrotizing sialometaplasia-like change (NSMLC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the associated clinicopathological parameters of, and to phenotypically characterize the SMG metaplasias. Esophagectomy specimens were retrospectively assessed on hematoxylin and eosin sections and assigned to either a Barrett's esophagus (BE) or non-BE control group. Clinicopathologic data was collected, and univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to assess the adjusted associations with NSMLC and OGM. Selected cases of SMG metaplasia were characterized. SMG were present in 82 esophagi that met inclusion criteria. On univariate analysis, NSMLC was associated with BE (p = 0.002). There was no relationship between NSMLC and patient age, sex, tumor size, or treatment history. OGM was associated with BE (p = 0.031). No relationship was found between OGM and patient age, sex, or tumor size. On multivariate analysis, BE was independently associated with NSMLC (odds ratio [OR] 4.95, p = 0.003). Treatment history was also independently associated with OGM (p = 0.029), but not NSMLC. Both NSMLC and OGM were non-mucinous ductal type epithelia retaining a p63-smooth muscle actin co-positive myoepithelial cell layer. NSMLC and OGM were present in endoscopic mucosal resection specimens. Our study suggests that SMG metaplasia is primarily a reflux-induced pathology. NSMLC may pose diagnostic dilemmas in resection specimens or when only partially represented in mucosal biopsies or endoscopic resection specimens. PMID:24863247

  20. A Molecular Clock Infers Heterogeneous Tissue Age Among Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chao-Jen; Hazelton, William D.; Kaz, Andrew M.; Willis, Joseph E.; Grady, William M.; Luebeck, E. Georg

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers that drift differentially with age between normal and premalignant tissues, such as Barrett’s esophagus (BE), have the potential to improve the assessment of a patient’s cancer risk by providing quantitative information about how long a patient has lived with the precursor (i.e., dwell time). In the case of BE, which is a metaplastic precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), such biomarkers would be particularly useful because EAC risk may change with BE dwell time and it is generally not known how long a patient has lived with BE when a patient is first diagnosed with this condition. In this study we first describe a statistical analysis of DNA methylation data (both cross-sectional and longitudinal) derived from tissue samples from 50 BE patients to identify and validate a set of 67 CpG dinucleotides in 51 CpG islands that undergo age-related methylomic drift. Next, we describe how this information can be used to estimate a patient’s BE dwell time. We introduce a Bayesian model that incorporates longitudinal methylomic drift rates, patient age, and methylation data from individually paired BE and normal squamous tissue samples to estimate patient-specific BE onset times. Our application of the model to 30 sporadic BE patients’ methylomic profiles first exposes a wide heterogeneity in patient-specific BE onset times. Furthermore, independent application of this method to a cohort of 22 familial BE (FBE) patients reveals significantly earlier mean BE onset times. Our analysis supports the conjecture that differential methylomic drift occurs in BE (relative to normal squamous tissue) and hence allows quantitative estimation of the time that a BE patient has lived with BE. PMID:27168458

  1. Deletion at fragile sites is a common and early event in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lisa A; Kostadinov, Rumen; Barrett, Michael T; Peiffer, Daniel A; Pokholok, Dimitry; Odze, Robert; Sanchez, Carissa A; Maley, Carlo C; Reid, Brian J; Gunderson, Kevin L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2010-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant intermediate to esophageal adenocarcinoma, which develops in the context of chronic inflammation and exposure to bile and acid. We asked whether there might be common genomic alterations that could be identified as potential clinical biomarker(s) for BE by whole genome profiling. We detected copy number alterations and/or loss of heterozygosity at 56 fragile sites in 20 patients with premalignant BE. Chromosomal fragile sites are particularly sensitive to DNA breaks and are frequent sites of rearrangement or loss in many human cancers. Seventy-eight percent of all genomic alterations detected by array-CGH were associated with fragile sites. Copy number losses in early BE were observed at particularly high frequency at FRA3B (81%), FRA9A/C (71.4%), FRA5E (52.4%), and FRA 4D (52.4%), and at lower frequencies in other fragile sites, including FRA1K (42.9%), FRAXC (42.9%), FRA 12B (33.3%), and FRA16D (33.3%). Due to the consistency of the region of copy number loss, we were able to verify these results by quantitative PCR, which detected the loss of FRA3B and FRA16D, in 83% and 40% of early molecular stage BE patients, respectively. Loss of heterozygosity in these cases was confirmed through pyrosequencing at FRA3B and FRA16D (75% and 70%, respectively). Deletion and genomic instability at FRA3B and other fragile sites could thus be a biomarker of genetic damage in BE patients and a potential biomarker of cancer risk. PMID:20647332

  2. Genome-wide methylation analysis shows similar patterns in Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jian; Ajani, Jaffer; Wu, Xifeng

    2013-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). To identify novel tumor suppressors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis and potential biomarkers for the malignant progression of BE, we performed a genome-wide methylation profiling of BE and EAC tissues. Using Illumina’s Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip microarray, we examined the methylation status of 27 578 CpG sites in 94 normal esophageal (NE), 77 BE and 117 EAC tissue samples. The overall methylation of CpG sites within the CpG islands was higher, but outside of the CpG islands was lower in BE and EAC tissues than in NE tissues. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed an excellent separation of NE tissues from BE and EAC tissues; however, the clustering of BE and EAC tissues was less clear, suggesting that methylation occurs early during the progression of EAC. We confirmed many previously reported hypermethylated genes and identified a large number of novel hypermethylated genes in BE and EAC tissues, particularly genes encoding ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase) peptidase proteins, cadherins and protocadherins, and potassium voltage-gated channels. Pathway analysis showed that a number of channel and transporter activities were enriched for hypermethylated genes. We used pyrosequencing to validate selected candidate genes and found high correlations between the array and pyrosequencing data (rho > 0.8 for each validated gene). The differentially methylated genes and pathways may provide biological insights into the development and progression of BE and become potential biomarkers for the prediction and early detection of EAC. PMID:23996928

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaz, Andrew M.; Grady, William M.; Stachler, Matthew D.; Bass, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) develops from Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a condition where the normal squamous epithelia is replaced by specialized intestinal metaplasia in response to chronic gastro-esophageal acid reflux. In a minority of individuals, BE can progress to low- and high-grade dysplasia (LGD and HGD) and eventually to intramucosal and then invasive carcinoma. BE provides researchers with a unique model to characterize the process by which a carcinoma arises from its precursor lesion. Molecular studies of BE have demonstrated that it is not simply a metaplastic tissue, but rather it harbors frequent alterations that are also present in dysplastic BE and in EAC. Both BE and EAC are characterized by loss of heterozygosity (LOH), aneuploidy, specific genetic mutations, and clonal diversity. Epigenetic abnormalities, primary alterations in DNA methylation, are also frequently seen in BE and EAC. Candidate gene and array-based approaches have demonstrated that numerous tumor-suppressor genes exhibit aberrant promoter methylation, and some of these altered genes are associated with the neoplastic progression of BE. It has also been shown that the BE and EAC epigenomes are characterized by hypomethylation of intragenic and non-coding regions. Given the limitations of histopathology for the diagnosis of BE and particularly dysplastic BE, genomic and epigenomic analyses have the potential to improve the precision of risk stratification. Assays to detect molecular alterations that are associated with neoplastic progression could one day be used to improve the pathological assessment of BE/EAC and to select high-risk patients for more intensive surveillance. PMID:26021206

  4. Incidence and predictors of adenocarcinoma following endoscopic ablation of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Choi, Sung Eun; Nishioka, Norman S.; Rattner, David W.; Puricelli, William P.; Tramontano, Angela C.; Kitano, Seigo; Hur, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate and risk factors of recurrent or metachronous adenocarcinoma following endoscopic ablation therapy in patients with Barrett’s esophagus (BE) have not been specifically reported. Aims The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and predictors of adenocarcinoma after ablation therapy for BE high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC). Methods This is a single center, retrospective review of prospectively collected data on consecutive cases of endoscopic ablation for BE. A total of 223 patients with BE (HGD or IMC) were treated by ablation between 1996 and 2011. Primary outcome measures were recurrence and new development of adenocarcinoma after ablation. Recurrence was defined as the presence of adenocarcinoma following the absence of adenocarcinoma in biopsy samples from 2 consecutive surveillance endoscopies. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess predictors of adenocarcinoma after ablation. Results 183 patients were included in the final analysis, and 40 patients were excluded: 22 for palliative ablation, 8 lost to follow-up, 5 for residual carcinoma and 5 for postoperative state. Median follow-up was 39 months. Recurrence or new development of adenocarcinoma was found in 20 patients (11%) and the median time to recurrence/development of adenocarcinoma was 11.5 months. Independent predictors of recurrent or metachronous adenocarcinoma were hiatal hernia size ≥ 4cm (odds ratio 3.649, P = 0.0233) and histology (HGD/adenocarcinoma) after 1st ablation (odds ratio 4.141, P = 0.0065). Conclusions Adenocarcinoma after endoscopic therapy for HGD or IMC in BE is associated with large hiatal hernia and histology status after initial ablation therapy. PMID:24395382

  5. Tissue engineered esophagus scaffold constructed with porcine small intestinal submucosa and synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mei-Rong; Gong, Mei; Da, Lin-Cui; Bai, Lin; Li, Xiu-Qun; Chen, Ke-Fei; Li-Ling, Jesse; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2014-02-01

    Acellular porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) has been successfully used for reconstructing esophagus with half circumferential defects. However, repairing full circumferential esophageal defects with SIS has been restricted due to the latter's poor mechanical properties. In the present study, synthetic polyesters biomaterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been used to improve the mechanical properties of SIS. Feasibility of SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA composite material scaffold for esophageal tissue engineering has been assessed through a series of testing. The appropriate mixing ratio of PHBHHx and PLGA polymers has been determined as 5:5 by mechanical testing and in vitro degradation experiment. The morphology of constructed membranous and tubular scaffolds was also characterized. As confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the contents of VEGF and TGF-β have respectively reached 657 ± 18 ng mL(-1) and 130 ± 4 pg mL(-1) within the SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA specimens. Biocompatibility of the SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA specimens with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and a live-dead cell viability assay. Actin filaments of MSCs on the composite materials were labeled. Biological safety of the extract from SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA specimens, measured as hemolysis rate, was all lower than 5%. Compared with SIS and SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA specimens, inflammatory reaction provoked by the PHBHHx-PLGA specimens in rats was however more severe. Our results have suggested that SIS/PHBHHx-PLGA composite material can offer a new approach for esophageal tissue engineering. PMID:24457267

  6. Dietary intake of vegetables, folate, and antioxidants and the risk of Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Li; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Parente, Paola; Verstovsek, Gordana; Alsarraj, Abeer; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diet is a potentially modifiable risk factor for Barrett's esophagus (BE). We investigated the associations between intakes of fruits and vegetables and risk of BE. Methods We identified study subjects from 1,859 participants who underwent the endoscopy in a single VA Medical Center in the U.S between 2008 and 2011. Dietary intake in the previous year was elicited using a self-administered Block food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for BE. Results A total of 151 cases with definite BE and 777 controls completed the FFQ. When highest tertile of intake was compared with the lowest, the OR (95% CI) was 0.46 (0.26-0.81) for dark green vegetables, 0.52 (0.30- 0.90) for legumes, 0.50 (0.28-0.90) for total fiber, 0.45 (0.25-0.81) for isoflavones, 0.52 (0.30- 0.67) for total folate, and 0.45 (0.26-0.79) for lutein, adjusting for multiple confounding factors including use of aspirin or proton pump inhibitor, gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms, and physical activity. The association for dark green vegetables was attenuated after adjustment for lutein, total fiber, and total folate (OR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.30-2.22). Conclusion Higher intake of dark green vegetables was associated with a decreased risk of BE in a veteran population. Such an inverse association may be partially mediated by lutein, fiber and folate. The novel findings on the association between intake of lutein, total folate, or isoflavones and risk of BE need further confirmation. PMID:23420329

  7. Safety of Prior Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in Patients Receiving Radiofrequency Ablation of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Ngozi I.; Tomizawa, Yutaka; Dunagan, Kelly T.; Lutzke, Lori S.; Wang, Kenneth K.; Prasad, Ganapathy A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is safe and effective treatment for flat dysplasia associated with Barrett’s esophagus (BE). However, there are limited data on the safety of RFA in patients who had prior endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), which might increase the risk of complications. We compared complications and histologic outcomes between patients who had EMR before RFA and those who received only RFA. METHODS We performed a retrospective analysis of data collected from patients treated for BE, associated with dysplasia or intramucosal cancer, at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 1998–2009. Patients were divided into groups that had RFA after EMR (group 1, n = 44) or only RFA (group 2, n = 46). We compared the incidence of complications (strictures, bleeding, and esophageal perforation) and histologic features (complete resolution of dysplasia and complete resolution of intestinal metaplasia [CR-IM]) between groups. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess predictors of stricture formation. RESULTS Stricture rates were 14% in group 1 and 9% in group 2 (odds ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26 –9.74). The rates of CR-IM were 43% in group 1 and 74% in group 2 (odds ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.14 – 0.78). The rates of complete resolution of dysplasia were 76% in group 1 and 71% in group 2 (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.39 – 4.17). The adjusted odds ratio for CR-IM in group 1 (adjusting for age, segment length, and grade of dysplasia) was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.15–1.66). CONCLUSIONS Stricture rates among patients who receive only RFA are comparable to those of patients who had prior EMR. EMR appears safe to perform prior to RFA. PMID:22056303

  8. Obesity and Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett’s Esophagus: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Reid, Brian J.; Onstad, Lynn; Risch, Harvey A.; Liu, Geoffrey; Bird, Nigel C.; Wu, Anna H.; Corley, Douglas A.; Romero, Yvonne; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Casson, Alan G.; Levine, David M.; Zhang, Rui; Ek, Weronica E.; MacGregor, Stuart; Ye, Weimin; Hardie, Laura J.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Whiteman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from observational studies suggest that body mass index (BMI) is causally related to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its precursor, Barrett’s esophagus (BE). However, the relationships may be affected by bias and confounding. Methods We used data from the Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Genetic Susceptibility Study: 999 patients with EAC, 2061 patients with BE, and 2169 population controls. We applied the two-stage control function instrumental variable method of the Mendelian randomization approach to estimate the unbiased, unconfounded effect of BMI on risk of EAC and BE. This was performed using a genetic risk score, derived from 29 genetic variants shown to be associated with BMI, as an instrument for lifetime BMI. A higher score indicates propensity to obesity. All tests were two-sided. Results The genetic risk score was not associated with potential confounders, including gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and smoking. In the instrumental variable analyses (IV), EAC risk increased by 16% (IV-odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01 to 1.33) and BE risk increased by 12% (IV-OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.25) per 1kg/m2 increase in BMI. BMI was statistically significantly associated with EAC and BE in conventional epidemiologic analyses. Conclusions People with a high genetic propensity to obesity have higher risks of esophageal metaplasia and neoplasia than people with low genetic propensity. These analyses provide the strongest evidence to date that obesity is independently associated with BE and EAC, and is not due to confounding or bias inherent in conventional epidemiologic analyses. PMID:25269698

  9. A rare recurrence of bilateral breast cancer in the esophagus coincidentally associated with primary gastric cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cases of esophageal metastasis of breast cancer are extremely rare. We present the case of a patient who developed recurrence as esophageal metastasis following treatment of bilateral breast cancer. Early-stage gastric cancer was also found coincidentally. Case presentation An 86-year-old Japanese female patient with a history of bilateral breast cancer was found to have a gastric mass on a medical examination. At 72 years of age, she had undergone a total mastectomy with level II axillary lymph node dissection (pT3N0M0 stage II). Left breast cancer was found at the age of 79. A total mastectomy was performed with level II axillary lymph node dissection (pT1N0M0 stage I). At the time of her current admission, our patient complained of dysphagia. A repeat gastrofiberscopy revealed a submucosal lesion in her middle esophagus, located 27cm distal to her incisors, as well as a known type I tumor of the gastric cardia. Computed tomography showed a mass lesion in her middle esophagus that had grown extraluminally and infiltrated the tracheal bifurcation and her left primary bronchus. A boring biopsy of the esophageal lesion was performed under ultrasonic monitoring, and a pathological diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the esophagus was obtained. The biopsy of the cardiac lesion revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. The expression status of her hormone receptors indicated that the esophageal lesion reflected metastatic recurrence of her breast cancer with coincidental primary gastric cancer (cT1N0M0 stage IA). Conclusions Esophageal metastasis of breast cancer is extremely rare. An individualized treatment plan combining multimodal approaches should therefore be devised according to the patient’s status. PMID:24533645

  10. Different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in stomach and esophagus identified by anterograde tracing from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Brookes, Simon; Hibberd, Tim

    2016-10-15

    In visceral organs of mammals, most noxious (painful) stimuli as well as innocuous stimuli are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). One of the major unresolved questions is the location, morphology, and neurochemistry of the nerve endings of spinal afferents that actually detect these stimuli in the viscera. In the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, there have been many anterograde tracing studies of vagal afferent endings, but none on spinal afferent endings. Recently, we developed a technique that now provides selective labeling of only spinal afferents. We used this approach to identify spinal afferent nerve endings in the upper GI tract of mice. Animals were anesthetized, and injections of dextran-amine were made into thoracic DRGs (T8-T12). Seven days post surgery, mice were euthanized, and the stomach and esophagus were removed, fixed, and stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Spinal afferent axons were identified that ramified extensively through many rows of myenteric ganglia and formed nerve endings in discrete anatomical layers. Most commonly, intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) were identified in myenteric ganglia of the stomach and varicose simple-type endings in the circular muscle and mucosa. Less commonly, nerve endings were identified in internodal strands, blood vessels, submucosal ganglia, and longitudinal muscle. In the esophagus, only IGVEs were identified in myenteric ganglia. No intraganglionic lamellar endings (IGLEs) were identified in the stomach or esophagus. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the upper GI tract. Eight distinct types of spinal afferent endings were identified in the stomach, and most of them were CGRP immunoreactive. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3064-3083, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019197

  11. Association Between Circulating Levels of Sex Steroid Hormones and Barrett's Esophagus in Men: a Case–Control Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Michael B.; Wood, Shannon N.; Cash, Brooks D.; Young, Patrick; Acosta, Ruben D.; Falk, Roni T.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hu, Nan; Su, Hua; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Gherman, Barbara; Giffen, Carol; Dykes, Cathy; Turcotte, Veronique; Caron, Patrick; Guillemette, Chantal; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Hyland, Paula L.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Esophageal adenocarcinoma is believed to result from the progression of gastroesophageal reflux disease to erosive esophagitis and re-epithelialization of the esophagus with a columnar cell population termed Barrett's esophagus (BE). Men develop BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma more frequently than women, and the ratio is increasing; approximately 7 men are diagnosed with malignancy for every woman, yet little is known about the mechanisms of this difference. We assessed whether sex steroid hormones were associated with BE in a male population. Methods We analyzed data from the Barrett's Esophagus Early Detection Case Control Study, based at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Blood samples were collected from 173 men with BE and 213 men without BE (controls, based on endoscopic analysis); 13 sex steroid hormones were measured by mass spectrometry and sex hormone binding globulin was measured by ELISA. We also calculated free estradiol, free testosterone and free dihydrotestosterone (DHT). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), heartburn, regurgitation, and gastroesophageal symptom score (excluding heartburn and regurgitation). Results Levels of free testosterone and free DHT were positively associated with BE risk; patients in the highest quartile for these hormones were most likely to have BE (for free testosterone, OR=5.36; 95% CI, 2.21–13.03; P=0.0002 and for free DHT, OR=4.25, 95% CI, 1.87–9.66; P=.001). Level of estrone sulfate was inversely associated with BE risk (P for trend=.02). No other hormone was associated with BE risk. Relationships were not modified by age or BMI. Conclusions In an analysis of men, levels of free testosterone and free DHT were significantly associated with risk of BE. PMID:25158929

  12. Characterization of the Distal Esophagus High-Pressure Zone with Manometry, Ultrasound and Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K.; Sloan, Joshua A.; Singh, Baltej; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Miller, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine how the individual components of the distal esophagus and proximal stomach form the gastroesophageal junction high-pressure zone (GEJHPZ) anti-reflux barrier. Methods An endoscopic ultrasound/manometry catheter was pulled through the proximal stomach and distal esophagus in 20 normal subjects. The axial length and width of individual structures on endoscopic ultrasound were measured. The anatomic orientation of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) components was examined in two organ donor specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Key Results The three distinct structures identified within the GEJHPZ, from distal to proximal, were: the gastric clasp and sling muscle fiber complex, crural diaphragm, and lower esophageal circular smooth muscle fibers (LEC). The LEC was statistically significantly thicker than adjacent esophageal muscles. These structures were associated with 3 pressure peaks. The pressure peak produced by the clasp/sling fiber complex often overlapped with the pressure peak from the crural diaphragm. The most proximal peak, associated with the LEC, was significantly greater and bimodal in 9 of 20 subjects. This bimodal LEC pressure peak correlated with two areas of thickened muscle observed with ultrasound. Micro-CT of GEJ from organ donors confirmed the two areas of thickened muscle. Conclusions and inferences Three distinct anatomic structures, the clasp and sling muscle fibers, crural diaphragm, and LEC combine to form the anti-reflux barrier of the proximal stomach and distal esophagus. The clasp and sling muscle fibers combine with the crural diaphragm to form a distal pressure profile. The more proximal LEC has a bimodal pressure profile in some patients. PMID:22998376

  13. Quality Indicators for the Management of Barrett’s Esophagus, Dysplasia, and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: International Consensus Recommendations from the American Gastroenterological Association Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prateek; Katzka, David A.; Gupta, Neil; Ajani, Jaffer; Buttar, Navtej; Chak, Amitabh; Corley, Douglas; El-Serag, Hashem; Falk, Gary W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Goldblum, John; Gress, Frank; Ilson, David H.; Inadomi, John M.; Kuipers, Ernest J.; Lynch, John P.; McKeon, Frank; Metz, David; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Pech, Oliver; Peek, Richard; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Repici, Alessandro; Seewald, Stefan; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart J.; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Wang, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The development of and adherence to quality indicators in gastroenterology, as in all of medicine, is increasing in importance to ensure that patients receive consistent high-quality care. In addition, government-based and private insurers will be expecting documentation of the parameters by which we measure quality, which will likely affect reimbursements. Barrett’s esophagus remains a particularly important disease entity for which we should maintain up-to-date guidelines, given its commonality, potentially lethal outcomes, and controversies regarding screening and surveillance. To achieve this goal, a relatively large group of international experts was assembled and, using the modified Delphi method, evaluated the validity of multiple candidate quality indicators for the diagnosis and management of Barrett’s esophagus. Several candidate quality indicators achieved >80% agreement. These statements are intended to serve as a consensus on candidate quality indicators for those who treat patients with Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:26296479

  14. Quality indicators for the management of Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia, and esophageal adenocarcinoma: international consensus recommendations from the American Gastroenterological Association Symposium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prateek; Katzka, David A; Gupta, Neil; Ajani, Jaffer; Buttar, Navtej; Chak, Amitabh; Corley, Douglas; El-Serag, Hashem; Falk, Gary W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Goldblum, John; Gress, Frank; Ilson, David H; Inadomi, John M; Kuipers, Ernest J; Lynch, John P; McKeon, Frank; Metz, David; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Pech, Oliver; Peek, Richard; Peters, Jeffrey H; Repici, Alessandro; Seewald, Stefan; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart J; Vennalaganti, Prashanth; Wang, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The development of and adherence to quality indicators in gastroenterology, as in all of medicine, is increasing in importance to ensure that patients receive consistent high-quality care. In addition, government-based and private insurers will be expecting documentation of the parameters by which we measure quality, which will likely affect reimbursements. Barrett's esophagus remains a particularly important disease entity for which we should maintain up-to-date guidelines, given its commonality, potentially lethal outcomes, and controversies regarding screening and surveillance. To achieve this goal, a relatively large group of international experts was assembled and, using the modified Delphi method, evaluated the validity of multiple candidate quality indicators for the diagnosis and management of Barrett's esophagus. Several candidate quality indicators achieved >80% agreement. These statements are intended to serve as a consensus on candidate quality indicators for those who treat patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26296479

  15. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and the Risk of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Natalia; Nguyen, Theresa; Ramsey, David; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been suggested to protect against esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). This study examined the effect of NSAIDs on the risk of developing Barett’s esophagus (BE), the precursor lesion to EAC. Methods We conducted a case-control study among eligible patients scheduled for either elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or recruited from primary care clinics to undergo a study EGD. We compared 323 patients with BE (296 nondysplastic and 27 dysplastic) with 2 separate control groups: 1347 patients from the elective EGD group ("endoscopy controls") and 502 patients from the primary care group ("primary care controls") with no endoscopic or histopathologic BE. Use of aspirin products and 23 nonaspirin NSAIDs was ascertained from detailed, self-reported questionnaires. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariable logistic-regression models. Results There were no significant differences in self-reported NSAID use between all BE cases and all controls (58.2% vs. 54.6%, P=0.33); this was seen for aspirin products (43.0% vs. 37.4%, P=0.08) and nonaspirin NSAIDs (7.7% vs. 8.9%, P=0.46). These findings persisted in the multivariable model for any NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.28), aspirin (adjusted OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.90–1.51), and nonaspirin NSAIDs (adjusted OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.55–1.39). Use of a combination of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs was reported in 7.4% cases and 8.3% controls, and a non-significant inverse association with BE was seen (adjusted OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.44–1.11). There was no significant association between BE and daily NSAID use (adjusted OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.78–1.37). Similar findings were observed for comparisons involving nondysplastic or dysplastic BE cases, and endoscopy or primary care control groups separately or combined. Conclusion The use of NSAIDs was not associated with a reduced risk of BE. It is likely that the protective

  16. Metformin Does not Reduce Markers of Cell Proliferation in Esophageal Tissues of Patients with Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chak, Amitabh; Buttar, Navtej S.; Foster, Nathan R.; Seisler, Drew K.; Marcon, Norman E.; Schoen, Robert; Cruz-Correa, Marcia R.; Falk, Gary W.; Sharma, Prateek; Hur, Chin; Katzka, David A.; Rodriguez, Luz M.; Richmond, Ellen; Sharma, Anamay N.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is associated with neoplasia, possibly via insulin-mediated cell pathways that affect cell proliferation. Metformin has been proposed to protect against obesity-associated cancers by decreasing serum insulin. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 study of patients with Barrett's Esophagus (BE) to assess the effect of metformin on phosphorylated S6 kinase (pS6K1) -- a biomarker of insulin pathway activation. Methods Seventy-four subjects with BE (mean age 58.7 years; 58 men [78%0; 52 with BE>2 cm [70%] were recruited through 8 participating organizations of the Cancer Prevention Network. Participants were randomly assigned to groups given metformin daily (increasing to 2000 mg/day by week 4; n=38) or placebo (n=36) for 12 weeks. Biopsy specimens were collected at baseline and at week 12 via esophagogastroduodenoscopy. We calculated and compared percent changes in median levels of pS6K1 between subjects given metformin vs placebo as the primary endpoint. Results The percent change in median level of pS6K1 did not differ significantly between groups (1.4% among subjects given metformin vs – 14.7% among subjects given placebo; 1-sided P=.80). Metformin was associated with an almost significant reduction in serum levels of insulin (median −4.7% among subjects given metformin vs 23.6% increase among those given placebo, P=.08) as well as in homeostatic model assessments of insulin resistance (median −7.2% among subjects given metformin vs 38% increase among those given placebo, P=.06). Metformin had no effects on cell proliferation (based on assays for KI67) or apoptosis (based on levels of caspase 3). Conclusions In a chemoprevention trial of patients with BE, daily administration of metformin for 12 weeks, compared with placebo, did not cause major reductions in esophageal levels of pS6K1. Although metformin reduced serum levels of insulin and insulin resistance, it did not discernibly alter epithelial

  17. Personal and family history of cancer and the risk of Barrett's esophagus in men.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, N; Ramsey, D; Kramer, J R; El-Serag, H B

    2015-04-01

    The association between Barrett's esophagus (BE) and a personal or family history of cancer other than gastroesophageal remains unknown. To evaluate the effect of personal and family history of certain cancers and cancer treatments on the risk of BE, we analyzed data from a Veterans Affairs case-control study that included 264 men with definitive BE (cases) and 1486 men without BE (controls). Patients with history of esophageal or gastric cancer were excluded. Patients underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy or a study esophagogastroduodenoscopy concurrently with screening colonoscopy to determine BE status. Personal and family history of several types of cancer was obtained from self-reported questionnaires, supplemented and verified by electronic medical-record reviews. We estimated the association between personal and family history of cancer or radiation/chemotherapy, and BE. Personal history of oropharyngeal cancer (1.5% vs. 0.4%) or prostate cancer (7.2% vs. 4.4%) was more frequently present in cases than controls. The association between BE and prostate cancer persisted in multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio 1.90; 95% confidence interval 1.07-3.38, P = 0.028) while that with oropharyngeal cancer (adjusted odds ratio 3.63; 95% confidence interval 0.92-14.29, P = 0.066) was attenuated after adjusting for retained covariates of age, race, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, and proton pump inhibitor use. Within the subset of patients with cancer, prior treatment with radiation or chemotherapy was not associated with BE. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in the proportions of subjects with several specific malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives. In conclusion, the risk of BE in men may be elevated with prior personal history of oropharyngeal or prostate cancer. However, prior cancer treatments and family history of cancer were not associated with increased risk of BE. Further studies are needed

  18. Three-layered scaffolds for artificial esophagus using poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibers and silk fibroin: An experimental study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun-Jae; Ju, Hyung Woo; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Chan Hum

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of an artificial esophagus using a three-layered poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-silk fibroin (SF) scaffold in a rat model. The artificial esophagus was a three-layered, hybrid-type prosthesis composed of an outer and inner layer of PCL with a middle layer of SF. After depositing the inner layer of the PCL scaffold by electrospinning, the lyophilized middle SF layer was created. The outer layer of PCL was produced following the same procedure used to make the inner PCL layer. Eleven rats were anesthetized using inhaled anesthesia. Circumferential defects of the cervical esophagus (n=11) were created and reconstructed. Groups of rats were sacrificed after the 1st and 2nd weeks. Three rats died of an esophageal fistula and wound infection. No gross evidence of a fistula, perforation, abscess formation, seroma accumulation, or surrounding soft-tissue necrosis was observed in the other rats sacrificed after the 1st and 2nd weeks. The artificial esophagus constructs produced complete healing of the circumferential defects by the 2nd week. The composition of the three-layered artificial esophagus was confirmed histologically to have an outer and inner layer of PCL and a middle layer of SF. The fusion of the PCL-SF scaffold and the regenerative tissue remained intact. Our study proposes a more practical experimental model for studying a three-layered PCL-SF scaffold in the esophagus. However, further studies on circumferential defect reconstruction in a rat model are still required. PMID:25294581

  19. Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lamart, Stephanie; Stovall, Marilyn; Simon, Steven L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Travis, Lois; Kwon, Deukwoo; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patient’s radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were {sup 60}Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower

  20. Raman spectroscopy for early real-time endoscopic optical diagnosis based on biochemical changes during the carcinogenesis of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Chen, Su-Yu; Lin, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light that represents the molecular composition of the interrogated volume to provide a direct molecular fingerprint. Several investigations have revealed that confocal Raman spectroscopy can differentiate non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus from esophageal high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma with high sensitivity and specificity. An automated on-line Raman spectral diagnostic system has made it possible to use Raman spectroscopy to guide accurate target biopsy instead of multiple random forceps-biopsies, this novel system is expected to improve in vivo precancerous diagnosis and tissue characterization of Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:26981179

  1. Local synthesis of pepsin in Barrett’s esophagus and the role of pepsin in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Tina; Hoekzema, Craig; Gould, Jon; Goldblatt, Matthew; Frelich, Matthew; Bosler, Matthew; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Johnston, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) continues to rise. PPIs reduce reflux acidity, but only transiently inactivate gastric enzymes. Nonacid reflux, specifically nonacid pepsin, contributes to carcinogenesis in the larynx. Given the carcinogenic potential of pepsin and inefficacy of PPIs to prevent EAC, the presence and effect of pepsin in the esophagus should be investigated. Methods Normal and Barrett’s biopsies from eight Barrett’s esophagus patients were collected for pepsin analysis via Western blot and RT-PCR. Human esophageal cells cultured from healthy patients were treated with pepsin (0.01-1mg/ml; 1-20hours), acid (pH4) +/− pepsin (5minutes); real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and cell migration were assayed. Results Pepsin was detected in all eight Barrett’s, and four of eight adjacent normal specimens. Pepsinogen mRNA was observed in two Barrett’s, but not in normal adjacent samples. Pepsin induced PTSG2 (COX-2) and IL1β expression and cell migration in vitro. Conclusions Pepsin is synthesized by metaplastic, Barrett’s esophageal mucosa. Nonacid pepsin increases metrics of tumorigenicity in esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. These findings implicate refluxed and locally synthesized pepsin in development and progression of EAC and, in part, explain the inefficacy of PPIs in prevention of EAC. PMID:26077392

  2. Altered cadherin and catenin complexes in the Barrett's esophagus-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence: correlation with disease progression and dedifferentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, T.; Biddlestone, L.; Shepherd, N.; Barr, H.; Warner, P.; Jankowski, J.

    1998-01-01

    The maintenance of adult tissue architecture is largely dependent on the function of cadherins. E-cadherin is expressed in most epithelia, although it may be co-expressed with P-cadherin in basal layers of stratified epithelia. Adhesive function of cadherins relies on interactions with catenins. Many reports have characterized reduced expression of cadherins and catenins in tumors, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to characterize expression of E- and P-cadherins, and the catenins, in the progression of Barrett's esophagus to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting were performed on paraffin-embedded and fresh-frozen tissue using antisera to the selected cadherins and catenins. The results of this study have shown inappropriate expression of cadherins and catenins in neoplastic Barrett's mucosa. There was a significant reduction of E-cadherin expression as the Barrett's metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence progressed (P < 0.01). In contrast, P-cadherin, expressed in basal layers of squamous esophagus, was usually absent from Barrett's and dysplasia but was expressed in 17 of 24 carcinomas, especially at the advancing tumor edge. Reduced expression of catenins was also seen, but in some specimens, immunoreactivity was observed in neoplastic nuclei, suggesting mediation of a nuclear function such as transcriptional regulation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9422531

  3. Application of the Prague C and M criteria for endoscopic description of columnar-lined esophagus in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jung Wan; Kim, Young Choon; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain whether the Prague circumferential (C) length and maximal (M) length criteria for grading the extent of Barrett’s esophagus can be applied prior to its widespread application in South Korea. METHODS: Two hundred and thirteen consecutive cases with endoscopic columnar-lined esophagus (CLE) were included and classified according to the Prague C and M criteria. RESULTS: Of 213 cases with CLE, the distribution of maximum CLE lengths was: 0.5-0.9 cm in 99 cases (46.5%); 1.0-1.4 cm in 63 cases (29.6%); 1.5-1.9 cm in 15 cases (7.0%); 2.0-2.4 cm in 14 cases (6.6%); 2.5-2.9 cm in 1 case (0.5%); and 7.0 cm in 1 case (0.5%). Twenty cases (9.4%) had columnar islands alone. Two hundred and eight cases (97.7%) lacked the circumferential CLE component (C0Mx). Columnar islands were found in 70 cases (32.9%), of which 20 cases (9.4%) had columnar islands alone. CONCLUSION: In regions where most CLE patients display short or ultrashort tongue-like appearance, more detailed descriptions of CLE’s in < 1.0 cm lengths and columnar islands, as well as avoidance of repeating the prefix “C0” need to be considered in parallel with the widespread application of the Prague system in South Korea. PMID:27114749

  4. Monitoring ALA-induced PpIX photodynamic therapy in the rat esophagus using fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kruijt, Bastiaan; de Bruijn, Henriette S; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; de Bruin, Ron W F; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J

    2008-01-01

    The presence of phased protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) bleach kinetics has been shown to correlate with esophageal response to 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in animal models. Here we confirm the existence of phased PpIX photobleaching by increasing the temporal resolution of the fluorescence measurements using the therapeutic illumination and long wavelength fluorescence detection. Furthermore fluorescence differential pathlength spectroscopy (FDPS) was incorporated to provide information on the effects of PpIX and tissue oxygenation distribution on the PpIX bleach kinetics during illumination. ALA at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1) was orally administered to 15 rats, five rats served as control animals. PDT was performed at an in situ measured fluence rate of 75 mW cm(-2) using a total fluence of 54 J cm(-2). Forty-eight hours after PDT the esophagus was excised and histologically examined for PDT-induced damage. Fluence rate and PpIX photobleaching at 705 nm were monitored during therapeutic illumination with the same isotropic probe. A new method, FDPS, was used for superficial measurement on saturation, blood volume, scattering characteristics and PpIX fluorescence. Results showed two-phased PpIX photobleaching that was not related to a (systematic) change in esophageal oxygenation but was associated with an increase in average blood volume. PpIX fluorescence photobleaching measured using FDPS, in which fluorescence signals are only acquired from the superficial layers of the esophagus, showed lower rates of photobleaching and no distinct phases. No clear correlation between two-phased photobleaching and histologic tissue response was found. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring fluence rate, PpIX fluorescence and FDPS during PDT in the esophagus. We conclude that the spatial distribution of PpIX significantly influences the kinetics of photobleaching and that there is a complex interrelationship between the distribution of PpIX and

  5. Photodynamic Therapy for 101 Early Cancers of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract, the Esophagus, and the Bronchi: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, P.; Fontolliet, Ch.; Wagnieres, G.; Woodtli, A.; Bergh, H. Van Den; Monnier, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    Cancer, when detected at an early stage, has a very good probability of being eradicated by surgery or radiotherapy. However, less aggressive treatments also tend to provide high rates of cure without the side effects of radical therapy. We report on the results of our clinical experience with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of early carcinomas in the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the tracheobronchial tree. Sixty-four patients with 101 squamous cell carcinomas were treated with three different photosensitizers: hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), Photofrin II, and tetra (m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC). Seventy-seven (76%) tumors showed a complete rsponse with no recurrence after a mean follow-up period of 27 months. There was no significant difference in terms of cure rates among the three dyes. However, mTHPC has a stronger phototoxicity and induces a shorter skin photosensitization than either of the other photosensitizers. There were eight major complications: three esophagotracheal fistulae after illumination with red light in the esophagus, two esophageal stenoses following 360° circumferential irradiation, and three bronchial stenoses. Illumination with the less penetrating green light and the use of a 180° or 240° windowed cylindrical light distributor render the risk of complications in the esophagus essentially impossible, without reducing the efficacy of the treatment. Therefore, PDT may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for early carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:18493496

  6. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  7. Use of a video laryngoscope to facilitate removal of a long, sharp-pointed blade from the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Kenneth N; Hagberg, Carin A

    2016-08-01

    Initial management of ingested esophageal foreign bodies involves airway assessment, determination of the requirement for and timing of therapeutic intervention, risk mitigation during removal, and identification of all indicated equipment for retrieval. Long, sharp-pointed objects lodged in the esophagus require emergent attention and should be retrieved endoscopically, if perforation has not occurred. Inducing general anesthesia and rapidly securing the airway can minimize the risk of aspiration, mitigate any effects of tracheal compression, avoid the potential of exacerbating existing trauma, and provide optimal conditions for removal of long, sharp-pointed esophageal foreign bodies. Video laryngoscopy provides improved recognition of anatomical structures in both normal and difficult airways, enabling assessment for hypopharyngeal and glottic trauma resulting from foreign body ingestion. The indirect view of video laryngoscopy also facilitates the coordinated manipulation of the airway by both the anesthesiologist and the surgeon as they visualize the anatomy together while securing the airway and removing the foreign body. PMID:27290934

  8. Frequencies of poor metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2C19 in esophagus cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Xing; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) gene polymorphism and cancer susceptibility by genotyping of CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (PMs) in cancer patients. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-five cases of esophagus cancer, 148 cases of stomach cancer, 212 cases of lung cancer, 112 cases of bladder cancer and 372 controls were genotyped by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) for CYP2C19 PMs. The frequencies of PMs in cancer groups and control group were compared. RESULTS: The frequencies of PMs of CYP2C19 were 34.1% (46/135) in the group of esophagus cancer patients, 31.8% (47/148) in the stomach cancer patients, 34.4% (73/212) in the group of lung cancer patients, only 4.5% (5/112) in the bladder cancer patients and 14.0% (52/372) in control group. There were statistical differences between the cancer groups and control group (esophagus cancer, χ2 = 25.65, P < 0.005, OR = 3.18, 95%CI = 2.005-5.042; stomach cancer, χ2 = 21.70, P < 0.005, OR = 2.86, 95%CI = 1.820-4.501; lung cancer, χ2 = 33.58, P < 0.005, OR = 3.23, 95%CI = 1.503-6.906; bladder cancer, χ2 = 7.50, P < 0.01, OR = 0.288, 95%CI = 0.112-0.740). CONCLUSION: CYP2C19 PMs have a high incidence of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, conversely they have a low incidence of bladder cancer. It suggests that CYP2C19 may participate in the activation of procarcinogen of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, but may involve in the detoxification of carcinogens of bladder cancer. PMID:15222046

  9. Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T-A1298C polymorphisms with risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus, and reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, F; Ormeci, N; Coban, S; Karabulut, H G; Aktas, B; Tukun, A; Tuncali, T; Yüksel, O; Alkış, N

    2012-07-01

    Incidence of the esophagus adenocarcinoma has been dramatically increasing in Western countries since the last decade. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus are risk factors for adenocarcinoma. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes play a key role not only in folate metabolism but also in esophagus, stomach, pancreatic carcinoma, and acute leukemias. Studies have suggested that genetic polymorphisms of MTHFR (C677T) may clarify the causes and events involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. In this study, we evaluated MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms, and vitamin B12, folate, and plasma homocystein levels in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), Barrett's esophagus (BE), chronic esophagitis, and healthy controls (n = 26, n = 14, n = 30, and n = 30, respectively). The mean age of patients in the EAC and BE groups was significantly higher compared with the control group (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, respectively). In all patient groups, serum folate levels were significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.01, respectively). There was no statistically significant association between folate levels and MTHFR gene polymorphisms. No differences were found in terms of MTHFR gene polymorphisms, homocystein, and B12 levels among the groups. MTHFR gene polymorphisms and folate deficiency are not predictors of early esophageal carcinoma. However, further studies using larger series of patients are needed to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway and to clarify the role of folate deficiency and folate metabolism in the development of esophagus adenocarcinoma. PMID:21951971

  10. Mast cell-mediated long-lasting increases in excitability of vagal C fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Kollarik, Marian; Ouyang, Ann; Myers, Allen C; Undem, Bradley J

    2007-10-01

    Several esophageal pathologies are associated with an increased number of mast cells in the esophageal wall. We addressed the hypothesis that activation of esophageal mast cells leads to an increase in the excitability of local sensory C fibers. Guinea pigs were actively sensitized to ovalbumin. The mast cells in the esophagus were selectively activated ex vivo by superfusion with ovalbumin. Action potential discharge in guinea pig vagal nodose esophageal C-fiber nerve endings was monitored in the isolated (ex vivo) vagally innervated esophagus by extracellular recordings. Ovalbumin activated esophageal mast cells, leading to the rapid release of approximately 20% of the tissue histamine stores. This was associated with a consistent and significant increase in excitability of the nodose C fibers as reflected in a two- to threefold increase in action potential discharge frequency evoked by mechanical (increases in intraluminal pressure) stimulation. The increase in excitability persisted unchanged for at least 90 min (longest time period tested) after ovalbumin was washed from the tissue. This effect could be prevented by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine, but once the increase in excitability occurred, it persisted in the nominal absence of histamine and could not be reversed even with large concentrations of the histamine receptor antagonist. In conclusion, activation of esophageal mast cells leads to a pronounced and long-lived increase in nociceptive C-fiber excitability such that any sensation or reflex evoked via the vagal nociceptors will likely be enhanced. The effect is initiated by histamine acting via H1 receptor activation and maintained in the absence of the initiating stimulus. PMID:17702952

  11. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  12. The influence of distal colon irritation on the changes of cystometry parameters to esophagus and colon distentions.

    PubMed

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G

    2016-01-01

    The co-occurrence of multiple pathologies in the pelvic viscera in the same patient, such as, irritable bowel syndrome and interstitial cystitis, indicates the complexity of viscero-visceral interactions and the necessity to study these interactions under multiple pathological conditions. In the present study, the effect of distal colon irritation (DCI) on the urinary bladder interaction with distal esophagus distention (DED), distal colon distention (DCD), and electrical stimulation of the abdominal branches of vagus nerve (abd-vagus) were investigated using cystometry parameters. The DCI significantly decreased the intercontraction time (ICT) by decreasing the storage time (ST); nonetheless, DED and Abd-vagus were still able to significantly decrease the ICT and ST following DCI. However, DCD had no effect on ICT following the DCI. The DCI, also, significantly decreased the Intravesical pressure amplitude (P-amplitude) by increasing the resting pressure (RP). Although DED has no effect on the P-amplitude, both in the intact and the irritated animals, the abd-vagus significantly increased the P-amplitude following DCI by increasing the maximum pressure (MP). In the contrary, 3mL DCD significantly increased the P-amplitude by increasing the MP and lost that effect following the DCI. Concerning the pressure threshold (PT), none of the stimuli had any significant changes in the intact animals. However, DCI significantly decreased the PT, also, the abd-vagus and 3mL DCD significantly decreased the PT. The results of this study indicate that chemical irritation of colon complicates the effects of mechanical irritation of esophagus and colon on urinary bladder function. PMID:27286126

  13. The Schistosome Esophagus Is a ‘Hotspot’ for Microexon and Lysosomal Hydrolase Gene Expression: Implications for Blood Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. Alan; Li, Xiao Hong; MacDonald, Sandy; Neves, Leandro Xavier; Vitoriano-Souza, Juliana; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Farias, Leonardo P.; James, Sally; Ashton, Peter D.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Castro Borges, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The schistosome esophagus is divided into anterior and posterior compartments, each surrounded by a dense cluster of gland cell bodies, the source of distinct secretory vesicles discharged into the lumen to initiate the processing of ingested blood. Erythrocytes are lysed in the lumen, leucocytes are tethered and killed and platelets are eliminated. We know little about the proteins secreted from the two glands that mediate these biological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used subtractive RNA-Seq to characterise the complement of genes that are differentially expressed in a head preparation, compared to matched tissues from worm tails. The expression site of representative highlighted genes was then validated using whole munt in situ hybridisation (WISH). Mapping of transcript reads to the S. mansoni genome assembly using Cufflinks identified ~90 genes that were differentially expressed >fourfold in the head preparation; ~50 novel transcripts were also identified by de novo assembly using Trinity. The largest subset (27) of secreted proteins was encoded by microexon genes (MEGs), the most intense focus identified to date. Expression of three (MEGs 12, 16, 17) was confirmed in the anterior gland and five (MEGs 8.1, 9, 11, 15 and 22) in the posterior gland. The other major subset comprised nine lysosomal hydrolases (aspartyl proteases, phospholipases and palmitoyl thioesterase), again localised to the glands. Conclusions A proportion of the MEG-encoded secretory proteins can be classified by their primary structure. We have suggested testable hypotheses about how they might function, in conjunction with the lysosomal hydrolases, to mediate the biological processes that occur in the esophagus lumen. Antibodies bind to the esophageal secretions in both permissive and self-curing hosts, suggesting that the proteins represent a novel panel of untested vaccine candidates. A second major task is to identify which of them can serve as immune

  14. TU-C-17A-10: Patient Features Based Dosimetric Pareto Front Prediction In Esophagus Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Zhao, K; Peng, J; Hu, W; Jin, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to study the feasibility of the dosimetric pareto front (PF) prediction based on patient anatomic and dosimetric parameters for esophagus cancer patients. Methods: Sixty esophagus patients in our institution were enrolled in this study. A total 2920 IMRT plans were created to generated PF for each patient. On average, each patient had 48 plans. The anatomic and dosimetric features were extracted from those plans. The mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose (MHD), spinal cord max dose and PTV homogeneous index (PTVHI) were recorded for each plan. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract overlap volume histogram (OVH) features between PTV and other critical organs. The full dataset was separated into two parts include the training dataset and the validation dataset. The prediction outcomes were the MHD and MLD for the current study. The spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the anatomical features and dosimetric features. The PF was fit by the the stepwise multiple regression method. The cross-validation method was used to evaluation the model. Results: The mean prediction error of the MHD was 465 cGy with 100 repetitions. The most correlated factors were the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV, and the overlap between heart and PTV in Z-axis. The mean prediction error of the MLD was 195 cGy. The most correlated factors were the first principal components of the OVH between lung and PTV, and the overlap between lung and PTV in Z-axis. Conclusion: It is feasible to use patients anatomic and dosimetric features to generate a predicted PF. Additional samples and further studies were required to get a better prediction model.

  15. On the origin of rhythmic contractile activity of the esophagus in early achalasia, a clinical case study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Wang, Xuan-Yu; Liu, Louis W. C.; Yu, Wenzhen; Yu, Yuanjie; Zhao, Liang; Huizinga, Jan D.

    2013-01-01

    A patient with early achalasia presented spontaneous strong rhythmic non-propulsive contractions at ~7/min, independent of swallows. Our aim was to evaluate characteristics of the rhythmic contractions, provide data on the structure of pacemaker cells in the esophagus and discuss a potential role for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the origin of rhythmicity. We hypothesize that intramuscular ICC (ICC-IM) are the primary pacemaker cells. The frequency but not the amplitude of the rhythmic contractions was inhibited by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor drotaverine consistent with cAMP inhibiting pacemaker currents in ICC-IM. The frequency increased by wet swallows but not dry swallows, consistent with stretch causing increase in slow wave frequency in ICC-IM. New studies on archival material showed that ICC-IM were present throughout the human esophageal musculature and were not diminished in early achalasia. Although ICC-IM exhibited a low density, they were connected to PDGFRα-positive fibroblast-like cells with whom they formed a dense gap junction coupled network. Nitrergic innervation of ICC was strongly diminished in early achalasia because of the loss of nitrergic nerves. It therefore appears possibly that ICC-IM function as pacemaker cells in the esophagus and that the network of ICC and PDGFRα-positive cells allows for coupling and propagation of the pacemaker activity. Loss of nitrergic innervation to ICC in achalasia may render them more excitable such that its pacemaker activity is more easily expressed. Loss of propagation in achalasia may be due to loss of contraction-induced aboral nitrergic inhibition. PMID:23734090

  16. Histopathologic Validation of Lymph Node Staging With FDG-PET Scan in Cancer of the Esophagus and Gastroesophageal Junction

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Toni; Flamen, Patrick; Ectors, Nadine; Van Cutsem, Erik; Peeters, Marc; Hiele, Martin; De Wever, Walter; Coosemans, Willy; Decker, Georges; De Leyn, Paul; Deneffe, Georges; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Mortelmans, Luc

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the value of positron emission tomography with 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for preoperative lymph node staging of patients with primary cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Summary Background Data FDG-PET appears to be a promising tool in the preoperative staging of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Recent reports indicate a higher sensitivity and specificity for detection of stage IV disease and a higher specificity for diagnosis of lymph node involvement compared with the standard use of computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound. Methods Forty-two patients entered the prospective study. All underwent attenuation-corrected FDG-PET imaging of the neck, thorax, and upper abdomen, a spiral computed tomography scan, and an endoscopic ultrasound. The gold standard consisted exclusively of the histology of sampled nodes obtained by extensive two-field or three-field lymphadenectomies (n = 39) or from guided biopsies of suspicious distant nodes indicated by imaging (n = 3). Results The FDG-PET scan had lower accuracy for the diagnosis of locoregional nodes (N1–2) than combined computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound (48% vs. 69%) because of a significant lack of sensitivity (22% vs. 83%). The accuracy for distant nodal metastasis (M+Ly), however, was significantly higher for FDG-PET than the combined use of computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound (86% vs. 62%). Sensitivity was not significantly different, but specificity was greater (90% vs. 69%). The FDG-PET scan correctly upstaged five patients (12%) from N1–2 stage to M+Ly stage. One patient was falsely downstaged by FDG-PET scanning. Conclusions FDG-PET scanning improves the clinical staging of lymph node involvement based on the increased detection of distant nodal metastases and on the superior specificity compared with conventional imaging modalities. PMID:11088069

  17. Environmental radioactivity and high incidence rates of stomach and esophagus cancer in the Van Lake region: a causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Akan, Zafer; Baskurt, Busranur; Asliyuksek, Hizir; Kam, Erol; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Yuksel, Mehmet Bilgehan; Biyik, Recep; Esen, Ramazan; Koca, Dogan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the incidence rates of cancer cases (averages for 2006-2010) and relationships with environmental radioactivity levels. Soil and water samples were collected from provincial and district centers of Van city and the outdoor gamma doses were determined using a portable gamma scintillation detector. Gross alpha and beta, (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K activities were measured in both tap water and soil samples. Although high rates of stomach and esophagus cancers have been reported previously in Van the underlying reasons have not hitherto been defined. Incidences of cancers were highest in the Gurpinar (326.0) and Ozalp (377.1) counties (p<0.001). As to the results of the gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements in the drinking water, these two counties also had high beta radionuclide levels: Gurpinar (140 mBq/dm3) and Ozalp (206 mBq/dm3). Even if within the normal range, a relation between the higher rate of the incidence of stomach and esophagus cancers with that of the higher rate of beta radionuclide activity was clear. On Spearman correlation analysis, the relation between higher beta radionuclide levels and cancer incidence was found to be statistically significant (p<0.01). According to the results of the analysis, Van residents receive an average 1.86 mSv/y annual dose from outdoor gamma radiation, ingestion of radionuclides in the drinking water, and indoor 222Rn activity. Moreover, gross alpha and beta activities were found to be extremely high in all of the lakes around the city of Van, Turkey. Further investigations with long-term detailed environmental radiation measurements are needed regarding the relationship between cancer cases and environmental radioactivity in the city of Van. PMID:24528059

  18. The influence of distal colon irritation on the changes of cystometry parameters to esophagus and colon distentions

    PubMed Central

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The co-occurrence of multiple pathologies in the pelvic viscera in the same patient, such as, irritable bowel syndrome and interstitial cystitis, indicates the complexity of viscero-visceral interactions and the necessity to study these interactions under multiple pathological conditions. In the present study, the effect of distal colon irritation (DCI) on the urinary bladder interaction with distal esophagus distention (DED), distal colon distention (DCD), and electrical stimulation of the abdominal branches of vagus nerve (abd-vagus) were investigated using cystometry parameters. The DCI significantly decreased the intercontraction time (ICT) by decreasing the storage time (ST); nonetheless, DED and Abd-vagus were still able to significantly decrease the ICT and ST following DCI. However, DCD had no effect on ICT following the DCI. The DCI, also, significantly decreased the Intravesical pressure amplitude (P-amplitude) by increasing the resting pressure (RP). Although DED has no effect on the P-amplitude, both in the intact and the irritated animals, the abd-vagus significantly increased the P-amplitude following DCI by increasing the maximum pressure (MP). In the contrary, 3mL DCD significantly increased the P-amplitude by increasing the MP and lost that effect following the DCI. Concerning the pressure threshold (PT), none of the stimuli had any significant changes in the intact animals. However, DCI significantly decreased the PT, also, the abd-vagus and 3mL DCD significantly decreased the PT. The results of this study indicate that chemical irritation of colon complicates the effects of mechanical irritation of esophagus and colon on urinary bladder function. PMID:27286126

  19. A Contralateral Esophagus-Sparing Technique to Limit Severe Esophagitis Associated With Concurrent High-Dose Radiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Halabi, Hani; Paetzold, Peter; Sharp, Gregory C.; Olsen, Christine; Willers, Henning

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade 3 or greater) esophagitis generally occurs in 15% to 25% of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT), which may result in treatment breaks that compromise local tumor control and pose a barrier to dose escalation. Here, we report a novel contralateral esophagus-sparing technique (CEST) that uses intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to reduce the incidence of severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: We reviewed consecutive patients with thoracic malignancies undergoing curative CCRT in whom CEST was used. The esophageal wall contralateral (CE) to the tumor was contoured as an avoidance structure, and IMRT was used to guide a rapid dose falloff gradient beyond the target volume in close proximity to the esophagus. Esophagitis was recorded based on the RTOG acute toxicity grading system. Results: We identified 20 consecutive patients treated with CCRT of at least 63 Gy in whom there was gross tumor within 1 cm of the esophagus. The median radiation dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-72.15 Gy). In all patients, ≥99% of the planning and internal target volumes was covered by ≥90% and 100% of prescription dose, respectively. Strikingly, no patient experienced grade ≥3 esophagitis (95% confidence limits, 0%-16%) despite the high total doses delivered. The median maximum dose, V45, and V55 of the CE were 60.7 Gy, 2.1 cc, and 0.4 cc, respectively, indicating effective esophagus cross-section sparing by CEST. Conclusion: We report a simple yet effective method to avoid exposing the entire esophagus cross-section to high doses. By using proposed CE dose constraints of V45 <2.5 cc and V55 <0.5 cc, CEST may improve the esophagus toxicity profile in thoracic cancer patients receiving CCRT even at doses above the standard 60- to 63-Gy levels. Prospective testing of CEST is warranted.

  20. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus initially presenting as a large retroperitoneal mass: A case diagnosed as cancer of unknown primary site

    PubMed Central

    YU, LANFANG; GE, XIAOXIAO; HUANG, SUI; WANG, YANLI; SHEN, PENG

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of unknown origin is uncommon. It is extremely rare when the primary site detected in the esophagus after 18 months. A 59-year-old female patient with waist pain was initially diagnosed as retroperitoneal metastatic SCC of occult origin. Six cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-fluorouracil were administered and clinical complete response was observed. The primary site was detected in the esophagus after 18 months and the overall survival (OS) was 28 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) initially presenting as a metastatic site with long progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. In conclusion, the different biological characteristics and complete response to first-line chemotherapy likely contribute to relatively long PFS and OS. PMID:24649200

  1. Proton pump inhibitors suppress iNOS-dependent DNA damage in Barrett's esophagus by increasing Mn-SOD expression

    SciTech Connect

    Thanan, Raynoo; Ma, Ning; Iijima, Katsunori; Abe, Yasuhiko; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Pinlaor, Somchai; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a risk factor of its adenocarcinoma (BEA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Nitroguanine and 8-oxodG are inflammation-related DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions and iNOS expression were higher in the order, BEA > BE > normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton pump inhibitors suppress DNA damage by increasing Mn-SOD via Nrf2 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions can be useful biomarkers to predict risk of BEA in BE patients. -- Abstract: Barrett's esophagus (BE), an inflammatory disease, is a risk factor for Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEA). Treatment of BE patients with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is expected to reduce the risk of BEA. We performed an immunohistochemical study to examine the formation of nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions, 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxygaunosine (8-oxodG), in normal esophageal, BE with pre- and post-treatment by PPIs and BEA tissues. We also observed the expression of an oxidant-generating enzyme (iNOS) and its transcription factor NF-{kappa}B, an antioxidant enzyme (Mn-SOD), its transcription factor (Nrf2) and an Nrf2 inhibitor (Keap1). The immunoreactivity of DNA lesions was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues. iNOS expression was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues, while Mn-SOD expression was significantly lower in the order of BEA < BE < normal tissues. Interestingly, Mn-SOD expression and the nuclear localization of Nrf2 were significantly increased, and the formation of DNA lesions was significantly decreased in BE tissues after PPIs treatment for 3-6 months. Keap1 and iNOS expression was not significantly changed by the PPIs treatment in BE tissues. These results indicate that 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG play a role in BE-derived BEA. Additionally, PPIs treatment may trigger the activation and nuclear translocation

  2. Chromosomal gains and genomic loss of p53 and p16 genes in Barrett's esophagus detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization of cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Mona; Skacel, Marek; Gramlich, Terry L; Brainard, Jennifer A; Rice, Thomas W; Goldblum, John R; Connor, Jason T; Casey, Graham; Legator, Mona S; Tubbs, Raymond R; Falk, Gary W

    2004-05-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology is a promising surveillance technique for Barrett's esophagus. Ancillary markers are sought to increase the sensitivity of cytology and allow identification of patients at increased risk for disease progression. To determine if there are specific genetic changes in Barrett's esophagus with associated high-grade dysplasia/intramucosal adenocarcinoma compared to those without dysplasia, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on cytologic specimens using probes to chromosomes and genomic regions previously described as altered in this disease. We studied archival brush cytology slides from 40 Barrett's esophagus patients: 21 with biopsy-proven high-grade dysplasia/carcinoma and 19 with no dysplasia and a minimum 5 years of negative follow-up. Centromeric enumeration probes (CEP) for chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12, and locus-specific probes (LSI) for 9p21 (p16 gene), and 17p13.1 (p53 gene) loci along with their corresponding CEP (9 and 17, respectively) were used in this study. A positive FISH result was defined as the presence of cells with >2 CEP signals or with a loss of the LSI signals relative to their corresponding CEP. p53 locus loss and/or aneusomy of chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12 abnormalities could be detected by FISH in routinely processed endoscopic brush cytology specimens from 95% of biopsy-positive cases with a specificity of 100%. Interestingly, all five cases with cytologic changes classified as indefinite for dysplasia from patients with a positive biopsy showed changes by FISH. Loss of the p16 locus was seen commonly in patients both with and without dysplasia/carcinoma. Selected biomarkers from this study merit further investigation to determine their potential to detect genetic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus prior to the development of high-grade dysplasia. PMID:15017433

  3. Comparison of three IMRT inverse planning techniques that allow for partial esophagus sparing in patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Michalski, D; Houser, C; Bednarz, G; Curran, W; Galvin, James

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare 3 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse treatment planning techniques as applied to locally-advanced lung cancer. This study evaluates whether sufficient radiotherapy (RT) dose is given for durable control of tumors while sparing a portion of the esophagus, and whether large number of segments and monitor units are required. We selected 5 cases of locally-advanced lung cancer with large central tumor, abutting the esophagus. To ensure that no more than half of the esophagus circumference at any level received the specified dose limit, it was divided into disk-like sections and dose limits were imposed on each. Two sets of dose objectives were specified for tumor and other critical structures for standard dose RT and for dose escalation RT. Plans were generated using an aperture-based inverse planning (ABIP) technique with the Cimmino algorithm for optimization. Beamlet-based inverse treatment planning was carried out with a commercial simulated annealing package (CORVUS) and with an in-house system that used the Cimmino projection algorithm (CIMM). For 3 of the 5 cases, results met all of the constraints from the 3 techniques for the 2 sets of dose objectives. The CORVUS system without delivery efficiency consideration required the most segments and monitor units. The CIMM system reduced the number while the ABIP techniques showed a further reduction, although for one of the cases, a solution was not readily obtained using the ABIP technique for dose escalation objectives. PMID:15324918

  4. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Elicited "Jackhammer Esophagus": A New Complication Due to Vagal Nerve Stimulation?

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-10-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a potentially curative method for treatment of highly symptomatic and drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). However, this technique can provoke esophageal and nerve lesion, due to thermal injury. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of a newly described motor disorder, the Jackhammer esophagus (JE) after RFCA, independently of GERD. We report a case of JE diagnosed by high-resolution manometry (HRM), in whom esophageal symptoms developed 2 weeks after RFCA, in absence of objective evidence of GERD. A 65-year-old male with highly symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF was candidate to complete electrical pulmonary vein isolation with RFCA. Prior the procedure, the patient underwent HRM and impedance-pH to rule out GERD or hiatal hernia presence. All HRM parameters, according to Chicago classification, were within normal limits. No significant gastroesophageal reflux was documented at impedance pH monitoring. Patient underwent RFCA with electrical disconnection of pulmonary vein. After two weeks, patient started to complain of dysphagia for solids, with acute chest-pain. The patient repeated HRM and impedance-pH monitoring 8 weeks after RFCA. HRM showed in all liquid swallows the typical spastic hypercontractile contractions consistent with the diagnosis of JE, whereas impedance-pH monitoring resulted again negative for GERD. Esophageal dysmotility can represent a possible complication of RFCA for AF, probably due to a vagal nerve injury, and dysphagia appearance after this procedure must be timely investigated by HRM. PMID:26351090

  5. Prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. and Hammondia spp. microcysts in esophagus tissue of sheep and cattle, emphasized on their morphological differences.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Ahmadpanahi, Javad; Alvandi, Ayda

    2014-10-01

    Sarcocystis and Hammondia are two obligatory protozoan parasites. These genera belong to cyst-forming coccidia group of the phylum Apicomplexa. They both need two different hosts to complete their life cycles. Felids and canids can act as definitive hosts, while herbivores, such as sheep and cattle, are the most important intermediate hosts. Reports verify that no important disease has been caused by Hammondia spp.; on the other hand, Sarcocystis spp. can cause some severe infectious disease in livestock industry such as abortion. Economic losses are another concern due to carcass condemnation during meat inspection in abattoirs and decrease in the quality and quantity of milk and wool production. Due to the Sarcocystis and Hammondia tissue cysts being similar, the distinction between these different genera is so important. In this study, the prevalence of Sarcocystis and Hammondia in the esophagus tissue of sheep and cattle slaughtered in one of the industrial abattoir in Iran was reported and an easy and rapid method for accurate diagnosing of Sarcocystis and Hammondia bradyzoites was explained. PMID:25082016

  6. Radiofrequency ablation coupled with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a treatment option for morbidly obese patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Keyur; Khaitan, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition that is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Risk factors that have been associated with the development of BE include male gender, Caucasian race, chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, smoking, age >50 and obesity. The current management of BE is dependent on underlying pathological changes and treatment can range from surveillance endoscopy with daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in the setting of intestinal metaplasia or low-grade dysplasia (LGD) to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), endoscopic mucosal resection or surgical resection in the setting of high-grade dysplasia. We report the case of a morbidly obese patient who was found to have long-segment BE with LGD during preoperative work-up for weight loss surgery with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). The patient underwent successful RFA for the treatment of her BE before and after her RYGBP procedure. At 5-year follow-up, there was minimal progression of BE after treatment. PMID:26945777

  7. Palmoplantar keratoderma in association with carcinoma of the esophagus maps to chromosome 17q distal to the keratin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Hennies, H.C.; Reis, A.; Hagedorn, M.

    1995-09-20

    Palmoplanatar keratoderma is a group of hereditary disorders of keratinization involving hyperkeratosis of palms and soles. Two different forms of palmoplanatar keratoderma have recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the body site-specific keratin 9 gene and in the keratin 1 gene, respectively. Now we have analyzed a large German family with autosomal dominantly inherited palmoplantar keratoderma in association with carcinoma of the esophagus. Linkage to both the type I keratin and the type II keratin gene cluster on chromosome 12q could be excluded. In contrast, we mapped palmoplantar keratoderma in this family to chromosome 17q distal to the type I keratin genes. Two-point linkage data at D17S801 gave a lod score Z{sub max}=5.1 at {theta}=0.00. Therefore, palmoplantar keratoderma is shown to be heterogeneous clinically as well as genetically and may be caused by mutations in keratins as well as in nonkeratins. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Clinical experience with intravenous misonidazole for carcinoma of the esophagus: results in attempting radiosensitization of each fraction of exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwade, J.G.; Kinsella, T.J.; Kelly, B.; Rowland, J.; Johnston, M.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    By using intravenous misonidazole, a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, the authors attempted to test the hypothesis of hypoxia as the basis of the relatively poor results seen with radiation therapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus. As the peripheral neuropathy of misonidazole was well recognized, they felt that an adequate dose of misonidazole could be given approximately ten times before peripheral neuropathy would necessitate its discontinuation. Because of a desire to maximize any possible effects of radiosensitization, it was decided to administer misonidazole with each fraction of radiation, attempting to deliver curative radiation therapy with only ten fractions of radiation. The authors thus devised a scheme of radiation consisting of 400 rad twice a week for 5 weeks, a total of 4000 rad. Originally the attempt was made to utilize preoperative radiation therapy and assess the histologic specimens for efficacy. However, major pulmonary toxicity caused revision of that plan. Twenty six patients were treated with radiotherapy alone without surgery, 12 of the patients being randomized to receive intravenous misonidazole with 10 fractions of 400 rad each. In terms of partial response, complete response, local control, and long-term survival, there was no suggestion of any benefit of intravenous misonidazole in these patients. As a consequence, although the number of study patients was small, the investigation was discontinued. Possible explanations for the failure to demonstrate any benefit of misonidazole are discussed.

  9. Comparison of essential and toxic elements in esophagus, lung, mouth and urinary bladder male cancer patients with related to controls.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Talpur, Farah Naz; Tuzen, Mustafa; Baig, Jameel Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    There is a compelling evidence in support of negative associations between essential trace and toxic elements in different types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between carcinogenic (As, Cd, Ni) and anti-carcinogenic (Se, Zn) trace elements in scalp hair samples of different male cancerous patients (esophagus, lung, mouth, and urinary bladder). For comparative purposes, the scalp hair samples of healthy males of the same age group (ranged 35-65 years) as controls were analyzed. Both controls and patients have the same socioeconomic status, localities, dietary habits, and smoking locally made cigarette. The scalp hair samples were oxidized by 65% nitric acid: 30% hydrogen peroxide (2:1) ratio in microwave oven followed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference material of human hair BCR 397. The mean concentrations of As, Cd, and Ni were found to be significantly higher in scalp hair samples of patients having different cancers as compared to the controls, while reverse results were obtained in the case of Se and Zn levels (p < 0.01). The study revealed that the carcinogenic processes are significantly affecting the trace elements burden and mutual interaction of essential trace and toxic elements in the cancerous patients. PMID:25548013

  10. 5-aminolevulinic acid for quantitative seek-and-treat of high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus cellular models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Chi Allison; Ling, Celine S. N.; Andrews, David W.; Patterson, Michael S.; Diamond, Kevin R.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Armstrong, David; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-02-01

    High-grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's esophagus (BE) poses increased risk for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. To date, early detection and treatment of HGD regions are still challenging due to the sampling error from tissue biopsy and relocation error during the treatment after histopathological analysis. In this study, CP-A (metaplasia) and CP-B (HGD) cell lines were used to investigate the "seek-and-treat" potential using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). The photodynamic therapy photosensitizer then provides both a phototoxic effect and additional image contrast for automatic detection and real-time laser treatment. Complementary to our studies on automatic classification, this work focused on characterizing subcellular irradiation and the potential phototoxicity on both metaplasia and HGD. The treatment results showed that the HGD cells are less viable than metaplastic cells due to more PpIX production at earlier times. Also, due to mitochondrial localization of PpIX, a better killing effect was achieved by involving mitochondria or whole cells compared with just nucleus irradiation in the detected region. With the additional toxicity given by PpIX and potential morphological/textural differences for pattern recognition, this cellular platform serves as a platform to further investigate real-time "seek-and-treat" strategies in three-dimensional models for improving early detection and treatment of BE.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation coupled with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a treatment option for morbidly obese patients with Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Keyur; Khaitan, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition that is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Risk factors that have been associated with the development of BE include male gender, Caucasian race, chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, smoking, age >50 and obesity. The current management of BE is dependent on underlying pathological changes and treatment can range from surveillance endoscopy with daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in the setting of intestinal metaplasia or low-grade dysplasia (LGD) to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), endoscopic mucosal resection or surgical resection in the setting of high-grade dysplasia. We report the case of a morbidly obese patient who was found to have long-segment BE with LGD during preoperative work-up for weight loss surgery with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). The patient underwent successful RFA for the treatment of her BE before and after her RYGBP procedure. At 5-year follow-up, there was minimal progression of BE after treatment. PMID:26945777

  12. The Prevalence of Barrett Esophagus Diagnosed in the Second Endoscopy: A Retrospective, Observational Study at a Tertiary Center.

    PubMed

    Suna, Nuretdin; Parlak, Erkan; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Yildiz, Hakan; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Oztas, Erkin; Sirtas, Zeliha; Yuksel, Mahmut; Aydinli, Onur; Bilge, Zulfikar; Taskiran, Ismail; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2016-04-01

    At present, we do not know the exact prevalence of Barrett esophagus (BE) developing later in patients without BE in their first endoscopic screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of BE on the second endoscopic examination of patients who had no BE in their first endoscopic examination.The data of the patients older than 18 years who had undergone upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy more than once at the endoscopy unit of our clinic during the last 6 years were retrospectively analyzed.During the last 6 years, 44,936 patients had undergone at least one endoscopic examination. Among these patients, 2701 patients who had more than one endoscopic screening were included in the study. Of the patients, 1276 (47.3%) were females and 1425 (52.7%) were males, with an average age of 54.9 (18-94) years. BE was diagnosed in 18 (0.66%) of the patients who had no BE in the initial endoscopic examination. The patients with BE had reflux symptoms in their medical history and in both endoscopies, they revealed a higher prevalence of lower esophageal sphincter laxity, hiatal hernia, and reflux esophagitis when compared to patients without BE (P < 0.001).Our study showed that in patients receiving no diagnosis of BE on their first endoscopic examination performed for any reason, the prevalence of BE on their second endoscopy within 6 years was very low (0.66%). PMID:27057907

  13. [Autologous bone marrow transfusion in the combined treatment of cancer of the thoracic segment of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Lytkin, M I; Malakhov, S F; Bebiia, N V; Zhukov, O I; Bagautdinov, Sh M

    1991-03-01

    Transplantation of autologous bone marrow was performed in 62 patients with carcinoma of the thoracic portion of the esophagus for prophylactics of disturbance of hemopoiesis and severe infectious complications in the postoperative period. With the help of myelokariocytopheresis procurement of the bone marrow was made 2-3 days before starting preoperative radiotherapy. After exfusion of the bone marrow mixture erythrocytes were separated and returned completely and immediately to the patient, myelokaryocytes being frozen. The volume of the bone marrow suspension from 1 patient made up on the average from 300 to 800 ml, the amount of the bone marrow cells in it from 4.5 to 11.2.10(9). Studies of the dynamics of concentrated and volumetric parameters of blood were performed. The functional specific features of the bone marrow erythropoiesis were estimated in the sternal punctate. The use of automyelotransfusion substantially reduced the frequency of infectious complications and, in the author's opinion, it is a fairly effective method of prophylactics and treatment of postoperative anemia. PMID:1654630

  14. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus (PSCEC) Associated with Paraneoplastic Sweating Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi Masoum, Seyed Hosein; Sharifi, Noorieh; Taraz Jamshidi, Shirin; Sharifian, Alireza; Rezaee, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus (PSCEC) associated with paraneoplastic sweating syndrome is a rare disease characterized with rapid growth rate, metastasis at the time of diagnosis, and poor prognosis. The lung is the most common site for small cell carcinoma but this malignancy includes 0.1% to 1% of all gastrointestinal and 0.8% to 2.7% of esophageal malignancies. So far more than 200 cases of PSCEC have been reported in literature. Case Report: The patient is a 54-year-old female from the Golestan province who presented with dysphagia, 19 kg-weight loss (from 105 kgs to 86 kgs), and excessive sweating. She was admitted in the thoracic surgery ward, at Ghaem Hospital, in the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, with a pathological diagnosis of small cell carcinoma. She underwent transhiatal total esophagectomy. Excessive sweating was eradicated after surgery and she was discharged after 13 days without any complication. She received chemotherapy and at her 5-year follow up, she showed no recurrence or metastasis. Conclusion: PSCEC usually requires chemotherapy with or without surgery. A favorable outcome, with total resection of the lesion combined with chemotherapy, was obtained. However, due to the rarity of the disease there is no definitive choice of treatment. PMID:26788492

  15. Real-time depth-resolved Raman endoscopy for in vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Teh, Ming; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational analytic technique sensitive to the changes in biomolecular composition and conformations occurring in tissue. With our most recent development of depth-resolved near-infrared (NIR) Raman endoscopy integrated with on-line diagnostic algorithms, in vivo real-time epithelial diagnostics has been realized under multimodal wide-field imaging (i.e., white- light reflectance (WLR), narrow-band imaging (NBI), autofluorescence imaging (AFI)) modalities. A selection of 43 patients who previously underwent Raman endoscopy (n=146 spectra) was used to render a robust model based on partial least squares - discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. The Raman endoscopy technique was validated prospectively on 2 new esophageal patients for in vivo tissue diagnosis. The Raman endoscopic technique could identify esophageal high-grade dysplasia in vivo with an accuracy of 85.9% (sensitivity: 91.3% (21/23): specificity 83.3% (40/48)) on spectrum basis. This study realizes for the first time depth-resolved Raman endoscopy for real-time in vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's epithelium at the biomolecular level.

  16. Recent Advances in Molecular Imaging of Premalignant Gastrointestinal Lesions and Future Application for Early Detection of Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kwang Hyun; Han, Na Young; Kwon, Chang Il; Lee, Hoo Keun; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time. This focused review series introduces high-resolution imaging modalities that are being evaluated preclinically and clinically for the detection of early GI cancers, especially Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging. In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging. PMID:24570878

  17. A multicenter, double-blinded validation study of methylation biomarkers for progression prediction in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Cheng, Yulan; Gu, Wen; Zheng, Yingye; Sato, Fumiaki; Mori, Yuriko; Olaru, Alexandru V.; Paun, Bogdan C.; Yang, Jian; Kan, Takatsugu; Ito, Tetsuo; Hamilton, James P.; Selaru, Florin M.; Agarwal, Rachana; David, Stefan; Abraham, John M.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.; Wallace, Michael B.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Washington, Kay; Wang, Jean; Canto, Marcia Irene; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Nelson, Mark A.; Wagner, Paul D.; Romero, Yvonne; Wang, Kenneth K.; Feng, Ziding; Sampliner, Richard E.; Meltzer, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma risk in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is increased 30- to 125-fold versus the general population. Among all BE patients, however, neoplastic progression occurs only once per 200 patient-years. Molecular biomarkers are therefore needed to risk-stratify patients for more efficient surveillance endoscopy and to improve the early detection of progression. We therefore performed a retrospective, multicenter, double-blinded validation study of 8 BE progression prediction methylation biomarkers. Progression or nonprogression were determined at 2 years (tier 1) and 4 years (tier 2). Methylation was assayed in 145 nonprogressors (NPs) and 50 progressors (Ps) using real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Ps were significantly older than NPs (70.6 vs. 62.5 years, p < 0.001). We evaluated a linear combination of the 8 markers, using coefficients from a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were high in the 2-, 4-year and combined data models (0.843, 0.829 and 0.840; p<0.001, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). In addition, even after rigorous overfitting correction, the incremental AUCs contributed by panels based on the 8 markers plus age vs. age alone were substantial (Δ-AUC = 0.152, 0.114 and 0.118, respectively) in all three models. A methylation biomarker-based panel to predict neoplastic progression in BE has potential clinical value in improving both the efficiency of surveillance endoscopy and the early detection of neoplasia. PMID:19435894

  18. Iron intake and markers of iron status and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Mark G; Abnet, Christian C; Murray, Liam J; Woodside, Jayne V; Anderson, Lesley A; Brockman, John D; Cantwell, Marie M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between iron intake and iron status with Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Methods 220 BE patients, 224 EAC patients, and 256 frequency-matched controls completed a lifestyle and food frequency questionnaire, and provided serum and toenail samples between 2002 and 2005. Using multiple logistic regression, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated within quartiles of intake/status. Results Comparing the fourth to the first quartile, ferritin (OR 0.47; 95%CI: 0.23, 0.97) and transferrin saturation (OR 0.41; 95%CI: 0.20, 0.82) were negatively associated with BE; whilst total iron binding capacity was positively associated per 50 µg/dl increment (OR 1.47; 95%CI: 1.12, 1.92). Comparing the fourth to the first quartile, iron intake (OR 0.50; 95%CI: 0.25, 0.98), non-heme iron intake per 10 mg/day increment (OR 0.29; 95%CI: 0.08, 0.99), and toenail iron (OR 0.40; 95%CI: 0.17, 0.93) were negatively associated with EAC; whilst heme iron intake was positively associated (OR 3.11 95%CI: 1.46, 6.61). Principal conclusion In contrast to the hypothesis that increased iron intakes and higher iron stores are a risk factor for BE and EAC, this study suggests that higher iron intakes and stores may have a protective association with BE and EAC, with the exception of what was found for heme iron intake. PMID:20936528

  19. Necrotizing Sialometaplasia-Like Change of the Esophageal Submucosal Glands is Associated with Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Braxton, David R.; Nickleach, Dana C.; Liu, Yuan; Farris, Alton B.

    2014-01-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) protect the squamous epithelium from insults such as gastroesophageal reflux disease by secreting mucins and bicarbonate. We have observed metaplastic changes within the SMG acini that we have termed oncocytic glandular metaplasia (OGM), and necrotizing sialometaplasia-like change (NSMLC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the associated clinicopathological parameters of, and to phenotypically characterize the SMG metaplasias. Esophagectomy specimens were retrospectively assessed on hematoxylin and eosin sections and assigned to either a Barrett’s esophagus (BE) or non-BE control group. Clinicopathologic data was collected, and univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to assess the adjusted associations with NSMLC and OGM. Selected cases of SMG metaplasia were characterized. SMG were present in 82 esophagi that met inclusion criteria. On univariate analysis, NSMLC was associated with BE (p=0.002). There was no relationship between NSMLC and patient age, sex, tumor size, or treatment history. OGM was associated with BE (p=0.031). No relationship was found between OGM and patient age, sex, or tumor size. On multivariate analysis, BE was independently associated with NSMLC (odds ratio [OR] 4.95, p =0.003). Treatment history was also independently associated with OGM (p =0.029), but not NSMLC. Both NSMLC and OGM were non-mucinous ductal type epithelia retaining a p63-smooth muscle actin co-positive myoepithelial cell layer. NSMLC and OGM were present in endoscopic mucosal resection specimens. Our study suggests that SMG metaplasia is primarily a reflux-induced pathology. NSMLC may pose diagnostic dilemmas in resection specimens or when only partially represented in mucosal biopsies or endoscopic resection specimens. PMID:24863247

  20. Phase Ib Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Dose Escalation Study of Polyphenon E in Patients with Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Joe, Andrew K; Schnoll-Sussman, Felice; Bresalier, Robert S; Abrams, Julian A; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Cheung, Ken; Friedman, Richard A; Yang, Chung S; Milne, Ginger L; Liu, Diane D; Lee, J Jack; Abdul, Kazeem; Bigg, Michelle; Foreman, Jessica; Su, Tao; Wang, Xiaomei; Ahmed, Aqeel; Neugut, Alfred I; Akpa, Esther; Lippman, Scott M; Perloff, Marjorie; Brown, Powel H; Lightdale, Charles J

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the safety and efficacy of the green tea-derived Polyphenon E (Poly E) in patients with Barrett's Esophagus (BE). Subjects were randomized to a 6-month, twice daily (BID) oral treatment of placebo or Poly E (200, 400, or 600 mg). Endoscopic evaluation, including biopsies, was performed before and after treatment. The primary objective was to demonstrate safety; secondary objectives investigated catechin accumulation and effects in clinical specimens. Of the 44 enrolled subjects, 11 received placebo, and 33 received Poly E. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered, and a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached. The recommended phase II dose was 600 mg twice daily. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AE) in Poly E-treated subjects were grade I and II nausea, grade I belching, and grade I lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. No treatment-related AEs were reported in placebo-treated subjects, aside from grade I laboratory abnormalities. Pill counts and subject diaries were not consistently collected, and compliance was difficult to determine. However, on the basis of an intention-to-treat analysis, there was a significant relationship between Poly E dose and esophageal EGCG level--mean changes (pmol/g) of 0.79 (placebo), 6.06 (200 mg), 35.67 (400 mg), and 34.95 (600 mg); P = 0.005. There was a possible relationship between Poly E dose and urine PGE-M concentration. In conclusion, Poly E was well-tolerated, and treatment with Poly E (400 and 600 mg) but not Poly E (200 mg) or placebo resulted in clinically relevant and detectable EGCG accumulation in the target organ, esophageal mucosa. PMID:26471236

  1. High Goblet Cell Count Is Inversely Associated with Ploidy Abnormalities and Risk of Adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carissa A.; Liu, Karen; Fong, Pui Yee; Li, Xiaohong; Cowan, David S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Reid, Brian J.; Blount, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Goblet cells may represent a potentially successful adaptive response to acid and bile by producing a thick mucous barrier that protects against cancer development in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between goblet cells (GC) and risk of progression to adenocarcinoma, and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, in BE patients. Experimental Design Baseline mucosal biopsies (N=2988) from 213 patients, 32 of whom developed cancer during the follow up period, enrolled in a prospective dynamic cohort of BE patients were scored in a blinded fashion, for the total number (#) of GC, mean # of GC/crypt (GC density), # of crypts with ≥ 1 GC, and the proportion of crypts with ≥1 GC, in both dysplastic and non-dysplastic epithelium separately. The relationship between these four GC parameters and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities and adenocarcinoma outcome was compared, after adjustment for age, gender, and BE segment length. Results High GC parameters were inversely associated with DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, such as aneuploidy, ploidy >2.7N, and an elevated 4N fraction > 6%, and with risk of adenocarcinoma. However, a Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the total # of GC and the total # crypts with ≥1 GC were the only significant GC parameters (p<0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study show, for the first time, an inverse relationship between high GC counts and flow cytometric abnormalities and risk of adenocarcinoma in BE. Further studies are needed to determine if GC depleted foci within esophageal columnar mucosa are more prone to neoplastic progression or whether loss of GC occurs secondary to underlying genetic abnormalities. PMID:26230607

  2. Predictors Of Treatment Failure After Radiofrequency Ablation For Intramucosal Adenocarcinoma in Barrett Esophagus: A Multi-institutional Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Agoston T; Strauss, Adam C; Dulai, Parambir S; Hagen, Catherine E; Muzikansky, Alona; Fudman, David I; Abrams, Julian A; Forcione, David G; Jajoo, Kunal; Saltzman, John R; Odze, Robert D; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Gordon, Stuart R; Lightdale, Charles J; Rothstein, Richard I; Srivastava, Amitabh

    2016-04-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), with or without endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), is a safe, effective, and durable treatment option for Barrett esophagus (BE)-associated dysplasia (DYS), but few studies have identified predictors of treatment failure in BE-associated intramucosal adenocarcinoma (IMC). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of IMC eradication when using RFA±EMR and to identify clinical and pathologic predictors of treatment failure. A retrospective review of medical records and a central review of index histologic parameters were performed for 78 patients who underwent RFA±EMR as the primary treatment for biopsy-proven IMC at 4 academic tertiary medical centers. Complete eradication (CE) (absence of IMC/DYS on first follow-up endoscopy) was achieved in 86% of patients, and durable eradication (DE) (CE with no recurrence of IMC/DYS until last follow-up) was achieved in 78% of patients, with significant variation between the 4 study sites (P=0.03 and 0.09 by analysis of variance for DE and CE, respectively). Use of EMR before RFA significantly reduced the risk for treatment failure for IMC/DYS (hazard ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.48; P=0.001), whereas IMC involving ≥50% of the columnar metaplastic area on index examination significantly increased the risk for treatment failure (hazard ratio, 4.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-11.7; P=0.005). Endoscopic and pathologic factors associated with treatment failure in BE-associated IMC treated with RFA±EMR may help identify the subset of IMC patients for whom a more aggressive initial approach may be justified. PMID:26645729

  3. Whole Genome Expression Array Profiling Highlights Differences in Mucosal Defense Genes in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nancarrow, Derek J.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Smithers, B. Mark; Gotley, David C.; Drew, Paul A.; Watson, David I.; Tyagi, Sonika; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Whiteman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has become a major concern in Western countries due to rapid rises in incidence coupled with very poor survival rates. One of the key risk factors for the development of this cancer is the presence of Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is believed to form in response to repeated gastro-esophageal reflux. In this study we performed comparative, genome-wide expression profiling (using Illumina whole-genome Beadarrays) on total RNA extracted from esophageal biopsy tissues from individuals with EAC, BE (in the absence of EAC) and those with normal squamous epithelium. We combined these data with publically accessible raw data from three similar studies to investigate key gene and ontology differences between these three tissue states. The results support the deduction that BE is a tissue with enhanced glycoprotein synthesis machinery (DPP4, ATP2A3, AGR2) designed to provide strong mucosal defenses aimed at resisting gastro-esophageal reflux. EAC exhibits the enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling (collagens, IGFBP7, PLAU) effects expected in an aggressive form of cancer, as well as evidence of reduced expression of genes associated with mucosal (MUC6, CA2, TFF1) and xenobiotic (AKR1C2, AKR1B10) defenses. When our results are compared to previous whole-genome expression profiling studies keratin, mucin, annexin and trefoil factor gene groups are the most frequently represented differentially expressed gene families. Eleven genes identified here are also represented in at least 3 other profiling studies. We used these genes to discriminate between squamous epithelium, BE and EAC within the two largest cohorts using a support vector machine leave one out cross validation (LOOCV) analysis. While this method was satisfactory for discriminating squamous epithelium and BE, it demonstrates the need for more detailed investigations into profiling changes between BE and EAC. PMID:21829465

  4. Whole genome expression array profiling highlights differences in mucosal defense genes in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nancarrow, Derek J; Clouston, Andrew D; Smithers, B Mark; Gotley, David C; Drew, Paul A; Watson, David I; Tyagi, Sonika; Hayward, Nicholas K; Whiteman, David C

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has become a major concern in Western countries due to rapid rises in incidence coupled with very poor survival rates. One of the key risk factors for the development of this cancer is the presence of Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is believed to form in response to repeated gastro-esophageal reflux. In this study we performed comparative, genome-wide expression profiling (using Illumina whole-genome Beadarrays) on total RNA extracted from esophageal biopsy tissues from individuals with EAC, BE (in the absence of EAC) and those with normal squamous epithelium. We combined these data with publically accessible raw data from three similar studies to investigate key gene and ontology differences between these three tissue states. The results support the deduction that BE is a tissue with enhanced glycoprotein synthesis machinery (DPP4, ATP2A3, AGR2) designed to provide strong mucosal defenses aimed at resisting gastro-esophageal reflux. EAC exhibits the enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling (collagens, IGFBP7, PLAU) effects expected in an aggressive form of cancer, as well as evidence of reduced expression of genes associated with mucosal (MUC6, CA2, TFF1) and xenobiotic (AKR1C2, AKR1B10) defenses. When our results are compared to previous whole-genome expression profiling studies keratin, mucin, annexin and trefoil factor gene groups are the most frequently represented differentially expressed gene families. Eleven genes identified here are also represented in at least 3 other profiling studies. We used these genes to discriminate between squamous epithelium, BE and EAC within the two largest cohorts using a support vector machine leave one out cross validation (LOOCV) analysis. While this method was satisfactory for discriminating squamous epithelium and BE, it demonstrates the need for more detailed investigations into profiling changes between BE and EAC. PMID:21829465

  5. Temporal and spatial evolution of somatic chromosomal alterations: A case-cohort study of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Arnaudo, Jessica; Liu, Karen; Sather, Cassandra L.; Kostadinov, Rumen L.; Odze, Robert D.; Kuhner, Mary K.; Maley, Carlo C.; Self, Steven G.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Blount, Patricia L.; Reid, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    All cancers are believed to arise by dynamic, stochastic somatic genomic evolution with genome instability, generation of diversity and selection of genomic alterations that underlie multi-stage progression to cancer. Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAs) have high levels of somatic copy number alterations. Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a risk factor for developing EA, and somatic chromosomal alterations (SCAs) are known to occur in BE. The vast majority (~95%) of individuals with BE do not progress to EA during their lifetimes, but a small subset develop EA, many of which arise rapidly even in carefully monitored patients without visible endoscopic abnormalities at the index endoscopy. Using a well-designed, longitudinal case-cohort study, we characterized SCA as assessed by SNP arrays over space and time in 79 “progressors” with BE as they approach the diagnosis of cancer and 169 “nonprogressors” with BE who did not progress to EA over 20,425 person-months of follow-up. The genomes of nonprogressors typically had small localized deletions involving fragile sites and 9p loss/copy neutral LOH that generate little genetic diversity and remained relatively stable over prolonged follow-up. As progressors approach the diagnosis of cancer, their genomes developed chromosome instability with initial gains and losses, genomic diversity, and selection of SCAs followed by catastrophic genome doublings. Our results support a model of differential disease dynamics in which nonprogressor genomes largely remain stable over prolonged periods whereas progressor genomes evolve significantly increased SCA and diversity within four years of EA diagnosis, suggesting a window of opportunity for early detection. PMID:24253313

  6. Intakes of dietary folate and other B vitamins are associated with risks of esophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus, and reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Linda; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Cantwell, Marie M; Anderson, Lesley A; Murray, Liam J

    2013-12-01

    Folate is implicated in carcinogenesis via effects on DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. Efficient folate metabolism requires other B vitamins and is adversely affected by smoking and alcohol. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) may develop through a process involving inflammation [reflux esophagitis (RE)] leading to metaplasia [Barrett's esophagus (BE)] and carcinoma. Within a population-based, case-control study, we investigated associations between dietary folate and related factors and risks of EAC, BE, and RE. EAC and BE cases had histologically confirmed disease; RE cases had endoscopically visible inflammation. Controls, age-sex frequency matched to EAC cases, were selected through population and general practice registers. Participants underwent structured interviews and completed food-frequency questionnaires. Multivariate ORs and 95% CIs were computed using logistic regression. A total of 256 controls and 223 EAC, 220 BE, and 219 RE cases participated. EAC risk decreased with increasing folate intake (OR highest vs. lowest = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.31, 1.00; P-trend < 0.01). Similar trends were found for BE (P-trend < 0.01) and RE (P-trend = 0.01). Vitamin B-6 intake was significantly inversely related to risks of all 3 lesions. Riboflavin intake was inversely associated with RE. Vitamin B-12 intake was positively associated with EAC. For EAC, there was a borderline significant interaction between folate intake and smoking (P-interaction = 0.053); compared with nonsmokers with high (≥ median) folate intake, current smokers with low intakes (

  7. Inoperable nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus managed by concomitant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, J.F.; Giovannini, M.; Padaut-Cesana, J.; Fuentes, P.; Giudicelli, R.; Gauthier, A.P.; Carcassonne, Y. )

    1990-07-15

    Thirty-five patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, cisplatin) and concomitant split-course radiation therapy. All of the patients presented with dysphagia. Treatment consisted of two courses of chemotherapy with 5-FU (1 g/m2/day in continuous infusion for 5 days (days 1 to 5 and days 29 to 33) ) and cisplatin (70 mg/m2 intravenous bolus at days 2 and 30). Radiation therapy was concomitant in two courses delivering 20 Gy in 5 days (days 1 to 5 and days 29 to 33). On the first day of treatment, endoscopic peroral dilation or Nd-YAG laser therapy was usually carried out. At the end of the treatment, all of the patients were capable of oral nutrition. Histoendoscopic confirmation was made 8 weeks after the beginning of the therapy. Twenty-five of the 35 patients had a complete response with negative biopsy findings. There was only one serious complication (fatal myelosuppression) in the only patient who received more than two courses of chemotherapy. Sixteen patients died and 19 were still alive at 3 to 42 months after the beginning of treatment. Overall median survival for the 35 patients is 17 months. Actuarial survival was 55 +/- 18% at 1 year and 41 +/- 21% at 2 years. The median survival of the Stage I and II patients is 28 months. These results confirm that concomitant chemoradiotherapy is capable of producing a very high histoendoscopic complete response rate and improved 1-year and 2-year survival. The use of concentrated split-course radiotherapy enabled the authors to reduce the total length of the treatment to two periods of 5 days, with results that are similar to previous studies using classic radiotherapy for a 5-week to 7-week period.

  8. Adherence to the 2011 American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement for the diagnosis and management of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Menezes, A; Tierney, A; Yang, Y-X; Forde, K A; Bewtra, M; Metz, D; Ginsberg, G G; Falk, G W

    2015-01-01

    Considerable variability exists in adherence to practice guidelines for Barrett's esophagus (BE). Rapid advances in management approaches to BE led to a new American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) medical position statement in 2011. Our aim was to assess how well members of the AGA Clinical Practice section adhered to these guidelines. A self-administered survey incorporating questions on diagnostic criteria, cancer risk estimates, screening, surveillance, and therapeutics for BE was distributed electronically to 5850 North American members of the AGA Clinical Practice section. The response rate was 470 of 2040 opened e-mails (23%). Intestinal metaplasia was required for diagnosis of BE by 90%, but the Prague classification was used by only 53% of those aware of it. The annual risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma was reported as 0.1-0.5% by 76%. Screening practices were variable, with 35% screening all patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and 15% repeating endoscopy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease following a negative screening. Surveillance guidelines were followed by 79% for nondysplastic BE and 86% for low-grade dysplasia, with expert pathology confirmation of dysplasia reported by 86%. Proton pump inhibitor dosing was variable, with 18% administering twice-daily doses and 30% titrating dose to symptoms. Ablation therapy was recommended by 6% for nondysplastic BE, 38% for low-grade dysplasia, and 52% for high-grade dysplasia. There is satisfactory adherence to the new AGA guidelines with respect to diagnosis, cancer risk estimates, and surveillance intervals in a select group of respondents. However, adherence continues to be variable in the use of the Prague classification, screening, and dosing of antisecretory therapy. Use of ablation therapy increases with grade of dysplasia. The reason for continued variability in adherence to BE practice guidelines remains unclear, and more evidence-based guidance is

  9. AKT expression is associated with degree of pathologic response in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Nadia; Shridhar, Ravi; Hoffe, Sarah; Almhanna, Khaldoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NCRT) has become standard in the treatment of locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) with survival correlated to degree of pathologic response. The phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mTOR pathway plays an important role in tumorgenesis and resistance. We sought to elucidate the role of this pathway in patients with EAC who received NCRT. Methods After IRB approval, a prospective trial was initiated in which patients with EAC underwent endoscopic biopsies of normal and tumor tissue prior to instituting NCRT. Patients then proceeded to esophagectomy. The pre-treatment tissues underwent gene expression profiling. SAM method was used to analyze expression of AKT within normal and tumor tissue. Expression was then correlated to degree of pathologic response. Results One-hundred patients were consented for the study, of which 67 met final eligibility. Nineteen patient’s tumors ultimately underwent gene expression profiling via microarray. The differential expression of all AKT isoforms in tumor tissue was markedly overexpressed compared to normal tissue (P=6×10−5). There were 3 patients designated as pNR, 6 as pPR, and 10 as pCR. Partial and non-responders had higher expressions of AKT compared to pCR with the non-responders consistently illustrated the highest expression of AKT (P=0.02). There was a significant correlation between individual isoforms of AKT-1, AKT-2, and AKT-3 and degree of pathologic response (P=0.002, 0.04, and 0.04 respectively). Conclusions AKT is overexpressed in patients with AC of the esophagus. Moreover, pathologic response to NCRT may be correlated with degree of AKT expression. Additional data is needed to clarify this relationship to potentially add targeted therapies to the neoadjuvant regimen. PMID:27034781

  10. Polymorphisms Near TBX5 and GDF7 Are Associated With Increased Risk for Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Palles, Claire; Chegwidden, Laura; Li, Xinzhong; Findlay, John M.; Farnham, Garry; Castro Giner, Francesc; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Kovac, Michal; Adams, Claire L.; Prenen, Hans; Briggs, Sarah; Harrison, Rebecca; Sanders, Scott; MacDonald, David; Haigh, Chris; Tucker, Art; Love, Sharon; Nanji, Manoj; deCaestecker, John; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Hapeshi, Julie; Barr, Hugh; Moayyedi, Paul; Watson, Peter; Zietek, Barbara; Maroo, Neera; Gay, Laura; Underwood, Tim; Boulter, Lisa; McMurtry, Hugh; Monk, David; Patel, Praful; Ragunath, Krish; Al Dulaimi, David; Murray, Iain; Koss, Konrad; Veitch, Andrew; Trudgill, Nigel; Nwokolo, Chuka; Rembacken, Bjorn; Atherfold, Paul; Green, Elaine; Ang, Yeng; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Chow, Wu; Paterson, Stuart; Kadri, Sudarshan; Beales, Ian; Grimley, Charles; Mullins, Paul; Beckett, Conrad; Farrant, Mark; Dixon, Andrew; Kelly, Sean; Johnson, Matthew; Wajed, Shahjehan; Dhar, Anjan; Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Onstad, Lynn; Gammon, Marilie D.; Corley, Douglas A.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Bird, Nigel C.; Hardie, Laura J.; Reid, Brian J.; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Geoffrey; Romero, Yvonne; Bernstein, Leslie; Wu, Anna H.; Casson, Alan G.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Whiteman, David C.; Risch, Harvey A.; Levine, David M.; Vaughan, Tom L.; Verhaar, Auke P.; van den Brande, Jan; Toxopeus, Eelke L.; Spaander, Manon C.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Krishnadath, Kausilia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; McManus, Ross; Reynolds, John V.; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; MacMathuna, Padraic; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Kelleher, Dermot; Vermeire, Severine; Cleynen, Isabelle; Bisschops, Raf; Tomlinson, Ian; Jankowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Barrett's esophagus (BE) increases the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We found the risk to be BE has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 (within the HLA region) and on 16q23, where the closest protein-coding gene is FOXF1. Subsequently, the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) identified risk loci for BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma near CRTC1 and BARX1, and within 100 kb of FOXP1. We aimed to identify further SNPs that increased BE risk and to validate previously reported associations. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with BE and further analyzed promising variants identified by BEACON by genotyping 10,158 patients with BE and 21,062 controls. Results We identified 2 SNPs not previously associated with BE: rs3072 (2p24.1; odds ratio [OR] = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.09–1.18; P = 1.8 × 10−11) and rs2701108 (12q24.21; OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.86–0.93; P = 7.5 × 10−9). The closest protein-coding genes were respectively GDF7 (rs3072), which encodes a ligand in the bone morphogenetic protein pathway, and TBX5 (rs2701108), which encodes a transcription factor that regulates esophageal and cardiac development. Our data also supported in BE cases 3 risk SNPs identified by BEACON (rs2687201, rs11789015, and rs10423674). Meta-analysis of all data identified another SNP associated with BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma: rs3784262, within ALDH1A2 (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.87–0.93; P = 3.72 × 10−9). Conclusions We identified 2 loci associated with risk of BE and provided data to support a further locus. The genes we found to be associated with risk for BE encode transcription factors involved in thoracic, diaphragmatic, and esophageal development or proteins involved in the inflammatory response. PMID:25447851

  11. Bile acids induce Delta-like 1 expression via Cdx2-dependent pathway in the development of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, Yuji; Ishimura, Norihisa; Uno, Goichi; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Yuki, Takafumi; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-01

    Crosstalk between the Notch signaling pathway and Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) has important roles in the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE). We investigated the expression and function of the Notch signaling ligand Delta-like 1 (Dll1) during the development of BE. We determined the expression levels of Dll1 and intracellular signaling molecules related to Notch signaling ((Notch1, Hairy/enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), and Atonal homolog 1 (ATOH1)) in human esophageal squamous and Barrett's epithelium samples. Next, those expression levels in esophageal squamous cells (Het-1A) and Barrett's esophageal cells (CP-A and BAR-T) following stimulation with either bile acids or gamma-secretase inhibitor were investigated. Finally, changes in those expression levels following transfection of a Cdx2 or Dll1 expression vector into Het-1A cells were examined. In addition, changes in those expression levels following knockdown of Cdx2 or Dll1 in CP-A cells were also examined. Dll1 was found to be upregulated and localized in the cell membrane and cytoplasm in BE. Bile acids enhanced cytoplasmic expression of Dll1 in CP-A cells, while cleaved Notch1 expression did not change, suggesting lack of a Dll1 agonistic effect on Notch signaling. Cells transfected with Cdx2 revealed significantly enhanced Dll1, while forced expression of Dll1 enhanced ATOH1, Cdx2, and MUC2 expression levels. Nevertheless, enhanced Dll1 did not induce Hes1 expression, suggesting that Dll1 may primarily function as an intracellular signaling molecule and not a Notch agonistic ligand in the canonical pathway. In addition, knockdown of Cdx2 completely abrogated any increase in Dll1 expression upon treatment with bile acids. Our results revealed a novel function of Dll1: facilitation of intestinal metaplasia in conjunction with Cdx2 expression. Furthermore, they suggest that intracellular induction of Dll1 expression in esophageal epithelial cells due to Cdx2 induction in response to bile acids has

  12. SU-E-P-47: Evaluation of Improvement of Esophagus Sparing in SBRT Lung Patients with Biologically Based IMRT Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N; Zhang, X; Morrill, S; Corry, P; Han, E; Hardee, M; Ratanatharathorn, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the potential of improving esophageal sparing for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer patients by using biological optimization (BO) compared to conventional dose-volume based optimization (DVO) in treatment planning. Methods: Three NSCLC patients (PTV (62.3cc, 65.1cc, and 125.1cc) adjacent to the heart) previously treated with SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse TPS (V11) using DVO and BO. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 5 fractions normalized to 95% of the PTV volume. Plans were evaluated by comparing esophageal maximum doses, PTV heterogeneity (HI= D5%/D95%), and Paddick’s conformity (CI) indices. Quality of the plans was assessed by clinically-used IMRT QA procedures. Results: By using BO, the maximum dose to the esophagus was decreased 1384 cGy (34.6%), 502 cGy (16.5%) and 532 cGy (16.2%) in patient 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The maximum doses to spinal cord and the doses to 1000 cc and 1500 cc of normal lung were comparable in both plans. The mean doses (Dmean-hrt) and doses to 15cc of the heart (V15-hrt) were comparable for patient 1 and 2. However for patient 3, with the largest PTV, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased by 62.2 cGy (18.3%) and 549.9 cGy (24.9%) respectively for the BO plans. The mean target HI of BO plans (1.13) was inferior to the DVO plans (1.07). The same trend was also observed for mean CI in BO plans (0.77) versus DVO plans (0.83). The QA pass rates (3%, 3mm) were comparable for both plans. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the use of biological models in treatment planning optimization can substantially improve esophageal sparing without compromising spinal cord and normal lung doses. However, for the large PTV case (125.1cc) we studied here, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased substantially. The target HI and CI were inferior in the BO plans.

  13. Surveillance in Patients With Barrett's Esophagus for Early Detection of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yao; Hyder, Ayaz; Bae, Sandy J; Zarin, Wasifa; O'Neill, Tyler J; Marcon, Norman E; Stein, Lincoln; Thein, Hla-Hla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although endoscopic surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) has been widely implemented for early detection of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), its justification has been debated. This systematic review aimed to evaluate benefits, safety, and cost effectiveness of surveillance for patients with BE. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, EconLit, Scopus, Cochrane, and CINAHL were searched for published human studies that examined screening practices, benefits, safety, and cost effectiveness of surveillance among patients with BE. Reviewers independently reviewed eligible full-text study articles and conducted data extraction and quality assessment, with disagreements resolved by consensus. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to assess the incidence of EAC, EAC/high-grade dysplasia (HGD), and annual stage-specific transition probabilities detected among BE patients under surveillance, and relative risk of mortality among EAC patients detected during surveillance compared with those not under surveillance. Results: A total of 51 studies with 11,028 subjects were eligible; the majority were of high quality based on the Newcastle–Ottawa quality scale. Among BE patients undergoing endoscopic surveillance, pooled EAC incidence per 1,000 person-years of surveillance follow-up was 5.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.2–6.8) and pooled EAC/HGD incidence was 7.7 (95% CI: 5.7–9.7). Pooled relative mortality risk among surveillance-detected EAC patients compared with nonsurveillance-detected EAC patients was 0.386 (95% CI: 0.242–0.617). Pooled annual stage-specific transition probabilities from nondysplastic BE to low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia, and EAC were 0.019, 0.003, and 0.004, respectively. There was, however, insufficient scientific evidence on safety and cost effectiveness of surveillance for BE patients. Conclusions: Our findings confirmed a low incidence rate of EAC among BE patients undergoing surveillance and a reduction in

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of One-Carbon Metabolism and Cancers of the Esophagus, Stomach, and Liver in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Chih; Chang, Po-Yin; Butler, Brendan; Goldstein, Binh Y.; Mu, Lina; Cai, Lin; You, Nai-Chieh Y.; Baecker, Aileen; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Heber, David; Lu, Qing-Yi; Li, Liming; Greenland, Sander; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism (folate metabolism) is considered important in carcinogenesis because of its involvement in DNA synthesis and biological methylation reactions. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in folate metabolic pathway and the risk of three GI cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China, with 218 esophageal cancer cases, 206 stomach cancer cases, 204 liver cancer cases, and 415 healthy population controls. Study participants were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire, and blood samples were collected after the interviews. We genotyped SNPs of the MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, DNMT1, and ALDH2 genes, using PCR-RFLP, SNPlex, or TaqMan assays. To account for multiple comparisons and reduce the chances of false reports, we employed semi-Bayes (SB) shrinkage analysis. After shrinkage and adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found positive associations between MTHFR rs1801133 and stomach cancer (any T versus C/C, SB odds-ratio [SBOR]: 1.79, 95% posterior limits: 1.18, 2.71) and liver cancer (SBOR: 1.51, 95% posterior limits: 0.98, 2.32). There was an inverse association between DNMT1 rs2228612 and esophageal cancer (any G versus A/A, SBOR: 0.60, 95% posterior limits: 0.39, 0.94). In addition, we detected potential heterogeneity across alcohol drinking status for ORs relating MTRR rs1801394 to esophageal (posterior homogeneity P = 0.005) and stomach cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.004), and ORs relating MTR rs1805087 to liver cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.021). Among non-alcohol drinkers, the variant allele (allele G) of these two SNPs was inversely associated with the risk of these cancers; while a positive association was observed among ever-alcohol drinkers. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism may be associated with cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Heterogeneity across alcohol consumption status of the

  15. Chronic ethanol (EtOH) feeding increases muscarinic receptor (mAChR) density in esophagus without parallel change in dose response (D-R) to cholinergic agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Gordon, J.H.; Urban, G.; Fields, J.Z. VA Hospital, Hines, IL )

    1991-03-11

    The mAChR/effector pathway for signal transduction is important in the physiology of esophagus and mAChR alterations are involved in EtOH induced changes in several organs. To see if EtOH-induced increases in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) are due to upregulation of mAChR, the authors evaluated mAChR binding and D-R curves for bethanechol (IV) induced increases in LESP, and compared these values to changes in LESP after acute and chronic EtOH. EtOH was given to cats acutely or chronically. The number of mAChR sites (Bmax) in esophagus was lowered by acute EtOH, withdrawal from chronic EtOH raised Bmax. Acute injection of EtOH to cats in withdrawal reversed this increase in mAChR density. These changes correlated with the earlier data on EtOH-induced changes in LESP. In contrast, the D-R curve for bethanechol shifted to the right. Thus, the withdrawal-associated increase in Bmax is more likely to be a compensatory response to deficits distal to the receptor recognition site than to proximal deficits and doesn't cause LESP hyperactivity. Also, receptor binding changes do not necessarily translate into physiological changes.

  16. Comparative retrospective study on the use of plastic prostheses and self-expanding metal stents in the palliative treatment of malignant strictures of the esophagus and cardia.

    PubMed

    Mosca, F; Consoli, A; Stracqualursi, A; Persi, A; Portale, T R

    2003-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant strictures of the esophagus and cardia is usually carried out by the endoscopic placement of a prosthesis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of the use of expandable stents, compared with conventional plastic prostheses. One hundred and thirteen endoscopic intubations were carried out in 120 patients affected by malignant stenosis of the esophagus and cardia using plastic prosthesis and self-expanding metal stents. Dysphagia was scored according to Atkinson and Ferguson's classification and the preoperative median score (3.6) was comparable in both groups. The technical success rate was 94.4% with plastic prosthesis and 93.7% with self-expanding metal stent while the functional success rate was, respectively, 85.2% and 88.8%. Three deaths occurred with plastic prostheses (4.4%), while no deaths were observed with metal stents. A comparative analysis of the results of this study suggests that the endoscopic placement of self-expanding metal stents is effective and safe and has to be preferred to the conventional plastic prosthesis for easier implantation and lower morbidity. PMID:12823210

  17. Myotomy of Distal Esophagus Influences Proximal Esophageal Contraction and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation in Patients with Achalasia After Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yutang; Tang, Xiaowei; Chen, Fengping; Deng, Zhiliang; Wu, Jianuan; Nei, Soma; Jiang, Bo; Gong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The motility change after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in achalasia is currently focused on lower esophageal sphincter (LES). This study aims to investigate the correlation of motility response between distal and proximal esophagus after POEM. Methods A total of 32 achalasia patients who received POEM and high-resolution manometry (HRM) were included for analysis. Eckardt score was used to assess symptom improvement. HRM was applied for studying motility. Main parameters analyzed were (1) LES: resting pressure (restP), 4-second integrated relaxation pressure; (2) esophageal body (EB): contractile integral of distal segment with myotomy (CI-DM) and proximal segment without myotomy (CI-PNM); and (3) upper esophageal sphincter (UES): relaxation pressure (UES-RP). Results There were 6 type I, 17 type II, and 9 type III achalasia patients included for analysis. (1) Eckardt score, LES tone, CI-DM, CI-PNM and UES-RP were reduced remarkably after POEM (P < 0.001). (2) no significant correlation was noted between LES tone and contractile intergral of EB. (3) a positive linear correlation of CI-DM and CI-PNM changes was detected (P < 0.001). (4) the change of UES-RP was positively correlated with the change of contractile integral of EB (P < 0.001). Conclusions Myotomy of the distal esophagus would attenuate proximal EB contraction and assist UES relaxation in achalasia patients after POEM. PMID:26459454

  18. Oral health and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and esophagus: results of two multicentric case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Guha, Neela; Boffetta, Paolo; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Eluf Neto, Jose; Shangina, Oxana; Zaridze, David; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Fernandez, Leticia; Mates, Dana; Daudt, Alexander W; Lissowska, Jolanta; Dikshit, Rajesh; Brennan, Paul

    2007-11-15

    Poor oral health has been reported as a risk factor in the etiology of head and neck cancer. Data on oral health were ascertained as part of two multicenter case-control studies comprising 924 cases and 928 controls in central Europe and 2,286 cases and 1,824 controls in Latin America. Incident cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, pharynx, larynx) and esophagus, as well as age (in quinquennia)- and sex frequency-matched controls, were enrolled from 1998 to 2003. Poor condition of the mouth (central Europe: odds ratio (OR) = 2.89, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.74, 4.81; Latin America: OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.47, 2.42), lack of toothbrush use (Latin America: OR = 2.36, 95% CI: 1.28, 4.36), and daily mouthwash use (Latin America: OR = 3.40, 95% CI: 1.96, 5.89) emerged as risk factors for head and neck cancer, independent of tobacco use and alcohol consumption. Missing between six and 15 teeth was an independent risk factor for esophageal cancer (central Europe: OR = 2.84, 95% CI: 1.26, 6.41; Latin America: OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.04, 4.59). These results indicate that periodontal disease (as indicated by poor condition of the mouth and missing teeth) and daily mouthwash use may be independent causes of cancers of the head, neck, and esophagus. PMID:17761691

  19. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  20. Cancer of the Esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 16,910 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.0% Estimated Deaths in 2016 15,690 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 36,857 people living with esophageal cancer in ...

  1. Biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Reid, Brian J; Blount, Patricia L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2003-04-01

    This article provides a framework for clinicians who are attempting the difficult task of interpreting the Barrett's biomarker literature with the goal of improving care for their patients. Although many articles. including more that 60 proposed biomarkers, have been published on this subject, only a few describe phase 3 and 4 studies that are of interest to the clinical gastroenterologist (Table 1). For year, dysplasia grade has been the sole means of risk stratification for patients with BE, and it likely will continue to be used in the foreseeable future. The current authors believe that dysplasia classification can be valuable using the team management approach and quality controls described previously. Significant problems, however, have emerged in phase 2 through 4 studies of dysplasia that make it imperative for the Barrett's field to incorporate additional biomarkers as they are validated. These problems include poor reproducibility of dysplasia interpretations, poor predictive value for negative, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia, and inconsistent results for HGD in different centers, all of which makes it virtually impossible to develop national guidelines for surveillance. Some studies have even suggested that endoscopic biopsy surveillance using dysplasia may not be worthwhile. Currently, flow cytometric tetraploidy and aneuploidy have progressed furthest in biomarker validation (see Table 1). With proper handling, endoscopic biopsy specimens can be shipped to reference laboratories that have the instruments, computer analytic methods, and expertise to reproducibly detect tetraploidy and aneuploidy. The results of phase 4 studies indicate that flow cytometry appears to be useful in detecting a subset of patients who do not have HGD and yet have an increased risk of progression to cancer that cannot be identified by dysplasia grade. For many reasons, the authors anticipate that the number of validated biomarkers will increase substantially in the future. Biopsy repositories are now readily available for phase 3 studies that can evaluate and compare biomarkers. There are initiatives for multi-institutional Barrett's Centers of Excellence that could provide rapid progress in biomarker evaluation. In addition to new candidate biomarkers, the human genome project has provided high-throughput methodologies and methods for computer analysis of data, which can provide the volume and quality control required for clinically useful biomarkers. Currently, 17p (p53) LOH has progressed the furthest among molecular biomarkers. The authors do not recommend its routine clinical use at the present time, however. Finally, it is likely that clinicians will want to follow the results of clinical treatment-response studies and epidemiologic studies that evaluate relationship between clinical interventions or environmental risk and protective factors and surrogate endpoints, especially if the endpoints are progessing well along the phases of biomarker validation. These studies are likely to be of clinical interest because they may becoming the basis for randomized clinical trials to prevent cancer in BE. PMID:12916666

  2. Case of Barrett's adenocarcinoma with marked endoscopic morphological changes in Barrett's esophagus over a long follow-up period of 15 years.

    PubMed

    Iwaya, Yugo; Yamazaki, Tomoo; Watanabe, Takayuki; Seki, Ayako; Ochi, Yasuhide; Hara, Etsuo; Arakura, Norikazu; Tanaka, Eiji; Hasebe, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    The natural history of Barrett's esophagus (BE) is unclear. We herein describe a case of Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BAC) in which we could closely observe marked morphological changes in BE over a long follow-up period of 15 years. A man in his seventies received routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and was diagnosed as having reflux esophagitis and short-segment BE. The BE gradually became elongated, and BAC was detected 9 years following the initial EGD examination with continued administration of a proton pump inhibitor. We witnessed that BE elongated sporadically over time and mucosal breaks of reflux esophagitis were detectable several years before elongation. The patient underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for BAC and has been monitored by EGD every year thereafter. These remarkable morphological changes may be representative of the natural history of BE and aid in deciding long-term disease management. PMID:26946036

  3. Effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and irinotecan followed by surgery on small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Shioi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Fumitaka; Chiba, Takehiro; Otsuka, Koki; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Koeda, Keisuke; Mizuno, Masaru; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Kimura, Yusuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCCE) is a rare disease with aggressive progression and a poor prognosis. A standard treatment strategy for SCCE is yet to be established. Presentation of case A 40-year-old woman with dysphagia was admitted to our hospital. A clinical diagnosis of SCCE (T3N1N0 stage IIIA) was established. She was initially treated with chemotherapy using cisplatin (CDDP) and irinotecan (CPT-11). After two courses of treatment, the primary lesion in the esophagus was not detectable by esophageal endoscopy. Likewise, swelling of the right recurrent nerve lymph node present prior to treatment could not be detected. The chemotherapy resulted in a complete response. One month after the conclusion of chemotherapy, radical esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection was performed. Histopathological examination of the excised specimen revealed no residual tumor or lymph node metastasis. The patient was discharged from hospital 29 days after surgery with no complications. The patient is alive and has remained cancer-free for 48 months after the surgery. Discussion Systemic chemotherapy for SCCE in combination with surgery was treated after surgery in most reports. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is advantageous from three viewpoints, namely achievement of downstaging, increasing complete resection rates, and a better completion of treatment compared with postoperative chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy following esophagectomy could be a useful treatment option for patients with limited disease (LD) of SCCE. Conclusion We report a case of SCCE achieving a pathologically complete response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using CDDP and CPT-11, and long-term survival followed by surgery. PMID:26615446

  4. Duodeno-Gastric-Esophageal Reflux—What is Pathologic? Comparison of Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus and Age-Matched Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgarten, Eva; Pütz, Benito; Hölscher, Arnulf H.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to analyse pH- and bile-monitoring data in patients with Barrett’s esophagus and in age- and gender-matched controls. Subjects and Methods Twenty-four consecutive Barrett’s patients (8 females, 16 males, mean age 57 years), 21 patients with esophagitis (10 females, 11 males, mean age 58 years), and 19 healthy controls (8 females, 11 males, mean age 51 years), were included. Only patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy. All groups were investigated with manometry, gastric and esophageal 24-h pH, and simultaneous bile monitoring according to a standardized protocol. A bilirubin absorption >0.25 was determined as noxious bile reflux. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) method was applied to determine the optimal cutoff value of pathologic bilirubin levels. Results Of Barrett’s patients, 79% had pathologic acidic gastric reflux (pH<4 >5% of total measuring time). However, 32% of healthy controls also had acid reflux (p < 0.05) without any symptoms. The median of esophageal bile reflux was 7.8% (lower quartile (LQ)–upper quartile (UQ) = 1.6–17.8%) in Barrett’s patients, in patients with esophagitis, 3.5% (LQ–UQ = 0.1–13.5), and in contrast to 0% (LQ–UQ = 0–1.0%) in controls, p = 0.001. ROC analysis showed the optimal dividing value for patients at more than 1% bile reflux over 24 h (75% sensitivity, 84% specificity). Conclusion An optimal threshold to differentiate between normal and pathological bile reflux into the esophagus is 1% (24-h bile monitoring with an absorbance >0.25). PMID:17436133

  5. Homeostatic Role of Transforming Growth Factor-β in the Oral Cavity and Esophagus of Mice and Its Expression by Mast Cells in These Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vitsky, Allison; Waire, James; Pawliuk, Robert; Bond, Arden; Matthews, Douglas; LaCasse, Emily; Hawes, Michael L.; Nelson, Carol; Richards, Susan; Piepenhagen, Peter A.; Garman, Richard D.; Andrews, Laura; Thurberg, Beth L.; Lonning, Scott; Ledbetter, Steve; Ruzek, Melanie C.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic growth factor; its overexpression has been implicated in many diseases, making it a desirable target for therapeutic neutralization. In initial safety studies, mice were chronically treated (three times per week) with high doses (50 mg/kg) of a murine, pan-neutralizing, anti-TGF-β antibody. Nine weeks after the initiation of treatment, a subset of mice exhibited weight loss that was concurrent with decreased food intake. Histopathology revealed a unique, nonneoplastic cystic epithelial hyperplasia and tongue inflammation, as well as dental dysplasia and epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation of both the gingiva and esophagus. In an effort to determine the cause of this site-specific pathology, we examined TGF-β expression in these tissues and saliva under normal conditions. By immunostaining, we found higher expression levels of active TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal tongue and esophageal submucosa compared with gut mucosal tissues, as well as detectable TGF-β1 in normal saliva by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, mast cells within the tongue, esophagus, and skin co-localized predominantly with the TGF-β1 expressed in these tissues. Our findings demonstrate a novel and restricted pathology in oral and esophageal tissues of mice chronically treated with anti-TGF-β that is associated with basal TGF-β expression in saliva and by mast cells within these tissues. These studies illustrate a previously unappreciated biological role of TGF-β in maintaining homeostasis within both oral and esophageal tissues. PMID:19406991

  6. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of Barrett’s esophagus in the absence of gastroesophageal reflux: An analysis of SEER-Medicare data

    PubMed Central

    Drahos, Jennifer; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Warren, Joan L.; Cook, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    GOALS: Evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and risk of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database compared with two control groups—Medicare population controls and endoscopy controls. BACKGROUND: Barrett’s esophagus principally arises as an adaptation to the proinflammatory state induced by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The relationship between obesity and BE is presumed to be mediated by GERD. However, evidence suggests central adiposity also increases risk of BE independent of GERD. Central adiposity is one risk factor defining metabolic syndrome, which confers a systemic proinflammatory state—a potential GERD-independent mechanism by which obesity could increase risk of BE. STUDY: MetS was defined as diagnosis of at least three of the following conditions: obesity, elevated triglycerides, high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). RESULTS: In 2,198 incident BE cases, prior MetS was significantly associated with BE [OR 1.20; 95%CI 1.07, 1.36] compared with population controls. However, GERD status modified the association; among those without prior GERD, MetS increased risk of BE by 34%, however no association was observed among those with a prior GERD diagnosis (p-value for effect modification <0.001). MetS was not associated with risk of BE compared with endoscopy controls. CONCLUSIONS: MetS increased risk of BE compared with population controls, an association driven by and confined to the non-GERD stratum. MetS may mediate an association between central adiposity and BE for those without GERD. PMID:24671095

  7. CONSIDERATION OF DOSE LIMITS FOR ORGANS AT RISK OF THORACIC RADIOTHERAPY: ATLAS FOR LUNG, PROXIMAL BRONCHIAL TREE, ESOPHAGUS, SPINAL CORD, RIBS, AND BRACHIAL PLEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring); Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT. PMID:20934273

  8. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  9. Presence or absence of intestinal metaplasia but not its burden is associated with prevalent high-grade dysplasia and cancer in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Bansal, A; McGregor, D H; Anand, O; Singh, M; Rao, D; Cherian, R; Wani, S B; Rastogi, A; Singh, V; House, J; Jones, P G; Sharma, P

    2014-01-01

    Universal agreement on the inclusion of intestinal metaplasia to diagnose Barrett's esophagus (BE) is lacking. Our aim was to determine the association of intestinal metaplasia and its density with the prevalence of dysplasia/cancer in columnar lined esophagus (CLE). Patients with CLE but no intestinal metaplasia (CLE-no IM) were identified by querying the clinical pathology database using SNOMED codes for distal esophageal biopsies. CLE-IM patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database of BE patients. Subsequently, relative risks for prevalent dysplasia and cancer were calculated. Since patients with CLE-no IM are not usually enrolled in surveillance, only prevalent dysplasia/cancer on index endoscopy was analyzed. Goblet cell density and percent intestinal metaplasia were estimated. All biopsy slides were reviewed for dysplasia by two experienced gastrointestinal pathologists. Two hundred sixty-two CLE-IM and 260 CLE-no IM patients were included (age 64±12 vs. 60±11 years, P=0.001; whites 92% vs. 82%, P=0.001; males 99.7% vs. 99.3%, P=NS; CLE length 3.4±3.2 vears 1.4±0.4 cm, P=0.001 and hiatus hernia 64% vs. 56%, P=0.013). The odds of finding low-grade dysplasia and of high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/cancer were 12.5-fold (2.9-53.8, P=0.007) and 4.2-fold (95% CI 1.4-13, P=0.01) higher, respectively, in the CLE-IM group. Reanalysis after controlling for important variables of age, race, and length did not significantly alter the overall results. In CLE-IM group, when patients with high (>50/LPF) versus low goblet cell density (<50/LPF) and <10% versus >10% intestinal metaplasia were compared, the odds of HGD/cancer, OR 1.5 (0.5-4.9, P=0.5) and 1.97 (0.54-7.22), respectively, were not significantly higher. Demonstration of intestinal metaplasia continues to be an essential element in the definition of BE, but its quantification may not be useful for risk stratification of HGD/cancer in BE. PMID:24165297

  10. BMP4 Signaling Is Able to Induce an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-Like Phenotype in Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma through Induction of SNAIL2

    PubMed Central

    Kestens, Christine; Siersema, Peter D.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) signaling is involved in the development of Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). In various cancers, BMP4 has been found to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) but its function in the development of EAC is currently unclear. Aim To investigate the expression of BMP4 and several members of the BMP4 pathway in EAC. Additionally, to determine the effect of BMP4 signaling in a human Barrett’s esophagus (BAR-T) and adenocarcinoma (OE33) cell line. Methods Expression of BMP4, its downstream target ID2 and members of the BMP4 pathway were determined by Q-RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis using biopsy samples from EAC patients. BAR-T and OE33 cells were incubated with BMP4 or the BMP4 antagonist, Noggin, and cell viability and migration assays were performed. In addition, expression of factors associated with EMT (SNAIL2, CDH1, CDH2 and Vimentin) was evaluated by Q-RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results Compared to squamous epithelium (SQ), BMP4 expression was significantly upregulated in EAC and BE. In addition, the expression of ID2 was significantly upregulated in EAC and BE compared to SQ. Western blot analysis confirmed our results, showing an upregulated expression of BMP4 and ID2 in both BE and EAC. In addition, more phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 was observed. BMP4 incubation inhibited cell viability, but induced cell migration in both BAR-T and OE33 cells. Upon BMP4 incubation, SNAIL2 expression was significantly upregulated in BAR-T and OE33 cells while CDH1 expression was significantly downregulated. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion Our results indicate active BMP4 signaling in BE and EAC and suggest that this results in an invasive phenotype by inducing an EMT-like response through upregulation of SNAIL2 and subsequent downregulation of CDH1. PMID:27191723

  11. The zinc-finger transcription factor SALL4 is frequently expressed in human cancers: association with clinical outcome in squamous cell carcinoma but not in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ergin; Tennstedt, Pierre; Högner, Anica; Lebok, Patrick; Sauter, Guido; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Izbicki, Jakob R; Wilczak, Waldemar

    2016-04-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor originally identified as a homeotic gene essential for organ development. Early studies suggested that SALL4 is a useful marker to identify testicular and ovarian germ cell tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of SALL4 immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) with 3966 samples from 94 different tumor types and on a further TMA with 492 esophagus carcinomas. SALL4 immunostaining was by far most prevalent and most intensive in testicular tumors with a positivity rate of 93.1 % in seminomas, 80 % in mixed germ cell tumors (embryonic carcinomas/yolk sac tumors), and 18.5 % in teratomas, respectively. However, SALL4 expression is not specific to germ cell tumors. We observed SALL4 positivity in non-germ cell tumors as carcinomas of the kidney (28.9 % of chromophobe, 34.4 % of clear cell carcinoma), in intestinal type adenocarcinoma of the stomach (10.9 %), in adenocarcinoma (10.5 %) and squamous cell carcinoma (7.2 %) of the esophagus, and in malignant melanoma (8.1 %) and invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma (20 %). SALL4 expression was not found in lymphomas, in soft tissue tumors or breast tumors. At analysis of esophagus carcinoma TMA, no significant association was seen between SALL4 expression and overall survival in adenocarcinoma. However, SALL4 expression was strongly associated with worse overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma. SALL4 expression can be found at relevant frequencies in various tumors of different primary sites. SALL4 expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus may constitute a sign of dedifferentiation leading to poor patient prognosis. PMID:26818834

  12. Evaluation of Mutational Testing of Preneoplastic Barrett's Mucosa by Next-Generation Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Endoscopic Samples for Detection of Concurrent Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Del Portillo, Armando; Lagana, Stephen M.; Yao, Yuan; Uehara, Takeshi; Jhala, Nirag; Ganguly, Tapan; Nagy, Peter; Gutierrez, Jorge; Luna, Aesis; Abrams, Julian; Liu, Yang; Brand, Randall; Sepulveda, Jorge L.; Falk, Gary W.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (BIM) may harbor genomic mutations before the histologic appearance of dysplasia and cancer and requires frequent surveillance. We explored next-generation sequencing to detect mutations with the analytical sensitivity required to predict concurrent high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus by testing nonneoplastic BIM. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) routine biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection samples from 32 patients were tested: nonprogressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-NP) with BIM, who never had a diagnosis of dysplasia or EAC (N = 13); progressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-P) with BIM and a worse diagnosis of HGD or EAC (N = 15); and four BIM-negative samples. No mutations were detected in the BIM-NP (0 of 13) or BIM-negative samples, whereas the BIM-P samples had mutations in 6 (75%) of 8 cases in TP53, APC, and CDKN2A (P = 0.0005), detected in samples with as low as 20% BIM. We found that next-generation sequencing from routine FFPE nonneoplastic Barrett's esophagus samples can detect multiple mutations in minute areas of BIM with high analytical sensitivity. Next-generation sequencing panels for detection of TP53 and possibly combined mutations in other genes, such as APC and CDKN2A, may be useful in the clinical setting to improve dysplasia and cancer surveillance in patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26068095

  13. Evaluation of Mutational Testing of Preneoplastic Barrett's Mucosa by Next-Generation Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Endoscopic Samples for Detection of Concurrent Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Del Portillo, Armando; Lagana, Stephen M; Yao, Yuan; Uehara, Takeshi; Jhala, Nirag; Ganguly, Tapan; Nagy, Peter; Gutierrez, Jorge; Luna, Aesis; Abrams, Julian; Liu, Yang; Brand, Randall; Sepulveda, Jorge L; Falk, Gary W; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2015-07-01

    Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (BIM) may harbor genomic mutations before the histologic appearance of dysplasia and cancer and requires frequent surveillance. We explored next-generation sequencing to detect mutations with the analytical sensitivity required to predict concurrent high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus by testing nonneoplastic BIM. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) routine biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection samples from 32 patients were tested: nonprogressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-NP) with BIM, who never had a diagnosis of dysplasia or EAC (N = 13); progressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-P) with BIM and a worse diagnosis of HGD or EAC (N = 15); and four BIM-negative samples. No mutations were detected in the BIM-NP (0 of 13) or BIM-negative samples, whereas the BIM-P samples had mutations in 6 (75%) of 8 cases in TP53, APC, and CDKN2A (P = 0.0005), detected in samples with as low as 20% BIM. We found that next-generation sequencing from routine FFPE nonneoplastic Barrett's esophagus samples can detect multiple mutations in minute areas of BIM with high analytical sensitivity. Next-generation sequencing panels for detection of TP53 and possibly combined mutations in other genes, such as APC and CDKN2A, may be useful in the clinical setting to improve dysplasia and cancer surveillance in patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26068095

  14. Glyco-centric lectin magnetic bead array (LeMBA) - proteomics dataset of human serum samples from healthy, Barrett׳s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma individuals.

    PubMed

    Shah, Alok K; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Choi, Eunju; Chen, David; Gautier, Benoît; Nancarrow, Derek; Whiteman, David C; Baker, Peter R; Clauser, Karl R; Chalkley, Robert J; Saunders, Nicholas A; Barbour, Andrew P; Joshi, Virendra; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-06-01

    This data article describes serum glycoprotein biomarker discovery and qualification datasets generated using lectin magnetic bead array (LeMBA) - mass spectrometry techniques, "Serum glycoprotein biomarker discovery and qualification pipeline reveals novel diagnostic biomarker candidates for esophageal adenocarcinoma" [1]. Serum samples collected from healthy, metaplastic Barrett׳s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) individuals were profiled for glycoprotein subsets via differential lectin binding. The biomarker discovery proteomics dataset consisting of 20 individual lectin pull-downs for 29 serum samples with a spiked-in internal standard chicken ovalbumin protein has been deposited in the PRIDE partner repository of the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PRIDE: PXD002442. Annotated MS/MS spectra for the peptide identifications can be viewed using MS-Viewer (〈http://prospector2.ucsf.edu/prospector/cgi-bin/msform.cgi?form=msviewer〉) using search key "jn7qafftux". The qualification dataset contained 6-lectin pulldown-coupled multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) data for 41 protein candidates, from 60 serum samples. This dataset is available as a supplemental files with the original publication [1]. PMID:27408916

  15. Dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett’s esophagus risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Pu, Zhongshu; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Pengfei; Hao, Yiming; Wang, Qian; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qingchuan

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett’s esophagus (BE) risk remain inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence on these issues. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published from inception through October 2015. A total of eight studies were included in this analysis. Fruit intake was not associated with BE risk (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.37–1.13), but vegetable intake was strongly associated with BE risk (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.29–0.71). Saturated fat, red meat and processed meat intakes were not associated with BE risk with OR = 1.25 (95% CI = 0.82–1.91), OR = 0.85 (95% CI = 0.61–1.17) and OR = 1.03 (95% CI = 0.73–1.46), respectively. Dietary vegetable not fruits intake may be associated with decreased BE risk. Fat and red and processed meat intakes may not contribute to an increased BE risk. Well-designed, large prospective studies with better established dose-response relationships are needed to further validate these issues. PMID:27256629

  16. Dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett's esophagus risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Pu, Zhongshu; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Pengfei; Hao, Yiming; Wang, Qian; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qingchuan

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett's esophagus (BE) risk remain inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence on these issues. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published from inception through October 2015. A total of eight studies were included in this analysis. Fruit intake was not associated with BE risk (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.37-1.13), but vegetable intake was strongly associated with BE risk (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.29-0.71). Saturated fat, red meat and processed meat intakes were not associated with BE risk with OR = 1.25 (95% CI = 0.82-1.91), OR = 0.85 (95% CI = 0.61-1.17) and OR = 1.03 (95% CI = 0.73-1.46), respectively. Dietary vegetable not fruits intake may be associated with decreased BE risk. Fat and red and processed meat intakes may not contribute to an increased BE risk. Well-designed, large prospective studies with better established dose-response relationships are needed to further validate these issues. PMID:27256629

  17. Three-Field Lymphadenectomy for Carcinoma of the Esophagus and Gastroesophageal Junction in 174 R0 Resections: Impact on Staging, Disease-Free Survival, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, T; Nafteux, P; Moons, J; Coosemans, W; Decker, G; De Leyn, P; Van Raemdonck, D; Ectors, N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of esophagectomy with 3-field lymphadenectomy on staging, disease-free survival, and 5-year survival in patients with carcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Background: Esophagectomy with 3-field lymphadenectomy is mainly performed in Japan. Data from Western experience with 3-field lymphadenectomy are scarce and dealing with relatively small numbers. As a result, its role in the surgical practice of cancer of the esophagus and GEJ remains controversial. Methods: Between 1991 and 1999, primary surgery with 3-field lymphadenectomy was performed in 192 patients, of whom a cohort of 174 R0 resections was used for further analysis. Results: Hospital mortality of the whole series was 1.2%. Overall morbidity was 58%. Pulmonary complications occurred in 32.8%, cardiac dysrhythmias in 10.9%, and persistent recurrent nerve problems in 2.6%. pTNM staging was as follows: stage 0, 0.6%; stage I, 9.2%; stage II, 27.6%; stage III, 28.7%; and stage IV, 33.9%. Overall 3- and 5-year survival was 51% and 41.9%, respectively. The 3- and 5-year disease-free survival was 51.4% and 46.3%, respectively. Locoregional lymph node recurrence was 5.2%; no patient developed an isolated cervical lymph node recurrence. Five-year survival for node-negative patients was 80.2% versus 24.5% for node-positive patients. Five-year survival by stage was 100% in stages 0 and I, 59.1% in stage II, 36.8% in stage III, and 13.3% in stage IV. Twenty-three percent of the patients with adenocarcinoma (25.8% distal third and 17.6% GEJ) and 25% of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma (26.2% middle third) had positive cervical nodes resulting in a change of pTNM staging specifically related to the unforeseen cervical lymph node involvement in 12%. Cervical lymph node involvement was unforeseen in 75.6% of patients with cervical nodes at pathologic examinations. Five-year survival for patients with positive cervical nodes was 27.7% for middle third

  18. Endoscopic ablation is a cost-effective cancer preventative therapy in patients with Barrett’s esophagus who have elevated genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ananya; Callenberg, Keith M.; Styn, Mindi A.; Jackson, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surveillance of patients with nondysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE) has a high cost and is of limited effectiveness in preventing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Ablation for NDBE remains expensive and controversial. Biomarkers of genomic instability have shown promise in identifying patients with NDBE at high risk for progression to EAC. Here, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of using such biomarkers to stratify patients with NDBE by risk for EAC and, subsequently, the cost-effectiveness of ablative therapy. Methods: A Markov decision tree was used to evaluate four strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 50-year old patients with NDBE over their lifetime: strategy I, natural history without surveillance; strategy II, surveillance per current guidelines; strategy III, ablation for all patients; strategy IV, risk stratification with use of a biomarker panel to assess genomic instability (i. e., mutational load [ML]). Patients with no ML underwent minimal surveillance, patients with low ML underwent standard surveillance, and patients with high ML underwent ablation. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and incremental net health benefit (INHB) were assessed. Results: Strategy IV provided the best values for quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), ICER, and INHB in comparison with strategies II and III. Results were robust in sensitivity analysis. In a Monte Carlo analysis, the relative risk for the development of cancer in the patients managed with strategy IV was decreased. Critical determinants of strategy IV cost-effectiveness were the complete response rate, cost of ablation, and surveillance interval in patients with no ML. Conclusion: The use of ML to stratify patients with NDBE by risk was the most cost-effective strategy for preventive EAC treatment. Targeting ablation toward patients with high ML presents an opportunity for a paradigm shift in the management of NDBE. PMID:27227114

  19. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus. PMID:19423751

  20. DNA methylation as an adjunct to histopathology to detect prevalent, inconspicuous dysplasia and early-stage neoplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Muhammad A; Liu, Xinxue; O’Donovan, Maria; Newton, Richard; Wernisch, Lorenz; Shannon, Nicholas B; Shariff, Kareem; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Ragunath, Krish; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endoscopic surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is problematic because dysplasia/early-stage neoplasia are frequently invisible and likely to be missed due to sampling bias. Molecular abnormalities may be more diffuse than dysplasia. The aim was therefore to test whether DNA methylation; especially on imprinted and X-chromosome genes; is able to detect dysplasia/early-stage neoplasia. Experimental design 27K methylation arrays were used to find genes best able to differentiate between 22 BE and 24 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) samples. These were validated using pyrosequencing on a retrospective cohort (60 BE, 36 dysplastic and 90 EAC) and then in a prospective multicenter study (98 BE patients, including 28 dysplastic and 9 early EAC) designed to utilize biomarkers to stratify patients according to their prevalent dysplasia/EAC status. Results 23% genes on the array, including 7% of X-linked and 69% of imprinted genes, demonstrated statistically significant changes in methylation in EAC vs. BE (Wilcoxon P<0.05). 6/7 selected candidate genes were successfully internally (Pearson’s P<0.01) and externally validated (ANOVA P<0.001). Four genes (SLC22A18, PIGR, GJA12 and RIN2) showed the greatest area under curve (0.988) to distinguish between BE and dysplasia/EAC in the retrospective cohort. This methylation panel was able to stratify patients from the prospective cohort into three risk groups based on the number of genes methylated (low risk: <2 genes, intermediate: 2 and high: >2). Conclusion Widespread DNA methylation changes were observed in Barrett’s carcinogenesis including ≈70% of known imprinted genes. A four-gene methylation panel stratified BE patients into three risk groups with potential clinical utility. PMID:23243219

  1. “Indefinite for Dysplasia” in Barrett's Esophagus: Inflammation and DNA Content Abnormality are Significant Predictors of Early Detection of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Tak; Emond, Mary J; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Ahn, Joseph; Upton, Melissa P; Westerhoff, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysplasia arising from Barrett's esophagus precedes esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Cases that are difficult to diagnose as dysplastic, especially in the setting of inflammation, may be designated “indefinite for dysplasia (IND).” Although flow cytometric analysis of DNA content has shown some promise in detecting EAC, there are few reports that have specifically evaluated the outcome of IND. Aims and methods: We analyzed a series of 96 IND patients seen at the University of Washington between 2005 and 2013 to determine the outcome of IND and to identify factors (including histologic features and DNA flow cytometric data) associated with subsequent detection of neoplasia. Results: Twenty-five percent of IND cases were found to have low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia (HGD), or EAC within 1 year, with 37% and 47% detected within 2 and 3 years, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year detection rates of HGD or EAC were 10%, 13%, and 20%, respectively. Active inflammation (hazard ratio (HR)=3.4, P=0.0005) and abnormal DNA content (HR=5.7, P=0.003) were significant risk factors of neoplasia. When active inflammation and DNA flow cytometric results were considered together, the HR for the combined markers was 18.8 (P<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of the combined markers for predicting detection of subsequent neoplasia within 3 years were 100% and 60%, respectively, with 100% negative and 89% positive predictive values. Conclusions: Histology with the support of DNA flow cytometry can identify a subset of IND patients who may have a higher risk for subsequent detection of neoplasia. PMID:25761942

  2. Prospective evaluation of the clinical utility of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients with Barrett’s esophagus: a Western center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Roxana M.; Gotoda, Takuji; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Draganov, Peter V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) carries significant advantages over endoscopic mucosal resection. As such, ESD is an established therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma but there are only limited data on ESD as therapy for Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Thus, we prospectively evaluated the outcomes of ESD in patients with BE with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and early esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) performed in a Western center. Patients and methods: This is a prospective cohort study. Indications for ESD included: (1) early EAC defined as lesions with intramucosal cancer or superficial submucosal invasion; (2) early EAC with positive lateral margin after EMR; and (3) nodularity with HGD that could not be removed en-bloc with EMR Results: From October 2013 to July 2015, 36 consecutive patients (median age 69, 32 males) underwent ESD at our center. Median procedure time was 88 minutes, with median maximal diameter of resected specimens of 49 mm. En-bloc, R0, and curative resection rates were 100 %, 81 %, and 69 %, respectively. Intramucosal EAC was found in 13 patients (36 %), and submucosal invasion in 13 patients (36 %). In 59 % of the cases, there was discrepancy in the pre- and post-ESD histopathologic diagnosis. Adverse events occurred in 8 patients (22 %), including one episode of bleeding treated with endoscopy and seven esophageal strictures, which were successfully managed with dilations. Conclusions: ESD for BE with HGD/early EAC is feasible and safe with resulting very high en-bloc and R0 resection rates. ESD provided for more accurate pathologic evaluation and significant discrepancy between the pre- and post-ESD histopathological diagnosis was noted. PMID:27556083

  3. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Activation beyond Robust Nuclear β-Catenin Accumulation in Nondysplastic Barrett’s Esophagus: Regulation via Dickkopf-112

    PubMed Central

    Lyros, Orestis; Rafiee, Parvaneh; Nie, Linghui; Medda, Rituparna; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Otterson, Mary F.; Behmaram, Behnaz; Gockel, Ιnes; Mackinnon, Alexander; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation has been reported only during the late steps of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) neoplastic progression, but not in BE metaplasia, based on the absence of nuclear β-catenin. However, β-catenin transcriptional activity has been recorded in absence of robust nuclear accumulation. Thus, we aimed to investigate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in nondysplastic BE. METHODS: Esophageal tissues from healthy and BE patients without dysplasia were analyzed for Wnt target gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Esophageal squamous (EPC1-& EPC2-hTERT), BE metaplastic (CP-A), and adenocarcinoma (OE33) cell lines were characterized for Wnt activation by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase assay. Wnt activity regulation was examined by using recombinant Wnt3a and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) as well as Dkk1 short interfering RNA. RESULTS: Wnt target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, Cyclin D1, Dkk1) and Wnt3a were significantly upregulated in nondysplastic BE compared with squamous mucosa. Elevated levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin were detected in nondysplastic BE. Nuclear active β-catenin and TOPflash activity were increased in CP-A and OE33 cells compared with squamous cells. Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin signaling activation was abolished by Dkk1 in CP-A cells. TOPFlash activity was elevated following Dkk1 silencing in CP-A but not in OE33 cells. Dysplastic and esophageal adenocarcinoma tissues demonstrated further Dkk1 and AXIN2 overexpression. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the absence of robust nuclear accumulation, β-catenin is transcriptionally active in nondysplastic BE. Dkk1 overexpression regulates β-catenin signaling in BE metaplastic but not in adenocarcinoma cells, suggesting that early perturbation of Dkk1-mediated signaling suppression may contribute to BE malignant transformation. PMID:26297437

  4. Dietary consumption of meat, fat, animal products and advanced glycation end-products and the risk of barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Li; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Chen, Liang; Rugge, Massimo; Parente, Paola; Verstovsek, Gordana; Alsarraj, Abeer; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are found in high quantity in high-fat foods and meat cooked at high temperature. AGEs have been shown to contribute to chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in humans. Aim To investigate the associations between consumption of meat, fat and AGEs, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Methods We conducted a case-control study using data from the patients who were scheduled for elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and from a random sample of patients who were identified at primary care clinics. Daily consumption of meat, fat and Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), a major type of AGEs, was derived from the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for BE. Results A total of 151 cases with BE and 777 controls without BE completed the FFQ. The multivariate OR (95% CI) for BE was 1.91 (1.07–3.38) for total meat, 1.80 (1.02–3.16) for saturated fat, and 1.63 (0.96–2.76) for CML-AGE, when the highest tertile of intake was compared with the lowest. The association for total meat was attenuated to 1.61 (0.82–3.16), and that for saturated fat to 1.54 (0.81–2.94) after adjusting for CML-AGE. Conclusions Higher consumption of total meat, saturated fat or possibly CML-AGE was associated with an increased risk of BE. CML-AGE may partly explain the association between total meat and saturated fat consumption and risk of BE. PMID:23957669

  5. BOB CAT: A Large-Scale Review and Delphi Consensus for Management of Barrett’s Esophagus With No Dysplasia, Indefinite for, or Low-Grade Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Cathy; Moayyedi, Paul; Corley, Douglas A.; DeCaestecker, John; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Falk, Gary; Vakil, Nimish; Sanders, Scott; Vieth, Michael; Inadomi, John; Aldulaimi, David; Ho, Khek-Yu; Odze, Robert; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Quigley, Eamonn; Gittens, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Iyer, Prasad G.; Alexandre, Leo; Ang, Yeng; Callaghan, James; Harrison, Rebecca; Singh, Rajvinder; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Geramizadeh, Bita; Kaye, Philip; Krishnadath, Sheila; Fennerty, M. Brian; Manner, Hendrik; Nason, Katie S.; Pech, Oliver; Konda, Vani; Ragunath, Krish; Rahman, Imdadur; Romero, Yvonne; Sampliner, Richard; Siersema, Peter D.; Tack, Jan; Tham, Tony C.K.; Trudgill, Nigel; Weinberg, David S.; Wang, Jean; Wang, Kenneth; Wong, Jennie Y.Y.; Attwood, Stephen; Malfertheiner, Peter; MacDonald, David; Barr, Hugh; Ferguson, Mark K.; Jankowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common premalignant lesion for which surveillance is recommended. This strategy is limited by considerable variations in clinical practice. We conducted an international, multidisciplinary, systematic search and evidence-based review of BE and provided consensus recommendations for clinical use in patients with nondysplastic, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia (LGD). METHODS We defined the scope, proposed statements, and searched electronic databases, yielding 20,558 publications that were screened, selected online, and formed the evidence base. We used a Delphi consensus process, with an 80% agreement threshold, using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) to categorize the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. RESULTS In total, 80% of respondents agreed with 55 of 127 statements in the final voting rounds. Population endoscopic screening is not recommended and screening should target only very high-risk cases of males aged over 60 years with chronic uncontrolled reflux. A new international definition of BE was agreed upon. For any degree of dysplasia, at least two specialist gastrointestinal (GI) pathologists are required. Risk factors for cancer include male gender, length of BE, and central obesity. Endoscopic resection should be used for visible, nodular areas. Surveillance is not recommended for <5 years of life expectancy. Management strategies for indefinite dysplasia (IND) and LGD were identified, including a de-escalation strategy for lower-risk patients and escalation to intervention with follow-up for higher-risk patients. CONCLUSIONS In this uniquely large consensus process in gastroenterology, we made key clinical recommendations for the escalation/de-escalation of BE in clinical practice. We made strong recommendations for the prioritization of future research. PMID:25869390

  6. Localization of specialized intestinal metaplasia and the molecular alterations in Barrett esophagus in a Japanese population: an analysis of biopsy samples based on the "Seattle" biopsy protocol.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shota; Watari, Jiro; Tomita, Toshihiko; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Okugawa, Takuya; Kondo, Takashi; Kono, Tomoaki; Tozawa, Katsuyuki; Ikehara, Hisatomo; Ohda, Yoshio; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Das, Kiron M; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    It remains unclear why Barrett esophagus (BE)-associated adenocarcinoma (EAC) frequently occurs in the 0 to 3 o'clock area of the BE. The aims of this study were to clarify the localization of specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM) as a precancerous lesion and of molecular alterations among different locations using 4-quadrant biopsies based on the "Seattle" protocol. We prospectively evaluated microsatellite instability; methylation status at the APC, CDKN2A, hMLH1, RUNX3, and MGMT genes; the immunoreactivity of the monoclonal antibody Das-1 for the colonic phenotype; and Ki-67 staining in 10 early EACs and 128 biopsy samples from 32 BE patients. Among the molecular changes, only APC gene hypermethylation was an independent predictive marker of EAC (odds ratio, 24.4; P = .01). SIM was more frequently identified in the 0 to 3 o'clock quadrant than in the 6 to 9 o'clock quadrant (P = .08). The Ki-67 index was higher in SIM than in the columnar-lined epithelium (CLE) without goblet cells (P < .0001) and in both SIM and CLE with Das-1 reactivity than in those without (P = .04 and P = .06, respectively). Furthermore, the index was relatively higher in the 0 to 3 o'clock quadrant than in the 6 to 9 o'clock quadrant in cases with Das-1 reactivity. RUNX3 methylation was more frequently found in SIM than in CLE (P = .04), whereas the incidence of the other biomarkers did not show a significant difference between the 0 to 3 o'clock and 6 to 9 o'clock areas, nor between SIM and CLE. SIM with Das-1 reactivity, but not molecular alterations, in the 0 to 3 o'clock quadrant may have higher proliferative activity compared to the other areas of the BE. PMID:27067780

  7. Evaluation of a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device Coupled with Assessment of Trefoil Factor 3 Expression for Diagnosing Barrett's Esophagus: A Multi-Center Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Innes, Caryn S.; Debiram-Beecham, Irene; O'Donovan, Maria; Walker, Elaine; Varghese, Sibu; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Lovat, Laurence; Griffin, Michael; Ragunath, Krish; Haidry, Rehan; Sami, Sarmed S.; Kaye, Philip; Novelli, Marco; Disep, Babett; Ostler, Richard; Aigret, Benoit; North, Bernard V.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Haycock, Adam; Morris, Danielle; Attwood, Stephen; Dhar, Anjan; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D. D.; Sasieni, Peter D.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a commonly undiagnosed condition that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Routine endoscopic screening for BE is not recommended because of the burden this would impose on the health care system. The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel approach using a minimally invasive cell sampling device, the Cytosponge, coupled with immunohistochemical staining for the biomarker Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3), could be used to identify patients who warrant endoscopy to diagnose BE. Methods and Findings A case–control study was performed across 11 UK hospitals between July 2011 and December 2013. In total, 1,110 individuals comprising 463 controls with dyspepsia and reflux symptoms and 647 BE cases swallowed a Cytosponge prior to endoscopy. The primary outcome measures were to evaluate the safety, acceptability, and accuracy of the Cytosponge-TFF3 test compared with endoscopy and biopsy. In all, 1,042 (93.9%) patients successfully swallowed the Cytosponge, and no serious adverse events were attributed to the device. The Cytosponge was rated favorably, using a visual analogue scale, compared with endoscopy (p < 0.001), and patients who were not sedated for endoscopy were more likely to rate the Cytosponge higher than endoscopy (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.001). The overall sensitivity of the test was 79.9% (95% CI 76.4%–83.0%), increasing to 87.2% (95% CI 83.0%–90.6%) for patients with ≥3 cm of circumferential BE, known to confer a higher cancer risk. The sensitivity increased to 89.7% (95% CI 82.3%–94.8%) in 107 patients who swallowed the device twice during the study course. There was no loss of sensitivity in patients with dysplasia. The specificity for diagnosing BE was 92.4% (95% CI 89.5%–94.7%). The case–control design of the study means that the results are not generalizable to a primary care population. Another limitation is that the acceptability data were limited to a single measure. Conclusions The

  8. Narrow-band imaging and white-light endoscopy with optical magnification in the diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus: results of the Asia-Pacific Barrett’s Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajvinder; Jayanna, Mahesh; Wong, Jennie; Lim, Lee Guan; Zhang, Jun; Lv, Jing; Liu, Dong; Lee, Yi-Chia; Han, Ming-Lun; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Namasivayam, Vikneswaran; Banerjee, Rupa; Uedo, Noriya; Chan, Wah Kheong; Ho, Shiaw Hooi; Chen, Shi-yao; Bhatia, Shobna; Funasaka, Kohei; Ando, Takafumi; Wu, Justin; Lesmana, Cosmas; Tam, William; Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, Chi-Yang; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Jung, Kee Wook; Bestari, Muhammad Begawan; Yao, Kenshi; Chong, Vui Heng; Sharma, Prateek; Ho, Khek-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The advent and utility of new endoscopic imaging modalities for predicting the histology of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) in real time with high accuracy appear promising and could potentially obviate the need to perform random biopsies where guidelines are poorly adhered to. We embarked on evaluating the performance characteristics of white-light endoscopy with magnification (WLE-z), narrow-band imaging with magnification (NBI-z) and a combination of both modalities. Design: This was a prospective online study with 28 endoscopists from 11 countries (Asia-Pacific region) participating as assessors. In total, 35 patients with BE were assessed using 150 slides from WLE-z and NBI-z randomly arranged using a simple classification with corresponding histology. The overall Accuracy (Acc), Sensitivity (Sn), Specificity (Sp), Positive Predictive Value (PPV), and Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of WLE-z, NBI-z and a combination of both were calculated. Results: The overall Acc for WLE-z and NBI-z images was 87.1 % and 88.7 %, respectively. When images from the two modalities were placed side by side, the Acc increased to 90.3 %. The Sn, Sp, PPV, and NPV of WLE-z were 48 %, 92 %, 45 %, and 93 % while with NBI-z, these improved to 89 %, 89 %, 56 %, and 98 %, respectively. When both imaging modalities were viewed together, they improved further to 93 %, 90 %, 61 %, and 99 %. Conclusion: The high NPV (99 %) when both WLE-z and NBI-z were used simultaneously indicates that areas with regular appearance that are diagnosed with confidence can effectively be left alone and not biopsied when performed at a skilled resourced center. This approach could potentially lead to a paradigm shift of how patients with BE are assessed. PMID:26134765

  9. Low risk of adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia in patients with non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus: Results from a cohort from a country with low esophageal adenocarcinoma incidence

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE) is considered to be approximately 0.3% per year or even lower, according to population-based studies. Data from countries with low EAC incidence are scarce. Our principal aim was to determine the incidence of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and EAC in NDBE. Our secondary aims were to identify the predictors of progression and to calculate the incidence of HGD/EAC, by using the calculation method for surveillance time in population-based studies. Materials and methods A cohort of NDBE patients was prospectively followed up. Cases of HGD and EAC (study end points) diagnosed during the first year of follow-up were considered as prevalent. Only cases with an endoscopic surveillance time > 1 year were included in our analysis. Results We enrolled 331 patients (251 men) in the surveillance program. Their median age was 59 years (interquartile range (IQR): 47–67 years). Their median NDBE length was 3 cm (IQR: 2–4 cm). Of these patients, 80 died during the follow-up (one from EAC) and two were lost to follow-up. After 2284 patient-years of endoscopic follow-up (median surveillance time, 5 years (IQR: 2–10 years)), we found that five cases of HGD and two cases of EAC were diagnosed. The incidence of HGD/EAC was 3.1 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 1.3–6.0) and that of EAC was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.2–2.9). The incidence of HGD/EAC in short segments (≤ 3 cm) was 0.7 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 0.3–3.4). The sole variable that we found associated with progression was NDBE length. If the total surveillance time was considered (3537 patient-years), the incidence of HGD and EAC was only slight lower. Conclusions The incidence of HGD and EAC was very low in NDBE. Therefore, current surveillance guidelines must be reassessed, at least for short-segment BE. PMID:27403300

  10. [Acute obstruction of the esophagus by mucilage].

    PubMed

    Laroche, C; Caquet, R; Remy, R; Duflo, B

    1975-10-23

    The authors present the case of an 84 year-old woman with chronic constipation who suddenly developed acute obstruction of the lower oesophagus on taking a tablespoonful of mucilage without water. The obstruction was relieved by fiber endoscopy. There was no other previous lesion which might explain this complication. The patient was seen again later in good general health. The authors recall the clinical and radiological signs of acute obstruction of the oesophagus and discuss the physiopathology. They propose treating them exclusively by oesophageal fiber endoscopy. PMID:175497

  11. Molecular pathogenesis of Barrett esophagus: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Wang, Kenneth K

    2015-06-01

    This article focuses on recent findings on the molecular mechanisms involved in esophageal columnar metaplasia. Signaling pathways and their downstream targets activate specific transcription factors leading to the expression of columnar and the more specific intestinal-type of genes, which gives rise to Barrett metaplasia. Several animal models have been generated to validate and study these distinct molecular pathways but also to identify the Barrett progenitor cell. Currently, the many aspects involved in the development of esophageal metaplasia that have been elucidated can serve to develop novel molecular therapies to improve treatment or prevent metaplasia. Nevertheless, several key events are still poorly understood and require further investigation. PMID:26021192

  12. Esophagus Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) ... barytée - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Barium Swallow हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual ...

  13. What Is Cancer of the Esophagus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... The lamina propria is a thin layer of connective tissue right under the epithelium. The muscularis mucosa is ... lamina propria. Submucosa: This is a layer of connective tissue just below the mucosa that contains blood vessels ...

  14. Esophagus Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) French (français) ... 검사 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Russian (Русский) Colonoscopy with Bowel Prep: Go-Lytely, Colyte, ...

  15. How Is Cancer of the Esophagus Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Imaging tests use x-rays, magnetic fields, sound waves, or radioactive substances to create pictures of the ... in the body. But MRI scans use radio waves and strong magnets instead of x-rays. The ...

  16. Barrett's esophagus: management of high-grade dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruol, Alberto; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Costantini, Mario; Battaglia, Giorgio; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Epifani, Magdalena; Ancona, Ermanno

    2004-03-01

    Esophagectomy remains the treatment of choice for the appropriate patient with Barrett's adenocarcinoma invading beyond the mucosa, without evidence of distant metastasis or invasion of adjacent organs. On the other hand, therapeutic management of patients with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or mucosal adenocarcinoma should be individualized, taking into account the patient's preferences, willingness to return for frequent endoscopic biopsies, and medical fitness to undergo esophagectomy. Surgery has to be considered the best treatment for HGD or superficial carcinoma, unless contraindicated by severe comorbidities, because it has proven to be the only treatment that is successful in curing the condition and preventing recurrent HGD or the development of invasive cancer. Nonsurgical treatment by photodynamic therapy or endoscopic mucosal resection may be a less invasive and organ-sparing option for elderly, poor-risk patients but it is still to be considered an investigational therapy that should only be conducted under a clinical trial protocol. Finally, intensive endoscopic biopsy surveillance of patients with HGD is another investigational option that may allow prompt treatment of cancer if it develops. However, few data document the safety of this observational approach. PMID:15013713

  17. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Esophagus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health ...

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Cancer of the Esophagus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the world, such as Iran, northern China, India, and southern Africa. The main type of esophageal ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  19. The Black Esophagus: A Rare But Deadly Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shafa, Shervin; Sharma, Neil; Keshishian, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of cases of acute esophageal necrosis along with a video demonstration. The video captures a case showing the severity of necrosis of the esophageal mucosa; an orogastric tube easily passed through the esophageal lumen and into the right hemithorax. The series also demonstrates the severity of this illness, with an associated high mortality rate. PMID:26958555

  20. Circulating Tumor Cells in the Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are elements of indisputable significance as they seem to be responsible for the onset of metastasis. Despite this, research into CTCs and their clinical application have been hindered by their rarity and heterogeneity at the molecular and cellular level, and also by a lack of technical standardization. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Its incidence has increased so much in recent years that new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed. Preliminary findings suggest that CTCs could represent an effective, non-invasive, real-time assessable biomarker in all stages of EAC. This review provides an overview of EAC and CTC characteristics and reports the main research results obtained on CTCs in this setting. The need to carry out further basic and translational research in this area to confirm the clinical usefulness of CTCs and to provide oncologists with a tool to improve therapeutic strategies for EAC patients was herein highlighted. PMID:27527155

  1. Potentially Curable Cancers of the Esophagus and Stomach.

    PubMed

    Elimova, Elena; Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Harada, Kazuto; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-09-01

    Gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas continue to be a major health burden globally and collectively represent the third leading cause of cancer death. Among patients with metastatic disease, most die of their cancer because of the limited number of modestly effective treatment regimens available today. The progress against these cancers has been slow compared with many other solid tumors despite many attempts. In-depth molecular profiling has also not been completed. Even when these cancers are localized, they impose considerable challenges for the patient, relatives, and treatment team alike. Localized gastric or gastroesophageal cancer is best managed with a multidisciplinary approach. This review focuses on the management of localized cancers by reviewing the current literature and explaining certain principles that help guide therapy for these patients. The future, however, will afford numerous opportunities, including exploitation of initial data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, to identify novel targets and drugs, harness the prowess of the immune system, and customize therapy for each patient. PMID:27594190

  2. TRPA1 in bradykinin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal C fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-02-01

    Bradykinin (BK) activates sensory nerves and causes hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is expressed in sensory nerves and mediates cold, mechanical, and chemical nociception. TRPA1 can be activated by BK. TRPA1 knockout mice show impaired responses to BK and mechanical nociception. However, direct evidence from sensory nerve terminals is lacking. This study aims to determine the role of TRPA1 in BK-induced visceral mechanical hypersensitivity. Extracellular recordings of action potentials from vagal nodose and jugular neurons are performed in an ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparation. Peak frequencies of action potentials of afferent nerves evoked by esophageal distension and chemical perfusion are recorded and compared. BK activates most nodose and all jugular C fibers. This activation is repeatable and associated with a significant increase in response to esophageal distension, which can be prevented by the B2 receptor antagonist WIN64338. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) activates most BK-positive nodose and jugular C fibers. This is associated with a transient loss of response to mechanical distensions and desensitization to a second AITC perfusion. Desensitization with AITC and pretreatment with TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 both inhibit BK-induced mechanical hypersensitivity but do not affect BK-evoked activation in nodose and jugular C fibers. In contrast, esophageal vagal afferent Adelta fibers do not respond to BK or AITC and fail to show mechanical hypersensitivity after BK perfusion. This provides the first evidence directly from visceral sensory afferent nerve terminals that TRPA1 mediates BK-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. This reveals a novel mechanism of visceral peripheral sensitization. PMID:19033534

  3. [Muscular tumors of the esophagus. Apropos of 9 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Domergue, J; Rouanet, P; Joyeux, H; Solassol, C; Pujol, H

    1986-10-01

    Between 1970 and 1983, nine cases of tumors of esophageal muscle and connective tissue were treated at the Centre Paul Lamarque. Leiomyoma (LM) (6 cases in this series) represented 0.8% of esophageal tumors reported from among 1,200 patients, while leiomyosarcoma (LMS) (3 cases in this series) were observed in 0.25%. LM is usually detected fortuitously and is asymptomatic, LMS provoking dysphagia of the "foreign body" type contrasting with the "monstrosity" of the radiologic image. Endoscopy and biopsy is justified only when LMS in suspected, since it could interfere with enucleation. Treatment is surgical, by enucleation without mucosal effraction for LM and esophageal resection for LMS. Adjuvant therapy has failed to provide evidence of efficacy. PMID:3805169

  4. [Humoral nonspecific immunity in patients with post-burn cicatrical strictures of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Mumladze, R B; Babaian, S S; Bobkov, Iu I; Chernyshev, V S; Taratuta, O V

    1983-03-01

    The authors have studied the significance of factors of the humoral non-specific defense (HND) in 37 patients with cicatricial constrictions of the oesophagus and stomach. The data obtained were used for choosing the optimum terms for gastrostoma and oesophagoplasty. In 14 patients treatment with lysozyme was performed due to decreased indices of HND. PMID:6857955

  5. Iatrogenic perforation of esophagus successfully treated with Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy (EVT)

    PubMed Central

    Loske, Gunnar; Schorsch, Tobias; Dahm, Christian; Martens, Eckhard; Müller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy (EVT) has been reported as a novel treatment option for esophageal leakage. We present our results in the treatment of iatrogenic perforation with EVT in a case series of 10 patients. Patients and methods: An open pore polyurethane drainage was placed either intracavitary through the perforation defect or intraluminal covering the defect zone. Application of vacuum suction with an electronic device (continuous negative pressure, –125 mmHg) resulted in defect closure and internal drainage. Results: Esophageal perforations were located from the cricopharyngeus (4/10) to the esophagogastric junction (2/10). EVT was feasible in all patients. Eight patients were treated with intraluminal EVT, one with intracavitary EVT, and one with both types of treatments. All perforations (100 %) were healed in within a median of (3 – 7) days. No stenosis occurred, no complications were observed, and no additional operative treatment was necessary. Conclusions: Our study suggests that intraluminal EVT will play an important role in endoscopic management of esophageal perforation. PMID:26716109

  6. [Portal vein thrombosis and rupture of the esophagus secondary to a barotrauma].

    PubMed

    Prignet, J M; Duval, J L; Raynard, B; Louvety, S; Flandrin, P; Thouard, H; Künkel, D

    1996-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis complicating a trauma is rare. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis associated with esophageal rupture after a blast injury due to the explosion of a pressurized nitrogen bottle. Portal vein thrombosis was discovered during oesophageal reconstruction, 70 days after the initial injury. A favorable outcome was observed. PMID:8734315

  7. [Incidence of epidermoid cancer of the esophagus in Asturias (1975-85)].

    PubMed

    Prados, C; Rodrigo Sáez, L; Fernández García, J; Fernández León, A; De Llano Rodríguez, I

    1990-06-01

    We present the incidence the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Asturias, based on the review of the clinical histories of eleven years (1975-85). Of 356 total cases, 92.4% were male patients and the remaining 7.6% females; the relation M:F was 12.2:1. Mean age at the time of diagnosis was 59.4 +/- 9.6 for males and 70 +/- for females. Total annual incidence was 2.8 +/- 0.8 cases/10(5) + population/year. Maximal annual incidence was registered in 1981: 1.1 cases/10(5) population/year. Asturias has eight health districts; those with highest incidence were mining areas: Mieres, Cangas de Narcea and Riaño. Compared to that of some developing countries, the incidence of esophageal cancer in Asturias is low, similar to that in European countries (except France) and white population of the USA; there is an aggregation of cases in males living in mining areas. PMID:2223247

  8. Simultaneous reconstruction of cervical soft tissue and esophagus with a gastro-omental free flap

    SciTech Connect

    Mixter, R.C.; Rao, V.K.; Katsaros, J.; Noon, J.; Tan, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A microvascular transfer of gastric tube and omentum was used to simultaneously reconstruct cervical soft-tissue and esophageal defects in five patients. All patients had previous high-dose radiation and multiple flap reconstructions. The largest esophageal and soft-tissue defects were 10 cm and 160 cm2, respectively. All wounds healed primarily except for one orocutaneous fistula. There was one death from an intraoperative stroke. The gastro-omental flap is useful in cases where the reconstructive surgeon is faced with both esophageal and soft-tissue defects--particularly in heavily irradiated patients who have few reconstructive options.

  9. [Tracheo-bronchial intubation for surgery of the esophagus via a thoracic approach].

    PubMed

    Bornet, J L; Desprats, R

    1977-01-01

    Tracheo-bronchial intubation using a double-lumen Carlens tube provides the surgeon with a mediastinal operating field free of any obstruction by the lung and provides greater surgical ease than that of an assistant retracting a constantly invasive lung with tracheal intubation. This anaesthetic technique involving the ventilation of only one lung during the endothoracic period of the surgical procedure has not been used routinely for extra-pulmonary surgery since the shunt which is created leads to a fear of dangerous hypoxia. The aim of this study involving 30 patients is to demonstrate that the blood oxygen saturation obtained by the careful ventilation of a single lung, that of the side on which the patient is lying, is perfectly acceptable and comparable with the preoperative oxygen saturation of the subject at rest. This is obtained at the price of an increase in insufflation pressures of the order of 100 percent. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung without visual confirmation after careful endobronchial aspiration makes it possible to prevent the development of areas of micro-atelectasia and to ensure the absence of any pulmonary postoperative complications. PMID:22287

  10. Auto-shape lossless compression of pharynx and esophagus fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Arif, Arif Sameh; Mansor, Sarina; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran; Karim, Hezerul Abdul

    2015-02-01

    The massive number of medical images produced by fluoroscopic and other conventional diagnostic imaging devices demand a considerable amount of space for data storage. This paper proposes an effective method for lossless compression of fluoroscopic images. The main contribution in this paper is the extraction of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluoroscopic images using appropriate shapes. The extracted ROI is then effectively compressed using customized correlation and the combination of Run Length and Huffman coding, to increase compression ratio. The experimental results achieved show that the proposed method is able to improve the compression ratio by 400 % as compared to that of traditional methods. PMID:25628161

  11. Recurrent acute thermal lesion induces esophageal hyperproliferative premalignant lesions in mice esophagus.

    PubMed

    Rapozo, D C M; Blanco, T C M; Reis, B B; Gonzaga, I M; Valverde, P; Canetti, C; Barja-Fidalgo, C; Simao, T A; Albano, R M; Kruel, C D P; Ribeiro Pinto, L F

    2016-04-01

    Hot beverage consumption is a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We developed an experimental mouse model to understand the mechanism of thermal lesion to esophageal carcinogenesis. Female BALB/c mice were treated by gavage with water at different temperatures three times a week and nitrosamines in the drinking water. Water at 70°C, but not at lower temperatures, initially induced an esophageal necrosis that healed and became resistant to necrosis after further administrations. However, when 70°C water was associated with N-nitrosodiethylamine at doses above 1ppm, there was interference in epithelial regeneration, allowing recurrent thermal injury and inflammation. Recurrent thermal injury resulted in hyper proliferative premalignant lesions being induced earlier (at 4weeks) and at a higher frequency (4-fold increase at 16weeks) when compared to mice treated with NDEA only. Ki-67 immunostaining revealed that recurrent thermal injury induced basal cell proliferation resulting in the expansion of epithelial basal cells, confirmed by the increase in cytokeratin 14 positive cells with concomitant reduction of differentiated cytokeratin 5 positive cells. We conclude that recurrent thermal lesion may act as a tumor promoter though a strong proliferation stimulus of esophageal epithelial basal cells. PMID:26899552

  12. High-fidelity DNA histograms in neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chenggong; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Huang, Qin; Klein, Michael; Goyal, Raj K

    2007-05-01

    This study describes the high-fidelity DNA histograms in different stages of neoplastic progression to Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BAC). High-fidelity DNA histograms were obtained with image cytometry on sections, and were classified based on DNA index values of the peaks into diploid, mild aneuploid, moderate aneuploid and severe aneuploid. Heterogeneity index (HI) representing cells with different DNA content and the 5N exceeding cell fraction were determined. One hundred and eighty-seven cases, including 34 normal gastrointestinal mucosa (control), 66 Barrett's-specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM), 22 low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 22 high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and 43 BAC were investigated. Controls showed sharp diploid peaks with HI values less than 13, and no 5N exceeding nuclei. SIM showed a spectrum of histograms including diploid, mild aneuploid and moderate aneuploid histograms. The frequency and severity of aneuploidy increased with worsening histological grades of dysplasia. All BAC cases were aneuploid, with moderate or severe aneuploidy. Marked elevated HI values (>20) and 5N exceeding fractions (>5%) were found in 5%, 32%, 50% and 88% of cases with SIM, LGD, HGD and BAC, respectively. The high-fidelity DNA histograms suggest that (1) Barrett's SIM may already be dysplastic in nature, and all BAC may be markedly aneuploid; and (2) elevated cellular DNA heterogeneity and 5N fractions may be markers of progressive chromosomal changes and 'unstable aneuploidy' that identifies progressive lesions. PMID:17310216

  13. [Esophageal intubation for palliative treatment in advanced carcinoma of the esophagus and cardia].

    PubMed

    Domene, C E; Cecconello, I; Volpe, P; Zilberstein, B; Sakai, P; Ishioka, S; Pinotti, H W

    1998-01-01

    This is a report of 121 cases of advanced esophageal and cardia cancer managed by endoscopic and surgical esophageal intubation. They were submitted to surgical intubation 69 (53%) patients, and 52 (47%) to endoscopic intubation. There were 32.5% of technical complications in endoscopic intubation and 26.5% in surgical intubation. Perfuration was more frequent (11.5%) in endoscopic intubation than surgical group. Mortality rate was 17.3% for endoscopic and 5.8% for surgical intubation. Perfuration was the main cause of death in endoscopic intubation. Survival rate was 3.5 months for endoscopic and 4.7 months for surgical intubation. The majority of patients died of cancer evolution--caquexia (55.5%), carcinomatosis (4.5%) and brain methastasis (1.1%). The results of endoscopic and surgical intubation in this group of patients recommend its use in patients with advanced esophageal and cardic cancer. PMID:9699358

  14. Using the methylome to identify aggressive Barrett’s esophagus — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    OVERALL STRATEGY: Our strategy will consist of using HumanMethylation450 arrays to identify methylation profiles and/or candidate methylated genes that distinguish BE from BE+LGD, BE+HGD and EAC (Aim 1). We will then assess whether these genes are predictive markers for aggressive BE (Aim 2)

  15. Efficacy of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel regimen for carcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Belani, C P; Luketich, J D; Landreaneau, R J; Kim, R; Ramanathan, R K; Day, R; Ferson, P F; Keenan, R J; Posner, M; Seeger, J; Lembersky, B

    1997-12-01

    Eighteen patients with esophageal carcinoma (16 adenocarcinoma, two squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with two cycles of induction chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) 175 mg/m2 (3-hour infusion), cisplatin 20 mg/m2/d x 4 days, and 5-fluorouracil 1 g/m2/d (continuous infusion x 4 days) separated by a 28-day interval before surgical resection. After resection, patients received two more cycles of the same regimen. A thorough staging evaluation was performed before patients were enrolled in the study. The salient chemotherapy toxicities included grade 3 nausea (two patients), grade 3 vomiting (two patients), grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (one patient each), and grades 3 and 4 neutropenia (two and 10 patients, respectively). No deaths occurred due to toxicity. Surgical resection was attempted in all 18 patients (100%) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy. Esophageal resection was successfully completed in 17 patients. Liver metastases were noted at laparotomy in the one patient who subsequently did not undergo esophageal resection. Surgical complications were minor, and no postoperative deaths occurred. Fifteen patients received two additional cycles of the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin regimen postoperatively, two received only one cycle, and one refused further therapy. Of 15 patients alive, 14 show no evidence of disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate of this group of patients is 82%. In conclusion, the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin combination is well tolerated and is an active regimen in esophageal carcinoma. PMID:9427275

  16. [Caustic stenosis of the esophagus in Libreville. Results of the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ondo N'Dong, F; Eyamame, D; Makaya, J; Mabamba, C; Aldunate, R S; Mbumbe King, A; Bellamy, J; Diane, C

    1992-04-01

    41 cases of caustic stenosis of the oesophagus were treated surgically by the thoracic and visceral surgical teams of La Fodation Jeanne Ebori and L'Hopital Pédiatrique d'Owendo in Libreville. The lesions were due to bleach ingestion in 38 cases, caustic soda in 2 cases and sulfuric acid in 1 case. Ingestion was an accident in 29 cases and voluntary in 12. There were 32 men and 9 women. Among them, there were 32 infants and 9 adults. The mean age was 4.5 years for the infants and 25 years for the adults. The surgical procedures were gastrostomy, followed by dilatations of the stenosis in 19 cases, esophagoplasty using the stomach, with pyloroplasty and jejunostomy in 4 cases, and gastrostomy associated with esophagoplasty using the colon in 18 cases. Mortality rate was 2.4%. It was about 1 patient, from general causes. Cervical or thoracic fistulae occurred in 4 patients, all of them successfully treated by medical means, and 3 patients had regressive pulmonary infections. The mean follow-up was 4 years, with good results. The authors suggest a surgical attitude in the management of caustic stenosis, every time the medical management is unsuccessfull. PMID:1527196

  17. Summary of combined treatment under endoscope on 70 esophagus cancer inpatients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Nong, Meilong; Li, Laisheng; Jia, Fang; Hao, Runchun

    1993-03-01

    We announce with satisfaction that combined treatment on 70 inpatients who suffered esophageal cancer in its middle or late course is perfectly successful. The combined methods include phototherapy, microwave therapy, and anticarcinogen local injection. The results are as follows: CR 3 cases, holds 4.3% of the total inpatients; PR 36 cases, 51.4%; MR 24 cases, 34.3%; NR 7 cases, 10%; the total effective rate 90%. Splendid results of treatment on enlarging the canal, improving dysphagia, and releasing obstruction have been obtained. The dysphagic grade increased from 66 to 148, the grade of esophagostenosis from 64 to 147, and the obstruction releasing rate is 69 out of 70 (that is 98.6%). The histological observation after treatment shows that 59/62 inpatients being reported as having cancer cells appear to have retrogression accompanied with a few or large quantities of necrotic cancer cells, and 3 inpatients were changed to negative reaction. No obvious poisoning or side effects arose. The combined treatment is more advantageous on those of old age or the physically weak and those who cannot stand for an operation, radiotherapy, or normal chemotherapy.

  18. [Importance of drug-induced ulceration in endoscopic lesions of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, G; Bengoa, J; de Peyer, R; Loizeau, E

    1985-01-01

    Drug-induced ulcers of the oesophagus represent a rare but probably under-recorded complication. In a series of 5900 endoscopies performed in 32 months, oesophageal ulcers were seen in 4 cases following the intake of doxycycline, and in one case after ingestion of pinaverium bromide and a bulk laxative respectively. Oesophageal ulcers were seen mainly in young patients without underlying oesophageal disease, presenting with chest pain and odynophagia. The most common site of involvement was at the aortic notch in the middle third of the oesophagus. The course was quickly favorable within 5-10 days after the drug was discontinued, but transient complete abstention from oral intake was required in some cases. Ulceration is thought to be secondary to drug stasis and local cytotoxic effects. Oesophageal ulcers can be prevented simply by recommending intake of the drug with sufficient water in the upright position at least two hours before retiring. PMID:3864236

  19. Management of Normal Tissue Toxicity Associated With Chemoradiation (Primary Skin, Esophagus, and Lung)

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Victor Y.; Villaruz, Liza; Haley, Marsha; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly one quarter of patients with lung cancer present with locally advanced disease where concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with good performance status. Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy consistently showed an improvement in survival compared with sequential chemoradiotherapy, at the expense of an increase in the toxicity profile. Over the past decades, several encouraging biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta and radioprotective agents such as amifostine were studied but without reaching approval for patient care. We reviewed the prevalence and risk factors for different adverse effects associated with the combined chemoradiotherapy modality, especially dermatitis, mucositis, esophagitis, and pneumonitis. These adverse effects can further be divided into acute, subacute, and chronic. Dermatitis is usually rare and responds well to topical steroids and usual skin care. Acute esophagitis occurs in 30% of patients and is treated with proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, local anesthetic, and dietary changes. Radiation pneumonitis is a subacute complication seen in 15% of patients and is usually managed with steroids. Chronic adverse effects such as radiation fibrosis and esophageal stricture occur approximately 6 months after completion of radiation therapy and are usually permanent. In this review, complications of chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer are delineated, and approaches to their management are described. Given that treatment interruption is associated with a worse outcome, patients are aggressively treated with a curative intent. Therefore, planning for treatment adverse effects improves patient tolerance, compliance, and outcome. PMID:23708070

  20. Spooning of the nails and webbing of the esophagus: koilonychia and Plummer-Vinson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Yu, Jie; Telfer, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Chronic iron deficiency can be associated with nail deformities like Koilonychia and Platynychia. It can also be associated with esophageal webs (Plummer-Vinson syndrome or Patterson-Brown-Kelly syndrome) causing dysphagia in the patient. Though the pathogenesis of this association remains anecdotal and presence of these physical findings should prompt the clinician towards considering chronic iron deficiency as the cause of anemia. PMID:26734146

  1. Active Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. The Esophagus as a Source of Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Craven, M.A.; Waterfall, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Many patients present with chest pain and are subsequently found to have normal coronary angiography; investigation of these patients frequently stops once coronary artery disease has been ruled out. It is now clear that considerable morbidity may be associated with failure to make a definite diagnosis in these patients, and that efforts to identify a cause for the pain should continue within appropriate limits. This paper presents the evidence in support of an esophageal cause of non-cardiac angina. The authors emphasize the difficulty in distinguishing between cardiac and esophageal angina on the basis of clinical history and suggest an approach to investigation. PMID:21253154

  3. [Microflora of the inflammatory erosive areas of the esophagus in esophagitis patients].

    PubMed

    Chervinets, V M

    2002-01-01

    Seven patients with erosive esophagitis and reflux esophagitis were examined. In cases of inflammatory erosive phenomena staphylococci, Micrococcus luteus, Candida, bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Veilonella, Klebsiella and other bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, as well as Helicobacter pylori were detected in different frequency. In most cases concentrations of microorganisms were 4.07-5.39 Ig CFU/g. Isolated microorganisms producing different pathogenicity enzymes--hemolysin (Streptococcus intermedius, S. sanguis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. warneri, Bacteroides spp.), lecithinase (Staphylococcus xylosus), caseinase, RNAase and catalase--were detected. PMID:12043159

  4. Response of Esophagus to High and Low Temperatures in Patients With Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yutang; Fang, Xiucai; Zhu, Liming; Sun, Xiaohong; Wang, Zhifeng; Wang, Ruifeng; Wei, Zhao; Wen, Ping; Xin, Haiwei; Chang, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Achalasia patients would feel exacerbated dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation when they drink cold beverages or eat cold food. But these symptoms would relieve when they drink hot water. Reasons are unknown. Methods Twelve achalasia patients (mean age, 34 ± 10 years; F:M, 3:9) who never had any invasive therapies were chosen from Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They were asked to fill in the questionnaire on eating habits including food temperature and related symptoms and to receive high-resolution manometry examination. The exam was done in 2 separated days, at swallowing room temperature (25℃) then hot (50℃) water, and at room temperature (25℃) then cold (2℃) water, respectively. Parameters associated with esophageal motility were analyzed. Results Most patients (9/12) reported discomfort when they ate cold food. All patients reported no additional discomfort when they ate hot food. Drinking hot water was effective in 5/8 patients who ever tried to relieve chest pain attacks. On manometry, cold water increased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure (P = 0.003), and prolonged the duration of esophageal body contraction (P = 0.002). Hot water decreased LES resting pressure and residue pressure during swallow (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002), increased LES relaxation rate (P = 0.029) and shortened the duration of esophageal body contraction (P = 0.003). Conclusions Cold water could increase LES resting pressure, prolong the contraction duration of esophageal body, and exacerbate achalasia symptoms. Hot water could reduce LES resting pressure, assist LES relaxation, shorten the contraction duration of esophageal body and relieve symptoms. Thus achalasia patients are recommended to eat hot and warm food and avoid cold food. PMID:23105999

  5. The esophagus as a source of non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Craven, M A; Waterfall, W E

    1988-03-01

    Many patients present with chest pain and are subsequently found to have normal coronary angiography; investigation of these patients frequently stops once coronary artery disease has been ruled out. It is now clear that considerable morbidity may be associated with failure to make a definite diagnosis in these patients, and that efforts to identify a cause for the pain should continue within appropriate limits. This paper presents the evidence in support of an esophageal cause of non-cardiac angina. The authors emphasize the difficulty in distinguishing between cardiac and esophageal angina on the basis of clinical history and suggest an approach to investigation. PMID:21253154

  6. Prospective Comparison of Surgery Alone and Chemoradiotherapy With Selective Surgery in Resectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Hisanori Nemoto, Kenji; Miyazaki, Shukichi; Yoshioka, Takashi; Ogawa, Yohishiro; Sakayauchi, Toru; Jingu, Keiichi; Miyata, Go; Onodera, Ko; Ichikawa, Hirofumi; Kamei, Takashi; Kato, Shunsuke; Ishioka, Chikashi; Satomi, Susumu; Yamada, Shogo

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Esophagectomy remains the mainstay treatment for esophageal cancer, although retrospective studies have suggested that chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is as effective as surgery. To determine whether CRT can substitute for surgery as the primary treatment modality, we performed a prospective direct comparison of outcomes after treatment in patients with resectable esophageal cancer who had received CRT and those who had undergone surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had resectable T1-3N0-1M0 thoracic esophageal cancer. After the surgeon explained the treatments in detail, the patients selected either CRT (CRT group) or surgery (OP group). The CRT course consisted of two cycles of cisplatin and fluorouracil with split-course concurrent radiotherapy of 60Gy in 30 fractions. Patients with progressive disease during CRT and/or with persistent or recurrent disease after CRT underwent salvage resection. Results: Of 99 eligible patients with squamous cell carcinoma registered between January 2001 and December 2005, 51 selected CRT and 48 selected surgery. Of the patients in the CRT group, 13 (25.5%) underwent esophagectomy as salvage therapy. The 3- and 5-year survival rates were 78.3% and 75.7%, respectively, in the CRT group compared with 56.9% and 50.9%, respectively, in the OP group (p = 0.0169). Patients in the OP group had significantly more metastatic recurrence than those in the CRT group. Conclusions: Treatment outcomes among patients with resectable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were comparable or superior after CRT (with salvage therapy if needed) to outcomes after surgery alone.

  7. Efficacy of traditional Chinese herbs on squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: histopathologic analysis of 240 cases.

    PubMed

    Xian, M S; Hayashi, K; Lu, J P; Awai, M

    1989-12-01

    Three types of traditional Chinese herb medicine were used to treat 98 patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma prior to surgical treatment. Forty-two patients with the same diagnosis were treated with these herbs plus cyclophosphamide (endoxan). One hundred similar patients received surgical treatment without herbs or endoxan treatment as controls. Histologic examinations of surgical specimens were made on all of these patients. Stromal lymphoid-cell infiltration and cancer tissue degeneration were more prominent in Menispernum dehuricum DC- or Chelidonium majus L-treated patients, and were less clear in patients treated with herbs plus endoxan and the controls. The antitumor action of herbs is thought to be brought about by the activation of an immunological rejection mechanism. Herbs plus endoxan may result in the masking of the immunological response of hosts without obviously damaging cancer tissues. PMID:2624142

  8. Beclomethasone in Treating Patients With Graft-Versus-Host Disease of the Esophagus, Stomach, Small Intestine, or Colon

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-31

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Graft Versus Host Disease; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  9. Late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: A phase III randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Kuaile; Shi Xuehui; Jiang Guoliang . E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com; Yao Weiqiang; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Gendi; Zhu Longxiang

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Late course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy (RT) is as effective as standard chemoradiotherapy for nonsurgical management of locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We have evaluated further the efficacy of concurrent LCAF RT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: In all, 111 eligible patients with esophageal SCC were randomized to receive LCAF alone (LCAF) or concurrent LCAF and chemotherapy (LCAT+CT) between March 1998 and July 2000. All patients received conventional fractionation irradiation of 1.8 Gy per day, to a dose of 41.4 Gy/23 fractions in 4-5 weeks, followed by accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation using reduced fields, 1.5 Gy/fractions twice a day, to a dose of 27 Gy in 18 days. Thus, the total dose was 68.4 Gy/41 fractions in 44 days. Fifty-four patients in the LCAF+CT arm had an additional four cycles of chemotherapy using cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} daily and fluorouracil (5-FU) 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily on Days 1-3 every 4 weeks starting on the same day that LCAF was delivered. Results: The median survival was 23.9 months (95% confidence [CI], 20.1-27.7) for the LCAF arm and 30.8 months (95% CI, 17.6-44.1) for the LCAF+CT arm, respectively. Survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years of the LCAF arm were 77%, 39%, and 28%, respectively, while those of the LCAF+CT arm were 67%, 44%, and 40%, respectively (p = 0.310). Grades 3 and 4 acute toxicities occurred in 46% and 25% of the patients in the LCAF arm and the LCAF+CT arm, respectively; 6% of the patients in the combined arm had Grade 5 acute toxicities, whereas none was noted in the LCAF alone arm. Conclusions: Late course accelerated hyperfractionation was effective for locally advanced esophageal SCC. There was a trend toward better survival among patients who received intensified treatment with concurrent chemotherapy. Further randomized studies with a larger number of patients should be carried out, but additional measures must be taken to reduce the higher mortality rate due to chemotherapy-related acute toxicities.

  10. Age-specific risk factor profiles of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: A pooled analysis from the international BEACON consortium.

    PubMed

    Drahos, Jennifer; Xiao, Qian; Risch, Harvey A; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Anderson, Lesley A; Bernstein, Leslie; Brown, Linda; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gammon, Marilie D; Kamangar, Farin; Liao, Linda M; Murray, Liam J; Ward, Mary H; Ye, Weimin; Wu, Anna H; Vaughan, Thomas L; Whiteman, David C; Cook, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal (EA) and esophagogastric junction (EGJA) adenocarcinoma have been steadily increasing in frequency in younger people; however, the etiology of these cancers is poorly understood. We therefore investigated associations of body mass index (BMI), cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, gastroesophageal reflux and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in relation to age-specific risks of EA and EGJA. We pooled individual participant data from eight population-based, case-control studies within the international Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON). The analysis included 1,363 EA patients, 1,472 EGJA patients and 5,728 control participants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for age-specific (<50, 50-59, 60-69, ≥70 years) cancer outcomes, as well as interactions by age. BMI, smoking status and pack-years, recurrent gastroesophageal reflux and frequency of gastroesophageal reflux were positively associated with EA and EGJA in each age group. Early-onset EA (<50 years) had stronger associations with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux (OR = 8.06, 95% CI: 4.52, 14.37; peffect modification  = 0.01) and BMI (ORBMI ≥ 30 vs . <25  = 4.19, 95% CI: 2.23, 7.87; peffect modification  = 0.04), relative to older age groups. In contrast, inverse associations of NSAID use were strongest in the oldest age group (≥70 years), although this apparent difference was not statistically significant. Age-specific associations with EGJA showed similar, but slightly weaker patterns and no statistically significant differences by age were observed. Our study provides evidence that associations between obesity and gastroesophageal reflux are stronger among earlier onset EA cancers. PMID:26175109

  11. Occupational mortality from squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in the United States during 1991-1996.

    PubMed

    Cucino, Claudia; Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2002-03-01

    The epidemiology of esophageal squamous cell cancer has remained poorly understood. The occupational distribution of this cancer may provide clues about its yet unknown etiology. Data files from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of the United States offer a unique source to study causes of death, broken down by occupation and industry. The number of deaths from esophageal cancer was retrieved from the computerized US vital statistics. Mortality by occupation or industry was expressed as standardized proportional mortality ratio (PMR), adjusted by age, gender, and ethnicity. Between 1991 and 1996, 63,717 subjects died from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Mortality was particularly high among nonwhites and men. The industrial and the occupational distributions shared a similar pattern. Mortality from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma occurred more frequently among subjects exposed to silica dust, such as brickmasons and stonemasons, concrete and terrazzo finishers, roofers, and construction laborers. It was also high in such industries as unspecified machinery or manufacturing and such occupations as unspecified material handlers, janitors, or cleaners. It was low in industries and occupations associated with agriculture, clergy, work in religious organizations, and textiles. In conclusion, mortality from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma appeared to be low in occupations associated with less consumption of alcohol and tobacco. It was high among occupations potentially associated with exposure to silica dust and chemical solvents or detergents. PMID:11911344

  12. LC–MS/MS Quantitation of Esophagus Disease Blood Serum Glycoproteins by Enrichment with Hydrazide Chemistry and Lectin Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glycosylation have been shown to have a profound correlation with development/malignancy in many cancer types. Currently, two major enrichment techniques have been widely applied in glycoproteomics, namely, lectin affinity chromatography (LAC)-based and hydrazide chemistry (HC)-based enrichments. Here we report the LC–MS/MS quantitative analyses of human blood serum glycoproteins and glycopeptides associated with esophageal diseases by LAC- and HC-based enrichment. The separate and complementary qualitative and quantitative data analyses of protein glycosylation were performed using both enrichment techniques. Chemometric and statistical evaluations, PCA plots, or ANOVA test, respectively, were employed to determine and confirm candidate cancer-associated glycoprotein/glycopeptide biomarkers. Out of 139, 59 common glycoproteins (42% overlap) were observed in both enrichment techniques. This overlap is very similar to previously published studies. The quantitation and evaluation of significantly changed glycoproteins/glycopeptides are complementary between LAC and HC enrichments. LC–ESI–MS/MS analyses indicated that 7 glycoproteins enriched by LAC and 11 glycoproteins enriched by HC showed significantly different abundances between disease-free and disease cohorts. Multiple reaction monitoring quantitation resulted in 13 glycopeptides by LAC enrichment and 10 glycosylation sites by HC enrichment to be statistically different among disease cohorts. PMID:25134008

  13. Ep-CAM expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a potential therapeutic target and prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Stoecklein, Nikolas H; Siegmund, Annika; Scheunemann, Peter; Luebke, Andreas M; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Verde, Pablo E; Eisenberger, Claus F; Peiper, Matthias; Rehders, Alexander; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Hosch, Stefan B

    2006-01-01

    Background To evaluate the expression and test the clinical significance of the epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to check the suitability of esophageal SCC patients for Ep-CAM directed targeted therapies. Methods The Ep-CAM expression was immunohistochemically investigated in 70 primary esophageal SCCs using the monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4. For the interpretation of the staining results, we used a standardized scoring system ranging from 0 to 3+. The survival analysis was calculated from 53 patients without distant metastasis, with R0 resection and at least 2 months of clinical follow-up. Results Ep-CAM neo-expression was observed in 79% of the tumors with three expression levels, 1+ (26%), 2+ (11%) and 3+ (41%). Heterogeneous expression was observed at all expression levels. Interestingly, tumors with 3+ Ep-CAM expression conferred a significantly decreased median relapse-free survival period (log rank, p = 0.0001) and median overall survival (log rank, p = 0.0003). Multivariate survival analysis disclosed Ep-CAM 3+ expression as independent prognostic factor. Conclusion Our results suggest Ep-CAM as an attractive molecule for targeted therapy in esophageal SCC. Considering the discontenting results of the current adjuvant concepts for esophageal SCC patients, Ep-CAM might provide a promising target for an adjuvant immunotherapeutic intervention. PMID:16796747

  14. Refractory chronic cough, or the need to focus on the relationship between the larynx and the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this review we question the current way of handling tackle a problem of chronic cough, especially by the excessive number of patients who can not find complete relief from your cough by anatomical diagnosis of universal use. From the field of Otolaryngology new perspectives arise now considering the larynx as a preferential afferent stimuli cough reflex arc. Also the constitution laryngopharyngeal reflux gas and new approaches to non-acid reflux and the local action of pepsin in laryngeal deserving of a joint review, which can illuminate new ways to handle the problem of chronic refractory cough. We believe that the chronic cough syndrome hpersensitivity as more precise label for chronic cough, should place particular emphasis on laryngeal sensory neuropathy as cough and reflux the influence that may have on their maintenance, and thereby causes definitely wide related to the syndrome if the larynx is incorporated, place greater number of afferent nerves of chronic cough, which are sure to cover much of the case of refractory cough remain without a satisfactory solution. The close collaboration between Otolaryngology, Gastroenterology and Pneumology in a patient with refractory chronic cough seems now an unavoidable necessity. PMID:23552099

  15. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  16. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  17. What's New in Esophageal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional resources for cancer of the esophagus What’s new in cancer of the esophagus research and treatment? ... people with Barrett’s esophagus. This may lead to new tests for finding the people who are likely ...

  18. Swallowing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the bottom of the esophagus to relax ( Achalasia ) Scarring that narrows the esophagus. This may be ... used if cancer is causing the swallowing problem. Achalasia or spasms of the esophagus may also respond ...

  19. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach. Causes Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid ...

  20. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  1. Apoptosis in esophagus and pancreas carcinoma cells induced by circulating microparticles is related to phosphatidyl serine and microparticle-associated caspases.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan; Chromik, Ansgar M; Uhl, Waldemar; Mügge, Andreas; Bulut, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Circulating microparticles (MPs) are recently discussed as "biologically active", participating in the pathology of diseases rather than being a marker of damaging processes. It was the purpose of the present study to investigate the effects of MPs, as isolated from the blood of healthy volunteers, on the induction of apoptosis and necrosis in cultured KYSE-270 esophageal and ASPC1 pancreas carcinoma cells. MPs were obtained from the blood of 20 healthy volunteers (11 women; mean age 33.3 years). Viability, apoptosis, and necrosis were determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V/propidium iodide and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester perchlorate (TMRE)/propidium iodide for staining. Incubation of KYSE and ASPC1 carcinoma cells with MPs (1-20.000/μl) for 48 h reduced significantly viability of the cells, and induced apoptosis, but not necrosis. This apoptotic effect was significant at a concentration of ≥1.000 MPs/μl in both cell types. Pre-treatment of MPs with either the global caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK or Annexin V which blocks phosphatidyl serine in the outer membrane of MPs with high affinity, almost abolished MP-induced apoptosis. A specific enzyme assay as well Western blot analysis confirmed the presence (activity, protein) of the apoptotic enzyme caspase-3 in MPs. Incubation of carcinoma cells with MPs (20.000/μl) resulted in an increase in caspase-3 protein in carcinoma cells; this increase could be prevented by pre-treatment of MPs with Annexin V. It is suggested that MPs induce concentration-dependent apoptosis in KSYE esophageal and ASPC1 pancreas carcinoma cells in vitro by transferring caspases into target cells. This process probably requires a target cell-MP interaction, and membrane-bound anionic phosphatidyl serine may be involved. PMID:21452043

  2. Differences in the Control of Secondary Peristalsis in the Human Esophagus: Influence of the 5-HT4 Receptor versus the TRPV1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Orr, William C.; Fabio, Pace; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride or esophageal infusion of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin promotes secondary peristalsis. We aimed to investigate whether acute esophageal instillation of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce or administration of mosapride has different effects on the physiological characteristics of secondary peristalsis. Methods Secondary peristalsis was induced with mid-esophageal air injections in 14 healthy subjects. We compared the effects on secondary peristalsis subsequent to capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce (pure capsaicin, 0.84 mg) or 40 mg oral mosapride. Results The threshold volume for generating secondary peristalsis during slow air distensions was significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion compared to mosapride (11.6 ± 1.0 vs. 14.1 ± 0.8 mL, P = 0.02). The threshold volume required to produce secondary peristalsis during rapid air distension was also significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion (4.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.2 ± 0.6 mL, P = 0.02). Secondary peristalsis was noted more frequently in response to rapid air distension after capsaicin infusion than mosapride (80% [60–100%] vs. 65% [5–100%], P = 0.04). Infusion of capsaicin or mosapride administration didn’t change any parameters of primary or secondary peristalsis. Conclusions Esophageal infusion with capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce suspension does create greater mechanosensitivity as measured by secondary peristalsis than 5-HT4 receptor agonist mosapride. Capsaicin-sensitive afferents appear to be more involved in the sensory modulation of distension-induced secondary peristalsis. PMID:27438088

  3. Using {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography to Estimate the Length of Gross Tumor in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Xiaojun; Yu Jinming Zhang Baijiang; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Weidi; Li Daotang; Han Anqin; Song Pingping; Li Hui; Yang Guoren; Kong Fengming; Fu Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to estimate gross tumor length in esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radical surgery were enrolled. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were delineated using three different methods: visual interpretation, standardized uptake value (SUV) 2.5, and 40% of maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) on FDG-PET imaging. The length of tumors on PET scan were measured and recorded as Length{sub vis}, Length{sub 2.5}, and Length{sub 40}, respectively, and compared with the length of gross tumor in the resected specimen (Length{sub gross}). All PET data were reviewed again postoperatively, and the GTV was delineated using various percentages of SUV{sub max}. The optimal-threshold SUV was generated when the length of PET matched the Length{sub gross}. Results: The mean ({+-}SD) Length{sub gross} was 5.48 {+-} 1.98 cm. The mean Length{sub vis}, Length{sub 2.5}, and Length{sub 40} were 5.18 {+-} 1.93 cm, 5.49 {+-} 1.79 cm, and 4.34 {+-} 1.54 cm, respectively. The mean Length{sub vis} (p = 0.123) and Length{sub 2.5} (p = 0.957) were not significantly different from Length{sub gross}, and Length{sub 2.5} seems more approximate to Length{sub gross.} The mean Length{sub 40} was significantly shorter than Length{sub gross} (p < 0.001). The mean optimal threshold was 23.81% {+-} 11.29% for all tumors, and it was 19.78% {+-} 8.59%, 30.92% {+-} 12.28% for tumors {>=}5 cm, and <5 cm, respectively (p = 0.009). The correlation coefficients of the optimal threshold were -0.802 and -0.561 with SUV{sub max} and Length{sub gross}, respectively. Conclusions: The optimal PET method to estimate the length of gross tumor varies with tumor length and SUV{sub max}; an SUV cutoff of 2.5 provided the closest estimation in this study.

  4. A Prospective Evaluation of Staging and Target Volume Definition of Lymph Nodes by {sup 18}FDG PET/CT in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Wen; Fu Xiaolong; Zhang Yingjian; Xiang Jiaqing; Shen Lei; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine an optimal standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold for detecting lymph node (LN) metastases in esophageal cancer using {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ({sup 18}FDG PET/CT) and to define the resulting nodal target volume, using histopathology as a 'gold standard.' Methods: Sixteen patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radical esophagectomy and three-field LN dissection after {sup 18}FDG PET/CT and CT scans were enrolled into this study. Locations of LN groups were recorded according to a uniform LN map. Diagnostic performance of different SUV thresholds was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The optimal cutoff SUV was determined by plotting the false-negative rate (FNR) and false-positive rate (FPR), the sum of both error rates (FNR+FPR), and accuracy against a hypothetical SUV threshold. For each patient, nodal gross tumor volumes (GTVNs) were generated with CT alone (GTVNCT), PET/CT (GTVNPET), and pathologic data (GTVNpath). GTVNCT or GTVNPET was compared with GTVNpath by means of a conformity index (CI), which is the intersection of the two GTVNs divided by the sum of them minus the intersection, e.g., CI{sub CT} and {sub path} = GTVN{sub CT} and {sub path}/(GTVN{sub CT}+ GTVN{sub path} - GTVN{sub CT} and {sub path}). Results: LN metastases occurred in 21 LN groups among the 144 specimens taken from the 16 patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9017 {+-} 0.0410. The plot of error rates showed a minimum of FNR+FPR for an SUV of 2.36, at which the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 76.19%, 95.93%, and 93.06%, respectively, whereas those of CT were 33.33%, 94.31%, and 85.42% (p values: 0.0117, 0.7539, and 0.0266). Mean GTVN{sub CT}, GTVN{sub PET}, and GTVN{sub path} were 1.52 {+-} 2.38, 2.82 {+-} 4.51, and 2.68 {+-} 4.16cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean CI{sub CT} and {sub path} and CI{sub PET} and {sub path} were 0.31 and 0.65 (p value = 0.0352). Conclusions: Diagnostic superiority of PET/CT at an SUV threshold of 2.36 over CT has potential value in nodal target volume definition, but whether this can contribute to better treatment outcomes needs prospective analyses of recurrences in a larger cohort of patients.

  5. The effect of celecoxib on DNA methylation of CDH13, TFPI2, and FSTL1 in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun Feng; Li, Yi Shuai; Drew, Paul A; Zhang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the in-vivo effect of the NSAID celecoxib on DNA methylation in the promoter region of the tumor-suppressor genes cadherin 13, tissue factor pathway inhibitor 12, and follistatin-like protein 1, and on apoptosis, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Forty-five patients who underwent an esophagectomy for ESCC were allocated to either a treatment group (n=22) or a control group (n=23). Patients in the treatment group were administered 800 mg/day of celecoxib for 14 days before surgery. Patients in the control group did not take any type of NSAID. Biopsies of the tumor were collected before surgery and tissue from the resection specimens after surgery. Methylation-specific PCR was used to measure DNA methylation and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. There was no difference in the proportion of patients with methylation for each of the genes between the patient groups before treatment. In those patients with pretreatment methylation, there was a significant reduction in the proportion with methylation and a significant increase in the corresponding messenger RNA expression after treatment with celecoxib. In those tissues in which there was a reduction in methylation following celecoxib treatment, there was a significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells, but not in the tissues with no change in methylation. In ESCC, in-vivo treatment with celecoxib is associated with a reduction in DNA methylation and increase in messenger RNA expression of tumor-suppressor genes, and increases in apoptosis. PMID:27400374

  6. Comparison of the efficiencies of esophageal manometry, vector volume analysis and esophagus pH monitoring in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Emrah; Özcan, Rahşan; Erdoğan, Ergun; Tekant, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare the superiorities of esophageal manometry, vector volume analysis and 24-hour pH meter studies in showing gastroesophageal reflux disease. Material and Methods: The files of the patients who presented to pediatric surgery and pediatric gastroenterology outpatient clinics of our hospital with suspicious gastroesophageal reflux disease between 2011 and 2012 and who were investigated were examined and 21 patients whose investigations had been completed were included in the study. The patients were evaluated by treatment method and were divided into three groups as Group 1 who were followed up with medical treatment, Group 2 in whom surgical intervention was performed and Group 3 who were not treated. Chi-square test was used in evaluation of the categorical variables, Kruskal Wallis test was used in comparison of the mean values between the groups and Dunn test was used in subgroup analyses when Kruskal Wallis test was found to be significant. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Thirteen of 21 patients included in the study were female and eight were male. The mean age of the patients was 5.71 years (one-16 years). In the 24-hour pH monitoring study, the mean reflux index was found to be 48.7% in Group 1, 42.4% in Group 2 and 28.3% in Group 3. In esophageal manometry studies, the pressure difference at lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was found to be 13,4 cm H2O in Group 1, 31.8 cm H2O in Group 2 and 4.3 cmH2O in Group 3. In vector volume analyses, the mean vector volume was calculated to be 96.01 cm3 in Group 1, 2 398.9 cm3 in Group 2 and 196.3 cm3 in Group 3. In the 24-hour pH monitoring study, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found in terms of showing reflux, whereas statistical significance could not be shown in terms of need for surgical treatment or need for medical treatment in any other method (p>0.05). Conclusions: Twenty-four-hour pH monitoring was found to be efficient in making a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease, whereas esophageal manometry and vector volume analyses were not found to be efficient. PMID:26884692

  7. Potential impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on surgical approach for operable squamous cell cancer of middle-to-lower esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sujing; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wanghu; Zhang, Baijiang; Ma, Li; Guo, Zhijun; Huang, Yong; Song, Pingping; Yu, Jinming; Guo, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is reported to have a significant advantage over CT for staging esophageal cancer (EC). However, whether PET/CT may play a useful role in guiding surgical approach remains undetermined. Methods Patients with potentially resectable squamous cell EC were randomized into either PET/CT group or CT group. The surgical data and survival outcomes were compared. Results Compared to the CT group, the right-sided approach was more frequently used (42.6% versus 25.5%, P=0.065) in the PET/CT group in order to allow surgical access to radiographically suspicious lymph nodes inaccessible from the left, thus enabling the removal of more involved lymph nodes (2.83 versus 1.76; P=0.039) as well as their stations (1.65 versus 1.08; P=0.042). Although the overall survival between the two groups was similar, the PET/CT group had a longer disease-free survival (DFS) than the CT group (27.1 months versus 18.9 months; P=0.019), especially in the subgroup of node-positive patients (22.5 months versus 13.5 months; P=0.02). Preoperative imaging arm was the only prognostic factor found to independently influence DFS. Conclusion For patients with middle-to-lower EC, surgical approaches directed by PET/CT may increase the likelihood of complete resection and affect DFS. PMID:26955283

  8. High-resolution manometric evaluation of the effects of cisapride on the esophagus during administration of solid and liquid boluses in awake healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Tarini V; Kass, Philip H; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Belafsky, Peter C; Marks, Stanley L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate the use of high-resolution manometry (HRM) in awake, healthy dogs and compare the effects of bolus type (liquid vs solid) and drug treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution [SS] vs cisapride) on esophageal pressure profiles. ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each dog received SS (10 mL) IV, and HRM was performed during oral administration of 10 boluses (5 mL each) of water or 10 boluses (5 g each) of canned food. Cisapride (1 mg/kg in 60 mL of SS) was subsequently administered IV to 7 dogs; HRM and bolus administration procedures were repeated. Two to 4 weeks later, HRM was repeated following administration of SS and water and food boluses in 4 dogs. Pressure profile data were obtained for all swallows, and 11 outcome variables were statistically analyzed. RESULTS After SS administration, predicted means for the esophageal contractile integral were 850.4 cm/mm Hg/s for food boluses and 660.3 cm/mm Hg/s for water boluses. Predicted means for esophageal contraction front velocity were 6.2 cm/s for water boluses and 5.6 cm/s for food boluses after SS administration. Predicted means for residual LES pressure were significantly higher following cisapride administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM was feasible and repeatable in awake healthy dogs of various breeds and sizes. Stronger esophageal contractions and faster esophageal contraction velocity occurred during solid bolus and liquid bolus swallows, respectively. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly following cisapride administration. Esophageal contractions and bolus transit latency should be further evaluated by HRM in clinically dysphagic dogs. PMID:27463544

  9. Survival benefit of radiotherapy to patients with small cell esophagus carcinoma - an analysis of Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xilei; Pan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare malignant tumor. So far, few studies are found to research the effect of radiotherapy (RT) to it. This study is designed to explore the prognostic factors, and analyze survival benefit of RT to patients with SCEC. Results Patients with SCEC were more likely to be in female, older, higher disease stage than those with non-small cell esophageal carcinoma. RT was used in more than 50% SCEC patients. RT tended be reduced as the disease stage raise in SCEC. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that age, year, disease stage, and RT were the prognostic factors of survival (P < 0.05). RT reduced nearly 75% risks of death in localized stage (P < 0.05), nearly 50% risks of death in regional stage (P > 0.05) and nearly 30% risks of death in distant stage (P > 0.05). Methods SCEC patients between 1973 and 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, year, sex, race, stage, surgery, and RT were summarized. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to explore the independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Cox regression survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of RT to SCEC based on different stages. Conclusions Stage, age, year, and RT are independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Survival benefit of RT exists in any disease stage, but is only statistically significant in localized stage of SCEC. PMID:26943276

  10. A method of producing carcinoma in upper aerodigestive tree and esophagus of the Syrian golden hamster using wounding and instillation of N-methylnitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Estensen, Richard D; Anderson, W Robert; Galbraith, Arthur R; Hartle, Donna E; Jordan, Margaret M; Ondrey, Frank G; Wattenberg, Lee W

    2007-08-01

    Details of a method for producing carcinoma of the aerodigestive tree of the Syrian golden hamster and the use of this model to evaluate putative agents for chemoprevention of these carcinomas are described. The method produces a majority of squamous carcinomas of the trachea and glottis that follow squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium. In addition, seen are adenocarcinomas arising in glands of the respiratory tree. Squamous carcinomas of the digestive epithelium arise in primary squamous epithelium. These tumors of digestive epithelium have a growth pattern that differs from that of the respiratory epithelium in that they grow and invade without filling the epithelial layer with tumor cells. PMID:17684140

  11. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stomach through the esophagus. A ring of muscle fibers in the lower esophagus prevents swallowed food from moving back up. These muscle fibers are called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). When ...

  13. What Is a Cardiothoracic Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... could treat: Lung cancer Severe emphysema Esophageal cancer Gastroesophageal reflux disease Hiatal hernias Swallowing disorders such as achalasia ...

  14. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  15. Your Digestive System and How It Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the junction of the esophagus and stomach, controls the passage of food and liquid between the esophagus and stomach. As ... different nutrients. The small intestine absorbs most digested food ... digestive process. [ Top ] Clinical Trials The National ...

  16. Heartburn prevention (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Heartburn is a condition where the acidic stomach contents back up into the esophagus causing pain in ... meal can help reduce the reflux which causes heartburn. Continuous irritation of the esophagus lining as in ...

  17. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... double aortic arch may press on the windpipe (trachea) and esophagus, leading to trouble breathing and swallowing. ... to relieve pressure on the esophagus and windpipe (trachea). The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and ...

  18. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... will ease pressure on the veins of your stomach, esophagus, intestines, and liver. ... Normally, blood coming from your esophagus, stomach, and ... of damage and there are blockages, blood cannot flow through it ...

  19. Esophagram (Barium Swallow Study)

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagram is a study that is completed in radiology. The test evaluates the esophagus. The esophagus is ... to wear. The study is completed in a radiology (x-ray/fluoroscopy) room. If a child is ...

  20. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photoradiation therapy; Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  1. Localization of tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (Foscan) in human healthy tissues and squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract, the esophagus and the bronchi: a fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Andrejevic Blant, S; Grosjean, P; Ballini, J P; Wagnières, G; van den Bergh, H; Fontolliet, C; Monnier, P

    2001-08-15

    To date, little is known about precise time-dependent distribution and histological localization of tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) in human healthy tissues and squamous cell malignancies in the upper aero-digestive tract. A fluorescence microscopy study was performed on 50 healthy tissue biopsies and on 13 tumors (graded from Tis to T1 SCC) from 30 patients. Tissue samples were taken between 4 h and 11 days following injection of 0.15 mg/kg mTHPC. A fairly comparable distribution pattern in various tissues was observed over time in different patients. Vascular localization of mTHPC fluorescence predominates at a short delay, whereas the dye is essentially located in the tumoral and healthy mucosa after longer delays. A much lower uptake and retention of mTHPC fluorescence was noted in striated muscle and cartilage as compared to neoplastic lesions. No significant selectivity was found between healthy and tumoral mucosa. The obtained data are important to confirm drug-light interval that have been selected for effective PDT for early SCC malignancies while minimizing the risks of over- or under-treatment. The low fluorescence level in striated muscle provides the opportunity to develop interstitial PDT as a treatment modality for invasive SCC of unfavorable locations in the oral cavity or pharynx, such as the base of the tongue. PMID:11485842

  2. Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Han Dali; Yu Jinming; Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Fu Zheng; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Baijiang; He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei; Zhao Shuqiang; Sun Xiangyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

  3. Inspissated bile syndrome in an infant with citrin deficiency and congenital anomalies of the biliary tract and esophagus: Identification and pathogenicity analysis of a novel SLC25A13 mutation with incomplete penetrance

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, HAN-SHI; ZHAO, SHU-TAO; DENG, MEI; ZHANG, ZHAN-HUI; CAI, XIANG-RAN; CHEN, FENG-PING; SONG, YUAN-ZONG

    2014-01-01

    Biallelic mutations of the SLC25A13 gene result in citrin deficiency (CD) in humans. Neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) is the major CD phenotype in pediatrics; however, knowledge on its genotypic and phenotypic characteristics remains limited. The present study aimed to explore novel molecular and clinical characteristics of CD. An infant suspected to have NICCD as well as her parents were enrolled as the research subjects. SLC25A13 mutations were investigated using various methods, including cDNA cloning and sequencing. The pathogenicity of a novel mutation was analyzed bioinformatically and functionally with a yeast model. Both the infant and her father were heterozygous for c.2T>C and c.790G>A, while the mother was only a c.2T>C carrier. The novel c.790G>A mutation proved bioinformatically and functionally pathogenic. The infant had esophageal atresia and an accessory hepatic duct, along with bile plug formation confirmed by laparoscopic surgery. However, the father seemed to be healthy thus far. The findings of the present study enrich the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of CD patients, and provided clinical and molecular evidence suggesting the possible non-penetrance of SLC25A13 mutations and the likely involvement of this gene in primitive foregut development during early embryonic life. PMID:25216257

  4. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  5. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the heart, diaphragm and its pillars, muscles of mastication, esophagus, tongue, and musculature..., including examination of, but not limited to, the heart, diaphragm and its pillars, muscles of...

  6. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the heart, diaphragm and its pillars, muscles of mastication, esophagus, tongue, and musculature..., including examination of, but not limited to, the heart, diaphragm and its pillars, muscles of...

  7. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  8. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  9. Dexlansoprazole

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dexlansoprazole is used to treat the symptoms of GERD, allow the esophagus to heal, and prevent further damage to the esophagus. Dexlansoprazole is in a class of medications called proton pump inhibitors. It works by decreasing the amount of acid made in ...

  10. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  11. Optional Sub-study to Intraoperative Imaging With ICG Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Lung, Prostate, Breast, Colon, Pancreatic, Renal, Bladder,Thyroid, Ovarian, Head and Neck,GI (Foregut - Esophagus),GI (Midgut) Cancer; Cancer of the Ovarian, Head and Neck,GI (Foregut - Esophagus),GI (Midgut), Sarcoma Cancer; Cancer of Neuro-onc, Parathyroid, Desmoid Tumors, Melanoma Cancer

  12. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs. -host disease

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, G.B.; Sullivan, K.M.; Plumley, T.F.

    1984-03-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder.

  13. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs.-host disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, G B; Sullivan, K M; Plumley, T F

    1984-03-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder. PMID:6607634

  14. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  15. Vomiting blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... first part of the small intestine, or esophagus Blood clotting disorders Defects in the blood vessels of the ... as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing ...

  16. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... food pipe or swallowing tube. A ring of muscle fibers prevents food at the top of the stomach from moving up into the esophagus. These muscle fibers are called the lower esophageal sphincter, or LES. ...

  18. PDT for malignant tumors: a clinical analysis of 152 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Li, Xin; Zhang, Changjun; Wang, Jian-Zhao; Zhang, Da-Ren

    1993-03-01

    Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) laser photodynamic therapy (PDT) was applied for the patients of 152 cases of malignant tumors, including tumors of the lip, tongue, esophagus, urinary bladder, skin, larynx, vagina, etc. Since early 1981 good results have been obtained.

  19. Could a Low-Risk Surgery Help Your Chronic Heartburn?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Drugs known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, can reduce stomach acid ... a barrier, preventing reflux into the esophagus, while proton pump inhibitors mainly act through reducing the acidity ...

  20. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms of: Heartburn or nausea after eating ( gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD ) Problems swallowing (feeling like food is stuck behind ... stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal contractions of the esophagus muscles that do ...

  1. Sunitinib

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine (bowel), or esophagus (tube that connects the throat with the stomach) in people with tumors that ... burning sensation of the lips, tongue, mouth or throat dry mouth change in the way things taste ...

  2. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need the following tests: Blood tests ( complete blood count , electrolytes , or liver tests). Esophageal manometry (to measure pressures in the esophagus) or pH monitoring (to see how much stomach acid is ...

  3. Rabeprazole

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which backward flow of acid from the stomach causes heartburn and possible injury of the esophagus (the tube that connects the throat and stomach). Rabeprazole is used to treat the symptoms of ...

  4. Stomach (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The stomach is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for breaking down food. The lower esophageal sphincter at the top of the stomach regulates food passing from the esophagus into the ...

  5. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  6. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Culture of cells from the esophagus for herpes or CMV Mouth or throat swab culture for candida You may ... as acyclovir, famciclovir, or valacyclovir can treat a herpes ... caspofungin (given by injection), or amphotericin (given by ...

  7. Role of the vegus nerve in epilepsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The vagus nerves branch off the brain on either side of the head and travel down the neck, along the esophagus to the intestinal tract. They are the longest nerves in the body, and affect swallowing and speech. ...

  8. Understanding GERD

    MedlinePlus

    ... heartburn: chocolate, coffee, peppermint, greasy or spicy foods, tomato products and alcoholic beverages. * Stop smoking. Tobacco inhibits saliva, which is the body’s major buffer. Tobacco may also stimulate stomach acid production and relax the muscle between the esophagus ...

  9. Heartburn

    MedlinePlus

    ... that contain caffeine Alcohol Carbonated drinks Citrus fruits Tomato products Chocolate, mints or peppermints Fatty foods or ... for ulcers, a pH test to check for acid in the esophagus, or an endoscopy to check ...

  10. Omeprazole

    MedlinePlus

    ... used alone or with other medications to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition in which backward flow of acid ... omeprazole is used to treat the symptoms of GERD, allow the esophagus to heal, and prevent further ...

  11. Do you Suffer from Heartburn or Acid Reflux?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). 1 Are You Suffering from Heartburn? Acid reflux happens when the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach does not work well. The muscle usually opens when food is ...

  12. Alendronate

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking corticosteroids (a type of medication that may cause osteoporosis in some patients). Alendronate is also used ... esophagus (tube between the mouth and stomach) or cause sores in the mouth if it is not ...

  13. Heartburn

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... effective. That's how heartburn begins. The stomach produces hydrochloric acid to digest food. The stomach has a mucous lining that protects it from hydrochloric acid, but the esophagus does not. So, when food ...

  14. Metal polish poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain -- severe Bloody stools Burns of the esophagus (food pipe) Vomiting, possibly with blood HEART AND BLOOD Collapse Low blood pressure -- develops rapidly BRAIN AND SPINE Coma (decreased level of consciousness and ...

  15. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of human organ under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 1984, as amended, means the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone marrow, cornea, eye, bone, skin, intestine (including the esophagus, stomach, small and/or large intestine,...

  16. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of human organ under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 1984, as amended, means the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone marrow, cornea, eye, bone, skin, intestine (including the esophagus, stomach, small and/or large intestine,...

  17. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal. This may be done during an esophagoscopy . Balloon cytology A procedure in which cells are collected ... the lining of the esophagus using a deflated balloon that is swallowed by the patient. The balloon ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal. This may be done during an esophagoscopy . Balloon cytology A procedure in which cells are collected ... the lining of the esophagus using a deflated balloon that is swallowed by the patient. The balloon ...

  19. Caulking compound poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stool Abdominal pain Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Nausea Vomiting Vomiting blood HEART AND BLOOD Collapse Low blood pressure that develops rapidly LUNGS AND AIRWAYS Breathing difficulty ( ...

  20. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Severe abdominal pain Vomiting Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Vomiting blood Blood in the stool Heart and blood vessels Low blood pressure (develops rapidly) Collapse Skin Irritation Burns Holes in ...