Science.gov

Sample records for especies nuevas mollusca

  1. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca - Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbiculafluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissenapolymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species. PMID:26311403

  2. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca – Bivalvia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species. PMID:26311403

  3. All the three ParaHox genes are present in Nuttallochiton mirandus (Mollusca: polyplacophora): evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria A; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2006-03-15

    The ParaHox gene cluster contains three homeobox genes, Gsx, Xlox and Cdx and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary sister of the Hox gene cluster. Among deuterostomes the three genes are found in the majority of taxa, whereas among protostomes they have so far been isolated only in the phylum Sipuncula. We report the partial sequences of all three ParaHox genes in the polyplacophoran Nuttallochiton mirandus, the first species of the phylum Mollusca where all ParaHox genes have been isolated. This finding has phylogenetic implications for the phylum Mollusca and for its relationships with the other lophotrochozoan taxa. PMID:16331637

  4. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Galba pervia (Gastropoda: Mollusca), an Intermediate Host Snail of Fasciola spp

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Wei, Shu-Jun; Song, Hui-Qun; Xu, Min-Jun; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes and the gene rearrangements are increasingly used as molecular markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships. Contributing to the complete mt genomes of Gastropoda, especially Pulmonata, we determined the mt genome of the freshwater snail Galba pervia, which is an important intermediate host for Fasciola spp. in China. The complete mt genome of G. pervia is 13,768 bp in length. Its genome is circular, and consists of 37 genes, including 13 genes for proteins, 2 genes for rRNA, 22 genes for tRNA. The mt gene order of G. pervia showed novel arrangement (tRNA-His, tRNA-Gly and tRNA-Tyr change positions and directions) when compared with mt genomes of Pulmonata species sequenced to date, indicating divergence among different species within the Pulmonata. A total of 3655 amino acids were deduced to encode 13 protein genes. The most frequently used amino acid is Leu (15.05%), followed by Phe (11.24%), Ser (10.76%) and IIe (8.346%). Phylogenetic analyses using the concatenated amino acid sequences of the 13 protein-coding genes, with three different computational algorithms (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis), all revealed that the families Lymnaeidae and Planorbidae are closely related two snail families, consistent with previous classifications based on morphological and molecular studies. The complete mt genome sequence of G. pervia showed a novel gene arrangement and it represents the first sequenced high quality mt genome of the family Lymnaeidae. These novel mtDNA data provide additional genetic markers for studying the epidemiology, population genetics and phylogeographics of freshwater snails, as well as for understanding interplay between the intermediate snail hosts and the intra-mollusca stages of Fasciola spp.. PMID:22844544

  5. The Complete Sequence of the Mitochondrial Genome of the Chamberednautilus (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Background: Mitochondria contain small genomes that arephysically separate from those of nuclei. Their comparison serves as amodel system for understanding the processes of genome evolution.Although complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been reported formore than 600 animals, the taxonomic sampling is highly biased towardvertebrates and arthropods, leaving much of the diversity yetuncharacterized. Results: The mitochondrial genome of a cephalopodmollusk, the Chambered Nautilus, is 16,258 nts in length and 59.5 percentA+T, both values that are typical of animal mitochondrial genomes. Itcontains the 37 genes that are typical for animal mtDNAs, with 15 on oneDNA strand and 22 on the other. The arrangement of these genes can bederived from that of the distantly related Katharina tunicata (Mollusca:Polyplacophora) by a switch in position of two large blocks of genes andtranspositions of four tRNA genes. There is strong skew in thedistribution of nucleotides between the two strands. There are an unusualnumber of non-coding regions and their function, if any, is not known;however, several of these demark abrupt shifts in nucleotide skew,suggesting that they may play roles in transcription and/or replication.One of the non-coding regions contains multiple repeats of a tRNA-likesequence. Some of the tRNA genes appear to overlap on the same strand,but this could be resolved if the polycistron were cleaved at thebeginning of the downstream gene, followed by polyadenylation of theproduct of the upstream gene to form a fully paired structure.Conclusions: Nautilus sp. mtDNA contains an expected gene content thathas experienced few rearrangements since the evolutionary split betweencephalopods and polyplacophorans. It contains an unusual number ofnon-coding regions, especially considering that these otherwise often aregenerated by the same processes that produce gene rearrangements. Thisappears to be yet another case where polyadenylation of mitochondrialtRNAs restores what would otherwise bean incompletestructure.

  6. Descriptions of three new species of Mitridae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoquan; Zhang, Suping; Li, Xinzheng

    2005-03-01

    Three new species of Family Mitridae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from the South China Sea are described in the present paper. They are Ziba aglais sp. nov. B. LI & S. ZHANg, Neocancilla daidaleosa sp. nov. B. LI & X. LI, and Mitra holkosa sp. nov. B. LI. Their systematic positions are also discussed.

  7. Comparative genomics of vesicomyid clam (Bivalvia: Mollusca) chemosynthetic symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Irene LG; Girguis, Peter R; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Vesicomyidae (Bivalvia: Mollusca) are a family of clams that form symbioses with chemosynthetic gamma-proteobacteria. They exist in environments such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps and have a reduced gut and feeding groove, indicating a large dependence on their endosymbionts for nutrition. Recently, two vesicomyid symbiont genomes were sequenced, illuminating the possible nutritional contributions of the symbiont to the host and making genome-wide evolutionary analyses possible. Results To examine the genomic evolution of the vesicomyid symbionts, a comparative genomics framework, including the existing genomic data combined with heterologous microarray hybridization results, was used to analyze conserved gene content in four vesicomyid symbiont genomes. These four symbionts were chosen to include a broad phylogenetic sampling of the vesicomyid symbionts and represent distinct chemosynthetic environments: cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. Conclusion The results of this comparative genomics analysis emphasize the importance of the symbionts' chemoautotrophic metabolism within their hosts. The fact that these symbionts appear to be metabolically capable autotrophs underscores the extent to which the host depends on them for nutrition and reveals the key to invertebrate colonization of these challenging environments. PMID:19055818

  8. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-Jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering. PMID:26700239

  9. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Nautilus macromphalus (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Boore, Jeffrey L

    2006-01-01

    Background Mitochondria contain small genomes that are physically separate from those of nuclei. Their comparison serves as a model system for understanding the processes of genome evolution. Although complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been reported for more than 600 animals, the taxonomic sampling is highly biased toward vertebrates and arthropods, leaving much of the diversity yet uncharacterized. Results The mitochondrial genome of the bellybutton nautilus, Nautilus macromphalus, a cephalopod mollusk, is 16,258 nts in length and 59.5% A+T, both values that are typical of animal mitochondrial genomes. It contains the 37 genes that are almost universally found in animal mtDNAs, with 15 on one DNA strand and 22 on the other. The arrangement of these genes can be derived from that of the distantly related Katharina tunicata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) by a switch in position of two large blocks of genes and transpositions of four tRNA genes. There is strong skew in the distribution of nucleotides between the two strands, and analysis of this yields insight into modes of transcription and replication. There is an unusual number of non-coding regions and their function, if any, is not known; however, several of these demark abrupt shifts in nucleotide skew, and there are several identical sequence elements at these junctions, suggesting that they may play roles in transcription and/or replication. One of the non-coding regions contains multiple repeats of a tRNA-like sequence. Some of the tRNA genes appear to overlap on the same strand, but this could be resolved if the polycistron were cleaved at the beginning of the downstream gene, followed by polyadenylation of the product of the upstream gene to form a fully paired structure. Conclusion Nautilus macromphalus mtDNA contains an expected gene content that has experienced few rearrangements since the evolutionary split between cephalopods and polyplacophorans. It contains an unusual number of non-coding regions, especially considering that these otherwise often are generated by the same processes that produce gene rearrangements. The skew in nucleotide composition between the two strands is strong and associated with the direction of transcription in various parts of the genomes, but a comparison with K. tunicata implies that mutational bias during replication also plays a role. This appears to be yet another case where polyadenylation of mitochondrial tRNAs restores what would otherwise be an incomplete structure. PMID:16854241

  10. Nuevas Galaxias Seyfert 1 Australes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, J.; Ruiz, M. T.

    1987-05-01

    En 1984 se inici una extensin del "survey" de Tololo que de- sarrollara en 1975 Smith, con la cmara Curtis-Schmidt y el prisma UV delgado. Utilizando placas IIIaJ horneadas, sin filtro, expues tas 90 minutos sin ensanchamiento se han obtenido a la fecha ms de 150 placas que cubren la zona entre -20 y -45 a latitudes galcticas mayores de 20; se presenta un detalle de las franjas que comprende el survey Calan-Tololo, indicando el grado de completitud de las mismas. Se ha encontrado un gran nmero de galaxias con lneas de emisin entre las cuales las ms frecuentes, ms de 300, son galaxias irregulares con formacin estelar violenta ("starburst galaxies"). Se ha encontrado un nmero de cuasares cercano a 100; casi todos ellos tienen la linea Lyman alfa en la zona entre 3300 y 5300 A, que corresponde a un rango de corrimientosal rojo 1.7< z <3.3 el cuasar con mayor corri- miento al rojo encontrado a la fecha en el survey tiene z = 3.1. La informacin detallada sobre cuasares y galaxias tipo "starburst" ser presentada en otro lugar. Entre los objetos ms interesantes encontrados en el survey Caln- Tololo destacan unas 50 nuevas galaxias Seyfert 1. Estas galaxias han sido encontradas por su fuerte exceso UV y su brillante ncleo, ms que por sus intensas lineas de emisin. Hemos observado espectroscpicamente, en el Observatorio Interamericano de Cerro Tololo, 37 de ellas para las cuales se presentan cartas de identificacin, coordenadas y los datos espectroscpicos obtenidos.

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii supports its association with Annelida rather than Mollusca

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Staton, Joseph

    2001-09-01

    We have determined the sequence of about half (7470 nts) of the mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii, the first representative of this phylum to be so studied. All of the 19 identified genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand. The arrangement of these genes is remarkably similar to that of the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus terrestris. Comparison of both the inferred amino acid sequences and the gene arrangements of a variety of diverse metazoan taxa reveals that the phylum Sipuncula is more closely related to Annelida than to Mollusca. This requires reinterpretation of the homology of several embryological features and of patterns of animal body plan evolution.

  12. Tierra Nueva -- A passive solar cohousing project

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.; Cooper, P.

    1999-10-01

    California architects take on the formidable challenges of designing a cohousing project, and discover that the end result is well worth the effort. The Tierra Nueva Cohousing Project consists of living units, a common house, community orchard, community gardens, community play space, space for a future shop and at the periphery of the site, parking, carports and garages. The units use thermal mass, solar heating, passive solar cooling, perimeter insulation on slabs. Design was agreed to by the community as a whole.

  13. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-09-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Authentic Research within the Grasp of High School Students, by Annis Hapkiewicz, p 1212 * JCE Classroom Activity #19: Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process, by Glen D. Lawrence and Stuart Fishelson, p 1216A Author Recognition A new program has been instituted to recognize high school teachers who are authors or coauthors of manuscripts published in the Journal. In May, letters were sent to teachers who wrote articles published in JCE beginning with Volume 74 (1997). If you were an author, you should have received a letter from us in late May or early June stating that your high school principal has been sent a Certificate of High School Author Recognition to be presented to you at a suitable occasion. Because the letters were sent late in the school year, you may not see the certificate until fall, or you may not receive your letter until then if we had only your school address. If you have authored or coauthored an article published in JCE and did not receive a letter, please contact me using the information about the Secondary School Chemistry Editor appearing on the Information Page in this issue. Syllabus Swap In the August issue, this column contained an invitation to exchange high school syllabi. The day after my copy of the August issue arrived, I received an email from a teacher indicating an interest in participating in an exchange. If you are interested, check the August "Especially for High School Chemistry Teachers" column for a brief discussion of the informal exchange program, or contact me. Research Conducted by High School Students In his June 1999 editorial "Learning Is a Do-It-Yourself Activity", p 725, John Moore wrote about the need to engage students actively in the learning process. As I have mentioned in this column previously, research conducted by students is one means of accomplishing this goal. In this issue, p 1212, Annis Hapkiewicz explains how she has drawn her Okemos [Michigan] High School students into a class research project that employs simple materials but leads to an elegant solution. It is highly likely that her students' conceptual understanding of solution properties, density, heat capacity, phase change, diffusion, and scientific inquiry was greatly enhanced by the experience. Other accounts of research by high school students in class, small-group, and individual settings will be published in future issues. I hope that the various approaches described will stimulate new ideas for student-conducted research to facilitate learning. One frustration that high school teachers and students may experience is difficult access to instrumentation needed to carry out investigations. Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) and other new technologies provide some relatively low-cost solutions to the problem, but the cost of specialized sensors can still be a barrier. In this issue a method for constructing an electrode for determining carbon dioxide concentration is described (p 1253). The article is not identified with Secondary School Chemistry mark (t) because it might not be of interest to a large number of high school teachers, but if the idea is appealing I encourage you to read the article. JCE has received several submissions from high school teachers describing devices constructed by their students, so I know there is some interest in low-cost build-it-yourself instrumentation. If you are among those who find this type of article interesting, please let me know. It will guide me in assigning the SSC icon to articles. Beginning Anew, Again For many readers, this issue will arrive only a few weeks or days before the beginning of the new school year. Others will already have begun the new school year. One of the joys of teaching lies in the cyclic nature of the school year. Ideas from summer workshops and conferences can be developed and implemented. Fresh faces in our classrooms provide another opportunity to try new approaches and to perfect proven teaching strategies. With all the publicity given to the occasion in the popular press, it seems trite to mention that this school year will end in the 21st century. Nevertheless it is an inescapable fact that this year's senior class will be the first to live out all their post-high-school years in a new century and a new millennium in a world where technological change occurs at breathtaking speed. When they become adults, this school year's students will face the host of problems that plague our planetproblems that will not be left behind with the mere turn of a calendar page: poverty, hunger, political upheaval, disease, natural disasters, environmental degradation. The new school year provides us with an opportunity to help these students equip themselves with the intellectual skills and working knowledge necessary to tackle global problems and local problems. It is a daunting task, one that can only be understood fully by those who teach high school students year after year, often with limited resources and inadequate reward. So why devote this space to something that every experienced teacher knows? Precisely to wish you well, to encourage, to say hurrah, and especially to thank you for what you have done and what you are going to do to educate youth for a productive and chemically literate life in the new millennium.

  14. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-05-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * An Elementary Outreach Program-Have Demo Will Travel, by James Swim, p 628 * Pressure and Stoichiometry, by Charles E. Roser and Catherine L. McCluskey, p 638 Making Connections vs Relevance: Chemistry and Biology For many years there has been a movement to make chemistry more relevant to learners, particularly in introductory chemistry courses. Sidebars describing chemical applications to real-world settings are sprinkled throughout textbooks. Consumer products are often used in place of reagent-grade chemicals, not only as a means of cost saving, but also in an attempt to make chemistry more relevant for the beginning learner. The Journal has published many articles dealing with the application of chemistry to other disciplines. As our understanding of the importance of constructivism in intellectual development has increased, the need to help students make connections between the knowledge they have constructed and their experiences in the classroom and laboratory has become more evident. The need is much deeper than simply recognizing familiar products or observing visible chemical changes. Relevance appears to be a helpful and perhaps necessary condition for learning, but it does not appear to be sufficient to ensure that connections are made between chemical concepts new to the learner and previously constructed knowledge. This month's JCE Classroom Activity "Soup or Salad? Investigating the Action of Enzymes in Fruit on Gelatin" (p 624A) is an example of an experiment that requires the student to use biological concepts to carry out a chemical investigation. The action of proteases from fresh or frozen pineapple and meat tenderizers on the proteins that provide the structure of gelatin is compared with the action of fruit that has been canned or heated in a microwave. Like other JCE Classroom Activities, references, additional information, and related activities are cited. The activity can be used in the classroom or assigned as a take-home activity. JCE Classroom Activity #15, "Liver and Onions: DNA Extraction from Animal and Plant Tissues" (p 400A, March 1999) also integrates chemical and biological concepts. The JCE Software videotape HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work is another useful resource. It can be used in any classroom where kinetics, catalysis, proteins, or enzymes are discussed. Information about JCE Software products can be found in recent issues of the Journal or by accessing JCE Online (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu). Because most high school students complete at least one year of biology before enrolling in chemistry, developing the connections between biology and chemistry can be especially productive. Connections between chemistry and biology often seem to be more real to students than do many of the phenomena we cite as applications. For example, students often are not able to make the connection between the excitation of electrons to produce electromagnetic radiation and anything that is personally relevant. The light given off by sodium or mercury vapor lights provides a common example of relating atomic emission to a useful process, but many students do not seem to find that particularly interesting. The need to make a connection between biology and chemistry becomes especially meaningful to students when the chemical change occurs within the human body. As an example, the interaction of emitted electromagnetic radiation with human cells to cause well-tanned skin seems more relevant to a greater number of students than the color of lights in a parking lot. This issue contains an article that describes a useful application of light to kill cancer cells through use of photosensitizers (p 592). The process of photodynamic therapy (PDT) provides another example that could help students make a connection between the emission of electromagnetic radiation and the challenge of killing cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Certainly this example is not a magic antidote to "why do we have to learn this stuff" and it doesn't directly relate atomic spectra to quantum theory. It does, however, deal with energy-matter interactions in a topic that is more relevant to students' daily lives. And in turn, the concept of electromagnetic radiation interacting with matter may be more important for most students to understand than is the quantum mechanical explanation of electronic configuration. This issue contains several other articles from which useful examples connecting chemistry and biology can be drawn. Most of these are not indicated in the table of contents with the high school mark (*) because they are written primarily for college biochemistry faculty members. However, many high school teachers who read this column have strong backgrounds in biology and can find useful information in some of these articles. A keyword search for "enzyme" using the online index (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Search/ ) yielded 75 articles published between January 1990 and the present, illustrating that a great deal about this topic alone has been published in this Journal. Other "biochemical" keywords that can be used to search the index include amino acids, biotechnology, hormones, lipids, metabolism, nucleic acids/DNA/RNA, and proteins/peptides. Other biological connections are evidenced through keywords such as drugs/pharmaceuticals, food science, medicinal chemistry, nutrition, and vitamins. Chemical Mysteries Revealed Online Ron DeLorenzo, editor of the Applications and Analogies feature, recently sent an email message describing a resource of interest to high school teachers. The Greenwich Science Education Center, Greenwich, Connecticut, is now displaying on their Web site (http://www.educationcenter.org) about 100 of DeLorenzo's interesting mystery articles. Anaheim and Boston To those readers who stopped by the JCE booth at the ACS National Meeting in Anaheim or at the NSTA convention Boston we wish to say thank you. Also, thank you to those with whom we spoke at the outstanding High School Program at Anaheim. Watch the June issue for more about these two outstanding conventions.

  15. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-07-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Super Science Connections, by Patricia B. McKean, p 916 * A pHorseshoe, by Roger Plumsky, p 935 National Conferences in Your Part of the Country For the past several months, considerable space in this column has been devoted to forthcoming national conferences and conventions and to highlights of conferences past. For some of us, location is fairly unimportant; but for most of us travel costs and time are both factors to consider when choosing a conference. The community of high school chemistry teachers is favored by the number of national conventions and conferences that are held each year in different locations. In 1999, for example, the spring National Meeting of the American Chemical Society was in Anaheim and the National Science Teachers Association National Convention was in Boston. This summer CHEMED '99 will be held in Fairfield, CT, August 1-5, and the fall National ACS Meeting will be in New Orleans. Teachers from the mid-South especially should consider attending the High School Program at New Orleans, described below by Lillie Tucker Akin, Chairperson of the Division's High School Program Committee. The event will be held on Sunday to minimize conflicts with the beginning of the school year. JCE at CHEMED '99 Stop by the JCE booth at CHEMED '99 in the exhibits area to learn more about the wide array of print and nonprint resources you can use in your classroom and laboratory. Members of the editorial staff will be on hand to talk with you. You are invited to participate in a workshop, "Promoting Active Learning through JCE Activity Sheets and Software", on Monday, August 1, 8:30-10:30. The free hands-on workshop is number WT11 and we encourage you to include it among your choices in the blanks provided on the third page of the registration form. We will also conduct an interactive session to listen to ideas for making the Journal more useful to you. Check the final program for location and time or inquire at the JCE exhibit booth. NSTA in Boston For the representatives of the Journal, the highlight of the National Science Teachers Association Convention was visiting with the many readers who stopped by the JCE booth. Among them were several who have authored an article or reviewed manuscripts. We hope that number increases from year to year. JCE exists for its readers and because many readers are willing to devote the time and effort necessary to write a manuscript and revise it based on peer review. The convention offered such a variety of opportunities to acquire useful information that it is impossible to name a single highlight, or even to list the top ten. Representative of the many outstanding chemistry-oriented sessions presented by high school teachers were "Ultraviolet, Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy in the Chemistry and Physics Laboratory", "Kool Conversions in a Block Schedule", and "Hot Packs, Cold Packs, and a Six-Pack of Chemistry Projects". Reports from Other Journals On pages 882-885, Steve Long and Kathy Thorsen have summarized interesting articles that have appeared recently in The Science Teacher and Chem 13 News, respectively. Even if you are a regular reader of one or both of these journals, you will enjoy reading these summaries. Steve and Kathy have done a great job of highlighting interesting and useful information. I thank both of them for these fine contributions to the Journal. High School Day in New Orleans Mark August 22, 1999, on your calendar now and plan to attend High School Chemistry Day at the National ACS Meeting in New Orleans. The High School Program Committee, with support from local ACS sections, has planned an extravaganza of workshops and presentations, including environmental programs and workshops conducted by Sargent-Welch; an afternoon of instrumentation by Buck Laboratories with the Alabama Science in Motion vans and drivers to show how to transport chemistry on wheels; 12 demonstrations by nationally recognized chemical demonstration experts; a series of nine oral presentations on "hot" topics in chemistry today; Carolina Biological's showcasing of Chemistry Set to Music and demonstrations where you can watch the periodic table come to life in front of your eyes; an afternoon of safety by Kauffman and Associates; and Penny Sconzo's entire day on calculator literacy in chemistry and biology with sessions for beginners and advanced users. In addition to five concurrent sessions specifically for high school teachers, the Division of Chemical Education will offer a variety of programs throughout the conference. A high school-college interface luncheon will feature chemical educator Glenn Crosby as keynote speaker. An array of door prizes will be given away, including a crisp 100 bill. Tickets for the luncheon are limited and will only be sold through preregistration. Registration information can be obtained through the ACS Internet home page, http://www.acs.org, in Chemical and Engineering News, or in the summer issue of the Division of Chemical Education Newsletter. Eisenhower funds can be used as support funds (check with your school coordinator for title programs). There will be a membership registration desk for teachers interested in joining the ACS Division of Chemical Education. Membership dues are 15 per year. We have a lot planned for you and we need all our high school chemistry teachers to attend and make this event a huge success! I look forward to seeing each of you in 'Nawlins! Lillie Tucker Akin

  16. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-12-01

    Chemistry and the Environment This issue contains more than 20 articles relating to the environment. Several articles of potential interest are indicated in the Table of Contents with the SSC mark (). Others are not so indicated because they depict use of expensive instrumentation or costly procedures, but if you have an interest in environmental chemistry you may wish to examine all the environmentally related articles. While many of the articles, both marked and unmarked, are targeted to college-level environmental chemistry curricula or to introductory courses for non-major, the methods described in several could be readily adapted to high school chemistry courses. One article likely to be of interest to teachers is found in News from Online, pp 1608-1609. The author explains how to use the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's EnviroMapper Web site to view and query environmental information. She mentioned finding a hazardous waste handler located near her home, so I decided to check the area near my home. I quickly located a natural gas salt dome storage facility marked on the map and, with a few more mouse clicks, I found information that included status of compliance with regulations, amounts of each compound released to the air in tons per year, and how to contact the corporation owning the site. Email and Web site addresses were included for the convenience of anyone wishing to contact the corporation. Students could learn a great deal about where they live that is relevant to chemistry by using the EPA site. Additional Web sites dealing with environmental issues and chemistry are cited in the sidebar at the bottom of p 1609. Among the articles that could be adapted to an advanced high school chemistry class or possibly even to an introductory class is one titled Bridge of Mandolin County (pp 1671-1672). It describes a case-study strategy similar to the scenarios used in ChemStudy. Students analyze information from various sources, including laboratory experiments if desired, discuss their findings, and make a recommendation regarding which of two road deicers should be used on the bridge. The article Pesticides in Drinking Water: Project-Based Learning within the Introductory Chemistry Curriculum (pp 1673-1667) describes class involvement in field data collection and analysis. Since more sophisticated instrumentation than is possessed by many schools is required, 6th grade science and high school chemistry classes work with a college class to obtain and analyze data. Everyone involved in this approach wins. The 6th graders, high school students, and college students all gain experience in sampling, preparing samples for analysis, determining pollutant levels, and drawing conclusions, each at an appropriate level of understanding. Plus, the high school students are exposed to instrumentation that otherwise would not be accessible, such as gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although the project described was started by the college faculty members who wrote the article, such an approach to many interesting environmental chemistry problems could be initiated by a high school teacher by seeking out a nearby college or university with whom to partner. An article that probably would not have received the SSC mark had I not noticed that two of the coauthors are high school students, is titled Remediation of Water Contaminated with an Azo Dye (pp 1680-1683). In addition to being interesting, the article is a good reminder that research opportunities for high school students exist. Still another article that received the SSC mark because of a high school connection is Chemical Analysis of Soils (pp 1693-1694). The authors mention that with modification their techniques could be used in high school chemistry. They cite a reference to an article published several years ago, titled Soil Analysis for High School Chemistry Students (J. Chem. Educ. 1980, 57, 897-899). It was published in a feature titled the 50-Minute Experiment. Block scheduling has brought an end to the 50-minute period in many classrooms, but the experiment is valid and potentially useful in providing experience with real-world samples. Write Now! With the coming of December days are shorter and nights are longer, and for many readers in the United States and Canada winter weather has set in. If you have been thinking about writing an article for JCE perhaps now is a good time to be doing it. I would like to call your attention to four feature columns designed especially for high school teachers: Chemical Principles Revisited Cary Kilner, Editor Exeter High School, 7 Salmon Street, Newmarket, NH 03857 Phone: 603/659-6825; Fax: 603/772-8287; email: CaryPQ@aol.com Interdisciplinary Connections Mark Alber, Editor Darlington School, 1014 Cave Spring Road, Rome, GA 30161 Phone: 706/236-0442; Fax: 706/236-0443; email: malber@darlington.rome.ga.us Second Year and Advanced Placement Chemistry John Fischer, Editor Ashwaubenon High School, 2391 Ridge Road, Green Bay, WI 54304 Phone: 414/492-2955 ext 2020; email: fischer@netnet.net View from My Classroom David Byrum, Editor Flowing Wells High School, 3301 E. Ft. Lowell Rd., Tucson, AZ 85716 Phone: 520/795-2928; email: DavidB1032@aol.com The titles are descriptive of the content sought for each feature, whose mission statement can be found at the JCE Web site, jchemed.chem.wisc.edu. Click on "Features" in the left-hand frame on your screen. All these editors will be happy to discuss your ideas for an article. Secondary School Feature Articles JCE Classroom Activity #22: Colors to Dye for: Preparation of Natural Dyes, p 1688A Applications of Biocatalysis to Industrial Processes, by John T. Sime, p 1658

  17. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-06-01

    Secondary School Feature Article * JCE Classroom Activity #18: Photochemistry and Pinhole Photography: An Interdisciplinary Experiment, by Angeliki A. Rigos and Kevin Salemme, p 736A High School Program at Anaheim ACS Meeting Congratulations to Barbara Sitzman of Chatsworth High School (Los Angeles) and her committee for organizing an outstanding day of activities! With support from the Southern California Section of the American Chemical Society and the encouragement of Tom Wildeman, CHED Program Committee Chair, the program attracted a large number of Southern California teachers and some from much greater distances. A synopsis of some of the day's activities is included in the Chemical Education Program Meeting Report, p 747. Other workshop topics included gel chromatography, forensic chemistry, art preservation and authentication, well water purification, and toxins in waste water. Also, a workshop on fitting polymers into the chemistry course was conducted by the Polymer Ambassadors. I thank Mickey Sarquis, founding editor of the JCE Secondary School Chemistry Section, for joining me in conducting an information workshop. The pictures appearing on this page were taken at the High School/College Interface Luncheon, which featured an address by Paul Boyer. In addition to the opportunity to visit with colleagues, enjoy a meal together, and win door prizes, those in attendance enjoyed a lively hands-on workshop led by Michael Tinnesand, Department Head of K-12 Science, ACS Education Division. Don't you wish you could have attended the High School Program? Plan Now: High School Program in New Orleans Mark your calendar for Sunday, August 22, 1999. The Fall ACS National Meeting will be held in New Orleans and the High School Program is scheduled on Sunday so that teachers will be able to avoid conflicts with the opening of the school year. Teachers in the Mid-South region are especially encouraged to plan on attending an outstanding program put together by Lillie Tucker Akin and her committee. Watch the Journal for program and registration information. Glenn Seaborg Memorial Periodic Table Quilt Raffle Harvey Gendreau of Framingham High School, MA, reports that Barbara McCarty, award-winning quilter and president of the Wayside Quilters Guild, has made a wall-sized periodic table quilt to honor the memory of Glenn Seaborg. The quilt will be raffled at ChemEd99 and funds from the raffle will be used to defray conference costs. The quilt is 2.5 meters wide by 1.5 meters high and the element squares are 13 cm on each side. Each of the 109 element squares contains the appliqué of the symbol and has stenciling for its atomic number and mass. The major periodic families are color coded and the border fabric has an eye-catching symbolic atom design. Nine colors for the elements include royal blue, deep purple, lilac, pink, burgundy and gold. The element square for seaborgium, atomic number 106, has been autographed by Glenn T. Seaborg. A certificate of authenticity will accompany the quilt. This is a unique opportunity to win a classroom (or home) art treasure. Each ticket is 2 or a book of 3 is 5. Tickets may be purchased on the ChemEd99 registration form and will be included in your conference packet. The quilt will be on display at the exposition hall and additional tickets can be purchased at the Unlimited Potential booth. Drawing will be on Wednesday, August 4th, in the expo area when door prizes are announced. You need not be present to win. Information about ChemEd99 may be obtained online at http://www.sacredheart.edu/chemed/. 1999 CMA Catalyst Awards Special congratulations to the High School and Pre-High School award recipients. National Winners are George R. Hague, Dallas, TX, and Wayne Goates, Goddard, KS. Regional winners are Rhonda Lynn Reist, Olathe, KS, and Anne Marie Holbrook, Cincinnati, OH. A complete list of the awardees, including the post-high-school recipients, is in the News & Announcements section of this issue, p 753. NSTA Convention in Boston Thank you to each reader who visited the JCE booth at the NSTA National Convention. With such a large number of exhibits we know that every minute counted and we are glad that you included JCE. We appreciate your suggestions for making JCE more useful to you, as well as hearing about the features of JCE that you like. Highlights from the convention that are of interest to chemistry teachers will be reported next month in this column.

  18. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-01-01

    Ideas and Resources in This Issue This issue contains a broad spectrum of topics of potential interest to high school teachers, including chemical safety, history, demonstrations, laboratory activities, electrochemistry, small group learning, and instructional software. In his report on articles published recently in The Science Teacher, Steve Long includes annotated references from that journal, and also from JCE, that provide timely and practical information (pp 21-22). The chemical significance of several anniversaries that will occur in the year 2000 are discussed in an article by Paul Schatz (pp 11-14). Scientists and inventors mentioned include Dumas, Wöhler, Goodyear, Joliot-Curie, Krebs, Pauli, Kjeldahl, and Haworth. Several discoveries are also discussed, including development of the voltaic pile, the use of chlorine to purify water, and the discovery of element 97, berkelium. This is the fourth consecutive year that Schatz has written an anniversaries article (1-3). Although most readers probably do not plan to be teaching in the years 2097-3000, these articles can make a nice addition to your file of readily available historical information for use now in meeting NSES Content Standard G (4). In contrast to the short historical summaries, an in-depth account of the work of Herman Boerhaave is provided by Trinity School (NY) teacher Damon Diemente. You cannot recall having heard of Boerhaave? Diemente explains in detail how Boerhaave's scientific observations, imperfect though they were, contributed significantly to the understanding of temperature and heat by scientists who followed him. Chemical demonstrations attract the interest of most of us, and Kathy Thorsen discusses several that appeared in Chem 13 News during the past year (pp 18-20). Included are demonstrations relating to LeChâtelier's principle, electronegativity, and the synthesis and reactions of carbon monoxide. Ideas for investigating the hydrophobic nature of Magic Sand are given in JCE Classroom Activity #23 (pp 40A-40B) and in an article by Robert Goldsmith (p 41). The 1999 Nobel Prize in chemistry and the research that led to the awards are discussed in an article beginning on p 14. An account of the 1998 winners appeared in last January's issue (5), providing the basis for another convenient resource file. Water droplets on a surface of Magic Sand. For many students electrochemistry is among the least favorite of the topics included in first- or second-year high school chemistry - despite the many interesting applications that students encounter every day. There are many reasons why students find the topic difficult, but misconceptions about current flow seem to present the largest obstacle to developing a conceptual understanding of electrochemical processes. Two university faculty members and a high school teacher, Huddle, White, and Rogers, have developed a teaching model to help students confront and overcome their misconceptions (pp 104-110). They have conducted studies of the impact of the model's use on student learning in both high school and introductory college chemistry courses. Particularly encouraging were the learning gains made by students with weak academic backgrounds. An action research project focused on student perspectives of small-group learning is described by Towns, Kreke, and Fields (pp 111-119). Although the project involved upper-division undergraduate university students, action research can be useful to any chemistry teacher who wishes to systematically examine and improve instructional methods and strategies. This article may be especially interesting to readers who frequently employ small-group learning techniques in their classroom. Advances in the technology of multimedia delivery are having an impact on the format in which new JCE Software releases are available. In particular, CD-ROM and Internet browsers are becoming increasingly important as the medium and method of access respectively. To better understand what is available for use in your classroom, read the article by Jon Holmes and Nancy Gettys (pp 135-136). Congratulations to Winners of ACS Regional Awards The winners of the 1999 regional awards in high school chemistry teaching are listed on page 26. Our congratulations go to each of these individuals who, as stated in the announcement, have "demonstrated excellence in teaching, exceptional ability to challenge and inspire students, extracurricular work, and willingness to keep up-to-date in the field". Additional information about the awards and the nomination process through which the regional awards and the national James Bryant Conant Award are selected can be found at http://www.acs.org/awards. High School Day Program at San Francisco in March If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area be sure to circle Monday, March 27, on your calendar now. Carolyn Abbott and her organizing committee have planned a full day of interesting activities. The full schedule of the day's activities will be published in the March issue of JCE. Literature Cited

    1. Schatz, P. F. J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 12.
    2. Schatz, P. F. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 23-25.
    3. Schatz, P. F. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 8-11.
    4. National Science Education Standards, National Academy Press: Washington DC, 1996; pp 200-204.
    5. Miller, J. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 12.
    Secondary School Feature Articles JCE Classroom Activity #23: Magic Sand, p 40A Determination of the Fundamental Electronic Charge via the Electrolysis of Water by Brittney Hoffman, Elizabeth Mitchell, Petra Roulhac, Marc Thomes, and Vincent M. Stumpo, p 95

  19. Higher ribosomal RNA substitution rates in Bacillariophyceae and Dasycladales than in Mollusca, Echinodermata, and Actinistia-Tetrapoda.

    PubMed

    Sorhannus, U

    1996-09-01

    Molecular evolutionary rates within two protistan and three metazoan taxa were estimated using divergence times derived from fossil records. The results indicate that the small-subunit rRNA sequences within Dasycladales (Chlorophyta) and Bacillariophyceae evolved at a rate approximately two to three times faster than that estimated within Echinodermata, Mollusca, and Actinistia-Tetrapoda. It was concluded that this twofold discrepancy demonstrates actual taxonomic differences in the fixation rate of mutations in the small-subunit rRNA. PMID:8752010

  20. [Diversity and microstructure of quitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) from the Caribbean of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Garca-Ros, Cedar I; Alvarez-Ruiz, Migdalia

    2011-03-01

    Diversity and microstructure of quitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) from the Caribbean of Costa Rica. The polyplacophorans of the coral reef on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica have been insufficiently studied. The examination of coral rubble accumulated in the shallow sublitoral waters on four collection stations in Provincia Limn revealed a higher diversity of chitons than was documented. From the country eight species were previously known: Ischnochiton erythronotus (C.B. Adams 1845); Ischnoplax pectinata (Sowerby 1840); Stenoplax boogii (Haddon 1886); S. purpurascens (C.B. Adams 1845); Acanthopleura granulata (Gmelin 1791); Chiton marmoratus Gmelin 1791; C. tuberculatus Linnaeus 1758 and Acanthochitona rhodea (Pilsbry 1893). This study added five more species that are reported here for the first time: Callistochiton portobelensis Ferreira 1976; Ischnochiton kaasi Ferreira 1987; I. pseudovirgatus Kaas 1972; Acanthochitona balesae Abbott 1954 and Cryptoconchus floridanus (Dall 1889). PMID:21516641

  1. From Polyplacophora to Cephalopoda: comparative analysis of nitric oxide signalling in mollusca.

    PubMed

    Moroz, L L; Gillette, R

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of putative nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cells has been analysed using NADPH-d histochemistry in the CNS and peripheral tissues in more than 2D ecologically and systematically different molluscan genera representing 3 main classes of the phylum MOLLUSCA: Polyplacophora (Lepidopleurus, Lepidozona, Katharina), Gastropoda (Littorina, Lymnaea, Aplexa, Physa, Planorbarius, Planorbis, Helisoma, Biomphalaria, Helix, Limax, Cepaea, Bulla, Aplysia, Phyllaplysia, Philine, Pleurobranchea, Tritonia, Armina, Flabellina, Cadlina) and Cephalopoda (Octopus, Sepia, Rossia, Loligo). Several species were used for more detailed immunohistochemical, biochemical, biophysical and physiological studies to further assay of NOS activity and to analyse functional roles of nitric oxide (NO) in these animals. The main conclusions of our comparative analysis and literature survey can be summarised as following: (i) There is strong evidence for the presence of NO-dependent signalling pathways in different molluscan species. (ii) We hypothesise that a general tendency in the evolution of NADPH-d-reactive cells in Mollusca is a migration of nitrergic function from periphery to the CNS. Also, different isoforms of NOS appear to be present in any one species. (iii) One of the main functional targets of NO signalling is the feeding system. However, there are obvious differences between predators (many labelled central motoneurons) and herbivorous species (many labelled peripheral putative sensory cells) as well as between land/freshwater and marine animals. Nevertheless, in all species tested NO-activated feeding-like motor patterns in the buccal ganglia. Additional functional and cellular targets for NO in molluscs are also considered. We briefly review neuromodulatory mechanisms of NO action and we consider molluscs as useful model systems for investigations of the roles of NO. PMID:8853687

  2. A new species of Eritrachys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Ochlerini) from Ecuador (Especie nueva de Eritrachys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Ochlerini) de Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of to the genus Eritrachys Ruckes, E. brailovskyi, collected in Ecuador, is described and illustrated. The male of E. bituberculata Ruckes is described and illustrated, with new records from Panama and Ecuador. A key to the species of the genus is provided....

  3. The Politics of Rural School Reform: Escuela Nueva in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Patrick J.; Benveniste, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Traces evolution of rural-school education plan in Colombia (Escuela Nueva), focusing on importance of Colombia's changing political and social climate in policy development. Identifies three phases of reform development and implementation: grassroots, formalized, and decoupled. Uses Escuela Nueva to demonstrate importance of recognizing dynamic,

  4. p63 gene structure in the phylum mollusca.

    PubMed

    Bari?evi?, Ana; tifani?, Mauro; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato

    2015-08-01

    Roles of p53 family ancestor (p63) in the organisms' response to stressful environmental conditions (mainly pollution) have been studied among molluscs, especially in the genus Mytilus, within the last 15 years. Nevertheless, information about gene structure of this regulatory gene in molluscs is scarce. Here we report the first complete genomic structure of the p53 family orthologue in the mollusc Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and confirm its similarity to vertebrate p63 gene. Our searches within the available molluscan genomes (Aplysia californica, Lottia gigantea, Crassostrea gigas and Biomphalaria glabrata), found only one p53 family member present in a single copy per haploid genome. Comparative analysis of those orthologues, additionally confirmed the conserved p63 gene structure. Conserved p63 gene structure can be a helpful tool to complement or/and revise gene annotations of any future p63 genomic sequence records in molluscs, but also in other animal phyla. Knowledge of the correct gene structure will enable better prediction of possible protein isoforms and their functions. Our analyses also pointed out possible mis-annotations of the p63 gene in sequenced molluscan genomes and stressed the value of manual inspection (based on alignments of cDNA and protein onto the genome sequence) for a reliable and complete gene annotation. PMID:25936268

  5. Catalogue of the type specimens deposited in the Mollusca Collection of the Museu Nacional / UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Alexandre Dias; Monteiro, Jlio Csar; Barbosa, Andr Favaretto; Salgado, Norma Campos; Coelho, Arnaldo Campos Dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    A curatorial revision of the type specimens deposited in the Mollusca Collection of the Museu Nacional / UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (MNRJ) revealed the existence of 518 lots of type specimens (holotypes, neotypes, syntypes and paratypes) for 285 names of molluscan taxa from 88 families, including 247 gastropods, 30 bivalves, three cephalopods and five scaphopods. A total of 106 holotypes and one neotype are deposited in the MNRJ. Type material for ten nominal taxa described as being deposited in the MNRJ was not located; the probable reasons are discussed. Some previously published erroneous information about types in the MNRJ is rectified. A total of 37 type specimens are illustrated. PMID:24871828

  6. Genetic divergence and geographic variation in the deep-water Conus orbignyi complex (Mollusca: Conoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Puillandre, Nicolas; Meyer, Christopher P.; Bouchet, Philippe; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2011-01-01

    Puillandre, N. et al. (2010) Genetic divergence and geographic variation in a deep-water cone lineage: molecular and morphological analyses of the Conus orbignyi complex (Mollusca: Conoidea). The cone snails (family Conidae) are a hyperdiverse lineage of venomous gastropods. Two standard markers, COI and ITS2, were used to define six genetically-divergent groups within a subclade of Conidae that includes Conus orbignyi; each of these was then evaluated based on their shell morphology. We conclude that three forms, previously regarded as subspecies of Conus orbignyi are distinct species, now recognized as Conus orbignyi, Conus elokismenos and Conus coriolisi. In addition, three additional species (Conus pseudorbignyi, Conus joliveti and Conus comatosa) belong to this clade. Some of the proposed species (e.g., Conus elokismenos) are possibly in turn complexes comprising multiple species. Groups such as Conidae illustrate the challenges generally faced in species delimitation in biodiverse lineages. In the case of the Conus orbignyi complex, not only are there definable, genetically divergent lineages, but also considerable geographic variation within each group. Our study suggests that an intensive analysis of multiple specimens within a single locality helps to minimize the confounding effects of geographic variation and can be a useful starting point for circumscribing different species within such a confusing complex. PMID:21712968

  7. Annotated type catalogue of the Orthalicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the Museum fr Naturkunde, Berlin

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described of 96 taxa classified within the superfamily Orthalicoidea and present in the Mollusca collection of the Museum fr Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Orthalicus elegans Rolle, 1895; Bulimus maranhonensis Albers, 1854; Orthalicus nobilis Rolle, 1895; Orthalichus tricinctus Martens, 1893. Orthalicus sphinx tresmariae is introduced as new name for Zebra sphinx turrita Strebel, 1909, not Zebra quagga turrita Strebel, 1909. The following synonyms are established: Zebra crosseifischeri Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus princeps fischeri Martens, 1893; Orthalicus isabellinus Martens, 1873 = Orthalicus bensoni (Reeve, 1849); Zebra zoniferus naesiotes Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus undatus (Bruguire, 1789); Porphyrobaphe (Myiorthalicus) dennisoni pallida Strebel, 1909 = Hemibulimus dennisoni (Reeve, 1848); Zebra delphinus pumilio Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus delphinus (Strebel, 1909); Orthalicus (Laeorthalicus) reginaeformis Strebel, 1909 = Corona perversa (Swainson, 1821); Bulimus (Eurytus) corticosus Sowerby III, 1895 = Plekocheilus (Eurytus) stuebeli Martens, 1885. The taxon Bulimus (Eudioptus) psidii Martens, 1877 is now placed within the family Sagdidae, tentatively in the genus Platysuccinea. Appendices are included with an index to all the types of Orthalicoidea extant (including those listed by Khler 2007) and a partial list of letters present in the correspondence archives. PMID:23794831

  8. A review of the non-bulimulid terrestrial Mollusca from the Region of Atacama, northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Juan Francisco; Cataln, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial mollusca are sparsely studied in Chile and, for the first time, a formal record of the diversity of land snails in northern Chile is reported. Coastal and desertic areas in the Region of Atacama, in the border of the Atacama desert and the Pacific Ocean, were surveyed with the aim to describe the presence and distribution of this poorly known fauna. Of the fourteen species recorded, the geographic distribution records for nine species are extended, and some taxa are recorded for the first time since their original descriptions. All, except one, of the fourteen terrestrial molluscan species occurring in the area are endemic to Chile; they are all terrestrial species, most of them have a restricted geographic distribution, and none of them is currently protected by law. The results reveal that the region of Atacama has one of the most diverse terrestrial snail biodiversity in Chile, ranking only after the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. Distribution records of all the studied species and a taxonomic key are also provided. PMID:24715800

  9. A review of the non-bulimulid terrestrial Mollusca from the Region of Atacama, northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Araya, Juan Francisco; Cataln, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial mollusca are sparsely studied in Chile and, for the first time, a formal record of the diversity of land snails in northern Chile is reported. Coastal and desertic areas in the Region of Atacama, in the border of the Atacama desert and the Pacific Ocean, were surveyed with the aim to describe the presence and distribution of this poorly known fauna. Of the fourteen species recorded, the geographic distribution records for nine species are extended, and some taxa are recorded for the first time since their original descriptions. All, except one, of the fourteen terrestrial molluscan species occurring in the area are endemic to Chile; they are all terrestrial species, most of them have a restricted geographic distribution, and none of them is currently protected by law. The results reveal that the region of Atacama has one of the most diverse terrestrial snail biodiversity in Chile, ranking only after the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. Distribution records of all the studied species and a taxonomic key are also provided. PMID:24715800

  10. Annotated type catalogue of the Orthalicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the Museum fr Naturkunde, Berlin.

    PubMed

    Breure, Abraham S H

    2013-01-01

    The type status is described of 96 taxa classified within the superfamily Orthalicoidea and present in the Mollusca collection of the Museum fr Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Orthalicus elegans Rolle, 1895; Bulimus maranhonensis Albers, 1854; Orthalicus nobilis Rolle, 1895; Orthalichus tricinctus Martens, 1893. Orthalicus sphinx tresmariae is introduced as new name for Zebra sphinx turrita Strebel, 1909, not Zebra quagga turrita Strebel, 1909. The following synonyms are established: Zebra crosseifischeri Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus princeps fischeri Martens, 1893; Orthalicus isabellinus Martens, 1873 = Orthalicus bensoni (Reeve, 1849); Zebra zoniferus naesiotes Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus undatus (Bruguire, 1789); Porphyrobaphe (Myiorthalicus) dennisoni pallida Strebel, 1909 = Hemibulimus dennisoni (Reeve, 1848); Zebra delphinus pumilio Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus delphinus (Strebel, 1909); Orthalicus (Laeorthalicus) reginaeformis Strebel, 1909 = Corona perversa (Swainson, 1821); Bulimus (Eurytus) corticosus Sowerby III, 1895 = Plekocheilus (Eurytus) stuebeli Martens, 1885. The taxon Bulimus (Eudioptus) psidii Martens, 1877 is now placed within the family Sagdidae, tentatively in the genus Platysuccinea. Appendices are included with an index to all the types of Orthalicoidea extant (including those listed by Khler 2007) and a partial list of letters present in the correspondence archives. PMID:23794831

  11. National Smoking Bans Help Everyone, Especially Nonsmokers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157181.html National Smoking Bans Help Everyone, Especially Nonsmokers: Study Review of ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- National smoking bans appear to be reducing the health harms ...

  12. Nacre and false nacre (foliated aragonite) in extant monoplacophorans (=Tryblidiida: Mollusca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa, Antonio G.; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquín; González-Segura, Alicia; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Extant monoplacophorans (Tryblidiida, Mollusca) have traditionally been reported as having an internal nacreous layer, thus representing the ancestral molluscan condition. The examination of this layer in three species of Neopilinidae ( Rokopella euglypta, Veleropilina zografi, and Micropilina arntzi) reveals that only V. zografi secretes an internal layer of true nacre, which occupies only part of the internal shell surface. The rest of the internal surface of V. zografi and the whole internal surfaces of the other two species examined are covered by a material consisting of lath-like, instead of brick-like, crystals, which are arranged into lamellae. In all cases examined, the crystallographic c-axis in this lamellar material is perpendicular to the surface of laths and the a-axis is parallel to their long dimension. The differences between taxa relate to the frequency of twins, which is much higher in Micropilina. In general, the material is well ordered, particularly towards the margin, where lamellae pile up at a small step size, which is most likely due to processes of crystal competition. Given its morphological resemblance to the foliated calcite of bivalves, we propose the name foliated aragonite for this previously undescribed biomaterial secreted by monoplacophorans. We conclude that the foliated aragonite probably lacks preformed interlamellar membranes and is therefore not a variant of nacre. A review of the existing literature reveals that previous reports of nacre in the group were instead of the aragonitic foliated layer and that our report of nacre in V. zografi is the first undisputed evidence of nacre in monoplacophorans. From the evolutionary viewpoint, the foliated aragonite could easily have been derived from nacre. Assuming that nacre represents the ancestral condition, as in other molluscan classes, it has been replaced by foliated aragonite along the tryblidiidan lineage, although the fossil record does not presently provide evidence as to when this replacement took place.

  13. Homology and homoplasy of swimming behaviors and neural circuits in the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, James M.; Sakurai, Akira; Lillvis, Joshua L.; Gunaratne, Charuni A.; Katz, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    How neural circuit evolution relates to behavioral evolution is not well understood. Here the relationship between neural circuits and behavior is explored with respect to the swimming behaviors of the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opithobranchia). Nudipleura is a diverse monophyletic clade of sea slugs among which only a small percentage of species can swim. Swimming falls into a limited number of categories, the most prevalent of which are rhythmic left–right body flexions (LR) and rhythmic dorsal–ventral body flexions (DV). The phylogenetic distribution of these behaviors suggests a high degree of homoplasy. The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying DV swimming has been well characterized in Tritonia diomedea and in Pleurobranchaea californica. The CPG for LR swimming has been elucidated in Melibe leonina and Dendronotus iris, which are more closely related. The CPGs for the categorically distinct DV and LR swimming behaviors consist of nonoverlapping sets of homologous identified neurons, whereas the categorically similar behaviors share some homologous identified neurons, although the exact composition of neurons and synapses in the neural circuits differ. The roles played by homologous identified neurons in categorically distinct behaviors differ. However, homologous identified neurons also play different roles even in the swim CPGs of the two LR swimming species. Individual neurons can be multifunctional within a species. Some of those functions are shared across species, whereas others are not. The pattern of use and reuse of homologous neurons in various forms of swimming and other behaviors further demonstrates that the composition of neural circuits influences the evolution of behaviors. PMID:22723353

  14. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  15. Student Stress Is Rising, Especially among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisberg, Leo

    2000-01-01

    Reports findings of a 1999 survey of 261,217 college freshmen at 462 two-year and four-year institutions concerning lifestyle and stress. Finds increasing numbers of students, especially women, report feeling overwhelmed and under stress. Also reports declines in drinking and smoking, more students planning to work full-time, more students

  16. Neuromuscular development of Aeolidiella stephanieae Valdéz, 2005 (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on the development of the nervous system and the musculature of invertebrates have become more sophisticated and numerous within the last decade and have proven to provide new insights into the evolutionary history of organisms. In order to provide new morphogenetic data on opisthobranch gastropods we investigated the neuromuscular development in the nudibranch Aeolidiella stephanieae Valdéz, 2005 using immunocytochemistry as well as F-actin labelling in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (cLSM). Results The ontogenetic development of Aeolidiella stephanieae can be subdivided into 8 stages, each recognisable by characteristic morphological and behavioural features as well as specific characters of the nervous system and the muscular system, respectively. The larval nervous system of A. stephanieae includes an apical organ, developing central ganglia, and peripheral neurons associated with the velum, foot and posterior, visceral part of the larva. The first serotonergic and FMRFamidergic neural structures appear in the apical organ that exhibits an array of three sensory, flask-shaped and two non-sensory, round neurons, which altogether disappear prior to metamorphosis. The postmetamorphic central nervous system (CNS) becomes concentrated, and the rhinophoral ganglia develop together with the anlage of the future rhinophores whereas oral tentacle ganglia are not found. The myogenesis in A. stephanieae begins with the larval retractor muscle followed by the accessory larval retractor muscle, the velar or prototroch muscles and the pedal retractors that all together degenerate during metamorphosis, and the adult muscle complex forms de novo. Conclusions Aeolidiella stephanieae comprises features of the larval and postmetamorphic nervous as well as muscular system that represent the ground plan of the Mollusca or even the Trochozoa (e. g. presence of the prototrochal or velar muscle ring). On the one hand, A. stephanieae shows some features shared by all nudibranchs like the postmetamorphic condensation of the CNS, the possession of rhinophoral ganglia and the lack of oral tentacle ganglia as well as the de novo formation of the adult muscle complex. On the other hand, the structure and arrangement of the serotonergic apical organ is similar to other caenogastropod and opisthobranch gastropods supporting their sister group relationship. PMID:20205753

  17. Solar generator, especially for space craft

    SciTech Connect

    Schweig, H.

    1981-10-06

    A plurality of lightweight sheets or panels are assembled to form a solar generator, especially for space craft. The panels or sheets which carry the solar cells, are made of fiber compound materials and are secured to a frame structure made of lightweight tubular members. Tensioning elements are operatively interposed between the frame structure and the panel sheets. The corners of the frame structures are provided with connecting elements so that several frames may be interconnected to form still larger assemblies. These assemblies may be folded and unfolded as desired.

  18. Thermal dependency of shell growth, microstructure, and stable isotopes in laboratory-reared Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kozue; Suzuki, Atsushi; Isono, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Irie, Takahiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Mori, Chiharu; Sato, Mizuho; Sato, Kei; Sasaki, Takenori

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally examined the growth, microstructure, and chemistry of shells of the bloody clam, Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia), reared at five temperatures (13, 17, 21, 25, and 29°C) with a constant pCO2 condition (˜450 μatm). In this species, the exterior side of the shell is characterized by a composite prismatic structure; on the interior side, it has a crossed lamellar structure on the interior surface. We previously found a negative correlation between temperature and the relative thickness of the composite prismatic structure in field-collected specimens. In the reared specimens, the relationship curve between temperature and the growth increment of the composite prismatic structure was humped shaped, with a maximum at 17°C, which was compatible with the results obtained in the field-collected specimens. In contrast, the thickness of the crossed lamellar structure was constant over the temperature range tested. These results suggest that the composite prismatic structure principally accounts for the thermal dependency of shell growth, and this inference was supported by the finding that shell growth rates were significantly correlated with the thickness of the composite prismatic structure. We also found a negative relationship between the rearing temperature and δ18O of the shell margin, in close quantitative agreement with previous reports. The findings presented here will contribute to the improved age determination of fossil and recent clams based on seasonal microstructural records.

  19. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Arumugam, Muthuvel; Azad, Raj Vardhan; Saxena, Rohit; Ghose, Supriyo; Biswas, Nihar Ranjan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India. Methods Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups. Results In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursa crumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization. Conclusions The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases. PMID:25183067

  20. Visual uncertainty influences the extent of an especial skill.

    PubMed

    Czy?, S H; Kwon, O-S; Marzec, J; Styrkowiec, P; Breslin, G

    2015-12-01

    An especial skill in basketball emerges through highly repetitive practice at the 15 ft free throw line. The extent of the role vision plays in the emergence of an especial skill is unknown. We examined the especial skills of ten skilled basketball players in normal and blurred vision conditions where participants wore corrective lenses. As such, we selectively manipulated visual information without affecting the participants' explicit knowledge that they were shooting free throws. We found that shot efficiency was significantly lower in blurred vision conditions as expected, and that the concave shape of shot proficiency function in normal vision conditions became approximately linear in blurred vision conditions. By applying a recently proposed generalization model of especial skills, we suggest that the linearity of shot proficiency function reflects the participants' lesser dependence on especial skill in blurred vision conditions. The findings further characterize the role of visual context in the emergence of an especial skill. PMID:26342796

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-01-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria. Images PMID:1577710

  2. Fast evolving 18S rRNA sequences from Solenogastres (Mollusca) resist standard PCR amplification and give new insights into mollusk substitution rate heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The 18S rRNA gene is one of the most important molecular markers, used in diverse applications such as molecular phylogenetic analyses and biodiversity screening. The Mollusca is the second largest phylum within the animal kingdom and mollusks show an outstanding high diversity in body plans and ecological adaptations. Although an enormous amount of 18S data is available for higher mollusks, data on some early branching lineages are still limited. Despite of some partial success in obtaining these data from Solenogastres, by some regarded to be the most "basal" mollusks, this taxon still remained problematic due to contamination with food organisms and general amplification difficulties. Results We report here the first authentic 18S genes of three Solenogastres species (Mollusca), each possessing a unique sequence composition with regions conspicuously rich in guanine and cytosine. For these GC-rich regions we calculated strong secondary structures. The observed high intra-molecular forces hamper standard amplification and appear to increase formation of chimerical sequences caused by contaminating foreign DNAs from potential prey organisms. In our analyses, contamination was avoided by using RNA as a template. Indication for contamination of previously published Solenogastres sequences is presented. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were conducted using RNA specific models that account for compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Conclusions The extreme morphological diversity of mollusks is mirrored in the molecular 18S data and shows elevated substitution rates mainly in three higher taxa: true limpets (Patellogastropoda), Cephalopoda and Solenogastres. Our phylogenetic tree based on 123 species, including representatives of all mollusk classes, shows limited resolution at the class level but illustrates the pitfalls of artificial groupings formed due to shared biased sequence composition. PMID:20214780

  3. A preliminary study of iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates (chitons, Mollusca) in near-shore environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-10-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radulae (teeth or rasping tongues) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron-bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radulae might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radulae collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00 ‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae in the sublittoral zone, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds on both green and red algae in the eulittoral zone, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Three possible pathways are proposed to account for the different isotopic signatures: (i) physiologically controlled processes within the chitons that lead to species-dependent fractionation; (ii) diet-controlled variability due to different Fe isotope fractionation in the red and green algal food sources; and (iii) environmentally controlled fractionation that causes variation in the isotopic signatures of bioavailable Fe in the different tidal regions. Our preliminary results suggest that while chitons are not simple recorders of the ambient seawater Fe isotopic signature, Fe isotopes provide valuable information concerning Fe biogeochemical cycling in near-shore environments, and may potentially be used to probe sources of Fe recorded in different organisms.

  4. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING SW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  5. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  6. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  7. An especial skill: Support for a learned parameters hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Gavin; Hodges, Nicola J; Kennedy, Rodney; Hanlon, Michael; Williams, A Mark

    2010-05-01

    We tested the 'learned parameters' hypothesis as an explanation of the 'especial skill effect'. Outcome attainment and movement kinematics were recorded for 10 expert and 10 novice players performing basketball free-throw shots at five distances (11-19 ft) with a regular and heavy weight basketball. As predicted, experts performed better than expected relative to the regression equation at the 15 ft, free-throw line with the regular basketball, supporting the 'especial skill effect'. This effect was not present for the experts when shooting with the heavy ball. Novices did not show an advantage at the free-throw line when performing with either ball. Although the outcome attainment scores support the 'learned parameters' hypotheses, kinematic analysis failed to identify differences in the movement pattern for the especial skill, suggesting that these skills (i.e., shooting at different distances) are not governed by separate motor programs. PMID:20045100

  8. Ten new complete mitochondrial genomes of pulmonates (Mollusca: Gastropoda) and their impact on phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reconstructing the higher relationships of pulmonate gastropods has been difficult. The use of morphology is problematic due to high homoplasy. Molecular studies have suffered from low taxon sampling. Forty-eight complete mitochondrial genomes are available for gastropods, ten of which are pulmonates. Here are presented the new complete mitochondrial genomes of the ten following species of pulmonates: Salinator rhamphidia (Amphiboloidea); Auriculinella bidentata, Myosotella myosotis, Ovatella vulcani, and Pedipes pedipes (Ellobiidae); Peronia peronii (Onchidiidae); Siphonaria gigas (Siphonariidae); Succinea putris (Stylommatophora); Trimusculus reticulatus (Trimusculidae); and Rhopalocaulis grandidieri (Veronicellidae). Also, 94 new pulmonate-specific primers across the entire mitochondrial genome are provided, which were designed for amplifying entire mitochondrial genomes through short reactions and closing gaps after shotgun sequencing. Results The structural features of the 10 new mitochondrial genomes are provided. All genomes share similar gene orders. Phylogenetic analyses were performed including the 10 new genomes and 17 genomes from Genbank (outgroups, opisthobranchs, and other pulmonates). Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood analyses, based on the concatenated amino-acid sequences of the 13 protein-coding genes, produced the same topology. The pulmonates are paraphyletic and basal to the opisthobranchs that are monophyletic at the tip of the tree. Siphonaria, traditionally regarded as a basal pulmonate, is nested within opisthobranchs. Pyramidella, traditionally regarded as a basal (non-euthyneuran) heterobranch, is nested within pulmonates. Several hypotheses are rejected, such as the Systellommatophora, Geophila, and Eupulmonata. The Ellobiidae is polyphyletic, but the false limpet Trimusculus reticulatus is closely related to some ellobiids. Conclusions Despite recent efforts for increasing the taxon sampling in euthyneuran (opisthobranchs and pulmonates) molecular phylogenies, several of the deeper nodes are still uncertain, because of low support values as well as some incongruence between analyses based on complete mitochondrial genomes and those based on individual genes (18S, 28S, 16S, CO1). Additional complete genomes are needed for pulmonates (especially for Williamia, Otina, and Smeagol), as well as basal heterobranchs closely related to euthyneurans. Increasing the number of markers for gastropod (and more broadly mollusk) phylogenetics also is necessary in order to resolve some of the deeper nodes -although clearly not an easy task. Step by step, however, new relationships are being unveiled, such as the close relationships between the false limpet Trimusculus and ellobiids, the nesting of pyramidelloids within pulmonates, and the close relationships of Siphonaria to sacoglossan opisthobranchs. The additional genomes presented here show that some species share an identical mitochondrial gene order due to convergence. PMID:21985526

  9. Identification of sequestered chloroplasts in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic sacoglossan sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sacoglossan sea slugs are well known for their unique ability among metazoans to incorporate functional chloroplasts (kleptoplasty) in digestive glandular cells, enabling the slugs to use these as energy source when starved for weeks and months. However, members assigned to the shelled Oxynoacea and Limapontioidea (often with dorsal processes) are in general not able to keep the incorporated chloroplasts functional. Since obviously no algal genes are present within three (out of six known) species with chloroplast retention of several months, other factors enabling functional kleptoplasty have to be considered. Certainly, the origin of the chloroplasts is important, however, food source of most of the about 300 described species is not known so far. Therefore, a deduction of specific algal food source as a factor to perform functional kleptoplasty was still missing. Results We investigated the food sources of 26 sacoglossan species, freshly collected from the field, by applying the chloroplast marker genes tufA and rbcL and compared our results with literature data of species known for their retention capability. For the majority of the investigated species, especially for the genus Thuridilla, we were able to identify food sources for the first time. Furthermore, published data based on feeding observations were confirmed and enlarged by the molecular methods. We also found that certain chloroplasts are most likely essential for establishing functional kleptoplasty. Conclusions Applying DNA-Barcoding appeared to be very efficient and allowed a detailed insight into sacoglossan food sources. We favor rbcL for future analyses, but tufA might be used additionally in ambiguous cases. We narrowed down the algal species that seem to be essential for long-term-functional photosynthesis: Halimeda, Caulerpa, Penicillus, Avrainvillea, Acetabularia and Vaucheria. None of these were found in Thuridilla, the only plakobranchoidean genus without long-term retention forms. The chloroplast type, however, does not solely determine functional kleptoplasty; members of no-retention genera, such as Cylindrobulla or Volvatella, feed on the same algae as e.g., the long-term-retention forms Plakobranchus ocellatus or Elysia crispata, respectively. Evolutionary benefits of functional kleptoplasty are still questionable, since a polyphagous life style would render slugs more independent of specific food sources and their abundance. PMID:24555467

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia): The first representative from the family Mactridae with novel gene order and unusual tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xueping; Zhao, Nana; Shen, Xin; Hao, Jue; Liang, Meng; Zhu, Xiaolin; Cheng, Hanliang; Yan, Binlun; Liu, Zhaopu

    2012-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome plays an important role in the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans. Mactridae, also known as trough shells or duck clams, is an important family of marine bivalve clams in the order Veneroida. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xishishe Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia), which is the first representative from the family Mactridae. The mitochondrial genome of C. antiquata is of 17,384bp in length, and encodes 35 genes, including 12 protein-coding, 21 transfer RNA, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Compared with the typical gene content of animal mitochondrial genomes, atp8 and tRNAS(2) are missing. Gene order of the mitochondrial genome of C. antiquata is unique compared with others from Veneroida. In the mitochondrial genome of the C. antiquata, a total of 2189bp of non-coding nucleotides are scattered among 26 non-coding regions. The largest non-coding region contains one section of tandem repeats (99 bp11), which is the second largest tandem repeats found in the mitochondrial genomes from Veneroida. The phylogenetic trees based on mitochondrial genomes support the monophyly of Veneridae and Lucinidae, and the relationship at the family level: ((Veneridae+Mactridae)+(Cardiidae+Solecurtidae))+Lucinidae. The phylogenetic result is consistent with the morphological classification. Meanwhile, bootstrap values are very high (BP=94-100), suggesting that the evolutionary relationship based on mitochondrial genomes is very reliable. PMID:22381378

  11. Effects of radiation on development, especially of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S.P.; D'Amato, C.J.

    1980-12-01

    Humans and other organisms are exposed to ionizing radiations from a variety of natural and man-made sources. Radiation may cause mutations and chromosome abnormalities, cell-killing, alterations and transformations in cell growth, and carcinogenetic changes. This paper considers principally the cell-killing and nonlethal cell alterations in developing laboratory mammals and humans, especially the nervous system, that follow irradiation and often lead to malformation and disturbed function, but at certain stages to restitution of the injury. Most of what researchers know about the mechanisms of these radiation effects in man is derived from animal experiments, especially with rats. The few observations in humans have corresponded closely to them. Researchers illustrate the cellular effects and malformative results with an example of cell-killing in the developing cortex of a human fetus exposed to therapeutic radiation in utero; a current timetable of the malformative and other effects of radiation on rats during development from which expectations of human effects might be extrapolated; examples of hydrocephalus produced in rats; low-dose alterations of nerve cells in rats; and a microcephalic Japanese boy exposed in utero to the atomic bomb at Hiroshima in 1945.

  12. Physical training, with especial reference to the training of convalescents.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Lieutenant-Colonel Netterville Barron, MVO RAMC, identified that although there was a moral and practical reason for providing training for convalescents, there lacked the scientific knowledge and structure to deliver it correctly. He should perhaps be considered the pioneer of rehabilitation within the military, with this paper providing the embryonic foundation from which the present DMRP has evolved. There is now very good science to support physical training and the delivery of rehabilitation, which now begins at the earliest time possible in the intensive care unit. From there, a robust structure of rehabilitation supports the patient back to duty or to the point of discharge. What has not altered is the seemingly never-ending debate about the provision of continued support (or lack of) after soldiers are finally discharged. Despite this fact, it is highly likely that Lt. Col Barron would be very satisfied with how far "physical training, with especial reference to the training of convalescent" has progressed. PMID:24845887

  13. Megafauna recovered from a cold hydrocarbon seep in the deep Alaskan Beaufort Sea, including a new species of Axinus (Thracidae: Bivalvia: Mollusca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. L.; Valentich-Scott, P.; Lorenson, T. D.; Edwards, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    Several specimens of a new species of Axinus and a single well-worn gastropod columella provisionally assigned to the genus Neptunea (Buccinidae: Gastropoda: Mollusca) were recently recovered from at least two cores, the longest of which is 5.72 m long, from a large seafloor mound, informally named the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM). The CSM is located at 2,530 m water depth on the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay and is a fluid explosion feature containing methane hydrate and methane-saturated sediments overlying a folded and faulted deep basin. Only two modern species of Axinus are currently known. Axinus grandis (Verrill & Smith, 1885) is a northern Atlantic species and the recently described species, A. cascadiensis Oliver and Holmes (2007), is only known from Baby Bare Seamount, Cascadia Basin, northeastern Pacific Ocean. Common fragments, single valves, and a single articulated specimen represent this new Axinus species. These shells were distributed over nearly the entire length of the primary core. All specimens show wear and (or) dissolution. The age of these specimens is unknown and no living representatives were encountered. The genus Axinus has a fossil record back to the early Eocene in England and the Paleocene and Eocene in Egypt. Biogeographically the genus appears to have originated in the Tethys Sea and became established in the Atlantic Ocean during the Eocene, spreading across the Arctic Ocean in the late Tertiary. With the opening of the Bering Strait in the latest Miocene or early Pliocene the genus Axinus migrated southwest into the northeast Pacific. Interestingly, hydrocarbon seep deposits are also present on the adjacent North Slope of Alaska in the Marsh Anticline at Carter Creek, Camden Bay. These rocks, the Nuwok beds, contain abundant Thracidae bivalve of the genus Thracia, but not Axinus, however the rocks also represent cold seep deposits. These rocks have been variously dated from Oligocene to Pliocene and the exact age remains uncertain. Neptunea are a predatory snails well represented in the earliest Miocene to Holocene of the northern Pacific Ocean and in the late Pliocene to Holocene of the northern Atlantic. The presence of Neptunea at CSM, if identified properly, gives a maximum age for these deposits of latest Miocene or early Pliocene, after the opening of the Bering Strait, although they could be as young as Holocene.

  14. Una Nueva IDEA: Una Guia para Padres acerca de los Cambios en la Ley de Educacion Especial para Ninos con Incapacidades (A New IDEA: A Parent's Guide to the Changes in Social Education Law for Children with Disabilities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Tammy

    This guide for parents, in Spanish, explains the changes in the federal special education law resulting from the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Changes related to the parent's role in decisions about the child's education and in how schools can discipline special education students are highlighted. A…

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUSTAINABLE AND APPROPRIATE DRINKING WATER SYSTEM FOR MONTANA DE LUZ AND NUEVA ESPERANZA, HONDURAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this project, we plan to design an appropriate and sustainable water treatment and supply system for a small village (Nueva Esperanza) and nearby orphanage in rural Honduras. The orphanage, named Montana de Luz, is a home exclusively for children with HIV/A...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUSTAINABLE AND APPROPRIATE DRINKING WATER SYSTEM FOR MONTANA DE LUZ AND NUEVA ESPERANZA, HONDURAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this project, we plan to design an appropriate and sustainable water treatment and supply system for a small village (Nueva Esperanza) and nearby orphanage in rural Honduras. The orphanage, named “Montana de Luz,” is a home exclusively for children with HIV/A...

  17. Nuevas observaciones de 3C10 con el VLA*: estudio de la expansin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynoso, E. M.; Moffett, D. A.:; Dubner, G. M.; Giacani, E. B.; Reynolds, S. P.; Goss, W. M.; Dickel, J.

    Se presentan nuevos resultados sobre la expansin del remanente de la supernova de Tycho a lo largo de un intervalo de 10.9 aos, comparando nuevas observaciones tomadas con el VLA a 1375 y 1635 MHz durante 1994 y 1995, con observaciones previas realizadas entre 1983 y 1984 (Dickel y col. ~1991 AJ 101, 2151), usando las mismas configuraciones, anchos de banda, calibradores y tiempos de integracin. El coeficiente de expansin se calcula para sectores radiales de 4o de ancho cada uno, ajustando la correlacin cruzada de las derivadas de los perfiles promedio para cada poca. A partir de la expansin medida, se estima el ndice (parmetro de expansin) de la ley potencial R? tm como m? d ln R/d ln t . Este valor se compara con coeficientes tericos para diferentes fases evolutivas de remanentes de supernova.

  18. Assessment of paleo-oxygenation conditions on the Agua Nueva Formation (Cenomanian-Turonian), Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuez, F.; Canet, C.; Barragan-Manzo, R.; Alfonso, P.

    2013-05-01

    Organic-carbon-rich, laminated sediments are characteristic and widespread in the global stratigraphic record of the mid-Cretaceous, mainly during the Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE's). In central-eastern Mexico, deposits of the Agua Nueva Formation are constituted by dark-gray, carbonaceous and laminated limestone with pyritic layers related to the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE 2. Herein, through different proxies, variations of paleo-redox conditions are studied in detail on a stratigraphic section of the Agua Nueva Formation. A first approach to redox conditions comes from the analysis of the stratigraphic record. Laminated fabrics and the paucity of bioturbation are typical features of a poorly oxygenated sedimentary environment. The presence of well-preserved fish remains and inoceramid bivalve shells is also consistent with those conditions. On the other hand, discrete light-colored and bioturbated thin levels indicate limited increases in the dissolved oxygen content. Geochemical proxies include ?13C in carbonates, ?34S in pyrite and the concentration of various redox-sensitive trace-elements. ?13C (VPDB) ranges from 0.39 to 1.30, whereas ?34Spy (VCDT) is between -41.23 and -11.27. The stratigraphic variation patterns of both isotopic values (?13C and ?34S) are roughly opposite, reflecting changes in the burial of organic matter (OM) and, consequently, in the rate of bacterial sulphate reduction. Thus, positive 13C-rich carbonates represent lower free oxygen condition which enhanced burial flux of OM, tend to shift ?13C of carbonates toward positive values and triggered the incorporation of 32S into the sulfide by bacteria. This situation is also suggested by an enrichment of the sediments in V, Ni, Cr, Cu, Co, Zn, Mo and U. The abundance and size distribution of pyrite framboids proved to be in good agreement with the geochemical results. They also suggest dysoxic to anoxic conditions for the stratigraphic section studied. Both parameters have been found to be highly variable through the stratigraphic section. The size of framboids varies from 0.9 ?m to 29.1 ?m, whereas the means of the populations in all analyzed samples range between 4.9 ?m and 7.4 ?m. The modal abundance ranges from 2.4% to 42.6%.; Framboidal pyrite

  19. Challenges to cognitive bases for an especial motor skill at the regulation baseball pitching distance.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jeffery P; Wilson, Jacob M; Wilson, Gabriel J; Theall, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    We tested expert baseball pitchers for evidence of especial skills at the regulation pitching distance. Seven college pitchers threw indoors to a target placed at 60.5 feet (18.44 m) and four closer and four further distances away. Accuracy at the regulation distance was significantly better than predicted by regression on the nonregulation distances (p < .02), indicating an especial skill effect emerged despite the absence of normal contextual cues. Self-efficacy data failed to support confidence as a mediating factor in especial skill effect. We concluded that cognitive theories fail to fully account for the patterns of observed data, and therefore theoretical explanations of the especial skills must address noncognitive aspects of motor learning and control. PMID:19791633

  20. Synthetic Marijuana Lands Thousands of Young People in the ER, Especially Young Males

    MedlinePLUS

    ... People in the ER, Especially Young Males Synthetic Marijuana Lands Thousands of Young People in the ER, ... on the scene a few years ago, synthetic marijuana (MJ)often called Spice or K2has become ...

  1. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.

  2. Paraneoplastic downbeat nystagmus associated with cerebellar hypermetabolism especially in the nodulus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo Young; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-08-15

    A 52-year-old man with vertigo and imbalance for two weeks showed spontaneous downbeat (DBN), horizontal gaze-evoked, and positional apogeotropic nystagmus along with severe limb and truncal ataxia. Gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI was normal, but whole body and brain 2-deoxy-2-[F18]fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism in the right lower lobe of the lung and the cerebellum, especially in the nodulus. The lesion in the lung was confirmed as mixed cell carcinoma. Paraneoplastic DBN may be associated with cerebellar hypermetabolism, especially in the nodulus. PMID:24928076

  3. Challenges to Cognitive Bases for an Especial Motor Skill at the Regulation Baseball Pitching Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Jeffery P.; Wilson, Jacob M.; Wilson, Gabriel J.; Theall, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We tested expert baseball pitchers for evidence of especial skills at the regulation pitching distance. Seven college pitchers threw indoors to a target placed at 60.5 feet (18.44 m) and four closer and four further distances away. Accuracy at the regulation distance was significantly better than predicted by regression on the nonregulation…

  4. Synthetic Marijuana Lands Thousands of Young People in the ER, Especially Young Males

    MedlinePLUS

    ... People in the ER, Especially Young Males Synthetic Marijuana Lands Thousands of Young People in the ER, ... on the scene a few years ago, synthetic marijuana (MJ)—often called “Spice” or “K2”—has become ...

  5. Men Have Greater Self-Esteem Than Women, Especially in Developed Nations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_156513.html Men Have Greater Self-Esteem Than Women, Especially in Developed Nations Study also ... 4, 2016 MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Self-esteem increases as people grow older, and men tend ...

  6. Las propiedades de las estrellas extraas en el marco de una nueva ecuacin de estado para la materia extraa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugones, G.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Se estudian las propiedades generales de las estrellas constitudas por materia extraa (ME) en el marco de una nueva ecuacin de estado (EOS) en la que consideramos la masa de los quarks como dependiente del nmero medio de bariones por unidad de volumen. Se asume esta dependencia de forma que los quarks sean livianos (pesados) a densidades altas (bajas). En esta aproximacin, la EOS de la ME es similar a la predicha por el modelo de la Bolsa del MIT, pero es significativamente mas dura a bajas densidades. Esta propiedad modifica las propiedades de las estrellas extraas en forma notable. Encontramos que, con esta nueva EOS, los objetos pueden ser ms masivos que en el caso de la EOS de la bolsa del MIT y que, adems, pueden presentar mayores redshifts gravitatorios en hasta un 10%. En el caso de las oscilaciones radiales de estos objetos, calculamos la relacin perodo vs. redshift gravitacional y encontramos una expresin analtica simple para el caso de las oscilaciones de objetos de baja masa. Encontramos que, an con hiptesis muy diferentes en cuanto a la ecuacin de estado de la materia extraa, las propiedades generales de estos objetos no se ve afectada en forma fundamental, y, por lo tanto, no deberan ser muy diferentes de las aqu expuestas.

  7. The Arctic is especially sensitive to black carbon emissions from within the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, M.; Berntsen, T.; Seland; Kristjansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic has warmed twice as fast as the global average over the past century and is likely to be especially sensitive to black carbon aerosols. Black carbon warm the air by absorbing solar radiation and can promote snow melt when deposited in snow. In this study we address the question of how sensitive the Arctic climate is to black carbon emitted within the Arctic compared to black carbon emitted at mid-latitudes. We consider the emission-climate response spectrum and present a set of experiments using a coupled global climate model. The climate model includes a snow model to simulate the climate effect of BC deposited on snow. A new emission data set including BC emissions from flaring and a seasonal variation in the domestic sector has been used. The dominating BC emissions in the Arctic is related to oil and gas fields in north western Russia. We find that most of the BC-induced warming in the Arctic is caused by black carbon deposited on snow, rather than in the atmosphere. Black carbon emitted in the Arctic is more likely to get deposited at the surface since most of the concentrations stay at lower altitudes. Especially during winter, BC emitted in North-Eurasia is transported into the high Arctic at low altitudes. We find that BC emitted within the Arctic has an almost 5-times larger Arctic surface temperature response (per unit of emitted mass) compared to emissions at mid-latitudes. Today there are few within-Arctic sources of BC, but the emissions are expected to grow due to increased human activity in the Arctic. There is a great need to improve cleaner technologies if further development is to take place in the Arctic, especially since the Arctic has a significantly higher sensitivity to BC emitted within the Arctic compared to BC emitted at mid-latitudes.

  8. The Present Status of Airship Construction, Especially of Airship-framing Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebner, Hans

    1938-01-01

    This work proposes to sketch, in broad outline, the status of airship construction in the various countries, at a time when commerce over great distances might be finally opened up to the airship through the performances of the "Graf Zeppelin." After a short historical review, a survey of the most important rigid and semirigid airships built since 1925, their differences and special problems, is made. In more detailed treatment, the framing construction of the more recent rigid airships and some especially interesting structural questions are investigated.

  9. The Dominant Robot: Threatening Robots Cause Psychological Reactance, Especially When They Have Incongruent Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubroeks, M. A. J.; Ham, J. R. C.; Midden, C. J. H.

    Persuasive technology can take the form of a social agent that persuades people to change behavior or attitudes. However, like any persuasive technology, persuasive social agents might trigger psychological reactance, which can lead to restoration behavior. The current study investigated whether interacting with a persuasive robot can cause psychological reactance. Additionally, we investigated whether goal congruency plays a role in psychological reactance. Participants programmed a washing machine while a robot gave threatening advice. Confirming expectations, participants experienced more psychological reactance when receiving high-threatening advice compared to low-threatening advice. Moreover, when the robot gave high-threatening advice and expressed an incongruent goal, participants reported the highest level of psychological reactance (on an anger measure). Finally, high-threatening advice led to more restoration, and this relationship was partially mediated by psychological reactance. Overall, results imply that under certain circumstances persuasive technology can trigger opposite effects, especially when people have incongruent goal intentions.

  10. Inappropriate management conditions, especially for the regressed class, are related to sperm quality in Prochilodus lineatus.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Thiago G; Hainfellner, Patrick; Kuradomi, Rafael Y; Muñoz, Mario E; Honji, Renato M; Moreira, Renata G; Batlouni, Sergio R

    2015-03-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the characteristics of the reproductive classes and semen quality in curimbatá (Prochilodus lineatus) breeders maintained in two different rearing systems. To achieve this goal, cages (Cs) and earthen ponds (EPs) were used as experimental systems to provide unsuitable and suitable conditions, respectively. The fish were maintained under the experimental conditions for 18 months. During this period, males were randomly sampled every 2 months for biometric analysis (n = 30 per sample) and for an evaluation of selected characteristics of the testes (n = 5 per sample). After this period, males maintained in EPs and males maintained in Cs (CMs) were evaluated in induced breeding experiments. We observed that rearing P. lineatus in a C at a high stocking density for the long 18-month period of study produced reductions in growth, testis development, gonadosomatic index values, and sperm quality in the fish. We found differences between the groups in all the reproductive classes examined, especially in the regression class, which showed a pronounced accumulation of immature germ cells in the CMs. In this group, we also noted a less intense transition from a continuous to discontinuous germinal epithelium, with an extended and abnormal but less intense spermatogenic period resulting in decreases in semen volume and sperm concentration in the breeding season. Together, such dysfunctions resulted in the production of low-quality sperm in the CMs, as demonstrated by lower-quality DNA (as evaluated by the comet assay), low fertilization success, and low hatching success. In conclusion, to ensure high-quality semen in P. lineatus, appropriate management conditions must be provided throughout the reproductive cycle, especially for the regressed class, even in winter, two seasons before the breeding season. PMID:25515362

  11. Double layered self-expanding metal stents for malignant esophageal obstruction, especially across the gastroesophageal junction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Dae; Park, Su Bum; Kang, Dae Hwan; Lee, Jae Hyung; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kim, Hyung Wook; Chung, Chung Uk; Jeong, Young Il

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of double-layered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction according to whether SEMS crosses the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). METHODS: Forty eight patients who underwent the SEMS insertion for malignant esophageal obstruction were enrolled. Patients were classified as GEJ group (SEMS across GEJ, 18 patients) and non-GEJ group (SEMS above GEJ, 30 patients) according to SEMS position. Double layered (outer uncovered and inner covered stent) esophageal stents were placed. RESULTS: The SEMS insertion and the clinical improvement were achieved in all patients in both groups. Stent malfunction occurred in seven patients in the GEJ group and nine patients in the non-GEJ group. Tumor overgrowth occurred in five and eight patients, respectively, food impaction occurred in one patient in each group, and stent migration occurred in one and no patient, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups. Reflux esophagitis occurred more frequently in the GEJ group (eight vs five patients, P = 0.036) and was controlled by proton pump inhibitor. Aspiration pneumonia occurred in zero and five patients, respectively, and tracheoesophageal fistula occurred in zero and two patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: Double-layered SEMS are a feasible and effective treatment when placed across the GEJ for malignant esophageal obstruction. Double-layered SEMS provide acceptable complications, especially migration, although reflux esophagitis is more common in the GEJ group. PMID:22851867

  12. Nitrogen-doped porous carbons by conversion of azo dyes especially in the case of tartrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong Jie; Chen, Chong; Cui, Peng; Chen, Xiang Ying

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbons possessing high surface areas and large pore volumes have been prepared by directly heating the mixture of tartrazine and Ca(OAc)2H2O at 800 C especially without further physical or chemical activation, where Ca(OAc)2H2O serves as the hard template to regulate the surface area and pore structures. It reveals that the addition of Ca(OAc)2H2O can remarkably improve the surface area and total pore volume. The T-Ca-800-3:1 sample displays the highest BET surface area as 1669 m2 g-1 and largest total pore volume 0.85 cm3 g-1, which is much larger than those without adding Ca(OAc)2H2O. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent capacitive performances, including high specific capacitance (ca. 224.3 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1), good rate capability (the retention of 42.6% at 60 A g-1) and good cycling stability (the retention of 92.3% within 5000 cycles).

  13. [The quality of medical examination of persons who underwent the impact of especially harmful chemical factors].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, A G

    2010-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of the results of dynamic clinical functional examination of the contingent working or worked with especially harmful chemical substances and the corresponding medical documentation was made. The research approved the effectiveness of the system of medical examination of servicemen and mandatory medical check-ups of civilian personnel selected to service or work with toxic chemicals relevant to chemical weapon at the expense of optimization of the procedure of selection and dynamic observation. General morbidity among servicemen with maximal professional risk was on 20% lower than in the group with minimal risk and on 64% lower than in the control group. The algorithm was developed to apply the diagnostic techniques during medical examination of servicemen and mandatory medical check-ups of the civilian personnel of Military Forces of Russian Federation. The system differentiating approach was implemented to take into account the specifics of disease course and the succession in medical maintenance of this group of the examined. The optimization was applied to the system of quality management in medical examination of servicemen and mandatory medical check-ups of the civilian personnel, selected to service or work with toxic chemicals relevant to chemical weapon in accordance with requirements of the Federal Law On the social support of citizen employed to work with chemical weapon. PMID:20731148

  14. A new specific method to detect cyanide in body fluids, especially whole blood, by fluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Felscher, D; Wulfmeyer, M

    1998-09-01

    This study shows a simple, rapid, and specific method for the quantitative determination of cyanide ion in body fluids, especially blood, by fluorimetry. It is based upon the transformation of cyanide ion into hydrocyanic acid, which then reacts with 2,3-naphthalenedialdehyde and taurine in a self-contained system. The 1-cyano-2-benzoisoindole derivate thus formed is suitable for fluorimetric measurement (lambdaEX = 418 nm; lambdaEM = 460 nm). The fluorescence intensity can be determined by spectrophotometry or by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. The detection limit is 0.002 microg/mL. Linearity was excellent from 0.002 to 1 microg/mL for spectrophotometry and from 0.002 to 5 microg/mL for HPLC with fluorescence detection. The coefficient of variation for repeatability was 8% or less. Thiocyanate and sulfide did not interfere, even at high concentrations (200 microg/mL). The method was applicable to whole blood, so it should be suitable for both clinical and forensic purposes. PMID:9737330

  15. Seasonal variability of meiofauna, especially harpacticoid copepods, in Posidonia oceanica macrophytodetritus accumulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascart, Thibaud; Lepoint, Gilles; Deschoemaeker, Silke; Binard, Marc; Remy, François; De Troch, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was (1) to assess the diversity and density of meiofauna taxa, especially harpacticoid copepod species, present within accumulated seagrass macrophytodetritus on unvegetated sand patches and (2) to elucidate the community structure of detritus-associated harpacticoid copepods in relation to natural temporal variability of physico-chemical characteristics of accumulations. This was investigated in a Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile seagrass ecosystem in the northwest Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Calvi, Corsica, 42°35‧N, 8°43‧E) using a triplicate macrophytodetritus core field sampling in two contrasting sites over the four seasons of 2011. Meiofauna higher taxa consisted of 50% Copepoda, of which 87% belonged to the Harpacticoida order. Nematoda was the second most abundant taxa. The copepod community displayed a wide variety of morphologically similar and ecologically different species (i.e. mesopsammic, phytal, phytal-swimmers, planktonic and parasitic). The harpacticoid copepod community followed a strong seasonal pattern with highest abundances and species diversity in May-August, revealing a link with the leaf litter epiphyte primary production cycle. Aside from the important role in sheltering, housing and feeding potential of macrophytodetritus, a harpacticoid community BEST analysis demonstrated a positive correlation with habitat complexity and a negative correlation with water movements and P. oceanica leaf litter accumulation.

  16. Prosaposin regulates coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells, especially those in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kashiba, Misato; Oizumi, Mikiko; Suzuki, Masaru; Sawamura, Yoshimi; Nagashima, Kohei; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a key component of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain and is one of the most important cellular antioxidants. We previously reported that glycoprotein saposin B (SapB) binds CoQ10 in human cells. To elucidate the physiological role of SapB and its precursor, prosaposin (Psap), we prepared stable transfectants of HepG2 that overexpress wild-type human Psap (Wt-Tf). We also established a SapB domain mutated Psap (Mt-Tf) in which cysteine198 was replaced with serine to disrupt three dimensional protein structure by the loss of S-S bridging. Psap knockdown (KD) strains were also examined. Western blotting analysis confirmed overexpression or knockdown of Psap in these HepG2 cells. The cellular ratios of CoQ10 to free cholesterol (FC) significantly decreased in the order of Wt-Tf>parental>Mt-Tf>KD. Additionally, the ratios of CoQ10/FC in mitochondrial fractions decreased in the order of Wt-Tf>parental>KD. These data indicate that Psap and/or SapB regulate CoQ10 levels in HepG2 cells, especially in their mitochondria. PMID:25320454

  17. Prosaposin regulates coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells, especially those in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kashiba, Misato; Oizumi, Mikiko; Suzuki, Masaru; Sawamura, Yoshimi; Nagashima, Kohei; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2014-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a key component of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain and is one of the most important cellular antioxidants. We previously reported that glycoprotein saposin B (SapB) binds CoQ10 in human cells. To elucidate the physiological role of SapB and its precursor, prosaposin (Psap), we prepared stable transfectants of HepG2 that overexpress wild-type human Psap (Wt-Tf). We also established a SapB domain mutated Psap (Mt-Tf) in which cysteine(198) was replaced with serine to disrupt three dimensional protein structure by the loss of S-S bridging. Psap knockdown (KD) strains were also examined. Western blotting analysis confirmed overexpression or knockdown of Psap in these HepG2 cells. The cellular ratios of CoQ10 to free cholesterol (FC) significantly decreased in the order of Wt-Tf>parental>Mt-Tf>KD. Additionally, the ratios of CoQ10/FC in mitochondrial fractions decreased in the order of Wt-Tf>parental>KD. These data indicate that Psap and/or SapB regulate CoQ10 levels in HepG2 cells, especially in their mitochondria. PMID:25320454

  18. Etologia aplicada al manejo de especies amenazadas: el caso del turon de patas negras (Mustela nigripes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vargas, A.; Biggins, D.; Miller, B.

    1999-01-01

    de esta especie de un modo más eficaz y rentable. Black-footed ferrets are considered one of the world's most endangered mammals. The last wild population was discovered in 1981 in Meteetsee, Wyoming, and, in 1985 it collapsed due to an epizootic of canine distemper in combination with sylvatic plague. Prior to the extinction of the last remnant population, 18 wild black-footed ferrets were captured to initiate captive propagation efforts. Captive breeding has been successful and, during the last 11 years, more than 2600 black-footed ferrets have been born in captive breeding centers. Since 1991, approximately 870 ferrets have been reintroduced in 5 areas located within the ferret's original geographic distribution, including sites in Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, and Arizona. Scientific research has been, and continues to be, a critical tool to direct recovery efforts. Studies in applied ethology conducted on captive and reintroduced ferret populations have demonstrated that a naturalistic captive environment, particularly during early developmental periods, enhances the expression of behaviors necessary for survival in nature. Ferrets raised in a naturalistic environment develop better predatory skills, are able to recognize prairie dog burrows as a home and shelter from predators, and are more physically fit. Results from these studies have been adapted into management strategies to help implement a more cost-effective road to black-footed ferret recovery.

  19. The mitochondrial genomes of two scallops, Argopecten irradians and Chlamys farreri (Mollusca: Bivalvia): the most highly rearranged gene order in the family Pectinidae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Shen, Xin; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Molluscs in general and bivalves in particular, exhibit an extraordinary degree of mitochondrial gene order variation when compared with other metazoans. Here, we determined the mitochondrial genomes of two scallops Argopecten irradians and Chlamys farreri. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. irradians is 16,211 nts in length and the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of C. farreri is 20,789 nts in length. Both of the genomes contain 35 genes including 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 21 transfer RNAs. In contrast to the typical animal mitochondrial genome, both of them lack one protein-coding gene atp8 and two trnSs, but show an additional copy of trnF in A. irradians and of trnM in C. farreri, respectively. Gene order and genome content were compared among the four sequenced scallops. Gene arrangement of C. farreri closely resembles that of Mizuhopecten yessoensis. However, two genomes of C. farreri and A. irradians show only three small identical gene blocks and two genomes of A. irradians and Placopecten magellanicus share only one gene block. Comparison of the gene arrangement demonstrated that the four scallops share few identical gene blocks although they belong to the same family. This feature is seldom observed in Metazoa, even in other molluscan classes. The dramatic gene rearrangement often occurs in bivalves, especially in marine bivalves. In addition, comparisons of genomic character among bivalves are also presented. PMID:20013337

  20. A new species of Tambja (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia) from the Mediterranean Sea: description of the first species of the genus from the Balearic Islands and Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, M.; Pola, M.; Ramón, M.

    2015-06-01

    A new species of polycerid nudibranchs of the genus Tambja is described from Mallorca Island (Spain) and Malta. So far, only two species of Tambja had been recorded in the Mediterranean Sea with a distribution limited to southern Spain. With Tambja mediterranea sp. nov., the distribution of the genus in the Mediterranean Sea is extended, and the new species represents the first occurrence of Tambja at the Balearic Islands and Malta. Externally, the new species is mainly characterized by having ground orange-red colour, dorsum covered with rounded whitish tubercles, rhinophores red with whitish tips and three gill branches with orange-reddish rachis and whitish branches. In the present paper, external and internal features of T. mediterranea are described and compared with other species of the genus, especially with its most similar species, T. limaciformis. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses (Bayesian and maximum likelihood) based on mitochondrial sequences (COI) show that T. mediterranea sp. nov. is sister to T. divae and that both species cluster together with T. limaciformis and T. amakusana with the maximum support.

  1. Environmental geochemistry on La Nueva Concepción mercury mining area, a comparison with the metallurgical complex of Almadenejos.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Washington; Herrera, Edison; Martínez-Coronado, Alba; Oyarzun, Roberto; Higueras, Pablo; María Esbrí, José

    2014-05-01

    Almadenejos is a small town located some 14 km East of Almadén, and was the main mining and metallurgical complex of an area comprising the Vieja Concepción (1699-1800), Nueva Concepción (1794-1965), and El Entredicho (Middle Age s.l., and 1981-1997) mines as well as the old Almadenejos metallurgical precinct (1700?-1860). This combination makes the area one of the most contaminated in the Almadén district. This study covers the Nueva Concepción mine area, a sector that lacked geochemical data before this study. We here present the results of a survey including soils (n = 80), lichens (Evernia prunastri) (n = 73) and total gaseous mercury (n = 61). The analyses of soils and lichens were carried out using an atomic absorption spectrometer AMA254, while total gaseous mercury determinations were in-situ obtained using a portable Lumex RA-915+. We used Surfer 8 for the krigging and subsequent mapping of geochemical data. Mercury contents in soils are in the range of 6 - 721 mg kg-1, clearly higher than critical concentrations in soils by Kabata-Pendias (2001) (0.3 - 5 mg kg-1). This mercury levels are higher in the metallurgical facility of Almadenejos (range = 25 - 15900 mg kg-1), putting forward that the main pollution legacy relates to the metallurgical activities and not to the mining operations. The statistical distribution of data is log-normal and as shown by the krigging Hg shows a remarkable E-W spatial component which closely matches the structural pattern of the main Hg hosting bed: the Criadero Quartzite. On the other hand, total gaseous mercury shows a WNW-ESE tendency most probably controlled by the local main wind direction. A similar spatial trend was found for the lichen's Hg contents. Mercury contents in these lichens are 103 times higher than in pristine areas but lower than those from the abandoned (and highly polluted) Almadenejos metallurgical complex.

  2. On the Chemical Synthesis and Physical Properties of Iron Pyrite, Especially the (100) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, Hector Alexander

    Given that iron pyrite (cubic FeS2, fool's gold) is a semiconductor with a 1 eV band gap, it has long been investigated for use in technological applications, especially photovoltaics. Unfortunately, numerous measurements indicate that it's properties, as currently synthesized at least, do not allow for effective devices. Photovoltages far below theoretical expectation are found as well as below band gap optical absorption. From a scientific standpoint, our understanding of the cause of these observations, the form of the density of states for instance, remains mired in uncertainty. In this work we have attempted to gain insight into this problem by creating ensembles of pyrite nanocrystals that can then be treated and measured with well-developed wet-chemical nanocrystal techniques. Specifically, we interpret the existing literature to advocate that the surface states of this material dominate its observed electrical properties. In an effort to better understand the most prevalent surface, the (100) face, we developed a synthesis that nucleates small (< 20 nm) pyrite nanoparticles and then changes chemical conditions to grow all other faces besides {100} to extinction, creating 37 nm nanocubes. The optical properties of these nanocubes are measured and the phenomenon of resonance light scattering (RLS) is observed. This phenomenon, along with the poor colloidal dispersibility of these nanocubes is then used to promote the idea that an unusual dynamic electronic phenomenon exists on these surfaces. This phenomenon is found to be passivated by introducing charged ligands to the surfaces of these particles. Additionally, after this surface treatment, two very sharp absorption features are observed at 0.73 and 0.88 eV. In connection with recent theoretical work, these transitions are taken as evidence that the (100) surface of pyrite is spin-polarized with each absorption peak being the signal of band edge absorption across a spin-selected direct band gap. A theoretical framework is proposed as a plausible explanation of the observed behavior. To wit, highly localized and energetically disordered Fe d-orbital states fill in the band gap of the (100) pyrite surface that is not perfectly terminated (or nearly so). Frustration between energetic disorder and Coulomb repulsion then results in the formation of metastable states that obscure the observation of these surface transitions and cause the dynamical behavior observed. It is further reasoned that one of these transitions, the one at 0.88 eV, has been observed before in cryogenic absorption and photoconductivity studies, and argued that a plausible reinterpretation of the data from these studies is possible. This reinterpretation can be rationalized within the context of the physical model posited here whereby cryogenic temperatures increase the importance of Coulombic interactions, which results in a decrease in the metastable DOS at the Fermi level and an electronic arrangement closer to that predicted theoretically, despite existing disorder. Finally, it is argued that the frustrated movement of electrons in metastable states can qualitatively explain the apparent conundrum in which surface sensitive probes are unable to measure the effect of isolated defects, despite the highly localized nature of the pyrite (100) surface. Given the range of phenomena this model explains, it may constitute a significant advance in our understanding of the electronic properties of pyrite. Additionally, given that electrochemical conversion of pyrite is a four electron process resulting in a high theoretical discharge capacity of 894 mAh g-1, we have synthesized micron-sized pyrite nanocubes for use in lithium-ion battery research. Previously the use of pyrite in such batteries has only been possible in non-rechargeable architectures. However, work described here shows that a solid state electrolyte can be used to contain the dissolution of these micron sized particles, allowing for battery cycling. This synthesis, especially the effect of pH on morphology, is described within th

  3. BAIAP2 exhibits association to childhood ADHD especially predominantly inattentive subtype in Chinese Han subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common chronic neurodevelopmental disorder with a high heritability. Much evidence of hemisphere asymmetry has been found for ADHD probands from behavioral level, electrophysiological level and brain morphology. One previous research has reported possible association between BAIAP2, which is asymmetrically expressed in the two cerebral hemispheres, with ADHD in European population. The present study aimed to investigate the association between BAIAP2 and ADHD in Chinese Han subjects. Methods A total of 1,397 ADHD trios comprised of one ADHD proband and their parents were included for family-based association tests. Independent 569 ADHD cases and 957 normal controls were included for case-control studies. Diagnosis was performed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of BAIAP2 were chosen and performed genotyping for both family-based and case-control association studies. Results Transmission disequilibrium tests (TDTs) for family-based association studies showed significant association between the CA haplotype comprised by rs3934492 and rs9901648 with predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I). For case-control study, chi-square tests provided evidence for the contribution of SNP rs4969239, rs3934492 and rs4969385 to ADHD and its two clinical subtypes, ADHD-I and ADHD-C. However, only the associations for ADHD and ADHD-I retained significant after corrections for multiplicity or logistic regression analyses adjusting the potential confounding effect of gender and age. Conclusions These above results indicated the possible involvement of BAIAP2 in the etiology of ADHD, especially ADHD-I. PMID:24377651

  4. Denaturation fingerprinting: two related mutation detection methods especially advantageous for high G + C regions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Weinshenker, B G; Wingerchuk, D M; Sommer, S S

    1998-01-01

    Two versions of denaturation fingerprinting (dnF2R and dnF1R are described for detecting mutations. DnF2R is a sensitive screening method in which fingerprints are generated by performing denaturing gel electrophoresis on bidirectional "cycle-sequencing" reactions with each of two dideoxy terminators, e.g. ddATP and ddCTP. When the fingerprints generated by ddATP and ddCTP are combined, all sequence changes are expected to result in one extra and one absent segment. DnF2R was performed on 246- and 318-bp segments of the human factor IX gene, and the products were electrophoresed through a 6% Long Ranger gel with 7 M urea. All 32 single-base mutations were detected in hemizygous males with hemophilia B. DnF2R has been applied to detect a total of seven heterozygous sequence changes in large-scale screening and was found to be especially suitable for high G+C regions. In a blinded analysis, all of twenty-four additional single-base mutations were detected, but 7 of 31 heterozygous mutations were missed (23%). To reduce the effort of dnF2R by almost twofold while retaining the ability to detect all types of single-base changes, one fingerprint (dnF1R) was generated by performing a single reaction with ddATP and a second chemically modified terminator (e.g., ROX-conjugated ddCTP), which retards the mobility of the same termination products. The sensitivity and specificity of dnF1R equaled that of dnF2R, with the exception that the blinded analysis of heterozygotes in the 318-bp segment, which revealed the presence of an additional mutation. DnF under partially denaturing conditions may have optimal sensitivity for the detection of heterozygotes. PMID:9454966

  5. Sediment analysis does not provide a good measure of heavy metal bioavailability to Cerastoderma glaucum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in confined coastal ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Arjonilla, M.; Gomez-Parra, A. ); Forja, J.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Sediments are considered a sink for metals entering the marine environment, especially in coastal areas. Once in the sediment layer, metals are distributed amongst all different phases of the sediment, governed by physicochemical conditions. One fraction is immobilized due to its incorporation into weakly reactive phases of the sediment; Another fraction may remain weakly bound to organic or mineral phases as sorbed, precipitated, or coprecipitated and complexed forms and can be assimilated by detritivorous and suspension-feeding benthic organisms. Many selective procedures have been suggested for metal extraction from sediments in order to estimate concentrations of fractions which are directly or indirectly available to the biota. The absence of a chemical treatment adequate for accurate quantification of metal bioavailability is well-known. Nevertheless, a good correlation between metal content in some organisms and in the sediment after a specific extraction treatment has sometimes been found so sediments are frequently used as indicators in pollution studies. In this paper, concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ph and Cd) in the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum, and in sediments at the same sampling locations are compared. C. glaucum is a suspension and deposit feeder, inhabiting a wide range of salinities. The study sampled 8 saltponds in the south of Cadiz Bay, located along a gradient of contamination produced by urban and industrial sewage effluents. The study sought to identify areas with different relative risk from metal pollution, in terms of biological effects and effects on water quality due to natural resuspension of sediments or to human relocation of sediments. C. glaucum was selected because of its wide distribution in the Bay, and also because it has no commercial value. This second fact means that its distribution and growth is not directly affected by man. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Limestone percussion tools from the late Early Pleistocene sites of Barranco Len and Fuente Nueva 3 (Orce, Spain).

    PubMed

    Barsky, Deborah; Vergs, Josep-Mara; Sala, Robert; Menndez, Leticia; Toro-Moyano, Isidro

    2015-11-19

    In recent years, there is growing interest in the study of percussion scars and breakage patterns on hammerstones, cores and tools from Oldowan African and Eurasian lithic assemblages. Oldowan stone toolkits generally contain abundant small-sized flakes and their corresponding cores, and are characterized by their structural dichotomy of heavy- and light-duty tools. This paper explores the significance of the lesser known heavy-duty tool component, providing data from the late Lower Pleistocene sites of Barranco Len and Fuente Nueva 3 (Orce, Spain), dated 1.4-1.2 Myr. Using quantitative and qualitative data from the large-sized limestone industries from these two major sites, we present a new methodology highlighting their morpho-technological features. In the light of the results, we discuss the shortfalls of extant classificatory methods for interpreting the role of percussive technology in early toolkits. This work is rooted in an experimental program designed to reproduce the wide range of percussion marks observed on the limestone artefacts from these two sites. A visual and descriptive reference is provided as an interpretative aid for future comparative research. Further experiments using a variety of materials and gestures are still needed before the elusive traces yield the secrets of the kinds of percussive activities carried out by hominins at these, and other, Oldowan sites. PMID:26483530

  7. Modeling treatment couches in the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Especially important for arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Duggar, William Neil; Nguyen, Alex; Stanford, Jason; Morris, Bart; Yang, Claus C

    2016-01-01

    This study is to demonstrate the importance and a method of properly modeling the treatment couch for dose calculation in patient treatment using arc therapy. The 2 treatment couch tops-Aktina AK550 and Elekta iBEAM evo-of Elekta LINACs were scanned using Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT Simulator. Various parts of the couch tops were contoured, and their densities were measured and recorded on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) using the established computed tomography density table. These contours were saved as organ models to be placed beneath the patient during planning. Relative attenuation measurements were performed following procedures outlined by TG-176 as well as absolute dose comparison of static fields of 10 × 10 cm(2) that were delivered through the couch tops with that calculated in the TPS with the couch models. A total of 10 random arc therapy treatment plans (5 volumetric-modulated arc therapy [VMAT] and 5 stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT]), using 24 beams, were selected for this study. All selected plans were calculated with and without couch modeling. Each beam was evaluated using the Delta(4) dosimetry system (Delta(4)). The Student t-test was used to determine statistical significance. Independent reviews were exploited as per the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core head and neck credentialing phantom. The selected plans were calculated on the actual patient anatomies with and without couch modeling to determine potential clinical effects. Large relative beam attenuations were noted dependent on which part of the couch top beams were passing through. Substantial improvements were also noted for static fields both calculated with the TPS and delivered physically when the couch models were included in the calculation. A statistically significant increase in agreement was noted for dose difference, distance to agreement, and γ-analysis with the Delta(4) on VMAT and SBRT plans. A credentialing review showed improvement in treatment delivery after couch modeling with both thermoluminescent dosimeter doses and film analysis. Furthermore, analysis of treatment plans with and without using the couch model showed a statistically significant reduction in planning target volume coverage and increase in skin dose. In conclusion, ignoring the treatment couch, a common practice when generating a patient treatment plan, can overestimate the dose delivered especially for arc therapy. This work shows that explicitly modeling the couch during planning can meaningfully improve the agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. Because of this project, we have implemented the couch models clinically across all treatment plans. PMID:26342567

  8. Effect of different agronomic practises on greenhouse gas emissions, especially N2O and nutrient cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2014-05-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, management practises need to be adapted by implementing sustainable land use. At first, reliable field data are required to assess the effect of different farming practises on greenhouse gas budgets. The conducted field experiment covers and compares two main aspects of agricultural management, namely an organic farming system and an integrated farming system, implementing additionally the effects of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practises. Furthermore, the analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties enables a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the monitored cycle of matter, especially the nitrogen cycle. Measurements were carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term field trials of the organic and integrated farming system were started in 1992. Since then, parcels in a field (each around 0,2-0,4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted. So the 20 years impacts of different tillage and fertilisation practises on soil properties including trace gases were examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 are monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial and since 2012 for the organic farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (per point: 4 chambers, each covering 0,4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit (Flessa et al. 2002). Each chamber is sampled 3-4 times in 24 hours. The main outcomes are the analysis of temporal and spatial dynamics of greenhouse gas fluxes as influenced by management practice events (fertilisation and tillage) and weather effects (drying-rewetting, freezing-thawing, intense rainfall and dry periods) in both established systems and the creation of an impact study comparing the minimum tillage system with the conventional tillage system. Physical, chemical and biological soil properties (i.a. texture, mineral nitrogen and soil organic carbon) were monitored to aggregate the parameters and processes influencing the greenhouse gas fluxes. Moreover, to understand processes leading the greenhouse gas emissions, additional experiments under laboratory conditions (e.g. soil potential for trace gas formation) are included. Furthermore, with the comparison of the similar long-term field experiments (organic vs. integrated) more relevant data are ascertained to assess and calculate the global warming potential of different management and tillage systems.

  9. Previously undocumented diversity and abundance of cryptic species: a phylogenetic analysis of Indo-Pacific Arminidae Rafinesque, 1814 (Mollusca: Nudibranchia) with descriptions of 20 new species of Dermatobranchus.

    PubMed

    Gosliner, Terrence M; Fahey, Shireen J

    2011-02-01

    The phylogenetic relationships amongst the Arminidae were analysed based upon morphological characters of 58 presently described species or nudibranchs, including 35 previously described Arminidae and 20 new species of Dermatobranchus. From the literature review and anatomical examinations, 43 characters were considered for 78 taxa. These characters were polarized using Berthella canariensis as the outgroup taxon and the type species of several other genera identified from recent publications. The resulting phylogeny supports the monophyly of Arminidae, Dermatobranchus, Doridina, and Proctonotidae. The paraphyly of the Arminina is further demonstrated in this study. Two previously described, but poorly known, species of Indo-Pacific Armina are redescribed, Armina magnaBaba, 1955 and Armina paucifoliataBaba, 1955. The anatomy and taxonomic status of nine previously described species of Dermatobranchus were examined in this study. The anatomy of Dermatobranchus pustulosus (van Hasselt, 1824) has been overlooked since Bergh (1888) illustrated the radula of van Hasselt's specimen. It is redescribed and its range is extended to several new localities in the western Pacific. Dermatobranchus pulcherrimus Miller & Willan, 1986 is considered here as a new synonym of Dermatobranchus rubidus (Gould, 1852). The following 20 species of Dermatobranchus are new and are described in the present paper: Dermatobranchus albineus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus arminus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus caesitius sp. nov., Dermatobranchus caeruleomaculatus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus cymatilis sp. nov., Dermatobranchus dendonephthyphagus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus diagonalis sp. nov., Dermatobranchus earlei sp. nov., Dermatobranchus fasciatus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus funiculus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus kalyptos sp. nov., Dermatobranchus kokonas sp. nov., Dermatobranchus leoni sp. nov., Dermatobranchus microphallus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus oculus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus phyllodes sp. nov., Dermatobranchus piperoides sp. nov., Dermatobranchus rodmani sp. nov., Dermatobranchus semilunus sp. nov., and Dermatobranchus tuberculatus sp. nov. Eighteen of these new taxa are found in the Indo-Pacific tropics and two are found in temperate South Africa, D. albineus and D. arminus. Unique combinations of morphological characters distinguish these as new species of Dermatobranchus. Several species that are externally similar have radically divergent internal morphology, are members of different clades of Dermatobranchus, and represent cryptic species. Especially important is the radular morphology, which shows remarkable diversity of form, probably related directly to the diversification of feeding of members of this clade on various octocorals. PMID:21527987

  10. Previously undocumented diversity and abundance of cryptic species: a phylogenetic analysis of Indo-Pacific Arminidae Rafinesque, 1814 (Mollusca: Nudibranchia) with descriptions of 20 new species of Dermatobranchus

    PubMed Central

    Gosliner, Terrence M; Fahey, Shireen J

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships amongst the Arminidae were analysed based upon morphological characters of 58 presently described species or nudibranchs, including 35 previously described Arminidae and 20 new species of Dermatobranchus. From the literature review and anatomical examinations, 43 characters were considered for 78 taxa. These characters were polarized using Berthella canariensis as the outgroup taxon and the type species of several other genera identified from recent publications. The resulting phylogeny supports the monophyly of Arminidae, Dermatobranchus, Doridina, and Proctonotidae. The paraphyly of the Arminina is further demonstrated in this study. Two previously described, but poorly known, species of Indo-Pacific Armina are redescribed, Armina magna Baba, 1955 and Armina paucifoliata Baba, 1955. The anatomy and taxonomic status of nine previously described species of Dermatobranchus were examined in this study. The anatomy of Dermatobranchus pustulosus (van Hasselt, 1824) has been overlooked since Bergh (1888) illustrated the radula of van Hasselt's specimen. It is redescribed and its range is extended to several new localities in the western Pacific. Dermatobranchus pulcherrimus Miller & Willan, 1986 is considered here as a new synonym of Dermatobranchus rubidus (Gould, 1852). The following 20 species of Dermatobranchus are new and are described in the present paper: Dermatobranchus albineus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus arminus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus caesitius sp. nov., Dermatobranchus caeruleomaculatus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus cymatilis sp. nov., Dermatobranchus dendonephthyphagus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus diagonalis sp. nov., Dermatobranchus earlei sp. nov., Dermatobranchus fasciatus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus funiculus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus kalyptos sp. nov., Dermatobranchus kokonas sp. nov., Dermatobranchus leoni sp. nov., Dermatobranchus microphallus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus oculus sp. nov., Dermatobranchus phyllodes sp. nov., Dermatobranchus piperoides sp. nov., Dermatobranchus rodmani sp. nov., Dermatobranchus semilunus sp. nov., and Dermatobranchus tuberculatus sp. nov. Eighteen of these new taxa are found in the Indo-Pacific tropics and two are found in temperate South Africa, D. albineus and D. arminus. Unique combinations of morphological characters distinguish these as new species of Dermatobranchus. Several species that are externally similar have radically divergent internal morphology, are members of different clades of Dermatobranchus, and represent cryptic species. Especially important is the radular morphology, which shows remarkable diversity of form, probably related directly to the diversification of feeding of members of this clade on various octocorals. PMID:21527987

  11. Regulating device for an electromagnetic control element especially in an internal combustion engine with auto-ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Locher, J.; Schaller, D.

    1985-02-12

    A regulating device for an electromagnetic control element, especially for an internal combustion engine with auto-ignition, is proposed in which a non-linear regulator with preferably a PD characteristic is coupled with a pulse regulator, preferably a two-point regulator with PID characteristic. Of special advantage is the interposition of a limiting device, which allows an increase in the D portion of the non-linear regulator, while at the same time suppressing interference. This results in an excellent control behavoir, especially in the face of small control deviations and in a control element or control circuit afflicted with friction and/or (magnetic) hysteresis.

  12. Nuevas Adquisiciones (Recent Acquisitions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Informacion Bibliografica Educativa, 1972

    1972-01-01

    This bibliography of educational materials lists approximately 100 publications recently acquired by the Colombian National Center for Documentation and Educational Information. The entries are listed according to subject matter; topics range from general educational theory to more specific subject topics. (VM)

  13. Una Guia para Los Padres sobre La Educacion Especial: El Derecho de Su Hijo(a) a Adquirir una Educacion en el Estado de Nueva York (A Parent's Guide to Special Education: Your Child's Right to an Education in New York State).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept. Albany. Office for the Education of Children with Handicapping Conditions.

    This guide provides information to help parents of special needs children in New York become active partners in the planning and implementation of special education programs. The first part of the guide provides in-depth information related to the special education process in New York State public schools. A historical view of children's rights to…

  14. Una Guia para Los Padres sobre La Educacion Especial: El Derecho de Su Hijo(a) a Adquirir una Educacion en el Estado de Nueva York (A Parent's Guide to Special Education: Your Child's Right to an Education in New York State).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept. Albany. Office for the Education of Children with Handicapping Conditions.

    This guide provides information to help parents of special needs children in New York become active partners in the planning and implementation of special education programs. The first part of the guide provides in-depth information related to the special education process in New York State public schools. A historical view of children's rights to

  15. Methyl Eugenol: Its Occurrence, Distribution, and Role in Nature, Especially in Relation to Insect Behavior and Pollination

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Keng Hong; Nishida, Ritsuo

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the occurrence and distribution (within a plant) of methyl eugenol in different plant species (> 450) from 80 families spanning many plant orders, as well as various roles this chemical plays in nature, especially in the interactions between tephritid fruit flies and plants. PMID:22963669

  16. Informe Anual a la Nacin sobre el Estado del Cncer con una seccin especial sobre la prevalencia d

    Cancer.gov

    El Informe Anual a la Nacin sobre el Estado del Cncer (1975 a 2010), mostr un descenso ms acelerado que en aos anteriores de los ndices de mortalidad por cncer de pulmn. Tambin contiene una seccin especial que destaca los efectos significativos

  17. [Microbiologic depuration of Anadara tuberculosa (Mollusca: Arcidae)].

    PubMed

    Wong, E; Antilln, F; Glenn, E; Gonzlez, M I

    1997-12-01

    In Costa Rica the mollusk Anadara tuberculosa represents a risk for human health due to the contamination of the growing waters and the fact that its is consumed raw. The families depending on the income obtained through commercialization of these animals have a low education and economic status. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop and evaluate simple methods of depuration that could be easily used by these families to make these mollusks safe for consumption. Bottles containing 11 of saline solution (25g/l) were prepared in duplicates to test the bactericidal effect of acetic acid. The solution in each bottle was adjusted to ph 4.5, 5.0 or 5.5 or held at ph of 7.0 or 8.0 for the controls. The solution in each bottle was then inoculated with approximately 1 X 104 cfu/ml of coliforms. Counts of coliforms were determined for each bottle 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 hours after inoculation. For the depuration studies, specimens with diameters ranging from 4.0 to 4.5 cm were collected from a harvester at the estuary of Puntarenas, Gulf of Nicoya. Fifty specimens each were depurated in separate tanks containing 25 1 of oxygenated saline solution adjusted with acetic acid to an initial ph of 4.5 (treatment) or non adjusted ph of 8.0 (control). Counts of Enterobacteriaceae were determined, in duplicates, every 12 hr for 48 hr. An additional fifty animals were depurated using the defined method and tested to determine if they met international standards of microbiological quality for aerobic plate count, Enterobacteriaceae count, Escherichia coli count and presence of Salmonella. A sensory evaluation using a triangle test was performed to compare a typical dish prepared with depurated or non-depurated animals. A significant coliform reduction was determined in a saline solution (25 g/l) at a pH range of 4.5 to 5.5. This reduction, during 8 hr, was higher in the acid treatments compared to the controls. During depuration, the elimination of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria was faster when acetic was used (initial ph = 4.5) than when it was not. This elimination was more important the first 24 hr, time defined as adequate for the application of the method. The method has the advantage of transforming the bivalve in a product that is safe for human consumption, since it guarantees that the international standards of microbiological quality, for raw and depurated mollusks, are reached. On the other hand, the sensory qualities of a typical dish prepared with depurated animals are not affected by the method, which can be easily implemented and applied by the people that work in the extraction of this mollusk. PMID:9698943

  18. FRESHWATER SNAILS (MOLLUSCA: GASTROPODA) OF NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater gastropod mollusks are represented in North America (north of Mexico) by 15 families, 78 genera and, as treated in this manual, 499 species. They are grouped into two large subclasses, the gill-breathing, operculated Prosobranchia and the lung-breathing, non-operculate...

  19. Geochemical Redox Indices and microfacies of the Cenomanian-Turonian Agua Nueva/Eagle Ford Fm, Mexico, Evidence for Anoxia Related to OAE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurrasse, F. J.; Sanchez-hernandez, Y.; Blanco, A.

    2013-05-01

    Widespread occurrence of black, C-organic-rich sediments within the time of the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary attests to the occurrence of a major global event affecting the carbon cycle coined OAE 2. Intense carbon sequestration in sediments associated with the development of anoxic waters in the deep-ocean and epicontinental seas also led to enhanced export of trace elements as organo-metallic compounds, hence their subsequent enrichment in oxygen-deficient to anoxic sediments. In some areas, stratification of the water column coupled with controlling local factors affected microbial productivity leading to TOC-enriched sediments developed under suboxic/anoxic conditions, in others microbial communities led to high TOC values. We integrate geochemical redox indicators and microfacies characterization to assess oxygenic conditions in the Cenomanian-Turonian C-org-rich deposit of the Agua Nueva Formation and the coeval Eagle Ford Fm/ Boquillas Fm. We studied laminated samples of the Agua Nueva from Xilitla, San Luis Potosi State; San Eugenio (type locality of the Formation), Tamaulipas State; and the Eagle Ford at Quarry Los Temporales, northern Coahuila State). Microfacies at all localities reveal the prevalence of coccoid cyanobacteria, some filamentous morphotypes and degraded shell fragments, as the primary components, regardless of TOC values. Planktonic foraminifera constitute 15 to 20 % of the microfossils reaching highest abundance at Los Temporales, including macro-organisms (crustaceans). Absence of benthic foraminifera, and parallel alignment of all components attest to the absence of bioturbation, thus oxygen-deficient bottom waters. Eagle Ford samples are low in TOC, whereas the Agua Nueva samples are enriched in OM as brown amorphous macerals with bacterial coccospheres in lamination attributed to sustained microbial blooms. TE concentrations (V, Ni, U) and redox indices (V/(V+Ni), Ni/Co, V/Cr and U/Th) from the three localities confirm that these sediments accumulated under oxygen-deprived conditions, as also indicated by samples falling within the suboxic/anoxic region in a V/(V+Ni) vs. Ni/Co plot. Thus, oxygen-deprived conditions in all the areas were not necessary accompanied by high TOC, as is the case of Los Temporales where oxygen levels may have been controlled by water column stratification, analogous to modern-day Black Sea. In areas of high TOC, enhanced primary microbial productivity may have intensified DO demand in the water column causing extension of the oxygen minimum zone not affecting plankton life in the uppermost water column. As a result, like at other OAE2 sites elsewhere, bottoms water became suboxic/anoxic, and in some cases developed sulfidic conditions as indicated by relatively high V/(V+Ni), and pervasive pyrite.

  20. [Caring for the health of your neighbor: the work of anthropologist Charles Wagley with the Servio Especial de Sade Pblica].

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Regina rika Domingos

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the work of Charles Wagley as a top staff member with Servio Especial de Sade Pblica (Special Public Health Service), a US-Brazil cooperation program established during World War II. Taking into consideration Wagley's experience with migration policy under Brazil's Rubber Program, as well as the context of development promotion and the issues then on the anthropological agenda, the article explores Wagley's community study of the Amazon town he visited while on SESP missions, published in the book Uma comunidade amaznica (Amazon Town). Encountering a reality that he believed emblematic of underdevelopment, Wagley was led to reflect on social change and the role of science. PMID:25099224

  1. Hyperhomocysteinemia is one of the risk factors associated with cerebrovascular stiffness in hypertensive patients, especially elderly males

    PubMed Central

    Okura, Takafumi; Miyoshi, Ken-ichi; Irita, Jun; Enomoto, Daijiro; Nagao, Tomoaki; Kukida, Masayoshi; Tanino, Akiko; Kudo, Kayo; Pei, Zouwei; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhomocystemia has been reported to be associated with cardiovascular disease, especially stroke. The resistive index (RI) estimated by carotid ultrasound is an established variable for estimating the risk of cerebral infarction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between homocysteine concentration and carotid RI, a marker of cerebral vascular resistance in essential hypertensive patients. We measured serum total homocysteine and carotid RI in 261 patients. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the association of homocysteine with carotid RI and intima media thickness (IMT). Age, sex, BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP), homocysteine, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), uric acid, CRP, HbA1c, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and use of antihypertensive agents were included as independent variables. Age, sex, use of antihypertensive agents, HDL-C and homocysteine levels were shown to be significant predictors of carotid RI, but not IMT. Multiple regression analysis in men older than 65 years showed homocysteine and SBP were associated significantly with carotid RI. In elderly male patients, homocysteine was the strongest predictor of carotid RI (B = 0.0068, CI = 0.00170.0120, P = 0.011) in the multivariate model. In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with carotid RI, a surrogate marker of cerebral vascular resistance, especially in elderly men. PMID:25012721

  2. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  3. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy should still be performed, especially in the patient with clinically positive axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng-fei; Zhao, Rong-rong; Liu, Yan-bing; Wang, Yong-sheng

    2013-10-01

    Current studies suggest that the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) should not be performed routinely, for it did not alter clinical management of breast cancer patients in terms of adjuvant treatment. However, consideration should be given to the fact, the study population in all current research relate to IM-SLNB is the patients with clinically negative axillary lymph nodes. As internal mammary lymph nodes metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary metastases, clinical trials currently fail to evaluate the status of internal mammary lymph nodes who really in need. In consideration of the impact to staging and accurate indication of radiation to the internal mammary area, we recommend that research on IM-SLNB should still be encouraged, especially in patients with clinically positive axillary lymph nodes. PMID:23838319

  4. Rapid scene perception with tragic consequences: observers miss perceiving vulnerable road users, especially in crowded traffic scenes.

    PubMed

    Sanocki, Thomas; Islam, Mohammed; Doyon, Jonathan K; Lee, Chanyoung

    2015-05-01

    How does scene complexity influence the detection of expected and appropriate objects within the scene? Traffic research has indicated that vulnerable road users (VRUs: pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists) are sometimes not perceived, despite being expected. Models of scene perception emphasize competition for limited neural resources in early perception, predicting that an object can be missed during quick glances because other objects win the competition to be individuated and consciously perceived. We used pictures of traffic scenes and manipulated complexity by inserting or removing vehicles near a to-be-detected VRU (crowding). The observers' sole task was to detect a VRU in the laterally presented pictures. Strong bias effects occurred, especially when the VRU was crowded by other nearby vehicles: Observers failed to detect the VRU (high miss rates), while making relatively few false alarm errors. Miss rates were as high as 65% for pedestrians. The results indicated that scene context can interfere with the perception of expected objects when scene complexity is high. Because urbanization has greatly increased scene complexity, these results have important implications for public safety. PMID:25772100

  5. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng-hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn’t affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging. PMID:26906758

  6. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng-Hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn't affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging. PMID:26906758

  7. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  8. Glitter-Like Iridescence within the Bacteroidetes Especially Cellulophaga spp.: Optical Properties and Correlation with Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kientz, Betty; Ducret, Adrien; Luke, Stephen; Vukusic, Peter; Mignot, Tm; Rosenfeld, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Iridescence results from structures that generate color. Iridescence of bacterial colonies has recently been described and illustrated. The glitter-like iridescence class, created especially for a few strains of Cellulophaga lytica, exhibits an intense iridescence under direct illumination. Such color appearance effects were previously associated with other bacteria from the Bacteroidetes phylum, but without clear elucidation and illustration. To this end, we compared various bacterial strains to which the iridescent trait was attributed. All Cellulophaga species and additional Bacteroidetes strains from marine and terrestrial environments were investigated. A selection of bacteria, mostly marine in origin, were found to be iridescent. Although a common pattern of reflected wavelengths was recorded for the species investigated, optical spectroscopy and physical measurements revealed a range of different glitter-like iridescence intensity and color profiles. Importantly, gliding motility was found to be a common feature of all iridescent colonies. Dynamic analyses of glitter formation at the edges of C. lytica colonies showed that iridescence was correlated with layer superposition. Both gliding motility, and unknown cell-to-cell communication processes, may be required for the establishment, in time and space, of the necessary periodic structures responsible for the iridescent appearance of Bacteroidetes. PMID:23300811

  9. Petrographic Evidence of Microbial Mats in the Upper Cretaceous Fish-Bearing, Organic-Rich Limestone, Agua Nueva Formation, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Hernndez-vila, J.; ngeles-Trigueros, S. A.; Garca-Cabrera, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    We document petrographic evidence of microbial mats in the Upper Cretaceous Agua Nueva Formation in the area of Xilitla (San Luis Potos, Central Mexico), located in the southern part of the Tampico-Misantla basin. The sequence consists predominantly of alternating decimeter-thick beds of fossiliferous dark laminated limestone (C-org > 1.0wt%), and light gray, bioturbated limestone (C-org < 1.0wt%), with occasional brown shale and green bentonite layers. Well-preserved fossil-fish assemblages occur in the laminated dark limestone beds, which include shark teeth (cf. Ptychodus), scales of teleosteans (Ichthyodectiformes), as well as skeletal remains of holosteans (Nursallia. sp), and teleosteans (cf. Rhynchodercetis, Tselfatia, and unidentified Enchodontids). Thin section and SEM analyses of the laminated, dark limestones, reveal a micritic matrix consisting of dark and light sub-parallel wavy laminae, continuous and discontinuous folded laminae with shreds of organic matter, filaments, oncoids, and interlocking structures. The structures are identical to those previously described for the Cenomanian-Turonian Indidura Fm at Parras de la Fuente (Coahuila state) demonstrated to be of microbial origin (Duque-Botero and Maurrasse, 2005; 2008). These structures are also analogous to microbial mats in present environments, and Devonian deposits (Kremer, 2006). In addition, the laminae at Xilitla include filamentous bacterial structures, as thin and segmented red elements. In some thin sections, filaments appear to be embedded within the crinkly laminae and shreds showing the same pattern of folding, suggestive of biomorphic elements that represent the main producers of the organic matter associated with the laminae. Thus, exceptional bacterial activity characterizes sedimentation during the accumulation of the Agua Nueva Formation. Oxygen-deficient conditions related to the microbial mats were an important element in the mass mortality and preservation of the fish assemblages. Absence of bioturbation, pervasive framboidal pyrite, and the high concentration of organic matter (TOC ranges from 1.2% to 8wt%) in the dark limestones are consistent with persistent recurring dysoxic/anoxic conditions, and the light-gray bioturbated limestones represent relatively well-oxygenated episodes. Planktonic foraminifera (Rotalipora cushmani) and Inoceramu labiatus indicate a time interval from the latest Cenomanian through the earliest Turonian, thus this long interval of severe oxygen deficiency is coeval with Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE-2). [Duque-Botero and Maurrasse. 2005. Jour. Iberian Geology (31), 85-98; 2008. Cret. Res., 29, 957-964; Kremer. 2006. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica (51, 1), 143-154

  10. Roles of unsaturated fatty acids (especially omega-3 fatty acids) in the brain at various ages and during ageing.

    PubMed

    Bourre, J M

    2004-01-01

    Among various organs, in the brain, the fatty acids most extensively studied are omega-3 fatty acids. Alpha-linolenic acid (18:3omega3) deficiency alters the structure and function of membranes and induces minor cerebral dysfunctions, as demonstrated in animal models and subsequently in human infants. Even though the brain is materially an organ like any other, that is to say elaborated from substances present in the diet (sometimes exclusively), for long it was not accepted that food can have an influence on brain structure, and thus on its function. Lipids, and especially omega-3 fatty acids, provided the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of diet (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. In fact the brain, after adipose tissue, is the organ richest in lipids, whose only role is to participate in membrane structure. First it was shown that the differentiation and functioning of cultured brain cells requires not only alpha-linolenic acid (the major component of the omega-3, omega3 family), but also the very long omega-3 and omega-6 carbon chains (1). It was then demonstrated that alpha-linolenic acid deficiency alters the course of brain development, perturbs the composition and physicochemical properties of brain cell membranes, neurones, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes (2). This leads to physicochemical modifications, induces biochemical and physiological perturbations, and results in neurosensory and behavioural upset (3). Consequently, the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (premature and term) conditions the visual and cerebral abilities, including intellectual. Moreover, dietary omega-3 fatty acids are certainly involved in the prevention of some aspects of cardiovascular disease (including at the level of cerebral vascularization), and in some neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, as well as in dementia, notably Alzheimer's disease. Recent results have shown that dietary alpha-linolenic acid deficiency induces more marked abnormalities in certain cerebral structures than in others, as the frontal cortex and pituitary gland are more severely affected. These selective lesions are accompanied by behavioural disorders more particularly affecting certain tests (habituation, adaptation to new situations). Biochemical and behavioural abnormalities are partially reversed by a dietary phospholipid supplement, especially omega-3-rich egg yolk extracts or pig brain. A dose-effect study showed that animal phospholipids are more effective than plant phospholipids to reverse the consequences of alpha-linolenic acid deficiency, partly because they provide very long preformed chains. Alpha-linolenic acid deficiency decreases the perception of pleasure, by slightly altering the efficacy of sensory organs and by affecting certain cerebral structures. Age-related impairment of hearing, vision and smell is due to both decreased efficacy of the parts of the brain concerned and disorders of sensory receptors, particularly of the inner ear or retina. For example, a given level of perception of a sweet taste requires a larger quantity of sugar in subjects with alpha-linolenic acid deficiency. In view of occidental eating habits, as omega-6 fatty acid deficiency has never been observed, its impact on the brain has not been studied. In contrast, omega-9 fatty acid deficiency, specifically oleic acid deficiency, induces a reduction of this fatty acid in many tissues, except the brain (but the sciatic nerve is affected). This fatty acid is therefore not synthesized in sufficient quantities, at least during pregnancy-lactation, implying a need for dietary intake. It must be remembered that organization of the neurons is almost complete several weeks before birth, and that these neurons remain for the subject's life time. Consequently, any disturbance of these neurons, an alteration of their connections, and impaired turnover of their constituents at any stage of life, will tend to accelerate ageing. The enzymatic activities of s

  11. Households across All Income Quintiles, Especially the Poorest, Increased Animal Source Food Expenditures Substantially during Recent Peruvian Economic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Debbie L.; Behrman, Jere R.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; Dearden, Kirk A.; Schott, Whitney; Penny, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative to plant-based foods, animal source foods (ASFs) are richer in accessible protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin B-12 and other nutrients. Because of their nutritional value, particularly for childhood growth and nutrition, it is important to identify factors influencing ASF consumption, especially for poorer households that generally consume less ASFs. Objective To estimate differential responsiveness of ASF consumption to changes in total household expenditures for households with different expenditures in a middle-income country with substantial recent income increases. Methods The Peruvian Young Lives household panel (n = 1750) from 2002, 2006 and 2009 was used to characterize patterns of ASF expenditures. Multivariate models with controls for unobserved household fixed effects and common secular trends were used to examine nonlinear relationships between changes in household expenditures and in ASF expenditures. Results Households with lower total expenditures dedicated greater percentages of expenditures to food (58.4% vs.17.9% in 2002 and 24.2% vs. 21.5% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively) and lower percentages of food expenditures to ASF (22.8% vs. 33.9% in 2002 and 30.3% vs. 37.6% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively). Average percentages of overall expenditures spent on food dropped from 47% to 23.2% between 2002 and 2009. Households in the lowest quintiles of expenditures showed greater increases in ASF expenditures relative to total consumption than households in the highest quintiles. Among ASF components, meat and poultry expenditures increased more than proportionately for households in the lowest quintiles, and eggs and fish expenditures increased less than proportionately for all households. Conclusions Increases in household expenditures were associated with substantial increases in consumption of ASFs for households, particularly households with lower total expenditures. Increases in ASF expenditures for all but the top quintile of households were proportionately greater than increases in total food expenditures, and proportionately less than overall expenditures. PMID:25372596

  12. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy cause reduction in mouse lifespans especially when fibronectin is overexpressed.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Yue, Fei; Song, Kun; Chen, Qi; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen; Xu, Guibin; Huang, Hai; Yi, Jinglin; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process that executes the turnover of dysfunctional organelles and misfolded or abnormally aggregated proteins. Microtubule-associated protein MAP1S interacts with autophagy marker LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux. LC3 binds with fibronectinmRNA and facilitates its translation. The synthesized fibronectin protein is exported to cell surface to initiate the assembly of fibronectin extracellular matrix. Fibronectin is degraded in lysosomes after it is engulfed into cytosol via endocytosis. Here, we show that defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy trigger oxidative stress, sinusoidal dilation, and lifespan reduction. Overexpression of LC3 in wild-type mice increases the levels of fibronectin and γ-H2 AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breakage. LC3-induced fibronectin is efficiently degraded in lysosomes to maintain a balance of fibronectin levels in wild-type mice so that the mice live a normal term of lifespan. In the LC3 transgenic mice with MAP1S deleted, LC3 enhances the synthesis of fibronectin but the MAP1S depletion causes an impairment of the lysosomal degradation of fibronectin. The accumulation of fibronectin protein promotes liver fibrosis, induces an accumulation of cell population at the G0/G1 stage, and further intensifies oxidative stress and sinusoidal dilatation. The LC3-induced overexpression of fibronectin imposes stresses on MAP1S-deficient mice and dramatically reduces their lifespans. Therefore, MAP1S-mediated autophagy plays an important role in maintaining mouse lifespan especially in the presence of extra amount of fibronectin. PMID:26750654

  13. Daily Use, Especially of High-Potency Cannabis, Drives the Earlier Onset of Psychosis in Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Di Forti, Marta; Sallis, Hannah; Allegri, Fabio; Trotta, Antonella; Ferraro, Laura; Stilo, Simona A.; Marconi, Arianna; La Cascia, Caterina; Reis Marques, Tiago; Pariante, Carmine; Dazzan, Paola; Mondelli, Valeria; Paparelli, Alessandra; Kolliakou, Anna; Prata, Diana; Gaughran, Fiona; David, Anthony S.; Morgan, Craig; Stahl, Daniel; Khondoker, Mizanur; MacCabe, James H.; Murray, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with an earlier age of onset of psychosis (AOP). However, the reasons for this remain debated. Methods: We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to 410 first-episode psychosis patients to investigate the association between gender, patterns of cannabis use, and AOP. Results: Patients with a history of cannabis use presented with their first episode of psychosis at a younger age (mean years = 28.2, SD = 8.0; median years = 27.1) than those who never used cannabis (mean years = 31.4, SD = 9.9; median years = 30.0; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.16–1.74; P < .001). This association remained significant after controlling for gender (HR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11–1.68; P < .001). Those who had started cannabis at age 15 or younger had an earlier onset of psychosis (mean years = 27.0, SD = 6.2; median years = 26.9) than those who had started after 15 years (mean years = 29.1, SD = 8.5; median years = 27.8; HR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.06–1.84; P = .050). Importantly, subjects who had been using high-potency cannabis (skunk-type) every day had the earliest onset (mean years = 25.2, SD = 6.3; median years = 24.6) compared to never users among all the groups tested (HR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.50- 2.65; P < .0001); these daily users of high-potency cannabis had an onset an average of 6 years earlier than that of non-cannabis users. Conclusions: Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users. PMID:24345517

  14. Isolation of a potent antibiotic producer bacterium, especially against MRSA, from northern region of the Persian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Darabpour, Esmaeil; Ardakani, Mohammad Roayaei; Motamedi, Hossein; Ronagh, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, emergence and prevalence of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) strain have become a great global concern in 21st century, so, it is necessary to discover new antibiotics against this pathogen. The aim of this study was isolation and evaluation marine bacteria from the Persian Gulf in order to finding antibiotic compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. For this purpose, water and sediment samples were collected from the Persian Gulf during March to October 2009. The antibacterial activity of the isolated bacteria was assessed using disc diffusion method. The Growth Curve Interference (GCI) parameter against MRSA was determined for the high potential antibiotic producing strain. The most important factors affecting fermentation conditions in antibiotic production were also optimized. Definite identification of intended isolate was confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Altogether, 51 bacterial colony was isolated and among them only 3 bacterium showed antibacterial activity. Pseudoalteromonaspiscicida PG-01 isolated from a sediment sample was chosen as the best antibiotic producing strain. This strain was effective against all tested Gram-positive bacteria, had good anti-MRSA activity and also GCI value against MRSA was two times lower than MIC value. Among the optimized fermentation parameters, carbon and nitrogen sources play major role in efficacy of optimized antibiotic production. Ultrastructural study on the effect of intended antibiotic compounds on MRSA using TEM revealed that the target site for this compound is cell wall. Considering the antibacterial effect of PG-01 strain especially against MRSA, intended antibiotic compounds can gives hope for treatment of diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria. PMID:22642595

  15. Extracellular vesicles derived from gut microbiota, especially Akkermansia muciniphila, protect the progression of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chil-Sung; Ban, Mingi; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Moon, Hyung-Geun; Jeon, Jun-Sung; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Park, Soo-Kyung; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Roh, Tae-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Jae Gyu; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota play an important part in the pathogenesis of mucosal inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, owing to the complexity of the gut microbiota, our understanding of the roles of commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the maintenance of immune homeostasis in the gut is evolving only slowly. Here, we evaluated the role of gut microbiota and their secreting extracellular vesicles (EV) in the development of mucosal inflammation in the gut. Experimental IBD model was established by oral application of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to C57BL/6 mice. The composition of gut microbiota and bacteria-derived EV in stools was evaluated by metagenome sequencing using bacterial common primer of 16S rDNA. Metagenomics in the IBD mouse model showed that the change in stool EV composition was more drastic, compared to the change of bacterial composition. Oral DSS application decreased the composition of EV from Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens in stools, whereas increased EV from TM7 phylum, especially from species DQ777900_s and AJ400239_s. In vitro pretreatment of A. muciniphila-derived EV ameliorated the production of a pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 from colon epithelial cells induced by Escherichia coli EV. Additionally, oral application of A. muciniphila EV also protected DSS-induced IBD phenotypes, such as body weight loss, colon length, and inflammatory cell infiltration of colon wall. Our data provides insight into the role of gut microbiota-derived EV in regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis, and A. muciniphila-derived EV have protective effects in the development of DSS-induced colitis. PMID:24204633

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashiya; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Siddiqui, Ziya; Kumari, Namita; Grover, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery. Aims: To compare the cost effectiveness of phacoemulsification (PE) versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Settings and Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Tertiary care hospital setting. Subjects and Methods: A total of 52 consenting patients with age-related cataracts, were prospectively recruited, and block randomized to PE or MSICS group. Preoperative and postoperative LogMAR visual acuity (VA), visual function-14 (VF-14) score and their quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were obtained, and the change in their values calculated. These were divided by the total cost incurred in the surgery to calculate and compare the cost effectiveness and cost utility. Surgery duration was also compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Two group comparison with Student's t-test. Significance set at P < 0.05; 95% confidence interval (CI) quoted where appropriate. Results: Both the MSICS and PE groups achieved comparative outcomes in terms of change (difference in mean [95% CI]) in LogMAR VA (0.03 [?0.05?0.11]), VF-14 score (7.92 [?1.03?16.86]) and QALYs (1.14 [?0.89?3.16]). However, with significantly lower costs (INR 3228 [27003756]), MSICS was more cost effective, with superior cost utility value. MSICS was also significantly quicker (10.58 min [6.8514.30]) than PE. Conclusions: MSICS provides comparable visual and QALY improvement, yet takes less time, and is significantly more cost-effective, compared with PE. Greater push and penetration of MSICS, by the government, is justifiably warranted in our country. PMID:26265639

  17. Studies on the pathology, especially brain lesions, induced by R7, a spontaneous mutant of Moloney murine sarcoma virus 124.

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, P. H.; Kwak, Y. T.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently isolated R7, a spontaneous Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MoMuSV) 124 variant. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis showed that, relative to MoMuSV 124, R7 has an extra repeat in each enhancer and a truncated mos gene in frame with the truncated gag coding sequence. This report presents a detailed study on the pathology induced by R7. R7 induced not only sarcomas with well developed angiomatous components but also brain lesions. Brain lesions were observed in all less-than-48-hour-old BALB/c mice inoculated with greater than 2 x 10(5) R7 focus-forming units (FFUs). R7 was detected in all brains examined by day 9 after inoculation, and brain lesions were observed in two of four mice examined by day 14 after inoculation. Light microscopy of brains revealed that approximately 15% of the lesions were unenclosed blood pools of varying sizes containing red blood cells and inflammatory cells spreading into surrounding brain tissues. The remainder of the brain lesions had tumor cells. These lesions ranged from a few enlarged vascular endothelial cells intermixed with blood cells to large circumscribed lesions consisting of well developed tangled masses of vessels surrounded by blood pools. Activated astrocytes surrounded and infiltrated the tumors. In addition, the thymus of R7-infected mice regressed significantly and precipitously due to apoptosis (especially of cortical thymocytes) at the end stage of the disease. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9626055

  18. Sensitization to common allergens, especially pollens, among children with respiratory allergy in the Trakya region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Mehtap; Oner, Naci; Celtik, Coskun; Okutan, Ozlem; Pala, Ozer

    2004-12-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis are common problems in children and the causative pollen allergens vary according to the geographical area. The aim of this study was to investigate patterns of sensitization to common inhalant allergens, especially pollens, in Turkish children living in the Trakya region and to determine differences between rural and urban areas. Allergen skin testing was prospectively performed on 539 children aged between 4 and 17 years with respiratory allergy. The reaction was considered to be positive if the mean wheal diameter was at least 3 mm greater than that of the negative controls. We detected positive skin reactions in 420 (77.9%) children. Two hundred and eighty-one (52.1%) mite, 277 (51.4%) pollen, 174 (32.3%) mold, 65 (12.1%) animal dander, 12 (2.2%) cockroach and 6 (1.1%) latex skin sensitivities were detected. Among the pollen allergies 173 were cereal pollen (32.1%), 170 grass pollen (31.5%) and 144 tree pollen allergies (26.7%). The most common positive skin test among the pollens was to cultivated wheat (Titicum vulgare) (n = 116, 21,5%), followed by rye grass (Lolium perenne) and orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata). Positive skin reactions to Alternaria, to Candida albicans, and to all pollens except Ulmus competris, Pinus sylvetris, Platanus vulgaris and Tilia platyphyllos, were higher in children with allergic rhinitis than in those with asthma. In children from rural areas, allergic skin reactivity was found to be more common against Candida albicans, sheep dander and all pollens except Corylus avellana, Fraxinus excelsior, Populus alba, Pinus sylvetris, Platanus vulgaris and Chenopodium album, than in urban children. Although Trakya is close to Greece and other Mediterranean countries, this study suggests that the pollens, which sensitize children, are not similar. PMID:15783130

  19. ON EXTRACELLULAR AND INTRACELLULAR VENOM ACTIVATORS OF THE BLOOD, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO LECITHIN AND FATTY ACIDS AND THEIR COMPOUNDS.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H

    1907-07-17

    In normal serums of the majority of mammalian and avian blood there exists certain substances capable of activating venom haemolysin. They are extractable from serum by means of ether, and are capable of conferring upon the originally non-activating serum a power to activate venom, when mixed with the latter. The ethereal extract consists of fatty acids, neutral fats and possibly also some ether soluble organic soaps. The fatty acids and soaps, especially of the oleinic series, acquire certain characteristics of complements in general, when they are mixed with serum. They are inactive without the venom in the mixture; they are inactivable with calcium chloride; they exhibit a tendency to go off in activity with age; they are inactive or only weakly active at 0 degrees C., and they are extractable by ether. In testing the serum from which the ether soluble substances are removed, it is found that no venom activating property is left. Warm alcoholic extraction of such serum yields, however, a large quantity of lecithin. In the case of non-activating serums no venom activating fats appear in the ethereal extract. Lecithin exists in such serum in no less quantity than in the activating kind. The addition of oleinic acid or its soluble soaps to a non-activating serum, in a ratio which corresponds to the percentage of fatty acids or soaps contained in some of the easily activating serums, will make the serum highly active in regard to venom. In normal serum of dog there exists, besides the group of activators already mentioned, another kind of venom activators which has been identified as a lecithin compound acting in the manner of free lecithin. A very sharp differentiation of the haemolysis produced by this activator and by the other groups of activators is obtained by means of calcium chloride, which is powerless against lecithin or lecithin compounds, but effective in removing the action of the latter. This lecithin containing proteid can be precipitated by half saturation with ammonium sulphate, but is perfectly soluble in water, and is not coagulated in neutral alkaline salt solutions upon boiling. Alcohol precipitates a proteid-like coagulum and extracts lecithin from it; ether does not extract lecithin from this compound. Non-activating serums do not contain any such lecithin compound. Lecithin contained in other serum proteids, mainly as lecithalbumin, and perhaps as contained in globulin, is not able to activate venom. This is true of all the serums with which I worked; it matters not whether these fractions (obtained with ammonium sulphate) belong to the most activating serum (dog) or to the non-activating serum (ox). The non-coagulable portion of all heated serum contains a venom activator of the nature of lecithin. This activator is contained in a non-coagulable proteid described by Howell which is identical with Chabrie's albumon. As there is no ether-extractable lecithin in this portion of the serum, the activating property of heated serum must be due to this proteid compound of lecithin. That this lecithin proteid does not pre-exist in normal serum but is produced by the action of high temperature is true of all serums except that of the dog. In venom activation we know now that lecithin becomes reactive with venom when it is transformed from other proteid compounds into the non-coagulable form, the albumon. Howell's view of the non-existence of the non-coagulable proteid in normal serum seems to receive a biological support from venom haemolysis. Ovovitellin derived from hen's egg is one of the best venom activators of the lecithin proteid type. The cause of venom susceptibility of various kinds of blood corpuscles does not depend upon the existence of lecithin in the corpuscles, but solely upon the amount of fatty acids, and perhaps, also, soaps and fats, contained in the corpuscles. The protection which calcium chloride gives against venom haemolysis is proof of the absence of lecithin activation. From the stroma of susceptible corpuscles fatty acids or some fats can be extracted with ether. After ethereal extraction the stroma becomes non-activating, while the extract contains fatty acids and some soaps or fats, which when added to venom-resistant corpuscles render the latter vulnerable to venom. The corpuscular solution of non-activating corpuscles does not contain enough fatty acids. The larger the amount of fatty acids and soaps in the corpuscles, the easier the cells undergo venom haemolysis. Lecithin exists in the strorna of all kinds of corpuscles, but in a form unavailable for venom activation. The somatic cytolytic processes caused by venom requires intracellular complements. The experiments performed on the cells of liver, kidney, testis and brain of the guinea-pig and rat indicate that the substances which act as complements are inactivable by calcium chloride. PMID:19867102

  20. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pin, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-Len, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potos, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria (> 1 mm in length) are also present oriented parallel to stratification. In addition to filamentous and coccoid cyanobacteria, the limestone beds contain rare benthic foraminifera, common planktic foraminifera, heterohelicids, Rotalipora spp., Rotalipora cf cushmani, Whiteinella spp, W. praehelvetica, which indicate a time interval from the latest Cenomanian to the earliest Turonian. Lithological, paleontological and microfacies data thus indicate that the sediments accumulated in open-marine to semi-restricted platform environments, under low-energy conditions. Primary lamination, pyrite and excellent degree of preservation of fishes, suggest that low oxygen concentration lead to the formation of anoxic/dysoxic conditions during the accumulation of these exceptional deposits, which are coeval with the worldwide development of OAE-2. Planktonic foraminifera and fishes indicate oxygenated conditions in the photic zone, but dysoxic/anoxic conditions near the bottom, which is consistent with the presence of inoceramids and the absence of bioturbation in the sediment.

  1. Nuevas oportunidades de inmunoterapia dirigida

    Cancer.gov

    Un equipo de investigadores del NCI ha informado que varios tipos de cánceres gastrointestinales tienen mutaciones específicas al tumor que pueden ser reconocidas por el sistema inmunitario, lo que ofrece una posible oportunidad terapéutica para pacientes

  2. Chrysomelids American diabroticines Hosts and natural enemies. Biology-feasibility for control of pest species (Crisomelidos Diabroticinos americanos Hospederos y enemigos naturales Biologia y factibili manejo especies plagas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chrysomelids in the Diabroticites include some of the most important pest species of the American continent. The chemical and management techniques used to date to control them are: crop rotation to prevent re-infection of host crops, especially in the species that display an egg diapause; insec...

  3. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1998-06-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Why Do Alcoholic Beverages Have "Legs"?, by Todd P. Silverstein, p 723. * Audience-Appropriate Analogies: Collision Theory, by Kent W. Piepgrass, p 724. * Using Balls from Different Sports To Model the Variation of Atomic Sizes, by Gabriel Pinto, p 725. * The Convergent Evolution of a Chemistry Project: Using Laboratory Posters as a Platform for Web Page Construction, by Sally Rigeman, p 727. * Process Development in the Teaching Laboratory, by Leonard C. Klein and Susanne M. Dana, p 745.

  4. Especially for Teens: Birth Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs)? The male latex or polyurethane condom gives the best protection against ... is a small dome-shaped device made of latex or silicone that fits inside the vagina and ...

  5. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-02-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles JCE Classroom Activity: #24. The Write Stuff: Using Paper Chromatography to Separate an Ink Mixture, p 176A Teaching Chemistry in the Midwinter Every year, forecasters around the world provide us with long-range predictions of what the seasons will afford us in the coming year. And each year, the weather provides a few surprises that the forecasters did not predict - such as a record amount of snow or record heat indexes, depending on where you live. Although the weatherman didn't predict it, we still must pull out our snow shovels or sun block and take the necessary steps to adapt to the situation. As teachers, we make predictions of teaching and learning goals that we aspire to achieve during a given year, and like the weather, the year brings surprises that aren't in line with our predictions. With that in mind, I would like to offer JCE as the scholastic snow shovel or sun shield you need to jump-start your class and reach the goals you have set. So find a warm (or cool) place, get comfortable, and spend some time with the February issue of JCE. Articles of General Interest in This Issue For readers living where snow falls, Williams's article on page 148 offers some historical background on the use of calcium chloride as a deicer. A diver that depends for its buoyancy upon gas given off by a chemical reaction is described by Derr, Lewis, and Derr in the article beginning on page 171. In her article appearing on pages 249-250, Wang describes a laboratory exercise that makes the mastery of solution preparation skills fun. The students' skill is tested by using the solutions they make to carry out the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction. For high school class applications I recommend use of 3% hydrogen peroxide, described as an option in the article. A well-organized approach to separating an ink mixture, with some possibly new twists, is laid out in the student- and teacher-friendly format of JCE Classroom Activity: #24, pages 176A-176B. Addressing Some Specialized Interests As in any issue of the Journal, there are several articles that are not designated with the secondary school mark (?) but are likely to be of interest to some high school teachers. For example, if you are interested in staying abreast of educational applications of computational chemistry, the articles on pages 199-221 will be among those you will wish to examine even though the focus is on meeting the learning needs of college students. For those with an interest in electronics, there are several articles on pages 252-262, on building on modifying useful devices. Among the topics: building a digital monitor for analyzing spectrophotometer signals, building a digital interface for a graphing calculator, and using an inexpensive commercial analog-to-digital converter. JCE Reviewers The standard of quality in JCE articles is due in great measure to the careful scrutiny and helpful suggestions of reviewers. I am proud to note that the names of several high school teachers are in the list of individuals who have reviewed manuscripts for JCE recently. This month's list, which appears on page 152, is a continuation from page 24 of the January issue. Keep watching if your name has not yet appeared. If you are not currently serving as a reviewer, I encourage you to sign up today. As a reviewer, you would review potential articles that have been submitted to the Journal. You may choose from a variety of subject areas to review and choose as few or as many manuscripts as you can handle. To find out how to become a reviewer, read the information on page 162 or visit our Web site at jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Reviewers. NACS 3/2000 Reminder NACS 3/2000 is the heading Carolyn Abbott uses in email correspondence about the High School Day program, which be held Monday, March 27, 2000, at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Francisco. Carolyn is High School Program Chair and she and her committee have assembled a full day of interesting and useful sessions for teachers. Among the sessions will be three worksh

  6. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1998-12-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Demonstrations of the Enormity of Avogadro's Number, by Damon Diemente, p 1565. * The Egg in the Bottle Revisited: Air Pressure and Amontons' Law (Charles' Law), by Louis H. Adcock, p 1567 * CD-ROM Spectroscope: A Simple and Inexpensive Tool for Classroom Demonstrations on Chemical Spectroscopy, by Fumitaka Wakabayashi, Kiyohito Hamada, Kozo Sone, p 1569 Environmental Chemistry Resources

  7. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-09-01

    Alternative Assessment The trend in several states to use high-stakes achievement test scores to evaluate districts, schools, and teachers appears to be at odds with the intent of the National Science Education Assessment Standards. Recently I read several postings on an Internet discussion list in which several high school teachers expressed differing opinions on how to deal with the situation. There seemed to be general agreement, however, that as increased emphasis is placed on preparation for high-stakes end-of-course examinations it becomes more difficult to assess conceptual understanding. High school chemistry teachers are an innovative lot, and I am confident that ways will be found to evaluate understanding no matter what. This month's issue contains two examples of using student-constructed posters as a means of assessment. Although we most often associate poster presentations with research, such as a science fair project, these articles show that posters may also be used to assess student learning in class settings. The examples are from lower-division college courses, but they may be equally useful in high school chemistry courses. An article titled Using Poster Sessions as an Alternative to Written ExaminationsThe Poster Exam by Pamela Mills and four co-authors contains a detailed explanation of how student-constructed posters can be used to assess student learning. A number of related articles are listed in the Literature Cited section. Another example is found in A Poster Session in Organic Chemistry That Markedly Enhanced Student Learning by P. A. Huddle. The same author also contributed the article How to Present a Paper or Poster in which useful, straightforward suggestions for communicating information and ideas clearly are provided.

  8. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-04-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Amino Acid Wordsearch, by Terry L. Helser, p 495. Games, Puzzles, and Humor In honor of April Fools' Day this issue contains 22 pages devoted to games and puzzles that can be used to teach aspects of chemistry. Most are designed for high school and first-year college students. The lead article, p 481, contains an annotated bibliography of chemistry games, complete with a vendor list. Many of the annotated games must be purchased, but the other articles that follow in this issue describe some games and puzzles that require minimal preparation using a word processor and readily available materials. Actually, JCE has a long tradition of publishing games and puzzles for chemistry teachers and their students. Read the letter by Helser and the Editor's response, p 468, for some recent background. Not having counted articles over past years, I became curious and turned to the online index, accessed by way of http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/. Because I wanted to search the entire 75-year life of the Journal, I searched titles for the words "game", "puzzle", and "humor" and obtained a total of 85 hits from the three searches. After eliminating titles of articles that were not applicable, I found that at least 25 games, 48 puzzles, and 5 humor articles have appeared during the past 75 years. At an average of one per year, the JCE editors hardly can be accused of frivolity, but game, puzzle, and humor articles have been published. The term "game" did not appear in any titles during 1945-1970, "puzzle" did not appear from 1927 to 1953, and there was no mention of humor (in the titles) prior to 1974. What appears to be the earliest article (1929) about a game was authored by an undergraduate student at the University of Colorado (1). It was titled "Chemical Bank", and the game pieces were tokens cut from cork stoppers. Wire hooks were inserted in the side of the token to represent valence electrons available for bonding. Carbon contained 4 hooks at 90° relative to each other, nitrogen contained three hooks at 120°, etc. The wires were sufficiently long and flexible that multiple bonding could be represented. Each player was dealt several game pieces and the first player received an extra carbon. The objective was to hook pieces together to make an acceptable molecule. Players took turns and the first player to use all his or her pieces was declared the winner. The first crossword puzzle to appear in JCE was written by a high school teacher from Hollywood, California (2). Ruth Van Vleet had observed that her students were caught up in the popularity of crossword puzzles of the time (1925) and used that interest to help students learn chemical facts. The puzzle published in the article was submitted by one of her students after completing one year of chemistry. The first article which carried the term "humor" in the title was published in 1974 (3). To meet the requirements of a class assignment to compare two elements, one student wrote an imaginary dialog between ytterbium and lutetium. Word play and puns were used to described similar and differing properties of the two elements. This article, however, was not the first account of using humor as a vehicle for stimulating student interest. Games, puzzles, and humor certainly can be overused. Usually they do not lead to the development of conceptual understanding. However, appropriate use, as many JCE readers have discovered, can stimulate student interest and reinforce factual knowledge. Some strategy games may help develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The games, humor, and puzzles published in JCE are peer-reviewed so that inaccuracies and errors are not perpetuated. So why not take advantage of this resource? And look forward to next April, or whenever, for more games, puzzles, and humor. Feedback Requested for View from My Classroom Feature David Byrum, editor of the View From My Classroom feature, requests the assistance of readers. During a recent conference on the preparation of new teachers, a question was asked about what specific ideas, procedures, concepts, and skills teachers wished that they had known more about as they started their first job. Some of the responses at the conference were:

    • How to choose which concepts/ideas/skills to teach
    • How to justify which concepts/ideas/skills to leave out
    • How to set up the equipment and supplies needed for common experiments
    • How to choose, set up, and perform useful demonstrations
    • How to order materials and supplies for the classroom and laboratory
    • How district, school, and department budgets work and how to order for the classroom or laboratory
    David would like to know what your thoughts are in regard to the question posed. What would you have liked to know more about as you started your teaching career? What information would have allowed you to miss a few of those potholes in your first few years of teaching? What information would have helped you raise your teaching to a higher level? Please take a few minutes to write your thoughts down and send them to David. Since this should be as quick and painless as possible, email is the preferred method. His email address is DavidB1032@aol.com. If you are without email, please send your comments to David L. Byrum, Flowing Wells High School, 3725 N. Flowing Wells Road, Tucson, AZ 85705. Literature Cited 1. James, H. J. Chem. Educ. 1929, 6, 1790-1792. 2. Van Vleet, R. C. J. Chem. Educ. 1925, 2, 292-294. 3. Levine, B; Myers, S. C. J. Chem. Educ. 1974, 51, 564.

  9. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-08-01

    Care to Share? An Informal Syllabus Exchange A recent email message from Thomas Shiland, who teaches at Saratoga Springs Senior High School, noted that the process of revising the high school chemistry syllabus is underway in New York State. He expressed a strong interest in helping construct a chemistry syllabus that represents the best thinking about appropriate content. He wondered if it would be possible to develop a way in which different secondary chemistry syllabi could easily be exchanged. It is likely that readers from other states and countries are involved in a similar process and might also be interested in exchanging syllabi. Many states do not use the term syllabus to describe their guiding curricular document for chemistry but rather refer to it as a framework or as guidelines. In most cases, the document includes a list of key ideas or topics, performance indicators, and the major understandings associated with each key idea. Such documents would be appropriate for exchange among those of you involved in the revision process. If you are interested in arranging an exchange please contact me by email at j.e.howell@usm.edu or by mail at J. E. Howell, Box 5043, USM, Hattiesburg, MS39406-5043, USA. High School Day Information The High School Chemistry Program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana will be held Sunday, August 22, 1999, at the Doubletree Hotel, 300 Canal Street. If you wish to register only for the High School Day activities, which includes a pass to the ACS Exposition, a special registration form is available from Lillie Tucker-Akin, 2800 Reynard Dr., Tupelo, MS38801; sci4me@aol.com; fax: 662/566-7906. Advance registration is 25 and the cost of the High School Luncheon is 12. Register in advance by August 1, 1999, or from 7:45 to 8:30 a.m. at the High School Day table in the conference room area of the Doubletree. The workshop schedule is shown below. Secondary School Feature Articles * Exploring the Ocean-Stating the Case for Chemistry, by Paul J. Scheuer, p 1075 * Distillation Apparatuses Using Household Items, by Danielle R. D. Campanizzi, Brenda Mason, Christine K. F. Hermann, p 1079 New Orleans Concurrent Workshops, High School Program 8:30 a.m.-9:20 a.m. A. A Teaching Resource for You: The Journal of Chemical Education, J. E. Howell, J. W. Moore, and A. M. Sarquis B. Electrical Conductivity, J. M. Manion and P. F. Krause, and The Properties of Gases, J.-M. Whitfield and K. A. Woodling C. Chemistry with Calculators for Beginners, P. Sconzo (3 hours) D. Spectrum of Activities for Chemistry Teachers, Carolina Biological Supply, S. Mitchell, F. Cherry, and L. Akin (3 hours) 9:30 a.m.-10:20 a.m. A. Applying Chemical Education Research to the Classroom, L. Akin and J. Valasek B. Another Look at the Deflection of Falling Liquids, H. H. Harris and J. Newstrum, and Encouraging Students to Investigate Acids and Bases Using Plant Indicators, P. K. Kerrigan C. Chemistry with Calculators (continued) D. Spectrum of Activities (continued) E. Science Education for Public Understanding (SEPUP) and Chemistry, Health, Environment, and Me, M. Koker and L. Akin (2 hours) 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. A. Increasing Aptitude and Interest of High School Students through Summer Camp, C. E. Fulton, and Energy Teaching Introduction to High School Chemistry, L.-M. Trejo B. Chemistry in Science Museum Exhibits: Opportunities and Challenges and Cooking with Chemistry, D. Katz C. Chemistry with Calculators (continued) D. Spectrum of Activities (continued) E. SEPUP (continued) 12:00 noon-1:15 p.m., High School Luncheon Educating High School Teachers for the 21st Century, Glenn Crosby 1:30 p.m.-2:20 p.m. A. Customized Mastery Learning in First-Year Chemistry and Computer Software for Chemistry Teachers Who Require Mastery Learning of Their Students, J. Bedenbaugh and A. Bedenbaugh B. Can One Teach Chemistry with Everyday Substances? A. Sae, and SourceBook Activities Using Everyday Substances, C. Ayers, J. Schreck, and M. V. Orna C. Chemistry with Calculators II, P. Sconzo (3 hours) D. An Enlightening Afternoon of Lab Safety, Carolina Biological Supply, J. Kaufman E. Alabama Science in Motion, T. Boman and C. Nassar (90 minutes) 2:30 p.m.-3:20 p.m. A. An Activity to Show Chemistry Students How to Organize Experimentally Determined Information and Using Chemistry to Teach Reasoning Skills, A. Bedenbaugh B. Demonstrations with Gases, M. D. Alexander, and The Ring of Fire with Rubbing Alcohol and a Couple of Others, W. Deese C. Chemistry with Calculators II (continued) D. An Enlightening Afternoon of Lab Safety (continued) E. Alabama Science in Motion (continued) and Buck Scientific, J. DeMenna 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. A. How Flawed Textbook Experiment Can Lead to an Opportunity for Guided Discovery by Students and a Simpler, Better Experiment, J. Bedenbaugh B. Demonstrating Applications of Chemistry with Everyday Substances, D. Katz C. Chemistry with Calculators II (continued) D. An Enlightening Afternoon of Lab Safety (continued) E. Buck Scientific (continued)

  10. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-05-01

    JCE Classroom Activity: #27. How Does Your Garden Grow? Investigating the "Magic Salt Crystal Garden", edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen, p 624A. Some Articles of Interest photos by Jerrold J. Jacobsen and Nancy S. Gettys This month's issue covers a wide variety of topics, from historical notes to the latest software from JCE. Gas burners are such familiar items in the laboratory that little thought is given to their development. An interesting article by Kathryn Williams (pp 558-559) explains how these humble devices came into being, beginning with Robert Bunsen's invention in 1857, through their adaptation in the United States in the 1930s to burn natural gas. Bunsen, in collaboration with Gustav Kirchhoff, used his invention in constructing an emission spectrometer that could be used in chemical analysis. A drawing of the instrument appears in the Williams article. The spectrometer is described in more detail in an article titled "A Brief History of Atomic Emission Spectrochemical Analysis, 1666-1950". Author Richard Jarrell traces the history of this important and lasting method of analysis from Isaac Newton's discovery of the visible spectrum to the development of the powerful analytical instruments that were in use in the 1950s. For readers who have a deeper interest in atomic emission spectroscopy, Jarrell's article is the first of five that are based on a symposium conducted in 1999 (pp 573-607). Visualizing the structure of ionic crystals is the topic of articles by Keenan Dungey (pp 618-619), Bruce Mattson (pp 622-623), and J. Kamenícek and M. Melichárek (pp 623-624). The ionic crystal theme is also carried out in JCE Classroom Activity #27 (pp 624A-B) and a demonstration on the preparation of sodium iodide, written by Zelek Herman (pp 619-621). Together, the five articles provide an interesting combination of ideas for investigating and describing both the macroscopic and the submicroscopic views of ionic crystals. Is It the "Write" Time for You? The end of the school year is approaching quickly. In previous years, several readers have submitted manuscripts soon after the end of the school year, while ideas were fresh in their mind and there was relief from the demands of daily classes. If you have an idea for an article, I encourage you to think about writing as soon as the school term ends. I can probably guess what you are saying, "I don't have anything that readers would be interested in." This is a common reaction, to which we frequently respond by reminding high school teachers that this is "your journal" and the only way to ensure that topics of interest to you are considered or published is by your active participation. In this presidential election year I am reminded of the familiar sentiment, "I voted in the election, so I have earned the right to complain about the politicians." I do not wish to encourage complaining, but there is a relevant correlation. By submitting manuscripts to the Journal, you are ensuring that you will continue to get your money's worth because it will include topics of interest to you. When considering a submission, many prospective authors are overwhelmed at the thought of preparing a complete manuscript. Don't let that stop you. If you have an idea, an outline, or a rough draft, any of the feature editors or I would be happy to discuss it with you. This one-on-one interaction during the development process will help you express your ideas more effectively. Many teachers across the country who are faced with similar situations and problems each day would benefit from an article discussing innovative teaching strategies or a new way to look at principles we teach every year. As you begin to formulate your ideas, I would like to emphasize five features whose editors are fellow teachers:

    • JCE Classroom Activities. An invitation for contributions was issued in the April issue of this column (JCE, 2000, 77, 431).
    • Chemical Principles Revisited, edited by Cary Kilner
    • Interdisciplinary Connections, edited by Mark Alber
    • Second Year and Advanced Placement Chemistry, edited by John Fischer
    • View From My Classroom, edited by David Byrum
    Information about the expectations for each feature and contact information for each feature editor may be found online, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/AboutJCE/Features/index.html. So review the various features today, and drop one of the editors or me an email briefly discussing your idea. We will begin a dialogue to explore the topic more thoroughly and do our best to provide feedback to help you submit the best possible manuscript. If you have selected a topic and are ready to prepare a manuscript for submission, be sure to consult the Guide to Submissions (JCE 2000, 77, 29-30 or http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/Guidelines.html). If you are considering writing about a laboratory experiment, consult Supplemental Guidelines, JCE Lab-Experiment Manuscripts ( this issue, p 562). We look forward to hearing from you soon.

  11. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-06-01

    It Was Nice to See You It was great to meet and talk to so many high school chemistry teachers who attended the High School Program at the ACS National Meeting in San Francisco or attended the NSTA National Convention in Orlando. Thank you to every teacher who visited the JCE Booth at either meeting and to the approximately 100 individuals who attended the JCE workshop early Monday morning at the ACS. At the NSTA meeting, the Mole Day Breakfast was a special occasion that was made very enjoyable by National Mole Day Foundation leaders Art Logan and Maury Oehler and the enthusiasm and camaraderie of the audience. For more about NMDF activities check out the website http://gamstcweb.gisd.k12.mi.us/~nmdf. Bringing Quality Visualization into the Classroom Turn to page 799 of this issue to learn about the release of Chemistry Comes Alive! Volume 4. The Chemistry Comes Alive! series of CD-ROMs are packed with Quicktime movies and still photos depicting chemical reactions, many of which are too hazardous or expensive to carry out in the classroom or laboratory. Many of the demonstrations are accompanied by background information, and they are also correlated with popular chemistry textbooks. An innovation appearing in Volume 4 is an interactive section on reactions in aqueous solution. Among the appealing features of the CCA! series is the ability to incorporate QuickTime movies of these demonstrations into your own presentations. The Reprise of Chemical Principles Revisited I am very pleased that Cary Kilner has agreed to edit the Chemical Principles Revisited feature. Please read his Mission Statement below. If you have an idea for a manuscript that fits this feature, now is the time to take action either by discussing it with Cary or by submitting a manuscript for review. This feature has the potential to be very useful to teachers, but it can reach its potential only through your suggestions and submissions. Let us hear from you soon. Scenes from High School Day at the ACS meeting in San Francisco. (Top photo, left to right) Carolyn Abbott, chair of the program, with Michael Tinnesand and Mare Taagepera. (Bottom photo) Michael Tinnesand speaking at the Luncheon. Photo by Morton Z. Hoffman. Mission Statement for Chemical Principles Revisited W. Cary Kilner, Feature Editor Exeter High School, 7 Salmon Street, Newmarket, NH 03857; 603/659-6825; CaryPQ@aol.com Through this feature, teachers are invited to share how they introduce and present a specific chemical principle, how students investigate the principle or its applications in the laboratory, and how student understanding of this principle is assessed. In most cases the principle would be one that is difficult for students to learn or apply, or one in which chemical research has led to a new understanding that has not yet appeared in textbooks. Discussion of content underlying the principle should provide insight that goes beyond the treatment of high school or general chemistry texts, providing depth that will enable the teacher to become confident in his or her understanding. The account may be a brief vignette that will inspire the reader to try something new and that can be easily implemented. Alternatively, it may be a longer discussion of phenomena that have been neglected or misinterpreted and to which a fresh, reflective, and informed view is provided. An example of a brief article is "The Disappearing Act: Teaching Students to Expect the Unexpected" (J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 155). An example of a longer article is "Studying the Activity Series of Metals" (J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 51), although a current submission should also include discussion of assessment and actual outcomes whenever possible. Teachers who have an idea for an article that fits this mission may contact the feature editor if they have questions.

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-02-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Building the Interest of High School Students for Science-A PACT Ambassador Program To Investigate Soap Manufacturing and Industrial Chemistry, by Matthew Lynch, Nicholas Geary, Karen Hagaman, Ann Munson, and Mark Sabo, p 191. * Promoting Chemistry at the Elementary Level, by Larry L. Louters and Richard D. Huisman, p 196. * Is It Real Gold? by Harold H. Harris, p 198. * The "Big Dog-Puppy Dog" Analogy for Resonance, by Todd P. Silverstein, p 206. * The Fizz Keeper, a Case Study in Chemical Education, Equilibrium, and Kinetics, by Reed A. Howald, p 208. Staying on Top: Curricular Projects, Relativistic Effects, and Standard-State Pressure You may wonder why some articles are identified with the Secondary School Chemistry logo (*) this month even though at first glance they appear to be of greater interest to college faculty.1 The three articles discussed below are representative of three broad categories: (i) the interrelatedness of science teaching and learning, K-16+; (ii) new understandings of chemical phenomena; and (iii) information about the use of SI units. For each article I have highlighted the major point(s) and the reasons it may be of interest to high school teachers. First, the article "The NSF 'Systemic' Projects- A New Tradition" (G. M. Barrow, p 158) is a commentary on changes in post-secondary introductory chemistry courses in which a distinction is drawn between information management and individual understanding. The author is of the opinion that most students expect the former and that the NSF-funded systemic projects "will thrive only if they are consistent with their information-management mission". Three individuals provided responses to the commentary from their perspective. Has a student asked you why mercury is a liquid, or why gold is the most electronegative metal? "Gold Chemistry: The Aurophilic Attraction" by J. Bardají and A. Laguna (p 201) and "Why Gold and Copper Are Colored but Silver Is Not" by A. H. Guerreor, H. J. Fasoli, and J. L. Costa (p 200) provide useful information in answering these questions. Have you thought about the effect of changing the standard-state pressure from 1 atm to the SI unit of 1 bar? The question is addressed in "How Thermodynamic Data and Equilibrium Constants Changed When the Standard-State Pressure Became 1 Bar" by R. S. Treptow (p 212). The author points out that although textbook authors have not yet abandoned use of 1 atm as standard-state pressure, thermodynamic data are reported in the research literature on the basis of 1 bar standard-state pressure. The author provides the information needed to readily convert thermodynamic data from one standard to the other. These articles represent just a few that may be of interest to you. I encourage you to explore other articles within the Journal that are not noted with the secondary school section logo. As we each continue to broaden our knowledge of chemistry and chemical education, JCE will continue to serve as an invaluable resource in our educational quest. Anaheim and Boston in March; Fairfield in August JCE will have a booth in the exhibition hall both at the ACS National Meeting in Anaheim, March 21-24, and at the NSTA National Convention in Boston, March 25-29. Additionally, the all-day High School Program on Monday, March 22, will be held as part of the ACS meeting. More details will be provided in the March issue of JCE. Make your plans to attend now. Registration information may be found at http://www.acs.org/meetings/anaheim/welcome.htm and http://www.nsta.org/conv/natgen.htm. Another outstanding event, ChemEd '99, will held on the campus of Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT, August 1-5, 1999. Information, including a call for presentation proposals, is available at http://www.sacredheart.edu/chemed/. The deadline for abstracts is March 1, 1999, so don't delay. Chemistry for Kids-Looking for New Ideas Over the life of the Chemistry for Kids (CFK) feature a relatively large number of articles have been published that describe outreach by college or high school faculty and students. The majority of these have dwelt on the details of delivery-be it demonstrations or hands-on activities. An article in this issue, "Promoting Chemistry at the Elementary Level: A Low-Maintenance Program of Chemical Demonstration" by Larry L. Louters and Richard D. Huisman (p 196), details an on-campus program that could be a model for others to use. We believe that almost every combination of interaction has been described in CFK articles. What we would like now are more CFK articles with an emphasis on science instruction in the elementary classroom. Learner-centered activities and teaching strategies that integrate chemistry into the curriculum, successful curricula, and applications of software or other technological innovations are among topics that could be of interest to readers. If you have an idea for a manuscript, the co-editors of the CFK feature would be happy to discuss it with you. Any suggestions regarding types of articles that you think would be helpful within this section are welcomed too. To contact the CFK feature editors: John T. Moore, Stephen F. Austin State University Department of Chemistry, Box 13006 SFA Station, Nacogdoches, TX 75962; 409/468-2384; jmoore@sfasu.edu; David Tolar, Ennis Intermediate School, Ennis, TX 75120; 903/872-5364; TolarD@ennis.ednet10.net. Note 1. Comments from readers regarding the appropriateness of the recommendations are always welcome (j.e.howell@usm.edu).

  13. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1998-10-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles >* A Simple, Transparent Fume Hood, by John Fredericks, p 1299 >* Solving the Mystery of Fading Fingerprints with London Dispersion Forces, by Doris R. Kimbrough and Ronald DeLorenzo, p 1300 >* London Dispersion Forces and "The Wave", by C. Jayne Wilcox, p 1301

  14. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-10-01

    Writing Across the Curriculum The notion that student learning is enhanced through writing is widely accepted at all educational levels if the product is fairly assessed and the learner is provided with feedback. Finding the time to critically evaluate student papers is difficult at best and competes with time needed to prepare laboratory investigations. A few weeks ago a teacher who has extensive extracurricular responsibilities that include extensive interaction with parents and community members shared with me his frustration in not being able to grade written reports. This teacher is the head football coach at his school, but many readers experience the same difficulties due to a variety of duties. There are no easy or completely satisfying answers to this problem, but this issue contains an account of a successful approach (Writing in Chemistry: An Effective Learning Tool, pp 1399-1403). Although they are based on experience in college courses, several ideas described in the article could be applied in high school chemistry courses. In another article, the author of Precise Writing for a Precise Science (pp 1407-1408) identifies 20 examples of familiar, but incorrect, grammatical constructions and explains how to phrase each one correctly. Chemical Education Research: Improving Chemistry Learning The results from research on how students learn have greatly increased our understanding of cognition in recent years. However, the results are often published in the science education research literature and are not readily accessible to the classroom teacher. Additionally, the research reports are couched in specialized terminology. This issue contains a Viewpoints article (pp 1353-1361) that bridges the gap between research results and classroom application. It was written by two veteran chemical educators, Dudley Herron and Susan Nurrenbern. The shift from behaviorism to constructivism as the dominant theory of learning is described briefly to provide a context for constructivist approaches. In the section titled "What Research Has Revealed", the authors provide a succinct summary of specific research findings under three tantalizing subheadings: "What You Think You Know May Not Be the Way It Is", "Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport!", and "Appropriate Outcomes Must Be Identified and Measured". The authors' insight into future research challenges is detailed in a sidebar. ChemEd'99: A Great Success The 1999 ChemEd Conference was a great success, judging by the many very favorable comments of high school teachers who attended. Thanks and congratulations go to Babu George and to the many volunteers who made this event possible through a great deal of hard work, ingenuity, and creativity. Many of the volunteers who gave so generously of their time, before and during the conference, are high school teachers. The program reflected the broad range of needs and interests of high school teachers. Credit for the success also should go to the many presenters. The workshops, demonstrations, papers, and posters that I attended were of high quality and useful to teachers. Conversation with other attendees convinced me that the same degree of quality and utility was characteristic of the entire conference program. Demonstrations are always an outstanding feature of ChemEd conferences and the Signature Demonstrations continued this tradition, as did the large number of demonstration sessions scheduled throughout the general program. The Reg Friesen Memorial Lecture, delivered by Steve Spangler, featured spectacular and stimulating demonstrations in the context of building connections between chemical concepts and real-world applications. Some other themes that permeated the general program were Internet applications, methods of assessment, safety and waste disposal, calculator and computer based laboratory methods, and ideas for making classroom instruction interesting and effective. Thank you to each reader who visited the JCE Exhibit or participated in our workshop on using JCE Activities. We enjoyed talking with you and appreciate the many helpful suggestions and comments. We want to express special thanks to the large number of new subscribers. Finally, the conference was fun. The opening ceremony parade included flags of all countries represented at the conference, individual element flags carried students, and moles of all descriptions. The Lobster/Clam Bake was an obvious success, evidenced by the mountains of mouth-watering food that was consumed. Seeing the periodic table emerge from the assemblage of large blocks of ice was a fitting sequel to witnessing the world's largest periodic table being put together at ChemEd'95 in Norfolk. It is exciting to anticipate how the periodic table might be represented at future ChemEd conferences. Start planning now to attend ChemEd'2001 in Toronto. Mole Day 1999 Remember National Mole Day is October 23! Read about the mole of the year on page 1335. National Chemistry Week 1999 Celebrate National Chemistry Week! starting on November 7th. An announcement on page 1338 describes this year's activity on finding creative uses for sodium polyacrylate. Secondary School Feature Articles * JCE Classroom Activity #20: Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent, p 1416A. * Experiments with Zeolites at the Secondary-School Level: Experience from the Netherlands, by Eric N. Coker, Pamela J. Davis, Aonne Kerkstra, Herman van Bekkum, p 1417.

  15. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2001-10-01

    JCE publications regularly make connections to a wide variety of interests, of which art is but one. Interdisciplinary Connections is a High School Feature Column designed to meet this challenge. Articles have been published relating literature (2) and writing (3) to chemistry. If you have developed interdisciplinary connections that you would like to share with other teachers, I encourage you to contact the feature editor, Mark Alber.2 Additional examples of annotated bibliographies on chemical connections to other disciplines or applications include food science (4), environmental concerns (5), and writing (6,7). The online "Search" link in the left-hand column of the home page of HS CLIC can lead to the discovery of articles relevant to many other interests. Happy connecting!

    Note

    1. For more information about NCW, visit their Web site.
    2. For the feature mission statement and contact information see the HS CLIC Web site.

    Literature Cited

    1. Chem. Eng. News 2001, 79 (Feb 26), 50.
    2. Thoman, C. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 495.
    3. Alber, M. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 478.
    4. Jacobsen, E. K. J. Chem. Educ.2000, 77, 1256.
    5. Moore, J. W.; Moore, E. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1976, 53, 167; 1976, 53, 240; 1975, 52, 288.
    6. Shires, N. P. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 494.
    7. Waterman, E. L. J. Chem. Educ. 1981, 58, 826.

  16. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emory Howell, J.

    1999-11-01

    More Feature Articles This Month This issue contains a larger-than-usual number of Secondary School Chemistry feature articles (see side-bar). Mary Harris, who teaches in St. Louis, Missouri, and her student, Lauren Picard, contributed an account of student research on the cuprammonium rayon process (p 1512). In addition to being informative and interesting, the article provides a model for student-teacher interaction in carrying out an independent research project. Two North Carolina teachers, Charles Roser and Catherine McCluskey, describe how to use a Calculator Based Laboratory (interface) to measure the kinetics of the reaction that occurs when a lightstick is activated (p 1514). The method and the easy-to-construct device they made could be used with other systems, as well. Don't Throw Away the Carrier Sheet All areas of JCE Online are now accessible to all JCE subscribers. To find out how you can benefit, read the article appearing on p 1599, Now That I Have It, What Can I Do with It? Jon Holmes, Editor of JCE Online, explains in the article how you can use this resource most effectively. Access to several areas, such as full text access to articles, requires that you log in. The mailing label on the carrier sheet that accompanies your Journal each month contains a password that you need to log in. That is why you need to keep the carrier sheet, at least until you have logged in for the first time and either memorized the number or written it in a safe place. Detailed instructions for logging on are found by clicking on the "How to Log On" link, which appears near the upper left corner of the JCE Online Home Page, jchemed.chem.wisc.edu. If you read a school library copy you need to ask your librarian what password you need to log in. Congratulations Among the recipients of the most prestigious American Society Awards (p 1481) are two individuals who have given generously of their time and energy to the cause of chemical education. Both are familiar names to many of our readers. The High School/College Interface Luncheon was part of the very rich day-long High School Program at the New Orleans ACS Meeting. Shown here (from left) are Glenn Crosby, the luncheon speaker; Lillie Tucker-Akin, the High School Day program chair; and Fred Johnson, Assistant Superintendent of Shelby County (TN) schools and Immediate Past President of NSTA. The recipient of the James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching is Frank G. Cardulla, who taught for many years at Niles North High School, Skokie, Illinois. His extensive record of service to fellow teachers includes editing the JCE "View from My Classroom" feature for several years and writing several articles, as well as his recent appointment to the JCE Board of Publication. The recipient of the George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education is Jerry A. Bell of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. An author of numerous articles appearing in JCE and a member of the JCE Board of Publication for several years, he currently serves as Board Chair. The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education Readers who attended the 15th BCCE in Waterloo, Ontario, know that much of the programming at these conferences is of interest to high school teachers. Many work shops, papers, and demonstrations are presented by high school teachers. There are many other outstanding papers and posters, plenary speakers, and exciting demonstrations. The 16th BCCE will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, July 30-August 3, 2000. Among the high school teachers already scheduled to present workshops at the 16th BCCE are George Hague, Lynn Hershey, and Jack Randall, and there will be many more before the program is completed. The High School Chemistry Program Chair is Tim Graham, Roosevelt High School (MI). The Organizing Committee is seeking the assistance of local sections of the American Chemical Society within a 300-mile radius of Ann Arbor in providing support for high school teachers to attend the conference. High school teachers who wish to attend, whether within the 300-mile radius or beyond, are encouraged to contact their local section of the ACS. Information about local sections can be found on the Web at www.acs.org. See p 1482 for more information about the conference, including deadlines for proposals and abstracts and for the conference Web site address. Secondary School Feature Articles * The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials, by John W. Nicholson and H. Mary Anstice, p 1497 * JCE Classroom Activity #21: Hunting for Chemicals in Consumer Products, p 1504A, by Arthur M. Last * Science for Kids Outreach Programs, by Birgit G. Koehler, Lee Y. Park, and Lawrence J. Kaplan, p 1505 *Henry's Law and Noisy Knuckles by Doris R. Kimbrough, p 1509 *Investigating the Cuprammonium Rayon Process in a High School Laboratory, by Lauren J. Pickard and Mary E. Harris, p 1512 * Lightstick Kinetics, by Charles E. Roser and Catherine L. McCluskey, p 1514

  17. Atrial Fibrillation in Hematologic Malignancies, Especially After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Risk Factors, Current Management, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Pankaj; Paydak, Hakan; Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; van Rhee, Frits

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to well-established risk factors, cancer has been increasingly associated with the development of AF. Its increased occurrence in those with hematologic malignancies has been attributed to chemotherapeutic agents and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Recently, a few studies have attempted to define the etiopathogenesis of AF in hematologic malignancies. The management of AF in these patients is challenging because of the concurrent complicating factors, such as thrombocytopenia, orthostatic hypotension, and cardiac amyloidosis. More studies are needed to define the management of AF, especially rate versus rhythm control and anticoagulation. Arrhythmias, in particular, AF, have been associated with an increased length of stay, increased intensive care unit admissions, and greater cardiovascular mortality. In the present review, we describe AF in patients with hematologic malignancies, the risk factors, especially after AHSCT, and the current management of AF. PMID:26776085

  18. Informe Anual a la Nación sobre el Estado del Cáncer con una sección especial sobre la prevalencia d

    Cancer.gov

    El Informe Anual a la Nación sobre el Estado del Cáncer (1975 a 2010), mostró un descenso más acelerado que en años anteriores de los índices de mortalidad por cáncer de pulmón. También contiene una sección especial que destaca los efectos significativos

  19. A Note on the Association of Extensive Hmangiomatous Nvus of the Skin with Cerebral (Meningeal) Hmangioma, especially Cases of Facial Vascular Nvus with Contralateral Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F. Parkes

    1929-01-01

    The main type of the cases under consideration is that in which extensive capillary nvus of the skin, especially of trigeminal distribution, is associated with contralateral spastic hemiplegia, developing in early life, probably sometimes connected with intracranial hmorrhage from the abnormal blood-vessels of a diffuse leptomeningeal angioma on the same side as the main vascular nvus of the face. Various points related to such cases are referred to. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:19986835

  20. Sublethal foot-predation on Donacidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Carmen; Tirado, Cristina; Manjón-Cabeza, Maria Eugenia

    2001-08-01

    The incidence of foot nipping was studied on the Donax spp. of the littoral of Málaga (Southern Spain, 2875 specimens collected from February 1990 to January 1991) and of Ré island (French Atlantic coast, 262 specimens of Donax vittatus (Da Costa, 1778) collected in May 1996). In Málaga, Donax trunculus L., 1758 was the species most regularly nipped (18% of individuals), with peaks in summer (25% in August and 48% in September) and winter (34% in December). In Ré island, 27% of the specimens showed a nipped foot. Logistic regression shows that in D. trunculus length is the variable that most influences the probability of foot nipping, followed by weight and chlorophyll a. However, the difference in length between damaged and undamaged individuals was not significant (U-Mann-Whitney test). The size class frequency and the values of Ivlev's index show that the small size classes were avoided, while for the other size classes predation remained balanced throughout the year. Therefore, the avoidance of the small size classes makes length the most influential variable. The logistic regression indicated a coefficient B=-0.03 for weight. This implies a slightly negative influence on the probability of foot nipping. However, without the data of September, there is a positive correlation ( r=0.76, p<0.01) between the monthly percentages of predation and the flesh dry weight of a standard individual (25 mm long). The peak in September could be due to the recruitment peak of bivalves, which may have attracted more predators to the area, and/or to the recruitment of predators such as crabs to the swash zone. Logistic regression and test of comparison of percentages indicate that there was not any influence of the sex of an animal on the probability of foot nipping. Only in February was a significantly higher percentage ( p<0.05) of females nipped (44.44%) than the total of females in the sample (20.20%). The biomass (as flesh dry weight) of D. trunculus lost by foot nipping amounts to more than 20% in most of the size classes. There was an increase from the small sizes to the largest ones, in which it reaches 37%, with a positive correlation ( r=0.84; p<0.005) between size class and loss of biomass. Possible predators responsible for the foot nipping are crabs. Crab species usually found together with the donacids were Portumnus latipes (Pennant, 1777) Liocarcinus vernalis (Risso, 1816) and Atelecyclus undecimdentatus (Herbst, 1783). In aquarium experiments, they demonstrated an ability to nip the foot of clams. Portumnus latipes was the most active foot nipper, but left alive all the damaged clams. Therefore, we conclude that crabs are the most likely foot-nipping predators in the field.

  1. Miocene Vetigastropoda and Neritimorpha (Mollusca, Gastropoda) of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Sven N.; Frassinetti, Daniel; Bandel, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Species of Vetigastropoda (Fissurellidae, Turbinidae, Trochidae) and one species of Neritimorpha (Neritidae) from the Navidad area, south of Valpara?so, and the Arauco Peninsula, south of Concepcin, are described. Among these, the Fissurellidae comprise Diodora fragilis n. sp., Diodora pupuyana n. sp., two additional unnamed species of Diodora, and a species resembling Fissurellidea. Turbinidae are represented by Cantrainea sp., and Trochidae include Tegula (Chlorostoma) austropacifica n. sp., Tegula (Chlorostoma) chilena n. sp., Tegula (Chlorostoma) matanzensis n. sp., Tegula (Agathistoma) antiqua n. sp., Bathybembix mcleani n. sp., Gibbula poeppigii [Philippi, 1887] n. comb., Diloma miocenica n. sp., Fagnastesia venefica [Philippi, 1887] n. gen. n. comb., Fagnastesia matanzana n. gen. n. sp., Calliostoma mapucherum n. sp., Calliostoma kleppi n. sp., Calliostoma covacevichi n. sp., Astele laevis [Sowerby, 1846] n. comb., and Monilea riorapelensis n. sp. The Neritidae are represented by Nerita (Heminerita) chilensis [Philippi, 1887]. The new genus Fagnastesia is introduced to represent low-spired trochoideans with a sculpture of nodes below the suture, angulated whorls, and a wide umbilicus. This Miocene Chilean fauna includes genera that have lived at the coast and in shallow, relatively warm water or deeper, much cooler water. This composition therefore suggests that many of the Miocene formations along the central Chilean coast consist of displaced sediments. A comparison with different fossil and Recent faunas from around the Pacific and South America indicates that the vetigastropod and neritid fauna from the Miocene of Chile has only minor affinities with taxa living near New Zealand, Argentina, and the tropical eastern Pacific at that time.

  2. [Chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) from El Salvador, Central America].

    PubMed

    Garca-Ros, Cedar I; Alvarez-Ruiz, Migdalia; Barraza, Jos E; Rivera, Ana M; Hasbn, Carlos R

    2007-03-01

    Collections of 11 species of shallow water Polyplacophora from El Salvador were made in July 2002. Previously only five species had been documented in El Salvador: Chaetopleura lurida (Sowerby, 1832); Ischnochiton guatemalensis (Thiele, 1910); Ceratozona angusta (Thiele, 1909); Chiton stokesii (Broderip, 1832) and Acantochitona exquisita (Pilsbry, 1893). Of these, L. guatemalensis and A. exquisita were not collected in this census. Seven other species are reported here for El Salvador for the first time: Lepidochitona beanii (Carpenter, 1857); Ischnochiton dispar (Sowerby, 1832); Stenoplax limaciformis (Sowerby, 1832); Callistochiton expressus (Carpenter, 1865); Acanthochitona arragonites (Carpenter, 1867); A. ferreirai (Lyons, 1988) and A. hirudiniformis (Sowerby, 1832). The known geographic distribution of 1. dispar is extended to the north. An un-named species of Lepidochitona is briefly described. PMID:18457124

  3. Amundsen Sea Mollusca from the BIOPEARL II expedition.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Camille; Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw; Barnes, David; Kaiser, Stefanie; Glover, Adrian; Sands, Chester; Strugnell, Jan; Enderlein, Peter; Geissler, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Information regarding the molluscs in this dataset is based on the epibenthic sledge (EBS) samples collected during the cruise BIOPEARL II / JR179 RRS James Clark Ross in the austral summer 2008. A total of 35 epibenthic sledge deployments have been performed at five locations in the Amundsen Sea at Pine Island Bay (PIB) and the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) at depths ranging from 476 to 3501m. This presents a unique and important collection for the Antarctic benthic biodiversity assessment as the Amundsen Sea remains one of the least known regions in Antarctica. Indeed the work presented in this dataset is based on the first benthic samples collected with an EBS in the Amundsen Sea. However we assume that the data represented are an underestimation of the real fauna present in the Amundsen Sea. In total 9261 specimens belonging to 6 classes 55 families and 97 morphospecies were collected. The species richness per station varied between 6 and 43. Gastropoda were most species rich 50 species followed by Bivalvia (37), Aplacophora (5), Scaphopoda (3) and one from each of Polyplacophora and Monoplacophora. PMID:23794869

  4. Characterization of the adhesive areas in Sepia tuberculata (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Scott, Robyn; Griffiths, Charles; Micossi, Andrea; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Adhesion in cephalopods is either mechanical, involving a reduced-pressure system of the arm and tentacle suckers, or is chemically mediated by special adhesive gland structures (as proposed for Euprymna, Idiosepius, and Nautilus). Four species of Sepia (S. typica, S. papillata, S. pulchra, and S. tuberculata) possess grooved structures on the ventral mantle surface and on the fourth arm pair, which are used to attach mechanically to the substratum. Because these areas are often partly covered with sand or debris, it has been hypothesized that chemical substances were involved in this attachment process. This study provides a histochemical and ultrastructural description of the glandular epithelium in the adhesive area of Sepia tuberculata. Two specific glandular cells (Type 1 and Type 2) are present in the epithelium, which differ clearly in their granule size and cellular structure. The aggregation of both cell types and their simultaneous secretion suggest that the secretions of both cell types work synergistically providing a two-component adhesive system which supports the primarily mechanical sucker adhesion by making the arm surface sticky. PMID:21688295

  5. Complete male mitochondrial genome of Anodonta anatina (Mollusca: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Soroka, Marianna; Burzyński, Artur

    2014-10-15

    Abstract Anodonta anatina is a freshwater mussel of the family Unionidae. These mussels have a unique mitochondria inheritance system named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Under DUI males have two, potentially very divergent mitochondrial genomes: F-type inherited from mother and M-type inherited from father. F-type is present in soma whereas M-type is present in gonadal tissues and sperm. Here we report two M-type sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes from Anodonta anatina. They are 16,906 bp long and their sequences are similar (0.1% divergence). The genome organization is identical to the other Unionidean M-type genomes published to date. There are 38 genes, including the recently described M-type specific M ORF. The presence of tRNA-like repeat in one of the noncoding regions, suggests that the control region is located in this area. Nucleotide composition is quite extreme, with AT content (66.2%) higher than in any other of the six published Unionidean M genomes. PMID:25317641

  6. Intramantle Inking: A Stress Behavior in Octopus bimaculoides (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Several Pacific 2-spot octopuses (Octopus bimaculoides) shipped from California and held in a recirculating seawater system at Illinois College exhibited an unusual postshipping stress behavior not previously documented in the literature. Ink, normally ejected into the surrounding seawater, was uncharacteristically retained in the mantle cavity. We describe the resulting behaviors, discuss successful resuscitation efforts, and briefly consider the possible role(s) that ink may have played in the death of one octopus. PMID:22330791

  7. Intramantle inking: a stress behavior in Octopus bimaculoides (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Heather; Toll, Ronald B

    2011-11-01

    Several Pacific 2-spot octopuses (Octopus bimaculoides) shipped from California and held in a recirculating seawater system at Illinois College exhibited an unusual postshipping stress behavior not previously documented in the literature. Ink, normally ejected into the surrounding seawater, was uncharacteristically retained in the mantle cavity. We describe the resulting behaviors, discuss successful resuscitation efforts, and briefly consider the possible role(s) that ink may have played in the death of one octopus. PMID:22330791

  8. Upper Cambrian chitons (Mollusca, polyplacophora) from Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J., Jr.; Vendrasco, M.J.; Darrough, G.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new specimens reveal a greater presence of chitons in Upper Cambrian rocks than previously suspected. Evidence is presented showing that the chiton esthete sensory system is present in all chiton species in this study at the very beginning of the known polyplacophoran fossil record. The stratigraphic occurrences and paleobiogeography of Late Cambrian chitons are documented. The 14 previously-named families of Cambrian and Ordovician chitons are reviewed and analyzed. Aulochitonidae n. fam. is defined, based on Aulochiton n. gen.; A. sannerae n. sp. is also defined. The long misunderstood family Preacanthochitonidae and its type genus Preacanthochiton Bergenhayn, 1960, are placed in synonymy with Mattheviidae and Chelodes Davidson & King, 1874, respectively; Eochelodes Marek, 1962, also is placed in synonymy with Chelodes, and Elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is placed in synonymy with Hemithecella Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. At the species level, H. elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, and Elongata perplexa Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, are placed in synonymy with H. eminensis Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995. The Ordovician species H. abrupta Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is transferred to the genus Chelodes as C. abrupta (Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995). The Ordovician species Preacanthochiton baueri Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Helminthochiton as H. ? baueri (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). The Ordovician species H. marginatus Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Litochiton as L. marginatus (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). Matthevia walcotti Runnegar, Pojeta, Taylor, & Collins, 1979, is treated as a synonym of Hemithecella expansa Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. In addition, other multivalved Cambrian mollusks are discussed; within this group, Dycheiidae n. fam. is defined, as well as Paradycheia dorisae n. gen. and n. sp. Cladistic analysis indicates a close relationship among the genera here assigned to the Mattheviidae, and between Echinochiton Pojeta, Eernisse, Hoare, & Henderson, 2003, and mattheviids. The results suggest treating these taxa as stem-lineage chitons, and do not support the hypothesis that they are aplacophorans.

  9. Biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic mollusca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Clarke, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    For many decades molluscan data have been critical to the establishment of the concept of a global-scale increase in species richness from the poles to the equator. Low polar diversity is key to this latitudinal cline in diversity. Here we investigate richness patterns in the two largest classes of molluscs at both local and regional scales throughout the Southern Ocean. We show that biodiversity is very patchy in the Southern Ocean (at the 1000-km scale) and test the validity of historical biogeographic sub-regions and provinces. We used multivariate analysis of biodiversity patterns at species, genus and family levels to define richness hotspots within the Southern Ocean and transition areas. This process identified the following distinct sub-regions in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic Peninsula, Weddell Sea, East Antarctic—Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctic—Enderby Land, East Antarctic—Wilkes Land, Ross Sea, and the independent Scotia arc and sub Antarctic islands. Patterns of endemism were very different between the bivalves and gastropods. On the basis of distributional ranges and radiation centres of evolutionarily successful families and genera we define three biogeographic provinces in the Southern Ocean: (1) the continental high Antarctic province excluding the Antarctic Peninsula, (2) the Scotia Sea province including the Antarctic Peninsula, and (3) the sub Antarctic province comprising the islands in the vicinity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  10. First molecular phylogeny of the subfamily Polycerinae (Mollusca, Nudibranchia, Polyceridae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomar, Gemma; Pola, Marta; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The subfamily Polycerinae includes four genera with around 46 species described to date. This subfamily is characterized by a limaciform body, which may have simple tentacular processes on the margin of the oral veil. Phylogenetic relationships between the genera of the subfamily Polycerinae (Polyceridae) have not yet been studied, and therefore, the only available information is based on morphological descriptions. The present study reports the first phylogenetic analysis of Polycerinae based on the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase subunit I and the large ribosomal subunit (16S rRNA) using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Our results showed that Polycerinae is monophyletic, but the relationships within the subfamily as well as within Polycera remain unresolved. A key finding of this study is that there are clearly two sympatric species of Polycera present in South Africa: Polycera capensis Quoy and Gaimard, 1824 also found in Australia and an undescribed Polycera sp. On the other hand, the studied specimens of the genus Gymnodoris were clustered within Polycerinae, reopening the problem of the systematic position of this genus. Additional genes and species of Polycerinae and Gymnodoris would provide more information and probably fully resolve this situation.

  11. A new dicyemid from Benthoctopus sibiricus (Mollusca: Cephalopoda: Octopoda).

    PubMed

    Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-12-01

    A new species of dicyemid mesozoan is described from Benthoctopus sibiricus Loyning, 1930, collected in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Dicyemennea chukchiense n. sp. is a medium species that reaches about 2,000 m in length; it lives in folds of the renal appendages. The vermiform stages are characterized in having 23 peripheral cells, a conical calotte, and an axial cell that extends to the base of the propolar cells. An anterior abortive axial cell is present in vermiform embryos. Infusoriform embryos consist of 37 cells; a single nucleus is present in each urn cell and the refringent bodies are solid. This is the first dicyemid described from the Arctic waters. PMID:21158621

  12. Single-walled carbon nanohorn (SWNH) aggregates inhibited proliferation of human liver cell lines and promoted apoptosis, especially for hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqian; Sun, Qiang; Bo, Jian; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Mengran; Xia, Zhenglin; Ju, Lili; Xiang, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) may be useful as carriers for anticancer drugs due to their particular structure. However, the interactions between the material itself and cancerous or normal cells have seldom been studied. To address this problem, the effects of raw SWNH material on the biological functions of human liver cell lines were studied. Our results showed that unmodified SWNHs inhibited mitotic entry, growth, and proliferation of human liver cell lines and promoted their apoptosis, especially in hepatoma cell lines. Individual spherical SWNH particles were found inside the nuclei of human hepatoma HepG2 cells and the lysosomes of normal human liver L02 cells, implying that SWNH particles could penetrate into human liver cells_and the different interacted mechanisms on human normal cell lines compared to hepatoma cell lines. Further research on the mechanisms and application in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with SWNHs is needed. PMID:24523586

  13. Negotiating contracts for vendor-financed purchases of EHR systems. Providers face extraordinary challenges securing financing for HIT projects, especially ones required to capitalize on ARRA incentives.

    PubMed

    Fox, Steven J; Schick, Vadim

    2010-01-01

    In this economic climate, healthcare providers may face extraordinary challenges securing financing for health IT projects, especially ones required to capitalize on the incentives in ARRA. Vendor financing may be the best option for many such providers. While such arrangements may often seem a win-win for both parties, providers should be aware of the many potential pitfalls inherent in vendorfinanced deals, including: 1.) additional pressure from vendors to accept their standard contractual terms and conditions because vendors have much more leverage if they are also the creditor in the transaction; 2.) failing to obtain necessary warranties and representations from vendors that their systems will comply with all relevant requirements under ARRA and will permit the provider to achieve meaningful use; and 3.) dealing with problems arising if the vendors' product fails to achieve certification, or the provider fails to achieve "meaningful use" in a timely manner. PMID:20077924

  14. Method for the improvement of the oxidation resistance of hydrocarbon oil, especially transformer oils by the selective removal of pro-oxidant nitrogen and sulfur compounds therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Felsky, G.

    1984-02-07

    Liquid hydrocarbon streams, preferably petroleum streams, most preferably lube and specialty oil streams and in particular transformer oils are rendered resistant to oxidation by treatment with a silver salt impregnated adsorbent, preferably silver nitrate impregnated alumina by the process of contacting the hydrocarbon oil stream with the silver salt impregnated adsorbent and recovering a hydrocarbon stream of reduced pro-oxidant heteroatom compound (nitrogen compound and sulfur compound) content. The silver salt impregnated adsorbent is regenerated by sequential washing with portions of aromatic solvent and polar solvent. The aromatic solvent strips aromatic sulfides from the adsorbent. This fraction may be recombined with the hydrocarbon stream, especially in the case of transformer oils, so as to enhance the oxidation stability/resistance of the oil. The polar solvent, such as 3% methanol in toluene, strips the aliphatic sulfides from the adsorbent. The regenerated column is then ready for reuse.

  15. Can Echocardiography, Especially Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion Measurement, Predict Pulmonary Hypertension and Improve Prognosis in Patients on Long-Term Dialysis?

    PubMed Central

    Grabysa, Radosław; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to pulmonary hypertension (PH) as a strong and independent risk factor for adverse outcome in the population of patients on long-term dialysis. Published results of observational studies indicate that the problem of PH refers mostly to patients on long-term hemodialysis and is less common in peritoneal dialysis patients. The main cause of this complication is proximal location of the arteriovenous fistula, causing chronically increased cardiac output. This paper presents the usefulness of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for measurement of the Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE) in the early diagnosis of PH in dialysis patients. Echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension with TTE, especially in the case of HD patients, ensures the selection of the proper location for the first arteriovenous fistula and facilitates the decision to switch to peritoneal dialysis or to accelerate the process of qualification for kidney transplantation. PMID:26697754

  16. Computed tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS) with 2D reflective grating for ultraviolet to long-wave infrared detection especially useful for surveying transient events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Mouroulis, Pantazis Z. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The optical system of this invention is an unique type of imaging spectrometer, i.e. an instrument that can determine the spectra of all points in a two-dimensional scene. The general type of imaging spectrometer under which this invention falls has been termed a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). CTIS's have the ability to perform spectral imaging of scenes containing rapidly moving objects or evolving features, hereafter referred to as transient scenes. This invention, a reflective CTIS with an unique two-dimensional reflective grating, can operate in any wavelength band from the ultraviolet through long-wave infrared. Although this spectrometer is especially useful for rapidly occurring events it is also useful for investigation of some slow moving phenomena as in the life sciences.

  17. Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) with 2D Reflective Grating for Ultraviolet to Long-Wave Infrared Detection Especially Useful for Surveying Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Mouroulis, Pantazis Z. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The optical system of this invention is an unique type of imaging spectrometer, i.e. an instrument that can determine the spectra of all points in a two-dimensional scene. The general type of imaging spectrometer under which this invention falls has been termed a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). CTIS's have the ability to perform spectral imaging of scenes containing rapidly moving objects or evolving features, hereafter referred to as transient scenes. This invention, a reflective CTIS with an unique two-dimensional reflective grating, can operate in any wavelength band from the ultraviolet through long-wave infrared. Although this spectrometer is especially useful for events it is also for investigation of some slow moving phenomena as in the life sciences.

  18. Promoter hypomethylation, especially around the E26 transformation-specific motif, and increased expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in BRCA-mutated serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) overexpression plays a critical role in ovarian cancer progression and the clinical development of PARP1 inhibitors to treat BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer has advanced rapidly. However, the mechanism regulating PARP1 expression remains unknown. Alterations in gene expression mediated by promoter methylation are being increasingly recognized and have frequently been reported in ovarian cancer. We therefore investigated the methylation status of the PARP1 promoter region and its correlation with PARP1 expression in BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Methods DNA from BRCA-mutated serous ovarian cancer samples and adjacent normal ovarian tissues were analyzed by bisulfite sequence using primers focusing on the CpG island in the promoter region of PARP1. Expression levels of PARP1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results Serous ovarian cancer tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of PARP1 compared to normal tissue, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with PARP1 mRNA levels. More importantly, E26 transformation-specific (ETS) defined CpG sites were significantly less methylated in ovarian cancer samples. Conclusions These results indicate that hypomethylation of the promoter region, especially around the ETS motif might play a role in the upregulation of PARP1 expression in the progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:23442605

  19. Hormonal interference with pheromone systems in parasitic acarines, especially ixodid ticks. Annual technical report No. 4, 1 May 1983-30 April 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenshine, D.E.; Oliver, J.H. Jr.; Homsher, P.J.

    1984-05-01

    The most important result of recent project research was the demonstration of the juvenoid JH III by radioimmunoassay. This assay revealed an estimated 78 pg/tick in the hemolymph of partially fed Hyalomma dromedarii females, and an estimated 3 pg/tick in the hemolymph of partially fed D. variabilis. Other studies, especially digestion of tritium labelled JH III, provided additional evidence suggesting the presence of this hormone in adult ticks. The implications of these findings for our understanding of sex pheromone regulation in ticks is discussed. Other studies described in this report deal with the source of ecdysteroid in teh camel tick, Hyalomma dromedarii, the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, and the soft tick, Ornithodoros parkeri. Studies done at ODU, using radioimmunoassay high performance liquid chromatography, and autoradiography, provide new evidence implicating the tick synganglion - lateral nerve plexus as an important site of ecdysteroid activity in the ixodid ticks. Other studies with ecdysteriods suggest that metabolism of ecdysone or 20-hydroxyecdysone (or both) to inactive metabolites, possibly including polar conjugates. If confirmed, these findings indicate the presence of only a single active ecdysteriod hormone in ticks, 20-hydroxyecdysone.

  20. Transfer of microRNAs by extracellular membrane microvesicles: a nascent crosstalk model in tumor pathogenesis, especially tumor cell-microenvironment interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Valencia, C Alexander; Dong, Biao; Chen, Meng; Guan, Pu-Jun; Pan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer treatments aiming at killing malignant cells have been applied for decades but have been unsuccessful at curing the disease. The modern concept of tumor microenvironment, especially angiogenesis, suggests that the tumor is not only composed of malignant cells, but also consists of other groups of cells that work together. Recently, genetic message transfer has been revealed between tumor cells and their microenvironment. The latest cell-derived vector, extracellular membrane microvesicles (EMVs), has been found to provide membrane protection and allowed to deliver genetic information beyond the cells. Additionally, EMV-associated microRNAs are involved in a variety of cellular pathways for tumor initiation and progression. Previous published reviews have focused on miRNA that included EMVs as a sensitive marker for tumor monitoring in clinical applications that are based on the alteration of their expression levels in conjunction with disease occurrence and progression. From the aspect of cellular crosstalk, this article will review the role of EMV-mediated microRNA transfer in tumor pathogenesis, including tumor treatment obstacles, history and features, and current research in inflammatory/immune pathologies, as well as in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. This nascent crosstalk model will provide a novel insight into complementing the classic mechanisms of intercellular communication and contribute to the potential therapeutic strategy via small RNA molecule-carrying EMVs for multimodality treatment of cancer. PMID:25885907

  1. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  2. Pattern formation in actin gels: A study in the mechanics of gels formed by the important cytoskeletal protein actin, especially as applied to cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel

    We have studied pattern formation in actin gels to better understand how they function in biological systems, especially in the motility mechanism used by some pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria. By coating themselves with certain enzymes, these bacteria appropriate actin (a protein) from the surrounding host cell's cytoplasm and cause a network or "gel" of actin filaments to grow on their outer surface. As the resulting "comet tail" shaped protrusion grows, it pushes the bacterium away. In experiments, polystyrene beads coated with the same enzymes will also generate comet tails and swim in a very similar manner. However, these bead experiments have also generated anomalous results such as the formation of many comet tails. In some experiments, when two comet tails formed they systematically grew into regular, oppositely handed helices. The formation of any comet tails on a bead poses a physical conundrum. The bacterial enzyme coating is asymmetrical so the comet tail forms in a particular place. But the beads are symmetrical, so comet tails formation constitutes symmetry breaking and spontaneous pattern formation. We have modeled this process as a competition between elastic energy (which favors many tails) and chemical energy (which favors few tails). Our analytical model explains the factors that experimentally determine the number of tails, and numerical simulations confirm these predictions. To understand the helical tails, we did extensive data analysis involving image processing, statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of images of the helical tails. We identified some important features of how the twin tails form. For instance, the tail growth rate is independent of drag force, and bead rotation must accompany helical tail formation. We also created a physical model for helical growth. Numerical simulations of our model show that at very low Reynolds number, a cylindrical object growing under the conditions of an actin comet tail can spontaneously grow into a helical shape.

  3. The motirod: a novel physical skill task that enhances motivation to learn and thereby increases neurogenesis especially in the female hippocampus.

    PubMed

    DiFeo, Gina; Curlik, Daniel M; Shors, Tracey J

    2015-09-24

    Males and females perform differently on a variety of training tasks. In the present study we examined performance of male and female rats while they were trained with a gross motor skill in which they learn to maintain their balance on an accelerating rotating rod (the accelerating rotarod). During training, many animals simply step off the rod, thus terminating the training. This problem was addressed by placing cold water below the rod. We termed the new training procedure "motirod" training because the trained animals were apparently motivated to remain on the rod for longer periods of time. Groups of male and female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on either the standard accelerating rotarod or the motirod for four trials per day on four consecutive days. Latency to fall from the rod (in seconds) was recorded. The motivating feature increased performance especially in females (p=.001). As a consequence of enhanced performance, females retained significantly more new cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus than those trained on the accelerating rotarod or those that received no training. In addition, individuals that learned well retained more new cells, irrespective of sex or task conditions. Previous studies have established that new cells rescued from death by learning remain in the hippocampus for months and mature into neurons (Leuner et al., 2004a; Shors, 2014). These data suggest that sex differences in physical skill learning can arise from sex differences in motivation, which thereby influence how many new neurons survive in the adult brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25543070

  4. In intergroup conflict, self-sacrifice is stronger among pro-social individuals, and parochial altruism emerges especially among cognitively taxed individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dreu, Carsten K. W. De; Dussel, D. Berno; Velden, Femke S. Ten

    2015-01-01

    Parochial altruism is decomposed in a tendency to benefit the in-group along with a tendency to ignore, derogate, and harm rivaling out-groups. Building off recent work suggesting that decisions to cooperate can be relatively fast and intuitive, we examine parochial altruism in intergroup conflict when cognitive deliberation is rendered difficult or not. Predictions were tested in an experiment using an incentivized Intergroup Prisoner’s Dilemma–Maximizing Differences Game with 95 subjects classified as either pro-social or pro-self being randomly allocated to high vs. low impulse-control conditions. Results showed, first of all, that self-sacrificial decisions to contribute were made faster than decisions not to contribute, and that faster decision time associated with more positive expectations of in-group members. Second, we observed that lowering impulse control with a difficult rather than easy Stroop Task increased the amount contributed to a pool that benefited in-group members while harming out-group members; thus reducing deliberation increased parochial altruism. Finally, results replicated earlier work showing that especially pro-social (vs. pro-self) individuals contributed more to the in-group and did not lower their contributions to the between-group pool that benefitted their in-group and, simultaneously, hurt the out-group. This pattern emerged independent of their impulse control. Thus, (in-group bounded) cooperation is more prominent among individuals with strong rather than weak other-regarding preferences. Moreover, the intuitive tendency to cooperate may have evolved in the context of intergroup conflict and therefore is sharp-edged—in-group bounded and including willingness to aggress out-groups. PMID:25999888

  5. How our practice of histopathology, especially tumour pathology has changed in the last two decades: reflections from a major referral center in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zubair; Idrees, Romana; Fatima, Saira; Arshad, Huma; Din, Nasir-ud; Memon, Aisha; Minhas, Khurram; Ahmed, Arsalan; Fatima, Syeda Samia; Arif, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rashida; Haroon, Saroona; Pervez, Shahid; Hassan, Sheema; Kayani, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Continued advances in the field of histo-pathology (and cyto-pathology) over the past two decades have resulted in dramatic changes in the manner in which these disciplines are now practiced. This is especially true in the setting of a large university hospital where the role of pathologists as clinicians (diagnosticians), undergraduate and postgraduate educators, and researchers has evolved considerably. The world around us has changed significantly during this period bringing about a considerable change in our lifestyles and the way we live. This is the world of the internet and the world-wide web, the world of Google and Wikipedia, of Youtube and Facebook where anyone can obtain any information one desires at the push of a button. The practice of histo (and cyto) pathology has also evolved in line with these changes. For those practicing this discipline in a poor, developing country these changes have been breathtaking. This is an attempt to document these changes as experienced by histo (and cyto) pathologists practicing in the biggest center for Histopathology in Pakistan, a developing country in South Asia with a large (180 million) and ever growing population. The Section of Histopathology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city has since its inception in the mid-1980s transformed the way histopathology is practiced in Pakistan by incorporating modern methods and rescuing histopathology in Pakistan from the primitive and outdated groove in which it was stuck for decades. It set histopathology in Pakistan firmly on the path of modernity and change which are essential for better patient management and care through accurate and complete diagnosis and more recently prognostic and predictive information as well. PMID:24935563

  6. [Especially gifted: especially happy, especially satisfied? On the self-concept of highly gifted and average children].

    PubMed

    Rost, D H; Hanses, P

    1994-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between intelligence and self-concept. 287 fourth-grade elementary-school students (151 intellectually gifted children and 136 children of average intelligence) participating in the Marburg Giftedness Project responded to an extended version of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale. Results show that gifted children score higher in all facets of self-concept. However, this difference is only in the scale "intellectual and school status" statistically significant. Compared with gifted and non-gifted "achievers", gifted "underachievers" score lower in most self-concept facets. Independently of their intelligence level, children of this age group have developed a very positive self-concept. PMID:7817606

  7. Nuevas herramientas en dinmica de actitud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, M.; Elipe, A.

    In the software market, a number of applications designed for symbolic computations and running on desk computers are continously appearing. Among them the authors use Mathematica to handle the very discouraging expressions appearing in the attitude dynamics problem. The graphic capability of Mathematica is used in the qualitative analysis of the attitude of an artificial satellite, in order to locate where the possible bifurcations take place.

  8. African agriculture especially vulnerable to warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-09-01

    Malnourishment across Africa could jump 40% by 2050 due to climate change, according to the Africa Agriculture Status Report 2014 (AASR), released on 2 September. With temperatures predicted to rise 1.5C-2.5C by midcentury, African smallholder farms, which are generally run by one family, are more vulnerable than ever, the report finds.

  9. Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Corbel, Michael J; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the epidemiological situation, live attenuated or killed vaccines against anthrax, brucellosis, cholera, glanders, plague and tularemia were developed and used for immunization of at-risk populations in the Former Soviet Union. Certain of these vaccines have been updated and currently they are used on a selective basis, mainly for high risk occupations, in the Russian Federation. Except for anthrax and cholera these vaccines currently are the only licensed products available for protection against the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. Development of improved formulations and new products is ongoing. PMID:26038506

  10. [Lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis: especially in children].

    PubMed

    Besouw, Martine T P; Verlinde, Piet F L; Uyttebroeck, Anne M; Renard, Marleen M

    2011-01-01

    Lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis are rare benign fatty tumours that mainly occur in children under the age of 3 years. Several body sites can be affected. The term 'lipoblastoma' is reserved for an encapsulated neoplasm; 'lipoblastomatosis' for tumours demonstrating infiltrative growth. Most of the clinical symptoms arise from a mass effect of the tumour on surrounding tissues. The tumours should be differentiated from lipoma, myxoid liposarcoma and hibernoma. A clear distinction can be made by cytogenetic analysis, since each of these tumours is known for its own typical genetic abnormalities. In lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis, these include a breakpoint in the 8q11-13 region or polysomy of chromosome 8, both leading to the activation of the oncogenic pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) on 8q12. Treatment consists of surgical resection; there is no need for radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Clinical outcome depends on the completeness of the resection and damage that is done to the surrounding tissues during surgery. PMID:21854662

  11. Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Corbel, Michael J; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-12-01

    In response to the epidemiological situation, live attenuated or killed vaccines against anthrax, brucellosis, cholera, glanders, plague and tularemia were developed and used for immunization of at-risk populations in the Former Soviet Union. Certain of these vaccines have been updated and currently they are used on a selective basis, mainly for high risk occupations, in the Russian Federation. Except for anthrax and cholera these vaccines currently are the only licensed products available for protection against the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. Development of improved formulations and new products is ongoing. PMID:26038506

  12. The Book Scene...Especially for Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peskorz, Adela, Comp.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography lists approximately 500 titles that reflect the diversity of interests and levels of sophistication among young adult readers between the ages of 12 and 18. Within each subject division is a varied array of fiction and nonfiction titles, some ideal for middle graders, others more appropriate for adult-level readers. The…

  13. Especially for Teens: Having a Baby

    MedlinePLUS

    ... An important vitamin for pregnant women is a B vitamin called folic acid. Getting enough folic acid before ... the best way to feed your baby. Breast milk helps the baby resist diseases and allergies. Breastfeeding ...

  14. Especially for Teens: You and Your Sexuality

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bisexuality is being attracted to both sexes. Many boys and girls are attracted to members of their own sex ... Gender identity is your sense of being a boy, a girl, or other gendered. Some teens feel that their ...

  15. My education in mineral (especially oil) economics

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The crude oil and natural gas markets have a long colorful history. To understand them, one needs some economic theory. The dominant view, of a fixed mineral stock, implies that a unit produced today means one less in the future. As mankind approaches the limit, it must exert ever more effort per unit recovered. This concept is false, whether stated as common sense or as elegant theory. Under competition, the price results from endless struggle between depletion and increasing knowledge. But sellers may try to control the market in order to offer less and charge more. The political results may feed back upon market behavior. These factors--depletion, knowledge, monopoly, and politics--must be analyzed separately before being put together to capture a slice of a changing history. 68 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. REFRIGERATION ESPECIALLY FOR VERY LOW TEMPERATURES

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, P.B.; Smith, H.R. Jr.

    1960-09-13

    A refrigeration system for producing very low temperatures is described. The system of the invention employs a binary mixture refrigerant in a closed constant volume, e.g., Freon and ethylene. Such mixture is compressed in the gaseous state and is then separated in a fractionating column element of the system. Thenceforth, the first liquid to separate is employed stagewise to cool and liq uefy successive portions of the refrigerant at successively lower temperatures by means of heat exchangers coupled between the successive stages. When shut down, all of the volumes of the system are interconnected and a portion of the refrigerant remains liquid at ambient temperatures so that no dangerous overpressures develop. The system is therefore rugged, simple and dependable in operation.

  17. Having a Baby (Especially for Teens)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Transmitted Infections (STIs)" ). What should I know about breastfeeding? Breastfeeding is the best way to feed your baby. ... milk helps the baby resist diseases and allergies. Breastfeeding also is cheaper than bottle-feeding and may ...

  18. [Biotechnology, especially genetic modification, and legislation].

    PubMed

    de Sitter, H; Peters, P W J

    2002-05-15

    Biotechnology and genetic modification (GM) related legislation is not yet fully developed in the European Union (EU). New legislation has been recently issued ('Introduction of GMO's in the environment') and recently proposals from the European Commission ('GMO's in food and feed' and 'Traceability and labelling of GMO's') entered the decision-making process in the end of 2001. The proposals for the establishment of the European Food Authority play a role in this respect. GMO legislation is complex not in the least because of the demands for the dossiers, to be submitted with an application, while these procedures for admission must become more transparent. In this paper the relevant legislation will be discussed with the exception of that related to human health. Because of dissatisfaction with the present legislation, the European Commission in the past years granted no new approvals for introductions on the market of GMO's and for GM novel foods. New legislation should suspend the present de-facto moratorium. The tasks and position of the Inspectorate for the Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health is discussed. A provision has been made in the legislation with respect to adventitious or technically unavoidable contamination of raw materials with GMO's up to a maximum of 1%, of which the enforcement is not yet watertight. The analytical methods are being still developed. PMID:12056264

  19. Immorality East and West: Are Immoral Behaviors Especially Harmful, or Especially Uncivilized?

    PubMed

    Buchtel, Emma E; Guan, Yanjun; Peng, Qin; Su, Yanjie; Sang, Biao; Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua; Bond, Michael Harris

    2015-10-01

    What makes some acts immoral? Although Western theories of morality often define harmful behaviors as centrally immoral, whether this is applicable to other cultures is still under debate. In particular, Confucianism emphasizes civility as fundamental to moral excellence. We describe three studies examining how the word immoral is used by Chinese and Westerners. Layperson-generated examples were used to examine cultural differences in which behaviors are called "immoral" (Study 1, n = 609; Study 2, n = 480), and whether "immoral" behaviors were best characterized as particularly harmful versus uncivilized (Study 3, N = 443). Results suggest that Chinese were more likely to use the word immoral for behaviors that were uncivilized, rather than exceptionally harmful, whereas Westerners were more likely to link immorality tightly to harm. More research into lay concepts of morality is needed to inform theories of moral cognition and improve understanding of human conceptualizations of social norms. PMID:26253486

  20. Use of 90 Hopkins Telescopic Examination as an OPD Tool to Clinically Evaluate and Record Oral Cavity Lesions: Our Experience in Early Detection, Especially in Patients with Limited Mouth Opening

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Karan; Patel, Daxesh; Patel, Purvi; Toprani, Rajendra; Patel, Kaustubh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Restricted mouth opening due to premalignant lesions like oral sub-mucous fibrosis, malignancies of oral cavity and postoperative status is very common in Indian patients. It is very difficult to evaluate, document and biopsy the lesions due to inability to access, vast area and diversity of premalignant lesions and subject variations. 90 Hopkins slender out-patient examination telescope was found useful tool in this. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of magnified view and reach of a slender telescope to document and examine the oral cavity for any premalignant and malignant lesions, especially for patients with restricted mouth opening and to study its impact on management. Materials and Methods A 900 Hopkins telescope was used to evaluate and document oral cavity examination in the Out Patients Department (OPD). The data of first 2000 patients was analysed. Results Difficult to reach areas, where mouth opening was severely restricted was the significant subset. A total of 1394 patients approached OPD for primary diagnosis at our tertiary cancer care centre. Six hundred and six patients were the ones in follow up after treatment in form of Surgery, Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy, or combination. Five twenty three patients (of 1394) with mouth opening ? 20mm formed the study group. Telescope guided biopsies were also taken in 50 patients from 56 sites. Serial recordings were compared objectively in premalignant, treatment evaluation and close watch groups. An increase of 5.6% in rate of diagnosis of malignancy was made possible with the help of telescopic examination in patients with mouth opening ? 20mm. Conclusion A 900 Hopkins telescopic examination is a useful tool to evaluate and record oral cavity lesions, especially in patients with restricted mouth openings. It is a useful tool for screening high risk group, giving definite advantage of objective evaluation and recording of the lesion. It can also be used to objectively evaluate response of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and as a teaching tool for the fellows. PMID:26266199

  1. Açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.): a tropical fruit with high levels of essential minerals-especially manganese-and its contribution as a source of natural mineral supplementation.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Vivian; de Almeida Teixeira, Gustavo Henrique; Barbosa, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Açaí is a fruit from the Brazilian Amazon region, with an exotic flavor, possessing high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Based on these properties, the fruit is classified as one of the new "super fruits." The mean daily consumption of açai pulp may reach 300 ml in several Brazilian regions. Further, this fruit is also gaining popularity in Europe and North America. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the levels of some essential minerals in freeze-dried açaí pulp obtained in different Brazilian locations. It was found that açaí pulp is rich in essential minerals (Ca, Fe, Mg, Zn), but the levels of copper (Cu) and especially manganese (Mn) are surprisingly markedly higher than the traditional sources of these elements in the human diet. A daily consumption of 300 ml açaí pulp leads to a Mn daily intake exceeding at least sixfold (14.6 mg on average) the reference daily intake for an adult. Consequently, Mn intake may surpass the permitted daily maximum intake of 11 mg, which leads to a special concern, particularly for children, vegetarians, and individuals with anemia, since iron (Fe) absorption is impaired by Mn. Our findings demonstrate that this fruit is a potential source of several nutrients and a good dietary supplement to resolve malnutrition problems. However, due to the expressive levels of Mn, further studies are necessary to evaluate potential adverse effects associated with açaí consumption. PMID:24555649

  2. In vitro characterization of aggregation and adhesion properties of viable and heat-killed forms of two probiotic Lactobacillus strains and interaction with foodborne zoonotic bacteria, especially Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Tareb, Raouf; Bernardeau, Marion; Gueguen, Marielle; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial aggregation and/or adhesion are key factors for colonization of the digestive ecosystem and the ability of probiotic strains to exclude pathogens. In the present study, two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM-I-3698 and Lactobacillus farciminis CNCM-I-3699, were evaluated as viable or heat-killed forms and compared with probiotic reference Lactobacillus strains (Lb. rhamnosus GG and Lb. farciminis CIP 103136). The autoaggregation potential of both forms was higher than that of reference strains and twice that of pathogenic strains. The coaggregation potential of these two beneficial micro-organisms was evaluated against several pathogenic agents that threaten the global safety of the feed/food chain: Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. The strongest coaggregative interactions were demonstrated with Campylobacter spp. by a coaggregation test, confirmed by electron microscopic examination for the two forms. Viable forms were investigated for the nature of the bacterial cell-surface molecules involved, by sugar reversal tests and chemical and enzymic pretreatments. The results suggest that the coaggregation between both probiotic strains and C. jejuni CIP 70.2(T) is mediated by a carbohydrate-lectin interaction. The autoaggregation potential of the two probiotics decreased upon exposure to proteinase, SDS or LiCl, showing that proteinaceous components on the surface of the two lactobacilli play an important role in this interaction. Adhesion abilities of both Lactobacillus strains were also demonstrated at significant levels on Caco-2 cells, mucin and extracellular matrix material. Both viable and heat-killed forms of the two probiotic lactobacilli inhibited the attachment of C. jejuni CIP 70.2(T) to mucin. In conclusion, in vitro assays showed that Lb. rhamnosus CNCM-I-3698 and Lb. farciminis CNCM-I-3699, as viable or heat-killed forms, are adherent to different intestinal matrix models and are highly aggregative in vitro with pathogens, especially Campylobacter spp., the most commonly reported zoonotic agent in the European Union. This study supports the need for further in vivo investigations to demonstrate the potential food safety benefits of Lb. rhamnosus CNCM-I-3698 and Lb. farciminis CNCM-I-3699, live or heat-killed, in the global feed/food chain. PMID:23329323

  3. The opisthobranch gastropods (Mollusca: Heterobranchia) from Venezuela: an annotated and illustrated inventory of species.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Manuel Caballer; Ortea, Jesús; Rivero, Nelsy; Tucker, Gabriela Carias; Malaquias, Manuel António E; Narciso, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The Caribbean waters of Venezuela are composed by a large variety of habitats, with over 2800 km of coastline, islands, and islets. This area is a transitional zone between two main biogeographic provinces, the Caribbean and the Brazilian, separated by the fresh water outflows of the Orinoco and Amazon rivers, and is therefore expected to be an area of high species diversity. However, concerning the study of molluscs, Venezuela is probably the poorest known region in the Caribbean. The best compilation of opisthobranch species known in Venezuela was produced almost a decade ago, mentioning the occurrence of 57 species, plus seven determined only to genus level. In this work, 134 species are reported for Venezuela (71 are illustrated), representing about 40 % of the entire diversity of opisthobranchs known in the Caribbean. Among the species occurring in Venezuela, 49 have here the southern limit of their distribution range and only one the northern limit. Forty-six species are recorded for the first time to the country and one is a new record for the Caribbean Sea, namely Placida cremoniana. In addition, the distribution and ecology of the species are given based in literature and new data. PMID:26624440

  4. [Membrane mechanisms of effects of antihypoxic agents bemethyl and almide on neurons of Mollusca].

    PubMed

    Vislobokov, A I; Marysheva, V V; Shabanov, P D

    2003-01-01

    Membranotropic effects of the antihypoxants bemithyl and almide, structural analogs of thiobenzimidazole, have been studied on the isolated neuronal preparations of Lymaea stagnalis branchycephalic mollusk. Both drugs in a concentration range of 100-1000 microM produced a reversible, dose-dependent nonselective single-phase blocking action upon the ion channels and completely blocked the channels at a concentration of 10 mM. Therefore, bemithyl and almide are active membranotropic compounds capable (in sufficiently high concentrations) of changing the conductivity of slow sodium, calcium, and potassium ion channels in excitable cells. The protective antihypoxant drug reactions on a systemic level of the organism are probably related to the fact that both drugs in small concentrations are capable of hyperpolarizing the cell membrane, activating the ion channel function, and stabilizing the action potential under hypoxia conditions; in greater concentrations, bemithyl and almide are capable of blocking ion currents, thus reducing the excitability of cells and protecting them from overstress. PMID:14743702

  5. Ultrastructure of euspermatozoa and paraspermatozoa in the volutid snail Adelomelon ancilla (Mollusca: Caenogastropoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabala, S.; Hermida, G. N.; Giménez, J.

    2009-09-01

    The ultrastructure of the euspermatozoa and the paraspermatozoa is investigated in Adelomelon ancilla, through histological section observed by transmission electron microscopy. Euspermatozoa of A. ancilla consists of: (1) a conical acrosomal vesicle (with a short basal invagination, constricted anteriorly) which is flattened at the apex and associated with an axial rod, a centrally perforated basal plate and a short accessory membrane, (2) a rod-shaped, solid and highly electron-dense nucleus (with a short basal fossa containing a centriolar complex and a initial portion of a 9 + 2 axoneme), (3) an elongate midpiece consisting of the axoneme sheathed by 5-6 helical mitochondrial elements each exhibiting a dense U-shaped outer layer, (4) an elongate glycogen piece (where the axoneme is sheathed by nine tracts of glycogen granules), (5) a dense annulus at the junction of the midpiece and glycogen piece, and (6) a short free tail region (where the axoneme is surrounded only by plasma membrane). We observed a parasperm in A. ancilla. This is vermiform in shape and is composed of multiple axonemes and extensive cytoplasm with numerous vesicles, and mitochondria are scattered inside the axonemes. Sperm of A. ancilla is characterized by the euspermatozoa type 2 and the paraspermatozoa morphology belongs to type 5. The U shaped electrodense mitochondrial element in the midpiece of the eusperm and the constriction in the acrosomal vesicle present in A. ancilla are exclusive. We suggest that these characteristics could have taxonomic importance, because these was observed in other volutids and have not been observed in the rest of caenogastropods studies. We consider that the morphology of paraspermatozoa in A. ancilla corresponds to the “lancet” type.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of pearl oysters and their relatives (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Pterioidea)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The superfamily Pterioidea is a morphologically and ecologically diverse lineage of epifaunal marine bivalves distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical continental shelf regions. This group includes commercially important pearl culture species and model organisms used for medical studies of biomineralization. Recent morphological treatment of selected pterioideans and molecular phylogenetic analyses of higher-level relationships in Bivalvia have challenged the traditional view that pterioidean families are monophyletic. This issue is examined here in light of molecular data sets composed of DNA sequences for nuclear and mitochondrial loci, and a published character data set of anatomical and shell morphological characters. Results The present study is the first comprehensive species-level analysis of the Pterioidea to produce a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic hypothesis for nearly all extant taxa. The data were analyzed for potential biases due to taxon and character sampling, and idiosyncracies of different molecular evolutionary processes. The congruence and contribution of different partitions were quantified, and the sensitivity of clade stability to alignment parameters was explored. Conclusions Four primary conclusions were reached: (1) the results strongly supported the monophyly of the Pterioidea; (2) none of the previously defined families (except for the monotypic Pulvinitidae) were monophyletic; (3) the arrangement of the genera was novel and unanticipated, however strongly supported and robust to changes in alignment parameters; and (4) optimizing key morphological characters onto topologies derived from the analysis of molecular data revealed many instances of homoplasy and uncovered synapomorphies for major nodes. Additionally, a complete species-level sampling of the genus Pinctada provided further insights into the on-going controversy regarding the taxonomic identity of major pearl culture species. PMID:21059254

  7. Organization pattern of nacre in Pteriidae (Bivalvia: Mollusca) explained by crystal competition

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G; Okamoto, Takashi; Ramírez, Joaquín

    2006-01-01

    Bivalve nacre is a brick-wall-patterned biocomposite of aragonite platelets surrounded by organic matter. SEM–electron back scatter diffraction analysis of nacre of the bivalve family Pteriidae reveals that early aragonite crystals grow with their c-axes oriented perpendicular to the growth surface but have their a- and b-axes disoriented. With the accumulation of successive lamellae, crystals progressively orient themselves with their b-axes mutually parallel and towards the growth direction. We propose that progressive orientation is a result of competition between nacre crystals at the growth front of lamellae, which favours selection of crystals whose fastest growth axis (b-axis) is oriented parallel to the direction of propagation of the lamella. A theoretical model has been developed, which simulates competition of rhombic plates at the lamellar growth front as well as epitaxial growth of crystals onto those of the preceding lamella. The model predicts that disordered nacre progressively produces bivalve-like oriented nacre. As growth fronts become diffuse (as is the common case in bivalves) it takes longer for nacre to become organized. Formation of microdomains of nacre platelets with different orientations is also reproduced. In conclusion, not only the organic matrix component, but also the mineral phase plays an active role in organizing the final microstructure. PMID:16777720

  8. Mechanisms underlying dual effects of serotonin during development of Helisoma trivolvis (Mollusca)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-HT) is well known as widely distributed modulator of developmental processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is also the earliest neurotransmitter to appear during neuronal development. In aquatic invertebrates, which have larvae in their life cycle, 5-HT is involved in regulation of stages transition including larval metamorphosis and settlement. However, molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying developmental transition in aquatic invertebrate species are yet poorly understood. Earlier we demonstrated that in larvae of freshwater molluscs and marine polychaetes, endogenous 5-HT released from the neurons of the apical sensory organ (ASO) in response to external stimuli retarded larval development at premetamorphic stages, and accelerated it at metamorphic stages. Here we used a freshwater snail Helisoma trivolvis to study molecular mechanisms underlying these dual developmental effects of 5-HT. Results Larval development of H. trivolvis includes transition from premetamorphic to metamorphic stages and shares the main features of metamorphosis with free-swimming aquatic larvae. Three types of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1-, 5-HT4- and 5-HT7-like) are functionally active at premetamorphic (trochophore, veliger) and metamorphic (veliconcha) stages, and expression patterns of these receptors and respective G proteins undergo coordinated changes during development. Stimulation of these receptors modulated cAMP-dependent regulation of cell divisions. Expression of 5-HT4- and 5-HT7-like receptors and their downstream Gs protein was down-regulated during the transition of pre- to metamorphic stage, while expression of 5-HT1 -like receptor and its downstream Gi protein was upregulated. In accordance with relative amount of these receptors, stimulation of 5-HTRs at premetamorphic stages induces developmental retardation, while their stimulation at metamorphic stages induces developmental acceleration. Conclusions We present a novel molecular mechanism that underlies stage-specific changes in developmental tempo of H. trivolvis larvae in response to endogenous 5-HT produced by the neurons of the ASO. We suggest that consecutive changes in expression patterns of different receptors and their downstream partners in the course of larval development represent the molecular base of larval transition from premetamorphic (non-competent) to metamorphic (competent) state. PMID:24625099

  9. Using DNA barcoding to differentiate invasive Dreissenaspecies (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Marescaux, Jonathan; Van Doninck, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and the quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) are considered as the most competitive invaders in freshwaters of Europe and North America. Although shell characteristics exist to differentiate both species, phenotypic plasticity in the genus Dreissena does not always allow a clear identification. Therefore, the need to find an accurate identification method is essential. DNA barcoding has been proven to be an adequate procedure to discriminate species. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mitochondrial gene (COI) is considered as the standard barcode for animals. We tested the use of this gene as an efficient DNA barcode and found that it allow rapid and accurate identification of adult Dreissena individuals. PMID:24453560

  10. Dating and biogeographical patterns in the sea slug genus Acanthodoris Gray, 1850 (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia).

    PubMed

    Hallas, Joshua M; Brian Simison, W; Gosliner, Terrence M

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies investigating vicariance and dispersal have been focused on correlating major geological events with instances of taxonomic expansion by incorporating the fossil record with molecular clock analyses. However, this approach becomes problematic for soft-bodied organisms that are poorly represented in the fossil record. Here, we estimate the phylogenetic relationships of the nudibranch genus Acanthodoris Gray, 1850 using three molecular markers (16S, COI, H3), and then test two alternative geologically calibrated molecular clock scenarios in BEAST and their effect on ancestral area reconstruction (AAR) estimates employed in LAGRANGE. The global temperate distribution of Acanthodoris spans multiple geological barriers, including the Bering Strait (∼5.32Mya) and the Baja Peninsula (∼5.5Mya), both of which are used in our dating estimates. The expansion of the Atlantic Ocean (∼95-105Mya) is also used to calibrate the relationship between A. falklandica Eliot, 1905 and A. planca Fahey and Valdés, 2005, which are distributed in southern Chile and South Africa respectively. Phylogenetic analyses recovered strong biogeographical signal and recovered two major clades representing northern and southern hemispheric distributions of Acanthodoris. When all three geological events are applied to the calibration analyses, the age for Acanthodoris is estimated to be mid-Cretaceous. When the expansion of the Atlantic Ocean is excluded from our analyses, however, Acanthodoris is estimated to be much younger, with a divergence time estimate during the Miocene. Regardless of divergence estimates, our AAR suggests that Acanthodoris may have origins in the Atlantic Ocean with the Atlantic acting as a dispersal point to the northeastern Pacific. These results suggest that Acanthodoris exhibits a rare instance of western trans-arctic expansion. This study also shows that northeast Pacific specimens of A. pilosa should be regarded as A. atrogriseata and that A. serpentinotus should be regarded as a synonym of A. pina. PMID:26752594

  11. Food intake and growth in Macoma balthica (mollusca) in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, H.

    Groups of Macoma balthica were kept during 4-week periods in an experimental set up at a constant temperature and food concentration. Food concentrations (expressed in particulate organic carbon) for the different groups ranged from 0 to 16 mg CI -1. The experiment was repeated 6 times, viz. in different months, and the temperatures were changed accordingly to correspond with levels found in the field. The rates of food intake, water clearance and growth were followed throughout the experiment. The flagellate Isochrysis galbana served as food. With increasing food concentration all 3 rates (food intake, water clearance and growth) increased up to maximum to decrease again at high food concentrations. Such bell-shaped relationships were observed in all seasons. The dependence of growth on food concentration was similar in all seasons. Zero growth or weight losses were observed at food concentrations below 1.3 mg CI -1, and maximum growth rates were reached at food concentrations between 5 and 7 mg CI -1. The daily maintenance ration amounted to about 1.2% of the body weight. Seasonal differences were observed in the relationships of the rates of both water clearance and food intake with food concentration. During the winter and spring the optimum curves for these relationships reached their maximum at food concentrations of 8 to 10 mg CI -1. During summer and early autumn the optimum curves were shifted to lower food concentrations, around 2 to 4 mg CI -1, probably as an adaptation to low food concentrations observed in the field during these periods.

  12. A biomechanical model of rock drilling in the piddock Barnea candida (Bivalvia; Mollusca)

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Ralf; Muller, Mees

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve Barnea candida (Pholadacea) makes its burrow in clay, soft rock and peat. Barnea has developed a number of adaptations to accommodate this lifestyle. Four muscles enable burrowing. These are situated around a dorsal pivot in such a way that the piddock is able to rotate the shells around two approximate orthogonal axes. The anterior adductor muscle anterior (AAM-A) and the posterior adductor muscle rotate the shells around a dorso-ventral axis; the anterior adductor muscle posterior (AAM-P) and the ventral adductor muscle rotate the shells around an antero-posterior axis. The AAM-A and the AAM-P have evolved from a single anterior adductor muscle and are attached to a piece of the shell that is folded inside out, the umbonal reflection. At the dorsal side of the piddock, the shell margins are reduced. This prevents collision of these margins during movement. Electrical stimulation experiments revealed that the opening of the antero-ventral side of the piddock is faster than its closure. These results were incorporated into a computer model that could simulate shell movements. The computer model allowed predictions about the shapes of burrows and scrape marks. As in Nature, simulated burrows had a long droplet shape with straight scrape marks. PMID:22696480

  13. Mechanisms and functional morphology associated with metal transport in Mercenaria mercenaria (Bivalvia:Mollusca)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.E.; Morse, M.P.

    1984-02-20

    Studies on the morphological and physiological effects of environmental pollutants on both adult and larval marine bivalve molluscs are described. We have established a substantial data base on metals accumulation within individual organs of the quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. In addition, studies on the transport, detoxification and elimination of cadmium and silver in this important species are reported. We have shown that various components of marine oilwell drilling muds can have deleterious effects on both adult sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, and surf clams, Spisula solidissima. For example, both Q-broxin and attapulgite clay, at concentrations as low as 100 mg 1/sup -1/, effected both the integrity of the sea scallop pseudolamellibranch gill and the rate of gill frontal ciliary activity.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Solemya velum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) and its relationships with Conchifera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bivalve mitochondrial genomes exhibit a wide array of uncommon features, like extensive gene rearrangements, large sizes, and unusual ways of inheritance. Species pertaining to the order Solemyida (subclass Opponobranchia) show many peculiar evolutionary adaptations, f.i. extensive symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria. Despite Opponobranchia are central in bivalve phylogeny, being considered the sister group of all Autobranchia, a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced yet. Results In this paper, we characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of the Atlantic awning clam Solemya velum: A-T content, gene arrangement and other features are more similar to putative ancestral mollusks than to other bivalves. Two supranumerary open reading frames are present in a large, otherwise unassigned, region, while the origin of replication could be located in a region upstream to the cox3 gene. Conclusions We show that S. velum mitogenome retains most of the ancestral conchiferan features, which is unusual among bivalve mollusks, and we discuss main peculiarities of this first example of an organellar genome coming from the subclass Opponobranchia. Mitochondrial genomes of Solemya (for bivalves) and Haliotis (for gastropods) seem to retain the original condition of mollusks, as most probably exemplified by Katharina. PMID:23777315

  15. Molecular Phylogeny of Mobilid and Sessilid Ciliates Symbiotic in Eastern Pacific Limpets (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda).

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nicholas A T; Lynn, Denis H

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the ciliate subclass Peritrichia, composed of the orders Mobilida and Sessilida, have recently come under debate as morphological and molecular analyses have struck contrasting conclusions as to the monophyly of the group. We provide additional molecular data to assess the monophyly of the Peritrichia by sequencing the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of two symbiotic peritrichs, Urceolaria korschelti and Scyphidia ubiquita, found inhabiting the mantle cavity of limpets. Although phylogenetic analyses indicated a nonmonophyletic Peritrichia, approximately unbiased tests revealed that the monophyletic hypothesis could not be rejected. With regard to the Mobilida, our analysis showed divergence within the family Trichodinidae related to host taxa-a molluscan clade and a fish clade. For the Sessilida, the family Scyphidiidae was sister to the Astylozoidae. In our sampling of U. korschelti and S. ubiquita, both species showed significant genetic divergence among geographically isolated, yet morphologically indistinguishable populations. We hypothesize that cryptic speciation has produced these morphologically identical species and argue that more extensive genomic analyses are required to fully assess the monophyly, biogeography, and ultimately biodiversity of the peritrichs. PMID:25711931

  16. New records for the shallow-water chiton fauna (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) of the Azores (NE Atlantic)

    PubMed Central

    vila, Srgio P.; Sigwart, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Published records, original data from recent field work on all of the islands of the Azores (NE Atlantic), and a revision of the entire mollusc collection deposited in the Department of Biology of the University of the Azores (DBUA) were used to compile a checklist of the shallow-water Polyplacophora of the Azores. Lepidochitona cf. canariensis and Tonicella rubra are reported for the first time for this archipelago, increasing the recorded Azorean fauna to seven species. PMID:23825446

  17. Morphological and molecular evidence for cryptic species of springsnails [genus Pseudamnicola ( Corrosella) (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae)].

    PubMed

    Delicado, Diana; Ramos, Marian A

    2012-01-01

    Several Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations of the central and eastern Iberian Peninsula have been ascribed to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri (Dupuy, 1851), though recent evidence demonstrates the species could be endemic to the departments of Var and Alpes-Maritimes in France. Through the identification of cryptic species using a combined morphological and phylogenetic approach, this paper provides a detailed morphological description of Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri, clarifying its taxonomic boundaries and confirming it as a French endemic. In parallel, by comparing Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations from the provinces of Castelln and Valencia in Eastern Spain, it was observed that rather than Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri they represented a new species here described as Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffeisp. n. Among other characters, the two species show marked differences in shell shape, male and female genital systems, radular formula and concentration of the nervous system. Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffeisp. n. was also compared morphologically to another two Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species living in nearby areas [Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hinzi Boeters, 1986 and Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) navasiana (Fagot, 1907)], molecularly to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) falkneri (Boeters, 1970), the type species of the subgenus, and to the rest of the Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species described so far. Morphological differentiation between the species is supported by a genetic divergence of 7.4% inferred from a partial sequence (658 bp) of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). On the basis of an average 8% (5.39 to 11.15%) divergence estimated for the COI gene in other Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species reported in GenBank, the existence of two specific entities is here proposed, which will have impact on conservation policies both in France and in Spain. PMID:22639531

  18. Unraveling the evolutionary history of the Chilostoma Fitzinger, 1833 (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Pulmonata) lineages in Greece.

    PubMed

    Psonis, Nikolaos; Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Mylonas, Moisis; Poulakakis, Nikos

    2015-10-01

    The land snails of the genus Chilostoma Fitzinger, 1833 that includes, in Greece, the (sub)genera Cattania, Josephinella and Thiessea, are highly diversified and present high levels of endemism. However, their evolutionary history is unknown and their taxonomy is complex and continuously revised. The aim of this study is to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of the lineages of the genus Chilostoma distributed in Greece based on partial DNA sequences of two mitochondrial DNA (16S rRNA and COI) genes. Complete sequences of one nuclear gene (ITS1) representing the major mitochondrial lineages were also analyzed. The phylogenetic trees revealed three distinct major clades that correspond to the three (sub)genera. Several taxonomical incongruencies were made obvious, thus, raising questions about the "true" number of species in each clade, while rendering a taxonomic re-evaluation necessary. From a phylogeographic point of view, it seems that the three major phylogenetic clades were separated in the late Miocene. They started differentiating into distinct species during the Pliocene and Pleistocene through several vicariance and dispersal events. PMID:26049041

  19. The phylogenetic position of Neritimorpha based on the mitochondrial genome of Nerita melanotragus (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Castro, Lyda R; Colgan, D J

    2010-11-01

    This is the first report of the mitochondrial gene order and almost-complete DNA sequence of a representative of the Neritimorpha, the highest-ranking gastropod clade lacking such data. Mitochondrial gene order in Nerita is largely plesiomorphic. Its only difference from the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris is a tRNA transposition shared by Vetigastropoda and Caenogastropoda. Genome arrangements were not informative enough to resolve the evolutionary relationships of Neritimorpha, Vetigastropoda and Caenogastropoda. The sister-group taxon of Neritimorpha varied in sequence-based analyses. Some suggested that Neritimorpha is the sister group of Caenogastropoda plus Heterobranchia and some that Neritimorpha and Caenogastropoda are sister groups. No analysis significantly supported the hypothesis that Vetigastroda is more closely related to Caenogastropoda than is Neritimorpha. PMID:20817109

  20. Production of digestive enzymes along the gut of the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata (Mollusca: Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary G; Martin, Alanna; Tsai, Whitney; Hafner, John C

    2011-11-01

    The esophagus and intestine form the longest regions of the digestive tract in the giant keyhole limpet and are lined by epithelial cells sharing a common morphology and releasing materials into the gut lumen by apocrine secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine if these morphologically similar regions release similar digestive enzymes and compare their contributions to digestive enzymes released from other regions of the gut. Principal component analysis of enzymes detected by the API ZYM system for 19 enzymes plus EnzChek assays for protease, ?-amylase, lipase, cellulase, and lysozyme identify four distinct regions of the gut: 1) crystalline style and style sac, 2) digestive gland, 3) salivary glands, and 4) esophagus and intestine. Heterogeneity in enzymatic activity was observed in regions of the gut with similar cell morphology (middle and posterior esophagus and intestine) as well as regions with different cell morphology (salivary glands, digestive gland and crystalline style). Enzyme activity in each of these regions is compared to other gastropods, in particular the abalone. Although much of the length of the digestive tract is lined by a morphologically similar epithelium, different regions of the alimentary tract produce a different suite of enzymes which may contribute to the digestive process. These data will help enhance our limited understanding of the digestive physiology of Megathura crenulata and lead to improvement of its culture for clinical research. PMID:21767658

  1. Phylogenetic relationships among six vetigastropod subgroups (Mollusca, Gastropoda) based on 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Won

    2005-04-30

    Complete 18S rDNA sequences were determined for 10 vetigastropods in order to investigate the phylogeny of Vetigastropoda, which is controversial. These sequences were analyzed together with published sequences for nine other vetigastropods and two nerites. With the two nerites as outgroups, the phylogeny was inferred by three analytical methods, neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony. The 18S rDNA sequence data support the monophyly of four vetigastropod superfamilies, the Pleurotomarioidea, the Fissurelloidea, the Haliotoidea, and the Trochoidea. The present results yield the new branching order: (Pleurotomarioidea (Fissurelloidea ((Scissurelloidea, Lepetodriloidea) (Haliotoidea, Trochoidea)))) within the vetigastropod clade. PMID:15879715

  2. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and mineral components, provides a new insight into biomineralization mechanisms and controls. PMID:15959908

  3. Proteomic analysis from the mineralized radular teeth of the giant Pacific chiton, Cryptochiton stelleri (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Michiko; Wang, Qianqian; Li, Dongsheng; Pan, Songqin; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Kisailus, David

    2012-09-01

    The biomineralized radular teeth of chitons are known to consist of iron-based magnetic crystals, associated with the maximum hardness and stiffness of any biomineral. Based on our transmission electron microscopy analysis of partially mineralized teeth, we suggest that the organic matrix within the teeth controls the iron oxide nucleation. Thus, we used Nano-LC-MS to perform a proteomic analysis of the organic matrix in radular teeth of the chiton Cryptochiton stelleri in order to identify the proteins involved in the biomineralization process. Since the genome sequence of C. stelleri is not available, cross-species similarity searching and de novo peptide sequencing were used to screen the proteins. Our results indicate that several proteins were dominant in the mineralized part of the radular teeth, amongst which, myoglobin and a highly acidic peptide were identified as possibly involved in the biomineralization process. PMID:22833255

  4. 18S ribosomal DNA sequences provide insight into the phylogeny of patellogastropod limpets (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Won

    2007-02-28

    To investigate the phylogeny of Patellogastropoda, the complete 18S rDNA sequences of nine patellogastropod limpets Cymbula canescens (Gmelin, 1791), Helcion dunkeri (Krauss, 1848), Patella rustica Linnaeus, 1758, Cellana toreuma (Reeve, 1855), Cellana nigrolineata (Reeve, 1854), Nacella magellanica Gmelin, 1791, Nipponacmea concinna (Lischke, 1870), Niveotectura pallida (Gould, 1859), and Lottia dorsuosa Gould, 1859 were determined. These sequences were then analyzed along with the published 18S rDNA sequences of 35 gastropods, one bivalve, and one chiton species. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference. The results of our 18S rDNA sequence analysis strongly support the monophyly of Patellogastropoda and the existence of three subgroups. Of these, two subgroups, the Patelloidea and Acmaeoidea, are closely related, with branching patterns that can be summarized as [(Cymbula + Helcion) + Patella] and [(Nipponacmea + Lottia) + Niveotectura]. The remaining subgroup, Nacelloidea, emerges as basal and paraphyletic, while its genus Cellana is monophyletic. Our analysis also indicates that the Patellogastropoda have a sister relationship with the order Cocculiniformia within the Gastropoda. PMID:17464213

  5. New records for the shallow-water chiton fauna (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) of the Azores (NE Atlantic).

    PubMed

    Avila, Srgio P; Sigwart, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Published records, original data from recent field work on all of the islands of the Azores (NE Atlantic), and a revision of the entire mollusc collection deposited in the Department of Biology of the University of the Azores (DBUA) were used to compile a checklist of the shallow-water Polyplacophora of the Azores. Lepidochitona cf. canariensis and Tonicella rubra are reported for the first time for this archipelago, increasing the recorded Azorean fauna to seven species. PMID:23825446

  6. Ross Sea Mollusca from the Latitudinal Gradient Program: R/V Italica 2004 Rauschert dredge samples.

    PubMed

    Ghiglione, Claudio; Alvaro, Maria Chiara; Griffiths, Huw J; Linse, Katrin; Schiaparelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Information regarding the molluscs in this dataset is based on the Rauschert dredge samples collected during the Latitudinal Gradient Program (LGP) on board the R/V "Italica" in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) in the austral summer 2004. A total of 18 epibenthic dredge deployments/samplings have been performed at four different locations at depths ranging from 84 to 515m by using a Rauschert dredge with a mesh size of 500?m. In total 8,359 specimens have been collected belonging to a total of 161 species. Considering this dataset in terms of occurrences, it corresponds to 505 discrete distributional records (incidence data). Of these, in order of abundance, 5,965 specimens were Gastropoda (accounting for 113 species), 1,323 were Bivalvia (accounting for 36 species), 949 were Aplacophora (accounting for 7 species), 74 specimens were Scaphopoda (3 species), 38 were Monoplacophora (1 species) and, finally, 10 specimens were Polyplacophora (1 species). This data set represents the first large-scale survey of benthic micro-molluscs for the area and provides important information about the distribution of several species, which have been seldom or never recorded before in the Ross Sea. All vouchers are permanently stored at the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA), Section of Genoa, enabling future comparison and crosschecking. This material is also currently under study, from a molecular point of view, by the barcoding project "BAMBi" (PNRA 2010/A1.10). PMID:24146597

  7. Ross Sea Mollusca from the Latitudinal Gradient Program: R/V Italica 2004 Rauschert dredge samples

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Claudio; Alvaro, Maria Chiara; Griffiths, Huw J.; Linse, Katrin; Schiaparelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Information regarding the molluscs in this dataset is based on the Rauschert dredge samples collected during the Latitudinal Gradient Program (LGP) on board the R/V Italica in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) in the austral summer 2004. A total of 18 epibenthic dredge deployments/samplings have been performed at four different locations at depths ranging from 84 to 515m by using a Rauschert dredge with a mesh size of 500?m. In total 8,359 specimens have been collected belonging to a total of 161 species. Considering this dataset in terms of occurrences, it corresponds to 505 discrete distributional records (incidence data). Of these, in order of abundance, 5,965 specimens were Gastropoda (accounting for 113 species), 1,323 were Bivalvia (accounting for 36 species), 949 were Aplacophora (accounting for 7 species), 74 specimens were Scaphopoda (3 species), 38 were Monoplacophora (1 species) and, finally, 10 specimens were Polyplacophora (1 species). This data set represents the first large-scale survey of benthic micro-molluscs for the area and provides important information about the distribution of several species, which have been seldom or never recorded before in the Ross Sea. All vouchers are permanently stored at the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA), Section of Genoa, enabling future comparison and crosschecking. This material is also currently under study, from a molecular point of view, by the barcoding project BAMBi (PNRA 2010/A1.10). PMID:24146597

  8. [Polyplacophoran communities (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) at Bahia de La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mxico].

    PubMed

    Garca Ros, Cedar I; Alvarez Ruiz, Migdalia

    2007-03-01

    Eight species of polyplacophorans have been reported from La Bahia de la Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We add Lepidochitona beanii, Chaetopleura lurida, Stenoplax limaciformis, S. mariposa, Lepidozona clathrata, L. serrata and Acanthochitona arragonites, increasing the known number of species to 15. Ordination analysis of five chiton communities at the site suggests a correlation of wave exposure to species composition and diversity: communities with intermediate wave exposure have more species (richness) and higher diversity (Shannon's index). PMID:18457125

  9. Old and sticky-adhesive mechanisms in the living fossil Nautilus pompilius (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Wani, Ryoji; Schwaha, Thomas; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Nautiloidea is the oldest group within the cephalopoda, and modern Nautilus differs much in its outer morphology from all other recent species; its external shell and pinhole camera eye are the most prominent distinguishing characters. A further unique feature of Nautilus within the cephalopods is the lack of suckers or hooks on the tentacles. Instead, the animals use adhesive structures present on the digital tentacles. Earlier studies focused on the general tentacle morphology and put little attention on the adhesive gland system. Our results show that the epithelial parts on the oral adhesive ridge contain three secretory cell types (columnar, goblet, and cell type 1) that differ in shape and granule size. In the non-adhesive aboral epithelium, two glandular cell types (cell types 2 and 3) are present; these were not mentioned in any earlier study and differ from the cells in the adhesive area. The secretory material of all glandular cell types consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharide units, whereas one cell type in the non-adhesive epithelium also reacts positive for acidic mucopolysaccharides. The present data indicate that the glue in Nautilus consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharides. The glue seems to be a viscous carbohydrate gel, as known from another cephalopod species. De-attachment is apparently effectuated mechanically, i.e., by muscle contraction of the adhesive ridges and tentacle retraction. PMID:22221553

  10. Old and sticky—adhesive mechanisms in the living fossil Nautilus pompilius (Mollusca, Cephalopoda)

    PubMed Central

    von Byern, Janek; Wani, Ryoji; Schwaha, Thomas; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Nautiloidea is the oldest group within the cephalopoda, and modern Nautilus differs much in its outer morphology from all other recent species; its external shell and pinhole camera eye are the most prominent distinguishing characters. A further unique feature of Nautilus within the cephalopods is the lack of suckers or hooks on the tentacles. Instead, the animals use adhesive structures present on the digital tentacles. Earlier studies focused on the general tentacle morphology and put little attention on the adhesive gland system. Our results show that the epithelial parts on the oral adhesive ridge contain three secretory cell types (columnar, goblet, and cell type 1) that differ in shape and granule size. In the non-adhesive aboral epithelium, two glandular cell types (cell types 2 and 3) are present; these were not mentioned in any earlier study and differ from the cells in the adhesive area. The secretory material of all glandular cell types consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharide units, whereas one cell type in the non-adhesive epithelium also reacts positive for acidic mucopolysaccharides. The present data indicate that the glue in Nautilus consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharides. The glue seems to be a viscous carbohydrate gel, as known from another cephalopod species. De-attachment is apparently effectuated mechanically, i.e., by muscle contraction of the adhesive ridges and tentacle retraction. PMID:22221553

  11. The Bulimulidae (Mollusca: Pulmonata) from the Región de Atacama, northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bulimulid genus Bostryx Troschel, 1847 is the most species-rich genus of land snails found in Chile, with the majority of its species found only in the northern part of the country, usually in arid coastal zones. This genus has been sparsely studied in Chile and there is little information on their distribution, diversity or ecology. Here, for the first time, a formal analysis of the diversity of bulimulids in the Región de Atacama, northern Chile, is reported. Of the seventeen species recorded for the area, most of them were efectively found in the field collections and one record was based on literature. Five taxa are described as new: Bostryx ancavilorum sp. nov., Bostryx breurei sp. nov., Bostryx calderaensis sp. nov., Bostryx ireneae sp. nov. and Bostryx valdovinosi sp. nov., and the known geographic distribution of seven species is extended. Results reveal that the Región de Atacama is the richest region in terrestrial snails in Chile, after the Juan Fernández Archipelago. All of the terrestrial molluscan species occurring in the area are endemic to Chile, most of them with restricted geographic distributions along the coastal zones, and none of them are currently protected by law. Further sampling in northern Chile will probably reveal more snail species to be discovered and described. PMID:26587346

  12. Gastrocopta (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Pupillidae) inthePilbara region of Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Whisson, Corey S.; Khler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Six species of Gastrocopta have been identified from the Pilbara region, Western Australia, by means of comparative analyses of shell and mtDNA variation. Three of these species, Gastrocopta hedleyi, Gastrocopta larapinta and Gastrocopta servilis, have been recorded in the Pilbara for the first time. Gastrocopta sp. CW1 is probably new to science and might be endemic to the region. By contrast, Gastrocopta hedleyi, Gastrocopta larapinta and Gastrocopta mussoni are shown to be widespread. PMID:23653507

  13. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of the loliginid squids (Mollusca: cephalopoda) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Anderson, F E

    2000-05-01

    The cephalopod taxon Loliginidae (Cephalopoda: Myopsida) is a species-rich group of tropical and temperate shallow-water squids, many of which are commercial fisheries objects and neurophysiological research organisms. The worldwide distribution of these squids could make Loliginidae a useful case study in shallow-water marine biogeography, but the phylogeny of the group is unknown. To clarify loliginid phylogeny, regions of two mitochondrial genes (the 16S rRNA and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes) were sequenced for members of 19 loliginid species and several outgroups. Maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses were performed on a combined data set, as well as on each data set individually. Analyses of the combined data support loliginid monophyly and reveal four clades-one consisting primarily of species in American waters from two genera, one composed of 3 east Atlantic species, one consisting of the bioluminescent loliginids (Uroteuthis sensu Vecchione et al., 1998) plus Loliolus japonica, and one represented by a Loligo (Alloteuthis) subulata-Lolliguncula mercatoris pair. The likelihood of the unconstrained maximum-likelihood tree is not significantly better than the likelihoods of the best trees constrained to Sepioteuthis monophyly or Uroteuthis monophyly, but there is significant support for Lolliguncula polyphyly. Tests of alternative hypotheses of loliginid cladogenesis suggest that cladogenesis within Loliginidae is correlated with the widening of the Atlantic and the closure of the Tethys Sea, although dispersal from the Indo-West Pacific is a reasonable explanation for the origin of the clade of American loliginines. PMID:10837151

  14. Spawning, fertilization, and larval development of Potamocorbula amurensis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicolini, M.H.; Penry, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    In Potamocorbula amurensis time for development to the straight-hinge larval stage is 48 hr at 15??C. Potamocorbula amurensis settles at a shell length of approximately 135 ??m 17 to 19 days after fertilization. Our observations of timing of larval devdlopment in P. amurensis support the hypothesis of earlier workers that its route of initial introduction to San Francisco Bay was as veliger larvae transported in ballast water by trans-Pacific cargo ships. The length of the larval period of P. amurensis relative to water mass residence times in San Francisco Bay suggests that it is sufficient to allow substantial dispersal from North Bay to South Bay populations in concordance with previous observations that genetic differentiation among populations of P. amurensis in San Francisco Bay is low. Potamocorbula amurensis is markedly euryhaline at all stages of development. Spawning and fertilization can occur at salinities from 5 to 25 psu, and eggs and sperms can each tolerance at least a 10-psu step increase or decrease in salinity. Embryos that are 2 hr old can tolerate the same range of salinities from (10 to 30 psu), and by the time they are 24 hr old they can tolerate the same range of salinities (2 to 30 psu) that adult clams can. The ability of P. amurensis larvae to tolerate substantial step changes in salinity suggests a strong potential to survive incomplete oceanic exchanges of ballast water and subsequent discharge into receiving waters across a broad range of salinities.

  15. Cell interactions influence the pattern of biomineralization in the Ilyanassa obsoleta (Mollusca) embryo.

    PubMed

    McCain, E R

    1992-11-01

    Ilyanassa obsoleta larvae have two calcium carbonate-containing organs, shell and statocyst, which are derived from five micromere cells (2a, 2c, 2d, 3c, 3d). "Internal shell," an abnormal, internal calcium carbonate mass, was previously observed when cells which normally induce shell and statocyst were removed. This study utilizes multiple-cell deletions to examine how these calcium carbonate-producing precursors control the pattern of biomineralization, whether it is in external shell, statocyst, or internal shell. It was demonstrated that internal shell was solely derived from any of these five cells. However, there was a quantitative difference in the frequency of internal shell production depending upon which cells, as well as how many, are deleted. In general, when external shell or statocyst production was diminished, as the result of removing several of the calcium carbonate-producing cells, internal shell was deposited instead. The presence of internal shell can best be explained as the result of altered interactions between these five cells after one or more have been deleted. Electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that internal shell differs from normal shell in both structure and crystal morphology and it can also be produced by statocyst precursors. Thus, both the deletion and electron microscopy data support the interpretation that the development of internal shell is controlled by shell- and statocyst-producing cells when the cell communication between these cells is disrupted. PMID:1301083

  16. Patterns of diversity of the Rissoidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the Atlantic and the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    vila, Srgio P; Goud, Jeroen; de Frias Martins, Antnio M

    2012-01-01

    The geographical distribution of the Rissoidae in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea was compiled and is up-to-date until July 2011. All species were classified according to their mode of larval development (planktotrophic and nonplanktotrophic), and bathymetrical zonation (shallow species--those living between the intertidal and 50?m depth, and deep species--those usually living below 50?m depth). 542 species of Rissoidae are presently reported to the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, belonging to 33 genera. The Mediterranean Sea is the most diverse site, followed by Canary Islands, Caribbean, Portugal, and Cape Verde. The Mediterranean and Cape Verde Islands are the sites with higher numbers of endemic species, with predominance of Alvania spp. in the first site, and of Alvania and Schwartziella at Cape Verde. In spite of the large number of rissoids at Madeira archipelago, a large number of species are shared with Canaries, Selvagens, and the Azores, thus only about 8% are endemic to the Madeira archipelago. Most of the 542-rissoid species that live in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean are shallow species (323), 110 are considered as deep species, and 23 species are reported in both shallow and deep waters. There is a predominance of nonplanktotrophs in islands, seamounts, and at high and medium latitudes. This pattern is particularly evident in the genera Crisilla, Manzonia, Onoba, Porosalvania, Schwartziella, and Setia. Planktotrophic species are more abundant in the eastern Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea. The results of the analysis of the probable directions of faunal flows support the patterns found by both the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity and the geographical distribution. Four main source areas for rissoids emerge: Mediterranean, Caribbean, Canaries/Madeira archipelagos, and the Cape Verde archipelago. We must stress the high percentage of endemics that occurs in the isolated islands of Saint Helena, Tristan da Cunha, Cape Verde archipelago and also the Azores, thus reinforcing the legislative protective actions that the local governments have implemented in these islands during the recent years. PMID:22693430

  17. Fine structure of the blood-brain interface in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, M; Abbott, N J

    1992-04-01

    The blood-brain interface was studied in a cephalopod mollusc, the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, by thin-section electron microscopy. Layers lining blood vessels in the optic and vertical lobes of the brain, counting from lumen outwards, include a layer of endothelial cells and associated basal lamina, a layer of pericytes and a second basal lamina, and perivascular glial cells. The distinction between endothelial cells and pericytes breaks down in small vessels. In the smallest microvessels, equivalent to capillaries, and in venous channels, and endothelial and pericyte layers are discontinuous, but a layer of glial cells is always interposed between blood and neural tissue, except where neurosecretory endings reach the second basal lamina. In microvessels in which cell membranes of the entire perivascular glial sheath could be followed, the glial layer was apparently 'seamless', not interrupted by an intercellular cleft, in ca 90% (27/30) of the profiles. Where a cleft did occur, it showed an elongated overlap zone between adjacent cells. The walls of venous channels are formed by lamellae of overlapping glial processes. In arterial vessels, the pericyte layer is thicker and more complete, with characteristic sinuous intercellular clefts. Arterioles are defined as vessels containing 'myofilaments' within pericytes, and arteries those in which the region of the second basal lamina is additionally expanded into a wide collagenous zone containing fibroblast-like cells and cell processes enclosing myofilaments. The 'glio-vascular channels' observed in Octopus brain are not a prominent feature of Sepia optic and vertical lobe. The organization of cell layers at the Sepia blood-brain interface suggests that it is designed to restrict permeability between blood and brain. PMID:1588346

  18. Annotated type catalogue of the Bulimulidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.; Ablett, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described of 404 taxa classified within the family Bulimulidae (superfamily Orthalicoidea) and kept in the London museum. Lectotypes are designated for Bulimus aurifluus Pfeiffer, 1857; Otostomus bartletti H. Adams, 1867; Helix cactorum d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus caliginosus Reeve, 1849; Bulimus chemnitzioides Forbes, 1850; Bulimus cinereus Reeve, 1849; Helix cora d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus fallax Pfeiffer, 1853; Bulimus felix Pfeiffer, 1862; Bulimus fontainii d’Orbigny, 1838; Bulimus fourmiersi d’Orbigny, 1837; Bulimus (Mesembrinus) gealei H. Adams, 1867; Bulimus gruneri Pfeiffer, 1846; Bulimus humboldtii Reeve, 1849; Helix hygrohylaea d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus jussieui Pfeiffer, 1846; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) binominis lascellianus E.A. Smith, 1895; Helix lichnorum d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) lucidus da Costa, 1898; Bulimus luridus Pfeiffer, 1863; Bulimus meleagris Pfeiffer, 1853; Bulimus monachus Pfeiffer, 1857; Bulimus montagnei d’Orbigny, 1837; Helix montivaga d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus muliebris Reeve, 1849; Bulimus nigrofasciatus Pfeiffer in Philippi 1846; Bulimus nitelinus Reeve, 1849; Helix oreades d’Orbigny, 1835; Helix polymorpha d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus praetextus Reeve, 1849; Bulinus proteus Broderip, 1832; Bulimus rusticellus Morelet, 1860; Helix sporadica d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus sulphureus Pfeiffer, 1857; Helix thamnoica var. marmorata d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulinus translucens Broderip in Broderip and Sowerby I 1832; Helix trichoda d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulinus ustulatus Sowerby I, 1833; Bulimus voithianus Pfeiffer, 1847; Bulimus yungasensis d’Orbigny, 1837. The type status of the following taxa is changed to lectotype in accordance with Art. 74.6 ICZN: Bulimulus (Drymaeus) caucaensis da Costa, 1898; Drymaeus exoticus da Costa, 1901; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) hidalgoi da Costa, 1898; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) interruptus Preston, 1909; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) inusitatus Fulton, 1900; Bulimulus latecolumellaris Preston, 1909; Bulimus (Otostomus) napo Angas, 1878; Drymaeus notabilis da Costa, 1906; Drymaeus notatus da Costa, 1906; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) nubilus Preston, 1903; Drymaeus obliquistriatus da Costa, 1901; Bulimus (Drymaeus) ochrocheilus E.A. Smith, 1877; Bulimus (Drymaeus) orthostoma E.A. Smith, 1877; Drymaeus expansus perenensis da Costa, 1901; Bulimulus pergracilis Rolle, 1904; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) plicatoliratus da Costa, 1898; Drymaeus prestoni da Costa, 1906; Drymaeus punctatus da Costa, 1907; Bulimus (Leptomerus) sanctaeluciae E.A. Smith, 1889; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) selli Preston, 1909; Drymaeus subventricosus da Costa, 1901; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) tigrinus da Costa, 1898; Drymaeus volsus Fulton, 1907; Drymaeus wintlei Finch, 1929; Bulimus zhorquinensis Angas, 1879; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) ziczac da Costa, 1898. The following junior subjective synonyms are established: Bulimus antioquensis Pfeiffer, 1855 = Bulimus baranguillanus Pfeiffer, 1853; Drymaeus bellus da Costa, 1906 = Drymaeus blandi Pilsbry, 1897; Bulimus hachensis Reeve 1850 = Bulimus gruneri Pfeiffer, 1846 = Bulimus columbianus Lea, 1838; Bulimus (Otostomus) lamas Higgins 1868 = Bulimus trujillensis Philippi, 1867; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) binominis lascellianus E.A. Smith, 1895 = Bulimulus (Drymaeus) binominis E.A. Smith, 1895; Drymaeus multispira da Costa, 1904 = Helix torallyi d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimulus (Drymaeus) plicatoliratus Da Costa, 1898 = Bulimus convexus Pfeiffer, 1855; Bulimus sugillatus Pfeiffer, 1857 = Bulimus rivasii d’Orbigny, 1837; Bulimus meridionalis Reeve 1848 [June] = Bulimus voithianus Pfeiffer, 1847. New combinations are: Bostryx montagnei (d’Orbigny, 1837); Bostryx obliquiportus (da Costa, 1901); Bulimulus heloicus (d’Orbigny, 1835); Drymaeus (Drymaeus) lusorius (Pfeiffer, 1855); Drymaeus (Drymaeus) trigonostomus (Jonas, 1844); Drymaeus (Drymaeus) wintlei Finch, 1929; Drymaeus (Mesembrinus) conicus da Costa, 1907; Kuschelenia (Kuschelenia) culminea culminea (d’Orbigny, 1835); Kuschelenia (Kuschelenia) culmineus edwardsi (Morelet, 1863); Kuschelenia (K.) gayi (Pfeiffer, 1857); Kuschelenia (Kuschelenia) tupacii (d’Orbigny, 1835); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) anthisanensis (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) aquilus (Reeve, 1848); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) bicolor (Sowerby I, 1835); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) caliginosus (Reeve, 1849); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) cotopaxiensis (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) filaris (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) ochracea (Morelet, 1863); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) petiti (Pfeiffer, 1846); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) purpuratus (Reeve, 1849); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) quechuarum (Crawford, 1939); Naesiotus cinereus (Reeve, 1849); Naesiotus dentritis (Morelet, 1863); Naesiotus fontainii (d’Orbigny, 1838); Naesiotus orbignyi (Pfeiffer, 1846); Protoglyptus pilosus (Guppy, 1871); Protoglyptus sanctaeluciae (E.A. Smith, 1889). Type material of the following taxa is figured herein for the first time: Bulimus cinereus Reeve, 1849; Bulimus coriaceus Pfeiffer, 1857; Bulimulus laxostylus Rolle, 1904; Bulimus pliculatus Pfeiffer, 1857; Bulimus simpliculus Pfeiffer, 1855. PMID:24715782

  19. Epibiotic relationships on Zygochlamys patagonica (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Pectinidae) increase biodiversity in a submarine canyon in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejter, Laura; López Gappa, Juan; Bremec, Claudia Silvia

    2014-06-01

    The continental slope of the southern SW Atlantic Ocean has many distinguishable deep submarine canyons, varying in depth and extension. The benthic fauna within one of them, detected in April 2005 by means of a multibeam SIMRAD EM1002 sonar, and located at 43°35‧S to 59°33‧W, 325 m depth, was studied to discuss faunal affinities with the neighbouring Patagonian scallop fishing grounds located at upper slope depths. In order to add faunal information to the previous general study, we studied the epibiotic species settled on Patagonian scallops (the dominant species in the area) collected in the reference sampling site using a 2.5-m mouth-opening dredge, 10 mm mesh size. We sampled 103 scallops with shell heights between 22 and 69 mm; epibionts were recorded on both valves. We found 53 epibiotic taxa, which were most conspicuous on the upper valve. Bryozoa was the most diverse group (34 species) while Polychaeta was the most abundant group, recorded on 94% of the scallops. Stylasteridae (2 species) and Clavulariidae (Cnidaria) conform newly recorded epibionts on Z. patagonica and the sponge Tedania (Tedaniopsis) infundibuliformis also represents a new record for the SW Atlantic Ocean.

  20. Morphological and molecular evidence for cryptic species of springsnails [genus Pseudamnicola ( Corrosella) (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Delicado, Diana; Ramos, Marian A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations of the central and eastern Iberian Peninsula have been ascribed to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri (Dupuy, 1851), though recent evidence demonstrates the species could be endemic to the departments of Var and Alpes-Maritimes in France. Through the identification of cryptic species using a combined morphological and phylogenetic approach, this paper provides a detailed morphological description of Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri, clarifying its taxonomic boundaries and confirming it as a French endemic. In parallel, by comparing Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations from the provinces of Castellón and Valencia in Eastern Spain, it was observed that rather than Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri they represented a new species here described as Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffei sp. n. Among other characters, the two species show marked differences in shell shape, male and female genital systems, radular formula and concentration of the nervous system. Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffei sp. n. was also compared morphologically to another two Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species living in nearby areas [Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hinzi Boeters, 1986 and Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) navasiana (Fagot, 1907)], molecularly to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) falkneri (Boeters, 1970), the type species of the subgenus, and to the rest of the Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species described so far. Morphological differentiation between the species is supported by a genetic divergence of 7.4% inferred from a partial sequence (658 bp) of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). On the basis of an average 8% (5.39 to 11.15%) divergence estimated for the COI gene in other Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species reported in GenBank, the existence of two specific entities is here proposed, which will have impact on conservation policies both in France and in Spain. PMID:22639531

  1. Lipoproteins of the egg perivitelline fluid of Pomacea canaliculata snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Garin, C F; Heras, H; Pollero, R J

    1996-12-01

    The lipid and protein composition of the perivitelline fluid of the eggs of Pomacea canaliculata was investigated. Two lipoproteins (PV 1 and PV 2) and one lipoprotein fraction (PV 3) were detected for the first time in gastropods. They represent 57.0, 7.5, and 35.5% of the egg total proteins, respectively. PV 1 is a glyco-carotene-protein complex with characteristics of a very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL). It has 0.33% lipids, mainly free sterols and phospholipids. The particle has a MW of 300 Kd and is composed of three subunits of 35, 32, and 28 Kd, respectively. PV 2 particle is a VHDL of 400 Kd and 3.75% lipids. The major lipid classes are free sterols and phospholipids and also have significant quantities of energy-providing triacylglycerides and free fatty acids. It is composed of two apoproteins of 67 and 31 Kd. PV 3 density corresponds to a high-density lipoprotein (HDL). It was fractionated into two subfractions "h" and "p". Fraction "h" contains 5.16% lipids, mainly free sterols, phospholipids, and free fatty acids, and two particles of 100 and 64 Kd. Dissociating electrophoresis showed two subunits of 34 and 29 Kd. Fraction "p" is composed of a single particle of 26 Kd that contains 9.5% lipids, which represents 30% of the total egg lipids. It has high levels of a carotenoid pigment. Besides it contains free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, sterified sterols, and triacylglycerides. These three fractions are probably the major supply of lipids and amino acids for the developing embryo. PMID:8972583

  2. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: ?-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase ?-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria. PMID:22707847

  3. Novel polymorphic microsatellite markers isolated from the pen shell Atrina pectinata (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pinnidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Bai, L J; Yang, A G; Zhou, L Q; Liu, Z H

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated 21 novel polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci from the pen shell Atrina pectinata using magnetic-bead hybridization enrichment. The characteristics of these loci were tested using a population of 30 individuals collected from the Penglai coast, Shandong Province. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 13, and polymorphism information content (PIC) varied from 0.1730 to 0.8954. Values for observed heterozygosity (HO) and expected heterozygosity (HE) ranged from 0.0714 to 0.9231 and from 0.1948 to 0.9237, respectively. Four loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The newly developed microsatellite markers will be beneficial in assessing the genetic diversity, population structure and genetic conservation of A. pectinata, and in other relevant research. PMID:25526185

  4. Phylogenetic relationships among major species of japanese coleoid cephalopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) using three mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Takumiya, Mikio; Kobayashi, Mari; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2005-02-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 36 species of major coleoid cephalopods from Japanese waters were studied using partial sequences of three mitochondrial genes, 16S rDNA, 12S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. Octopoda and Decapoda were monophylic groups. Within Sepioidea, Sepiadariidae and Sepiolidae were not closely related to Sepiidae, but rather related to Teuthoidea. Sepiidae with a distinct calcareous shell formed a single cluster. Myopsida was closely related to Oegopsida. Within Octopoda, Opisthoteuthis depressa and Argonauta argo diverged earlier than Octopodiidae. The common octopuses in Japanese waters were separated into three clusters. The first cluster occupied a basal position, and includes large-sized octopuses, such as Enteroctopus dofleini and Octopus (Paroctopus) conispadiceus from the continental shelf and upper slope. The second cluster consisted of long-armed octopuses, such as O. ornatus, O. minor, and O. sasakii. The third cluster contained small- to medium-sized octopus, such as Amphioctopus fangsiao, A. areolatus, O. cyaneus, and O. vulgaris, in which several species possess ocelli on the web. The second cluster formed the sister group to the third cluster. PMID:15738635

  5. Ultrastructure of the heart muscle cells of the cuttlefish Rossia macrosoma (Delle Chiaje) (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Jensen, H; Tjonneland, A

    1977-12-13

    The muscle cells of the ventricle, the branchial heart and the branchial heart appendages of Rossia macrosoma (Delle Chiaje) are studied. The ventricle myocardium has three muscle layers, while the other two organs exhibited a loose arrangement of muscle cells. The muscle cells of the ventricle, the branchial heart and the branchial heart appendages are similar in structure. The nuclei are surrounded by myofibrils. In the myofibrils A-, I- and discontinuous Z-bands are seen. The diameters of the thick filaments are 300--400A, their length varies from 1.7 to 3.9 mu. Thin filaments have a diameter of approximately 85A. The ratio between thick and thin filaments is roughly 1 to 11. The SR runs mostly as a longitudinal network within the myofibrils. A few short T-tubules are observed in the Z-regions. Peripheral and internal couplings exist. The latter are few in number. Intercalated discs are small and rarely observed. They have been found in all three organs. A difference in the function of these organs is not reflected in the ultrastructure of the intercalated discs. These discs are often of the interdigitating type with interfibrillar junctions and unspecialized regions. Peripheral couplings are seen at the unspecialized regions. The intercalar surfaces of the muscle cells "shoulder off" into the lateral surface, and the transition between the two surfaces is not a sharp one. Attachment plaques are found scattered over the whole sarcolemma. PMID:597840

  6. Redescription of two Dicyemennea (Phylum: Dicyemida) from Rossia pacifica (Mollusca: Cephalopoda: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Furuya, Hidetaka

    2007-08-01

    Two species of dicyemid mesozoan are redescribed from Rossia pacifica Berry, 1911, collected off Iwase in Toyama Bay, Honshu, Japan. Dicyemennea brevicephaloides Bogolepova-Dobrokhotova, 1962, is a large species that reaches about 4,000 microm in length. This species attaches to the surface of the branchial heart appendages. The vermiform stages are characterized as having 23 peripheral cells, a disc-shaped calotte, and an axial cell that extends to the propolar cells. An anterior abortive axial cell is absent in vermiform embryos. Infusoriform embryos consist of 35 cells; a single nucleus is present in each urn cell and the refringent bodies are absent. Dicyemennea rossiae Bogolepova-Dobrokhotova, 1962, is a medium species that reaches about 2000 microm in length. This species lives in folds of the renal appendages. The vermiform stages are characterized as having 29-34 peripheral cells, a conical calotte, and an axial cell that extends to the middle of the metapolar cells. An anterior abortive axial cell is present in vermiform embryos. Infusoriform embryos consist of 39 cells; 2 nuclei are present in each urn cell and the refringent bodies are solid. PMID:17918363

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the nudibranch Roboastra europaea (Mollusca: Gastropoda) supports the monophyly of opisthobranchs.

    PubMed

    Grande, Cristina; Templado, José; Cervera, J Lucas; Zardoya, Rafael

    2002-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (14,472 bp) of the mitochondrial genome of the nudibranch Roboastra europaea (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia) was determined. This highly compact mitochondrial genome is nearly identical in gene organization to that found in opisthobranchs and pulmonates (Euthyneura) but not to that in prosobranchs (a paraphyletic group including the most basal lineages of gastropods). The newly determined mitochondrial genome differs only in the relative position of the trnC gene when compared with the mitochondrial genome of Pupa strigosa, the only opisthobranch mitochondrial genome sequenced so far. Pupa and Roboastra represent the most basal and derived lineages of opisthobranchs, respectively, and their mitochondrial genomes are more similar in sequence when compared with those of pulmonates. All phylogenetic analyses (maximum parsimony, minimum evolution, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian) based on the deduced amino acid sequences of all mitochondrial protein-coding genes supported the monophyly of opisthobranchs. These results are in agreement with the classical view that recognizes Opisthobranchia as a natural group and contradict recent phylogenetic studies of the group based on shorter sequence data sets. The monophyly of opisthobranchs was further confirmed when a fragment of 2,500 nucleotides including the mitochondrial cox1, rrnL, nad6, and nad5 genes was analyzed in several species representing five different orders of opisthobranchs with all common methods of phylogenetic inference. Within opisthobranchs, the polyphyly of cephalaspideans and the monophyly of nudibranchs were recovered. The evolution of mitochondrial tRNA rearrangements was analyzed using the cox1+rrnL+nad6+nad5 gene phylogeny. The relative position of the trnP gene between the trnA and nad6 genes was found to be a synapomorphy of opisthobranchs that supports their monophyly. PMID:12270894

  8. The Continuing Debate on Deep Molluscan Phylogeny: Evidence for Serialia (Mollusca, Monoplacophora + Polyplacophora)

    PubMed Central

    Stöger, I.; Sigwart, J. D.; Kano, Y.; Knebelsberger, T.; Marshall, B. A.; Schwabe, E.; Schrödl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Molluscs are a diverse animal phylum with a formidable fossil record. Although there is little doubt about the monophyly of the eight extant classes, relationships between these groups are controversial. We analysed a comprehensive multilocus molecular data set for molluscs, the first to include multiple species from all classes, including five monoplacophorans in both extant families. Our analyses of five markers resolve two major clades: the first includes gastropods and bivalves sister to Serialia (monoplacophorans and chitons), and the second comprises scaphopods sister to aplacophorans and cephalopods. Traditional groupings such as Testaria, Aculifera, and Conchifera are rejected by our data with significant Approximately Unbiased (AU) test values. A new molecular clock indicates that molluscs had a terminal Precambrian origin with rapid divergence of all eight extant classes in the Cambrian. The recovery of Serialia as a derived, Late Cambrian clade is potentially in line with the stratigraphic chronology of morphologically heterogeneous early mollusc fossils. Serialia is in conflict with traditional molluscan classifications and recent phylogenomic data. Yet our hypothesis, as others from molecular data, implies frequent molluscan shell and body transformations by heterochronic shifts in development and multiple convergent adaptations, leading to the variable shells and body plans in extant lineages. PMID:24350268

  9. A tropical Atlantic species of Melibe Rang, 1829 (Mollusca, Nudibranchia, Tethyiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Erika; DuPont, Anne; Valdés, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Melibe is described based on two specimens collected in Florida. This new species is well differentiated morphologically and genetically from other species of Melibe studied to date. The four residue deletions in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 protein found in all previously sequenced tropical species of Melibe sequenced (and Melibe rosea) are also present in this new species. These deletions do not appear to affect important structural components of this protein but might have fitness implications. This paper provides the first confirmed record of Melibe in the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. PMID:23878514

  10. Patterns of Diversity of the Rissoidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, Sérgio P.; Goud, Jeroen; de Frias Martins, António M.

    2012-01-01

    The geographical distribution of the Rissoidae in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea was compiled and is up-to-date until July 2011. All species were classified according to their mode of larval development (planktotrophic and nonplanktotrophic), and bathymetrical zonation (shallow species—those living between the intertidal and 50 m depth, and deep species—those usually living below 50 m depth). 542 species of Rissoidae are presently reported to the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, belonging to 33 genera. The Mediterranean Sea is the most diverse site, followed by Canary Islands, Caribbean, Portugal, and Cape Verde. The Mediterranean and Cape Verde Islands are the sites with higher numbers of endemic species, with predominance of Alvania spp. in the first site, and of Alvania and Schwartziella at Cape Verde. In spite of the large number of rissoids at Madeira archipelago, a large number of species are shared with Canaries, Selvagens, and the Azores, thus only about 8% are endemic to the Madeira archipelago. Most of the 542-rissoid species that live in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean are shallow species (323), 110 are considered as deep species, and 23 species are reported in both shallow and deep waters. There is a predominance of nonplanktotrophs in islands, seamounts, and at high and medium latitudes. This pattern is particularly evident in the genera Crisilla, Manzonia, Onoba, Porosalvania, Schwartziella, and Setia. Planktotrophic species are more abundant in the eastern Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea. The results of the analysis of the probable directions of faunal flows support the patterns found by both the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity and the geographical distribution. Four main source areas for rissoids emerge: Mediterranean, Caribbean, Canaries/Madeira archipelagos, and the Cape Verde archipelago. We must stress the high percentage of endemics that occurs in the isolated islands of Saint Helena, Tristan da Cunha, Cape Verde archipelago and also the Azores, thus reinforcing the legislative protective actions that the local governments have implemented in these islands during the recent years. PMID:22693430

  11. External morphology of spermatozoa and spermatozeugmata of the freshwater mussel Truncilla truncata (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Lasee, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Truncilla truncata males release spherical aggregates of spermatozoa, called spermatozeugmata, at spawning. Sperm aggregates from other bivalve species have been described, but few detailed studies exist of the morphology of unionid spermatozeugmata and spermatozoa. We provide the first description of the external morphology of spermatozeugmata and spermatozoa of T. Truncata. The spermatozeugmata had an inside diameter of 76 mu m and contained 8000-9000 spermatozoa. Heads of spermatozoa were directed toward the center of the sphere into a translucent shell; tails were arranged radially and caused the spermatozeugmata to rotate. Spermatozoa of T. Truncata measured 3.3 mu m in length (excluding tail) and each had a head, a midpiece and a flagellum. We also documented the release of spermatozeugmata in two additional unionid species, Lampsilis cardium and Amblema plicata plicata.

  12. Nucularcidae: A new family of palaeotaxodont Ordovician pelecypods (Mollusca) from North America and Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J., Jr.; Stott, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The new Ordovician palaeotaxodont family Nucularcidae and the new genus Nucularca are described. Included in Nucularca are four previously described species that have taxodont dentition: N. cingulata (Ulrich) (the type species), N. pectunculoides (Hall), N. lorrainensis (Foerste), and N. gorensis (Foerste). All four species are of Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian; Katian) age and occur in eastern Canada and the northeastern USA. Ctenodonta borealis Foerste is regarded as a subjective synonym of Nucularca lorrainensis. No new species names are proposed. The Nucularcidae includes the genera Nucularca and Sthenodonta Pojeta and Gilbert-Tomlinson (1977). Sthenodonta occurs in central Australia in rocks of Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) age. The 12 family group names previously proposed for Ordovician palaeotaxodonts having taxodont dentition are reviewed and evaluated in the Appendix. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  13. Three new species of Pruvotinidae (Mollusca: Solenogastres) from Antarctica and NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamarro, Maria; García-Álvarez, Oscar; Urgorri, Victoriano

    2013-09-01

    The family Pruvotinidae (Solenogastres, Cavibelonia) includes thirty species of fifteen genera grouped in five subfamilies. These subfamilies are defined by the combination of the presence or absence of hollow hook-shaped sclerites, the presence or absence of a dorsopharyngeal gland and the type of ventrolateral foregut glandular organs: type A, type C or circumpharyngeal. In this paper, three new species of the family Pruvotinidae are described: Pruvotina artabra n. sp. and Gephyroherpia impar n. sp. from NW Spain, and Pruvotina manifesta n. sp. from Antarctic Peninsula. These new descriptions increase the global knowledge of Solenogastres biodiversity.

  14. Cytogenetics of Anodonta cygnea (Mollusca: Bivalvia) as possible indicator of environmental adversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrilho, J.; Leitão, A.; Vicente, C.; Malheiro, I.

    2008-11-01

    Anodonta cygnea is a freshwater clam, belonging to the Unionidae family, which can be found in rivers and lagoons all over Europe and Northern America. As they appear as important case studies for ecological damage assessments, the various species of the Unionidae family have been submitted to a sort of recent studies on their chromosomal or cytogenetic status. In this study we confirmed the diploid chromosome number of 2 n = 38 for this species, and established for the first time the karyotype, which comprised six metacentric, 12 submetacentric and one subtelocentric chromosome pairs. We also found a high percentage of cells with an abnormal number of chromosomes. Considering that karyotype disturbances in Unionids have been previously related with exposure to chemicals, either natural or produced by human activity, we determined the aneuploidy index for our population. The aneuploidy index is an excellent marker for pollutant presence/effect. The animals acclimatized in tap water and in natural water from the lake where the individuals were collected showed different levels of aneuploidy. The higher values were found in tap water. Chromosome analysis techniques seem a suitable tool to study the impact of contaminants referred above, and making A. cygnea a suitable organism for assessment of an eugenic damage in aquatic systems. On the other hand, our results also point out to the importance of doing the acclimatizing process of the collected animals in their own natural water.

  15. The end of a long controversy: systematics of the genus Limenandra (Mollusca: Nudibranchia: Aeolidiidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Leila; Pola, Marta; Gosliner, Terrence M.; Cervera, Juan Lucas

    2014-03-01

    Limenandra Haefelfinger and Stamm 1958 is a small genus within the Aeolidiidae with, until this paper, only two species: Limenandra nodosa Haefelfinger and Stamm 1958 and Limenandra fusiformis Baba 1949. Although most recent authors have regarded Limenandra as a junior synonym of Baeolidia Bergh 1888, recent molecular studies have demonstrated its monophyletic status and have rejected the circumtropical distribution attributed to the type species, L. nodosa. The present paper reviews the previously known species of Limenandra with additional morphological data and describes three new species: Limenandra barnosii sp. nov. and Limenandra rosanae sp. nov. from the Indo-Pacific are easily distinguished from all other Limenandra species by their vivid and bright colour patterns, while Limenandra confusa sp. nov., also from the Indo-Pacific, is very similar to the Atlantic and Mediterranean L. nodosa. The five species differ in colouration, the size and ornamentation of the cerata, the rhinophorial papillae, details of the reproductive system and the number of salivary glands. Additionally, Limenandra can be easily distinguished from other Aeolidiidae based on differences in the radular and receptaculum seminis morphology.

  16. Life history of the bathyal octopus Pteroctopus tetracirrhus (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quetglas, Antoni; Ordines, Francesc; González, María; Franco, Ignacio

    2009-08-01

    The life cycle of the deep-sea octopus Pteroctopus tetracirrhus was studied from monthly samples obtained throughout the year in different areas of the western Mediterranean (mainly around the Balearic Islands and along the coast of the Iberian Peninsula). A total of 373 individuals (205 females, 168 males) were analyzed; females ranged from 4.5 to 14.0 cm mantle length (ML) and males from 4.5 to 11.5 cm ML. There were few small-sized octopuses (<7 cm ML) in the samples, which might indicate that these individuals inhabit rocky grounds that are not accessible to trawlers or waters deeper than the maximum depth sampled (800 m). The species occurred more frequently around the Balearic Islands than along the Iberian Peninsula as they appeared in 20% and 7%, respectively, of the hauls in these areas. The octopus inhabits the lower continental shelf and upper slope in both areas, primarily between 200 and 500 m depth. Modal lengths were followed from autumn, when recruits were caught by trawlers, to summer, when reproduction took place. Females grew from 8 to 10 cm ML from winter to spring, but this modal size did not increase further in summer; males grew from 7 to 9 cm ML from winter to spring. The total disappearance of large individuals after summer suggests a life cycle lasting a single year. The evolution of the monthly mean sizes showed that the growth was best described by log-linear functions in both sexes. The length at first maturity was clearly higher in females (12 cm ML) than in males (8 cm ML). A total of 30 different prey items, belonging to four major taxonomic groups (crustaceans, osteichthyes, cephalopods and gastropods), were identified in the stomach contents. The diet of the octopus was based on crustaceans and teleosts, which accounted for 75% and 23% of the prey items, respectively. Cephalopods and gastropods were accessory prey as they only represented 1.6% and 0.7%, respectively, of the total. The octopus showed a marked preference for the benthic fish Symphurus nigrescens and the endobenthic crustacean Alpheus glaber. The bathymetric distribution of P. tetracirrhus coincides with those of these two main prey, which suggests that the distribution of the octopus might be strongly linked to its trophic resources.

  17. Multi-species generalist predation on the stochastic harvested clam Tivela mactroides (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Fernandez, Wellington S.; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flavia B.; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down control is an important force modulating the abundance of prey and structuring marine communities. The harvested trigonal clam Tivela mactroides is hypothesized to be part of the diet of a variety of marine organisms, with its stock influencing predator abundance and being influenced by them. Here we analyzed the diet of potential predators of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay, northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil, to identify the main consumers of this marine resource, and also to address the importance of this clam in the diet of each predator. Samples were taken year-round by trawls; all specimens collected were identified and measured and the food items identified and quantified. Twenty-one species consumed T. mactroides, whose importance in the diet varied greatly in both the volume ingested and the frequency of occurrence (pompano Trachinotus carolinus > blue crab Callinectes danae > starfish Astropecten marginatus). Top-down influence on T. mactroides was also dependent on the abundance of consumers (yellow catfish Cathorops spixii > rake stardrum Stellifer rastrifer > barred grunt Conodon nobilis > A. marginatus). Considering the mean volume ingested, the frequency of occurrence of T. mactroides in the diet, and the relative abundance of consumers, the predators that most influenced T. mactroides were T. carolinus, A. marginatus, and C. danae, in decreasing order. Large numbers of small-sized individuals of T. mactroides (<10 mm) were generally preyed upon by A. marginatus, which may have a stronger effect on clam abundance in comparison to C. danae and T. carolinus, which preyed upon larger clams. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that predators' consumption of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay can influence its stocks, mainly due to the type and/or abundance of predator species, the volume and number of individuals of T. mactroides preyed upon, and the temporal variations in the abundance of predators.

  18. A new Middle Miocene Niveria Jousseaume, 1884 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Trivioidea) from Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehse, Dirk

    2011-02-01

    A new species of Niveria from the Middle Miocene (Badenian) of the Paratethys of Borsodbóta, Hungary is described. This species is characterized by its callused dorsum and dorsal depression. Niveria jozefgregoi sp. nov. is discussed with comparative species from the Badenian of Hungary, the Pliocene of the Mediterranean region, Florida and Recent species from Madeira and the Islas Galápagos.

  19. Submarine canyons as the preferred habitat for wood-boring species of Xylophaga (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, C.; Voight, J. R.; Company, J. B.; Plyuscheva, M.; Martin, D.

    2013-11-01

    Submarine canyons are often viewed as natural “debris concentrators” on the seafloor. Organic substrates may be more abundant inside than outside canyon walls. To determine the effects of the presence these substrates in the Blanes submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) and its adjacent western open slope, we deployed wood to study colonizing organisms. Three replicate pine and oak cubes (i.e. most common trees inland) were moored at 900, 1200, 1500 and 1800 m depth and collected after 3, 9 and 12 months. Wood from inside the canyon was significantly more heavily colonized by the five morphotypes of wood-boring bivalves than was wood on the adjacent open slope. Xylophaga sp. A dominated all wood types and locations, with peak abundance at 900 and 1200 m depth. Its growth rate was highest (0.070 mm d-1) during the first three months and was faster (or it recruits earlier) in pine than in oak. Size distribution showed that several recruitment events may have occurred from summer to winter. Xylophaga sp. B, appeared first after 9 months and clearly preferred pine over oak. As the immersion time was the same, this strongly supported a specific association between recruiters and type of substrate. Three morphotypes, pooled as Xylophaga spp. C, were rare and seemed to colonize preferentially oak inside the canyon and pine in the adjacent open slope. Individuals of Xylophaga were more abundant inside the canyon than in nearby off-canyon locations. Blanes Canyon may serve as a long-term concentrator of land-derived vegetal fragments and as a consequence sustain more animals. Are the species richness and abundance of wood-boring bivalves higher inside the canyon than on the adjacent open slope? Do the composition and density of the wood-boring bivalves change with deployment time and depth, as well as on the type of the sunken wood? What is the growth rate of the dominant wood-boring species?

  20. The Vermetidae of the Gulf of Kachchh, western coast of India (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Joshi, Devanshi MukundRay; Mankodi, Pradeep C

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are often termed underwater wonderlands due to the presence of an incredible biodiversity including numerous invertebrates and vertebrates. Among the dense population of benthic and bottom-dwelling inhabitants of the reef, many significant species remain hidden or neglected by researchers. One such example is the vermetids, a unique group of marine gastropods. The present study attempts for the first time to assess the density and identify preferred reef substrates in the Gulf of Kachchh, state of Gujarat, on the western coast of India. A total of three species of the family Vermetidae were recorded during the study and their substrate preferences identified. PMID:26877684

  1. Vestigial phragmocone in the gladius points to a deepwater origin of squid (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.; Bizikov, Vyacheslav A.; Fuchs, Dirk

    2012-03-01

    The microstructure of the gladius cone was investigated in six species of nektonic squid: shallow-water Loligo gahi (Loliginidae), pelagic eurybathic Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), and deepwater Onykia ingens (Onychoteuthidae) and Gonatus antarcticus (Gonatidae) using state-of-the-art microscopy. Apart from L. gahi, all other species had septa-like layers in the gladius cone, which for the first time were investigated in detail and compared with those in extinct Cretaceous belemnites Hibolithes sp. and Pachyteuthis sp., and spirulid Cyrtobelus sp. It was found that the organic layers of the gladius cone in recent squid can be homologized with the organic components of the shell in fossil phragmocone-bearing coleoids. The septa-like layers in modern gladius cones therefore represent a vestigial phragmocone composed of organic septal rudiments of the ancestral phragmocone that has lost the siphuncle and gas-filled chambers. The well-developed rostrum in onychoteuthids and small rostrum of the gladius in ommastrephids and gonatids can be seen as homologous with the belemnoid rostrum, which may indicate a close phylogenetic relationship between belemnites and at least some squid. Possible evolutionary pathways of the reduction of the functional phragmocone in squid ancestors are discussed. Several features such as the loss of shell calcification, deep water speciation, and the structure of the equilibrium organ point to a deep-water origin of squids.

  2. Rich and rare—First insights into species diversity and abundance of Antarctic abyssal Gastropoda (Mollusca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Enrico; Michael Bohn, Jens; Engl, Winfried; Linse, Katrin; Schrödl, Michael

    2007-08-01

    The abyssal depths of the polar oceans are thought to be low in diversity compared with the shallower polar shelves and temperate and tropical deep-sea basins. Our recent study on the gastropod fauna of the deep Southern Ocean gives evidence of the existence of a rich gastropod assemblage at abyssal depths. During the ANDEEP I and II expeditions to the southern Drake Passage, Northwestern Weddell Sea, and South Sandwich Trench, gastropods were collected by bottom and Agassiz trawls, epibenthic sledge, and multicorer, at 40 stations in depths between 127 and 5194 m. On the whole, 473 specimens, corresponding to 93 species of 36 families, were obtained. Of those, 414 specimens were caught below 750 m depth and refer to 84 (90%) benthic species of 32 (89%) families. Most families were represented by a single species only. The numerically dominant families were Skeneidae and Buccinidae (with 10 and 11 species, respectively), Eulimidae and Trochidae (with 9 species each), and Turridae (6 species). Thirty-Seven benthic deep-sea species (44%) were represented by a single specimen, and another 20 species (24%) were found at a single station, suggesting that more than two thirds of Antarctic deep-sea gastropod species are very rare or have a very scattered distribution. Of the 27 species occurring at two or more deep-sea stations, 14 were collected with different gear. Approximately half of the deep-water species are new to science or have been recently described. The present investigation increases the total number of recorded benthic Antarctic deep-sea gastropods (below 750 m) from 115 to 177. The previously known depth ranges have been extended, often considerably, for 31 species. The collected deep-sea gastropods comprise both eurybathic shelf species (29%) and apparently true deep-sea species (58%); some of the latter may belong to a so far unknown Antarctic abyssal fauna. Geographical ranges of the collected Antarctic benthic deep-sea gastropod species appear limited, and all these 84 species seem endemic to Antarctica south of the Polar Front. Comparing diversity and abundances based on epibenthic sledge samples, there is no clear relationship between Antarctic deep-sea gastropod abundance and species richness with depth. However, both Antarctic and adjacent deep-sea areas are still far from being adequately sampled to allow more comprehensive conclusions.

  3. Quantification of midkine gene expression in Patella caerulea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) exposed to cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillitano, Francesca; Mugelli, Alessandro; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Vanucci, Silvana

    2007-10-01

    The release of cadmium into many coastal areas represents a threat to ecosystems and human health; cadmium is carcinogenic in mammals and in both marine invertebrates and vertebrates. The use of molluscs to assess the ecologic risk associated with contaminants is strongly recommended on account of their ecological role and on their highly conserved control and regulatory pathways that are often homologous to vertebrate systems. We previously identified a midkine family protein in the limpet Patella caerulea; the midkine is a recently discovered cytokines family with unequivocal informative value on repairing injury and neoplastic processes in mammals. Here we report on midkine ( mdk) and α-tubulin ( α-tub) gene expression patterns in P. caerulea exposed to cadmium. Limpets, collected on two occasions from a breakwater at a marina (Tyrrhenian Sea) were exposed to sublethal cadmium concentrations (0.5 and 1 mg l -1 Cd) over a 10-day exposure period. RNA was extracted from the viscera of unexposed and exposed specimens. Real time TaqMan RT-PCR was performed to measure the relative mdk and α-tub gene expression levels. A remarkable mdk over-expression was observed in all exposed animals with respect to unexposed ones; mdk over-expression was significantly higher in both treatments when compared with un-treatment (mean expression levels: 23- and 38-fold, for 0.5 and 1 mg l -1 Cd treatment, respectively; ANOVA, for both P < 0.01). The study also indicates that the mdk up-regulation was significantly Cd-concentration dependent ( P < 0.05). A significant up-regulation of the constitutive α-tub gene was also observed in 1 mg l -1 Cd-treated animals (mean expression level: 4-fold; ANOVA, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence paving the way for the use of the midkine as a promising new biomarker of effect in the environment risk assessment policy.

  4. Random walk, zonation and the food searching strategy of Terebralia palustris (Mollusca, Potamididae) in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannini, Marco; Cannicci, Stefano; Mrabu, Elisha; Rorandelli, Rocco; Fratini, Sara

    2008-12-01

    Terebralia palustris is a common mud-whelk present at a particularly high density in all Indo-West Pacific mangroves. Young snails feed on nothing but mud while larger specimens are able to feed on fallen leaves too. In Kenya (Mida Creek) under the canopy, competition for mangrove leaves can be very high due to the high density of Sesarmidae crabs. On open exposed muddy platforms, no Sesarmidae occur but the leaf density is very low because the leaves are only randomly present as they are deposited and removed twice a day by the tide. However, the snail density is always very high, raising the question as to whether the snails use a special searching strategy to optimize their resource finding rather than a purely random movement. By analyzing the snails' movements on a uniform area at different levels and comparing them with simulated random paths, we could show that the snails' movements are not purely random. The distribution of different size classes of T. palustris in Mida Creek was known to be quite odd: the same simulation approach suggests that the zonation asymmetry could reasonably be due to the stochastic recruitment of juveniles in space and time and maintained by a substantial long-lasting spatial inertia.

  5. Mitochondrial genome of the endangered marine gastropod Strombus gigas Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Edna J; Castro, Erick R; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-03-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas is an endangered marine gastropod of significant economic importance across the Greater Caribbean region. This work reports for the first time the complete mitochondrial genome of S. gigas, obtained by FLX 454 pyrosequencing. The mtDNA genome encodes for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. In addition, the coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to other previously reported mitogenomes of gastropods. PMID:25186797

  6. Spermatozoa and spermatogenesis in the northern quahaug Mercenaria mercenaria (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xue-Ping; Yang, Wan-Xi; Dahms, Hans-U.; Lin, Zhihua; Chai, Xueliang

    2008-12-01

    We studied the ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and spermatozoa in the northern quahaug, the clam Mercenaria mercenaria. Spermatogenetic cells gradually elongate. Mitochondria gradually fuse and increase in size and electron density. During spermatid differentiation, proacrosomal vesicles migrate towards the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus and eventually form the acrosome. The spermatozoon of M. mercenaria is of a primitive type. It is composed of head, mid-piece, and tail. The acrosome shows a subacrosomal space with a short conical contour. The slightly curved nucleus of the spermatozoon contains fine-grained dense chromatin. The middle piece consists of a centriolar complex which is surrounded by four mitochondria. The flagellum has a standard “9 + 2” microtubular structure. The ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermatogenesis of M. mercenaria shares a number of features with other species of the family Veneridae. M. mercenaria may be a suitable model species for further investigations into the mechanisms of spermatogenesis in the Bivalvia.

  7. Freshwater bivalve mollusca (unionidae, sphaeriidae, corbiculidae) of the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.C.; Fuller, S.L.H.

    1980-11-01

    A guide to freshwater bivalve molluscs found at the Savannah River Plant is presented. A dichotomous taxonomic key is provided to common forms and to unreported species whose geographic distributions include nearby localities. Discussions of ecology, life history, larval hosts, and other pertinent information is provided. (ACR)

  8. Evaluation of Freshwater Mussel (Mollusca: Unionoidea) Fitness Pre- and Post- Relocation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, H. E.; Farris, J. L.; Christian, A. D.

    2005-05-01

    Freshwater mussels are often displaced by human activities. Construction of bridges that offer potential impact to large numbers mussels often results in a relocation strategy to minimize loss. While this may reduce mortality, the metabolic consequences of relocation have not been evaluated. In this study we measured glycogen and lipid concentrations and RNA to DNA ratios to determine fitness impairments on relocated mussels. We hypothesize that organisms subjected to continuous stress should first use stored glycogen, followed by growth cessation measured as a reduction of RNA in relation to the DNA present, and finally a mobilization of tissue lipids, measured as a decrease in tissue lipid concentrations. We collected mantle snips from three surrogate species of mussels from four sites on the White River in eastern Arkansas during late summer, to establish expected glycogen, lipid, and RNA:DNA levels. Mean tissue lipids concentrations (μg/g) were 63.09, 67.96, and 50.46 for Quadrula quadrula, Q. pustulosa and Obliquaria reflexa, respectively. Mean tissue glycogen concentrations (μg/g) were 346.66, 592.26, and 336.58 for Q. quadrula, Q. pustulosa, and O. reflexa, respectively. This study can provide response information on relocated individuals as well as provide estimation of sufficient time required for mussel adaptation to novel environments.

  9. Phylogeny and evolution of ontogeny of the family Oxytomidae Ichikawa, 1958 (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutikov, O. A.; Temkin, I. E.; Shurygin, B. N.

    2010-08-01

    We described ontogenies and reconstructed morphogeneses of hinges in some supraspecific taxa of the bivalve family Oxytomidae Ichikawa, 1958 from the Mesozoic of Russia. The phylogeny of the family is reconstructed using evolutionary and cladistic methods. The appearance of the endemic genus Arctotis Bodylevsky, 1960 in the epicontinental seas of Siberia can be explained in terms of gradual transformations of the ligament and byssal apparatus in the Northern Siberian members of Praemeleagrinella Lutikov et Shurygin, 2009 and Praearctotis Lutikov et Shurygin, 2009.

  10. Recovery of the biogenic nest habitat of Limaria hians (Mollusca: Limacea) following anthropogenic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Colin; Moore, Colin G.

    2009-04-01

    The rate of regrowth of Limaria hians nest material, following a simulated dredging impact, was examined on an extensive L. hians bed off the west coast of Scotland. Within an area of complete coverage of the sea bed by a turf of L. hians nest material, the turf was cleared by diver from 10 × 0.25 m 2 plots and the sediment subsequently raked to simulate the passage of a scallop dredge. The areal extent and pattern of nest regrowth were recorded after 6 and 12 months. Control plots showed no significant change in 100% nest cover over the year. In the treated plots regrowth generally occurred from extension of peripheral nest material. Over the initial 6 autumn and winter months treatment plots displayed a mean regrowth of 9.2% of the cleared area, increasing to 15% in the second 6-month spring and summer period. However, no significant difference in growth was found between these periods. After 12 months half the treatment plots exhibited <25% nest cover and none of them contained nest of a thickness comparable to the surrounding bed. Conversion of regrowth rates within the treated plots to the rate of nest advance along a linear front, gave a value of 3.2 cm per year, highlighting the susceptibility of this species-rich biotope to scallop dredging.

  11. Body condition and gametogenic cycle of Galatea paradoxa (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the Volta River estuary, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei-Boateng, D.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    The reproductive cycle of Galatea paradoxa which is the basis for an artisanal fishery in the Volta River estuary, Ghana, was studied using condition indices and histological methods from March 2008 to July 2009. The cycle is annual with a single spawning event between June and October. Gametogenesis starts in November progressing steadily to a peak in June-July when spawning begins until October when the animal is spent. The condition indices (shell-free wet weight/total wet weight, ash-free dry weight/shell weight and gonad wet weight/shell weight) showed a clear relationship with the gametogenic stage rising from a minimum at stage (I) start of gametogenesis, to their highest values at stages (IIIA) ripe and (IIIB) start of spawning before declining significantly to stage (IV) spent.It is suggested that condition index may prove a valuable technique in fishery management to recognise the reproductive stages of G. paradoxa as it is less expensive and time consuming than histological techniques in addition to being easier to teach to non-specialists. The data presented in this study provide information on the timing of spawning events for G. paradoxa, which is necessary for developing sustainable management strategies and selection of broodstock for aquaculture.

  12. A study of the type series of Nautilus pompilius Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca, Cephalopoda, Nautilida).

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana V

    2015-01-01

    Few animals are treasured by zoologists more than Nautilus, and Nautilus pompilius Linnaeus, 1758, the type species of the genus, in particular. However, the type series of this species has not been studied in great detail. According to the rules of zoological nomenclature the type series consists of all the specimens included by the author in the new nominal taxon at the time of description (whether directly or by bibliographic reference), and any evidence, published or unpublished, may be taken into account to determine what specimens are included. The type series of Nautilus pompilius includes specimens in the Linnean Society of London, the University Museum in Uppsala, and specimens figured by pre-Linnaean authors indicated by reference by Linnaeus (1758). One specimen in London and four specimens in Uppsala, which are still extant, are likely to have been known to Linnaeus at the time when he prepared the 10th Edition of Systema Naturae (Linnaeus 1758), although none of these specimens was specifically mentioned by him. Even though it is widely believed that Linnaeus (1767) designated as lectotype a specimen figured by Rumphius (1705) in his D'Amboinsche Rariteitkamer, referred to in the Systema Naturae, this presumed lectotypification is not valid because Linnaeus did not explicitly indicate that any particular specimen was considered to be the type of the species. Later lectotype designations of Rumphius' illustrations are invalid because they show three different specimens. It seems that the best approach, given the quality of the material and the lack of clarity as to its type status, would be to apply to the ICZN asking to set aside all previous type fixations and designate a neotype, preferably a DNA sequenced specimen of known provenance. PMID:26249392

  13. Neuromuscular development in Patellogastropoda (Mollusca: Gastropoda) and its importance for reconstructing ancestral gastropod bodyplan features

    PubMed Central

    Kristof, Alen; de Oliveira, André Luiz; Kolbin, Konstantin G.; Wanninger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Within Gastropoda, limpets (Patellogastropoda) are considered the most basal branching taxon and its representatives are thus crucial for research into evolutionary questions. Here, we describe the development of the neuromuscular system in Lottia cf. kogamogai. In trochophore larvae, first serotonin-like immunoreactivity (lir) appears in the apical organ and in the prototroch nerve ring. The arrangement and number of serotonin-lir cells in the apical organ (three flask-shaped, two round cells) are strikingly similar to those in putatively derived gastropods. First, FMRFamide-lir appears in veliger larvae in the Anlagen of the future adult nervous system including the cerebral and pedal ganglia. As in other gastropods, the larvae of this limpet show one main and one accessory retractor as well as a pedal retractor and a prototroch muscle ring. Of these, only the pedal retractor persists until after metamorphosis and is part of the adult shell musculature. We found a hitherto undescribed, paired muscle that inserts at the base of the foot and runs towards the base of the tentacles. An apical organ with flask-shaped cells, one main and one accessory retractor muscle is commonly found among gastropod larvae and thus might have been part of the last common ancestor. PMID:26869747

  14. Using DNA barcoding to differentiate invasive Dreissenaspecies (Mollusca, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Marescaux, Jonathan; Van Doninck, Karine

    2013-12-30

    The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and the quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) are considered as the most competitive invaders in freshwaters of Europe and North America. Although shell characteristics exist to differentiate both species, phenotypic plasticity in the genus Dreissena does not always allow a clear identification. Therefore, the need to find an accurate identification method is essential. DNA barcoding has been proven to be an adequate procedure to discriminate species. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mitochondrial gene (COI) is considered as the standard barcode for animals. We tested the use of this gene as an efficient DNA barcode and found that it allow rapid and accurate identification of adult Dreissena individuals. PMID:24453560

  15. Effects of salinity on biomarker responses in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) exposed to diesel oil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Angela Zaccaron; Zanette, Juliano; Fernando Ferreira, Jaime; Guzenski, Joo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2005-11-01

    Crassostrea rhizophorae is a euryhaline oyster that inhabits mangrove areas, which are widely distributed along the Brazilian coast. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of salinity (9, 15, 25, and 35ppt) on the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), catalase (CAT), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the digestive gland of this species after exposure to diesel oil for 7 days at nominal concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 1mlL(-1) and after depuration for 24h and 7 days. GST activity increased in a diesel oil concentration-dependent manner at salinities 25 and 15ppt and remained slightly elevated even after depuration periods of 24h and 7 days. No changes were observed in the activities of G6PDH, CAT, and AChE in the oysters exposed to diesel and depurated. Based on these results, GST activity in the digestive gland of C. rhizophorae might be used as a biomarker of exposure to diesel oil in sites where the salinity is between 15 and 25ppt, values usually observed in mangrove ecosystems. PMID:16216631

  16. From sea to land and beyond New insights into the evolution of euthyneuran Gastropoda (Mollusca)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The Euthyneura are considered to be the most successful and diverse group of Gastropoda. Phylogenetically, they are riven with controversy. Previous morphology-based phylogenetic studies have been greatly hampered by rampant parallelism in morphological characters or by incomplete taxon sampling. Based on sequences of nuclear 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA as well as mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI DNA from 56 taxa, we reconstructed the phylogeny of Euthyneura utilising Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. The evolution of colonization of freshwater and terrestrial habitats by pulmonate Euthyneura, considered crucial in the evolution of this group of Gastropoda, is reconstructed with Bayesian approaches. Results We found several well supported clades within Euthyneura, however, we could not confirm the traditional classification, since Pulmonata are paraphyletic and Opistobranchia are either polyphyletic or paraphyletic with several clades clearly distinguishable. Sacoglossa appear separately from the rest of the Opisthobranchia as sister taxon to basal Pulmonata. Within Pulmonata, Basommatophora are paraphyletic and Hygrophila and Eupulmonata form monophyletic clades. Pyramidelloidea are placed within Euthyneura rendering the Euthyneura paraphyletic. Conclusion Based on the current phylogeny, it can be proposed for the first time that invasion of freshwater by Pulmonata is a unique evolutionary event and has taken place directly from the marine environment via an aquatic pathway. The origin of colonisation of terrestrial habitats is seeded in marginal zones and has probably occurred via estuaries or semi-terrestrial habitats such as mangroves. PMID:18294406

  17. Late Paleozoic subulitacea (mollusca:gastropoda), mass extinctions and the replacement of evolutionary faunas

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Mesogastropod subulitaceans possess characteristics typical of active carnivores and occupied a trophic regime typical of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolutionary fauna. Despite occupying a vacant niche, subulitaceans are low in both diversity and abundance in late Paleozoic gastropod faunas. In addition, Paleozoic Archaeogastropoda and Mesogastropoda are taxonomically and functionally distinct from Mesozoic groups and display diversity dynamics typical of the Paleozoic evolutionary fauna, not the Mesozoic-Cenozoic fauna with which they were grouped by Sepkoski. Late Paleozoic gastropods are different from pre-Carboniferous taxa, but there is no preferential expansion of the major Mesozoic taxa, nor is there any pattern of exploitation of a major niche utilized by later groups but under-used by Paleozoic taxa. The high taxonomic level used Sepkoski's factor analysis neglects the finer scale of replacement and diversification. This distinct evolutionary behavior of Paleozoic gastropods may be typical of other taxa as well. It weakens the assertions of Kitchell and Carr and Sepkoksi and Miller that the replacement of evolutionary Fauna II by Fauna III began in the late Paleozoic and would have occurred even without the Guadelupian-Dzulfian mass extinction. Thus for gastropods at last, the Late Permian mass extinction did not merely speed up on ongoing process, but probably determined the evolutionary outcome.

  18. Size-differential feeding in Pinna nobilis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia): Exploitation of detritus, phytoplankton and zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, John; Ezgeta-Balić, Daria; Peharda, Melita; Skejić, Sanda; Ninčević-Gladan, Živana; Matijević, Slavica

    2011-04-01

    The endangered fan shell Pinna nobilis is a large bivalve mollusc (<120 cm shell length) endemic to the Mediterranean that lives one-third buried in soft substrata, generally in shallow coastal waters. We hypothesised that P. nobilis of different sizes would ingest different food sources, because small fan shells will inhale material from closer to the substratum than do large fan shells. We studied stomach contents and faeces of 18 fan shells, 6 small (mean 23.0 cm length), 6 medium-sized (mean 41.5 cm length) and 6 large (mean 62.7 cm length) living in a small area of a low-energy coastal detritic bottom characterised by mud, sand and macroalgae at Mali Ston Bay, Croatia. We found that all P. nobilis ingested copious quantities of undetermined detritus (probably at least 95% of ingested material), phytoplankton, micro and mesozooplankton and pollen grains. Large P. nobilis stomach contents showed a preponderance of water column calanoid copepods, while small fan shells had higher numbers of bivalve larvae. All fan shells took in high numbers of harpacticoid copepods that are benthonic, feeding on microbial communities of detritus and benthic vegetation. There was also a significant selection of phytoplankton species, some apparently occurring between inhalation and ingestion. The stomach contents of small P. nobilis had a higher organic matter content than either medium-sized or large fan shells; this indicated that small fan shells ingested detritus of higher organic content than did larger P. nobilis. As the faeces of all P. nobilis had similar organic matter content, this also indicates higher assimilation efficiencies in small fan shells. The demonstration of differential dietary selectivity by different sized animals has implications for future trophic studies of this endangered species. This study also provides the first demonstration of predation on zooplankton by P. nobilis.

  19. The cephalic sensory organ in veliger larvae of pulmonates (Gastropoda: Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Schaefer, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    The apical area of larvae of four primitive pulmonate species was investigated by means of serial ultrathin and light microscope sections. Cephalic sensory organs (CSOs) were found in the larvae of Onchidium cf. branchiferum (Onchidiidae) and Laemodonta octanfracta (Ellobiidae), while no trace of the organ was present in the larvae of Ovatella myosotis (Ellobiidae) or Williamia radiata (Siphonariidae). TEM investigation revealed very similar CSOs in O. cf. branchiferum and L. octanfracta, with characteristic putative sensory cell types: ampullary cells with an internal ampulla containing densely packed cilia, para-ampullary cells with external cilia parallel to the surface, and ciliary tuft cells, bearing short ciliary tufts. The epithelium covering the organ has a thick microvillar border with microvilli laterally bearing a pair of electron-dense accumulations and a glycocalyx with interspersed flat plaque-like elements. While homologues of all major elements of the CSO can be found in other gastropod taxa, for example caenogastropods and opisthobranchs, the homology of the ampullary cell with similar cells in nongastropods appears unlikely. The CSO of L. octanfracta is associated with an additional structure, an epithelial external protrusion, lying ventral to the CSO. The absence of the organ in W. radiata weakens hypotheses on the organ's function of examining settlement conditions and velar control. PMID:11746470

  20. Structure and formation of the unusual sperm of Patelloida latistrigata (Mollusca : Patellogastropoda): implications for fertilization biology.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Alan N; Hodgson, Valerie; Eckelbarger, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    The structure of the spermatozoa and spermatogenesis of the lottiid limpet Patelloida latistrigata is described by transmission electron microscopy. Although the lengths of the spermatozoa (about 60 ?m) and their head region (about 12 ?m) are similar to those of other patellogastropods, the structure of the sperm head and midpiece are very different. The head consists of an unusually large acrosome (about 11-?m long) with a broad posterior invagination that houses the relatively small nucleus. The midpiece mitochondria, which are rather elongate with large folded tubular cristae, are housed in a cytoplasmic sheath posterior to the nucleus. The proximal centriole is unusually elongate (about 2-?m long). The axoneme that emerges from the distal centriole is surrounded anteriorly by the cytoplasmic sheath in which the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane has electron-dense material. The flagellum is enlarged at its terminal end. Spermatogenesis is similar to that described for other patellogastropods. Patelloida latistrigata, therefore, has spermatozoa that seem to meet the morphological criteria of ent-aquasperm, which raises the question of whether fertilization is truly external in this limpet. However, it is also possible that the modifications to the sperm are linked to unknown specializations of the egg or egg envelope. PMID:22589402

  1. Spatial distribution and home-range of the pest slug Arion lusitanicus (Mollusca: Pulmonata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Brigitte; Paill, Wolfgang

    2001-08-01

    The density and distribution of egg-batches, juveniles and adult Arion lusitanicus, as well as individual home-ranges, were investigated over two seasons. The study was performed on grassland which was mown twice a year and received no herbicides or pesticides, with neighbouring field and stream-side vegetation. Female-mature slugs preferred restricted areas closely neighbouring the taller vegetation of the stream-side vegetation and field, but less-favourable parts of the site were also inhabited in the second year when population densities increased and weather conditions were more favourable. It was postulated that slugs could have home-ranges, as homing behaviour is a well-known phenomenon. The application of a long-lasting individual marking technique enabled calculations of home-ranges (convex polygons) for slugs for the first time. Home-range size averaged 45.4 m 2 when the population density was low in 1995, and was found to be negatively correlated with density, as it decreased to 12.4 m 2 in 1996, when population density was high. Mating sites were found to be distinctly closer to the geometric centres of activity than the sites used for egg-deposition. Egg-batches were aggregated under the shelter traps (50 50 cm squares of hardboard covered with polystyrene) and the pattern of distribution of egg-batches persisted in the young hatchlings. A number of foreign A. lusitanicus were introduced into the unfavourable centre of the site, and by two to four weeks after release their distribution exactly resembled that of the local ones. In all the various aspects of behaviour investigated, large individual differences were found, suggesting a great plasticity in this generalist species. The importance of the species' dispersal capacity in relation to general ecological and applied aspects of control is discussed in the context of the present findings.

  2. Dynamics and ecology of an Indo-Pacific conch, Conomurex persicus (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in southeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Erhan; Ergev, Mehmet Betil

    2006-03-01

    Conomurex persicus, one of the tropical conchs, has been introduced to one of the subtropical regions, the northeastern Mediterranean Sea, and invaded sandy bottoms between 1 and 10 m deep. Population dynamics were studied from specimens collected with a standard dredge (60 x 15 cm mouth opening, 0.5 x 0.5 cm eye opening of net). Samples of C persicus were collected monthly along the 5 and 10 m depth contours off Erdemli, Mersin, Turkey, in February and May 2000. Intra-annual density depended on salinity levels, while inter-annual density was correlated with bottom water temperature. Specimens underwent spring emergences and winter burial and sheltering (disappearance). Emergence took place in March when temperatures rose and the disappearance occurred in October-November when temperatures dropped. Adults live at 10 m, juveniles are recruited at a 5 m depth. Recruitment began in April and continued for the next 6 months. In contrast to shell width or shell lip thickness, shell length was not a convenient index for estimation of growth parameters. Annual production and mortality were calculated to be 7.86 g m(-2) and 3.80 g m(-2), respectively, in April-November. PMID:18457181

  3. Mixed populations of Bulinus senegalensis (Muller) and Bulinus forskali (Ehrenburg) (Mollusca: Planorbidae) in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Goll, P H

    1981-01-01

    A brief survey of alluvial pools and irrigated ricefields in The Gambia shows that the distribution of Bulinus senegalensis is not confined to laterite pools and is similar to that in neighbouring Senegal. B. senegalensis was found in every site at least once, alone or with B. forskali. The proportion of the two species varies during the season and from year to year. It is no longer necessary to consider B. forskali as a natural host of S. haematobium. PMID:7324134

  4. Distribution of Lymnaeidae (Mollusca: Pulmonata), intermediate snail hosts of Fasciola hepatica in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pointier, J P; Noya, O; Alarcn de Noya, B; Thron, A

    2009-08-01

    An extensive malacological survey was carried out between 2005-2009 in order to clarify the exact number of lymnaeid species which may be intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica in Venezuela. Four species were discovered during this survey, including two local species: Lymnaea cubensis and Lymnaea cousini and two exotic species: Lymnaea truncatula and Lymnaea columella. The most common local species was L. cubensis which was found at 16 out of the 298 sampling sites. This species has a large distribution area throughout the Northern part of Venezuela and was encountered from sea level to an altitude of 1,802 m in state of Trujillo. The second local species L. cousini was collected at only two sites of the Andean Region at altitudes of 3,550 m and 4,040 m, respectively. The European L. truncatula was found at 24 sites all located in the states of Mrida and Tchira at an altitude varying between 1,540-4,000 m. The respective distribution areas of L. cubensis and L. truncatula do not appear to overlap, but more detailed malacological surveys are needed. The fourth lymnaeid species, L. columella was collected in a canal from Mrida at an altitude of 1,929 m and in an irrigation canal from the state of Gurico, at an altitude of 63 m. The role of these four lymnaeid species in the transmission of fascioliasis in Venezuela is discussed. PMID:19820844

  5. Ultrastructure developments during spermiogenesis in Polydora ciliata (Annelida: Spionidae), a parasite of mollusca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Libin; Qiu, Tianlong; Xue, Dongxiu; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-12-01

    Spionid worms of Polydora ciliata inhabit the shells of many commercially important bivalves and cause disease in molluscan aquaculture. Their sperm structure is closely related to their fertilization method. To give an insight into the sperm structure and spermatogenesis, ultrastructure details of the subcellular components of germ cells during spermiogenesis of Polydora ciliata are detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In P. ciliata, during spermiogenesis, chromatin is regularly arranged as dense fibrils and becomes more condensed when the nucleus elongates. Microtubules do not surround the nucleus during its elongation. The Golgi phase is characterized by the formation of proacrosomal granules within the Golgi apparatus. The proacrosomal granules fuse to form a single, spherical acrosomal vesicle that migrates to the anterior pole of the cell. At the time of nuclear condensation, mitochondria become reduced in number but increased in size, causing deep indentation at the base of the nucleus. The mid-piece has a few mitochondria. The cap phase includes the spreading of the acrosomal granule over the surface of the nucleus of the differentiating spermatid. The acrosomal phase of spermiogenesis is typically associated with changes in the shape of the nucleus, acrosome and tail. The relationship of sperm ultrastructure to spermiogenesis in spionidae species was discussed.

  6. The Vermetidae of the Gulf of Kachchh, western coast of India (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Devanshi MukundRay; Mankodi, Pradeep C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coral reefs are often termed underwater wonderlands due to the presence of an incredible biodiversity including numerous invertebrates and vertebrates. Among the dense population of benthic and bottom-dwelling inhabitants of the reef, many significant species remain hidden or neglected by researchers. One such example is the vermetids, a unique group of marine gastropods. The present study attempts for the first time to assess the density and identify preferred reef substrates in the Gulf of Kachchh, state of Gujarat, on the western coast of India. A total of three species of the family Vermetidae were recorded during the study and their substrate preferences identified. PMID:26877684

  7. Clarifying phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of the bivalve order Arcida (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia).

    PubMed

    Combosch, David J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The systematics of the bivalve order Arcida constitutes an unresolved conundrum in bivalve systematics. The current definition of Arcida encompasses two superfamilies: Limopsoidea, which includes the recent families Philobryidae and Limopsidae, and Arcoidea, which encompasses the families Arcidae, Cucullaeidae, Noetiidae, Glycymerididae and Parallelodontidae. This classification, however, is controversial particularly with respect to the position and taxonomic status of Glycymerididae. Previous molecular phylogenies were limited either by the use of only a single molecular marker or by including only a few limopsoid and glycymeridid taxa. The challenging nature of Arcida taxonomy and the controversial results of some of the previous studies, prompted us to use a broad range of taxa (55 species), three nuclear markers (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and histone H3) and a wide range of algorithmic approaches. This broad but stringent approach led to a number of results that differ significantly from previous studies. We provide the first molecular evidence that supports the separation of Arcoidea from Limopsoidea, although the exact position of Glycymerididae remains unresolved, and the monophyly of Limopsoidea is algorithm-dependent. In addition, we present the first time-calibrated evolutionary tree of Arcida relationships, indicating a significant increase in the diversification of arcidan lineages at the beginning of the Cretaceous, around 140Ma. The monophyly of Arcida, which has been supported previously, was confirmed in all our analyses. Although relationships among families remain somehow unresolved we found support for the monophyly of most arcidan families, at least under some analytical conditions (i.e., Glycymerididae, Noetiidae, Philobryidae, and Limopsidae). However, Arcidae, and particularly Arcinae, remain a major source of inconsistency in the current system of Arcida classification and are in dire need of taxonomic revision. PMID:26427825

  8. Temporal dynamics of amino and fatty acid composition in the razor clam Ensis siliqua (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Narciso, Luis; Marques, António; Bandarra, Narcisa; Rosa, Rui

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the temporal dynamics of both amino acid (AA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in marine bivalves. We investigated the seasonal variation of these compounds in the pod razor clam Ensis siliqua in relation to food availability, salinity, water temperature and reproductive cycle. AA content varied between 46.94 and 54.67 % dry weight (DW), and the AAs found in greater quantity were glutamic acid, glycine and aspartic acid. FA content varied between 34.02 and 87.94 mg g-1 DW and the FAs found in greater quantity were 16:0 and 22:6 n-3. Seasonal trends were observed for AAs and FAs. FAs increased with gametogenesis and decreased with spawning while AA content increased throughout spawning. The effect of increasing temperature and high food availability during the spawning season masked the loss of AAs resulting from gamete release. Still, a comparatively greater increase in the contents of glutamic acid and leucine with spawning indicate their possible involvement in a post-spawning gonad recovery mechanism. A post-spawning decrease in 14:0, 16:0, 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-7 and 18:1 n-9 is indicative of the importance of these FAs in bivalve eggs. An increase in 18:3 n-3, 18:4 n-3, 20:1 n-9 and 20:2 n-6 during gametogenesis suggests their involvement in oocyte maturation. The FA 22:4 n-6, while increasing with spawning, appears to play a role in post-spawning gonad recovery. Salinity did not have an effect on the AA composition. None of the environmental parameters measured had an effect on FA composition.

  9. The continuing debate on deep molluscan phylogeny: evidence for Serialia (Mollusca, Monoplacophora + Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Stger, I; Sigwart, J D; Kano, Y; Knebelsberger, T; Marshall, B A; Schwabe, E; Schrdl, M

    2013-01-01

    Molluscs are a diverse animal phylum with a formidable fossil record. Although there is little doubt about the monophyly of the eight extant classes, relationships between these groups are controversial. We analysed a comprehensive multilocus molecular data set for molluscs, the first to include multiple species from all classes, including five monoplacophorans in both extant families. Our analyses of five markers resolve two major clades: the first includes gastropods and bivalves sister to Serialia (monoplacophorans and chitons), and the second comprises scaphopods sister to aplacophorans and cephalopods. Traditional groupings such as Testaria, Aculifera, and Conchifera are rejected by our data with significant Approximately Unbiased (AU) test values. A new molecular clock indicates that molluscs had a terminal Precambrian origin with rapid divergence of all eight extant classes in the Cambrian. The recovery of Serialia as a derived, Late Cambrian clade is potentially in line with the stratigraphic chronology of morphologically heterogeneous early mollusc fossils. Serialia is in conflict with traditional molluscan classifications and recent phylogenomic data. Yet our hypothesis, as others from molecular data, implies frequent molluscan shell and body transformations by heterochronic shifts in development and multiple convergent adaptations, leading to the variable shells and body plans in extant lineages. PMID:24350268

  10. Molluscicidal activity of some marine substances against the snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Planorbidae).

    PubMed

    Miyasato, P A; Kawano, T; Freitas, J C; Berlinck, R G S; Nakano, E; Tallarico, L F

    2012-05-01

    Freshwater snails of the genus Biomphalaria play a major role as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the etiologic agent of schistosomiasis. While Biomphalaria spp. control by molluscicides is one of the main strategies to reduce the snail population in infected areas, there are few effective molluscicides commercially available. Natural products may be considered as potentially useful and safe molluscicides. We have evaluated the molluscicidal activity of 12 extracts from ten marine organisms on adult and embryonic stages of Biomphalaria glabrata. Only extracts of the red algae Liagora farinosa and of the sponge Amphimedon viridis presented molluscicidal activity. Lethal concentration (LC)(50) values obtained were 120 ?g/mL for L. farinosa CH(2)Cl(2) extract (apolar fraction) and 20 ?g/mL for A. viridis extract and halitoxin. The polar alga fraction and halitoxin had no effect on B. glabrata embryos. The algae apolar fraction was active on B. glabrata in all embryonic development stages, with LC(50) values for blastulae at 42 ?g/mL, gastrulae at 124 ?g/mL, trochophore at 180 ?g/mL, and veliger at 222 ?g/mL. This is the first report of extracts from marine organisms which presented molluscicidal activity. PMID:22205347

  11. Neuroimagen en la enfermedad de Alzheimer: nuevas perspectivas

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Introducción y desarrollo En los próximos 50 años vamos a presenciar un incremento significativo de la población mayor de 65 años y por lo tanto va a aumentar, considerablemente, el número de individuos con riesgo de desarrollar demencias neurodegenerativas, especialmente la enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA). Las estrategias actuales de tratamiento farmacológico y no farmacológico se han centrado en las fases sintomáticas de esta enfermedad y, gradualmente, vamos teniendo una mayor comprensión de los posibles factores de riesgo del síndrome clínico. Conclusiones Los estudios de neuroimagen han sido muy útiles para mostrar los cambios estructurales del envejecimiento normal y patológico, así como también los factores de riesgo para la EA. Los tratamientos apropiados de los factores de riesgo y su posible combinación con tratamientos específicos para la EA podrían prolongar el período presintomático de la EA y, por tanto, mejorar la calidad de vida y disminuir la carga para el paciente, la familia y la sociedad. PMID:20517866

  12. El Idioma en Nueva York (The Language in New York)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Amelia

    1977-01-01

    An interview with the president of the three-year-old Hispanic-American Journalists Association of New York. A summary of the aims and activities of the association and of the strides made in securing the rights of the Spanish-speaking population is given. (Text is in Spanish.) (AMH)

  13. Hacia la Nueva Reforma (Toward the New Reform).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Darcy

    A new wave of reform is needed for Latin American universities suffering from structural rigidity, duplicity, inefficiency, and lack of community. The structural crisis in the university reflects the general social crisis in which society is pressured by opposing forces leading it toward either historical modernization or evolutionary

  14. Nuevas Adquisiciones [y] Resumenes (Recent Acquisitions and Abstracts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Informacion Bibliografica Educativa, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This bibliography lists over 130 publications, books, and articles recently acquired by the Colombian National Center for Documentation and Pedagogical Information concerning a variety of educational topics. The acquisitions are listed alphabetically under subject headings; publications from many countries are included. Several of the entries are

  15. Graph analysis of dream reports is especially informative about psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Natália B.; Furtado, Raimundo; Maia, Pedro P. C.; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2014-01-01

    Early psychiatry investigated dreams to understand psychopathologies. Contemporary psychiatry, which neglects dreams, has been criticized for lack of objectivity. In search of quantitative insight into the structure of psychotic speech, we investigated speech graph attributes (SGA) in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I, and non-psychotic controls as they reported waking and dream contents. Schizophrenic subjects spoke with reduced connectivity, in tight correlation with negative and cognitive symptoms measured by standard psychometric scales. Bipolar and control subjects were undistinguishable by waking reports, but in dream reports bipolar subjects showed significantly less connectivity. Dream-related SGA outperformed psychometric scores or waking-related data for group sorting. Altogether, the results indicate that online and offline processing, the two most fundamental modes of brain operation, produce nearly opposite effects on recollections: While dreaming exposes differences in the mnemonic records across individuals, waking dampens distinctions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of the differential diagnosis of psychosis based on the analysis of dream graphs, pointing to a fast, low-cost and language-invariant tool for psychiatric diagnosis and the objective search for biomarkers. The Freudian notion that “dreams are the royal road to the unconscious” is clinically useful, after all. PMID:24424108

  16. Type 2 Diabetes May Raise Dementia Risk, Especially in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may increase the chances of dementia, regardless of gender. "It's a good question but one to which we don't have a definitive answer," she said. "Some studies suggest that vessel damage in the brain caused ...

  17. Graph analysis of dream reports is especially informative about psychosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Natália B.; Furtado, Raimundo; Maia, Pedro P. C.; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2014-01-01

    Early psychiatry investigated dreams to understand psychopathologies. Contemporary psychiatry, which neglects dreams, has been criticized for lack of objectivity. In search of quantitative insight into the structure of psychotic speech, we investigated speech graph attributes (SGA) in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I, and non-psychotic controls as they reported waking and dream contents. Schizophrenic subjects spoke with reduced connectivity, in tight correlation with negative and cognitive symptoms measured by standard psychometric scales. Bipolar and control subjects were undistinguishable by waking reports, but in dream reports bipolar subjects showed significantly less connectivity. Dream-related SGA outperformed psychometric scores or waking-related data for group sorting. Altogether, the results indicate that online and offline processing, the two most fundamental modes of brain operation, produce nearly opposite effects on recollections: While dreaming exposes differences in the mnemonic records across individuals, waking dampens distinctions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of the differential diagnosis of psychosis based on the analysis of dream graphs, pointing to a fast, low-cost and language-invariant tool for psychiatric diagnosis and the objective search for biomarkers. The Freudian notion that ``dreams are the royal road to the unconscious'' is clinically useful, after all.

  18. Graph analysis of dream reports is especially informative about psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mota, Natlia B; Furtado, Raimundo; Maia, Pedro P C; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2014-01-01

    Early psychiatry investigated dreams to understand psychopathologies. Contemporary psychiatry, which neglects dreams, has been criticized for lack of objectivity. In search of quantitative insight into the structure of psychotic speech, we investigated speech graph attributes (SGA) in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I, and non-psychotic controls as they reported waking and dream contents. Schizophrenic subjects spoke with reduced connectivity, in tight correlation with negative and cognitive symptoms measured by standard psychometric scales. Bipolar and control subjects were undistinguishable by waking reports, but in dream reports bipolar subjects showed significantly less connectivity. Dream-related SGA outperformed psychometric scores or waking-related data for group sorting. Altogether, the results indicate that online and offline processing, the two most fundamental modes of brain operation, produce nearly opposite effects on recollections: While dreaming exposes differences in the mnemonic records across individuals, waking dampens distinctions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of the differential diagnosis of psychosis based on the analysis of dream graphs, pointing to a fast, low-cost and language-invariant tool for psychiatric diagnosis and the objective search for biomarkers. The Freudian notion that "dreams are the royal road to the unconscious" is clinically useful, after all. PMID:24424108

  19. Why Is It Important to Eat Grains, Especially Whole Grains?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the risk of heart disease. Consuming foods containing fiber, such as whole grains, as part of a healthy diet, may reduce constipation. Eating whole grains may help with weight management. Eating grain products fortified with folate before and ...

  20. Flexible drill string member especially for use in directional drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, G.J.; Smith, H.G. Jr.; Schnitker, M.W.; Beatty, G.E.

    1989-03-14

    A drill string member is described for drilling deviated holes to be interposed in a drill string, the drill string having a downhole or bit end and a surface or upper end, the member being interposed between a downhole motor driven bit at the bit end and drill pipe at the upper end, and the drill string member having a weight per unit length slightly more than that of the drill pipe. The drill string member comprising has tool joint means at each end thereof and a main body portion, there between, the main body portion of the drill string member being formed with at least one spiral groove extending over the entire length of the main body portion and covering substantially the entire distance on the member between the tool joint means, the spiral groove defining lands on the main body portion between the flights thereof and being formed in the main body portion such that the maximum depth of the spiral groove is in the range of about 55% to about 85% of the wall thickness of the body measured from the O.D. of the land to the I.D. of the member. The drill string member is made in such a way that the difference in the maximum stress in the lands and in the groove produced in the member due to bending loads produced during drilling the deviated holes is equal to or less than 43,000 psi.

  1. Photodegradation and photostabilization of polymers, especially polystyrene: review.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Emad; Haddad, Raghad

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation may cause the significant degradation of many materials. UV radiation causes photooxidative degradation which results in breaking of the polymer chains, produces free radical and reduces the molecular weight, causing deterioration of mechanical properties and leading to useless materials, after an unpredictable time. Polystyrene (PS), one of the most important material in the modern plastic industry, has been used all over the world, due to its excellent physical properties and low-cost. When polystyrene is subjected to UV irradiation in the presence of air, it undergoes a rapid yellowing and a gradual embrittlement. The mechanism of PS photolysis in the solid state (film) depends on the mobility of free radicals in the polymer matrix and their bimolecular recombination. Free hydrogen radicals diffuse very easily through the polymer matrix and combine in pairs or abstract hydrogen atoms from polymer molecule. Phenyl radical has limited mobility. They may abstract hydrogen from the near surrounding or combine with a polymer radical or with hydrogen radicals. Almost all synthetic polymers require stabilization against adverse environmental effects. It is necessary to find a means to reduce or prevent damage induced by environmental components such as heat, light or oxygen. The photostabilization of polymers may be achieved in many ways. The following stabilizing systems have been developed, which depend on the action of stabilizer: (1) light screeners, (2) UV absorbers, (3) excited-state quenchers, (4) peroxide decomposers, and (5) free radical scavengers; of these, it is generally believed that excited-state quenchers, peroxide decomposers, and free radical scavengers are the most effective. Research into degradation and ageing of polymers is extremely intensive and new materials are being synthesized with a pre-programmed lifetime. New stabilizers are becoming commercially available although their modes of action are sometimes not thoroughly elucidated. They target the many possible ways of polymer degradation: thermolysis, thermooxidation, photolysis, photooxidation, radiolysis etc. With the goal to increase lifetime of a particular polymeric material, two aspects of degradation are of particular importance: Storage conditions, and Addition of appropriate stabilizers. A profound knowledge of degradation mechanisms is needed to achieve the goal. PMID:25674392

  2. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ... Active Bacterial Core surveillance CDC's Handwashing Information Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  3. Tire-to-Surface Friction Especially Under Wet Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Richard H.; Batterson, Sidney A.; Harrin, Eziaslav N.

    1959-01-01

    The results of measurements of the maximum friction available in braking on various runway surfaces under various conditions is shown for a C-123B airplane and comparisons of measurements with a tire-friction cart on the same runways are made. The.results of studies of wet-surface friction made with a 12-inch-diameter low-pressure tire on a tire-friction treadmill, with an automobile tire on the tire-friction cart, and with a 44 x 13 extra-high-pressure type VII aircraft tire at the Langley landing-loads track are compared. Preliminary results of tests on the tire-friction treadmill under wet-surface conditions to determine the effect of the wiping action of the front wheel of a tandem-wheel arrangement on the friction available in braking for the rear wheel are given.

  4. A Film Unit Designed Especially For Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, John L.

    An Agency for International Development (AID) project established an educational film production unit in Malawi. The project was designed to deliver extension services and information from the Ministry of Agriculture to rural farmers and had to: 1) produce films which meet the needs of villagers; 2) keep costs to an absolute minimum; and 3) fully…

  5. Pattern Formation by Inelastic Collisions, Especially in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Toshio

    The Titius-Bode law governs the planet distribution in our Solar system. In this paper a possible explanation is proposed based on inelastic collision effects among planetessimals during the evolution of the Solar system. The main purpose of this paper is, however, to introduce a strategy to study phenomena driven by rare but drastic events such as colllisions in the planetary problem. Many complex systems evolve through rare but violent events, so that an efficient strategy to simulate such systems is desirable. An event-driven strategy is proposed in this article, and is used to produce many runs of 108 year evolution history of planetary systems. I have found that the Titius-Bode law holds approximately, if the gravitational effect (scattering) and the collisions are taken into account. The result illustrates the importance of inelastic collisions, which are often neglected in the standard classical mechanics courses. Therefore, for completeness, other simpler particle systems under the effect of inelastc collisions, such as one-dimensional systems, are also included.

  6. How to avoid infections in Ramadan, especially urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Naseem

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged and poor control of diabetes has detrimental effects on the immune system by reducing both B and T cell function, causing neutrophilic dysfunction and less production of inflammatory cytokines. This makes people with diabetes vulnerable to various bacterial, viral and fungal infections in all body organs. The commonest cause of chronic renal disease is uncontrolled diabetes, placing patients, particularly women, at high risk for recurrent and complicated urinary tract infections. Diabetic patients who opt to fast during Ramadan must be clearly counseled about keeping themselves hydrated between non-fasting hours and maintaining good glycaemic control through diet and antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26013793

  7. OEDIPUS REX: WHERE ARE WE GOING, ESPECIALLY WITH FEMALES?

    PubMed

    Balsam, Rosemary H

    2015-07-01

    The Oedipus myth usefully informs triangulated object relations, though males, females, and "humankind" can become overly interchangeable. Freud's intentions to enlighten sexed gender are nowadays obscured. In 1931, he rejected Oedipus for females. Counterreactive gender blindness forecloses exploration about female development. Loewald's (1979) view of Oedipus Rex emancipates male heterosexuals from a recurring (universal), regressive pull back to mother. Ogden (1987) offers further insights into earliest female development. The author suggests a lifelong, progressive trajectory of mother/daughter closeness, in synch with a girl's shared slow body development into maturity and childbearing. Freeing the female dyad from obligatory pathological interpretation may inspire fresh sex and gender clinical theory. PMID:26198601

  8. Especial Skills: Their Emergence with Massive Amounts of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keetch, Katherine M.; Schmidt, Richard A.; Lee, Timothy D.; Young, Douglas E.

    2005-01-01

    Differing viewpoints concerning the specificity and generality of motor skill representations in memory were compared by contrasting versions of a skill having either extensive or minimal specific practice. In Experiments 1 and 2, skilled basketball players more accurately performed set shots at the foul line than would be predicted on the basis

  9. Apparatus and method for cutting soft materials, especially meat

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane S.; Jones, James F.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Shaw, Dick L.; Scalia, Barbara J.

    2005-10-18

    An apparatus and method for cutting soft materials such as meat. Two or more spirally mounted helical blades are situated between two supports, and the supports are mounted to a shank. The shank is rotated to impart rotary action to the spiral shear blades, and the entire device may be used to perform various cutting operations. The distal or bottom one of the supports may also be a cutting blade, and a number of versions of bottom cutting blades are useable in the practice of the invention.

  10. Consciousness: a neural capacity for objectivity, especially pronounced in humans.

    PubMed

    Dijker, Anton J M

    2014-01-01

    Consciousness tends to be viewed either as subjective experience of sensations and feelings, or as perception and internal representation of objects. This paper argues that neither view sufficiently acknowledges that consciousness may refer to the brain's most adaptive property: its capacity to produce states of objectivity. It is proposed that this capacity relies on multiple sensorimotor networks for internally representing objects and their properties in terms of expectancies, as well as on motivational and motor mechanisms involved in exploration, play, and care for vulnerable living and non-living objects. States of objectivity are associated with a very special phenomenal aspect; the experience that subjective aspects are absent and one is "just looking" at the world as it really is and can be. However, these states are normally closely preceded and followed by (and tend to be combined or fused with) sensations and feelings which are caused by activation of sensory and motivational mechanisms. A capacity for objectivity may have evolved in different species and can be conceived as a common basis for other elusive psychological properties such as intelligence, conscience, and esthetic experience; all three linked to crucial behaviors in human evolution such as tool making, cooperation, and art. The brain's pervasive tendency to objectify may be responsible for wrongly equating consciousness with feelings and wrongly opposing it to well-learned or habitual ("unconscious") patterns of perception and behavior. PMID:24672506

  11. An ultrastructural study of calcifying odontogenic cyst, especially calcified material.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Masafumi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kimijima, Yutaka; Ichinose, Shizuko; Sasaki, Kodo; Amagasa, Teruo

    2002-06-01

    The ultrastructural features of calcification in a case of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) were studied. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the inner parts of the cyst wall revealed many short microvilli, and X-ray microanalysis of the high-density masses in the intercellular parts showed prominent calcium peaks, which meant that these masses were calcified materials. On transmission electron microscopic observations, many calcifications exhibited a distinctive ring formation around the periphery of a central core that consisted of an amorphous structure. These calcifications were observed with necrotic remnants of nuclear material and many identifiable mitochondria, thin fibers, and epithelial cells. The cytoplasm of ghost cells consisted of numerous short electron-dense tonofilament bundles. Needle-like structures were shown in the tonofilament bundles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the needle-like crystals were hydroxyapatite. It is suggested that calcification in a COC may be related to degenerative mitochondria and tonofilament bundles of ghost cells. PMID:12181653

  12. Immune Mechanisms in Atherosclerosis, Especially in Diabetes Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Frostegrd, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1? (IL-1?), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed. PMID:24194733

  13. Consciousness: a neural capacity for objectivity, especially pronounced in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dijker, Anton J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Consciousness tends to be viewed either as subjective experience of sensations and feelings, or as perception and internal representation of objects. This paper argues that neither view sufficiently acknowledges that consciousness may refer to the brain’s most adaptive property: its capacity to produce states of objectivity. It is proposed that this capacity relies on multiple sensorimotor networks for internally representing objects and their properties in terms of expectancies, as well as on motivational and motor mechanisms involved in exploration, play, and care for vulnerable living and non-living objects. States of objectivity are associated with a very special phenomenal aspect; the experience that subjective aspects are absent and one is “just looking” at the world as it really is and can be. However, these states are normally closely preceded and followed by (and tend to be combined or fused with) sensations and feelings which are caused by activation of sensory and motivational mechanisms. A capacity for objectivity may have evolved in different species and can be conceived as a common basis for other elusive psychological properties such as intelligence, conscience, and esthetic experience; all three linked to crucial behaviors in human evolution such as tool making, cooperation, and art. The brain’s pervasive tendency to objectify may be responsible for wrongly equating consciousness with feelings and wrongly opposing it to well-learned or habitual (“unconscious”) patterns of perception and behavior. PMID:24672506

  14. Molluscum Contagiosum (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more small growths or wart-like bumps (called mollusca) that are usually pink, white, or skin-colored. ... the small round pink, white, or skin-colored mollusca on the skin. These bumps are filled with ...

  15. Cryptic species of deep-sea clams (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) from hydrothermal vent and cold-water seep environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C.; Schutz, Steven J.; Gustafson, Richard G.; Lutz, Richard A.

    1994-08-01

    A protein-electrophoretic analysis of six putative morphospecies in the bivalve family Vesicomyidae from eight deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the eastern Pacific, three cold-water seep sites in the eastern Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, and one whale-carcass site off Southern California revealed electromorph patterns diagnostic of 10 vesicomyid species. Electrophoretic patterns for 14 enzymes encoded by 17 presumptive gene loci were scored in all 10 species. The pairwise genetic distances (Nei's D) for these 10 species ranged from 0.857 to 2.792, values within the range expected for distinct species and genera. However, the degree of genetic divergence among these taxa could not be used for phylogenetic inferences because allozyme differences had in many cases reached evolutionary saturation. Notwithstanding, the present results revealed a significant problem with current morphospecies identifications of these clams and with applications of the current generic names Calyptogena and Vesicomya. Given the cryptic nature of these taxa, we suggest that subsequent studies simply refer to these clams as "vesicomyids" until careful morphological analyses and molecular studies are completed and systematic relationships are clarified.

  16. Alterations in the mantle epithelium during transition from hatching gland to adhesive organ of Idiosepius pygmaeus (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Cyran, Norbert; Klepal, Waltraud; Städler, Yannick; Schönenberger, Jürg; von Byern, Janek

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial gland systems play an important role in marine molluscs in fabricating lubricants, repellents, fragrances, adhesives or enzymes. In cephalopods the typically single layered epithelium provides a highly dynamic variability and affords a rapid rebuilding of gland cells. While the digestive hatching gland (also named Hoyle organ) is obligatory for most cephalopods, only four genera (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions by means of glandular cells in an adhesive area on the mantle or tentacles. In Idiosepius this adhesive organ is restricted to the posterior part of the fin region on the dorsal mantle side and well developed in the adult stage. Two gland cell types could be distinguished, which produce different contents of the adhesive. During the embryonic development the same body area is occupied by the temporary hatching gland. The question arises, in which way the hatching gland degrades and is replaced by the adhesive gland. Ultrastructural analyses as well as computer tomography scans were performed to monitor the successive post hatching transformation in the mantle epithelium from hatching gland degradation to the formation of the adhesive organ. According to our investigations the hatching gland cells degrade within about 1 day after hatching by a type of programmed cell death and leave behind a temporary cellular gap in this area. First glandular cells of the adhesive gland arise 7 days after hatching and proceed evenly over the posterior mantle epithelium. In contrast, the accompanying reduction of a part of the dorsal mantle musculature is already established before hatching. The results demonstrate a distinct independence between the two gland systems and illustrate the early development of the adhesive organ as well as the corresponding modifications within the mantle. PMID:25483816

  17. Absence of formation of benzo[a]pyrene/DNA adducts in the cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis, Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.G.; Lu, L.J.W.; Salazar, J.J.; Holoubek, V. )

    1994-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) injected intramuscularly into the base of the arms of cuttlefish was released continuously from the injection site and removed from the organism. Only a portion of the compound accumulated in the body. Twenty-four hr after its injection, 75% of B[a]P applied in olive oil was removed from the cuttlefish, and 1.2% was found in the body outside the head, in site of injection. If the carcinogen was dissolved in dimethylformamide, the removal of B[a]P was slower, so that only 18% of the injected B[a]P was removed from the organism and 0.36% accumulated in the body outside the head 24 hr after injection. The high level of B[a]P in gills and hemolymph 4 hr after injection and the kinetics of the decrease of its concentration with time indicate that these two organs could be involved in the excretion of B[a]P from the body. The B[a]P/DNA adducts characteristic for vertebrates could not be demonstrated in gills, skin, brain, hepatopancreas, and lymphocytes of the cuttlefish 24 hr after injection. The dose of the carcinogene injected into the cuttlefish was 2-4 times higher than the dose resulting in the formation of a high level of B[a]P/DNA adducts in vertebrates. A different metabolism of B[a]P in the tissue of cephalopods, compared to vertebrates, could be less favorable to the process leading to malignant transformation and could explain the absence from the literature of reports of tumors in cephalopods. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Standardization of a Patella spp. (Mollusca, Gastropoda) embryo-larval bioassay and advantages of its use in marine ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Sara; Fernández, Nuria; Ribeiro, Pedro A

    2016-05-01

    The use of three limpet species, Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, Patella depressa Pennant, 1777 and Patella ulyssiponensis Gmelin, 1791 as model organisms in marine ecotoxicology has been evaluated. Initial laboratory experiments were aimed to standardize a biological test with embryos and larvae of Patella spp, establishing the percentage of normal trochophore larvae as endpoint. Before conducting in vitro fertilization, oocytes must be maturated artificially by incubation in an alkaline solution; therefore, alkalinizing agent, pH and time of eggs alkalinization were evaluated. Moreover, time of sperm activation, optimum sperm and oocytes concentration during fertilization, gamete contact time, use of stirring during the fertilization, egg concentration and incubation temperature were examined. Minimum sample size per treatment was also estimated. Exposure of oocytes for 10min to FSW alkalinized with NH4OH at pH 9.0, the use of undiluted sperm pre-activated during 45min and a concentration of 200 oocytesmL(-1), a gamete-contact time of 180min and egg incubation at 18°C during 24h at a concentration of 80 eggsmL(-1) were the conditions allowing maximal embryo-larval development success. With an error of 0.05, a sampling size ≥320 allows a 95% confidence in the estimate. This Patella spp. acute bioassay fulfills a number of important a priori requirements to be used in ecotoxicological studies. Nevertheless, in vitro fertilization requires considerable handling, which may lead to failure in fecundation. Such difficulties are also addressed, in order to facilitate the routine use of this protocol by other laboratories. PMID:26845705

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Clusters in Chromosomes of Five Clam Species Belonging to the Family Veneridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Prez-Garca, Concepcin; Hurtado, Ninoska S.; Morn, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal changes accompanying bivalve evolution are an area about which few reports have been published. To improve our understanding on chromosome evolution in Veneridae, ribosomal RNA gene clusters were mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomes of five species of venerid clams (Venerupis corrugata, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ruditapes decussatus, Dosinia exoleta, and Venus verrucosa). The results were anchored to the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic tree currently available for Veneridae. While a single major rDNA cluster was found in each of the five species, the number of 5S rDNA clusters showed high interspecies variation. Major rDNA was either subterminal to the short arms or intercalary to the long arms of metacentric or submetacentric chromosomes, whereas minor rDNA signals showed higher variability. Major and minor rDNAs map to different chromosome pairs in all species, but in R. decussatus one of the minor rDNA gene clusters and the major rDNA cluster were located in the same position on a single chromosome pair. This interspersion of both sequences was confirmed by fiber FISH. Telomeric signals appeared at both ends of every chromosome in all species. FISH mapping data are discussed in relation to the molecular phylogenetic trees currently available for Veneridae. PMID:24967400

  20. Effects of food type, feeding frequency, and temperature on juvenile survival and growth of Marisa cornuarietis (Mollusca: Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Selck, Henriette; Aufderheide, John; Pounds, Nadine; Staples, Charles; Caspers, Norbert; Forbes, Valery

    2006-01-01

    The present experiments are part of a larger study designed to investigate the influence of husbandry parameters on the life history of the ramshorn snail, Marisa cornuarietis, in order to identify suitable husbandry conditions for maintaining multi-generation populations in the laboratory for use in ecotoxicological testing. In this paper we focus on the effects of a combination of food types and feeding frequencies (i.e., the frequency with which the snails were offered food) on juvenile growth and survival at different temperatures. Offspring produced in the laboratory by wild specimens of M. cornuarietis, from Puerto Rico, were used to test the effects of three types of food (lettuce, alginate with fish food, alginate with snail mix) fed at three frequencies (given ad libitum on 4/4, 2/4, or 1/4 d) on juvenile survival and growth. The 4-d feeding regimens were repeated four times, giving a total of 16 d for the experiments. The experiments were conducted at two temperatures (22 and 25C) under a 12 h light:12 h dark photoperiod. Juvenile growth rates increased with increasing feeding frequency for all food types. The most rapid growth rates occurred in the high-frequency lettuce treatments and the slowest growth rates in the low-frequency lettuce and alginate with snail mix treatments. Juvenile snails grew faster at 25 than at 22C, and mortality was about twice as high at the lower temperature. Growth rates were used to provide a rough estimate of time to maturity, which was determined to take about twice as long at 22 than at 25C. The results showed that lettuce is the best food if supplied in abundance, but effects on growth are very dependent on feeding frequency and temperature. We conclude that 25C is a more appropriate temperature for maintaining populations than 22C, that lettuce provides a suitable food source, and that food should be supplied continuously for husbandry and toxicity testing of populations of M. cornuarietis. PMID:19009044

  1. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae).

    PubMed

    Taylor, John D; Glover, Emily A

    2013-01-01

    Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400-650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200-825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar. PMID:24039537

  2. Do the changes in temperature and light affect the functional response of the benthic mud snail Heleobia australis (Mollusca: Gastropoda)?

    PubMed

    Magalhes, Thaisa R F; Neves, Raquel A F; Valentin, Jean L; Figueiredo, Gisela M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of temperature increase combined to conditions of light incidence on functional response of Heleobia australis. Experiments were conducted using nine to ten food concentrations for each treatment: 20C without light; 30C without light and, 30C under low light intensity. For each experiment, the functional response type III (sigmoidal) was fitted and equation parameters were determined. Results suggest that, if the sediment temperature increases, H. australis will not have its ingestion rates affected negatively, whilst its feeding behavior seems to be negatively affected by light. Ingestion rates estimated for organic content in the Guanabara Bay were: 0.34 gC ind-1h-1 at 20C without light, 1.44 gC ind-1h-1 at 30C without light and 0.64 gC ind-1h-1 at 30C under light incidence. Higher ingestion rates were estimated at the high temperature, even under light incidence, and temperature seems to have outweighed the light effect. In contrast, if higher carbon content is considered, despite high temperature, the experiment conducted with light incidence showed lower ingestion rates than those from the experiment at 20C without light. This study provides the first quantification of H. australis ingestion rates and the effects that changes in temperature and light have on its feeding behavior. PMID:25014915

  3. First report of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) in Achatina fulica (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from Southeast and South Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maldonado Jr, Arnaldo; Simes, Raquel O; Oliveira, Ana Paula M; Motta, Esther M; Fernandez, Mnica A; Pereira, Zilene M; Monteiro, Simone S; Torres, Eduardo J Lopes; Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho

    2010-11-01

    The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a worldwide-distributed zoonotic nematode that can cause human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Here, for the first time, we report the isolation of A. cantonensis from Achatina fulica from two Brazilian states: Rio de Janeiro (specifically the municipalities of Barra do Pira, situated at the Paraiba River Valley region and So Gonalo, situated at the edge of Guanabara Bay) and Santa Catarina (in municipality of Joinville). The lungworms were identified by comparing morphological and morphometrical data obtained from adult worms to values obtained from experimental infections of A. cantonensis from Pernambuco, Brazil, and Akita, Japan. Only a few minor morphological differences that were determined to represent intra-specific variation were observed. This report of A. cantonensis in South and Southeast Brazil, together with the recent report of the zoonosis and parasite-infected molluscs in Northeast Brazil, provide evidence of the wide distribution of A. cantonensis in the country. The need for efforts to better understand the role of A. fulica in the transmission of meningoencephalitis in Brazil and the surveillance of molluscs and rodents, particularly in ports, is emphasized. PMID:21120369

  4. Distribution, biomass, recruitment and productivity of Anadara senilis (L.) (Mollusca: Bivalvia) on the banc d'Arguin, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, W. J.; Gueye, Abou; Meijboom, A.; Piersma, Th.; Alassane Sall, Mamadou

    Data on distribution, ecology, biomass, recruitment, growth, mortality and productivity of the West African bloody cockle Anadara senilis were collected at the Banc d'Aguuin, Mauritania, in early 1985 and 1986. Ash-free dry weight appeared to be correlated best with shell height. A. senilis was abundant on the tidal flats of landlocked coastal bays, but nearly absent on the tidal flats bordering the open sea. The average biomass for the entire area of tidal flats was estimated at 5.5 gm -2 ash-free dry weight. The A. senilis population appeared to consist mainly of 10 to 20-year-old individuals, showing a very slow growth and a production: biomass ratio of about 0.02 y -1. Recruitment appeared negligible and mortality was estimated to be about 10% per year. Oystercatchers ( Haematopus ostralegus), the gastropod Cymbium cymbium and unknown fish species were responsible for a large share of this. The distinction of annual growth marks permitted the assessment of year-class strength, which appeared to be correlated with the average discharge of the river Senegal. This may be explained by assuming that year-class strength and river discharge both are correlated with rainfall at the Banc d'Arguin.

  5. Growth estimation of mangrove cockle Anadara tuberculosa (Mollusca: Bivalvia): application and evaluation of length-based methods.

    PubMed

    Flores, Luis A

    2011-03-01

    Growth is one of the key processes in the dynamic of exploited resources, since it provides part of the information required for structured population models. Growth of mangrove cockle, Anadara tuberculosa was estimated through length-based methods (ELEFAN I y NSLCA) and using diverse shell length intervals (SLI). The variability of L(infinity), k and phi prime (phi') estimates and the effect of each sample were quantified by jackknife techniques. Results showed the same L(infinity) estimates from ELEFAN I and NSLCA across each SLI used, and all L(infinity) were within the expected range. On the contrary, k estimates differed between methods. Jackknife estimations uncovered the tendency of ELEFAN I to overestimate k with increases in SLI, and allowed the identification of differences in uncertainty (PE and CV) between both methods. The average values of phi' derived from NSCLA1.5 and length-age sources were similar and corresponded to ranges reported by other authors. Estimates of L(infinity), k and (phi' from NSCLA1.5 were 85.97 mm, 0.124/year and 2.953 with jackknife and 86.36mm de L(infinity), 0.110/year de k and 2.914 de phi' without jackknife, respectively. Based on the observed evidence and according to the biology of the species, NSCLA is suggested to be used with jackknife and a SLI of 1.5 mm as an ad hoc approach to estimate the growth parameters of mangrove cockle. PMID:21513195

  6. [Abundance and morphometry of tuberculosa Anadara and A. similis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the Manglar de Purruja, Dulce Gulf, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Silva Benavides, A M; Bonilla Carrin, R

    2001-12-01

    The density, population, length, yield and sex proportion of the mollusks Anadara tuberculosa and A. similis were studied in Baha de Golfito, Golfo Dulce, Pacific coast of Costa Rica from February 1998 to February 1999. A. tuberculosa was more abundant (0.9 units m(-2)), than A. similis (0.2 units m(-2)); the highest abundance was found at the canal mouths. The average lengths were 43.3 mm for A. tuberculosa and 42.8 mm for A. similis (both under the Costa Rican legal minimal length for exploitation: 47 mm). Maximum lengths were measured in the middle and upstream Canal Mayor, respectively: 43.0 mm and 43.4 mm. The correlation between length and fresh weight was 0.81 (Pearson). The average total weights were 26.2 g for A. tuberculosa and 19.1 g for A. similis. The condition index (a meat yield measurement) was higher in A. similis (21.2%) than in A. tuberculosa (17.2%). The maximum yield for both species lies in the 31-35 mm range. The male ratio was 43.7%. A species recovery plan is urgent because these results suggest both a decrease in density and illegal exploitation. PMID:15264545

  7. Phylogeography of the Rock Shell Thais clavigera (Mollusca): Evidence for Long-Distance Dispersal in the Northwestern Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Daewui; Li, Qi; Kong, Ling-Feng; Ni, Gang; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsukuma, Akihiko; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Chungoo; Lee, Hyuk Je; Park, Joong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    The present-day genetic structure of a species reflects both historical demography and patterns of contemporary gene flow among populations. To precisely understand how these factors shape current population structure of the northwestern (NW) Pacific marine gastropod, Thais clavigera, we determined the partial nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial COI gene for 602 individuals sampled from 29 localities spanning almost the whole distribution of T. clavigera in the NW Pacific Ocean (~3,700 km). Results from population genetic and demographic analyses (AMOVA, ΦST-statistics, haplotype networks, Tajima’s D, Fu’s FS, mismatch distribution, and Bayesian skyline plots) revealed a lack of genealogical branches or geographical clusters, and a high level of genetic (haplotype) diversity within each of studied population. Nevertheless, low but significant genetic structuring was detected among some geographical populations separated by the Changjiang River, suggesting the presence of geographical barriers to larval dispersal around this region. Several lines of evidence including significant negative Tajima’s D and Fu’s FS statistics values, the unimodally shaped mismatch distribution, and Bayesian skyline plots suggest a population expansion at marine isotope stage 11 (MIS 11; 400 ka), the longest and warmest interglacial interval during the Pleistocene epoch. The lack of genetic structure among the great majority of the NW Pacific T. clavigera populations may be attributable to high gene flow by current-driven long-distance dispersal of prolonged planktonic larval phase of this species. PMID:26171966

  8. Premire occurrence fossile du genre Pyramidelloides (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Eulimidae) dcouvert dans l'ocne de l'Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozouet, Pierre; Dockery, David T.

    2001-09-01

    Pyramidelloides dolini n. sp., older strongly sculptured eulimid, is described from the Middle Eocene of southwestern Alabama (Gosport Sand). This new species probably had a planktotrophic larval stage similar to the recent Indo-West-Pacific species. Relationship with the species of the genus Palisadia is discussed. Geographic distributions of both the fossil and the recent species of the genera Pyramidelloides and Palisadia support finally a classic pattern in tropical marine biogeography: a discontinuous geographic range between Indo-Pacific and Caribbean provinces.

  9. Annotated type catalogue of Bothriembryon (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in Australian museums, with a compilation of types in other museums

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.; Whisson, Corey S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Type material of 41 Australian Bothriembryon taxa present in Australian museums is critically listed, indicating systematic issues that need to be resolved in further studies. Information on additional type material of 22 taxa in non-Australian museums is compiled. The seven fossil taxa known so far are included in this catalogue. Based on the current systematic position, 38 species are treated in this paper. Bothriembryon jacksoni Iredale, 1939, Bothriembryon notatus Iredale, 1939, Bothriembryon praecelsus Iredale, 1939 and Bothriembryon serpentinus Iredale, 1939 are elevated to species level. Bothriembryon gratwicki (Cox, 1899) is listed as status to be determined. PMID:22679384

  10. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John D.; Glover, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar. PMID:24039537

  11. Annotated type catalogue of the Megaspiridae, Orthalicidae, and Simpulopsidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S. H.; Ablett, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described for 65 taxa of the Orthalicoidea, classified within the families Megaspiridae (14), Orthalicidae (30), and Simpulopsidae (20); one taxon is considered a nomen inquirendum. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Helix brephoides d’Orbigny, 1835; Simpulopsis cumingi Pfeiffer, 1861; Bulimulus (Protoglyptus) dejectus Fulton, 1907; Bulimus iris Pfeiffer, 1853. The type status of Bulimus salteri Sowerby III, 1890, and Strophocheilus (Eurytus) subirroratus da Costa, 1898 is now changed to lectotype according Art. 74.6 ICZN. The taxa Bulimus loxostomus Pfeiffer, 1853, Bulimus marmatensis Pfeiffer, 1855, Bulimus meobambensis Pfeiffer, 1855, and Orthalicus powissianus var. niveus Preston 1909 are now figured for the first time. The following taxa are now considered junior subjective synonyms: Bulimus marmatensis Pfeiffer, 1855 = Helix (Cochlogena) citrinovitrea Moricand, 1836; Vermiculatus Breure, 1978 = Bocourtia Rochebrune, 1882. New combinations are: Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) Rochebrune, 1882; Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) aequatoria (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) anthisanensis (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) aquila (Reeve, 1848); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) badia (Sowerby I, 1835); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) bicolor (Sowerby I, 1835); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) caliginosa (Reeve, 1849); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) coagulata (Reeve, 1849); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) cotopaxiensis (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) filaris (Pfeiffer, 1853); Kara indentata (da Costa, 1901); Clathrorthalicus magnificus (Pfeiffer, 1848); Simpulopsis (Eudioptus) marmartensis (Pfeiffer, 1855); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) nucina (Reeve, 1850); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) ochracea (Morelet, 1863); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) peaki (Breure, 1978); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) petiti (Pfeiffer, 1846); Clathrorthalicus phoebus (Pfeiffer, 1863); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) polymorpha (d’Orbigny, 1835); Scholvienia porphyria (Pfeiffer, 1847); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) purpurata (Reeve, 1849); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) quechuarum Crawford, 1939; Quechua salteri (Sowerby III, 1890); Kuschelenia (Bocourtia) subfasciata Pfeiffer, 1853; Clathrorthalicus victor (Pfeiffer, 1854). In an addedum a lectotype is being designated for Bulimulus (Drymaeus) interruptus var. pallidus Preston, 1909. An index is included to all taxa mentioned in this paper and the preceding ones in this series (Breure and Ablett 2011, 2012, 2014). PMID:25632243

  12. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as why it is there? and are the cells active or inactive? PMID:25109761

  13. Grazing under experimental hypercapnia and elevated temperature does not affect the radula of a chiton (Mollusca, Polyplacophora, Lepidopleurida).

    PubMed

    Sigwart, Julia D; Carey, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    Chitons (class Polyplacophora) are benthic grazing molluscs with an eight-part aragonitic shell armature. The radula, a serial tooth ribbon that extends internally more than half the length of the body, is mineralised on the active feeding teeth with iron magnetite apparently as an adaptation to constant grazing on rocky substrates. As the anterior feeding teeth are eroded they are shed and replaced with a new row. The efficient mineralisation and function of the radula could hypothetically be affected by changing oceans in two ways: changes in seawater chemistry (pH and pCO2) may impact the biomineralisation pathway, potentially leading to a weaker or altered density of the feeding teeth; rising temperatures could increase activity levels in these ectothermic animals, and higher feeding rates could increase wear on the feeding teeth beyond the animals' ability to synthesise, mineralise, and replace radular rows. We therefore examined the effects of pH and temperature on growth and integrity in the radula of the chiton Leptochiton asellus. Our experiment implemented three temperature (?10, 15, 20 C) and two pCO2 treatments (?400 ?atm, pH 8.0; ?2000 ?atm, pH 7.5) for six treatment groups. Animals (n = 50) were acclimated to the treatment conditions for a period of 4 weeks. This is sufficient time for growth of ca. 7-9 new tooth rows or 20% turnover of the mineralised portion. There was no significant difference in the number of new (non-mineralised) teeth or total tooth row count in any treatment. Examination of the radulae via SEM revealed no differences in microwear or breakage on the feeding cusps correlating to treatment groups. The shell valves also showed no signs of dissolution. As a lineage, chitons have survived repeated shifts in Earth's climate through geological time, and at least their radulae may be robust to future perturbations. PMID:24923634

  14. Repertoire and evolution of TNF superfamily in Crassostrea gigas: implications for expansion and diversification of this superfamily in Mollusca.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Qiu, Limei; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members represent a group of cytokines participating in diverse immunological, pathological and developmental pathways. However, compared with deuterostomia and cnidaia, the composition and evolution of TNF homologous in protostomia are still not well understood. In the present study, a total of 81 TNF superfamily (TNFSF) genes from 15 mollusk species, including 23 TNFSF genes from Crassostrea gigas, were surveyed by genome-wide bioinformatics analysis. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 out of 23 C.?gigas TNFSF genes in five clades exhibited orthologous relationships with Pinctada fucata TNFSF genes. Moreover, there were 15 C.?gigas TNFSF genes located in oyster-specific clusters, which were contributed by small-scaled tandem and/or segmental duplication events in oyster. By comparing the sequences of duplicated TNFSF pairs, exon loss and variant in exon/intron length were revealed as the major modes of divergence in gene structure. Most of the duplicated C.?gigas TNFSF pairs were evolved under purifying selection with consistent tissue expression patterns, implying functional constraint shaped diversification. This study demonstrated the expansion and early divergence of TNF superfamily in C.?gigas, which provides potential insight into revealing the evolution and function of this superfamily in mollusk. PMID:25910814

  15. On some Vetigastropoda (Mollusca, Gastropoda) from the Plio-Pleistocene of the Philippines with descriptions of three new species.

    PubMed

    Helwerda, Renate Ariane; Wesselingh, Frank Pieter; Williams, Suzanne T

    2014-01-01

    We studied representatives of seven vetigastropod families in an extremely well-preserved Plio-Pleistocene mollusc fauna found in relatively deep water sediments (c. 200-300 m paleodepth) from the north-western Philippines. The fauna is systematically described and its paleoenvironmental and paleobiogeographical character is explored. Twenty-six species of gastropods were studied, three of which are described as new: Halystina conoidea n. sp., Calliotropis arenosa n. sp. and Ethminolia wareni n. sp. Four new combinations are proposed: Pseudotalopia taiwanensis (Chen, 2006), Solariella segersi (Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006), Zetela tabakotanii (Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006) and Ilanga konos (Vilvens, 2009). Fourteen species are known living. Most extant species nowadays occur around the Philippines. Two of the species also occur in Neogene deposits from western Pacific islands. The new fauna offers insights into the character of relatively deep water Indo-West Pacific mollusc faunas prior to the onset of the late Quaternary ice ages. PMID:24869812

  16. Molecular phylogeny suggests polyphyly of both the turban shells (family Turbinidae) and the superfamily Trochoidea (Mollusca: Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Williams, S T; Ozawa, T

    2006-04-01

    Bayesian and parsimony phylogenetic analyses of sequence from two nuclear and two mitochondrial genes suggest that neither the molluscan superfamily Trochoidea, nor the family Turbinidae are monophyletic. The family Turbinidae s.l. divides into two main groups. The first group includes taxa previously referred to the five subfamilies Angariinae, Colloniinae, Phasianellinae, Tricoliinae, Gabrieloninae, and the liotiine genus Cinysca; these subfamilies are here recognized as Angariidae, Colloniidae, and Phasianellidae (with subfamilies Phasianellinae, Tricoliinae, and Gabrieloninae). The second group, which corresponds to Turbinidae sensu stricto, includes Prisogasterinae, Turbininae, and the liotiine genus Liotina, all of which are more closely related to trochids than they are to the first group. Several morphological studies have suggested previously that the family Phasianellidae is distinct from Turbinidae. However, this is the first study to suggest that Phasianellidae forms a group with some taxa previously thought of as turbinids, but excluding the nominotypical genus Turbo and its allies. The family Turbinidae has traditionally been described as the only family in the Vetigastropoda group that has a calcified operculum. The non-monophyly of Turbinidae suggests that calcareous opercula may have arisen independently more than once within the Vetigastropoda. PMID:16483804

  17. Morphology of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract of the giant keyhole limpet, Megathura crenulata (Mollusca; Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary G; Bessette, Tracy; Martin, Alanna; Cotero, Renae; Vumbaco, Kathryn; Oakes, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    To understand the digestive functions in the giant keyhole limpet, it is important to know the types of cells present in each region of the gut and their roles in the secretion of digestive enzymes and absorption of nutrients. This study describes the morphology of cells lining the entire gut and identifies sites that may be secreting materials to aid digestion. Previous studies involving electron microscopy and enzyme analysis have focused on the salivary and digestive glands of several gastropods. Studies on the rest of the gut tract typically include only histological descriptions of the epithelia and although several types of cells have been described, they appear very similar. The purpose of this study is to determine if electron microscopy can provide better insights into the functions of cells in these poorly studied regions of the gut. Our ultrastructural observations suggest that only two types of cells, mucus secreting cells and apocrine secretory cells make up the epithelium in the esophagus, style sac, and intestine. These regions account for 85% of the length of the entire digestive tract. Apocrine secretory cells contain pigment granules, bear cilia, and/or microvilli at their apices, and release product into the gut lumen via apocrine secretion. This suggests that the secretory processes involved with digestion are occurring in most regions of the gut and that apocrine secretion is the primary mode by which materials are introduced into the gut lumen. The lips, salivary glands, stomach, and digestive gland lack apocrine secretory cells and the epithelial cells are similar to those described in other gastropods. J. Morphol. 271:1134-1151, 2010. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20730925

  18. Karyology of the Antarctic chiton Nuttallochiton mirandus (Thiele, 1906) (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) with some considerations on chromosome evolution in chitons.

    PubMed

    Odierna, Gaetano; Aprea, Gennaro; Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Canapa, Adriana; Capriglione, Teresa; Olmo, Ettore

    2008-01-01

    We describe the karyotype, location of nucleolus-organizing regions (NORs) and heterochromatin distribution and composition in the Antarctic chiton Nuttallochiton mirandus. Specimens had a karyotype of 2n = 32 chromosomes, of which two were microchromosomes. Among macrochromosomes, the elements of the first and fourth pair were bi-armed, the others were telocentric. At least six NOR sites were detected with NOR-FISH, but only four were Ag-NOR-banding-positive. The two microchromosomes were essentially euchromatic, while all macrochromosomes exhibited clear pericentromeric C bands that were found to be AT-rich (being quinacrine- and DAPI-positive) and resistant to digestion with AluI and HaeIII. N. mirandus has the largest number of chromosomes (2n = 32) and telocentric elements (26) of all the chiton species studied to date. The karyological results of our study agree with previous molecular data indicating N. mirandus as a sister taxon of Acanthochitona crinita. The karyotypes of the two species could be related as a result of Robertsonian rearrangements. According to the more parsimonious hypothesis, the former would be the primitive karyotype, although other evolutionary events cannot be ruled out. PMID:18668332

  19. "First" abyssal record of Stenosemus exaratus (G.O.Sars, 1878) (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) intheNorth-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Allcock, Louise; Schwabe, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The first proven abyssal record of Stenosemus exaratus (G.O. Sars, 1878) is presented on the basis of an ROV study in the Irish Sea. For the first time in situ images of the species and data on the environmental parameters are provided. PMID:23794838

  20. A new genus and species of Thyasiridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) from deep-water, Beaufort Sea, northern Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Valentich-Scott, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; II; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Edwards, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bivalve mollusk shells were collected in 2350 m depth in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean off northern Alaska. Initial identification suggested the specimens were a member of the bivalve family Thyasiridae, but no known eastern Pacific or Arctic living or fossil thyasirid resembled these deep-water specimens. Comparisons were made with the type of the genera Maorithyas Fleming, 1950, Spinaxinus Oliver & Holmes, 2006, Axinus Sowerby, 1821, and Parathyasira Iredale, 1930. We determined the Beaufort Sea species represents a new genus, herein described as Wallerconcha. These specimens also represent a new species, herein named Wallerconcha sarae. These new taxa are compared with known modern and fossil genera and species of thyasirds. PMID:25589851

  1. Structure and composition of the nacre-prisms transition in the shell of Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Ball, Alexander D; Cotte, Marine; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Meibom, Anders; Salom, Murielle; Susini, Jean; Williams, C Terry

    2008-03-01

    A microstructural, mineralogical, and chemical study of the nacre-prisms boundary in the shells of Pinctada margaritifera shows that this boundary is not an abrupt transition, but that there exists a distinct fibrous layer with clear topographic structures and evidence of growth lines. A three-step biomineralization process is proposed that involves changes in the chemical and biochemical composition of the last growth increments of the calcite prisms, formation of the fibrous layer, and development of regular tablets in the nacreous layer. PMID:18246463

  2. Deep-water Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the Oman Margin, Arabian Sea, new species and examples of endemism and cosmopolitanism.

    PubMed

    Oliver, P Graham

    2015-01-01

    Seven species of Thyasiridae are reported from the Oman Margin of the Arabian Sea at depths between 688 m and 3356 m. Hypoxic conditions exist at depths between 400 and 1200 m and three species are restricted to this zone and to the Arabian Sea. Leptaxinus indusarium has also been recorded from the Indus Fan and Channelaxinus investigatoris from off Sri Lanka. A new species Thyasira anassa sp. nov. is described from the hypoxic zone. Another four species are recorded from the abyssal zone where oxygen levels are typical for the deep ocean. Here another new species is described, Parathyasira bamberi sp. nov. but the other species could not be conclusively identified because of close affinity with populations from other oceans.  Deep water Atlantic species Axinulus croulinensis and Mendicula ferruginosa are apparently present in the abyssal Indian Ocean while another thyasirid shell is very close to Channelaxinus excavatus from the Eastern Pacific and C. perplicata from the Atlantic. Accompanying these abyssal thyasirids were other bivalve species, Deminucula atacellana, Limopsis pelagica and Bentharca asperula that cannot be distinguished by morphology from their Atlantic populations. It is concluded that using morphology alone that the abyssal species may well be cosmopolitan in distribution. PMID:26250317

  3. Reproductive cycle of Anomalocardia brasiliana (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Veneridae) in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhus, Bahia.

    PubMed

    Luz, J R; Boehs, G

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the reproductive cycle of Anomalocardia brasiliana, typical of the estuarine region of the Cachoeira River, Ilhus, Bahia, Brazil. For this purpose, 20 specimens were collected biweekly between August 2005 and August 2006 on an intertidal bank (14 48' 23" S and 39 02' 47" W). The animals were measured on the anteroposterior axis (length), examined macroscopically and removed from the shell and fixed in Davidson's solution. Subsequently, the tissues were impregnated in paraffin, cut into 7 mm sections and stained with Harris hematoxylin and eosin (HE). The slides were examined under a light microscope. The water temperature at the site ranged from 24 to 30.5 C (mean: 27.4 C; SD 1.9), salinity from zero to 23 (mean: 13.7; SD 7.5) and rainfall from 28.3 mm to 248.8 mm monthly (yearly mean: 130 mm). The sample (n = 478) showed a sex ratio (M: F) of 1: 1.2 (p < 0.05) and no cases of hermaphroditism. There was no sexual dimorphism. Males and females showed reproductive synchrony. The reproductive cycle was continuous, with releases of gametes mainly in spring, summer and autumn. These results are similar to those found in other regions, but there was no reproductive rest period as reported for populations in higher latitudes. PMID:21881791

  4. Living on the mountains: patterns and causes of diversification in the springsnail subgenus Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) (Mollusca: Caenogastropoda: Hydrobiidae).

    PubMed

    Delicado, Diana; Machordom, Annie; Ramos, Marian A

    2013-09-01

    Hydrobiidae is one of the largest families of freshwater gastropods comprised of approximately 400 genera and 1000 species. Despite this high level of diversity, most hydrobiid species inhabit fragile ecosystems in restricted distribution areas. In this work, we analyze modes of speciation and causes of diversification in the hydrobiid springsnail subgenus Pseudamnicola (Corrosella). Species of this group typically live in nutrient poor springs and streams and are restricted to mountainous regions of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and Southern France. Previous morphological and molecular (based only on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene) studies revealed 11 nominal Corrosella species. In this study, we enhance published molecular results by generating new data from mitochondrial (16S rRNA and COI) and nuclear ribosomal regions (18S and 28S rRNA) from 50 Corrosella populations. As a result of this study we have identified one new species, making a total of twelve recognized species in the subgenus Corrosella. Our phylogenetic results also reveal the existence of three lineages within the subgenus, and the estimation of time divergence indicates the occurrence of three main speciation events during the upper Miocene to Pleistocene. We test the influence of several geographical and ecological variables and observe that diversification patterns are related to habitat fragmentation rather than environmental conditions. This result suggests that the high level of diversity observed within the subgenus may have resulted from a non-adaptive radiation. The formation of the Iberian Peninsula mountain ranges (the Pyrenees in the north and the Betic Cordillera in the south) and the configuration of the Iberian current hydrographic system played important roles in Corrosella speciation. Additionally, during the Miocene the Iberian Peninsula experienced a gradient of increasing temperature and dryness from north to south, which together with a high level of tectonic activity, may have caused the majority of the diversity found in the southern Iberian Peninsula. PMID:23660110

  5. Prosorhynchoides borealis Bartoli, Gibson & Bray, 2006 (Digenea: Bucephalidae) cercariae from Abra prismatica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Icelandic waters.

    PubMed

    Eydal, M; Freeman, M A; Kristmundsson, ; Bambir, S H; Jnsson, P M; Helgason, S

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the adult stage of Prosorhynchoides borealis (Digenea) from Lophius piscatorius in Icelandic waters and infections with the larval stages (sporocysts and cercariae) found for the first time in the bivalve Abra prismatica (Semelidae). The previously known first intermediate host was Abra alba (Semelidae). Ribosomal DNA sequencing studies on all three life stages of the parasite (cercariae, metacercariae, adults) were performed to confirm their identites. Morphometric measurements confirmed that the adult worms belong to the newly described species P. borealis. Prosorhynchoides borealis sporocysts filled with cercariae were found in 16% of A. prismatica bivalves sampled at depths between 34 and 93 m off South Iceland. Prevalence ranged from 0 to 44% between different localities. The parasite was found only in the larger bivalves. Extensive sporocyst infection in the haemocoel of the foot caused mechanical muscle damage with subsequent degeneration and necrosis. Other tissues, including the digestive gland, nephridia, gills and intestine, were less heavily infected. Only focal necrosis was observed in the digestive gland, nephridia and gills, and local atrophy in the intestine. Cercariae were also observed in the lumen of both the stomach and intestine. This is the first report of A. prismatica as an alternative first intermediate host for P. borealis. Ribosomal DNA sequence data reveals 100% homology in the data between cercariae, metacercariae and adult digeneans, supporting the morphological data suggesting that all stages belong to the same species. PMID:22217433

  6. Oxygen uptake, diffusion limitation, and diffusing capacity of the bipectinate gills of the abalone, Haliotis iris (Mollusca: Prosobranchia).

    PubMed

    Ragg, Norman L C; Taylor, H Harry

    2006-03-01

    Extant abalone retain an ancestral system of gas exchange consisting of paired bipectinate gills. This paper examines the hypothesis that fundamental inefficiencies of this arrangement led to the extensive radiation observed in prosobranch gas exchange organs. Oxygen uptake at 15 degrees C was examined in the right gill of resting adult blackfoot abalone, Haliotis iris Martyn 1784. Pre- and post-branchial haemolymph and water were sampled and oxygen content, partial pressure (Po2), pH, and haemocyanin content measured; in vivo haemolymph flow rate was determined by an acoustic pulsed-Doppler flowmeter. During a single pass across the gills, mean seawater Po2 fell from 138.7 Torr to 83.4 Torr, while haemolymph Po2 rose from 37.2 Torr to 77.0 Torr raising total O2 content from 0.226 to 0.346 mmol L(-1). Haemolymph flowed through the right gill at a mean rate of 9.6 mL min(-1) and carried 0.151 to 0.355 mmol L(-1) of haemocyanin (mean body mass 421 g). Only 34.7% of the oxygen carried in the arterial haemolymph was taken up by the tissues and less than half of this was contributed by haemocyanin. A diffusion limitation index (Ldiff) of 0.47-0.52, a well-matched ventilation-perfusion ratio (1.2-1.4) and a diffusing capacity (D) of 0.174 micromol O2 kg(-1) Torr(-1) indicate that the gills operate efficiently and are able to meet the oxygen requirements of the resting abalone. PMID:16448833

  7. [Evolutionary history of Metazoa, ancestral status of the bilateria clonal reproduction, and semicolonial origin of the mollusca].

    PubMed

    Martynov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary history of any metazoan group is a history of the entire ontogenetic cycles instead of separate stages and genes only. Ontogeny in the most objective way links two key components of the biological systematics: historically-independent characters attribution and phylogeny itself. A general theory encompassing "static" traditional taxonomy and dynamic evolutionary process, based on the ontogenetic transformation of the organisms' shape is suggested here to term as ontogenetic systematics. As an important practical implication of the ontogenetic systematics, a new model of the bilaterian metazoans evolution is suggested. The new model considers asexual clonal reproduction as a central feature of the ancestral ontogenetic cycles of basal Bilateria. The new scenario resolves several notable contradictions, e.g. morphological, ontogenetic and molecular similarities of Pogonophora, Vestimentifera, Phoronida simultaneously to protostomian Spiralia (Lophotrochozoa) and Deuterostomia. The suggested model implies individuation (possibly multiple) of ancestral semicolonial sedentary group as a major factor of the basal Bilateria diversification. In the late Ediacaran and early Cambrian thus existed ancestral bilaterian group that shared characters of both Spiralia and Deuterostomia and possessed polyp-shape body and cephalic secretory shield (like in modern Pterobranchia and Vestimentifera), that later on reduced in various lines. This ancestral taxon in rank of supraphylum is suggested to term as Carmaphora (shield-bearers). Presence of the enigmatic sedentary fossil of the genus Cloudina with vestimentiferan-like tubes and evident clonal reproduction already in the late Ediacaran, and most recent found of an unquestionable pterobranch already in the early Cambrian support the new model of Bilateria evolution. PMID:24163984

  8. Opisthobranchs from the western Indian Ocean, with descriptions of two new species and ten new records (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Yonow, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Seventy species of opisthobranchs are described in this work based on collections from the Persian Gulf, Socotra, Kenya, Zanzibar, Madagascar, La Réunion, Mauritius, the Seychelles, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. Ten species are newly recorded from the western Indian Ocean and four species are recorded in the scientific literature for the first time since their original descriptions. Two species are described as new: Cyerce bourbonica sp. n. from La Réunion and Doriopsilla nigrocerasp. n. from the Persian Gulf coast of Saudi Arabia. Chromodoris cavae is removed from its synonymy with Chromodoris tennentana and redescribed from specimens from La Réunion, while several new synonyms are proposed for some commonly occurring species. Risbecia bullockii is recorded for the second time from the Indian Ocean and assigned to its correct genus. PMID:22711992

  9. Antimicrobial activities of the tissue extracts of Babylonia spirata Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from Thazhanguda, southeast coast of India

    PubMed Central

    Periyasamy, N; Srinivasan, M; Balakrishnan, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of the tissue extracts of Babylonia spirata (B. spirata) against nine bacterial and three fungal pathogens. Methods Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial and fungal growth. Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and in vitro antifungal activity was determined against Czapex Dox agar. The antimicrobial activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract. Molecular size of muscle protein was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). And fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectro photometry analysis was also studied. Results The maximum inhibition zone (12 mm) was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the crude ethanol extract of B. spirata and the minimum inhibition zone (2 mm) was noticed against Staphylococcus aureus in the crude methanol extract of B. spirata. Water extract of B. spirata showed the highest activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Ethanol, acetone, methanol, chloroform and water extracts showed antimicrobial activity against almost all the bacteria and fungus. Compared with water extracts, ethanol and methanol extracts showed higher activity against all pathogens. The molecular weight of protein of the gastropod sample ranged from 2-110 kDa on SDS-PAGE. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of bioactive compounds signals at different ranges. Conclusions The research shows that the great medicinal value of the gastropod muscle of B. spirata may be due to high quality of antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23569831

  10. Natural products isolated from species of Halgerda bergh, 1880 (Mollusca: Nudibranchia) and their ecological and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Shireen J; Carroll, Anthony R

    2007-06-01

    Chemical investigations of five species of molluscan nudibranchs, Halgerda, collected from Australia and Japan were carried out. We identified a novel tryptophan derivative halgerdamine (1) along with the known compounds trigonellin (3), esmodil (4), zooanemonin (5), and C2-alpha-D-mannosylpyranosyl-L-tryptophan (2) from Halgerda aurantiomaculata. C2-alpha-D-mannosylpyranosyl-L-tryptophan (2) was previously thought to be a by-product of tryptophan metabolism exclusive to humans. The only other chordates reported to contain this compound are a number of ascidian species from New Caledonia and Australia including Atriolum robustum and Leptoclinides dubius. The occurrence of 2 in a mollusc has not been previously reported. Structure elucidation of 1 was achieved by using high-field 2D NMR spectroscopy. No secondary metabolites were detected in extracts from five of the six other species studied, whereas Halgerda gunnessi contained mixtures of acylated tetrasaccharides. The compounds isolated from Halgerda are different from those found in the close sister taxon, Asteronotus. Specifically, species of Halgerda contain no terpenes, spirodysin, or bromophenols, as does Asteronotus. Furthermore, in contrast to other members of the Nudibranchia such as Chromodoris and Phyllidia, in which compound yields are quite high, several cryptic species of Halgerda seem to lack secondary metabolites, whereas the two highly conspicuous species yield mildly cytotoxic MeOH extracts. Our findings support recent hypotheses regarding progressive evolution of opisthobranchs. In particular, opisthobranchs have evolved to exploit a wider range of food and metabolites than did their ancestors, a demonstration of physiological innovation. Some species of Halgerda may not be chemically protected either via de novo synthesis or by sequestering particularly toxic compounds. PMID:17457663

  11. Impacts associated with the recent range shift of the aeolid nudibranch Phidiana hiltoni (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia) in California.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Jeffrey H R; Gosliner, Terrence M; Pearse, John S

    2011-01-01

    In 1977, Phidiana hiltoni (O'Donoghue in J. Entomol Zool (Pomona College, Claremont, California) 19:77-119, 1927) began spreading northward from Monterey, California. By 1992, it had reached Duxbury Reef (37° 53' 23″ N, 122° 41' 59″ W), 100 km to the north, where other nudibranchs subsequently appeared to decline. The role of P. hiltoni in this decline was investigated through diet analysis, feeding trials, and comparison of historical and recent abundance data. In the wild, P. hiltoni preyed largely on hydroids, but also showed evidence of predation on nudibranchs. In the laboratory, P. hiltoni attacked most of the dendronotid and aeolid nudibranchs presented to it, ingesting small individuals whole. The pooled abundance of nudibranchs vulnerable to attack by P. hiltoni declined an average of two-thirds at Duxbury Reef since its arrival, compared to (1) no change in the non-vulnerable species and (2) no change in either group at two other sites where P. hiltoni was one to two orders of magnitude less abundant. Phidiana hiltoni therefore appears to have caused this decline, likely through a combination of direct predation and competition for prey. A brief larval period, combined with cyclonic re-circulation in the lee of Point Reyes, may be driving self-recruitment of P. hiltoni at Duxbury Reef, as well as hindering further northward spread. PMID:24391265

  12. Opisthobranchs from the western Indian Ocean, with descriptions of two new species and ten new records (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Yonow, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Seventy species of opisthobranchs are described in this work based on collections from the Persian Gulf, Socotra, Kenya, Zanzibar, Madagascar, La Réunion, Mauritius, the Seychelles, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. Ten species are newly recorded from the western Indian Ocean and four species are recorded in the scientific literature for the first time since their original descriptions. Two species are described as new: Cyerce bourbonicasp. n. from La Réunion and Doriopsilla nigrocerasp. n. from the Persian Gulf coast of Saudi Arabia. Chromodoris cavae is removed from its synonymy with Chromodoris tennentana and redescribed from specimens from La Réunion, while several new synonyms are proposed for some commonly occurring species. Risbecia bullockii is recorded for the second time from the Indian Ocean and assigned to its correct genus. PMID:22711992

  13. Freshwater snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from the Commonwealth of Dominica with a discussion of their roles in the transmission of parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We collected six species of freshwater snails from Dominica, including Biomphalaria kuhniana, Gundlachia radiata Helisoma (= Planorbella) trivolvis, Melanoides tuberculata, Neritina punctulata, and Physa marmorata. Our collections indicate that un-reported species such as Gundlachia radiata and Hel...

  14. Integrative study of a new cold-seep mussel (Mollusca: Bivalvia) associated with chemosynthetic symbionts in the Marmara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Bénédicte; Duperron, Sébastien; Lorion, Julien; Sara Lazar, Cassandre; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2012-09-01

    Recently, small Idas-like mussels have been discovered living on carbonate crusts associated with cold-seeps in the Marmara Sea. These mussels, here referred to as Idas-like nov. sp., differ morphologically and genetically from another species identified as Idas aff. modiolaeformis, living in the same type of ecosystem in the Nile Deep-Sea Fan (eastern Mediterranean Sea). A phylogenetic analysis confirms the distinction between the two species, which belong to highly divergent lineages. Carbon stable isotope values, as well as the detection of thiotroph-related bacteria in the gill tissue, support the presence of a symbiotic, thiotroph-derived nutrition. In contrast, Idas aff. modiolaeformis displays six different types of symbionts. Finally our size-frequency data suggest that the recruitment is continuous in the examined area. The present study extends the documented distribution of symbiont-bearing mussels to the Marmara Sea, and contributes to the characterisation of biological communities in this recently explored area.

  15. Biomphalaria straminea (Mollusca: Planorbidae) as an intermediate host of Drepanocephalus spp. (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Brazil: a morphological and molecular study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species of trematodes belonging to the genus Drepanocephalus are intestinal parasites of piscivorous birds, primarily cormorants (Phalachrocorax spp.), and are widely reported in the Americas. During a 4-year malacological study conducted on an urban lake in Brazil, 27-collar-spined echinostome cerc...

  16. Cytogenetic characterisation of the razor shells Ensis directus (Conrad, 1843) and E. minor (Chenu, 1843) (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tizón, Ana M.; Rojo, Verónica; Vierna, Joaquín; Jensen, K. Thomas; Egea, Emilie; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2013-03-01

    The European razor shell Ensis minor (Chenu 1843) and the American E. directus (Conrad 1843) have a diploid chromosome number of 38 and remarkable differences in their karyotypes: E. minor has four metacentric, one metacentric-submetacentric, five submetacentric, one subtelocentric and eight telocentric chromosome pairs, whereas E. directus has three metacentric, two metacentric-submetacentric, six submetacentric, six subtelocentric and two telocentric pairs. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a major ribosomal DNA probe located the major ribosomal genes on one submetacentric chromosome pair in both species; FISH with a 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) probe rendered one chromosomal (weak) signal for E. minor and no signal for E. directus, supporting a more dispersed organisation of 5S rDNA compared to the major ribosomal genes. The vertebrate telomeric sequence (TTAGGG) n was located on both ends of each chromosome, and no interstitial signals were detected. In this work, a comparative karyological analysis was also performed between the four Ensis species analysed revealing that the three European species studied so far, namely E. minor, E. siliqua (Linné 1758) and E. magnus Schumacher 1817 show more similarities among them than compared to the American species E. directus. In addition, clear karyotype differences were found between the morphologically similar species E. minor and E. siliqua.

  17. Assimilation of terrigenous organic matter via bacterial biomass as a food source for a brackish clam, Corbicula japonica (Mollusca: Bivalva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Maki, Yonosuke; Matsumasa, Masatoshi

    2013-07-01

    Corbicula japonica collected from the Kitakami River estuary, northeastern Japan, showed lower δ34S values in soft-body parts (+1.7 to +11.0‰) than the ambient seawater sulfate sulfur (+21‰), and this value gradually decreased at successive sites up to 15.8 km upstream from the river mouth. Previous study using carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggests that the bivalve nonselectively assimilates particulate organic matter of marine and terrestrial origin by filter feeding. This pattern in δ34S values may indicate a considerable contribution of a food source derived from terrigenous organic matter, which has low δ34S values close to 0‰, and the bivalve has been reported to have cellulase and hemicellulase activities. Unique fatty acids (iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 acids), both characteristic of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were observed in the salt-free, soft-body parts of the bivalve. The concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, possibly derived from bacteria, was also high. Trace amounts of a polyunsaturated fatty acid (20:5ω3) specific to dinoflagellates were detected. In Corbicula habitats, reductive sandy layers with ample sulfides that were sporadically intercalated into the oxidative sandy sediment were often observed. The stable isotopic signatures of sediment sulfides (acid-volatile sulfide) and associated pore-water sulfates were -8.9 to +8.6‰ and +22.4 to +26.3‰, respectively, indicating the existence of bacterial sulfate-reducing activity and thiobios biomass. These isotopic signatures of the sediment, with the fatty acid composition of the bivalve, confirm the importance of a food source derived from bacteria belonging to the thiobios in the substrate sediments via pedal feeding, rather than direct digestion of terrigenous organic matter, in this estuarine ecosystem.

  18. Polyplacophora (Mollusca) from the San Diego Formation: A remarkable assemblage of fossil chitons from the Pliocene of southern Califoria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vendrasco, Michael J.; Eernisse, Douglas J.; Powell, Charles L.; Fernandez, Christine Z.

    2012-01-01

    taphonomic factors bias valve ratios long after valves are disarticulated. New foraminiferan and molluscan data indicate a middle or late Pliocene age of deposition for these beds, between 3.3 to 2.5 million years ago (Ma), and possibly about 3.0 Ma.

  19. Spatial diversity of rocky midlittoral macro-invertebrates associated with the endangered species Patella ferruginea (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Rabaoui, Lotfi; Fguiri, Hosni; Diawara, Moctar; Ben Hassine, Oum Kalthoum

    2010-04-01

    The present study focuses on horizontal spatial variability of benthic macrofauna associated with Patella ferruginea. Thirty-six samples collected at 12 transects belonging to 4 midlittoral sites along the rocky Tunisian coastline, were examined. A total of 44 species belonging to 5 taxa were found. Multivariate analysis applied on gathered data did not show a horizontal spatial variability at small scale (between transects), but at large scale, between sites as well as sectors. Thus, three groups of communities were identified (GI: Korbous and El Haouaria; GIIa: Zembra Island and GIIb: Kelibia). The distribution of species abundance within these groups revealed that crustaceans were the most abundant taxon, due to the overwhelming dominance of Chthamalus stellatus. This substratum appeared to create favourable micro-habitats for the installation of molluscs including gastropods. Regarding the low diversity index ( H') and evenness ( J), they seemed to reflect a disturbance and a demographic unbalance within these communities. The heterogeneity of substrate surface, created by C. stellatus specimens appeared to be caused by various complex interactions established between the key components of these communities in particular suspension feeders, predators, herbivorous molluscs and macroalgae. Thus, the dynamic status of each of these communities is the result of these complex interactions.

  20. An annotated catalogue and bibliography of the taxonomy, synonymy and distribution of the Recent Vetigastropoda of South Africa (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Herbert, David G

    2015-01-01

    A complete inventory of the known Recent vetigastropod fauna of South Africa is provided. Bibliographic citations to works discussing the taxonomy, synonymy and distribution of the species in a southern African or south-western Indian Ocean context are provided. Additional explanatory notes are given where pertinent. New genus records for South Africa: Acremodontina B.A. Marshall, 1995; Choristella Bush, 1879; Cocculinella Thiele, 1909; Conjectura Finlay, 1926; Crosseola Iredale, 1924; Falsimargarita Powell, 1951; Lepetella Verrill, 1880; Profundisepta McLean & Geiger, 1998; Stomatella Lamarck, 1816; Stomatia Helbling, 1779; Stomatolina Iredale, 1937; Synaptocochlea Pilsbry, 1890; Tibatrochus Nomura, 1940; Visayaseguenzia Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006; Zetela Finlay, 1926. New species records for South Africa: Acremodontina aff. carinata Powell, 1940; Anatoma finlayi (Powell, 1937); Anatoma munieri (P. Fischer, 1862); Calliotropis acherontis B.A. Marshall, 1979; Calliotropis bucina Vilvens, 2006; Cocculinella minutissima (E.A. Smith, 1904); Diodora ruppellii (G.B. Sowerby (I), 1835); Emarginula costulata Deshayes, 1863; Emarginula decorata Deshayes, 1863; Jujubinus hubrechti Poppe, Tagaro & Dekker, 2006; Lepetella sp.; Seguenzia orientalis Thiele, 1925; Stomatella auricula Lamarck, 1816; Stomatia phymotis Helbling, 1779; Stomatolina angulata (A. Adams, 1850); Stomatolina cf. calliostoma (A. Adams, 1850); Stomatolina aff. danblumi Singer & Mienis, 1999; Stomatolina cf. rubra (Lamarck, 1822); Stomatolina sp.; Synaptocochlea concinna (Gould, 1845); Tectus mauritianus (Gmelin, 1791); Tibatrochus cf. incertus (Schepman, 1908); Turbo imperialis Gmelin, 1791; Turbo tursicus Reeve, 1848; Visayaseguenzia compsa (Melvill, 1904).New species: Spectamen martensi, replacement name for Spectamen semisculptum sensu Herbert (1987) (non Martens, 1904). New name: Oxystele antoni is proposed as a new name for Trochus (Turbo) variegatus (non Gmelin, 1791 =Heliacus) Anton, 1838. Revised taxonomy: Cyclostrema semisculptum Martens, 1904 is an earlier name for Solariella intermissa Thiele, 1925, and is referable to the genus Zetela Finlay, 1926; Margarita bicarinata A. Adams & Reeve, 1850 is considered to be a senior synonym of Solariella undata G.B. Sowerby (II), 1870, and is referable to the genus Ilanga Herbert, 1987. Validation of the name Trochus tigrinus Chemnitz, 1781 is credited to Dillwyn (1817) rather than Anton (1838). New synonyms: Clanculus exquisita Turton, 1932 =Calliostoma africanum Bartsch, 1915; Cyclostrema alfredensis Bartsch, 1915 =Parviturbo alfredensis (Bartsch, 1915); Cynisca gloriosa Bartsch, 1915 =Cinysca spuria (Gould, 1861); Herbertina hayesi Herbert, 1995 =Bruceina chenoderma (Barnard, 1963); Ilanga millardi Herbert, 1987 =Ilanga humillima (Thiele, 1925); Leptothyra africana Bartsch, 1915 =Cinysca spuria (Gould, 1861); Leptothyra albocincta Turton, 1932 =Tricolia striolata (Turton, 1932); Solariella undata G.B. Sowerby (II), 1870, S. gratiosa Thiele, 1925 and S. valdiviae Thiele, 1925 =Ilanga bicarinata bicarinata (A. Adams & Reeve, 1850); Solariella chuni Thiele, 1925, S. intermissa Thiele, 1925, S. gilchristi Barnard, 1963 and S. macleari Barnard, 1963 =Zetela semisculpta (Martens, 1904); Turbo (Collonia) armillatus G.B. Sowerby (III), 1886 =Cinysca spuria (Gould, 1861). New combinations: Basilissa (Ancistrobasis) compsa Melvill, 1904 is transferred to Visayaseguenzia; Calcar rhysopoma Barnard, 1964 is transferred to Bothropoma; Calliostoma glaucophaos Barnard, 1963 is transferred to Falsimargarita; Calliotropis chenoderma Barnard, 1963 is transferred to Bruceina; Collonia bicarinata Martens, 1902 is transferred to Cinysca; Crossea agulhasensis Thiele, 1925 is transferred to Conjectura; Cyclostrema semisculptum Martens, 1904 is transferred to Zetela; Cyclostremella farica Bartsch, 1915 is transferred to Dikoleps; Cynisca africana Bartsch, 1915 is transferred to Homalopoma; Leptogyra africana: Bartsch, 1915 is transferred to Cirsonella; Leptothyra agulhasensis Thiele, 1925 is transferred to Homalopoma; Leptothyra alfredensis Bartsch, 1915 is transferred to Parviturbo; Leptothyra sola Barnard, 1963 is transferred to a Parviturbo; Liotia (Cynisca) semiclausa Thiele, 1925 is transferred to Cinysca; Monilea spuria Gould, 1861 is transferred to Cinysca; Monodonta gibbula Thiele, 1925 is transferred to Cantrainea; Puncturella voraginosa Herbert & Kilburn, 1986 is transferred to Profundisepta; Solariella fuscomaculata G.B. Sowerby (III), 1892 is transferred to Skenea; Solariella turbynei Barnard, 1963 is transferred to Zetela; Turbo boswellae Barnard, 1969 is transferred to Cantrainea; Turbo foveolatus Barnard, 1963 is transferred to Crosseola; Turbo ponsonbyi G.B. Sowerby (III), 1897 is transferred to Bothropoma; Vitrinella agulhasensis Thiele, 1925 is transferred to Parviturbo; Vitrinella (Docomphala) arifca Bartsch, 1915 is transferred to Lodderena; Vitrinella inclinans Barnard, 1963 is transferred to Skenea. PMID:26624772

  1. Life cycle, population dynamics, growth and production of Abra segmentum (Mollusca, Bivalvia) at low salinities in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Theodoros; Kasapis, K.; Kalpia, V.

    2009-12-01

    Aspects of the biology of Abra segmentum were investigated at low salinities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Monolimni Lagoon, Northern Aegean Sea). Monthly samples were collected during the period from February 1998 to January 1999. Recruitment occurred from mid-spring to early autumn (0.3-5.7 psu) and recruits grew during summer and autumn (1.2-5.7 psu), while a major part vanished during next autumn, displaying a maximum life span of about 20 months. A positive correlation was found between the percentage of individuals having a shell length of ≤3.5 mm and temperature; age group 0 showed a growth rate of 0.97 mm per month, and the largest individual collected had a 19.76 mm shell length. The population density sharply increased during late spring (0.3-1.2 psu); this increase was followed by a decline during summer and, afterwards, a gradual increase up to late autumn. Secondary production calculated by the size-frequency method gave a mean annual density ( n) of 3,357 individuals m-2, a mean annual biomass ( B) of 21.98 g DW m-2, an annual production ( P) of 73.72 g DW m-2 and a P: B ratio of 3.35. A comparison of the present data with available data of A. segmentum populations from higher salinity habitats revealed that this bivalve in the study area showed a life history pattern similar to that of other populations of the species and a comparatively high growth rate, maximum body size, n, B, P and P: B ratio. Our findings suggest that the studied aspects of A. segmentum biology could not be markedly affected by low salinities.

  2. Biomphalaria straminea (Mollusca: Planorbidae) as an intermediate host of Drepanocephalus spp. (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Brazil: a morphological and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson A; Griffin, Matt J; Quiniou, Sylvie M; Ware, Cynthia; Melo, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Species of trematodes belonging to the genus Drepanocephalus are intestinal parasites of piscivorous birds, primarily cormorants (Phalachrocorax spp.), and are widely reported in the Americas. During a 4-year malacological study conducted on an urban lake in Brazil, 27-collar-spined echinostome cercariae were found in 1665/15,459 (10.7 %) specimens of Biomphalaria straminea collected. The cercariae were identified as Drepanocephalus spp. by sequencing the 18S (SSU) rDNA, ITS1/5.8S rDNA/ITS2 (ITS), 28S (LSU) rDNA region, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) markers. In experimental life cycle studies, metacercariae developed in laboratory-reared guppies (Poecilia reticulata); however, attempts to infect birds and rodents were unsuccessful. Two closely related morphotypes of cercariae were characterized. One species, identified by molecular markers as a genetic variant of Drepanocephalus auritus (99.9 % similarity at SSU, ITS, LSU; 97.2 % at CO1; 95.8 % at ND1), differs slightly from an archived North American isolate of this species also sequenced as part of this study. A second species, putatively identified as Drepanocephalus sp., has smaller cercariae and demonstrates significant differences from D. auritus at the CO1 (11.0 %) and ND1 (13.6 %) markers. Aspects related to the morphological taxonomic identification of 27-collar-spined echinostome metacercariae are briefly discussed. This is the first report of the involvement of molluscs of the genus Biomphalaria in the transmission of Drepanocephalus and the first report of D. auritus in South America. PMID:25982569

  3. Population genetic structure of Bellamya aeruginosa (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Viviparidae) in China: weak divergence across large geographic distances.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qian H; Husemann, Martin; Ding, Baoqing; Luo, Zhi; Xiong, Bang X

    2015-11-01

    Bellamya aeruginosa is a widely distributed Chinese freshwater snail that is heavily harvested, and its natural habitats are under severe threat due to fragmentation and loss. We were interested whether the large geographic distances between populations and habitat fragmentation have led to population differentiation and reduced genetic diversity in the species. To estimate the genetic diversity and population structure of B. aeruginosa, 277 individuals from 12 populations throughout its distribution range across China were sampled: two populations were sampled from the Yellow River system, eight populations from the Yangtze River system, and two populations from isolated plateau lakes. We used seven microsatellite loci and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I sequences to estimate population genetic parameters and test for demographic fluctuations. Our results showed that (1) the genetic diversity of B. aeruginosa was high for both markers in most of the studied populations and effective population sizes appear to be large, (2) only very low and mostly nonsignificant levels of genetic differentiation existed among the 12 populations, gene flow was generally high, and (3) relatively weak geographic structure was detected despite large geographic distances between populations. Further, no isolation by linear or stream distance was found among populations within the Yangtze River system and no signs of population bottlenecks were detected. Gene flow occurred even between far distant populations, possibly as a result of passive dispersal during flooding events, zoochoric dispersal, and/or anthropogenic translocations explaining the lack of stronger differentiation across large geographic distances. The high genetic diversity of B. aeruginosa and the weak population differentiation are likely the results of strong gene flow facilitated by passive dispersal and large population sizes suggesting that the species currently is not of conservation concern. PMID:26640670

  4. Establishment of the green mussel, Perna viridis (Linnaeus 1758) (Mollusca: Mytilidae) on the West Coast of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, A.J.; Marelli, D.C.; Frischer, M.E.; Danforth, J.M.; Williams, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999, the green mussel, Perna viridis, was first observed in Tampa Bay, Florida. This was the first reported occurrence of this Indo-Pacific marine bivalve in North America. The mussels found in Tampa Bay were confirmed to be P. viridis based on both morphological and genetic characteristics. Since the initial discovery, surveys in Tampa Bay and on the west coast of Florida have documented the growth, recruitment, and range expansion of P. viridis. From November 1999 to July 2000, the mean shell length of a Tampa Bay population increased from 49.0 mm to 94.1 mm, an increase of 97%. Populations of P. viridis are successfully reproducing in Tampa Bay. Recruitment was observed on sampling plates in May and continued through July 2000. The full extent of mussel colonization is not clear, but mussels were found outside Tampa Bay in St. Petersburg, Florida, south to Venice. Based on these studies it is evident that P. viridis has successfully invaded Tampa Bay and the west coast of Florida. The long-term impact of P. viridis on native communities off the west coast of Florida cannot be predicted at this time.

  5. Behavioral thermoregulation and critical thermal limits of giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata(Sowerby 1825) (Mollusca; Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Denisse Re, Ana; Salas, Alfredo; Galindo-Sanchez, Clara E; Gonzalez, Marco A; Sanchez, Adolfo; Rosas, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The thermoregulatory behavior of the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata was determined in a horizontal thermal gradient during the day at 18.9 °C and 18.3 °C for the night. The final preferendum determined for giant keyhole limpets was of 18.6±1.2 °C. Limpets' displacement velocity was 10.0±3.9 cm h(-1) during the light phase and 8.4±1.6 cm h(-1) during the dark phase. The thermotolerance (measured as CTMax at 50%) was determined in a keyhole limpet in three acclimation temperatures 17, 20, and 23 °C. Limpets were subjected to water increasing temperatures at a rate of 1 °C every 30 min, until they detached from the substrate. The critical thermal maximum at 50% was 27.2, 27.9 and 28.3 °C respectively. PMID:26615735

  6. A natural history of the deep-sea aplacophoran Prochaetoderma yongei and its relationship to confamilials (Mollusca, Prochaetodermatidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheltema, Amélie H.; Ivanov, Dmitry L.

    2009-09-01

    Previously published studies are woven together into a natural history of a deep-sea aplacophoran mollusc species, Prochaetoderma yongei Scheltema, 1985, and its confamilial species in the Prochaetodermatidae. This amphi-Atlantic species occurs sometimes in great numbers at upper bathyal depths, rivaling polychaetes in numerical dominance. It appears to be an opportunist, with wide geographic and depth distribution, rapid development from lecithotrophic larva to settlement and maturity, and omnivory. A short illustrated morphological description using characters useful for identifying all prochaetodermatid species should prove useful to nontaxonomists whose business is the deep-sea benthic fauna.

  7. A new species of Pulvinites (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the upper Paleocene Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Virginia ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, L.W.; Waller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvinites lawrencei n.sp. is described from the upper Paleocene (Landenian Stage) Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Stafford County, Virginia. This is the first report of a member of the pteriacean family Pulvinitidae in the Tertiary on either side of the Atlantic, the only other post-Mesozoic records of Pulvinites being in the Paleocene of California and the present-day Pacific off southeast Australia. The stratigraphic setting and co-occurring molluscan assemblage of the new species indicate shallow-shelf, open-marine conditions with near normal salinities. -Authors

  8. THE BEHAVIOR OF LOLIGO OPALESCENS (MOLLUSCA: CEPHALOPODA) AS OBSERVED BY A REMOTELY OPERATED VEHICLE (ROV). (R825381)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Genetic differentiation of Octopus minor (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) off the northern coast of China as revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Sun, G H; Zheng, X D; Ren, L H; Wang, W J; Li, G R; Sun, B C

    2015-01-01

    Octopus minor (Sasaki, 1920) is an economically important cephalopod that is found in the northern coastal waters of China. In this study, we investigated genetic differentiation in fishery populations using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). A total of 150 individuals were collected from five locations: Dalian (DL), Yan-tai (YT), Qingdao (QD), Lianyungang (LY), and Zhoushan (ZS), and 243 reproducible bands were amplified using five AFLP primer combinations. The percentage of polymorphic bands ranged from 53.33 to 76.08%. Nei's genetic identity ranged from 0.9139 to 0.9713, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0291 to 0.0900. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, based on the genetic distance. The DL and YT populations originated from one clade, while the QD, LY, and ZS populations originated from another. The results indicate that the O. minor stock consisted of two genetic populations with an overall significantly analogous FST value (0.1088, P < 0.05). Most of the variance was within populations. These findings will be important for more sustainable octopus fisheries, so that this marine resource can be conserved for its long-term utilization. PMID:26634529

  10. Radix dolgini: The integrative taxonomic approach supports the species status of a Siberian endemic snail (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Lymnaeidae).

    PubMed

    Vinarski, Maxim V; Aksenova, Olga V; Bespalaya, Yulia V; Bolotov, Ivan N; Schniebs, Katrin; Gofarov, Mikhail Yu; Kondakov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    The molecular techniques are the standard tool for the study of the taxonomic position and phylogenetic affinities of the lymnaeid genus Radix Montfort, 1810, and the majority of the European representatives of this taxon have been studied in this respect. However, a plethora of nominal species of Radix described from Northern Asia (Siberia and the Russian Far East) are still characterized only morphologically, raising some doubts concerning their validity. In this paper, we present the triple (morphological, molecular, and zoogeographical) evidence that there is at least one endemic species of Radix, Radix dolgini (Gundrizer and Starobogatov, 1979), widely distributed in Siberia and Western Mongolia. Phylogenetically, it is a sister species to the European R. labiata (Rossmaessler, 1835) [=R. peregra auct.], and their common ancestor most probably lived in the Pliocene, nearly 3.25Myr ago. Our results assume the existence of an extended dispersal barrier for freshwater hydrobionts between Europe and Siberia in the Late Pliocene that may be important for biogeographical explanations. Three other nominal Siberian species of Radix: R. kurejkae (Gundrizer and Starobogatov, 1979), R. gundrizeri (Kruglov and Starobogatov, 1983), and R. ulaganica (Kruglov and Starobogatov, 1983) proved to be the junior synonyms of R. dolgini. PMID:26705968

  11. Differences in absolute and relative growth between two shell forms of Pinna nobilis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) along the Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaoui, Lotfi; Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Belgacem, Walid; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the absolute and relative growth patterns of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis along the Tunisian coastline, taking into consideration both the variability among different areas and between the two shell forms "combed" and "straight and wide". Five subpopulations of the species were sampled, one from northern, two from eastern and two from southern Tunisia. Various assumptions on the growth patterns were tested based on an information theory approach and multi-model inference. For absolute growth, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two shell forms of P. nobilis and no difference among subpopulations was the most supported by the data. For the same age, "straight and wide" individuals gained on average greater lengths than the "combed" individuals. The absolute growth of the species was found to be asymptotic and the logistic model was the one most supported by the data. As for the relative growth, apart from the classical allometric model Y = aXb, more complicated models of the form ln Y = f(ln X) that either assumed non-linearities or breakpoints were tested in combination with assumptions for possible differences between the two forms and among subpopulations. Among the eight studied relationships between morphometric characters, the classical allometric model was supported in only two cases, while in all other cases more complicated models were supported. Moreover, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two forms was supported in three cases and the assumption of different growth patterns among subpopulations in four cases. Although precise relationships between the morphometric plasticity of the fan mussel and environmental factors have not been proven in this paper, local small scale constraints might be responsible of the different growth patterns observed in the same locality. A possible co-action of genetic factors should be evaluated in the future.

  12. Genetic structure of Onchidium "struma" (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Eupulmonata) from the coastal area of China based on mtCO I.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Shen, Heding; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Bianna; Zheng, Pei; Wang, Chengnuan

    2016-03-01

    The genetic diversity and population genetic structure of Onchidium "struma" were investigated using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CO I) gene sequences. A total of 240 individuals representing 10 collection sites from across a large portion of its known range were included in the analysis. Overall, 42 haplotypes were defined and 97 polymorphic sites were observed. The O. "struma" populations had high haplotype diversity (0.9280) and nucleotide diversity (0.0404). We inferred that the early maturity and extensive survival habitat led to high genetic diversity of O. "struma" populations in China. Bayesian analysis and SAMOVA analysis showed significant genetic differentiation among populations and all populations were divided into two groups, (HK and HN) versus (GY, DF, CX, CN, ND and XM). The Mantel test revealed no significant correlation between geographic distance and genetic distance (r = 0.251; p = 0.058). Restricted gene flow caused by a shorter term pelagic veliger stage and limited dispersal potential were inferred to result in genetic differentiation among populations based on nested analysis. HK population might be an invasive species by artificial transplantation. PMID:25103423

  13. Experimental and molecular study of cercariae of Clinostomum sp. (Trematoda: Clinostomidae) from Biomphalaria spp. (Mollusca: Planorbidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, H A; Caffara, M; Fioravanti, M L; Melo, A L

    2015-02-01

    Despite the large number of reports of species of Clinostomum from vertebrate hosts in South America, studies evaluating the molluscan transmitters of these parasites are scarce. In the present study, clinostomatoid cercariae shed from 0.02% (4/17,485) specimens of Biomphalaria spp., collected at the Pampulha reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were used for experimental infection of Poecilia reticulata . Samples of cercariae from molluscs and metacercariae experimentally obtained from fish were subjected to morphological and molecular analyses and compared with species of Clinostomum reported in the Americas. The cercariae and metacercariae, here identified as Clinostomum sp., present general morphology similar to that reported for Clinostomum marginatum , however, from molecular point of view, differ significantly from North American C. marginatum and other species of Clinostomum reported in South America. These results suggest that the diversity of Clinostomum found in Brazil may be underestimated. Additional studies aimed at molecular characterization of South American species of Clinostomum, including the finding of specimens with sequences similar to that reported for C. marginatum in North America are required. PMID:25090192

  14. First record of a nematode Metastrongyloidea (Aelurostrongylus abstrusus larvae) in Achatina (Lissachatina) fulica (Mollusca, Achatinidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, Silvana C; Fernandez, Monica A; Torres, Eduardo J L; Coelho, Pablo M; Lanfredi, Reinalda M

    2008-05-01

    Achatina (Lissachatina) fulica was introduced in Brazil in the 1980s for commercial purposes ("escargot" farming) and nowadays, mainly by human activity, it is widespread in at least 23 out of 26 Brazilian states and Braslia, including the Amazonian region and natural reserves, where besides a general nuisance for people it is a pest and also a public health concern, since it is one of the natural intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, ethiological agent of the meningoencephalitis in Asia. As Brazil is experiencing the explosive phase of the invasion, the Laboratrio de Malacologia do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz has been receiving samples of these molluscs for identification and search for Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Angiostrongylus costaricensis larvae. While examining samples of A. fulica different nematode larvae were obtained, including Aelurostrongylus, whose different species are parasites of felids, dogs, primates, and badger. Morphological and morphometric analyses presented herein indicated the species Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, as well as the occurrence of other nematode larvae (Strongyluris-like) found in the interior of the pallial cavity of A. fulica. This is the first report in Brazil of the development of A. abstrusus infective larvae in A. fulica evidencing the veterinary importance of this mollusc in the transmission of A. abstrusus to domestic cats. Since the spread of A. fulica is pointed out in the literature as one of the main causative spread of the meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis the authors emphasize the need of sanitary vigilance of snails and rats from vulnerable areas for A. cantonensis introduction as the port side areas. PMID:18078952

  15. A cybertaxonomic revision of the micro-landsnail genus Plectostoma Adam (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Diplommatinidae), from Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Indochina

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Thor-Seng; Vermeulen, Jaap Jan; Marzuki, Mohammad Effendi bin; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Plectostoma is a micro land snail restricted to limestone outcrops in Southeast Asia. Plectostoma was previously classified as a subgenus of Opisthostoma because of the deviation from regular coiling in many species in both taxa. This paper is the first of a two-part revision of the genus Plectostoma, and includes all non-Borneo species. In the present paper, we examined 214 collection samples of 31 species, and obtained 62 references, 290 pictures, and 155 3D-models of 29 Plectostoma species and 51 COI sequences of 19 species. To work with such a variety of taxonomic data, and then to represent it in an integrated, scaleable and accessible manner, we adopted up-to-date cybertaxonomic tools. All the taxonomic information, such as references, classification, species descriptions, specimen images, genetic data, and distribution data, were tagged and linked with cyber tools and web servers (e.g. Lifedesks, Google Earth, and Barcoding of Life Database). We elevated Plectostoma from subgenus to genus level based on morphological, ecological and genetic evidence. We revised the existing 21 Plectostoma species and described 10 new species, namely, P. dindingensis sp. n., P. mengaburensis sp. n., P. whitteni sp. n., P. kayiani sp. n., P. davisoni sp. n., P. relauensis sp. n., P. kubuensis sp. n., P. tohchinyawi sp. n., P. tenggekensis sp. n., and P. ikanensis sp. n. All the synthesised, semantic-tagged, and linked taxonomic information is made freely and publicly available online. PMID:24715783

  16. A cytochemical analysis of the follicular cells and the yolk in the growing oocytes of Octopus vulgaris (Cephalopoda, Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Bolognari, A; Carmignani, M P; Zaccone, G

    1976-01-01

    From an examination of the structural and cytochemical data obtained on the follicular epithelium and on the growing oocytes of Octopus vulgaris it has been possible to establish that, during the evitellogenetic period, the follicular cells penetrate into the oocyte cytoplasm and assume the form of cords. The yolk, which meanwhile has been constituted also through the probable contribution of material metiated by the follicular cells, is seen to be rich in neutral glycoproteins, proteins with sulphydrilic and thiolic radicals and proteins tyrosine and tryptophan containing, but is lacking in glycogen and in acid mucopolysaccharides. PMID:135466

  17. Microsatellite loci for dreissenid mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) and relatives: markers for assessing exotic and native populations.

    PubMed

    Feldheim, Kevin A; Brown, Joshua E; Murphy, Douglas J; Stepien, Carol A

    2011-07-01

    We developed and tested 14 new polymorphic microsatellite loci for dreissenid mussels, including the two species that have invaded many freshwater habitats in Eurasia and North America, where they cause serious industrial fouling damage and ecological alterations. These new loci will aid our understanding of their genetic patterns in invasive populations as well as throughout their native Ponto-Caspian distributions. Eight new loci for the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha polymorpha and six for the quagga mussel D. rostriformis bugensis were compared with new results from six previously published loci to generate a robust molecular toolkit for dreissenid mussels and their relatives. Taxa tested include D. p. polymorpha, D. r. bugensis, D. r. grimmi, D. presbensis, the 'living fossil'Congeria kusceri, and the dark false mussel Mytilopsis leucophaeata (the latter also is invasive). Overall, most of the 24 zebra mussel (N = 583) and 13 quagga mussel (N = 269) population samples conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations for the new loci following sequential Bonferroni correction. The 11 loci (eight new, three previously published) evaluated for D. p. polymorpha averaged 35.1 alleles and 0.72 mean observed heterozygosity per locus, and 25.3 and 0.75 for the nine loci (six new, three previously published) developed for D. r. bugensis. All but three of these loci successfully amplified the other species of Dreissena, and all but one also amplified Congeria and Mytilopsis. All species and populations tested were significantly divergent using the microsatellite data, with neighbour-joining trees reflecting their evolutionary relationships; our results reveal broad utility for resolving their biogeographic, evolutionary, population and ecological patterns. PMID:21457480

  18. A cybertaxonomic revision of the micro-landsnail genus Plectostoma Adam (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Diplommatinidae), from Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Indochina.

    PubMed

    Liew, Thor-Seng; Vermeulen, Jaap Jan; Marzuki, Mohammad Effendi Bin; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Plectostoma is a micro land snail restricted to limestone outcrops in Southeast Asia. Plectostoma was previously classified as a subgenus of Opisthostoma because of the deviation from regular coiling in many species in both taxa. This paper is the first of a two-part revision of the genus Plectostoma, and includes all non-Borneo species. In the present paper, we examined 214 collection samples of 31 species, and obtained 62 references, 290 pictures, and 155 3D-models of 29 Plectostoma species and 51 COI sequences of 19 species. To work with such a variety of taxonomic data, and then to represent it in an integrated, scaleable and accessible manner, we adopted up-to-date cybertaxonomic tools. All the taxonomic information, such as references, classification, species descriptions, specimen images, genetic data, and distribution data, were tagged and linked with cyber tools and web servers (e.g. Lifedesks, Google Earth, and Barcoding of Life Database). We elevated Plectostoma from subgenus to genus level based on morphological, ecological and genetic evidence. We revised the existing 21 Plectostoma species and described 10 new species, namely, P. dindingensis sp. n., P. mengaburensis sp. n., P. whitteni sp. n., P. kayiani sp. n., P. davisoni sp. n., P. relauensis sp. n., P. kubuensis sp. n., P. tohchinyawi sp. n., P. tenggekensis sp. n., and P. ikanensis sp. n. All the synthesised, semantic-tagged, and linked taxonomic information is made freely and publicly available online. PMID:24715783

  19. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-07-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmission electron microscopy. Within the scope of the present study we investigated the myogenesis of premetamorphic, metamorphic, and juvenile developmental stages of the anaspidean opisthobranch Aplysia californica using fluorescence F-actin-labeling in conjunction with modern confocal laser scanning microscopy. We categorized muscles with respect to their differentiation and degeneration and found three true larval muscles that differentiate during the embryonic and veliger phase and degenerate during or slightly after metamorphosis. These are the larval retractor, the accessory larval retractor, and the metapodial retractor muscle. While the pedal retractor muscle, some transversal mantle fibers and major portions of the cephalopedal musculature are continued and elaborated during juvenile and adult life, the buccal musculature and the anterior retractor muscle constitute juvenile/adult muscles which differentiate during or after metamorphosis. The metapodial retractor muscle has never been reported for any other gastropod taxon. Our findings indicate that the late veliger larva of A. californica shares some common traits with veligers of other gastropods, such as a larval retractor muscle. However, the postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the importance of ontogenetic approaches to understand adult conditions and life history patterns. PMID:18157859

  20. Opisthobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda) – more than just slimy slugs. Shell reduction and its implications on defence and foraging

    PubMed Central

    Wägele, Heike; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2005-01-01

    Background In general shell-less slugs are considered to be slimy animals with a rather dull appearance and a pest to garden plants. But marine slugs usually are beautifully coloured animals belonging to the less-known Opisthobranchia. They are characterized by a large array of interesting biological phenomena, usually related to foraging and/or defence. In this paper our knowledge of shell reduction, correlated with the evolution of different defensive and foraging strategies is reviewed, and new results on histology of different glandular systems are included. Results Based on a phylogeny obtained by morphological and histological data, the parallel reduction of the shell within the different groups is outlined. Major food sources are given and glandular structures are described as possible defensive structures in the external epithelia, and as internal glands. Conclusion According to phylogenetic analyses, the reduction of the shell correlates with the evolution of defensive strategies. Many different kinds of defence structures, like cleptocnides, mantle dermal formations (MDFs), and acid glands, are only present in shell-less slugs. In several cases, it is not clear whether the defensive devices were a prerequisite for the reduction of the shell, or reduction occurred before. Reduction of the shell and acquisition of different defensive structures had an implication on exploration of new food sources and therefore likely enhanced adaptive radiation of several groups. PMID:15715915

  1. Evolutionary Pattern and Process within the Vertigo gouldii (Mollusca: Pulmonata, Pupillidae) group of minute North American Land Snails

    PubMed Central

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Coles, Brian F.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar

    2010-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 19 sibling taxa in the Vertigo gouldii group was conducted on 73 individuals sampled across North America using DNA sequence data of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S), and the internal transcribed spacer-2 of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (ITS-2) gene. The results of these analyses were found incongruent with previous taxonomic concepts used to define the V. gouldii group and its composite taxa that were based entirely on conchological features. The mtDNA sequence data suggest that some previous members of the traditional V. gouldii group may be more closely related to V. modesta. They also suggest that V. gouldii may itself consist of seven species-level branches spread across two deeply rooted clades. Revision of geographical distributions on the basis of these analyses suggests that these Vertigo species may commonly possess continental-sized ranges in spite of their minute size and limited active dispersal ability. High levels of sympatry within the group are also confirmed, with up to four species being known to co-occur within single microsites. These data also suggest that rates of diversification have been non-constant. Assuming a 1%/my rate of base pair substitution, a 10-fold diversification pulse is indicated from 6.7-7.0 myBP, which would be co-incident with known mid-late Miocene global climate changes. PMID:19766197

  2. Anatomy and ecology of the shell-less endoparasitic gastropod Asterophila japonica Randall and Heath, 1912 (Mollusca: Eulimidae).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takenori; Muro, Kentaro; Komatsu, Miko

    2007-07-01

    The shell-less, endoparasitic gastropod, Asterophila japonica , was collected from two species of sea star, Leptychaster anomalus Fisher, 1906 and Ctenodiscus crispatus (Retzius, 1805) in Toyama Bay, Japan. All observed individuals were located on the aboral side of the host's disk (except one specimen parasitizing the arm) between the epidermis and the coelomic epithelium. More than one large individual frequently co-occur on a single host. The body plan of A. japonica is surprisingly modified from that of general gastropods; organs unrelated to digestion and reproduction are greatly reduced, simplified or completely lost. Dimorphism of body size is striking between males and females: males are much smaller than females and are attached to the surface of the pseudopallium of females. Females deposit and brood an egg mass(es) in the pseudopallial cavity until the eggs develop to veliger larvae. At the late developmental stage, brooded larvae reduce the velum and develop the foot for crawling, suggesting lecithotrophic development with or without a short planktonic stage. It is uncertain as to how the larvae can find and parasitize the next generation of the host. The systematic placement of Asterophila in the family Eulimidae is supported by three characters, viz. parasitism on echinoderms, smooth hydrophobic protoconch, and the enclosure of the visceral mass with the pseudopallium. PMID:17824778

  3. Effects of anthracene on filtration rates, antioxidant defense system, and redox proteomics in the Mediterranean clam Ruditapes decussatus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Sellami, Badreddine; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; Louati, Hla; Dellali, Mohamed; Driss, Mouhamed Ridha; Assa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Hamouda, Beyrem; Coelho, Ana Varela; Sheehan, David

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the impact of a toxic polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), anthracene (ANT), on Ruditapes decussatus collected from a Tunisian coastal lagoon (Bizerte Lagoon). Filtration rates, several antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione transferase (GST)--as well as indices of protein oxidation status were determined in various tissues of this bivalve. Specimens were exposed to 100 ?g/L of ANT for 2 days. ANT levels were evaluated using HPLC and were detected in the gill and digestive gland at different amounts. ANT exposure altered the behavior of bivalves by changing the siphon movement and decreasing filtration rate significantly. The enzymatic results indicated that ANT exposure affected the oxidative stress status of the gills of R. decussatus. In addition, modification of proteins was detected in the gills using redox proteomics after ANT treatment. Three protein spots were successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). These proteins can be roughly related to muscle contraction function. In contrast, no significant modification of enzymatic and protein responses was detected in the digestive gland after ANT treatment. These data demonstrate that combined behavioral and biochemical analyses are a powerful tool to provide valuable insights into possible mechanisms of toxicity of anthracene in R. decussatus. Additionally, the results highlight the potential of the gill as a valuable candidate for investigating PAH toxicity. PMID:25779113

  4. A new genus and species of Thyasiridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) from deep-water, Beaufort Sea, northern Alaska.

    PubMed

    Valentich-Scott, Paul; Powell, Charles L; Ii; Lorenson, Thomas D; Edwards, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve mollusk shells were collected in 2350 m depth in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean off northern Alaska. Initial identification suggested the specimens were a member of the bivalve family Thyasiridae, but no known eastern Pacific or Arctic living or fossil thyasirid resembled these deep-water specimens. Comparisons were made with the type of the genera Maorithyas Fleming, 1950, Spinaxinus Oliver & Holmes, 2006, Axinus Sowerby, 1821, and Parathyasira Iredale, 1930. We determined the Beaufort Sea species represents a new genus, herein described as Wallerconcha. These specimens also represent a new species, herein named Wallerconchasarae. These new taxa are compared with known modern and fossil genera and species of thyasirds. PMID:25589851

  5. On growth and form of irregular coiled-shell of a terrestrial snail: Plectostoma concinnum (Fulton, 1901) (Mollusca: Caenogastropoda: Diplommatinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Annebelle C.M.; Schilthuizen, Menno; Urdy, Severine

    2014-01-01

    The molluscan shell can be viewed as a petrified representation of the organism’s ontogeny and thus can be used as a record of changes in form during growth. However, little empirical data is available on the actual growth and form of shells, as these are hard to quantify and examine simultaneously. To address these issues, we studied the growth and form of a land snail that has an irregularly coiled and heavily ornamented shell–Plectostoma concinnum. The growth data were collected in a natural growth experiment and the actual form changes of the aperture during shell ontogeny were quantified. We used an ontogeny axis that allows data of growth and form to be analysed simultaneously. Then, we examined the association between the growth and the form during three different whorl growing phases, namely, the regular coiled spire phase, the transitional constriction phase, and the distortedly-coiled tuba phase. In addition, we also explored the association between growth rate and the switching between whorl growing mode and rib growing mode. As a result, we show how the changes in the aperture ontogeny profiles in terms of aperture shape, size and growth trajectory, and the changes in growth rates, are associated with the different shell forms at different parts of the shell ontogeny. These associations suggest plausible constraints that underlie the three different shell ontogeny phases and the two different growth modes. We found that the mechanism behind the irregularly coiled-shell is the rotational changes of the animal’s body and mantle edge with respect to the previously secreted shell. Overall, we propose that future study should focus on the role of the mantle and the columellar muscular system in the determination of shell form. PMID:24883245

  6. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LYMNAEIDAE (MOLLUSCA, BASOMMATOPHORA), INTERMEDIATE HOST OF Fasciola hepatica LINNAEUS, 1758 (TREMATODA, DIGENEA) IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Camilla; Scholte, Ronaldo Guilherme Carvalho; D'ávila, Sthefane; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Carvalho, Omar dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Snails of the family Lymnaeidae act as intermediate hosts in the biological cycle of Fasciola hepatica, which is a biological agent of fasciolosis, a parasitic disease of medical importance for humans and animals. The present work aimed to update and map the spatial distribution of the intermediate host snails of F. hepatica in Brazil. Data on the distribution of lymnaeids species were compiled from the Collection of Medical Malacology (Fiocruz-CMM, CPqRR), Collection of Malacology (MZUSP), “SpeciesLink” (CRIA) network and through systematic surveys in the literature. Our maps of the distribution of lymnaeids show that Pseudosuccinea columella is the most common species and it is widespread in the South and Southeast with few records in the Midwest, North and Northeast regions. The distribution of the Galba viatrix, G. cubensis and G. truncatula showed a few records in the South and Southeast regions, they were not reported for the Midwest, North and Northeast. In addition, in the South region there are a few records for G. viatrix and one occurrence of Lymnaea rupestris. Our findings resulted in the first map of the spatial distribution of Lymnaeidae species in Brazil which might be useful to better understand the fasciolosis distribution and delineate priority areas for control interventions. PMID:24879003

  7. Taxonomic review of the family Discodorididae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Nudibranchia) from Brazil, with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Alvim, Juliana; Pimenta, Alexandre Dias

    2013-01-01

    The family Discodorididae was previously represented by 11 species in Brazil; however, recently collected specimens from several localities in Rio de Janeiro, in addition to the study of material previously deposited in scientific collections, revealed the existence of 13 taxa: Diaulula greeleyi (MacFarland, 1909), Discodoris hummelincki (Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1963) comb. nov., Discodoris branneri MacFarland, 1909, Geitodoris pusae (Er. Marcus, 1955), Hoplodoris hansrosaorum Domnguez, Garca & Troncoso, 2006, Jorunna spazzola Er. Marcus, 1955, Jorunna spongiosa sp. nov., Paradoris mulciber (Ev. Marcus, 1971), Platydoris angustipes (Mrch, 1863), Rostanga byga Er. Marcus, 1958a, Taringa telopia Er. Marcus, 1955, Taringa iemanja sp. nov., and Thordisa diuda Er. Marcus, 1955. Discodoris voniheringi MacFarland, 1909 was previously regarded as nomen dubium, and this view is maintained in the present study. Three new records for the Brazilian coast are recognized among these 13 taxa; the previous record of Diaulula phoca (Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1967a) is rectified as Discodoris hummelincki comb. nov., constituting the first record of this species from Brazil; two new species, Taringa iemanja sp. nov. and Jorunna spongiosa sp. nov., are described in anatomical detail. The following taxa, which were formerly considered junior synonyms of species studied in this work, have been revalidated: Diaulula nayarita (Ortea & Llera, 1981), from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, which differs from Diaulula greeleyi in the length and width of caryophyllidia; Discodoris mortenseni Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1963, from the Caribbean, which is likely to belong to Jorunna, yet differs from Jorunna spazzola in body size and coloration, radula appearance, and number of lamellae in the rhinophores; Jorunna luisae Ev. Marcus, 1976, which differs from Jorunna spazzola in the reproductive system, mainly in the size and shape of the accessory gland; and Thordisa azmani Cervera & Garca-Gmez, 1989, which differs from Thordisa diuda in the presence of two accessory glands in the genital atrium and the absence of one denticle in the external surface of the inner lateral teeth. Finally, the specimens of Geitodoris pusae reported from the European coast and Mediterranean Sea show differences in general coloration and in the radula, gill, and reproductive system, thereby these specimens likely refer to different taxa. PMID:25113344

  8. Neosataria, replacement name for Sataria Annandale, 1920 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Bithyniidae), preoccupied by Sataria Roewer, 1915 (Arachnida: Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Siddharth; Khot, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The family Bithyniidae is represented in tropical Asia by the following genera, Bithynia, Digonistoma, Mysorella, Parabithynia, Emmericiopsis, Hydrobioides, Parafossarulus, Pseudovivipara, Sataria and Wattebladia (Dudgeon 1999; Pyron & Brown 2015). PMID:26249930

  9. Annotated type catalogue of the Bothriembryontidae and Odontostomidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.; Ablett, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described for specimens of 84 taxa classified within the families Bothriembryontidae and Odontostomidae (superfamily Orthalicoidea) and kept in the Natural History Museum, London. Lectotypes are designated for Bulimus (Liparus) brazieri Angas, 1871; Bulimus broderipii Sowerby I, 1832; Bulimus fuligineus Pfeiffer, 1853; Helix guarani d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus (Tomigerus) ramagei E.A. Smith, 1890; Helix rhodinostoma d’Orbigny, 1835; Bulimus (Bulimulus) ridleyi E.A. Smith, 1890. The type status of the following taxa is changed to lectotype in accordance with Art. 74.6 ICZN: Placostylus (Euplacostylus) cylindricus Fulton, 1907; Bulimus pyrostomus Pfeiffer, 1860; Bulimus turneri Pfeiffer, 1860. The following taxon is synonymised: Bulimus oblitus Reeve, 1848 = Bahiensis neglectus (Pfeiffer, 1847). PMID:22539914

  10. Alteration of acetylcholinesterase activity in Semele solida (MOLLUSCA: SEMELIDAE) as a biochemical response to coastal anthropogenic impact.

    PubMed

    Srain, Benjamin M; Rudolph, Anny J

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was analyzed as a molecular marker indicative of exposure to organophosphorus pesticide residues in individuals of the endemic clam species Semele solida in selected coastal locations of Chile's VIII Region. AChE activity was assayed in clams from (i) Penco Beach near the mouth of the Andalién River (Concepción Bay), (ii) Lenga Beach, near the mouth of the Lenga Estuary (San Vicente Bay), and (iii) Coliumo Beach, near the mouth of the Coliumo Estuary (Coliumo Bay). We also analyzed variations in protein content of clam hemolymph, and variability in the activity of AChE in relation to the sizes of the individual clams sampled. Collection of the clams was done using routine methods, during the spring of 2005, the period during which the use of pesticides is typically intensified in the surrounding forestry and agriculture. The results showed no significant correlation of AChE activity with either the size of the clam, or with the concentration of proteins in the hemolymph. The lowest AChE activity was observed in clams from mouth of the Andalién River (187.5 +/- 34.9 Umin(-1)) which was significantly less than that measured in specimens collected near the mouth of the Coliumo Estuary and the mouth of the Lenga Estuary. A very close relation was observed between the degree of anthropogenic inputs, ocean dynamics, and alterations in AChE activity in S. solida. This clam appears to be a useful indicator species, and AChE activity a sensitive marker for the presence of xenobiotics. PMID:18161577

  11. In situ distribution and characterization of the organic content of the oyster shell Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Ball, Alexander D; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Chevallard, Corinne; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Farre, Bastien; Pouvreau, Stéphane; Salomé, Murielle

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation of commercial oysters is now facing the possible influence of global change in sea water composition, commonly referred to as "ocean acidification". In order to test the potential consequence of the predicted environmental changes, a cultivation experiment was carried out. The left and right valves of the oyster shell Crassostrea gigas differ in their structure; moreover, lenses of non compact layers are irregular. The shell layers of juvenile C. gigas are studied using a variety of highly spatially resolved techniques to establish their composition and structure. Our results confirm the presence of three different calcitic structural types. The role of the lenses of chalky layers is not yet deciplered. Despite a common mineralogy, the elemental composition of the layers differs. The sulphur aminoacids and sulphated polysaccharide contents of the intracrystalline and intercrystalline matrices differ, as well as those of the structural types. The possible different sensitivity of these structures to environmental changes is still unknown. PMID:23022314

  12. Numerical Quantification of Perkinsus Marinus in the American Oyster Crassostrea virginicata (Gmelin 1791) (Mollusca: Bivalvia) by Modern Stereology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species of Perkinsus are responsible for high mortalities of bivalve molluscs world-wide. Techniques to accurately estimate parasites in tissues are required to improve understanding of perkinsosis. This study quantifies the number and tissue distribution of Perkinsus marinus in ...

  13. Mortality of unionid bivalves (Mollusca) associated with Dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.; Masteller, Edwin C.

    1999-01-01

    Two exotic species of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) began to colonize bottom substrates in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie in 1990. By 1991, all native unionid (Unionidae) shells were infested by dreissenids. In 1990 and 1991, about 500 individual unionids of 15 species were collected: in 1992, 246 individuals of 12 species were collected; in 1993, 64 individuals of 6 species; in 1994, three individuals of three species; and in 1995, no unionids were found. In general, infestation indices of unionids were relatively low in 1990 and 1991, increased in 1992, and decreased in 1993. Mortality of unionids associated with infestation in the bay occurred in a shorter period of time (ca. two to three years) than has been documented in other water bodies. Observations in an area of Presque Isle not included in the present study, indicate that a small remnant population of unionids exists in the presence of heavily-colonized substrates by dreissenid mussels. Since other shallow-water areas of Lake Erie support infestation-free unionids in the presence of dreissenid mussels, it is hoped that some unionids will survive in Presque Isle Bay of Lake Erie.

  14. Limitations of cytochrome oxidase I for the barcoding of Neritidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) as revealed by Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Chee, S Y

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene has been universally and successfully utilized as a barcoding gene, mainly because it can be amplified easily, applied across a wide range of taxa, and results can be obtained cheaply and quickly. However, in rare cases, the gene can fail to distinguish between species, particularly when exposed to highly sensitive methods of data analysis, such as the Bayesian method, or when taxa have undergone introgressive hybridization, over-splitting, or incomplete lineage sorting. Such cases require the use of alternative markers, and nuclear DNA markers are commonly used. In this study, a dendrogram produced by Bayesian analysis of an mtDNA COI dataset was compared with that of a nuclear DNA ATPS-? dataset, in order to evaluate the efficiency of COI in barcoding Malaysian nerites (Neritidae). In the COI dendrogram, most of the species were in individual clusters, except for two species: Nerita chamaeleon and N. histrio. These two species were placed in the same subcluster, whereas in the ATPS-? dendrogram they were in their own subclusters. Analysis of the ATPS-? gene also placed the two genera of nerites (Nerita and Neritina) in separate clusters, whereas COI gene analysis placed both genera in the same cluster. Therefore, in the case of the Neritidae, the ATPS-? gene is a better barcoding gene than the COI gene. PMID:26125766

  15. Preliminary phytochemical screening and molluscicidal activity of the aqueous extract of Bidens pilosa Linn (Asteraceae) in Subulina octona (Mollusca, Subulinidade).

    PubMed

    Souza, Bruna A; Silva, Lidiane C da; Chicarino, Evelyn D; Bessa, Elisabeth C A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference concentrations (LC?? e LC??) of aqueous extracts of Bidens pilosa on the land snail Subulina octona, in order to assess the changes caused by 24 and 48 h exposure to the sublethal concentration regarding species' fecundity, hatchability and in offspring produced after exposure to confirm the presence of tannins, saponins and flavonoids in this plant species. Eggs newly hatched and 30 day-old snails were exposed to sublethal concentration, calculated for adults. The phytochemical analysis confirmed the presence of flavonoids, condensed tannins and saponins in the aqueous extract of B. pilosa. The LC?? and LC?? obtained were 51.4 mg/mL and 74.1 mg/mL respectively. The exposure to sublethal concentration reduced significantly the hatchability and the survival of the offspring hatched from exposed eggs and also caused a reduction on survival and growth in snails exposed for both time period. The exposure time also caused a reduction at the evaluated parameters. PMID:24141417

  16. Towards a late Middle Pleistocene non-marine molluscan biostratigraphy for the British Isles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, David H.

    2001-10-01

    The fossils of non-marine Mollusca are among the most prominent in Pleistocene deposits. They were one of the first fossil groups to be noted in the literature, as early as the beginning of the 18th century. With the stabilisation of taxonomies in the 19th century numerous publications appeared with faunal lists of interglacial taxa, but few attempts were made to use the data for interpretation. Work from 1950 onwards, especially by Sparks and Kerney in Britain, Puissgur in France, and by Loek in Central Europe, used a quantitative approach to sorting, counting and interpreting assemblages. Despite the adoption of this rigorous methodology to molluscan studies, interglacial faunas were used primarily to reconstruct past environments, and although faunal changes through the Pleistocene were recognised, it was thought that non-marine Mollusca were inherently badly fitted for use as tools for dating in the classic geological sense. Recent work, coupled with the re-evaluation of sites described in the literature, has allowed non-marine molluscan faunas to be used as biostratigraphic indicators. Biostratigraphic schemes evolved from this work are comparable with parallel investigations using Mammalia, Coleoptera and lithostratigraphy calibrated by a number of geochronometric methods, but may be at variance with pollen biostratigraphies.

  17. Extensive Giant Molluscum Contagiosum in a HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pilani, Abhishek P.; Kota, Rahul Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a very common benign self-limiting cutaneous viral infection caused by molluscum contagiosum virus. Disease is self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals, while it is severe and prolonged when associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The widespread and refractory mollusca of HIV disease occur especially on the face. In advanced stages of immunosuppression, giant or verrucous forms of MC may occur. Molluscum contagiosum tends to take a chronic course and is usually not responsive to various treatments in immunocompromised patients. Here, we present a HIV positive male patient with extensive papulonodular lesions over face, neck, bilateral upper limbs since 2 months, diagnosed as giant molluscum contagiosum, treated with cryotherapy with little improvement for few weeks after which patient did not turn up. PMID:26672647

  18. Extensive Giant Molluscum Contagiosum in a HIV Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Vora, Rita V; Pilani, Abhishek P; Kota, Rahul Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a very common benign self-limiting cutaneous viral infection caused by molluscum contagiosum virus. Disease is self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals, while it is severe and prolonged when associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The widespread and refractory mollusca of HIV disease occur especially on the face. In advanced stages of immunosuppression, giant or verrucous forms of MC may occur. Molluscum contagiosum tends to take a chronic course and is usually not responsive to various treatments in immunocompromised patients. Here, we present a HIV positive male patient with extensive papulonodular lesions over face, neck, bilateral upper limbs since 2 months, diagnosed as giant molluscum contagiosum, treated with cryotherapy with little improvement for few weeks after which patient did not turn up. PMID:26672647

  19. Foods of Spectacled Eiders Somateria fischeri in the Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.R.; Piatt, J.F.; Trust, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    The winter diet of Spectacled Eiders living in marine habitats is known only from two individuals described by Cottam (1939). Here we examine marine diets from 36 stomachs collected near St. Lawrence Island, Bering Sea, Alaska, during May-June in 1987 and 1992. All Spectacled Eiders ate Mollusca, including Gastropoda (snails; frequency of occurrence 20.0%; sole taxon 0.0%) and Bivalvia (bivalves; 80.0%; 48.0%), and Crustacea (barnacles, amphipods and crabs; 30.6%; 0.0%). One bird ate a cod. The predominant species group eaten was Macoma Clams (72.0%; 36.0%). Prey species of Spectacled Eiders occur predominantly in waters 25-60 m deep in the Bering Sea. To obtain these prey, especially the bivalves, on the winter area Spectacled Eiders must forage in waters exceeding 40 m. We speculate that Spectacled Eiders regularly forage at depths of 45-70 m throughout winter.

  20. La Generacion Millennials en La Universidad: Nuevas Realidades Para El Consejero Profesional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez-Davila, Nelissa

    2013-01-01

    College life strategies must be reassessed in light of the new generational culture taking hold with the arrival in college campuses of "Millennials" Generation students (Strauss & Howe 2000). This study explored college professional counselors' "Millennials" Generation knowledge, their techniques and strategies in…

  1. The New Room Arrangement as a Teaching Strategy = La Nueva Organizacion del Salon como Estrategia Educativa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister

    Many typical classroom behavior problems--running in the classroom, inability to make choices, failure to stick with activities, fighting over toys, and poor use of materials-- can be traced to how the room is arranged and how materials are displayed. By making a few changes in the classroom environment, early childhood teachers can create a…

  2. "Escuela Nueva" in Spain: Origins and Implications in Teacher Professional Development for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorrin Abellan, Ivan M.; Villagra Sobrino, Sara L.; Garcia Sastre, Sara

    2013-01-01

    During the Spanish Second Republican government (April 1931-July 1939), there was an institutional initiative in the country called "Misiones Pedagogicas", deeply based in the early Deweyan conception of Progressive Education. The aim of this project was bringing access to culture, entertainment and some sort of progress to rural areas

  3. The New Room Arrangement as a Teaching Strategy = La Nueva Organizacion del Salon como Estrategia Educativa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister

    Many typical classroom behavior problems--running in the classroom, inability to make choices, failure to stick with activities, fighting over toys, and poor use of materials-- can be traced to how the room is arranged and how materials are displayed. By making a few changes in the classroom environment, early childhood teachers can create a

  4. Su Nueva Vida en los Estados Unidos. (Your New Life in the United States).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Vivian; And Others

    An illustrated guide to aspects of life in the United States is presented in Spanish for recent Hispanic arrivals. The guidelines address such topics as resettlement agencies, community relations and national customs, the U.S. government, local and long distance transport, mail and telephone communication systems, employment practices, the

  5. Modelado de las Distribuciones Espectrales de Energa de tres nuevas estrellas jvenes de tipo FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, L. V.; Rodn, J.; Gmez, M.; Whitney, B.

    In this work we present the modeling of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of three protostellar objects of the FU Orionis type, for which an outburst was observed in the last two years. We applied the code developed by Whitney et al. (ApJ 591, 1049, 2003) to model the SEDs. We derived physical and geometric parameters for each object, which agree with those previously obtained for other FU Orionis type stars. Furthermore, the three objects were studied in their stages of high and low activity. Our results suggest that the disk plays a key role in the outburst event, which is reflected in an increase of at least one order of magnitude of the mass accretion rate from the disk to the central object, with respect to the low activity period. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. Su Nueva Vida en los Estados Unidos. (Your New Life in the United States).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Vivian; And Others

    An illustrated guide to aspects of life in the United States is presented in Spanish for recent Hispanic arrivals. The guidelines address such topics as resettlement agencies, community relations and national customs, the U.S. government, local and long distance transport, mail and telephone communication systems, employment practices, the…

  7. Tecnologias mas nuevas para la seguridad escolar (Newer Technologies for School Security). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tod

    This digest in Spanish describes several technologies that can be used to control access to, and improve surveillance of, school grounds. Access can be controlled by using "smart" cards to control keyed entries. Many schools have problems with multiple copies of keys, and these card systems are integrated with computer software that allows for

  8. "Escuela Nueva" in Spain: Origins and Implications in Teacher Professional Development for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorrin Abellan, Ivan M.; Villagra Sobrino, Sara L.; Garcia Sastre, Sara

    2013-01-01

    During the Spanish Second Republican government (April 1931-July 1939), there was an institutional initiative in the country called "Misiones Pedagogicas", deeply based in the early Deweyan conception of Progressive Education. The aim of this project was bringing access to culture, entertainment and some sort of progress to rural areas…

  9. La Generacion Millennials en La Universidad: Nuevas Realidades Para El Consejero Profesional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez-Davila, Nelissa

    2013-01-01

    College life strategies must be reassessed in light of the new generational culture taking hold with the arrival in college campuses of "Millennials" Generation students (Strauss & Howe 2000). This study explored college professional counselors' "Millennials" Generation knowledge, their techniques and strategies in

  10. Nuevas tecnicas basadas en redes neuronales para el diseno de filtros de microondas multicapa apantallados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual Garcia, Juan

    In this PhD thesis one method of shielded multilayer circuit neural network based analysis has been developed. One of the most successful analysis procedures of these kind of structures is the Integral Equation technique (IE) solved by the Method of Moments (MoM). In order to solve the IE, in the version which uses the media relevant potentials, it is necessary to have a formulation of the Green's functions associated to the mentioned potentials. The main computational burden in the IE resolution lies on the numerical evaluation of the Green's functions. In this work, the circuit analysis has been drastically accelerated thanks to the approximation of the Green's functions by means of neural networks. Once trained, the neural networks substitute the Green's functions in the IE. Two different types of neural networks have been used: the Radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) and the Chebyshev neural networks. Thanks mainly to two distinct operations the correct approximation of the Green's functions has been possible. On the one hand, a very effective input space division has been developed. On the other hand, the elimination of the singularity makes feasible the approximation of slow variation functions. Two different singularity elimination strategies have been developed. The first one is based on the multiplication by the source-observation points distance (rho). The second one outperforms the first one. It consists of the extraction of two layers of spatial images from the whole summation of images. With regard to the Chebyshev neural networks, the OLS training algorithm has been applied in a novel fashion. This method allows the optimum design in this kind of neural networks. In this way, the performance of these neural networks outperforms greatly the RBFNNs one. In both networks, the time gain reached makes the neural method profitable. The time invested in the input space division and in the neural training is negligible with only few circuit analysis. To show, in a practical way, the ability of the neural based analysis method, two new design procedures have been developed. The first method uses the Genetic Algorithms to optimize an initial filter which does not fulfill the established specifications. A new fitness function, specially well suited to design filters, has been defined in order to assure the correct convergence of the optimization process. This new function measures the fulfillment of the specifications and it also prevents the appearance of the premature convergence problem. The second method is found on the approximation, by means of neural networks, of the relations between the electrical parameters, which defined the circuit response, and the physical dimensions that synthesize the aforementioned parameters. The neural networks trained with these data can be used in the design of many circuits in a given structure. Both methods had been show their ability in the design of practical filters.

  11. Una nueva galaxia IR con nucleo compuesto: Seyfert 1.5 y estallido de formacion estelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, S. L.; Merlo, D. C.; Moyano, M. M.

    Optical aperture spectroscopy and CCD broad- and narrow-band images are presented for the barred Seyfert 1 galaxy: IRAS 22117-3903. IRAS data are also used to analyse this object. The CTIO broad band CCD imaging show interesting morphological features: a compact nucleus with a prominent bar; two bright spiral arms; and a partial/segmented inner ring. The narrow-band imaging show that the nuclear H+[NII] emission is concentrate mainly in the nucleus. We find optical spectral features characteristic of a Seyfert 1.5 nucleus; i.e.; showing hydrogen emission lines with broad and narrow components. We detected high excitation emission lines ([CaV]+[FeXIV]; [FeVII]). We study the stellar population in the nuclear region. We find that the stellar population that represent quite well the nuclear stellar population is an average of spiral galaxies dominated by the old population plus a contribution of young stars. Physical conditions are derived for the narrow emission line region; and we detected very high electron temperature (T=4400045000 K); untypical for the ordinary AGNs and probably associated to shocks in a starburst component. Finally; at the optical and IR wavelength; we find properties typical of an nucleus with compound nature; in good agreement with the AGN/QSOs evolutionary model of Lpari ; Terlevich (2006; ; 368; 1001). FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  12. Nuevas Tendencias en la Ensenanza de las Ciencias (New Trends in Science Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oficina Regional de Educacion de la Unesco para America Latina y el Caribe, Santiago (Chile).

    The concern for improving science education in Latin America is reflected in this document compiled by UNESCO offices in Chile, Uruguay, and Paris with financial support from UNICEF, and directed to Latin American science teachers. The first part deals with planning the reforms needed in science education and the practical considerations involved.…

  13. Nuevas Perspectivas en la Efficiencia del Uso Nirogeno en Vaca Lecheras

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cows utilize feed crude protein (CP) with greater efficiency than other ruminants, but still excrete about 2 to 3 times more nitrogen (N) in manure than they secrete in milk. This increases milk production costs plus environmental N pollution. Optimizing microbial protein formation in the rume...

  14. "Familias: Preparando La Nueva Generacin": A Randomized Control Trial Testing the Effects on Positive Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Williams, Lela Rankin; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Booth, Jaime M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This article reports the effects of a culturally grounded parenting intervention to strengthen positive parenting practices. Method: The intervention was designed and tested with primarily Mexican origin parents in a large urban setting of the southwestern United States using an ecodevelopmental approach. Parents (N = 393) were

  15. Nueva investigacion sobre kindergarten de dia completo (Recent Research on All-Day Kindergarten). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Patricia

    Noting that much of the early research on the effects of all-day kindergarten had serious problems with internal and external validity due to inadequate methodological standards, this Spanish-language digest reviews research conducted in the 1990s. The digest discusses the academic, social, and behavioral effects of all-day kindergarten, as well…

  16. Was the Sun especially active at the end of the late glacial epoch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, Liliya

    In their pioneering work, the geophysicists A. Brekke and A. Egeland (1983) collected beliefs of different peoples, associated with northern lights. Our analyses of this collection show that these beliefs are mainly related to the mythological idea of ``abnormal'' deads (dead, childless old maids in Finnish beliefs; killed people; spirits dangerous to children). We find similar motifs in Slavic fairy tales about the ``Thrice-Nine Land,'' regarded as the other world in folkloric studies (in the Land where mobile and agitated warlike girls live, whose Head Girl is characterized by the words ``white snow, pretty light, the prettiest in the World,'' but whose name ``Mariya Morevna'' refers to the word ``mort''; where a river flows with its banks covered by human bones; where the witch Baba-Yaga dwells, being extremely dangerous for children). Moreover, it can be noted that similar narrative fabulous myths deal with the concept of auroral oval northern lights, since some specific features of the natural auroral forms are mentioned there, with their particular spatial orientations (to the North or West). This resembles the manner in which Ancient Greek myths describe the real properties of the heavenly phenomena in a mythological language. It is interesting that myths on the high-latitude northern lights spread even to the South of Europe (and, might be, to India and Iran). This fact can be understood in view of the following. It has been established that, during the late glacial epoch, the environmental and cultural conditions were similar over the area from Pyrenean to the Ural Mountains; the pattern of hunters' settlements outlined the glacial sheet from the outside. Relics of the hunters' beliefs can now be found in Arctic, where the environment and lifestyle remain nearly unchanged. The ethnographer Yu.B. Simchenko (1976) has reconstructed the most archaic Arctic myths. According to them, the World of dead is associated with the world of ice governed by the ``Ice mother,'' who takes human souls to the World of dead. At the beginning of glacial-sheet degradation, people lived by hunting for wild reindeer. The animal moved to high latitudes behind the edge of the thawing glacial sheet, and the people followed the main object of their hunting. Thus, they went in the direction of their mythological World of dead. As they unexpectedly discovered the enchanting eye-catcher of northern lights, they should assume that they encountered the border of the World of dead. Emotional experience gained from such direct contact with the World of dead, as also from the narratives about the fascinating and spectacular view of this World seen by their own eyes, was recorded in the cosmological myths. Later, the descendants of the hunters scattered over the drying earth, which rapidly became overgrown with forest. The relics of their cosmological myths persist as a cultural phenomenon. Thus, the cultural inheritance looks like evidence of high auroral and solar activity at the epoch when the glacial sheet was thawing. If so, we deal with a mirror reflection of the correlation between the space weather and climate known for Maunder's minimum.

  17. Nuts, especially walnuts, have both antioxidant quantity and efficacy and exhibit significant potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Joe A; Cai, Yuxing

    2012-02-01

    Free and total (after basic hydrolysis) polyphenols in nine types of raw and roasted nuts and two types of peanut butter (54 commercial samples) were analyzed after methanol extraction by a single step Folin-Ciocalteu reagent using catechin as standard. Walnuts had the highest free and total polyphenols in both the combined raw and roasted samples. Total polyphenols in the nuts were significantly higher than free polyphenols. Roasting had little effect on either free or total polyphenols in nuts. Raw and roasted walnuts had the highest total polyphenols. The efficacy of raw and roasted nut antioxidants was assessed by measuring the ability of the free polyphenol nut extracts to inhibit the oxidation of lower density lipoproteins (LDL + VLDL). A nut polyphenol, catechin, was measured after binding of three nut extracts to lower density lipoproteins. Walnut polyphenols had the best efficacy among the nuts and also the highest lipoprotein-bound antioxidant activity. Based on USDA availability data, the per capita total polyphenols was 162 mg from nuts per day in 2008. This corresponds to 19% of the total polyphenols from fruits and vegetables, nuts, grains, oils and spices in the US diet. Nuts provided 158 mg of polyphenols per day to the European Union diet. Nuts are high in polyphenol antioxidants which by binding to lipoproteins would inhibit oxidative processes that lead to atherosclerosis in vivo. In human supplementation studies nuts have been shown to improve the lipid profile, increase endothelial function and reduce inflammation, all without causing weight gain. These qualities make nuts a nutritious healthy snack and food additive. PMID:22187094

  18. Undiagnosed disease, especially diabetes, casts doubt on some of reported health 'advantage' of recent Mexican immigrants.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Silvia Helena; Goldman, Dana P; Smith, James P

    2012-12-01

    Newly arrived Mexican immigrants in the United States generally report better health than do native-born Americans, but this health advantage erodes over time. At issue is whether the advantage is illusory-a product of disease that goes undiagnosed in Mexico but is discovered after immigration. Using results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we compared clinical to self-reported diagnosed disease prevalence and found that Mexican immigrants are not as healthy as previously thought when undiagnosed disease is taken into account, particularly with respect to diabetes. About half of recent immigrants with diabetes were unaware that they had the disease-an undiagnosed prevalence that was 2.3 times higher than that among Mexican Americans with similar characteristics. Diagnosed prevalence was 47 percent lower among recent Mexican immigrants than among native-born Americans for both diabetes and hypertension, but undiagnosed disease explained one-third of this recent immigrant advantage for diabetes and one-fifth for hypertension. The remaining health advantage might be explained in part by immigrant selectivity-the notion that healthier people might be more likely to come to the United States. Lack of disease awareness is clearly a serious problem among recent Mexican immigrants. Since undiagnosed disease can have adverse health consequences, medical practice should emphasize disease detection among new arrivals as part of routine visits. Although we found little evidence that health insurance plays much of a role in preventing these diseases, we did find that having health insurance was an important factor in promoting awareness of both hypertension and diabetes. PMID:23213157

  19. Circularity measuring system: A shape gauge designed especially for use on large objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrkaste, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Circularity Measuring System (CMS) was developed to make an in-situ determination of shape similarity for selected fit large cylinders (RSRM segments). It does this to a repeatable accuracy of 0.10 mm (0.004 inch). This is less that the goal of 0.07 mm (0.003 inch), but was determined adequate because of the addition of an assembly aid that increased the entry chamfer of the clevis side of the joint. The usefulness of the CMS is demonstrated by the application to measurements other than its specified design purpose, such as submarine hull circularity, SRM mid-case circularity, as well as circularity of interfacing SRM tooling, specifically the rounding devices and horizontal disassembly devices. Commercialization of the tool is being pursued, since it is an enhancement of metrology technology for circularity determination. The most accurate in-situ technology it replaces is determined from a template. The CMS is an improvement in accuracy and operation.

  20. Children's health insurance program premiums adversely affect enrollment, especially among lower-income children.

    PubMed

    Abdus, Salam; Hudson, Julie; Hill, Steven C; Selden, Thomas M

    2014-08-01

    Both Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which are run by the states and funded by federal and state dollars, offer health insurance coverage for low-income children. Thirty-three states charged premiums for children at some income ranges in CHIP or Medicaid in 2013. Using data from the 1999-2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we show that the relationship between premiums and coverage varies considerably by income level and by parental access to employer-sponsored insurance. Among children with family incomes above 150percent of the federal poverty level, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 1.6-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance may be higher among those children whose parents lack an offer of employer-sponsored insurance than among those whose parents have such an offer. Among children with family incomes of 101-150percent of poverty, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 6.7-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage and a 3.3-percentage-point increase in uninsurance. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance is even larger among children whose parents lack offers of employer coverage. PMID:25092836

  1. Mediacion en educacion especial: Una guia para los padres (Special Education Mediation: A Guide for Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    Designed for Spanish-speaking parents of students with disabilities living in Oregon, this brochure describes the general mediation process that parents can use to resolve special education services disputes with schools. It begins by discussing what mediation is and the characteristics of a trained mediator. It addresses the requirement for…

  2. Special Education: Parent and Student Rights = Educacion Especial: Los Derechos de los Padres y Estudiantes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Special Education Programs.

    Intended for parents of children with possible disabilities in Texas, these two combined booklets (one in English and one in Spanish) outline the step-by-step process qualifying the child for special education services and explain the parent's rights and responsibilities under federal and state law. Introductory material includes a letter to…

  3. Questions Often Asked about Special Education Services = Preguntas sobre los servicios de educacion especial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupper, Lisa, Ed.

    This guide, available in both English and Spanish, answers questions often asked by parents about special education services. Questions and answers address the following topics: where to begin if a parent believes a child needs special education services, services available to very young children, the evaluation process, the Individualized…

  4. Missouri Professional School Counselors: Ratios Matter, Especially in High-Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapan, Richard T.; Gysbers, Norman C.; Stanley, Bragg; Pierce, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Results link lower student-to-school-counselor ratios to better graduation rates and lower disciplinary incidents across Missouri high schools. An interaction favorable for promoting student success in school was found between increasing percentages of students receiving free or reduced-price lunch and smaller student-to-school-counselor ratios.

  5. System for photometric calibration of optoelectronic imaging devices especially streak cameras

    DOEpatents

    Boni, Robert; Jaanimagi, Paul

    2003-11-04

    A system for the photometric calibration of streak cameras and similar imaging devices provides a precise knowledge of the camera's flat-field response as well as a mapping of the geometric distortions. The system provides the flat-field response, representing the spatial variations in the sensitivity of the recorded output, with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than can be achieved in a single submicrosecond streak record. The measurement of the flat-field response is carried out by illuminating the input slit of the streak camera with a signal that is uniform in space and constant in time. This signal is generated by passing a continuous wave source through an optical homogenizer made up of a light pipe or pipes in which the illumination typically makes several bounces before exiting as a spatially uniform source field. The rectangular cross-section of the homogenizer is matched to the usable photocathode area of the streak tube. The flat-field data set is obtained by using a slow streak ramp that may have a period from one millisecond (ms) to ten seconds (s), but may be nominally one second in duration. The system also provides a mapping of the geometric distortions, by spatially and temporarily modulating the output of the homogenizer and obtaining a data set using the slow streak ramps. All data sets are acquired using a CCD camera and stored on a computer, which is used to calculate all relevant corrections to the signal data sets. The signal and flat-field data sets are both corrected for geometric distortions prior to applying the flat-field correction. Absolute photometric calibration is obtained by measuring the output fluence of the homogenizer with a "standard-traceable" meter and relating that to the CCD pixel values for a self-corrected flat-field data set.

  6. Kt/V (and especially its modifications) remains a useful measure of hemodialysis dose.

    PubMed

    Daugirdas, John T

    2015-09-01

    Removal of small molecular weight solutes shows a strong relationship to hemodialysis outcomes. In contrast, survival with high-flux dialysis or hemodiafiltration is only slightly better than with low-flux hemodialysis. Despite laboratory evidence regarding toxicity of protein-bound uremic solutes, few data exist showing that increased removal of this class of molecules impacts outcomes. In the FHN trials, there was no effect of frequent dialysis, including frequent and long dialysis, on nutrition or control of anemia, outcomes expected to be sensitive to uremic toxin removal; the main benefit appeared to be better volume control. Scaling of hemodialysis dose to total body water may not be optimal. Kt/V scaling to body surface area and use of a continuous measure such as standard Kt/V reduces the likelihood of underdialysis of small patients, including children, and women. Minimum hemodialysis time may best be considered in respect to ultrafiltration rate, and a maximum target ultrafiltration rate unscaled to body size may be optimal. Intensive, extended dialysis may cause adverse effects to residual kidney function, and more information needs to be collected to better understand how urine volume modifies dose requirements, and how to maximize the chances of preserving residual kidney function. PMID:26176827

  7. Urine is a better biomarker source than blood especially for kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Gao, Youhe

    2015-01-01

    Change is the soul of biomarker definition. Changes are more likely to be removed from blood because of homeostasis mechanisms of the body. Therefore, urine is probably a better biomarker source than blood. The road map to the urinary biomarker era is proposed. Researchers are reminded the potential opportunities and risks in their study design. Kidney diseases are emphasized as they produce most significant changes in urine. PMID:25355564

  8. Some Remarks on Quantum Mechanics in a Curved Spacetime, Especially for a Dirac Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arminjon, Mayeul

    2015-07-01

    Some precisions are given about the definition of the Hamiltonian operator H and its transformation properties, for a linear wave equation in a general spacetime. In the presence of time-dependent unitary gauge transformations, H as an operator depends on the gauge choice. The other observables of QM and their rates also become gauge-dependent unless a proper account for the gauge choice is done in their definition. We show the explicit effect of these non-uniqueness issues in the case of the Dirac equation in a general spacetime with the Schwinger gauge. We show also in detail why, the meaning of the energy in QM being inherited from classical Hamiltonian mechanics, the energy operator and its mean values ought to be well defined in a general spacetime.

  9. Rubber hand presentation modulates visuotactile interference effect especially in persons with high autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Wada, Makoto; Ide, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Persons with high autistic traits showed diverse reactions as to their multisensory integration, whereas neurotypical persons adequately integrate visual and tactile information. Successive visual stimuli sometimes interfere ordering of successive tactile stimuli. Presentation of a hand-shaped object would affect the interference. Besides, its associations with autistic traits have not been reported. Here, we investigated the effect of a rubber hand presentation on interferences to tactile temporal order judgment by successive visual stimuli. We also investigated whether individual differences associated with autistic traits. A rubber hand was placed palm down in front of the participant in one condition, while in other conditions, it was inverted or was not presented. Participants were required to judge the temporal order of tactile stimuli presented to the index finger and ring finger of their unseen right hand, and needed to ignore the visual stimuli placed on the corresponding fingers of the rubber hand. When incongruent visual stimuli were delivered along with presentation of the rubber hand, the participant's judgment was notably reversed. In contrast, the degree of reversals significantly decreased when the rubber hand was not presented or presented in an inverted direction. Additionally, we found that participants with high autistic traits tended to show large reversal with the rubber hand presentation, while they showed small reversal when the rubber hand was inverted. Our results suggest that rubber hand corresponding to one's own hand facilitates visuotactile interference. Furthermore, autistic traits may affect the integration of visuotactile inputs when the rubber hand is presented. PMID:26358127

  10. What Play by a Playwright Other than Shakespeare Has Been Especially Effective with Your Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Patricia L.

    2005-01-01

    Many high school teachers have described their favorite non-Shakespearean books that are effective with their students. Reginald Rose's "Twelve Angry Men", Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" and Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House" are some of the commonly taught books in high schools, as these books enlighten the students about the connections between

  11. Richness of Lichen Species, Especially of Threatened Ones, Is Promoted by Management Methods Furthering Stand Continuity

    PubMed Central

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwbische Alb, Hainich-Dn, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m2 comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species instead of coniferous plantations, and (5) increasing the amount of deadwood in forests. PMID:23383196

  12. Richness of lichen species, especially of threatened ones, is promoted by management methods furthering stand continuity.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwbische Alb, Hainich-Dn, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m(2) comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species instead of coniferous plantations, and (5) increasing the amount of deadwood in forests. PMID:23383196

  13. A Review of Non-Cancer Effects, Especially Circulatory and Ocular Diseases1

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    There is a well-established association between high doses (> 5 Gy) of ionizing radiation exposure and damage to the heart and coronary arteries, although only recently have studies with high quality individual dosimetry been conducted that would enable quantification of this risk adjusting for concomitant chemotherapy. The association between lower dose exposures and late occurring circulatory disease has only recently begun to emerge in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in various occupationally-exposed cohorts, and is still controversial. Excess relative risks per unit dose in moderate and low dose epidemiological studies are somewhat variable, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. Radiation doses of 1 Gy or more are associated with increased risk of posterior subcapsular cataract. Accumulating evidence from the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, Chernobyl liquidators, US astronauts and various other exposed groups suggest that cortical cataracts may also be associated with ionizing radiation, although there is little evidence that nuclear cataracts are radiogenic. The dose response appears to be linear, although modest thresholds (of no more than about 0.6 Gy) cannot be ruled out. A variety of other non-malignant effects have been observed after moderate/low dose exposure in various groups, in particular respiratory and digestive disease and central nervous system (and in particular neuro-cognitive) damage. However, because these are generally only observed in isolated groups, or because the evidence is excessively heterogeneous, these associations must be treated with caution. PMID:23903347

  14. Remotely operable sample-taking appliance, especially for ascertaining radioactivity profiles in contaminated material surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hanulik, J.

    1983-09-20

    A sample-taking appliance comprises several sensors arranged on a turntable like sensor carrier in such a manner that the application areas of the small sensor sponges decrease stepwise from the first to the last sensor. By simple rotation of the turntable the sensors can be brought successively into a working position. The sensor carrier is preferably accommodated in a housing which is open at the bottom and which is raisable and lowerable in the frame of the appliance by, for example, a threaded spindle. The threaded spindle is driven by an electric motor. For each sampling the sensor carrier is lowered until the cell voltage corresponds to a predetermined desired value. This produces sufficiently precise and reproductible measured values of the electrolytic current for ascertaining the removed layer thickness. The appliance makes it possible to take material samples even from locations of high radiation loading. The material layers removed as samples lie concentrically above each other so that the graduation of the application areas comes into full effect and the material samples taken by the small sponges and the radioactivity contained therein are not falsified.

  15. Genetic-based prediction of disease traits: prediction is very difficult, especially about the future†

    PubMed Central

    Schrodi, Steven J.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Shan, Ying; Tromp, Gerard; Sninsky, John J.; Callear, Amy P.; Carter, Tonia C.; Ye, Zhan; Haines, Jonathan L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Crane, Paul K.; Smelser, Diane T.; Elston, Robert C.; Weeks, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Translation of results from genetic findings to inform medical practice is a highly anticipated goal of human genetics. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the role of genetics in medically-relevant prediction. Germline genetics presages disease onset and therefore can contribute prognostic signals that augment laboratory tests and clinical features. As such, the impact of genetic-based predictive models on clinical decisions and therapy choice could be profound. However, given that (i) medical traits result from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, (ii) the underlying genetic architectures for susceptibility to common diseases are not well-understood, and (iii) replicable susceptibility alleles, in combination, account for only a moderate amount of disease heritability, there are substantial challenges to constructing and implementing genetic risk prediction models with high utility. In spite of these challenges, concerted progress has continued in this area with an ongoing accumulation of studies that identify disease predisposing genotypes. Several statistical approaches with the aim of predicting disease have been published. Here we summarize the current state of disease susceptibility mapping and pharmacogenetics efforts for risk prediction, describe methods used to construct and evaluate genetic-based predictive models, and discuss applications. PMID:24917882

  16. Secondary containment systems especially well suited for hydrocarbon storage and delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, J.

    1987-07-28

    A secondary containment system is described comprising a sheet of membrane material which is large enough to line at least a portion of a collection and containment pit along with trenches radiating. The trenches are graded to drain into the pit where a substantial amount of membrane bulk enables it to bunch in at least an area of the pit and to provide sufficient slack to conform to irregularities on the walls and floor of the lined portion of the pit and trenches. Localized stresses do not occur at places where the membrane bridges projections form by the irregularities, corners, or the like, anchoring means independent of the membrane and surrounding at least part of the perimeter of the pit. Means for attaching the anchoring means to the membrane to secure it provides a shoring for walls of the pit by restraining movement of the membrane if there should be a cave-in of the pit for a period of time which is at least long enough for workers to escape if there should be a cave-in. Means for closing and joining at least some sections of the membranes to preserve the integrity of a seal formed in order to form a secondary containment enclosure.

  17. The Big Five Factor Marker Adjectives Are Not Especially Popular Words. Are They Superior Descriptors?

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Eka

    2015-12-01

    Vocabularies of natural languages evolve over time. Useful words become more popular and useless concepts disappear. In this study, the frequency of the use of 295 English, 100 German, and 114 French personality adjectives in book texts and Twitter messages as qualifiers of the words person, woman, homme, femme, and Person was studied. Word frequency data were compared to factor loadings from previous factor analytic studies on personality terms. The correlation between the popularity of an adjective and its highest primary loading in five- and six-factor models was low (-0.12 to 0.17). The Big five (six) marker adjectives were not more popular than "blended" adjectives that had moderate loadings on several factors. This finding implies that laymen consider "blended" adjectives as equally useful descriptors compared to adjectives that represent core features of the five (six) factors. These results are compatible with three hypotheses: 1) laymen are not good at describing personality, 2) the five (six) factors are artifacts of research methods, 3) the interaction of the five (six) factors is not well understood. PMID:25957182

  18. Making a case for breeding frost tolerant potatoes adapted to Andean Highlands especially the Altiplano

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although cultivated potatoes are sensitive to mild frost (severely damaged at air temperatures below -2 or -3 C) limited progress has been made in developing frost hardy cultivars. This may be due to the fact that most potato crop grown in North America and Europe has minimal risk to be subjected to...

  19. Therapeutic Strategies for SLE Involving Cytokines: Mechanism-Oriented Therapies Especially IFN-? Targeting Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: lupus) is a chronic complicated autoimmune disease and pathogenesis is still unclear. However, key cytokines have been recognized. Interferon (IFN)-? and also IFN?/? are of particular importance. Depending on the concept that lupus is a helper T(Th)1 disease and that dendritic cells (DCs) determine the direction of lupus, balance shift of Th1/Th2 and immunogenic/tolerogenic DCs is reviewed for therapy. (IFN)-?- and IFN-?/?-targeted (gene) therapies are introduced. These consist of Th1/Th2 balance shift and elimination of IFN-? and IFN-?-related cytokines such as (interleukin)IL-12 and IL-18. Other approaches include suppression of immunocompetent cells, normalization of abnormal T-cell function, costimulation blockade, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) blockade, and suppression of nephritic kidney inflammation. Moreover, balance shift of IFN-?/? and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? together with regulatory T(Treg) cells are briefely introduced. Clinical application will be discussed. PMID:20827419

  20. NSAIDs and serious cardiovascular disorders: especially cox-2 inhibitors and diclofenac.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used as analgesics expose patients to cardiovascular risks that can be predicted from their pharmacological properties. As of mid-2015, what is known about the cardiovascular harms of the NSAIDs of choice, ibuprofen and naproxen? Most of the data from comparative trials of NSAIDs concern cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen. Few studies have addressed the serious cardiovascular effects of other NSAIDs. In 2013, a U.K. team published a large meta-analysis of hundreds of randomised trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo or one NSAID with another NSAID. Compared with placebo, a statistically significant increase in the risk of serious cardiovascular adverse effects was demonstrated with cox-2 inhibitors and with diclofenac (about +40%). This risk is mainly due to an increase in myocardial infarctions and vascular deaths. Another meta-analysis found similar results in terms of cardiovascular deaths. The results of epidemiological studies are consistent with those of randomised clinical trials. According to meta-analyses of randomised trials, high-dose ibuprofen increases cardiovascular risks to the same degree as diclofenac or cox-2 inhibitors. The risk seems to mainly apply to daily doses of 2400 mg, a finding borne out by epidemiological studies that showed no increased risk with ibuprofen 1200 mg. Two meta-analyses of clinical trials showed that all NSAIDs roughly double the risk of heart failure. One meta-analysis showed a small, statistically significant increase in the risk of atrial fibrillation. In practice, from a cardiovascular perspective, the NSAIDs of choice are ibuprofen, on condition that the dose does not exceed 1200 mg per day, and naproxen. In contrast, it would appear from the study data that cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen (2400 mg per day) are best avoided. As for other NSAIDs, the clinical data are too sparse to allow a meaningful comparison with the better studied NSAIDs. It is advisable to avoid using these other drugs. PMID:26942254

  1. INFORME: Un Proyecto Especial para Estudiantes Muy Especiales (Report: A Special Project for Very Special Students).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Rosa

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a special education program for children with lower intelligence quotients and emotional problems, to study introductory level Spanish with a teacher whose native language is Spanish. In addition to language content, the classes included instruction in social science. The program assisted these children in improving their knowledge of…

  2. Especies del género Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) invadiendo ambientes naturales y seminaturales en Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tamarix species (Tamaricaceae) invading natural and seminatural habitats in Argentina. The genus Tamarix includes species behaving as aggressive invaders in the USA, México and Australia. Previous studies report a variable number of species of this genus cultivated in Argentina as ornamentals,wind-b...

  3. A review of non-cancer effects, especially circulatory and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P

    2013-11-01

    There is a well-established association between high doses (>5Gy) of ionizing radiation exposure and damage to the heart and coronary arteries, although only recently have studies with high-quality individual dosimetry been conducted that would enable quantification of this risk adjusting for concomitant chemotherapy. The association between lower dose exposures and late occurring circulatory disease has only recently begun to emerge in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in various occupationally exposed cohorts and is still controversial. Excess relative risks per unit dose in moderate- and low-dose epidemiological studies are somewhat variable, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well-known (but unobserved) risk factors. Radiation doses of 1Gy or more are associated with increased risk of posterior subcapsular cataract. Accumulating evidence from the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, Chernobyl liquidators, US astronauts, and various other exposed groups suggests that cortical cataracts may also be associated with ionizing radiation, although there is little evidence that nuclear cataracts are radiogenic. The dose-response appears to be linear, although modest thresholds (of no more than about 0.6Gy) cannot be ruled out. A variety of other non-malignant effects have been observed after moderate/low-dose exposure in various groups, in particular respiratory and digestive disease and central nervous system (and in particular neuro-cognitive) damage. However, because these are generally only observed in isolated groups, or because the evidence is excessively heterogeneous, these associations must be treated with caution. PMID:23903347

  4. Theaflavins from black tea, especially theaflavin-3-gallate, reduce the incorporation of cholesterol into mixed micelles.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Vermeer MA; Mulder TP; Molhuizen HO

    2008-12-24

    Tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and may be associated with reduced heart disease rates. Theaflavins, which are formed in the production of black tea, have been suggested being responsible for the blood-cholesterol-lowering (BCL) effects of tea. We hypothesized that the effect of theaflavins on BCL could be through interference in the formation of dietary mixed micelles, which could result in reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption. Micelles were produced by mixing oleic acid, bile acids, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol. Theaflavin-treated micelles/particles were analyzed using electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, and light-scattering particle size measurements. A dose-dependent inhibitory effect of theaflavins on the incorporation of (14)C-labeled cholesterol into micelles and a theaflavin-dependent increase in particle size was found. These particles consisted of insoluble large multilamellar vesicles with onion-like structures. Ultracentrifugation and HPLC analysis revealed that the pellets contained mainly theaflavin-3-gallate, while the remaining theaflavins were found to be present in the supernatant. Using purified theaflavin subtypes confirmed that mainly theaflavin-3-gallate is responsible for multilamellar vesicle formation. These results show that theaflavins can play a role in decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption via inhibition of micelle formation.

  5. Preparation and application of vegetable proteins, especially proteins from sunflower seed, for human consumption. An approach.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, B

    1983-01-01

    About 80% of the world protein production are of vegetable origin. More than half the vegetable protein is fed to animals, whereas merely 10 kg protein per capita are obtained from meat, milk and eggs per year. Therefore, and because of rising prices for raw materials and energy the production and the firsthand utilisation of proteinacous plants for foodstuffs are a worldwide problem. As future source of protein for human nutrition sunflower seed and oil extraction residues from sunflower seed, respectively, are of great significance. Sunflower seed does not contain anti-nutritive and toxical compounds. After crossing of species having a high oil content, the today cultivated sunflower hybrids bring seeds containing 17-22% crude protein and 30-52% oil. The cultivation also has led to a considerable reduction of the hull content. In processing of sunflower proteins colour problems occur resulting from finely ground particles of dark hulls and from polyphenolic acids which are easily oxidized and converted into brown polymerics. Essential components of the sunflower protein production are, therefore, the at least 98% dehulling before processing as well as the separation of polyphenolic acids and/or the prevention of their oxidation. In principle, the variation and combination of technological steps in pre-treating and defatting of sunflower seed, in extracting, precipitating, washing and drying of proteins, the chemical modification of proteins obtained, the interaction with neutral salts or complexing agents, and the admixture of lysine or proteins of high lysine content allow to adapt sunflower proteins to each type of application. PMID:6877346

  6. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  7. Potential use of dietary natural products, especially polyphenols, for improving type-1 allergic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yoshio; Takimoto, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Kawaguchi, Kiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Type-1 allergic diseases consist of two phases. An inductive phase comprises IgE formation to allergens based on the immune system being biased to predominant T-helper type 2 responses. In a triggering phase allergic symptoms are triggered due to a robust secretion of mediators from mast cells and other cells after re-exposure to the same allergen. Various polyphenols, found in foods and plant sources, have potent anti-allergic activities that have been shown in different disease models and in human clinical trials. The present review summarizes the recent findings and progress in the research about polyphenols and natural products, and their role in allergic diseases. Intake of representative polyphenols (flavones, flavone-3-ols, catechins, anthocyanidins, flavanones, procyanidins, and resveratrol) can improve a skewed Th1/Th2 balance and suppress antigen-specific IgE antibody formation. Oral administration of fermented grape foods (FGF), one example of natural products fermented by lactic acid bacteria, is effective for decreasing allergic symptoms in the effector phase. Inhibitory mechanisms of polyphenols are also discussed. PMID:23701564

  8. [Acute traumatic and especially neglected traumatic hip dislocations are very rare in children].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F F; Wirth, T; Eberhardt, O

    2012-09-01

    We report about the first hip arthroscopies of extracapsular neglected hip dislocations with concomitant injuries in two children (2 and 4 years old). The major problem of traumatic hip dislocation is avascular necrosis. Further problems are possible concomitant injuries. It is important not to cause further damage by therapeutic procedures. In a 4-year-old child the hip could be reduced under visualization and in a 2-year-old child with epiphyseal fracture the extent of the operation could be reduced. In both children large avulsion injuries of the ligamentum capitis femoris could be resected via hip arthroscopy. Hip arthroscopy can reduce surgical morbidity considerably and can possibly contribute to prevention of the feared avascular necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:22038236

  9. Interaction of dietary compounds, especially polyphenols, with the intestinal microbiota: a review.

    PubMed

    Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra; Tarko, Tomasz; Satora, Pawe?; Sroka, Pawe?

    2015-04-01

    The intestinal microbiome plays an important role in the metabolism of chemical compounds found within food. Bacterial metabolites are different from those that can be generated by human enzymes because bacterial processes occur under anaerobic conditions and are based mainly on reactions of reduction and/or hydrolysis. In most cases, bacterial metabolism reduces the activity of dietary compounds; however, sometimes a specific product of bacterial transformation exhibits enhanced properties. Studies on the metabolism of polyphenols by the intestinal microbiota are crucial for understanding the role of these compounds and their impact on our health. This review article presents possible pathways of polyphenol metabolism by intestinal bacteria and describes the diet-derived bioactive metabolites produced by gut microbiota, with a particular emphasis on polyphenols and their potential impact on human health. Because the etiology of many diseases is largely correlated with the intestinal microbiome, a balance between the host immune system and the commensal gut microbiota is crucial for maintaining health. Diet-related and age-related changes in the human intestinal microbiome and their consequences are summarized in the paper. PMID:25672526

  10. People* Working . . . *Especially Women . . . A Book of Materials, Activities, and Ideas for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valiant, Sharon

    This bibliography lists publications and other media, historical facts, and suggestions for activities that show women as working and accomplishing people. Materials are from all grade levels (K-12) and many subject areas. Arrangement is in three sections. Part I deals with women who have worked but not for wages, the pioneer, the homemaker, and…

  11. Low nox rich-lean combustor especially useful in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, J.M.

    1989-07-11

    This patent describes a rich-lean combustor having at least one combustion stage and operable with reduced emission of fuel bound and thermal nitrogen oxide products. The combustor consists of: tubular wall means having at least three successive tubular wall portions disposed in successive downstream locations and having respectively increasing dimensions in the radial direction to provide a generally outwardly diverging combustor envelope along the axial direction that defines an outwardly diverging combustion zone for low NO/sub chi/ combustion; means for supporting the tubular wall portions relative to each other to provide a rigid structure for the combustor; nozzle means for supplying fuel to the combustor in at least one predetermined location; each successive pair of adjacent tubular wall portions being structured to define a generally annular inlet flow path extending in the radial direction between the outer surface of the radially inward upstream wall portion of the pair and the inner surface of the radially outward downstream wall portion of the pair and further extending downstream in the axial direction along the inner surface of the radially outward downstream wall portion of the pair so that successive annular flow paths axially overlap, to enable the annular flows to combine at least partly for swirling radially inward flow into the combustion zone.

  12. Toward Better Research on--and Thinking about--Evaluation Influence, Especially in Multisite Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Melvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation is typically carried out with the intention of making a difference in the understandings and actions of stakeholders and decision makers. The author provides a general review of the concepts of evaluation "use," evaluation "influence," and "influence pathways," with connections to multisite evaluations. The study of evaluation influence…

  13. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Kenneth L. (Rochester, NY)

    2009-02-17

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  14. A unilocular thymic cyst associated with true thymic hyperplasia: a challenging diagnosis especially in a child.

    PubMed

    Mlika, Mona; Gattoufi, Walid; Zribi, Hazem; Braham, Emna; Marghli, Adel; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of a mediastinal mass in a 19-year-old patient corresponding microscopically to an association of unilocular thymic cyst and true thymic hyperplasia. Our aim is to highlight the absence of specificity of clinical and radiological findings and the necessity of a thorough sampling of the tumor in order to establish the diagnosis. PMID:26445562

  15. [Peripheral air way disturbances, especially emphysematous changes due to chromate compounds (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kimura, K

    1981-11-01

    There are few reports on peripheral air way due to chromate hazard, although many reports about upper and large respiratory tract disturbance were present. In this report, the bronchiolar and alveolar injuries due to chromate compounds were examined based on clinical, pathological investigation and animal experiments. The results were as follows. (1) Clinical investigations of former chromate workers (93 subjects): (a) Based upon findings of lung function tests and chest radiographs, no cases were diagnosed as definite emphysema, and there were only 4 suspected cases of emphysema. (b) 93 subjects were divided to 8 groups by smoking history and labor period, and were examined for their lung function. The values of %FVC, FEV1.0%, V50, V25, MMEFR, CV/VC% and delta N2% of these groups revealed within normal limits. (2) Pathological examination of autopsied and resected lung of 9 chromate lung cancer patients showed emphysematous changes of 8 cases, of which severe grade of emphysematous changes seen in only one, and mild or moderate emphysematous changes in seven. (3) All of the animals treated with monochromate or sodium dichromate, both of which were hexavalent chromate, showed emphysema in the long term experiments, but none treated with chromite ore (trivalent chromate) or saline. (4) The animals showed congestion soon after injection of monochromate in the short term experiments. Emphysematous changes clearly observed in 2 days. Based on our animal experiments, it is concluded that hexavalent chromate acts as a cause to produce emphysema. But clinically it seems reasonable to conclude that effects of chromate compounds to induce emphysema are very mild in men. PMID:7338337

  16. Determining traces of indium in especial-purity tin by laser atomic absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, I.V.; Chekalin, N.V.; Tikhomirova, E.I.

    1985-04-20

    This paper examines various schemes for the selective laser excitation of tin atoms in an acetylene-air flame. The exciting source was provided by two laser systems: dye lasers, which include master lasers and a prism telescope along with an amplifier having transverse pumping by a nitrogen laser, and dye lasers employing glancing incidence and longitudinal pumping by the second harmonic of an Nd-YAG laser. A limit of detection for indium in aqueous solution of about 1 pg/ml has been attained and there is virtually no effect from tin in a two-stage ioinization scheme up to a concentration of 50 g/liter. It is possible to determine indium in tin at the level of 10/sup -8/%.

  17. Especially Social: Exploring the Use of an iOS Application in Special Needs Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campigotto, Rachelle; McEwen, Rhonda; Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2013-01-01

    A five-month exploratory study was conducted with iOS mobile devices in two Toronto area schools with students in grades 7 through 12. Both classrooms were identified as Special Education classes by the Ontario Ministry of Education, and each student was identified as having exceptionalities requiring additional support and differentiation within

  18. Especially for Parents--Santa Barbara County Schools Environmental Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Barbara County Schools, CA.

    The bilingual (Spanish and English) packet of materials was developed to provide answers to parent concerns about the children attending the Environmental Education Outdoor School Program. The first pamphlet describes the program, giving information on the faculty and response to emergency situations, climate and clothes, natural hazards, mail to

  19. The prospect of nuclear energy in Trkiye especially after Fukushima accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ahin, Smer

    2014-09-01

    Trkiye considers since mid-50's to use nuclear electricity, but Government and bureaucracy have continuously postponed reactor construction. However, since 2010 the case has gained a real shape. Official agreement has been signed for the construction of 4 units of Russian VVER type reactors with installed power of 41200 MWel. It is expected that they will begin to deliver electricity early 20's. Further negotiations are being conducted with Japanese Mitsubashi and French AREVA. The target is to have nuclear electricity by 2023 at the 100th anniversary of Turkish Republic. Turkish Nuclear Energy Strategy aims; Decrease country's dependency on foreign suppliers of energy sources Provide fuel supply mix diversification Utilization of environmentally friendly energy production technologies Possess advanced and prestigious power generation technologies.

  20. The Three Bears and Other Plays: Six Easy Plays Especially Written for Educationally Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, Dhyan

    This booklet contains six easy plays written for educationally handicapped children. The plays are brief, use few characters and simple language and plots, and are based on fairy tales. Titles are: (1) "The Three Bears'" (2) "The Gingerbread Boy'" (3) "Little Red Riding Hood'" (4) "The Three Billy Goats Gruff'" (5) "Hansel and Gretel'" and (6)

  1. Steam generator for nuclear power plants, especially for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, H.; Sawitzki, M.; Sterk, Z.

    1980-04-29

    Steam generator for nuclear power plants includes a cylindrical housing, a tube bundle for conducting primary medium enclosed by the housing, and at least one tube support plate holding the tube bundle. The cylindrical housing includes a base member secured to the tube support plate and defining therewith inlet and outlet chambers for the primary medium, the cylindrical housing having a pair of opposing flanges on portions of the cylindrical housing located on opposite sides of the tube support plate, and flange connection means for tightly connecting the portions of the cylindrical housing on opposite sides of the tube support plate. The flange connection means being releasable for assembling and disassembling the tube bundle and includes a stud bolt connection, the flanges have opposing sealing surfaces, a lip seal disposed between the sealing surfaces and have radially outwardly protruding lips tightly welded to one another. The lips have a radially inner region secured by respective circular bead welds to the flanges.

  2. US cardiologist workforce from 1995 to 2007: modest growth, lasting geographic maldistribution, especially in rural areas

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Sanjay; Ross, Joseph S.; Wang, Yongfei; Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Rodgers, George P.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Rathore, Saif S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    A sufficient cardiology workforce is necessary to ensure access to cardiovascular care. Specifically, access to cardiologists is important in the management and treatment of chronic cardiovascular disease. Previous workforce analyses focused narrowly on the total numbers necessary to care for the entire population and not the geographic distribution of the workforce. To examine the supply and distribution of the cardiologist workforce, we mapped the ratios of cardiologists, primary care physicians, and total physicians to the population aged 65 years or older within different Hospital Referral Regions from the years 1995 and 2007. We found within the 12-year span of our study growth in the cardiology workforce was modest compared to the primary care physician and total physician workforces. Also we found a persistent geographic misdistribution of cardiologists associated with socioeconomic population characteristics. Our results suggest that large segments of our population, specifically in rural areas, continue to have decreased access to cardiologists despite a modest growth in the overall workforce. Policy initiatives focused upon increasing the cardiologist workforces in these areas in necessary to provide adequate cardiovascular care. PMID:22147857

  3. Validating health impact assessment: Prediction is difficult (especially about the future)

    SciTech Connect

    Petticrew, Mark . E-mail: mark@msoc.mrc.gla.ac.uk; Cummins, Steven; Sparks, Leigh; Findlay, Anne

    2007-01-15

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been recommended as a means of estimating how policies, programmes and projects may impact on public health and on health inequalities. This paper considers the difference between predicting health impacts and measuring those impacts. It draws upon a case study of the building of a new hypermarket in a deprived area of Glasgow, which offered an opportunity to reflect on the issue of the predictive validity of HIA, and to consider the difference between potential and actual impacts. We found that the actual impacts of the new hypermarket on diet differed from that which would have been predicted based on previous studies. Furthermore, they challenge current received wisdom about the impact of food retail outlets in poorer areas. These results are relevant to the validity of HIA as a process and emphasise the importance of further research on the predictive validity of HIA, which should help improve its value to decision-makers.

  4. Effects of Partially Ionised Medical Oxygen, Especially with O2?, in Vibration White Finger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pere?insk, Slavomr; Murnov, Lenka; Engler, Ivan; Doni?, Viliam; Murn, Pavol; Varga, Marek; Legth, ?ubomr

    2014-01-01

    A major symptom of hand-arm vibration syndrome is a secondary Raynauds phenomenonvibration white finger (VWF)which results from a vasospasm of the digital arteries caused by work with vibration devices leading to occupational disease. Pharmacotherapy of VWF is often ineffective or has adverse effects. The aim of this work was to verify the influence of inhalation of partially ionized oxygen (O2?) on peripheral blood vessels in the hands of patients with VWF. Ninety one (91)patients with VWF underwent four-finger adsorption plethysmography, and the pulse wave amplitude was recorded expressed in numeric parameterscalled the native record. Next, a cold water test was conducted following with second plethysmography. The patients were divided in to the three groups. First and second inhaled 20-min of ionized oxygen O2? or oxygen O2 respectively. Thirth group was control without treatment. All three groups a follow-up third plethysmographythe post-therapy record. Changes in the pulse wave amplitudes were evaluated. Inpatients group inhaling O2? a modest increase of pulse wave amplitude was observed compared to the native record; patients inhaling medical oxygen O2 and the control showed a undesirable decline of pulse wave amplitude in VWF fingers. Strong vasodilatation were more frequent in the group inhaling O2? compare to O2 (p < 0.05). Peripheral vasodilatation achieved by inhalation of O2? could be used for VWF treatment without undesirable side effect in hospital as well as at home environment. PMID:24871260

  5. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  6. Images. A Workbook for Enhancing Self-Esteem and Promoting Career Preparation, Especially for Black Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mattie Evans

    This illustrated workbook is designed to help young black women develop self-esteem and explore career options. Part I, "Who Am I?" comprises the following chapters: (1) "The Search for Self," exploring attitudes, feelings, values, and interests; (2) "How I Get Along with People," discussing interpersonal communication and language behavior; and

  7. Heterogeneous growth of meteorites and planets, especially the earth and moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that enough information remains in meteorites to show that the solar nebula was chemically inhomogeneous, and that it did not develop under physical and chemical equilibrium. It is found that the earth is not in chemical equilibrium, and that it still retains vestiges of its heterogeneous growth in spite of prolonged convection and volcanism. The present investigation has the aim to unify simple ideas into a comprehensive, complex scheme for heterogeneous growth of the planets and parent bodies of meteorites. A scheme is considered for the conversion of dust and gas in the solar nebula into the present population of bodies. Attention is given to possible processes for the growth and development of planetesimals from dust via clouds, the major episodes in the development of the solar system, the relation of meteorites to a solar nebula with monotonic variation of temperature and oxidation state, the significance of meteorite properties, the composition of the inner planets, and the development of the earth.

  8. Daily menus can result in suboptimal nutrient intakes, especially calcium, of adolescents living in dormitories.

    PubMed

    Kresi?, Greta; Simundi?, Borislav; Mandi?, Milena L; Kendel, Gordana; Zezelj, Sandra Pavici?

    2008-03-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate daily menus in Croatian dormitories and to assess the overall intake of dairy products among resident adolescents. For this purpose, 168 daily menus were chosen for nutritional evaluation by random sampling. In addition, 227 adolescents (133 girls and 94 boys) participated in a questionnaire focused on food intake in addition to the meals supplied in dormitories with the aim to assess the amount and the type of dairy products consumed. The results showed that only 35% of the daily menus were nutritionally balanced. Most of the menus provided an excess of energy, protein, carbohydrate, saturated fat, phosphorus, riboflavin, and vitamin A. The levels of calcium and magnesium in the menus were suboptimal. The menus offered to adolescents provided approximately 2 servings of dairy products per day. Milk was the most often supplied dairy product (1.1 servings per day), whereas yogurt had the lowest frequency of serving (0.2 servings per day). The most preferred dairy-based snack for both sexes was milk. Dairy-based snacks provided about 1 serving per day for both sexes and contributed to about 30% of the recommended dietary allowances for calcium. Adolescents who regularly consumed dairy-based snacks meet the recommendations (3.2 servings of dairy products per day and about 98% recommended dietary allowances for calcium). We conclude that the institutional menu planning should be improved because the intake of dairy snacks will continue to be a problem for achieving a healthy diet in adolescences. PMID:19083403

  9. Choose a variety of grains daily, especially whole grains: a challenge for consumers.

    PubMed

    Kantor, L S; Variyam, J N; Allshouse, J E; Putnam, J J; Lin, B H

    2001-02-01

    The 2000 edition of Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the first to include a specific guideline for grain foods, separate from fruits and vegetables, and recognize the unique health benefits of whole grains. This paper describes and evaluates major tools for assessing intakes of total grains and whole grains, reviews current data on who consumes grain foods and where, and describes individual- and market-level factors that may influence grain consumption. Aggregate food supply data show that U.S. consumers have increased their intake of grain foods from record low levels in the 1970s, but consumption of whole-grain foods remains low. Data on individual intakes show that consumption of total grains was above the recommended 6 serving minimum in 1994-1996, but consumption of whole grains was only one third of the 3 daily servings many nutritionists recommend. Increased intake of whole-grain foods may be limited by a lack of consumer awareness of the health benefits of whole grains, difficulty in identifying whole-grain foods in the marketplace, higher prices for some whole-grain foods, consumer perceptions of inferior taste and palatability, and lack of familiarity with preparation methods. In July 1999, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized a health claim that should both make it easier for consumers to identify and select whole-grain foods and have a positive effect on the availability of these foods in the marketplace. PMID:11160579

  10. Effects of listening to music with headphones on hearing--especially under noisy conditions.

    PubMed

    Miyake, S; Kumashiro, M

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of exposure to music using headphones under noisy conditions on hearing. The most comfortable loudness (MCL) for three kinds of music (Rock, Popular, Japanese songs) decided by two normal hearing subjects was measured under 6 noisy conditions (Train, Subway, Tram, Bus, Underground, Street) in a soundproof room. In the same manner, the MCL of favorite tunes of five subjects were measured. Temporary threshold shift 2 min after exposure (TTS2) to music for 30 min at the highest MCL was obtained. Furthermore, the characteristics such as spectral structures in one-third octave band or level fluctuations (coefficient of variation) were obtained for noise and music and compared. Statistical analysis revealed that MCL in Street was significantly higher than under other conditions and there was no significant differences in MCL among the various types of music. However, the highest MCL was found for Rock. About 20 dB of TTS was observed in one ear and the hazardous of headphones use in noisy conditions was suggested. PMID:3809814

  11. Patterns of discoloration and oxidation by direct and scattered fluxes, especially oxygen on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Filz, R. C.; Rich, F. J.; Sagalyn, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    A number of interesting discoloration patterns are clearly evident on M0002-1 which resides on three faces of LDEF: front face, rear face, and earth face. Most interesting is the pattern of blue oxidation on polished single crystal silicon apparently produced by once-scattered ram oxygen atoms along the earth face. Most of the other patterns are seen in the Thermal Control Paint. Also, severe oxidation of CR-39 polycarbonate occurred on the front face of LDEF, as expected. A complete explanation for the patterns has not yet been obtained.

  12. Public and Private Incentives for Investment in Higher Education: Are They Sufficient, Especially for Black Males?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appiah, Elizabeth N.

    2013-01-01

    The institutional costs of higher education have been rising. With diminishing public support per student, tuition and fees private costs have also been rising. But so have the real earnings of college graduates. Are there still sufficient incentives on efficiency grounds for additional public investment in higher education? And in particular,

  13. Especially for Teachers: Getting Started [and] Professional Development Handouts. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    American Memory is a Web site created by the Library of Congress which provides public access to more than 7 million historical items, presented in over 100 thematic collections through the World Wide Web. These items reflect the collective American memory, its history and culture, and include unique and rare documents, photographs, films, and

  14. Coupled metabolic and photolytic pathway for degradation of pyridinedicarboxylic acids, especially dipicolinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.A. ); Taylor, B.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Three isomers of pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) (2,3-, 2,5-, and 2,6-PDCA) were partially oxidized by marine bacteria when grown aerobically on the corresponding phthalate analogs. The metabolites, unlike the parent PDCAs, absorbed light in the solar actinic range (wavelengths greater than 300 nm) and were readily degraded in sunlight. The principal product from 2,6-PDCA (dipicolinic acid) metabolism was extracted from a culture fluid, purified by column chromatography, and analyzed by UV-visible, infrared, and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The compound was identified as 2,3-dihydroxypicolinic acid (2,3-DHPA). 2,3-DHPA was photolyzed in aqueous solution (pH 8.0) with a half-life of 100 min. Eight photoproducts, three of which were photolabile, were detected by high performance liquid chromatography. Ammonia was also photoproduced from 2,3-DHPA. Analysis of the photoproducts by UV-visible spectroscopy and by high-performance liquid chromatography of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones indicated that the products were conjugated carbonyls and carboxylic acids. Six of the photoproducts were readily consumed by bacterial strain CC9M. In illuminated aquatic environments, couple bio- and photodegradative mechanisms probably contribute to the degradation of PDCAs.

  15. An Essay on Leadership, Especially through South African and New Zealand Cultural Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gaynor Anne

    2009-01-01

    After reviewing the literature on the topic of leadership, Simkins (2005) confirmed what the author finds to be true; that there is an over-abundance of models and theories of leadership in the literature. More concerning is that some of these models and theories disappear as quickly as they appear. Learning about leadership develops through

  16. Modeling of the visual artifact in range-gated active imaging, especially in burst mode.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-07-01

    An active imaging system in burst mode allows the duty cycle of laser pulses to be close to 50%. In this configuration, a visual artifact resulting from a remote zone in the scene can appear in the image of the desired visualized zone. Therefore, the elements of this remote zone will create confusion in the image with erroneous estimated distances. These misinterpretations can be very disturbing when determining the distance of a target in the scene. In order to demonstrate the occurrence of visual artifacts with an active imaging system in burst mode, the different translated signals in the time domain as well as the atmospheric attenuation and the attenuation due to the inverse square distance were included in the modeling of this mode. A graphic method, which does not take into account the different attenuations, was also proposed to give an idea of the visual artifact phenomenon. The validity of the modeling was demonstrated by comparing the results of the outdoor tests carried out with an active imaging system in burst mode. Consequently, the simulation programs can use this modeling to evaluate the visual artifact in a scene. PMID:25089984

  17. Analysis of the visual artifact in range-gated active imaging, especially in burst mode.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-09-20

    After the demonstration of the occurrence of visual artifacts with an active imaging system in burst mode in a previous paper, the analysis of this phenomenon was realized. A visual artifact resulting from a remote zone in the scene can appear in the image of the real visualized zone when the duty cycle of laser pulses is close to 50%, as in the burst mode. Therefore, the elements of this remote zone will create confusion in the image, with erroneous estimated distances. These misinterpretations can be very embarrassing to those attempting to determine the distance of a target in the scene. From the modeling realized and validated in the previous paper, the behavior of the visual artifact was analyzed with two types of burst mode used in active imaging, the duration of the laser pulse being identical to the duration of the temporal aperture of the imager. In the first mode, the width of the visualized zone is set, depending on the distance. The second mode increases the width of the visualized zone so that the foreground of the zone is constantly visible. The results showed that the distance of the visual artifacts in variable mode increased much more quickly than the distance in fixed mode. In both modes, the most intense visual artifacts appear when the range of the visualized zone remains within the first kilometer. When this range is very short, the illuminance of the visual artifact in fixed mode is much more intense than the illuminance in variable mode. On the other hand, for long distances, the illuminance of the visual artifact in variable mode is greater than the illuminance in fixed mode, but decreases quickly beyond a certain distance, making it insignificant. PMID:25322113

  18. A unilocular thymic cyst associated with true thymic hyperplasia: a challenging diagnosis especially in a child

    PubMed Central

    Mlika, Mona; Gattoufi, Walid; Zribi, Hazem; Braham, Emna; Marghli, Adel; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of a mediastinal mass in a 19-year-old patient corresponding microscopically to an association of unilocular thymic cyst and true thymic hyperplasia. Our aim is to highlight the absence of specificity of clinical and radiological findings and the necessity of a thorough sampling of the tumor in order to establish the diagnosis. PMID:26445562

  19. DNA terminal base pairs have weaker hydrogen bonds especially for AT under low salt concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Izabela; Amarante, Tauanne D.; Weber, Gerald

    2015-11-01

    DNA base pairs are known to open more easily at the helix terminal, a process usually called end fraying, the details of which are still poorly understood. Here, we present a mesoscopic model calculation based on available experimental data where we consider separately the terminal base pairs of a DNA duplex. Our results show an important reduction of hydrogen bond strength for terminal cytosine-guanine (CG) base pairs which is uniform over the whole range of salt concentrations, while for AT base pairs, we obtain a nearly 1/3 reduction but only at low salt concentrations. At higher salt concentrations, terminal adenine-thymine (AT) pair has almost the same hydrogen bond strength than interior bases. The calculated terminal stacking interaction parameters display some peculiarly contrasting behavior. While there is mostly no perceptible difference to internal stacking, for some cases, we observe an unusually strong dependence with salt concentration which does not appear follow any pattern or trend.

  20. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  1. Especially for Teachers: Selected Documents on the Teaching of Science 1966-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley, Comp.; And Others

    Designed to supplement the day-to-day planning, teaching, and evaluation activities of science teachers at all educational levels, this compilation contains over 900 resumes of practitioner-oriented documents announced in "Resources in Education" (RIE) between 1966 and 1981. The resumes are presented under these headings: (1) elementary…

  2. Global assessment of avian influenza control strategies, especially the role of vaccine efficacy and vaccination effectiveness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OFFLU is the joint World Organisation for Animal Health and Food and Agricultural Organization (OIE-FAO) global network of expertise on animal influenzas. OFFLU aims to reduce negative impacts of animal influenza viruses by promoting effective collaboration between animal health experts. OFFLU puts ...

  3. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  4. Special Education: Parent and Student Rights = Educacion Especial: Los Derechos de los Padres y Estudiantes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Special Education Programs.

    Intended for parents of children with possible disabilities in Texas, these two combined booklets (one in English and one in Spanish) outline the step-by-step process qualifying the child for special education services and explain the parent's rights and responsibilities under federal and state law. Introductory material includes a letter to

  5. ORGANIC MATTER IN THE EXPIRED BREATH WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS INHIBITING POWER ON OXIDIZING FERMENTS.

    PubMed

    Amoss, H L

    1913-02-01

    Weichardt claims to have demonstrated the presence of an organic body in the expired air. He allowed the exhaled breath to pass through hydrochloric acid solution, evaporated the resulting solution to dryness on a water bath, and obtained a weighable residue which charred on ignition. If he neutralized the acid solution and concentrated it under reduced pressure, he obtained a solution which inhibited the bluing of the guaiacum indicator by blood. By exposing calcium chloride in a room in which the air had been vitiated, he claimed also to have obtained a substance from the air which prevented the bluing of the guaiacum indicator by blood. The experiments here recorded show that a variable amount of matter is retained by weak hydrochloric solution when exhaled breath is passed through it, and that this matter is volatile on ignition. Contrary to the findings of Weichardt, there is no charring or blackening. Nesslerization shows the residue to consist mainly, if not wholly, of ammonium chloride. This ammonia is believed to have come from the decomposition of food particles about the teeth. In one case the person (S.) had smoked just before the experiment, so that a small amount of the ammonia from the tobacco smoke may have been held temporarily by the saliva and food particles in the mouth and been given off gradually during the experiment. Weichardt's experiments on the inhibition of the guaiacum test for blood by means of the substances retained when exhaled breath is passed through hydrochloric acid or over calcium chloride crystals are not corroborated. It is further shown that the guaiacum indicator is unreliable for these tests in view of the fact that a small amount of free acid or free alkali will inhibit the guaiacum test for blood. This fact is offered as a probable explanation of Weichardt's results. Calcium chloride alone gives a deep blue color with the guaiacin indicator. Weichardt used this salt to collect from the expired breath certain unknown substances which he claims inhibit the oxidation of guaiacum by blood. His results are therefore inconclusive. The phenolphthalin test for blood has been studied in this connection and further light has been thrown on this reaction. The sodium salt of phenolphthalin is colorless in alkaline solution, and is readily oxidized by minute quantities of blood to phenolphthalein which gives a characteristic deep purplish red color in alkaline solution. It has been found that the presence of calcium chloride and ammonium chloride in small amounts retards and, in large amounts, prevents this reaction. It is believed that any salt composed of a weak base combined with a strong acid will have the same effect. This is discussed in the text. It has also been shown that the presence of calcium chloride or ammonium chloride decreases the depth of color of phenolphthalein in sodium hydroxide solution. Carbon dioxide also prevents the oxidation of phenolphthalin by blood. Of course this does not mean that carbon dioxide prevents the action of the oxidizing ferments generally. In this particular case the substance to be oxidized, namely phenolphthalin, was not allowed by reason of the presence of the carbon dioxide to combine with the alkali and thereby assume a state in which it could be easily oxidized. The results of one experiment seem to indicate a relation between the amount of dissolved oxygen in the solutions and the percentage of oxidation. Sodium chloride either alone or with the aid of hydrogen peroxide is able to bring about the oxidation of phenolphthalin in alkali to a very slight extent (3.5 to 5 per cent. in twenty-four hours). Therefore phenolphthalin as a test for oxidizing ferments should not be used in the presence of an appreciable amount of inorganic salts or carbon dioxide. Complete dialysis is recommended in these cases. It is also to be noted that the great delicacy of the test allows considerable dilution. Liquids were obtained from the expired breath by passing this through weak hydrochloric acid or by condensing the moisture in it by conducting it through cooled Drechsel bottles. Attempts were then made to prove the presence in these liquids of some substance which inhibits the oxidation of phenolphthalin by blood, but all were unsuccessful. Moreover attempts to concentrate these liquids by evaporation under reduced pressure or by the passage of a direct current (colloidal travel) were also unsuccessful. It is planned to improve upon the apparatus used to concentrate colloids by the passage of a direct current, and to test the effect of expired breath products on the rate of oxidation of phenolphthalin by blood. PMID:19867631

  6. The prospect of nuclear energy in Türkiye especially after Fukushima accident

    SciTech Connect

    Şahin, Sümer

    2014-09-30

    Türkiye considers since mid-50's to use nuclear electricity, but Government and bureaucracy have continuously postponed reactor construction. However, since 2010 the case has gained a real shape. Official agreement has been signed for the construction of 4 units of Russian VVER type reactors with installed power of 4×1200 MW{sub el}. It is expected that they will begin to deliver electricity early 20's. Further negotiations are being conducted with Japanese Mitsubashi and French AREVA. The target is to have nuclear electricity by 2023 at the 100{sup th} anniversary of Turkish Republic. Turkish Nuclear Energy Strategy aims; • Decrease country's dependency on foreign suppliers of energy sources • Provide fuel supply mix diversification • Utilization of environmentally friendly energy production technologies Possess advanced and prestigious power generation technologies.

  7. Researches on ailerons and especially on the test loads to which they should be subjected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1927-01-01

    Aileron calculations have hitherto given greatly differing results according to different authors. It seems to be the general opinion that it is only necessary to give the ailerons such dimensions that the airplane can maneuver well, that the stresses they must undergo are relatively small, and that they are strong enough if their framework is of the order of strength as the wings to which they are attached. This article will show that the problem is really quite complex and that it should receive more attention.

  8. Especially for Teachers: ERIC Documents on the Teaching of Mathematics, 1966-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suydam, Marilyn N., Comp.; Higgins, Jon L., Comp.

    Presented is a compilation of materials for teachers available through ERIC that focus on mathematics instruction. Over 900 citations were selected from those listed in Resources in Education (RIE) between 1966 and 1980. Abstracts of the documents are presented in the following categories: Algebra; Applications; Calculators and Computers;

  9. Modular Coils with Low Hydrogen Content Especially for MRI of Dry Solids

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Elmar; Grbner, Jens; Gpper, Michael; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Flgge, Tabea; Hennig, Jrgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hvener, Jan-Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent advances have enabled fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials. This development has opened up new applications for MRI, but, at the same time, uncovered new challenges. Previously, MRI-invisible materials like the housing of MRI detection coils are now readily depicted and either cause artifacts or lead to a decreased image resolution. In this contribution, we present versatile, multi-nuclear single and dual-tune MRI coils that stand out by (1) a low hydrogen content for high-resolution MRI of dry solids without artifacts; (2) a modular approach with exchangeable inductors of variable volumes to optimally enclose the given object; (3) low cost and low manufacturing effort that is associated with the modular approach; (4) accurate sample placement in the coil outside of the bore, and (5) a wide, single- or dual-tune frequency range that covers several nuclei and enables multinuclear MRI without moving the sample. Materials and Methods The inductors of the coils were constructed from self-supporting copper sheets to avoid all plastic materials within or around the resonator. The components that were mounted at a distance from the inductor, including the circuit board, coaxial cable and holder were manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene. Results and Conclusion Residual hydrogen signal was sufficiently well suppressed to allow 1H-MRI of dry solids with a minimum field of view that was smaller than the sensitive volume of the coil. The SNR was found to be comparable but somewhat lower with respect to commercial, proton-rich quadrature coils, and higher with respect to a linearly-polarized commercial coil. The potential of the setup presented was exemplified by 1H / 23Na high-resolution zero echo time (ZTE) MRI of a model solution and a dried human molar at 9.4 T. A full 3D image dataset of the tooth was obtained, rich in contrast and similar to the resolution of standard cone-beam computed tomography. PMID:26496192

  10. Biological Evolution on the Earth Influenced by Astronomical Objects: Especially Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponert, J.; Príhoda, P.

    2009-12-01

    Taking in to account 20,000 explosions of intragalactic supernovae per million years, the sources estimated at 1056 - 1057 MeV producing the high intensity of gamma- and xray-radiation even after its reduction through the Earth atmosphere, may have a significant mutagenic action. During the time period of the last 4 billion years not less than one hundred explosions up to the mean distance 126 pc from the Earth. All such explosions were able to evoke a genetic revolution among most taxonomic groups of terrestrial organisms. For mountain organisms, the more frequent supernova explosions in distance up to 400-900 pc are of importance, maritime organisms could be influenced mainly by secondary radiation products, rather than directly by the gamma and X-rays from the supernovae. The mechanisms of macroevolution depending on supernovae is elucidated. Smaller genetical revolutions in the macroevolutional process (formation of genera) took place on the average once every 10 millions or more years, fundamental genetic revolutions once in 100 millions or more years. Also other newly discovered astronomical gamma-ray sources have to be taken in account.

  11. Sleep Restriction Is Associated With Increased Morning Plasma Leptin Concentrations, Especially in Women

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norah S.; Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives We evaluated the effects of sleep restriction on leptin levels in a large, diverse sample of healthy participants, while allowing free access to food. Methods Prospective experimental design. After 2 nights of baseline sleep, 136 participants (49% women, 56% African Americans) received 5 consecutive nights of 4 hours time in bed (TIB). Additionally, one subset of participants received 2 additional nights of either further sleep restriction (n = 27) or increased sleep opportunity (n = 37). Control participants (n = 9) received 10 hr TIB on all study nights. Plasma leptin was measured between 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon following baseline sleep, after the initial sleep-restriction period, and after 2 nights of further sleep restriction or recovery sleep. Results Leptin levels increased significantly among sleep-restricted participants after 5 nights of 4 hr TIB (Z = ?8.43, p < .001). Increases were significantly greater among women compared to men (Z = ?4.77, p < .001) and among participants with higher body mass index (BMI) compared to those with lower (Z = ?2.09, p = .036), though participants in all categories (sex, race/ethnicity, BMI, and age) demonstrated significant increases. There was also a significant effect of allowed TIB on leptin levels following the 2 additional nights of sleep restriction (p < .001). Participants in the control condition showed no significant changes in leptin levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that sleep restriction with ad libitum access to food significantly increases morning plasma leptin levels, particularly among women. PMID:20453022

  12. The Camp Health Manual. An Excellent Reference Written Especially for Organized Camps. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, David; Middelkamp, J. Neal

    This book is a guide to the diagnosis and care of sick children in organized camping situations. This book presents health care information for the management of medical and surgical problems by the camp counselor, camp director, camp nurse, and camp physician. The chapters are: (1) Camp Standards; (2) The Infirmary; (3) Infirmary Supplies; (4)

  13. "Infectobesity: viral infections (especially with human adenovirus-36: Ad-36) may be a cause of obesity.

    PubMed

    van Ginneken, Vincent; Sitnyakowsky, Laura; Jeffery, Jonathan E

    2009-04-01

    In recent years viral infections have been recognized as possible cause of obesity, alongside the traditionally recognized causes (genetic inheritance, and behaviour/environmental causes such as diet exercise, cultural practices and stress). Although four viruses have been reported to induce obesity (infectoobesity) in animal models (chickens, mice, sheep, goat, dogs, rats and hamsters), until recently the viral etiology of human obesity has not received sufficient attention, possibly because the four viruses are not able to infect humans. In a series of papers over the last ten years, however, the group of Prof. Dhurandhar (Pennington Biomedical Research Center, LA, USA) demonstrated that a human adenovirus, adenovirus-36 (Ad-36), is capable of inducing adiposity in experimentally infected chickens, mice and non-human primates (marmosets). Ad-36 is known to increase the replication, differentiation, lipid accumulation and insulin sensitivity in fat cells and reduces those cells' leptin secretion and expression. It also affects human primary preadipocytes. In rats increased adiposity was observed due to Ad-36 infection. Recent studies have shown that, in the USA, antibodies to Ad-36 were more prevalent in obese subjects (30%) than in non-obese subjects (11%). We postulate that Ad-36 may be a contributing factor to the worldwide rising problem of obesity. We suggest the extension of comparative virological studies between North America and Europe, and studies between discordant twins (both dizygous and monozygous). PMID:19138827

  14. Multigene molecular phylogenetics reveals true morels (Morchella) are especially species-rich in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella) in China was estimated by initially analyzing nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequences from 361 specimens collected in 21 provinces during the 2003-2011 growing seasons, together with six collections obtained on loan fro...

  15. [Intraspecific chromosomal variability in human pathogenic fungi, especially in Histoplasma capsulatum].

    PubMed

    Romero-Martnez, Rafael; Canteros, Cristina; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The ploidy, karyotype, and chromosome length polymorphism (CLP) of human pathogenic fungi were revised with emphasis on Histoplasma capsulatum, the causative agent of the systemic mycosis, histoplasmosis. Currently, different systems of gel electrophoresis are being used to determine fungal electrokaryotypes (EK). By renaturation kinetic and genomic reconstruction in H. capsulatum strains (G-186AS and Downs), estimated genome sizes of 23 and 32 Mb were determined for both strains, respectively. The haploid state was proposed for both strains, although aneuploidy was suggested for the Downs strain. Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF), field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), and Southern blot using different probes showed the presence of six to seven chromosomes in the Downs strain (low virulence), whereas four chromosomes were identified in the G-186B strain (high virulence). The use of these methods in the three major H. capsulatum reference strains (G-217B and Downs from the United States of America, G-186B from Panama) revealed distinct chromosome sizes, from 0.5 to 5.7 Mb, with CLP associated with chromosomes size and mobility. Recently, by CHEF, using 19 H. capsulatum isolates from Latin-America and the G-186B strain, five to seven chromosomes with 1.1 to 11.2 Mb molecular sizes were revealed, which again suggested CLP in H. capsulatum. However, to elucidate the EKs polymorphism in H. capsulatum and its relationship with the isolates phenotype more studies are needed to understand the mechanisms controlling ploidy variability. PMID:15709795

  16. Predominance of a single phylogenetic species in colonization events among a sextet of decollate land snail, Rumina decollata (Mollusca: Pulmonata: Subulinidae), species.

    PubMed

    Prvot, Vanya; Jordaens, Kurt; Backeljau, Thierry

    2014-03-01

    The hermaphroditic, facultatively selfing, land snail Rumina decollata is a common, widespread species that is indigenous to the Mediterranean region and that has been introduced to many other regions of the world. However, recent DNA sequence analyses have indicated that R. decollata is a complex of several phylogenetic species, two of which correspond to previously distinguished allozyme strains with different body colors (light vs. dark) and life history characteristics. Against this background, this paper attempts to identify which of these phylogenetic species have been introduced elsewhere in the world. Based on a comparative DNA sequence analysis of putatively introduced populations from South America, North America, Japan, and the North Atlantic Islands versus native Mediterranean populations, it is shown that all putatively introduced populations belong to a single phylogenetic species that was previously recognized as the dark morph. Hence, the colonizing and invasive character of R. decollata seems to be due to this phylogenetic species. Nevertheless, in its native area the dark morph is supposed to be outcompeted when sympatric with the light morph of R. decollata. This issue is briefly discussed and the Iberian Peninsula is tentatively proposed as an important source for introduced R. decollata populations outside Europe. PMID:24804823

  17. Prevalence of a protozoan parasite Cristigera sp. (Ciliophora:Ciliatea) from edible oysters (Mollusca:Bivalvia) of Sundarbans, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tanima; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The coastal region of West Bengal is bestowed with a wide range of natural forest and aquatic resources. The estuarine complex is a culmination of the interaction of land, sea and freshwater. It offers diverse specialised habitats such as mangroves, non vegetated mudflats, inter tidal zones and reclaimed areas. Such areas are home to a number of terrestrial, freshwater and marine communities. Edible oyster resources in these regions are Crassostrea gryphoides and Saccostrea cucullata, which are the keystone species found in the intertidal zone and can tolerate huge variation of salinity. These are used as food by local people and marketed to earn cash. The population of this species has been declined due to parasitic infection and pollution. There are many protozoan parasites which infect these oysters causing diseases. During survey period, a protozoan parasite of the genus Cristigera have been observed only from the edible oyster Crassostrea gryphoides collected from Kaikhali and Frasergunj among three selected sites namely Kaikhali, Frasergunj and Digha of West Bengal mainly during monsoon and post-monsoon season. Considering such rare and specific prevalence of Cristigera sp, it may be considered as potential bio-indicator. PMID:25035589

  18. Chaetogaster limnaei (annelida: oligochaeta) as a parasite of the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, and the quagga mussel Dreissena bugensis (mollusca: bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Conn, D B; Ricciardi, A; Babapulle, M N; Klein, K A; Rosen, D A

    1996-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels, Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis, were found to be infected by the naidid oligochaete Chaetogaster limnaei at four sites in the St. Lawrence River. This is the first report of this species infecting dreissenids anywhere in the world. Most worms inhabited the mantle cavity, where they caused erosion of the mantle and gill epithelia as determined by histopathological examination. Others penetrated various tissues; one had invaded the ovary and was feeding on oocytes and ovarian tissues. Of 606 mussels examined, 166 (27.4%) harbored at least 1 C. limnaei. The prevalence varied between 1% and 80%, depending on the collection site and date. The worms were slightly but significantly more prevalent in D. bugensis than in D. polymorpha. The intensity ranged from 1 to 18 worms per infected host. Variations in prevalence and intensity were not related to the size or sex of the host, but the data did suggest some seasonality. PMID:8825436

  19. Long-term feeding with Euglena gracilis cells modulates immune responses, oxidative balance and metabolic condition in Diplodon chilensis (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae) exposed to living Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Virginia A; Castro, Juan M; Rocchetta, Iara; Nahabedian, Daniel E; Conforti, Visitación; Luquet, Carlos M

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the modulating effect of long-term feeding with lyophilized Euglena gracilis cells on immune response, oxidative balance and metabolic condition of the freshwater mussel Diplodon chilensis. Mussels, previously fed with Scenedesmus vacuolatus (SV) or E. gracilis (EG) for 90 days, were challenged with an environmentally relevant concentration of Escherichia coli in water for 5 days, under feeding or starvation conditions. EG diet increased overall phagocytic activity and tissue hemocyte accumulation (gill and mantle), and favored hemocyte viability upon E. coli challenge. Tissular hemocyte accumulation, and humoral bacteriolytic activity and protein content were similarly stimulated by EG and E. coli, with no further effect when both stimuli were combined. Both, E. coli challenge and EG diet reduced gill bacteriolytic activity with respect to nonchallenged SV mussels, while no effect was observed in challenged EG mussels. Gill and digestive gland protein contents, along with digestive gland bacteriolytic activity were higher in EG than in SV mussels. Both SV and EG mussels showed increased gill mass upon E. coli challenge, while digestive gland mass was increased by bacterial challenge only in SV mussels. Bacterial challenge produced no effect on humoral reactive oxygen species levels of both groups. Total oxyradical scavenging capacity levels was reduced in challenged SV mussels but remained unaffected in EG ones. In general, EG diet decreased glutathione S-transferase and catalase activities in gill and digestive gland, compared with SV diet; but increased enzyme activity was evident in challenged mussels of both groups. Gill and digestive gland lipid peroxidation levels were higher in EG than in SV mussels but E. coli challenge had stronger effect on SV mussels. Adductor muscle RNA:DNA ratio was higher in EG mussels than in SV ones, and increased upon E. coli challenge in mussels of both groups. E. gracilis can be suggested as a nutritional and protective diet complement suitable for filtering bivalves. However, our results obtained from starved mussels show that starvation periods after supplying this diet should be avoided, since these could revert part of the acquired benefits and/or exacerbate detrimental effects. PMID:25463294

  20. Emergence, Development, and Maturity of the Gonad of Two Species of Chitons Sea Cockroach (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) through the Early Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Abadia-Chanona, Quetzalli Yas

    2013-01-01

    This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or early life stages were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equation Y?=?aXb. A total of 125 chitons (4?TL?40 mm, in total length TL) were used. All allometric relations showed a strong positive correlation (r), close to 1, with b-values above three, indicating an isometric growth. Gonadal ontogenesis and gonad development stages were categorised into three periods (Pw without gonad, Pe gonad emergence, and Pf gonadal sac formed) and four stages (S0 gametocytogenesis, S1 gametogenesis, S2 mature, and S3 spawning), respectively. Compound digital images were attained for each process. Periods and stages are overlapped among them and between species, with the following overall confidence intervals in TL: Pw 6.1314.32 mm, Pe 10.3216.93 mm, Pf 12.9925.01 mm, S0 16.0824.34 mm (females) and 19.5126.60 mm (males), S1 27.1535.63 mm (females) and 23.4532.27 mm (males), S2 24.4840.24 mm (females) and 25.4532.87 mm (males). Sexual differentiation (in S0) of both chitons occurs first as a female then as a male; although, males reach the onset of the first sexual maturity earlier than females, thus for C. articulatus males at 17 mm and females at 32 mm, and for C. albolineatus males at 23.5 mm and females at 28 mm, all in TL. Four early life stages (i.e., subjuvenile, juvenile, subadult, and adult) are described and proposed to distinguish growth sequences. Our results may be useful to diverse disciplines, from developmental biology to fisheries management. PMID:23936353

  1. Taxonomical study on the mollusks collected in Marion-Dufresne (MD55) and other expeditions to SE Brazil: the Fissurellidae (Mollusca, Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Simone, Luiz Ricardo L; Cunha, Carlo M

    2014-01-01

    The Fissurellidae collected by the Marion-Dufresne Expedition, as well as other regional expeditions to SE Brazil are examined taxonomically, treating 21 species, of which 20 are new. The following new species are described (order according to depth range; species marked with * are from expeditions other than MD55): Cornisepta uirapa (790-940 m), Cornisepta arrepiata (295-1,050 m), Cornisepta aninga (295-1,050 m), Cranopsis hycavis (637 m), Cranopsis nymphalis (295 m), Cranopsis enigmatica (790-940 m), Cranopsis cearensis* (250 m), Cranopsis apostrema (110-940 m), Cranopsis alaris (250-450 m), Cranopsis canopa* (250 m), Cranopsis columbaris* (250 m), Emarginula suspira (54-940 m), Emarginula icosisculpta (10-12 m), Manganesepta atiaia (950-1,570 m), Profundisepta denudata* (3,000 m), Puncturella volcano (607-620 m), Rimula leptarcis (85-105 m), Zeidora pussa (607-940 m), Zeidora crepidula (790-940 m), Hemimarginula hemitoma (1-105 m). Diodora mirifica Mtivier, 1972 (10-12 m), common in Brazilian oceanic islands, is the only fissurellid species previously known from that area. The genera Cornisepta, Cranopsis, Manganesepta, Profundisepta, Zeidora, and Hemimarginula are reported for the first time from Brazil. Emarginula suspira is named for material that has been misidentified as E. tuberculosa, a Miocene Mediterranean fossil. PMID:25081465

  2. Phylogeny and relationships of pleurotomariid gastropods (Mollusca: Gastropoda): an assessment based on partial 18S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase I sequences.

    PubMed

    Harasewych, M G; Adamkewicz, S L; Blake, J A; Saudek, D; Spriggs, T; Bult, C J

    1997-03-01

    The phylogenetic position of the ancient family Pleurotomariidae within the Molluscan class Gastropoda, as well as the relationships of its Recent genera and species, were assessed using an iterative, two-gene (18S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase I) approach to phylogeny reconstruction. In order to orient the Pleurotomariidae within Gastropoda, partial 18S rDNA sequences were determined for 7 pleurotomariid and 22 other gastropods that span the major groups within the class as well as for one cephalopod and two polyplacophorans, which serve as outgroups. Cladistic analyses of a sequence of approximately 450 base pairs (bp) near the 5' end of the 18S rDNA support the monophyly of the following higher gastropod taxa: Patellogastropoda, Vetigastropoda, Neritopsina, Apogastropoda, and its subclades Caenogastropoda and Heterobranchia. The 18S rDNA sequences and 579 bp of cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) analyzed separately and together, indicate that Pleurotomariidae are included within Vetigastropoda but comprise a clade that is the sister group to the other families referred to this order. Monophyly of the Pleurotomariidae is also supported by the unique presence of seven separate inserts (ranging in length from 1 to 68 bp) within the V2 variable region of the 18S RNA. Relationships of the genera and species within Pleurotomariidae are fully resolved using "total molecular evidence" consisting of partial sequences of 18S rDNA and COI and including data on length variation within the inserts. PMID:9116867

  3. Emergence, development, and maturity of the gonad of two species of chitons "sea cockroach" (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) through the early life stages.

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Abadia-Chanona, Quetzalli Yas

    2013-01-01

    This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or "early life stages" were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equation Y?=?aX(b) . A total of 125 chitons (4?TL?40 mm, in total length "TL") were used. All allometric relations showed a strong positive correlation (r), close to 1, with b-values above three, indicating an isometric growth. Gonadal ontogenesis and gonad development stages were categorised into three periods ("Pw" without gonad, "Pe" gonad emergence, and "Pf" gonadal sac formed) and four stages ("S0" gametocytogenesis, "S1" gametogenesis, "S2" mature, and "S3" spawning), respectively. Compound digital images were attained for each process. Periods and stages are overlapped among them and between species, with the following overall confidence intervals in TL: Pw 6.13-14.32 mm, Pe 10.32-16.93 mm, Pf 12.99-25.01 mm, S0 16.08-24.34 mm (females) and 19.51-26.60 mm (males), S1 27.15-35.63 mm (females) and 23.45-32.27 mm (males), S2 24.48-40.24 mm (females) and 25.45-32.87 mm (males). Sexual differentiation (in S0) of both chitons occurs first as a female then as a male; although, males reach the onset of the first sexual maturity earlier than females, thus for C. articulatus males at 17 mm and females at 32 mm, and for C. albolineatus males at 23.5 mm and females at 28 mm, all in TL. Four early life stages (i.e., subjuvenile, juvenile, subadult, and adult) are described and proposed to distinguish growth sequences. Our results may be useful to diverse disciplines, from developmental biology to fisheries management. PMID:23936353

  4. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001). We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans. PMID:26366861

  5. Draft genome assemblies and predicted microRNA complements of the intertidal lophotrochozoans Patella vulgata (Mollusca, Patellogastropoda) and Spirobranchus (Pomatoceros) lamarcki (Annelida, Serpulida).

    PubMed

    Kenny, Nathan J; Namigai, Erica K O; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Hui, Jerome H L; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNAs that act post-transcriptionally to regulate gene expression levels. Some studies have indicated that microRNAs may have low homoplasy, and as a consequence the phylogenetic distribution of microRNA families has been used to study animal evolutionary relationships. Limited levels of lineage sampling, however, may distort such analyses. Lophotrochozoa is an under-sampled taxon that includes molluscs, annelids and nemerteans, among other phyla. Here, we present two novel draft genomes, those of the limpet Patella vulgata and polychaete Spirobranchus (Pomatoceros) lamarcki. Surveying these genomes for known microRNAs identifies numerous potential orthologues, including a number that have been considered to be confined to other lineages. RT-PCR demonstrates that some of these (miR-1285, miR-1287, miR-1957, miR-1983 and miR-3533), previously thought to be found only in vertebrates, are expressed. This study provides genomic resources for two lophotrochozoans and reveals patterns of microRNA evolution that could be hidden by more restricted sampling. PMID:26319627

  6. Skryjelites auritus gen. et sp. nov. and Quasimolites quasimodo gen. et sp. nov.-two new middle Cambrian hyolithids (?Mollusca) from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Valent, Martin; Fatka, Old?ich; Szabad, Michal; Micka, Vclav; Marek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Two new endemic genera and species of extinct group of Hyolitha, Skryjelites auritus gen. et sp. nov. and Quasimolites quasimodo gen. et sp. nov. are described and illustrated from the Buchava Formation of the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). PMID:26623820

  7. Characterization of the multilayered shell of a limpet, Lottia kogamogai (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda), using SEM-EBSD and FIB-TEM techniques.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Kameda, Jun; Sasaki, Takenori; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2010-08-01

    The microstructure and its crystallographic aspect of the shell of a limpet, Lottiakogamogai, have been investigated, as the first step to clarify the mechanism of shell formation in limpet. The shell consists of five distinct layers stacked along the shell thickness direction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation technique was primarily adopted, as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The five layers were termed as M+3, M+2, M+1, M, M-1 from the outside to the inside in previous works, where M means myostracum. The outmost M+3 layer consists of calcite with a "mosaic" structure; granular submicron sub-grains with small-angle grain boundaries often accompanying dislocation arrays. M+2 layer consists of flat prismatic aragonite crystals with a leaf-like cross section, stacked obliquely to the shell surface. It looks that the prismatic crystals are surrounded by organic sheets, forming a compartment structure. M+1 and M-1 layers adopt a crossed lamellar structure consisting of aragonite flat prisms with rectangular cross section. M layer has a prismatic structure of aragonite perpendicular to the shell surface and with irregular shaped cross sections. Distinct organic sheets were not observed between the crystals in M+1, M and M-1 layers. The {110} twins are common in all aragonite M+2, M+1, M and M-1 layers, with the twin boundaries parallel to the prisms. These results for the microstructure of each layer should be considered in the discussion of the formation mechanism of the limpet shell structure. PMID:20430100

  8. Annotated type catalogue of the Orthalicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the Royal Belgian Institute of Sciences, Brussels, with descriptions of two new species

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described of 57 taxa from the superfamily Orthalicoidea in the collection of the Brussels museum. Two new species are described: Stenostylus perturbatus sp. n., and Suniellus adriani sp. n. New lectotypes are designated for Bulimulus (Naesiotus) amastroides Ancey, 1887; Bulimulus blanfordianus Ancey, 1903; Bulimulus montivagus chacoensis Ancey, 1897; Bulimus coloratus Nyst, 1845; Plecochilus dalmasi Dautzenberg, 1900; Placostylus porphyrostomus elata Dautzenberg, 1923; Bulimulus ephippium Ancey, 1904; Bulimus fulminans Nyst, 1843; Bulimus funckii Nyst, 1843; Orphnus thompsoni lutea Cousin, 1887; Bulimus melanocheilus Nyst, 1845; Orphnus thompsoni nigricans Cousin, 1887; Orphnus thompsoni olivacea Cousin, 1887; Bulimulus pollonerae Ancey, 1897; Orphnus thompsoni zebra Cousin, 1887. New combinations are: Bostryx borellii (Ancey, 1897); Bostryx carandaitiensis (Preston, 1907); Protoglyptus mazei (Crosse, 1874); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) sanborni (Haas, 1947). New synonymies are established for the following nominal taxa: Orphnus thompsoni var. lutea Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Orphnus thompsoni var. nigricans Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Thaumastus nystianus var. nigricans Cousin, 1887 = Drymaeus (Drymaeus) nystianus (Pfeiffer, 1853); Orphnus thompsoni var. olivacea Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Orphnus thompsoni var. zebra Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845). PMID:21747669

  9. The introduced snail Melanoides Tuberculatus (Muller, 1774) (Mollusca: Thiaridae) in aquatic ecosystems of the Brazilian semiarid Northeast (Piranhas-Assu River basin, State of Rio Grande do Norte).

    PubMed

    Santos, C M; Eskinazi-Sant'Anna, E M

    2010-02-01

    Records of the gastropod Melanoides tuberculatus (Müller, 1774), family Thiaridae, in the Piranhas-Assu River basin in Rio Grande do Norte reveal the dispersal of this native Southeast Asian and East African species into aquatic environments of the Brazilian semiarid region, including artificial environments (reservoirs) and lotic systems. The eutrophic conditions of the local waterbodies appear to favor the present situation, where this invasive species reaches extremely high densities, sometimes over 10,000 ind x m(-2) as in Armando Ribeiro Gonçalves Reservoir. These observations indicate the immediate need for new studies on the spatial distribution of the species and its potential impact on the biodiversity and water quality of the waterbodies of the semiarid region of the state. Implantation of regular and systematic monitoring of the aquatic resources of the region is urgently required. PMID:20231954

  10. Bait formulations of molluscicides and their effects on biochemical changes in the ovotestis of snail Lymnaea acuminata (Mollusca; Gastropoda:Lymnaeidae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Singh, D K

    2011-01-01

    The effect of sub-lethal feeding of bait formulations containing molluscicidal component of Ferula asafoetida (ferulic acid, umbelliferone), Syzygium aromaticum (eugenol) and Carum carvi (limonene) on biochemical changes in the ovotestis of snail Lymnaea acuminata were studied. Bait formulations feeding to L. acuminata were studied in clear glass aquaria having diameter of 30 cm. Baits were prepared from different binary combinations of attractant amino acid (valine, aspartic acid, lysine and alanine 10 mM) in 100 mL of 2% agar solution + sub-lethal (20% and 60% of 24h LC50) doses of different molluscicides (ferulic acid, umbelliferone, eugenol and limonene). These baits caused maximum significant reduction in free amino acid, protein, DNA, RNA levels i.e. 41.37, 23.56, 48.36 and 14.29% of control in the ovotestis of the snail, respectively. Discontinuation of feeding after treatment of 60% of 96h LC50 of molluscicide containing bait for next 72h caused a significant recovery in free amino acid, protein, DNA and RNA levels in the ovotestis of L. acuminata. PMID:22012453

  11. Where’s Waldo? A new commensal species, Waldo arthuri (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Galeommatidae), from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Valentich-Scott, Paul; Ó Foighil, Diarmaid; Li, Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A galeommatid bivalve mollusk, representing a new species, is described from off the coasts of California and Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The new bivalve has a commensal relationship with the heart urchin, Brisaster latifrons. It has been observed crawling between the oral spines of this urchin, frequently near the peristome. The bivalve has been recorded from 80 (Vancouver Island) to 444 (southern California) meters depth, in muddy sediments. In common with other galeommatoideans, the new species broods its young; however it differs from the large majority of commensal members in lacking planktotrophic larval development. Waldo arthuri, new species, has multiple morphological, ecological and developmental similarities to other members of the genus Waldo Nicol, 1966, from the southern Atlantic and Antarctic Oceans. This is most pronounced for the Argentine species, Waldo paucitentaculatus Zelaya & Ituarte, 2013, Waldo arthuri’s sister speciesin nuclear and mitochondrial gene trees. Despite this close relationship, Waldo arthuri is phylogentically distinct and possesses several hinge, shell sculpture, foot, and mantle tentacle characteristics that merit its description as new. PMID:23878515

  12. Observations on the distribution of freshwater mollusca and chemistry of the natural waters in the south-eastern Transvaal and adjacent northern Swaziland*

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, C. H. J.; Frank, G. H.

    1964-01-01

    An extensive survey of the molluscan fauna and of the chemistry of the freshwaters of the Eastern Transvaal Lowveld has revealed no simple correlation between the two. The waters fall into four fairly distinct and geographically associated groups chiefly characterized by their calcium and magnesium content. The frequency of the two intermediate hosts of bilharziasis was found to be roughly proportional to the hardness of the water but as the latter, in this area, is associated with altitude and this again with temperature and stream gradient it is thought highly probable that the distribution of these snails is the result of the interaction of a complex of factors. None of the individual chemical constituents in any of the waters examined is regarded as outside the tolerance range of these snails. It is also concluded that under natural conditions this area would have had few waterbodies suitable for colonization by these snails but that the expansion of irrigation schemes has created ideal conditions for their rapid establishment throughout the area. PMID:14163962

  13. Selection of reference genes as internal controls for gene expression in tissues of red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Mollusca, Vetigastropoda; Swainson, 1822).

    PubMed

    López-Landavery, Edgar A; Portillo-López, Amelia; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel A

    2014-10-10

    The red abalone Haliotis rufescens is one of the most important species for aquaculture in Baja California, México, and despite this, few gene expression studies have been done in tissues such as gill, head and gonad. For this purpose, reverse transcription and quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a powerful tool for gene expression evaluation. For a reliable analysis, however, it is necessary to select and validate housekeeping genes that allow proper transcription quantification. Stability of nine housekeeping genes (ACTB, BGLU, TUBB, CY, GAPDH, HPRTI, RPL5, SDHA and UBC) was evaluated in different tissues of red abalone (gill, head and gonad/digestive gland). Four-fold serial dilutions of cDNA (from 25 ngμL(-1) to 0.39 ngμL(-1)) were used to prepare the standard curve, and it showed gene efficiencies between 0.95 and 0.99, with R(2)=0.99. geNorm and NormFinder analysis showed that RPL5 and CY were the most stable genes considering all tissues, whereas in gill HPRTI and BGLU were most stable. In gonad/digestive gland, RPL5 and TUBB were the most stable genes with geNorm, while SDHA and HPRTI were the best using NormFinder. Similarly, in head the best genes were RPL5 and UBC with geNorm, and GAPDH and CY with NormFinder. The technical variability analysis with RPL5 and abalone gonad/digestive gland tissue indicated a high repeatability with a variation coefficient within groups ≤ 0.56% and between groups ≤ 1.89%. These results will help us for further research in reproduction, thermoregulation and endocrinology in red abalone. PMID:25101866

  14. Activation of anaerobic metabolism in Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) experimentally infected by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tunholi-Alves, Vincius Menezes; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Castro, Rosane N; Sant'Ana, Luiza D'Oliveira; Santos-Amaral, Luciana; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Martins; Garcia, Juberlan; Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho; Pinheiro, Jairo; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2014-02-01

    The activity of lactate dehydrogenase and the concentrations of glucose in the hemolymph and of glycogen in the digestive gland and cephalopedal mass of Biomphalaria glabrata experimentally infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis were evaluated. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the hemolymph concentrations of some carboxylic acids (oxalic, piruvic, lactic and succinic). After one, two and three weeks of infection, the snails were dissected to collect the hemolymph and separate the tissues. A significant reduction of the levels of glucose in the hemolymph was observed as of the first week of infection in relation to the control group. The lactate dehydrogenase activity of the infected group was significantly higher than the average of the control group. This increase was accompanied by a reduction of the levels of piruvic acid and an increase in the levels of lactic acid in the hemolymph of the parasited snails, confirming the acceleration of the anaerobic metabolism, necessary for the host to obtain energy and maintain its redox balance. In parallel, there was a decrease in the glycogen content of the storage tissues, with that reduction being significantly greater in the cephalopedal mass than the digestive gland, demonstrating that in this interaction system, the mobilization of glycogen was not sufficient to maintain and reestablish the normal glycemia of the infected snails. PMID:24042059

  15. At the limits of a successful body plan – 3D microanatomy, histology and evolution of Helminthope (Mollusca: Heterobranchia: Rhodopemorpha), the most worm-like gastropod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastropods are among the most diverse animal clades, and have successfully colonized special habitats such as the marine sand interstitial. Specialized meiofaunal snails and slugs are tiny and worm-shaped. They combine regressive features – argued to be due to progenetic tendencies – with convergent adaptations. Microscopic size and concerted convergences make morphological examination non-trivial and hamper phylogenetic reconstructions. The enigmatic turbellarian-like Rhodopemorpha are a small group that has puzzled systematists for over a century. A preliminary molecular framework places the group far closer to the root of Heterobranchia – one of the major gastropod groups – than previously suggested. The poorly known meiofaunal Helminthope psammobionta Salvini-Plawen, 1991 from Bermuda is the most worm-shaped free-living gastropod and shows apparently aberrant aspects of anatomy. Its study may give important clues to understand the evolution of rhodopemorphs among basal heterobranchs versus their previously thought origin among ‘higher’ euthyneuran taxa. Results We describe the 3D-microanatomy of H. psammobionta using three-dimensional digital reconstruction based on serial semithin histological sections. The new dataset expands upon the original description and corrects several aspects. Helminthope shows a set of typical adaptations and regressive characters present in other mesopsammic slugs (called ‘meiofaunal syndrome’ herein). The taxonomically important presence of five separate visceral loop ganglia is confirmed, but considerable further detail of the complex nervous system are corrected and revealed. The digestive and reproductive systems are simple and modified to the thread-like morphology of the animal; the anus is far posterior. There is no heart; the kidney resembles a protonephridium. Data on all organ systems are compiled and compared to Rhodope. Conclusions Helminthope is related to Rhodope sharing unique apomorphies. We argue that the peculiar kidney, configuration of the visceral loop and simplicity or lack of other organs in Rhodopemorpha are results of progenesis. The posterior shift of the anus in Helminthope is interpreted as a peramorphy, i.e. hypertrophy of body length early in ontogeny. Our review of morphological and molecular evidence is consistent with an origin of Rhodopemorpha slugs among shelled ‘lower Heterobranchia’. Previously thought shared ‘diagnostic’ features such as five visceral ganglia are either plesiomorphic or convergent, while euthyneury and a double-rooted cerebral nerve likely evolved independently in Rhodopemorpha and Euthyneura. PMID:23809165

  16. First record of Cymatium keenae Beu, 1970 (Mollusca: Ranellidae) from Antofagasta Bay, northern Chile, in connection with El Niño events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Tom; Riascos, Jose M.; Pacheco, Aldo

    2008-03-01

    Cymatium ( Monoplex) keenae Beu, 1970, the neopolitan triton, is a Ranellidae predator distributed in tropical and subtropical waters. In this study we report this species for the first time in Antofagasta Bay, northern Chile. Adult specimens have been found since June 2003 at depths ranging from 5 to 15 m in La Rinconada Marine Reserve (23°28'18″S, 70°30'46″W) in Antofagasta Bay, near a scallop farming facility. The present findings clearly extend the geographic range of C. keenae, which previously had been reported from La Paz, Gulf of California (Mexico) to Galápagos Islands (Ecuador) in the SE Pacific. Previous evidence strongly suggests that the intrusion of this tropical immigrant can be related to warm El Niño episodes. We analyze the key role of the oceanographic characteristics of Antofagasta Bay as potential temporal refuge for this species.

  17. Identification of a group of cryptic marine limpet species, Cellana karachiensis (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda) off Veraval coast, India, using mtDNA COI sequencing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sneha; Poriya, Paresh; Vakani, Bhavik; Singh, S P; Kundu, Rahul

    2016-03-01

    Present communication reports the phylogenetic relationship between three groups of a marine limpet having different color banding patterns using COI sequencing. Samples were sequenced for mtDNA COI gene using universal primer. Comparative BLAST revealed that all three types were around 99.59% identical with Cellana karachiensis, first record of this species from Indian coasts. Apart from the morphological variations, the mtDNA COI gene analysis revealed around 1% nucleotide variations between these three types. The observed dissimilarity in COI sequences was possibly too little to consider these types as three different species. The derivation of amino acid positions indicated that these types could possibly be a complex of three cryptic species of C. karachiensis. The study proposes that the Oman and Indian populations of C. karachiensis might have derived by allopatric speciation due to geographical isolation. The group of these three cryptic species, sharing same habitat between themselves, possibly showed sympatric speciation. PMID:25109628

  18. Large Vesicomyidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from cold seeps in the Gulf of Guinea off the coasts of Gabon, Congo and northern Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Cosel, Rudo; Olu, Karine

    2009-12-01

    Two new genera and three new species of large Vesicomyidae are described from cold-seep sites on pockmarks and other sulfide-rich environments in the Gulf of Guinea (tropical east Atlantic) off Gabon, Congo (Brazzaville) and northern Angola, from 500 to 4000 m depth: " Calyptogena" (s.l.) regab n. sp., Wareniconcha (n.g.) guineensis (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931), Elenaconcha guiness n.g. n. sp., and Isorropodon atalantae n. sp. For two other species already taken by the R/V Valdivia in 1898, Calyptogena valdiviae (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931) and Isorropodon striatum (Thiele and Jaeckel 1931) new localities were discovered, and the species are rediscussed. E. guiness n.g. n.sp. is also recorded from off Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania, collected by commercial fishing vessels. The vesicomyid species here treated were encountered in different depth ranges along the Gabon-Congo-Angola margin, between 500 and 4000 m depth, and it was found that, in comparison with the dredge samples taken by the Valdivia expedition off southern Cameroon and off Rio de Oro (both at 2500 m), the same species occur in other depth ranges, in some cases with a vertical difference of more than 1000 m. .That means that the species are not confined to a given depth thought being typical for them and that the characteristics of the biotope are likely to play a major role in the distribution of the vesicomyids associated to cold seeps or other reduced environments along the West African margin.

  19. It's not what it looks like: molecular data fails to substantiate morphological differences in two sea hares (Mollusca, Heterobranchia, Aplysiidae) from southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Luiza de Oliveira; Cunha, Carlo Magenta; Colpo, Karine Delevati; Valdés, Ángel

    2014-12-01

    Species of sea hares have been recognized traditionally based on morphological traits, mainly the radula, external coloration, and reproductive anatomy. However, recent studies have shown substantial color variation in some sea slug species. Molecular data have been successfully used to differentiate morphologically similar species of "opisthobranchs" and resolve questions on the taxonomic value of color. The objective of this paper is to use molecular data in an attempt to elucidate whether specimens of Aplysia brasiliana with distinct colorations and morphologies are actually the same species. To this end, DNA from 14 specimens of A. brasiliana was extracted, including five specimens identified as a distinct morphotype from typical A. brasiliana. Although the two morphotypes have consistent differences in their external morphology and radula, the molecular data confirmed that there are no significant genetic differences between them. This is another example of the need to re-evaluate taxonomic decisions based on morphology in light of molecular evidence.

  20. Mechanisms and functional morphology associated with metal transport in Mercenaria mercenaria (bivalvia: mollusca): Progress report No. 7 for the contract period 1 September 1985 to 31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.E.; Morse, M.P.

    1987-02-04

    Studies on metal transport in the quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, are reported. Podocytes, a specialized type of cell that functions in ultrafiltration, have been identified in the pericardial glands of the quahog using transmission and scanning electron microscopy raising the question of whether metals may reach the kidney via the primary urine, or whether most metals arrive in the kidney via the blood. The accumulation of /sup 109/Cd in quahog extracellular kidney granules suggests the involvement the kidney cell's lysosomal system in the overall process of metal sequestration. The different patterns of metal interactions observed in the quahog kidney, digestive gland and gill demonstrate that each of these three organs utilizes different mechanisms of metal detoxification and accumulation.