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Sample records for espectronodal constante para

  1. Rotational constants and structure of para-difluorobenzene determined by femtosecond Raman coherence spectroscopy: A new transient type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Takuya; Frey, Hans-Martin; Felker, Peter M.; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) detected by degenerate four-wave mixing is a background-free method that allows to determine accurate gas-phase rotational constants of non-polar molecules. Raman RCS has so far mostly been applied to the regular coherence patterns of symmetric-top molecules, while its application to nonpolar asymmetric tops has been hampered by the large number of RCS transient types, the resulting variability of the RCS patterns, and the 103-104 times larger computational effort to simulate and fit rotational Raman RCS transients. We present the rotational Raman RCS spectra of the nonpolar asymmetric top 1,4-difluorobenzene (para-difluorobenzene, p-DFB) measured in a pulsed Ar supersonic jet and in a gas cell over delay times up to ˜2.5 ns. p-DFB exhibits rotational Raman transitions with ΔJ = 0, 1, 2 and ΔK = 0, 2, leading to the observation of J -, K -, A -, and C-type transients, as well as a novel transient (S-type) that has not been characterized so far. The jet and gas cell RCS measurements were fully analyzed and yield the ground-state (v = 0) rotational constants A0 = 5637.68(20) MHz, B0 = 1428.23(37) MHz, and C0 = 1138.90(48) MHz (1σ uncertainties). Combining the A0, B0, and C0 constants with coupled-cluster with single-, double- and perturbatively corrected triple-excitation calculations using large basis sets allows to determine the semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C1-C2) = 1.3849(4) Å, re(C2-C3) = 1.3917(4) Å, re(C-F) = 1.3422(3) Å, and re(C2-H2) = 1.0791(5) Å.

  2. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  3. Solar constant secular changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    1990-01-01

    A recent model for solar constant secular changes is used to calculate a 'proxy' solar constant for: (1) the past four centuries, based upon the sunspot record, (2) the past nine centuries, based upon C-14 observations and their relation to solar activity, and (3) the next decade, based upon a dynamo theory model for the solar cycle. The proxy solar constant data is tabulated as it may be useful for climate modelers studying global climate changes.

  4. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  5. Space Shuttle astrodynamical constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, B. F.; Williamson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Basic space shuttle astrodynamic constants are reported for use in mission planning and construction of ground and onboard software input loads. The data included here are provided to facilitate the use of consistent numerical values throughout the project.

  6. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  7. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  8. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  9. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. XrayOpticsConstants

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-06-20

    This application (XrayOpticsConstants) is a tool for displaying X-ray and Optical properties for a given material, x-ray photon energy, and in the case of a gas, pressure. The display includes fields such as the photo-electric absorption attenuation length, density, material composition, index of refraction, and emission properties (for scintillator materials).

  11. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  12. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  13. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-05-29

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a {pi}{radical}(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment.

  14. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  15. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-09-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72-74 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with typical errors of 2-3 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s^-1 Mpc^-1 and typical errors of 1-2 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  16. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed

    Tully, R B

    1993-06-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  17. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  18. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  19. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  20. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  1. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    . Benzhydrylium ions (diarylcarbenium ions) with para- and meta-substituents are used as reference compounds for these investigations, because their Lewis acidities and electrophilicities can be varied by many orders of magnitude, while the steric surroundings of the reaction centers are kept constant. The rate constants for their reactions with nucleophiles correlate linearly over a wide range with the Lewis acidities of the benzhydrylium ions: from slow reactions with late transition states to very fast reactions with early, reactant-like transition states (including reactions which proceed without an enthalpic barrier, ΔH(⧧) = 0). Thus, unequivocal evidence is obtained that even within a series of closely related reactions, the Leffler-Hammond α cannot be a measure for the position of the transition state. Differences in intrinsic barriers lead to deviations from the linear rate-equilibrium correlations and give rise to counterintuitive phenomena. Thus, 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) reacts with lower intrinsic barriers than 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP) and, therefore, is a stronger nucleophile as well as a better nucleofuge than DMAP. Common synthetically used SN2 reactions are presented, in which weak nucleophiles replace stronger ones. Whereas solvolysis rates of alkoxy- and alkyl-substituted benzhydryl derivatives correlate linearly with the Lewis acidities of the resulting carbenium ions, this is not the case for amino-substituted benzhydrylium ions, where differences in intrinsic barriers play a major role. The common rule that a structural variation, which increases the electrophilicity of a carbocation at the same time reduces its electrofugality, does not hold any longer. The need to systematically analyze the role of intrinsic barriers is emphasized. PMID:27108991

  2. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  3. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  4. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  5. Formulas for determining rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelachvili, G.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Linear Triatomic Molecules', Part 9, of Volume 20 `Molecular Constants mostly from Infrared Spectroscopy' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'. Part of the introduction, it states formulas for determining rotational constants, band center, band origin, and quadrupole coupling. Specific comments relate to BHO (HBO) and COS (OCS).

  6. Constant Communities in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Srinivasan, Sriram; Ganguly, Niloy; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2013-05-01

    Identifying community structure is a fundamental problem in network analysis. Most community detection algorithms are based on optimizing a combinatorial parameter, for example modularity. This optimization is generally NP-hard, thus merely changing the vertex order can alter their assignments to the community. However, there has been less study on how vertex ordering influences the results of the community detection algorithms. Here we identify and study the properties of invariant groups of vertices (constant communities) whose assignment to communities are, quite remarkably, not affected by vertex ordering. The percentage of constant communities can vary across different applications and based on empirical results we propose metrics to evaluate these communities. Using constant communities as a pre-processing step, one can significantly reduce the variation of the results. Finally, we present a case study on phoneme network and illustrate that constant communities, quite strikingly, form the core functional units of the larger communities.

  7. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  8. Variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, S. J.; Vucetich, H.

    La variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales es un problema que ha motivado numerosos trabajos teóricos y experimentales desde la hipótesis de los grandes números de Dirac en 1937. Entre los métodos experimentales y observacionales para establecer restricciones sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentes es importante mencionar: comparación entre relojes atómicos[1], métodos geofísicos[2][3], análisis de sistemas de absorción en quasares[4][5][6] y cotas provenientes de la nucleosíntesis primordial[7]. En un trabajo reciente[5], se reportó una significativa variación en la constante de estructura fina. Intentos de unificar las cuatro interacciones fundamentales dieron como resultado teorías con múltiples dimensiones como las teorías de Kaluza-Klein y teorías de supercuerdas. Estas teorías proporcionan un marco teórico natural para el estudio de la variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales. A su vez, un modelo sencillo para estudiar la variación de la constante de estructura fina, fue propuesto en [8], a partir de premisas muy generales como ser covarianza, invarianza de gauge, causalidad y invarianza ante reversiones temporales en el electromagnetismo. Diferentes versiones de las teorías antes mencionadas coinciden en predecir variaciones temporales de las constantes fundamentales pero difieren en la forma de esta variación[9][10]. De esta manera, las restricciones establecidas experimentalmente sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentales pueden ser una herramienta importante para testear estas diferentes teorías. En este trabajo, utilizamos las cotas provenientes de diversas técnicas experimentales, para testear si las mismas son consistentes con alguna de las teorías antes mencionadas. En particular, establecemos cotas sobre la variación de los parámentros libres de las diferentes teorías como por ejemplo el radio de las dimensiones extras en las teorías tipo Kaluza-Klein.

  9. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  10. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, ?. For example, the standard model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers or scales? they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as ?, c, G, e and k ?, are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense, only dimensionless constants are 'fundamental'. Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental 'constants' of nature is operationally well defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as ? or ? on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might disagree depending on their apparatus. All these confusions disappear if one asks only unit-independent questions. We provide a selection of opposing opinions in the literature and respond accordingly.

  11. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  12. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  13. Constant-amplitude RC oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Sinusoidal oscillator has a frequency determined by resistance-capacitance /RC/ values of two charge control devices and a constant-amplitude voltage independent of frequency and RC values. RC elements provide either voltage-control, resistance-control, or capacitance-control of the frequency.

  14. Optical constants of solid methane

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.N.; Thompson, W.R.; Sagan, C. . Lab. for Planetary Studies); Arakawa, E.T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J.P. ); Khanna, R.K. . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry); Pollack, J.B. . Ames Research Center)

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH{sub 4} for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. We present preliminary results of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 {mu}m to 2.6 {mu}m region. We report k for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using our previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110{degree}K (Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.31, 700 (1986)) we compute n for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH{sub 4}. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The 1% concordance Hubble constant

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Hinshaw, G.

    2014-10-20

    The determination of the Hubble constant has been a central goal in observational astrophysics for nearly a hundred years. Extraordinary progress has occurred in recent years on two fronts: the cosmic distance ladder measurements at low redshift and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at high redshift. The CMB is used to predict the current expansion rate through a best-fit cosmological model. Complementary progress has been made with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at relatively low redshifts. While BAO data do not independently determine a Hubble constant, they are important for constraints on possible solutions and checks on cosmic consistency. A precise determination of the Hubble constant is of great value, but it is more important to compare the high and low redshift measurements to test our cosmological model. Significant tension would suggest either uncertainties not accounted for in the experimental estimates or the discovery of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology. In this paper we examine in detail the tension between the CMB, BAO, and cosmic distance ladder data sets. We find that these measurements are consistent within reasonable statistical expectations and we combine them to determine a best-fit Hubble constant of 69.6 ± 0.7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. This value is based upon WMAP9+SPT+ACT+6dFGS+BOSS/DR11+H {sub 0}/Riess; we explore alternate data combinations in the text. The combined data constrain the Hubble constant to 1%, with no compelling evidence for new physics.

  16. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  17. Quaternions as astrometric plate constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for solving problems in relative astrometry is proposed. In it, the relationship between the measured quantities and the components of the position vector of a star is modeled using quaternions, in effect replacing the plate constants of a standard four-plate-constant solution with the four components of a quaternion. The method allows a direct solution for the position vectors of the stars, and hence for the equatorial coordinates. Distortions, magnitude, and color effects are readily incorporated into the formalism, and the method is directly applicable to overlapping-plate problems. The advantages of the method include the simplicity of the resulting equations, their freedom from singularities, and the fact that trigonometric functions and tangential point transformations are not needed to model the plate material. A global solution over the entire sky is possible.

  18. Confinement from constant field condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Guendelman, Eduardo; Spallucci, Euro

    2007-01-01

    For (2 + 1)- and (3 + 1)-dimensional reformulated SU (2) Yang-Mills theory, we compute the interaction potential within the framework of the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism. This reformulation is due to the presence of a constant gauge field condensate. Our results show that the interaction energy contains a linear term leading to the confinement of static probe charges. This result is equivalent to that of the massive Schwinger model.

  19. The constant-V vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faller, Alan J.

    2001-05-01

    It has been found that the generation of swirl by a continuous rotary oscillation of a right-circular cylinder partially filled with water can leave a vortex with a radially constant tangential velocity, V, i.e. [partial partial differential]V/[partial partial differential]r = 0, excepting a small central core and the sidewall boundary layer. This vortex maintains [partial partial differential]V/[partial partial differential]r = 0 during viscous decay by the turbulent bottom boundary layer, a fact that suggests that [partial partial differential]V/[partial partial differential]r = 0 is a stable condition for a decaying vortex.

  20. Henry's law constants of polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-05-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. Depending on the case, infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediary results. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  1. Markov constant and quantum instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelantová, Edita; Starosta, Štěpán; Znojil, Miloslav

    2016-04-01

    For a qualitative analysis of spectra of certain two-dimensional rectangular-well quantum systems several rigorous methods of number theory are shown productive and useful. These methods (and, in particular, a generalization of the concept of Markov constant known in Diophantine approximation theory) are shown to provide a new mathematical insight in the phenomenologically relevant occurrence of anomalies in the spectra. Our results may inspire methodical innovations ranging from the description of the stability properties of metamaterials and of certain hiddenly unitary quantum evolution models up to the clarification of the mechanisms of occurrence of ghosts in quantum cosmology.

  2. Assessing uncertainty in physical constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Max; Fischhoff, Baruch

    1986-09-01

    Assessing the uncertainty due to possible systematic errors in a physical measurement unavoidably involves an element of subjective judgment. Examination of historical measurements and recommended values for the fundamental physical constants shows that the reported uncertainties have a consistent bias towards underestimating the actual errors. These findings are comparable to findings of persistent overconfidence in psychological research on the assessment of subjective probability distributions. Awareness of these biases could help in interpreting the precision of measurements, as well as provide a basis for improving the assessment of uncertainty in measurements.

  3. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  4. Henry's law constants of polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  5. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  6. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  7. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  8. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  9. High voltage compliance constant current ballast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A ballast circuit employing a constant current diode and a vacuum tube that can provide a constant current over a voltage range of 1000 volts. The simple circuit can prove useful in studying voltage breakdown characteristics.

  10. Fundamental Constants and Tests with Simple Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Precise measurements with simple atoms provide stringent tests of physical laws, improving the accuracy of fundamental constants--a set of which will be selected to fully define the proposed New International System of Units. This talk focuses on the atomic constants (namely, the Rydberg constant, the fine-structure constant, and the proton charge radius), discussing the impact of the proton radius obtained from the Lamb-shift measurements in muonic hydrogen. Significant discrepancies persist despite years of careful examination: the slightly smaller proton radius obtained from muonic hydrogen requires the Rydberg constant and the fine-structure constant to have values that disagree significantly with the CODATA recommendations. After giving a general overview, I will discuss our effort to produce one-electron ions in Rydberg states, to enable a different test of theory and measurement of the Rydberg constant.

  11. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  12. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, Max E.

    1996-01-01

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an eletrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable.

  13. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  14. Dielectric constant microscopy for biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavade, A. V.; Kothari, D. C.; Löbbe, C.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of Dielectric Constant Microscopy for biological materials using double pass amplitude modulation method. The dielectric constant information can be obtained at nanometer scales using this technique. Electrostatic force microscopy images of biological materials are presented. The images obtained from the EFM technique mode clearly show inversion contrast and gives the spatial variation of tip-sample capacitance. The EFM images are further processed to obtain dielectric constant information at nanometer scales.

  15. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  16. Modification of the characteristic gravitational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujičić, V. A.

    2006-08-01

    In the educational and scientific literature the numerical values of gravitational constants are seen as only approximately correct. The numerical values are different in work by various researchers, as also are the formulae and definitions of constants employed. In this paper, on the basis of Newton’s laws and Kepler’s laws we prove that it is necessary to modify the characteristic gravitational constants and their definitions. The formula for the geocentric gravitational constant of the satellites Kosmos N and the Moon are calculated.

  17. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastase, Horatiu; Weltman, Amanda

    2015-07-01

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now).

  18. Performance of a constant torque pedal device.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, K.

    1979-01-01

    A constant-torque oscillatory pedal-crank device using vertical movement of the feet is described and its performance compared to a conventional rotational cycle. Using a generator to measure the power output the constant-torque device produced 33% less power and thus has no practical value as an alternative to the conventional pedal-crank system. Images Figure 3 PMID:526783

  19. Regularizing cosmological singularities by varying physical constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Marosek, Konrad E-mail: k.marosek@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2013-02-01

    Varying physical constant cosmologies were claimed to solve standard cosmological problems such as the horizon, the flatness and the Λ-problem. In this paper, we suggest yet another possible application of these theories: solving the singularity problem. By specifying some examples we show that various cosmological singularities may be regularized provided the physical constants evolve in time in an appropriate way.

  20. Vacuum energy and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2015-06-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive value for the cosmological constant or vacuum energy density. We discuss recent ideas that the cosmological constant plus Large Hadron Collider (LHC) results might hint at critical phenomena near the Planck scale.

  1. Cosmological constant from the emergent gravity perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2014-05-01

    Observations indicate that our universe is characterized by a late-time accelerating phase, possibly driven by a cosmological constant Λ, with the dimensionless parameter Λ {LP2} ˜= 10-122, where LP = (Għ/c3)1/2 is the Planck length. In this review, we describe how the emergent gravity paradigm provides a new insight and a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. After reviewing the necessary background material, we identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for solving the cosmological constant problem. We show that these conditions are naturally satisfied in the emergent gravity paradigm in which (i) the field equations of gravity are invariant under the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian and (ii) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant in the solution. The numerical value of this integration constant can be related to another dimensionless number (called CosMIn) that counts the number of modes inside a Hubble volume that cross the Hubble radius during the radiation and the matter-dominated epochs of the universe. The emergent gravity paradigm suggests that CosMIn has the numerical value 4π, which, in turn, leads to the correct, observed value of the cosmological constant. Further, the emergent gravity paradigm provides an alternative perspective on cosmology and interprets the expansion of the universe itself as a quest towards holographic equipartition. We discuss the implications of this novel and alternate description of cosmology.

  2. The method of constant stimuli is inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Fitzhugh, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    Simpson (1988) has argued that the method of constant stimuli is as efficient as adaptive methods of threshold estimation and has supported this claim with simulations. It is shown that Simpson's simulations are not a reasonable model of the experimental process and that more plausible simulations confirm that adaptive methods are much more efficient that the method of constant stimuli.

  3. Air kerma rate constants for radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, H; Groenewald, W

    1988-01-01

    Conversion to SI units requires that the exposure rate constant which was usually quoted in R.h-1.mCi-1.cm2 be replaced by the air kerma rate constant with units m2.Gy.Bq-1.s-1. The conversion factor is derived and air kerma rate constants for 30 radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and brachytherapy are listed. A table for calculation of air kerma rates for other radionuclides is also given. To calculate absorbed dose to tissue, the air kerma rate has to be multiplied by approximately 1.1. A dose equivalent rate constant is thus listed which allows direct calculation of dose equivalent rate to soft tissue without resorting to exposure rate constants tabulated in the special units R.m2.mCi-1.h-1 which should no longer be used. PMID:3208786

  4. Elastic constants of layers in isotropic laminates.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, Paul R; Ledbetter, Hassel; Kim, Sudook; Reimanis, Ivar

    2003-11-01

    The individual laminae elastic constants in multilayer laminates composed of dissimilar isotropic layers were determined using ultrasonic-resonance spectroscopy and the linear theory of elasticity. Ultrasonic resonance allows one to measure the free-vibration response spectrum of a traction-free solid under periodic vibration. These frequencies depend on pointwise density, laminate dimensions, layer thickness, and layer elastic constants. Given a material with known mass but unknown constitution, this method allows one to extract the elastic constants and density of the constituent layers. This is accomplished by measuring the frequencies and then minimizing the differences between these and those calculated using the theory of elasticity for layered media to select the constants that best replicate the frequency-response spectrum. This approach is applied to a three-layer, unsymmetric laminate of WpCu, and very good agreement is found with the elastic constants of the two constituent materials. PMID:14649998

  5. Latest rocket measurements of the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. H.; Willson, R. C.; Kendall, J. M.; Harrison, R. G.; Hickey, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Three rocket flights which carried a payload of absolute radiometers to measure the solar constant with an accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 per cent have been accomplished. Several of the rocket radiometers were duplicates of those aboard the Solar Maximum Mission and Nimbus spacecrafts. The values for the solar constant obtained by the rocket sensors for the three flight dates indicate an increase between the first and latter two flights approximately equivalent to the uncertainty of the measurements. The values for the solar constant for the three flights are 1367, 1372 and 1374 W/sq m.

  6. Direct expressions for magnetic anisotropy constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryo; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-11-01

    Direct expressions for the magnetic anisotropy constants are given at a finite temperature from a microscopic viewpoint. The present derivation assumes that the Hamiltonian is a linear function with respect to the magnetization direction. We discuss in detail the first-order anisotropy constant K1 and show that our present results reproduce previous results. We applied our method to Nd2Fe14B compounds and confirmed that the present method can reproduce the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotoropy constants K1, K2, and K3 well.

  7. Marshak waves: Constant flux vs constant T-a (slight) paradigm shift

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1994-12-22

    We review the basic scaling laws for Marshak waves and point out the differences in results for wall loss, albedo, and Marshak depth when a constant absorbed flux is considered as opposed to a constant absorbed temperature. Comparisons with LASNEX simulations and with data are presented that imply that a constant absorbed flux is a more appropriate boundary condition.

  8. Dielectric constant of water in the interface.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ∼5 to 18 Å. PMID:27394114

  9. Constant-amplitude, frequency- independent phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Electronic circuit using operational amplifiers provides output with constant phase shift amplitude, with respect to sinusoidal input, over wide range of frequencies. New circuit includes field effect transistor, Q, operational amplifiers, A1 and A2, and phase detector.

  10. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  11. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  12. The Cosmological Constant in Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongchao

    2008-10-10

    Hawking proposed that the cosmological constant is probably zero in quantum cosmology in 1984. By using the right configuration for the wave function of the universe, a complete proof is found very recently.

  13. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  14. How the cosmological constant affects gravastar formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.; Silva, M.F.A. da; Rocha, P. E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    Here we generalized a previous model of gravastar consisted of an internal de Sitter spacetime, a dynamical infinitely thin shell with an equation of state, but now we consider an external de Sitter-Schwarzschild spacetime. We have shown explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, a ''bounded excursion'' stable gravastar, a stable gravastar, or a de Sitter spacetime, depending on the total mass of the system, the cosmological constants, the equation of state of the thin shell and the initial position of the dynamical shell. We have found that the exterior cosmological constant imposes a limit to the gravastar formation, i.e., the exterior cosmological constant must be smaller than the interior cosmological constant. Besides, we have also shown that, in the particular case where the Schwarzschild mass vanishes, no stable gravastar can be formed, but we still have formation of black hole.

  15. A model for solar constant secular changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, contrast models for solar active region and global photospheric features are used to reproduce the observed Active Cavity Radiometer and Earth Radiation Budget secular trends in reasonably good fashion. A prediction for the next decade of solar constant variations is made using the model. Secular trends in the solar constant obtained from the present model support the view that the Maunder Minimum may be related to the Little Ice Age of the 17th century.

  16. Optical constants of concentrated aqueous ammonium sulfate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Using experimental data obtained from applying spectroscopy to a 39-wt-% aqueous ammonium sulfate solution, it is shown that, even though specific aerosol optical constants appear quite accurate, spectral variations may exist as functions of material composition or concentration or both. Prudent users of optical constant data must then include liberal data error estimates when performing calculations or in interpreting spectroscopic surveys of collected aerosol material.

  17. Divergences and involution-dependent constants

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors show the cancellation of the dilation divergence in the 1-loop open bosonic string vacuum and N-tachyon scattering amplitude depends upon a set of involution-dependent constants. Such a set of constants exists at each loop level and thus provides a means with which to study the connection between the cancellation of divergences and anomalies for the gauge group SO(2/sup D/2/).

  18. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Setare, M. R.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant, in flat and non-flat background geometry. We extract the exact differential equations determining the evolution of the dark energy density-parameter, which include G-variation correction terms. Performing a low-redshift expansion of the dark energy equation of state, we provide the involved parameters as functions of the current density parameters, of the holographic dark energy constant and of the G-variation.

  19. Simple constant-current-regulated power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priebe, D. H. E.; Sturman, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Supply incorporates soft-start circuit that slowly ramps current up to set point at turn-on. Supply consists of full-wave rectifier, regulating pass transistor, current feedback circuit, and quad single-supply operational-amplifier circuit providing control. Technique is applicable to any system requiring constant dc current, such as vacuum tube equipment, heaters, or battery charges; it has been used to supply constant current for instrument calibration.

  20. Effective optical constants of anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    The applicability of a technique for determining the optical constants of soil or aerosol components on the basis of measurements of the reflectance or transmittance of inhomogeneous samples of component material is investigated. Optical constants for a sample of very pure quartzite were obtained by a specular reflection technique and line parameters were calculated by classical dispersion theory. Predictions of the reflectance of powdered quartz were then derived from optical constants measured for the anisotropic quartz and for pure quartz crystals, and compared with experimental measurements. The calculated spectra are found to resemble each other moderately well in shape, however the reflectance level calculated from the psuedo-optical constants (quartzite) is consistently below that calculated from quartz values. The spectrum calculated from the quartz optical constants is also shown to represent the experimental nonrestrahlen features more accurately. It is thus concluded that although optical constants derived from inhomogeneous materials may represent the spectral features of a powdered sample qualitatively a quantitative fit to observed data is not likely.

  1. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G.

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  2. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  3. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  4. Constant crunch coordinates for black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Adrian P.; Holz, Daniel E.; Kheyfets, Arkady; Laguna, Pablo; Miller, Warner A.; Shoemaker, Deirdre M.

    2001-03-01

    We reinvestigate the utility of time-independent constant mean curvature foliations for the numerical simulation of a single spherically symmetric black hole. Each spacelike hypersurface of such a foliation is endowed with the same constant value of the trace of the extrinsic curvature tensor K. Of the three families of K-constant surfaces possible (classified according to their asymptotic behaviors), we single out a subfamily of singularity-avoiding surfaces that may be particularly useful, and provide an analytic expression for the closest approach such surfaces make to the singularity. We then utilize a nonzero shift to yield families of K-constant surfaces which (1) avoid the black hole singularity, and thus the need to excise the singularity, (2) are asymptotically null, aiding in gravity wave extraction, (3) cover the physically relevant part of the spacetime, (4) are well behaved (regular) across the horizon, and (5) are static under evolution, and therefore have no ``grid stretching/ sucking'' pathologies. Preliminary numerical runs demonstrate that we can stably evolve a single spherically symmetric static black hole using this foliation. We wish to emphasize that this coordinatization produces K-constant surfaces for a single black hole spacetime that are regular, static, and stable throughout their evolution.

  5. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place. PMID:20866874

  6. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place.

  7. DESIGN NOTE: A compact catalytic converter for the production of para-hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, A. M.; Cubric, D.; King, G. C.

    2002-05-01

    The design and operation of a compact converter to produce a constant flow of para-hydrogen from normal hydrogen is described. The converter features a paramagnetic compound (nickel sulfate) that catalyses the conversion of ortho- to para-hydrogen at temperatures of 14-21 K. The converter has been tested by measuring rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra in the para-hydrogen produced. The percentage of the para-hydrogen species in the converted gas was determined to be >97%.

  8. Measurement of the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Iida, Simpei; Yamashita, Takashi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions (Ps-). The Ps- ions emitted from the sample surface coated with Na were accelerated. The γ-rays from the accelerated Ps- ions were Doppler- shifted and thus the signals of self-annihilation of the Ps- ions were isolated from those of self-annihilation of para-positronium (p-Ps) or pair-annihilation of positrons in the bulk. Clear and reliable values of the diffusion constants have been obtained.

  9. Clusters of Galaxies and the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, N.

    2008-09-01

    The expansion rate, at height scale, of the Universe, is given for the value of the Hubble constant (H0). Several methods have used by determinations of the Hubble constant: CMB anisotropy's, Supernovae observation and AGN at height red-shift. In this work, we used the Grainge et al (3) method by estimated of the Hubble constant thought of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and the result of the VSA interferometer (Teide Observatory) and the X-ray data by ROSAT. We obtain, h ? 0,78, in accord with other report by cluster of galaxies (Mason et al, 2001) as higher than of the standard value h =0,71 obtain by other method. We discussed the systematic fount of error and possible discrepant by assumptions of the spheroid and isothermal in cluster and the Sunyaev- Zel'dovich Kinetic effect.

  10. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  11. Binary Solid Propellants for Constant Momentum Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Mahaffy, Kevin E.

    2008-04-28

    A constant momentum mission is achieved when the speed of the vehicle in the inertial frame of reference is equal to the speed of exhaust relative to the vehicle. Due to 100% propulsive efficiency such missions are superior to traditional constant specific impulse missions. A new class of solid binary propellants for constant momentum missions is under development. A typical propellant column is prepared as a solid solution of two components, with composition gradually changing from 100% of a propellant of high coupling coefficient (C{sub m}) to one which has high specific impulse (I{sub sp}). The high coupling component is ablated first, gradually giving way to the high I{sub sp} component, as the vehicle accelerates. This study opens new opportunities for further design of complex propellants for laser propulsion, providing variable C{sub m} and I{sub sp} during missions.

  12. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2011-10-01

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  14. Coulomb field in a constant electromagnetic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear Maxwell equations are written up to the third-power deviations from a constant-field background, valid within any local nonlinear electrodynamics including QED with a Euler-Heisenberg (EH) effective Lagrangian. The linear electric response to an imposed static finite-sized charge is found in the vacuum filled by an arbitrary combination of constant and homogeneous electric and magnetic fields. The modified Coulomb field and corrections to the total charge and to the charge density are given in terms of derivatives of the effective Lagrangian with respect to the field invariants. These are specialized for the EH Lagrangian.

  15. Image segmentation via piecewise constant regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Scott T.; Bovik, Alan C.

    1994-09-01

    We introduce a novel unsupervised image segmentation technique that is based on piecewise constant (PICO) regression. Given an input image, a PICO output image for a specified feature size (scale) is computed via nonlinear regression. The regression effectively provides the constant region segmentation of the input image that has a minimum deviation from the input image. PICO regression-based segmentation avoids the problems of region merging, poor localization, region boundary ambiguity, and region fragmentation. Additionally, our segmentation method is particularly well-suited for corrupted (noisy) input data. An application to segmentation and classification of remotely sensed imagery is provided.

  16. Black hole constraints on varying fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, Jane H

    2007-08-10

    We apply the generalized second law of thermodynamics and derive upper limits on the variation in the fundamental constants. The maximum variation in the electronic charge permitted for black holes accreting and emitting in the present cosmic microwave background corresponds to a variation in the fine-structure constant of Deltaalpha/alpha approximately 2 x 10(-23) per second. This value matches the variation measured by Webb et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 884 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 091301 (2001)] using absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars and suggests the variation mechanism may be a coupling between the electron and the cosmic photon background. PMID:17930813

  17. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  18. Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2008-02-15

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of {delta}{alpha} and {delta}(m{sub p}/m{sub e}) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  19. Dielectric constants of soils at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, F. E.; Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    A knowledge of the complex dielectric constant of soils is essential in the interpretation of microwave airborne radiometer data of the earth's surface. Measurements were made at 37 GHz on various soils from the Phoenix, Ariz., area. Extensive data have been obtained for dry soil and soil with water content in the range from 0.6 to 35 percent by dry weight. Measurements were made in a two arm microwave bridge and results were corrected for reflections at the sample interfaces by solution of the parallel dielectric plate problem. The maximum dielectric constants are about a factor of 3 lower than those reported for similar soils at X-band frequencies.

  20. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  1. Atomic Weights No Longer Constants of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.; Holden, N.

    2011-03-01

    Many of us grew up being taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis has changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature.

  2. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  3. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  4. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 12: Time Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on time constants is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy…

  5. Double well isomerization rate constants in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Anthony G.; Hynes, James T.

    1985-02-01

    The rate constant k for a double well isomerization in solution is calculated over the entire friction range. The importance of frequency-dependent friction for both the vibrational energy transfer (VET) and barrier passage components of k is described. Rapid suppression of the VET transfer component with increasing degrees of freedom is discussed.

  6. Stokes constants for a singular wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Linnaeus, Staffan

    2005-05-01

    The Stokes constants for arbitrary-order phase-integral approximations are calculated when the square of the wave number has either two simple zeros close to a second-order pole or one simple zero close to a first-order pole. The treatment is based on uniform approximations. All parameters may assume general complex values.

  7. Can compactifications solve the cosmological constant problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant Λ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at Λ = 0. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain Λ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why Λ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cosmological constant to zero. We also show that the fundamental Planck mass is being sent to zero, and so the central problem is trivially avoided by removing high energy physics altogether. On the other hand, by including various large mass scales from particle physics with a high fundamental Planck mass, one is faced with a real problem, whose only known solution involves accidental cancellations in a landscape.

  8. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  9. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  10. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  11. CONSTANT VOLUME SAMPLING SYSTEM WATER CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion of organic motor vehicle fuels produces carbon dioxide and water (H2O) vapor (and also products of incomplete combustion, e.g. hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, at lower concentrations). he Constant Volume Sampling (CVS) system, commonly used to condition auto exhaust ...

  12. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej; Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ˜0.03.

  13. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  14. Bouncing models with a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Rodrigo; Pereira, Stella; Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Siffert, Beatriz B.

    2012-01-01

    Bouncing models have been proposed by many authors as a completion of, or even as an alternative to, inflation for the description of the very early and dense Universe. However, most bouncing models contain a contracting phase from a very large and rarefied state, where dark energy might have had an important role as it has today in accelerating our large Universe. In that case, its presence can modify the initial conditions and evolution of cosmological perturbations, changing the known results already obtained in the literature concerning their amplitude and spectrum. In this paper, we assume the simplest and most appealing candidate for dark energy, the cosmological constant, and evaluate its influence on the evolution of cosmological perturbations during the contracting phase of a bouncing model, which also contains a scalar field with a potential allowing background solutions with pressure and energy density satisfying p=wɛ, w being a constant. An initial adiabatic vacuum state can be set at the end of domination by the cosmological constant, and an almost scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations is obtained for w≈0, which is the usual result for bouncing models. However, the presence of the cosmological constant induces oscillations and a running towards a tiny red-tilted spectrum for long-wavelength perturbations.

  15. FATE, THE ENVIRONMENTAL FATE CONSTANTS INFORMATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An online database, FATE, has been developed for the interactive retrieval of kinetic and equilibrium constants that are needed for assessing the fate of chemicals in the environment. he database contains values for up to 12 parameters for each chemical. s of December 1991, FATE ...

  16. Variations of the Solar Constant. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites.

  17. The ideal Kolmogorov inertial range and constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The energy transfer statistics measured in numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wavenumbers in the inertial range. Using the measured self-similar form, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate were deduced. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant was calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  18. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, D.; Vaughn, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations.

  19. Construction of Lines of Constant Density and Constant Refractive Index for Ternary Liquid Mixtures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasic, Aleksandar Z.; Djordjevic, Bojan D.

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates construction of density constant and refractive index constant lines in triangular coordinate system on basis of systematic experimental determinations of density and refractive index for both homogeneous (single-phase) ternary liquid mixtures (of known composition) and the corresponding binary compositions. Background information,…

  20. Pole placement with constant gain output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Given a linear time invariant multivariable system with m inputs and p outputs, it was shown that p closed loop poles of the system can be preassigned arbitrarily using constant gain output feedback provided (A circumflex, B circumflex) is controllable. These data show that if (A circumflex, B circumflex, C circumflex) is controllable and observable, and Rank B circumflex = m, Rank C circumflex = p, then max (m,p) poles of the system can be assigned arbitarily using constant gain output feedback. Further, it is shown that in some cases more than max (m,p) poles can be arbitrarily assigned. A least square design technique is outlined to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  1. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  2. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonera, Cezary; Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-01

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand's theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay-Turbine-Winternitz (TTW) and Post-Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest).

  3. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Molecular dynamics at constant temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for molecular dynamics (MD) at constant temperature and pressure are investigated. The ability to remain in a regular orbit in an intermittent chaotic regime is used as a criterion for long-time stability. A simple time-centered algorithm (leap frog) is found to be the most stable of the commonly used algorithms in MD. A model of N one-dimensional dimers with a double-well intermolecular potential, for which the distribution functions at constant temperature T and pressure P can be calculated, is used to investigate MD-NPT dynamics. A time-centered NPT algorithm is found to sample correctly and to be very robust with respect to volume scaling.

  5. Dielectric Constant Measurements for Characterizing Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buehler, M.; Seshadri, S.; Kuhlman, G.; Schaap, M.

    2005-01-01

    The return to the Moon has ignited the need to characterize the lunar regolith using fast, reliable in-situ methods. Characterizing the physical properties of the rocks and soils can be very difficult because of the many complex parameters that influence the measurements. In particular, soil electrical property measurements are influenced by temperature, mineral type, grain size, porosity, and soil conductivity. Determining the dielectric constant of lunar materials may be very important in providing quick characterization of surface deposits, especially for the Moon. A close examination of the lunar regolith samples collected by the Apollo astronauts indicates that the rocks and soils on the Moon are dominated by silicates and oxides. In this presentation, we will show that determining the dielectric constant measurements can provide a simple, quick detection method for minerals that contain titanium, iron, and water. Their presence is manifest by an unusually large imaginary permittivity.

  6. Hyperscaling violation and the shear diffusion constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Kedar S.; Mukherjee, Debangshu; Narayan, K.

    2016-09-01

    We consider holographic theories in bulk (d + 1)-dimensions with Lifshitz and hyperscaling violating exponents z , θ at finite temperature. By studying shear gravitational modes in the near-horizon region given certain self-consistent approximations, we obtain the corresponding shear diffusion constant on an appropriately defined stretched horizon, adapting the analysis of Kovtun, Son and Starinets. For generic exponents with d - z - θ > - 1, we find that the diffusion constant has power law scaling with the temperature, motivating us to guess a universal relation for the viscosity bound. When the exponents satisfy d - z - θ = - 1, we find logarithmic behaviour. This relation is equivalent to z = 2 +deff where deff =di - θ is the effective boundary spatial dimension (and di = d - 1 the actual spatial dimension). It is satisfied by the exponents in hyperscaling violating theories arising from null reductions of highly boosted black branes, and we comment on the corresponding analysis in that context.

  7. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  9. Potentiometric determination of aminal stability constants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P D

    1995-02-01

    Potentiometric titration was used to determine the logarithms of the stepwise equilibrium constants for the species formed between morpholine and formaldehyde in aqueous solution, ionic strength 0.5 and 2.5M (KCl) at 25 degrees C. The instrumental and computational techniques developed for metal-ligand stability constant determination were applied. Formaldehyde is equivalent to the metal-ion and is represented by M while neutral morpholine is equivalent to the ligand and is represented by L. The stability constants of the following equilibria were determined by non-linear regression (figures in parentheses are at ionic strength 2.5 M KCl): M + L left arrow over right arrow ML (hemi-aminal) logK(1) = 2.90 +/- 0.02 (2.980 +/- 0.004); ML + L left arrow over right arrow ML(2) (bis-aminal); log K(2) = 1.3 +/- 0.2 (1.41 +/- 0.07); MLH left arrow over right arrow ML + H(+) (protonated hemi-aminal) pK(a) = 5.87 +/- 0.01 (6.411 +/- 0.005); ML(2)H left arrow over right arrow ML(2) + H(+) (protonated bis-aminal) pK(a) = (7.6 +/- 0.2). the pK(a) of the protonated bis-aminal could only be determined at the higher ionic strength. The results are in good agreement with reported values determined using the classic formol titration. The automated titration system acquired the full time course of the pH change upon each titrant addition allowing a kinetic analysis to be performed as well as an equilibrium analysis. The forward and reverse rate constants for M + L left arrow over right arrow ML were 0.77M(-1) sec(-1) and 8.1 x 10(-4) sec(-1). respectively. PMID:18966223

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation at constant temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, M.; Schmaljohann, H.; Kronjäger, J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-09-01

    We present an experimental approach to Bose-Einstein condensation by increasing the particle number of the system at almost constant temperature. In particular, the emergence of a new condensate is observed in multicomponent F=1 spinor condensates of Rb87 . Furthermore, we develop a simple rate-equation model for multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensate thermodynamics at finite temperature which well reproduces the measured effects.

  11. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars Pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations. These models are central to the navigation and mission design functions, but they are also used in other aspects of the project such as science observation planning and data reduction.

  12. Dynamical Cosmological Constant in R 3 Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Nasser; Fathi, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we go through the famous f( R) theories of gravity, but keeping a peculiar one, namely R 3 modification. Moreover, instead of a coordinate free cosmological parameter, we take it to be a function of time. Having all these stuff, we investigate the notions of standard cosmology model, in the context of R 3 modification to general relativity, and in various regimes, we study the dynamical cosmological constant.

  13. Planck Constant Determination from Power Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Equating mechanical to electrical power links the kilogram, the meter, and the second to the practical realizations of the ohm and the volt derived from the quantum Hall and the Josephson effects, yielding an SI determination of the Planck constant. The NIST watt balance uses this power equivalence principle, and in 1998 measured the Planck constant with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 8.7 x 10-8, the most accurate determination to date. The next generation of the NIST watt balance is now being assembled. Modification to the experimental facilities have been made to reduce the uncertainty components from vibrations and electromagnetic interference. A vacuum chamber has been installed to reduce the uncertainty components associated with performing the experiment in air. Most of the apparatus is in place and diagnostic testing of the balance should begin this year. Once a combined relative standard uncertainty of one part in 10-8 has been reached, the power equivalence principle can be used to monitor the possible drift in the artifact mass standard, the kilogram, and provide an accurate alternative definition of mass in terms of fundamental constants. *Electricity Division, Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the U.S.

  14. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  15. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions of Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth; Ackmann, James

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of suspensions of blood cells have recently been reported by Ackmann, et al.(J. J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). At frequencies below 100 kHz, the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') goes through a maximum at a blood cell volume fraction of about 70%. Effective medium approximations do not agree well with this behavior. As a more realistic model, we are studying the grain consolidation model of Roberts and Schwartz(J. N. Roberts and L. M. Schwartz, Phys. Rev. B 31), 5990 (1985). We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of this model for a cubic array of spheres. The simulations agree remarkably well with experiment. They suggest, however, that ɛ' may be showing oscillations rather than a simple maximum. Comparison of the simulated and experimental points suggests that this is not an artifact of the periodic array used in the model. Furthermore the simulations indicate that the maximum (or oscillations) disappears at low conductivities of the suspending fluid.

  16. What is Fine-structure Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-10-01

    Equation in [1] α>= 1/ ln λ, linking fine-structure constant and cosmological constant derived by using S = k ln W, the total number of microstates used (W) is 10^60, justified based on a unique age tag attached to each Planck time. The OPEN and CLOSED states of the particle's mouth illustrated in [1] could be two different types of entropic repositioning pulses, say attractive and repulsive. They need not be confused as affecting the number of microstates. The characteristics of a microstate need not change the number of microstates. Mathematically then, W = N! / n!(N-n)!; where N = 10^60 and n =1; giving W = 10^60, used in [1]. There are reasons to consider each Planck time as unique microstate based on its unique age. While investigating the proposal in terms of other theories, one has to be to keep in mind that the knowledge that created one problem cannot solve another. Refer to [1] Goradia, Shantilal, ``What is Fine-structure Constant?'' http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  17. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  18. Bouncing Models with a Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Siffert, Beatriz B.; Maier, Rodrigo; Pereira, Stella

    2011-06-01

    Most bouncing models contain a contracting phase from a very large and rarefied state, where dark energy might have had an important role. If this is that case, the presence of dark energy can modify the initial conditions and evolution of cosmological perturbations, changing the known results already obtained in the literature concerning their amplitude and spectrum. In this work, we assume the simplest and most appealing candidate for dark energy, the cosmological constant, and study its influence on the evolution of cosmological perturbations during the contracting phase of a bouncing model, containing also a perfect fluid with constant equation of state parameter w. We show that, due to the vacuum state choice we have to make when a cosmological constant is present, the spectrum of the perturbations are substantially altered. We conclude that, in this case, the presence of a stiff matter fluid in the contracting phase is needed in order to have a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations in the expanding phase.

  19. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in < 250 ms), simultaneous load current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  20. Optical constants of minerals and rocks.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J R; Strong, P F

    1975-12-01

    Lorentz line parameters (and estimates of their standard deviations) have been empirically derived from measured reflectance data for muscovite mica, an anorthosite, a diopsidic pyroxenite, an almandite-pyrope garnet, and a soda lime glass. These parameters provide a useful starting point for computer calculations requiring optical constants as a function of frequency and are therefore given here. A novel method of fitting the reflectance data by least squares is described in detail, as is the statistical procedure for estimating the standard deviations of the parameters found. PMID:20155132

  1. Constant mean curvature foliations in cosmological spacetimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendall, A. D.

    1996-11-01

    Foliations by constant mean curvature hypersurfaces provide a possibility of defining a preferred time coordinate in general relativity. In the following various conjectures are made about the existence of foliations of this kind in spacetimes satisfying the strong energy condition and possessing compact Cauchy hypersurfaces. Recent progress on proving these conjectures under supplementary assumptions is reviewed. The method of proof used is explained and the prospects for generalizing it discussed. The relations of these questions to cosmic censorship and the closed universe recollapse conjecture are pointed out.

  2. Noncommutative approach to the cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, Remo; Nicolini, Piero

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, we study the cosmological constant emerging from the Wheeler-DeWitt equation as an eigenvalue of the related Sturm-Liouville problem. We employ Gaussian trial functionals and we perform a mode decomposition to extract the transverse-traceless component, namely, the graviton contribution, at one loop. We implement a noncommutative-geometry-induced minimal length to calculate the number of graviton modes. As a result, we find regular graviton fluctuation energies for the Schwarzschild, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter backgrounds. No renormalization scheme is necessary to remove infinities, in contrast to what happens in conventional approaches.

  3. Quantum coherence, wormholes, and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.G. )

    1989-08-15

    Coleman has argued that if wormhole solutions to the Euclidean action coupled to matter dominate the Euclidean path integral for quantum gravity, they do not lead to a loss of quantum coherence for wave functions in our Universe. Furthermore, they also lead to the prediction that the ultimate'' cosmological constant is zero. I analyze the assumptions that go into this result and argue that the presence of wormhole solutions does lead to a loss of quantum coherence and, furthermore, completely destroys the Euclidean quantum theory by producing a highly nonlocal effective Euclidean action which is violently unbounded from below.

  4. The Boltzmann constant from a snifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukodi, B.; Sárközi, Zs; Néda, Z.; Tunyagi, A.; Györke, E.

    2012-03-01

    Evaporation of a small glass of ethylic alcohol is studied both experimentally and through an elementary thermal physics approach. For a cylindrical beaker and no air flow in the room, a simple quadratic relation is found between the evaporation time and the mass of evaporated liquid. This problem and the obtained results offer excellent possibilities for simple student experiments and for testing basic principles of thermal physics. As an example, we use the obtained results for estimating the value of the Boltzmann constant from evaporation experiments.

  5. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  6. Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, R.; Nishimura, H.; Stricker, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four-dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter, which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Without fine tuning the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a generic formation of a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  7. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α‑1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  8. Axion decay constants away from the lamppost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Krippendorf, Sven

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown whether a bound on axion field ranges exists within quantum gravity. We study axion field ranges using extended supersymmetry, in particular allowing an analysis within strongly coupled regions of moduli space. We apply this strategy to Calabi-Yau compactifications with one and two Kähler moduli. We relate the maximally allowable decay constant to geometric properties of the underlying Calabi-Yau geometry. In all examples we find a maximal field range close to the reduced Planck mass (with the largest field range being 3.25 M P ). On this perspective, field ranges relate to the intersection and instanton numbers of the underlying Calabi-Yau geometry.

  9. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-07-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  10. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  11. Modified large number theory with constant G

    SciTech Connect

    Recami, E.

    1983-03-01

    The inspiring ''numerology'' uncovered by Dirac, Eddington, Weyl, et al. can be explained and derived when it is slightly modified so to connect the ''gravitational world'' (cosmos) with the ''strong world'' (hadron), rather than with the electromagnetic one. The aim of this note is to show the following. In the present approach to the ''Large Number Theory,'' cosmos and hadrons are considered to be (finite) similar systems, so that the ratio R-bar/r-bar of the cosmos typical length R-bar to the hadron typical length r-bar is constant in time (for instance, if both cosmos and hadrons undergo an expansion/contraction cycle: according to the ''cyclical big-bang'' hypothesis: then R-bar and r-bar can be chosen to be the maximum radii, or the average radii). As a consequence, then gravitational constant G results to be independent of time. The present note is based on work done in collaboration with P.Caldirola, G. D. Maccarrone, and M. Pavsic.

  12. Constant Domain-regulated Antibody Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies. PMID:22948159

  13. Simple liquid models with corrected dielectric constants.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Christopher J; Li, Libo; Dill, Ken A

    2012-06-14

    Molecular simulations often use explicit-solvent models. Sometimes explicit-solvent models can give inaccurate values for basic liquid properties, such as the density, heat capacity, and permittivity, as well as inaccurate values for molecular transfer free energies. Such errors have motivated the development of more complex solvents, such as polarizable models. We describe an alternative here. We give new fixed-charge models of solvents for molecular simulations--water, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane. Normally, such solvent models are parametrized to agree with experimental values of the neat liquid density and enthalpy of vaporization. Here, in addition to those properties, our parameters are chosen to give the correct dielectric constant. We find that these new parametrizations also happen to give better values for other properties, such as the self-diffusion coefficient. We believe that parametrizing fixed-charge solvent models to fit experimental dielectric constants may provide better and more efficient ways to treat solvents in computer simulations. PMID:22397577

  14. A Constant-Force Resistive Exercise Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Paul; Ruttley, Tara

    2010-01-01

    A constant-force resistive exercise unit (CFREU) has been invented for use in both normal gravitational and microgravitational environments. In comparison with a typical conventional exercise machine, this CFREU weighs less and is less bulky: Whereas weight plates and associated bulky supporting structures are used to generate resistive forces in typical conventional exercise machines, they are not used in this CFREU. Instead, resistive forces are generated in this CFREU by relatively compact, lightweight mechanisms based on constant-torque springs wound on drums. Each such mechanism is contained in a module, denoted a resistive pack, that includes a shaft for making a torque connection to a cable drum. During a stroke of resistive exercise, the cable is withdrawn from the cable drum against the torque exerted by the resistance pack. The CFREU includes a housing, within which can be mounted one or more resistive pack(s). The CFREU also includes mechanisms for engaging any combination of (1) one or more resistive pack(s) and (2) one or more spring(s) within each resistive pack to obtain a desired level of resistance.

  15. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Gonera, Cezary Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  16. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  17. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  18. Do Wormholes Fix the Coupling Constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2004-05-01

    If Newtonian gravitation is modified to use surface-to-surface separation between particles, it can have the strength of nuclear force between nucleons. This may be justified by possible existence of quantum wormholes in particles. All gravitational interactions would be between coupled wormholes, emitting 1/r graviton flux from their exit mouths as a function of the particle size, allowing the point-like treatment above. When the wormhole exit mouths are 1 Planck length apart, the resultant force is the known strong force coupling constant with an order of magnitude of 40 compared to the normal gravitational strength for nucleons. In addition to being mathematically simple, the above finding is consistent with observations of other coupling constants, Feynman's speculation of "transfusion" of two particles into spin 2 gravitons (published in 1962), Hawking radiation, big-bang theory abundance of quantum wormholes, wormhole theory fine-tuned by Kip S. Thorne and Matt Visser, and recent microscopic gravity measurements. It potentially leads to the holographic principle being promoted by Dr. G. t' Hooft, by naturally pointing out that the mass of the particles is proportional to their diameter squared.

  19. Constantly energized no-load tension packer

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, D.C.; Reiter, K.C.

    1981-12-29

    A retrievable, constantly energized, no-load packer is securable within a well and removable by application of tension. Upper and lower slip means are expandable into gripping engagement with the casing. A control body extends to the upper and lower slips and is encircled by packing means. A release housing extends from the lower expansion means with latch means being provided for securing the control body with the release housing, the latch means being shiftable to disengage the control body from the release housing for retrieval of the apparatus. Lock sleeve means are connected to the release housing for securing the latch means and one of the control body and release housing and are shearably releasable therefrom for disengagement of the control body and the release housing, the application of tension through the control string being carried by the control body without being transmitted through the lock sleeve means to set the apparatus. A tubular member securable to the running string is telescopically manipulatable within the body of the apparatus to provide a conventional slick joint upon selective release from the body of the apparatus. Effective pressure area means are provided for transmitting to the packer means a compressive force resulting from a differential pressure from above or below across the packing means when the slip means are in expanded position and the packing means are sealed relative to the casing whereby the packing means are constantly energized and maintained in sealed relation with the casing.

  20. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ωhde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ2min=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain -0.07<ΩΛ0<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ωhde0<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  1. PREFACE: Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Volkmar; Kramer, Bernhard

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 70th PTB Seminar which, the second on the subject "Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology", was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig from October 21 to 22, 1985. About 100 participants from the universities and various research institutes of the Federal Republic of Germany participated in the meeting. Besides a number of review lectures on various broader subjects there was a poster session which contained a variety of topical contributed papers ranging from the theory of the quantum Hall effect to reports on the status of the metrological experiments at the PTB. In addition, the participants were also offered the possibility to visit the PTB laboratories during the course of the seminar. During the preparation of the meeting we noticed that even most of the general subjects which were going to be discussed in the lectures are of great importance in connection with metrological experiments and should be made accessible to the scientific community. This eventually resulted in the idea of the publication of the papers in a regular journal. We are grateful to the editor of Metrologia for providing this opportunity. We have included quite a number of papers from basic physical research. For example, certain aspects of high-energy physics and quantum optics, as well as the many-faceted role of Sommerfeld's fine-structure constant, are covered. We think that questions such as "What are the intrinsic fundamental parameters of nature?" or "What are we doing when we perform an experiment?" can shed new light on the art of metrology, and do, potentially, lead to new ideas. This appears to be especially necessary when we notice the increasing importance of the role of the fundamental constants and macroscopic quantum effects for the definition and the realization of the physical units. In some cases we have reached a point where the limitations of our knowledge of a fundamental constant and

  2. Computing the dielectric constant of liquid water at constant dielectric displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    The static dielectric constant of liquid water is computed using classical force field based molecular dynamics simulation at fixed electric displacement D . The method to constrain the electric displacement is the finite-temperature classical variant of the constant D method developed by Stengel, Spaldin, and Vanderbilt [Nat. Phys. 5, 304 (2009), 10.1038/nphys1185]. There is also a modification of this scheme imposing fixed values of the macroscopic field E . The method is applied to the popular SPC/E model of liquid water. We compare four different estimates of the dielectric constant, two obtained from fluctuations of the polarization at D =0 and E =0 and two from the variation of polarization with finite D and E . It is found that all four estimates agree when properly converged. The computational effort to achieve convergence varies, however, with constant D calculations being substantially more efficient. We attribute this difference to the much shorter relaxation time of longitudinal polarization compared to transverse polarization accelerating constant D calculations.

  3. Search for a Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    Since the days of Dirac scientists have speculated about the possibility that the laws of nature, and the fundamental constants appearing in those laws, are not rock-solid and eternal but may be subject to change in time or space. Such a scenario of evolving constants might provide an answer to the deepest puzzle of contemporary science, namely why the conditions in our local Universe allow for extreme complexity: the fine-tuning problem. In the past decade it has been established that spectral lines of atoms and molecules, which can currently be measured at ever-higher accuracies, form an ideal test ground for probing drifting constants. This has brought this subject from the realm of metaphysics to that of experimental science. In particular the spectra of molecules are sensitive for probing a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio μ, either on a cosmological time scale, or on a laboratory time scale. A comparison can be made between spectra of molecular hydrogen observed in the laboratory and at a high redshift (z=2-3), using the Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile) and the Keck telescope (Hawaii). This puts a constraint on a varying mass ratio Δμ/μ at the 10^{-5} level. The optical work can also be extended to include CO molecules. Further a novel direction will be discussed: it was discovered that molecules exhibiting hindered internal rotation have spectral lines in the radio-spectrum that are extremely sensitive to a varying proton-electron mass ratio. Such lines in the spectrum of methanol were recently observed with the radio-telescope in Effelsberg (Germany). F. van Weerdenburg, M.T. Murphy, A.L. Malec, L. Kaper, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). A. Malec, R. Buning, M.T. Murphy, N. Milutinovic, S.L. Ellison, J.X. Prochaska, L. Kaper, J. Tumlinson, R.F. Carswell, W. Ubachs, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 403, 1541 (2010). E.J. Salumbides, M.L. Niu, J. Bagdonaite, N. de Oliveira, D. Joyeux, L. Nahon, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. A 86, 022510

  4. Kaluza-Klein Bulk Viscous Cosmological Model with Time Dependent Gravitational Constant and Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Namrata I.; Bhoga, Shyamsunder S.

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological models with time varying gravitational constant G and cosmological constant Λ in the presence of viscous fluid in Kaluza-Klein metric were investigated. The solutions to Einstein Field Equation were obtained for different types of G, with bulk coefficient ξ = ξ 0 ρ d (where ρ is density of the Universe, d is some constant) and lambda Λ = α H 2 + β R -2 where H and R are Hubble parameter and scale factor respectively. Two possible models are suggested, one where G is proportional to H and, the other where G is inversely proportional to H. While the former leads to a non-singular model, the latter results in an inflationary model. Both Cosmological models show that the Universe is accelerating; but at the early stage of the Universe the behaviour of both models is quite different,which has been studied through the variation of decelerating parameter q with time.

  5. Numerical results on the transcendence of constants involving pi, e, and Euler's constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The existence of simple polynomial equations (integer relations) for the constants e/pi, e + pi, log pi, gamma (Euler's constant), e exp gamma, gamma/e, gamma/pi, and log gamma is investigated by means of numerical computations. The recursive form of the Ferguson-Fourcade algorithm (Ferguson and Fourcade, 1979; Ferguson, 1986 and 1987) is implemented on the Cray-2 supercomputer at NASA Ames, applying multiprecision techniques similar to those described by Bailey (1988) except that FFTs are used instead of dual-prime-modulus transforms for multiplication. It is shown that none of the constants has an integer relation of degree eight or less with coefficients of Euclidean norm 10 to the 9th or less.

  6. Constant field gradient planar cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  7. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  8. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  9. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  10. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress. PMID:27179471

  11. Constant-parameter capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Jolly (1982, Biometrics 38, 301-321) presented modifications of the Jolly-Seber model for capture-recapture data, which assume constant survival and/or capture rates. Where appropriate, because of the reduced number of parameters, these models lead to more efficient estimators than the Jolly-Seber model. The tests to compare models given by Jolly do not make complete use of the data, and we present here the appropriate modifications, and also indicate how to carry out goodness-of-fit tests which utilize individual capture history information. We also describe analogous models for the case where young and adult animals are tagged. The availability of computer programs to perform the analysis is noted, and examples are given using output from these programs.

  12. Black holes and the positive cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2013-02-01

    We address some aspects of black hole spacetimes endowed with a positive cosmological constant, i.e. black holes located inside a cosmological event horizon. First we establish a general criterion for existence of cosmological event horizons. Using the geometrical set up built for this, we study classical black hole no hair theorems for both static and stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We discuss cosmic Nielsen-Olesen strings as hair in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. We also give a general calculation for particle creation by a Killing horizon using complex path analysis and using this we study particle creation in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime by both black hole and the cosmological event horizons.

  13. Gravitational collapse and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Deshingkar, S. S.; Jhingan, S.; Chamorro, A.; Joshi, P. S.

    2001-06-15

    We consider here the effects of a nonvanishing cosmological term on the final fate of a spherical inhomogeneous collapsing dust cloud. It is shown that, depending on the nature of the initial data from which the collapse evolves, and for a positive value of the cosmological constant, we can have a globally regular evolution where a bounce develops within the cloud. We characterize precisely the initial data causing such a bounce in terms of the initial density and velocity profiles for the collapsing cloud. In the cases otherwise, the result of collapse is either the formation of a black hole or a naked singularity resulting as the end state of collapse. We also show here that a positive cosmological term can cover a part of the singularity spectrum which is visible in the corresponding dust collapse models for the same initial data.

  14. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  15. Explosive helium burning at constant pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.-A.; Hanawa, T.; Sugimoto, D.

    The results of numerical calculations of nucleosynthesis under adiabatic conditions, i.e., when the only heat exchange with the external regions takes place through neutrinos, are reported. Attention is focused on explosive burning associated with shell flashes, assuming that nuclear energy is deposited in a mass element, followed by expansion and density decrease. Consideration is given to three cases, the shell flash near the surface of a degenerate star, to nuclear burning concentrated in a small region of a star, and to the heat energy being deposited in intermediate layers. A reaction network of 181 nuclear species was constructed and the thermodynamic evolution was calculated assuming constant pressure and adiabatic conditions. The final products of the reactions of H-1 to Cu-62 were projected to by O-16, Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ca-40, Ti-44, Cr-48, and Fe-52.

  16. Constant-force approach to discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2013-06-01

    Aiming to approach the thermodynamical properties of hard-core systems by standard molecular dynamics simulation, we propose setting a repulsive constant-force for overlapping particles. That is, the discontinuity of the pair potential is replaced by a linear function with a large negative slope. Hence, the core-core repulsion, usually modeled with a power function of distance, yields a large force as soon as the cores slightly overlap. This leads to a quasi-hardcore behavior. The idea is tested for a triangle potential of short range. The results obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics for several repulsive forces are contrasted with the ones obtained for the discontinuous potential and by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo. We found remarkable agreements for the vapor-liquid coexistence densities as well as for the surface tension. PMID:23758356

  17. Fast Fourier Transforms of Piecewise Constant Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorets, Eugene

    1995-02-01

    We present an algorithm for the evaluation of the Fourier transform of piecewise constant functions of two variables. The algorithm overcomes the accuracy problems associated with computing the Fourier transform of discontinuous functions; in fact, its time complexity is O (N2 logN + NP log2 (1/ε) + V log3 (1/ε)), where ε is the accuracy, N is the size of the problem, P is the perimeter of the set of discontinuities, and V is its number of vertices. The algorithm is based on the Lagrange interpolation formula and the Green's theorem, which are used to preprocess the data before applying the fast Fourier transform. It readily generalizes to higher dimensions and to piecewise smooth functions.

  18. Simple Pendulum Determination of the Gravitational Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Harold V.; Faller, James E.

    2010-09-10

    We determined the Newtonian constant of gravitation G by interferometrically measuring the change in spacing between two free-hanging pendulum masses caused by the gravitational field from large tungsten source masses. We find a value for G of (6.672 34{+-}0.000 14)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}. This value is in good agreement with the 1986 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) value of (6.672 59{+-}0.000 85)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 1121 (1987)] but differs from some more recent determinations as well as the latest CODATA recommendation of (6.674 28{+-}0.000 67)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 633 (2008)].

  19. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-05-15

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M{sub D-1}xS{sup 1}, where D is the spacetime dimension and M{sub D-1} stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  20. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  1. Fluorodeoxyglucose rate constants, lumped constant, and glucose metabolic rate in rabbit heart

    SciTech Connect

    Krivokapich, J.; Huang, S.C.; Selin, C.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-04-01

    The isolated arterial perfused rabbit interventricular septum was used to measure myocardial metabolic rate for glucose (MMRGlc) and rate constants and lumped constant (LC) for the glucose analogue (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) using a tracer kinetic model. FDG was delivered by constant infusion during coincidence counting of tissue /sup 18/F radioactivity. The MMRGlc was measured by the Fick method. Control septa were paced at 72 beats/min and perfused at 1.5 ml/min with oxygenated perfusate containing 5.6 mM glucose and 5 mU/ml insulin. The following conditions were tested: 3.0 and 4.5 ml/min; insulin increased to 25 mU/ml; insulin omitted; 2.8 mM and 11.2 mM glucose; 144 beats/min and 96 paired stimuli/min; and anoxia. Under all conditions studied the phosphorylation (hexokinase) reaction was rate limiting relative to transport. Compared with control conditions, the phosphorylation rate constant was significantly increased with 2.8 mM glucose as well as in anoxia. With 4.5 ml/min and 11.2 mM glucose, conditions that should increase glucose flux into tissue without increasing demand, the phosphorylation rate constant decreased significantly. With 11.2 mM glucose, 96 paired stimuli/min, and anoxia without insulin, a significant increase in the hydrolysis rate of FDG 6-phosphate was observed and suggests that hydrolysis is also an important mechanism for regulating the MMRGlc. Increased transport rate constants were observed with increased flow rates, 96 paired stimuli/min, and anoxia at 96 beats/min. The LC was not significantly different from control in 11 of 14 conditions studied. Therefore, under most conditions in average LC can be used to calculate MMRGlc estimates.

  2. Effects of constant-current/constant-voltage charge parameters on lead-acid traction cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Deluca, W.H.; Biwer, R.L.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    A factor described for the application of battery systems for electric vehicle propulsion is the methodology of charging. It was quantitatively determined that both the total charge cycle time and the maximum charging rate (constant-current level) are limited by battery charge acceptance. The test system and procedures are outlined, acquired battery parameter data presented, and conclusions discussed.

  3. Are thermal constants constant? A test using two species of ladybird.

    PubMed

    Jarošík, V; Kumar, G; Omkar; Dixon, A F G

    2014-02-01

    There is a controversy about whether the thermal constants, lower developmental threshold, rate of development and corresponding degree days required for development, change when a species is reared under different developmental conditions. We present a more precise way of measuring these constants using the linear relationship between the rate of development and temperature. First we use the equation proposed by Ikemoto and Takai (2000) to determine the linear phase of development and then a generalised linear model having a different variance at low and high temperatures, specific for each condition, to estimate the parameters of the linear relationship. Using this method, we show that providing the difference in food quality is sufficiently great, an aphidophagous ladybird develops significantly faster and starts developing at a significantly lower temperature on a good than on a poor quality diet. Adaptive significance of the thermal constants not remaining constant is discussed in terms of a trade-off between growth and rate of development, when temperature and food quality varies. PMID:24556254

  4. Emergence of constant curvature spacetimes with an effective charge and cosmological constant in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Anton; Dadhich, Naresh; Singh, Parampreet

    2015-04-01

    The loop quantum dynamics of Kantowski-Sachs and the interior of higher genus black hole spacetimes with cosmological constant has some peculiar features not shared by various other spacetimes in loop quantum cosmolgy. As in the other cases, though the quantum geometric effects resolve the singularity and result in a bounce, after the bounce a spacetime with small spacetime curvature does not emerge at late times. Instead, asymptotically the spacetime has constant spacetime curvature with a product manifold. Interestingly, though the spacetime curvature of these asymptotic spacetimes is very high, the effective metric of these spacetimes is a solution to the Einstein field equations. Analysis of the components of the Ricci tensor shows that after the singularity resolution, the Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes lead to an effective charged Nariai, and, the higher genus black hole interior lead to an anti Bertotti-Robinson spacetime with an effective tachyonic charge. The asymptotic spacetimes have an effective cosmological constant which is different in magnitude, and sometimes even its sign, from the cosmological constant in the Kantwoski-Sachs and higher genus black hole metrics.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ, and in the fine-structure constant, α, are not present in the Standard Model of particle physics but they arise quite naturally in grant unification theories, multidimensional theories and in general when a coupling of light scalar fields to baryonic matter is considered. The light scalar fields are usually attributed to a negative pressure substance permeating the entire visible Universe and known as dark energy. This substance is thought to be responsible for a cosmic acceleration at low redshifts, z < 1. A strong dependence of μ and α on the ambient matter density is predicted by chameleon-like scalar field models. Calculations of atomic and molecular spectra show that different transitions have different sensitivities to changes in fundamental constants. Thus, measuring the relative line positions, Δ V, between such transitions one can probe the hypothetical variability of physical constants. In particular, interstellar molecular clouds can be used to test the matter density dependence of μ, since gas density in these clouds is ~15 orders of magnitude lower than that in terrestrial environment. We use the best quality radio spectra of the inversion transition of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and rotational transitions of other molecules to estimate the radial velocity offsets, Δ V ≡ Vrot - Vinv. The obtained value of Δ V shows a statistically significant positive shift of 23±4stat±3sys m s-1 (1σ). Being interpreted in terms of the electron-to-proton mass ratio variation, this gives Δμ/μ = (22±4stat±3sys)×10-9. A strong constraint on variation of the quantity F = α2/μ in the Milky Way is found from comparison of the fine-structure transition J=1-0 in atomic carbon C i with the low-J rotational lines in carbon monoxide 13CO arising in the interstellar molecular clouds: |Δ F/F| < 3×10-7. This yields |Δ α/α| < 1.5×10-7 at z = 0. Since extragalactic absorbers have gas densities

  6. A constant daylength during the Precambrian era?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.; Walker, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide would have been resonant with free oscillations of the atmosphere when the day was approximately 21 h long, c. 600 Ma ago. Very large atmospheric tides would have resulted, with associated surface pressure oscillations in excess of 10 mbar in the tropics. Near resonance the Sun's gravitational torque on the atmospheric tide--accelerating Earth's rotation--would have been comparable in magnitude to the decelerating lunar torque upon the oceanic tides. The balance of the opposing torques may have long maintained a resonant approximately 21 h day, perhaps for much of the Precambrian. Because the timescale of lunar orbital evolution is not directly affected, a constant daylength would result in fewer days/month. The hypothesis is shown not to conflict with the available (stromatolitic) evidence. Escape from the resonance could have followed a relatively abrupt global warming, such as that occurring at the end of the Precambrian. Alternatively, escape may simply have followed a major increase in the rate of oceanic tidal dissipation, brought about by the changing topography of the world's oceans. We integrate the history of the lunar orbit with and without a sustained resonance, finding that the impact of a sustained resonance on the other orbital parameters of the Earth-Moon system would have not been large.

  7. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  8. An Alcohol Test for Drifting Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.; Bethlem, H. L.; Kleiner, I.; Xu, L.-H.

    2013-06-01

    The Standard Model of physics is built on the fundamental constants of nature, however without providing an explanation for their values, nor requiring their constancy over space and time. Molecular spectroscopy can address this issue. Recently, we found that microwave transitions in methanol are extremely sensitive to a variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ, due to a fortuitous interplay between classically forbidden internal rotation and rotation of the molecule as a whole. In this talk, we will explain the origin of this effect and how the sensitivity coefficients in methanol are calculated. In addition, we set a limit on a possible cosmological variation of μ by comparing transitions in methanol observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on radio-astronomical observations of PKS1830-211, we deduce a constraint of Δμ/μ=(0.0± 1.0)× 10^{-7} at redshift z = 0.89, corresponding to a look-back time of 7 billion years. While this limit is more constraining and systematically more robust than previous ones, the methanol method opens a new search territory for probing μ-variation on cosmological timescales. P. Jansen, L.-H. Xu, I. Kleiner, W. Ubachs, and H.L. Bethlem Phys. Rev. Lett. {106}(100801) 2011. J. Bagdonaite, P. Jansen, C. Henkel, H.L. Bethlem, K.M. Menten, and W. Ubachs Science {339}(46) 2013.

  9. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  10. More on lensing by a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Rindler, W.; Dossett, J.

    2010-04-01

    The question of whether or not the cosmological constant affects the bending of light around a concentrated mass has been the subject of some recent papers. We present here a simple, specific and transparent example where Λ bending clearly takes place, and where it is clearly neither a coordinate effect nor an aberration effect. We then show that in some recent works using perturbation theory the Λ contribution was missed because of initial too stringent smallness assumptions. Namely, our method has been to insert a Kottler (Schwarzschild with Λ) vacuole into a Friedmann universe, and to calculate the total bending within the vacuole. We assume that no more bending occurs outside. It is important to observe that while the mass contribution to the bending takes place mainly quite near the lens, the Λ bending continues throughout the vacuole. Thus, if one deliberately restricts one's search for Λ bending to the immediate neighbourhood of the lens, one will not find it. Lastly, we show that the Λ bending also follows from standard Weyl focusing, and so again, it cannot be a coordinate effect.

  11. Backlight illumination design using constant extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Light guiding backlights are a good solution to attain ambient or display illuminations. Generally, they are attained using intended macroscopic defects (dots). Their size, shape and density are designed using ray tracing software. Smaller defects have the fascinating feature that they may not be perceived by the eye. Such a light guide will therefore look transparent and undisturbed. However, such microscopic or even nanoscaled defects are well beyond the limitations of geometrical optics and therefore need other approaches for their design. An interesting alternative to surface defects are particles inside the material or a well-defined surface roughness. In contrast to a defect structure, particle densities or surface roughness cannot be changed without difficulty. These may, however, be much more easily manufactured. In this paper, a simple analytical method for the design of such light guides will be presented. This method is compared to the results of commercial software and will be used to design a homogeneous illumination adopting constant particle density inside the material.

  12. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  13. Constant vs variable resistance knee extension training.

    PubMed

    Manning, R J; Graves, J E; Carpenter, D M; Leggett, S H; Pollock, M L

    1990-06-01

    To compare the effect of constant resistance (CR) and variable resistance (VR) training on full range-of-motion (ROM) strength development, 22 men and 27 women (age = 26 +/- 5 yr) were randomly assigned to either a CR training group (N = 17), a VR training group (N = 17), or a control group (N = 15) that did not train. The CR and VR groups trained 2 to 3 d.wk-1 for 10 wk. Subjects completed one set of full ROM (120 to 0 degrees of flexion) bilateral knee extensions with an amount of weight that allowed 8 to 12 repetitions during each training session. For the VR group, resistance was varied with a cam supplied by the manufacturer (Nautilus). For the CR group, the cam was removed and replaced with a round sprocket. Prior to and after training, maximal voluntary isometric torque was measured at 9, 20, 35, 50, 65, 80, 95, and 110 degrees of knee flexion. Analysis of covariance indicated that the VR and CR groups gained strength at all angles (P less than or equal to 0.05) when compared to the control. [table: see text] There was no difference (P greater than 0.05) between the CR and VR groups at any angle, and the magnitude of strength gained was similar (P greater than 0.05) among angles for both groups. These data indicate that both CR and VR knee extension training elicit full ROM strength development. PMID:2381309

  14. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant.

    PubMed

    Truong, G-W; Anstie, J D; May, E F; Stace, T M; Luiten, A N

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  15. Cosmological Constant and the Final Anthropic Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćirković, Milan M.; Bostrom, Nick

    The influence of recent detections of a finite vacuum energy (`cosmological constant') on our formulation of anthropic conjectures, particularly the so-called Final Anthropic Principle is investigated. It is shown that non-zero vacuum energy implies the onset of a quasi-exponential expansion of our causally connected domain (`the universe') at some point in the future, a stage similar to the inflationary expansion at the very beginning of time. The transition to this future inflationary phase of cosmological expansion will preclude indefinite survival of intelligent species in our domain, because of the rapid shrinking of particle horizons and subsequent depletion of energy necessary for information processes within the horizon of any observer. Therefore, to satisfy the Final Anthropic Hypothesis (reformulated to apply to the entire ensemble of universes), it is necessary to show that (i) chaotic inflation of Linde (or some similar model) provides a satisfactory description of reality, (ii) migration between causally connected domains within the multiverse is physically permitted, and (iii) the time interval left to the onset of the future inflationary phase is sufficient for development of the technology necessary for such inter-domain travel. These stringent requirements diminish the probability of the Final Anthropic Hypothesis being true.

  16. Measuring the cosmological constant with redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, W. E.; Peacock, J. A.; Heavens, A. F.

    1996-10-01

    It has been proposed that the cosmological constant {LAMBDA} might be measured from geometric effects on large-scale structure. A positive vacuum density leads to correlation function contours which are squashed in the radial direction when calculated assuming a matter-dominated model. We show that this effect will be somewhat harder to detect than previous calculations have suggested: the squashing factor is likely to be < 1.3, given realistic constraints on the matter contribution to {OMEGA}. Moreover, the geometrical distortion risks being confused with the redshift-space distortions caused by the peculiar velocities associated with the growth of galaxy clustering. These depend on the density and bias parameters via the combination β = {OMEGA}^0.6/b, and we show that the main practical effect of a geometrical flattening factor F is to simulate gravitational instability with B_eff_ ~ 0.5(F - 1). Nevertheless, with datasets of sufficient size it is possible to distinguish the two effects, We discuss in detail how this should be done, and give a maximum-likelihood method for extracting {LAMBDA} and βb from anisotropic power-spectrum data. New-generation redshift surveys of galaxies and quasars are potentially capable of detecting a non-zero vacuum density, if it exists at a cosmologically interesting level.

  17. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut

    2011-11-01

    For turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or ``collision'' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass, the latter almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2005, 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present contribution it is shown that the above image of dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an ``Apollonian gear.'' Its parts and pieces are are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. Our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum (in terms of pi) as 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as the integer number 2. Our derivations are free of empirical relations and rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws only. Department of the Navy Grant, ONR Global

  18. Dimensionless constants, cosmology, and other dark matters

    SciTech Connect

    Tegmark, Max; Aguirre, Anthony; Rees, Martin J.; Wilczek, Frank

    2006-01-15

    We identify 31 dimensionless physical constants required by particle physics and cosmology, and emphasize that both microphysical constraints and selection effects might help elucidate their origin. Axion cosmology provides an instructive example, in which these two kinds of arguments must both be taken into account, and work well together. If a Peccei-Quinn phase transition occurred before or during inflation, then the axion dark matter density will vary from place to place with a probability distribution. By calculating the net dark matter halo formation rate as a function of all four relevant cosmological parameters and assessing other constraints, we find that this probability distribution, computed at stable solar systems, is arguably peaked near the observed dark matter density. If cosmologically relevant weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter is discovered, then one naturally expects comparable densities of WIMPs and axions, making it important to follow up with precision measurements to determine whether WIMPs account for all of the dark matter or merely part of it.

  19. A relation between diffusion, temperature and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the temperature of a diffusing fluid with the diffusion constant κ2 in an expanding universe approaches a constant limit T∞ = κ2 H in its final de Sitter stage characterized by the horizon 1 H determined by the Hubble constant. If de Sitter surface temperature in the final equilibrium state coincides with the fluid temperature, then the cosmological constant Λ = 3H2 = 6πκ2.

  20. Stunt Barbie - A Laboratory Practicum Combining Constant Velocity and Constant Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertting, Scott

    2011-04-01

    In preparing to teach the advanced physics course at my high school, I found it useful to work through the end-of-chapter problems in the book used by the advanced class. A problem on motion in one dimension involved a stunt woman in free fall from a tree limb onto a horse running beneath her.2 The problem presents a connected learning opportunity for students because it requires the use of the constant velocity model xf = v*t + xi and the constant acceleration model yf = ½* g* t2 + vyi* t + yi (where g = 9.8 m/s/s) to solve it. I named the stunt woman Barbie and created an activity titled "Stunt Barbie."

  1. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X.

    1995-09-01

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  2. Low Energy Quantum Gravity, the Cosmological Constant and Gauge Coupling Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, David J.

    Robinson and Wilczek have suggested that loop corrections in quantum gravity can alter the running gauge coupling constants from the behaviour found in the absence of gravity. Although their original calculation is not correct, the basic idea behind their paper has been re-examined recently for quantized Einstein-Maxwell theory with a cosmological constant. In this essay I discuss some of the issues surrounding the calculation and mention some of the implications. I argue that it is possible for a theory that is not conventionally asymptotically free to become so in the presence of gravity, and for gravity to lead to a new ultraviolet fixed point. This establishes a provocative link between the microscopic and macroscopic realms.

  3. Influences of brain tissue poroelastic constants on intracranial pressure (ICP) during constant-rate infusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogai; von Holst, Hans; Kleiven, Svein

    2013-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model has been developed to study the mean intracranial pressure (ICP) response during constant-rate infusion using linear poroelasticity. Due to the uncertainties in the poroelastic constants for brain tissue, the influence of each of the main parameters on the transient ICP infusion curve was studied. As a prerequisite for transient analysis, steady-state simulations were performed first. The simulated steady-state pressure distribution in the brain tissue for a normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation system showed good correlation with experiments from the literature. Furthermore, steady-state ICP closely followed the infusion experiments at different infusion rates. The verified steady-state models then served as a baseline for the subsequent transient models. For transient analysis, the simulated ICP shows a similar tendency to that found in the experiments, however, different values of the poroelastic constants have a significant effect on the infusion curve. The influence of the main poroelastic parameters including the Biot coefficient α, Skempton coefficient B, drained Young's modulus E, Poisson's ratio ν, permeability κ, CSF absorption conductance C(b) and external venous pressure p(b) was studied to investigate the influence on the pressure response. It was found that the value of the specific storage term S(ε) is the dominant factor that influences the infusion curve, and the drained Young's modulus E was identified as the dominant parameter second to S(ε). Based on the simulated infusion curves from the FE model, artificial neural network (ANN) was used to find an optimised parameter set that best fit the experimental curve. The infusion curves from both the FE simulation and using ANN confirmed the limitation of linear poroelasticity in modelling the transient constant-rate infusion. PMID:22452461

  4. The Not so Constant Gravitational "Constant" G as a Function of Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Gravitation is still the less understood among the fundamental forces of Nature. The ultimate physical origin of its ruling constant G could give key insights in this understanding. According to the Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a massive body determines a gravitational potential that alters the speed of light, the clock's rate and the particle size as a function of the distance from its own center. On the other hand, it has been shown that the presence of mass determines a modification of Zero-Point Field (ZPF) energy density within its volume and in the space surrounding it. All these considerations strongly suggest that also the constant G could be expressed as a function of quantum vacuum energy density somehow depending on the distance from the mass whose presence modifies the ZPF energy structure. In this paper, starting from a constitutive medium-based picture of space, it has been formulated a model of gravitational constant G as a function of Planck's time and Quantum Vacuum energy density in turn depending on the radial distance from center of the mass originating the gravitational field, supposed as spherically symmetric. According to this model, in which gravity arises from the unbalanced physical vacuum pressure, gravitational "constant" G is not truly unchanging but slightly varying as a function of the distance from the mass source of gravitational potential itself. An approximate analytical form of such dependence has been discussed. The proposed model, apart from potentially having deep theoretical consequences on the commonly accepted picture of physical reality (from cosmology to matter stability), could also give the theoretical basis for unthinkable applications related, for example, to the field of gravity control and space propulsion.

  5. Newman-Penrose constants of stationary electrovacuum space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiangdong; Gao Sijie; Wu Xiaoning

    2009-05-15

    A theorem related to the Newman-Penrose constants is proven. The theorem states that all the Newman-Penrose constants of asymptotically flat, stationary, asymptotically algebraically special electrovacuum space-times are zero. Straightforward application of this theorem shows that all the Newman-Penrose constants of the Kerr-Newman space-time must vanish.

  6. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  8. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  9. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  10. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  11. Reliability concerns with logical constants in Xilinx FPGA designs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Graham, Paul; Morgan, Keith; Ostler, Patrick; Allen, Greg; Swift, Gary; Tseng, Chen W

    2009-01-01

    In Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays logical constants, which ground unused inputs and provide constants for designs, are implemented in SEU-susceptible logic. In the past, these logical constants have been shown to cause the user circuit to output bad data and were not resetable through off-line rcconfiguration. In the more recent devices, logical constants are less problematic, though mitigation should still be considered for high reliability applications. In conclusion, we have presented a number of reliability concerns with logical constants in the Xilinx Virtex family. There are two main categories of logical constants: implicit and explicit logical constants. In all of the Virtex devices, the implicit logical constants are implemented using half latches, which in the most recent devices are several orders of magnitudes smaller than configuration bit cells. Explicit logical constants are implemented exclusively using constant LUTs in the Virtex-I and Virtex-II, and use a combination of constant LUTs and architectural posts to the ground plane in the Virtex-4. We have also presented mitigation methods and options for these devices. While SEUs in implicit and some types of explicit logical constants can cause data corrupt, the chance of failure from these components is now much smaller than it was in the Virtex-I device. Therefore, for many cases, mitigation might not be necessary, except under extremely high reliability situations.

  12. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  13. Determination of the lumped constant and the kinetic constants for deoxyglucose and fluorodeoxyglucose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.H.; Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Wolf, A.; Fowler, J.; Russell, J.; Arnett, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Shiue, C.Y.; Atkins, H.

    1985-01-01

    If both the time course of the arterial plasma radionuclide concentration and the brain tissue radionuclide concentrations are known, it is possible to calculate the kinetic constants (k/sub 1/*, k/sub 2/*, k/sub 3/*, k/sub 4/*) of the glucose analogue. In a series of male subjects, arterial blood samples were obtained at frequent intervals immediately following the bolus administration of /sup 18/F-FDG and then at less frequent intervals for up to 5 hours after the radionuclide administration. The tissue time course was obtained by making positron emission tomographic scans every three minutes for 30 minutes and then at less frequent intervals for 5 hours. These images were used to construct the time course of /sup 18/F activity in gray and white matter structures. Using these values for the lumped constants and the kinetic constants, the values obtained for the global metabolic rate for glucose in two series of young male subjects were 4.99 +- 0.23 and 5.55 +- 0.37 mg/100 g/min when /sup 11/C-DG and /sup 18/F-FDG were used as tracers respectively.

  14. Does the Newtonian Gravity "Constant" G Vary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    2015-08-01

    A series of measurements of Newton's gravity constant, G, dating back as far as 1893, yielded widely varying values, the variation greatly exceeding the stated error estimates (Gillies, 1997; Quinn, 2000, Mohr et al 2008). The value of G is usually said to be unrelated to other physics, but we point out that the 8B Solar Neutrino Rate ought to be very sensitive. Improved pulsar timing could also help settle the issue as to whether G really varies. We claim that the variation in measured values over time (1893-2014 C.E.) is a more serious problem than the failure of the error bars to overlap; it appears that challenging or adjusting the error bars hardly masks the underlying disagreement in central values. We have assessed whether variations in the gravitational potential due to (for example) local dark matter (DM) could explain the variations. We find that the required potential fluctuations could transiently accelerate the Solar System and nearby stars to speeds in excess of the Galactic escape speed. Previous theories for the variation in G generally deal with supposed secular variation on a cosmological timescale, or very rapid oscillations whose envelope changes on that scale (Steinhardt and Will 1995). Therefore, these analyses fail to support variations on the timescale of years or spatial scales of order parsecs, which would be required by the data for G. We note that true variations in G would be associated with variations in clock rates (Derevianko and Pospelov 2014; Loeb and Maoz 2015), which could mask changes in orbital dynamics. Geringer-Sameth et al (2014) studied γ-ray emission from the nearby Reticulum dwarf galaxy, which is expected to be free of "ordinary" (stellar, black hole) γ-ray sources and found evidence for DM decay. Bernabei et al (2003) also found evidence for DM penetrating deep underground at Gran Sasso. If, indeed, variations in G can be tied to variations in gravitational potential, we have a new tool to assess the DM density.

  15. Calculation of kinetic rate constants from thermodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John

    1995-01-01

    A new scheme for relating the absolute value for the kinetic rate constant k to the thermodynamic constant Kp is developed for gases. In this report the forward and reverse rate constants are individually related to the thermodynamic data. The kinetic rate constants computed from thermodynamics compare well with the current kinetic rate constants. This method is self consistent and does not have extensive rules. It is first demonstrated and calibrated by computing the HBr reaction from H2 and Br2. This method then is used on other reactions.

  16. The constant displacement scheme for tracking particles in heterogeneous aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.H.; Gomez-Hernandez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation of mass transport by particle tracking or random walk in highly heterogeneous media may be inefficient from a computational point of view if the traditional constant time step scheme is used. A new scheme which adjusts automatically the time step for each particle according to the local pore velocity, so that each particle always travels a constant distance, is shown to be computationally faster for the same degree of accuracy than the constant time step method. Using the constant displacement scheme, transport calculations in a 2-D aquifer model, with nature log-transmissivity variance of 4, can be 8.6 times faster than using the constant time step scheme.

  17. Planck’s constant as a natural unit of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The proposed revision of SI units would embed Planck’s constant into the definition of the kilogram, as a fixed constant of nature. Traditionally, Planck’s constant is not readily interpreted as the size of something physical, and it is generally only encountered by students in the mathematics of quantum physics. Richard Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics allows a neat visualization of the constant as the circumference of a surveyor’s wheel for measuring action along each path, making Planck’s constant a natural yardstick, almost literally. This approach is shown to have other benefits in the presentation of other basic quantum phenomena.

  18. FOREWORD: International determination of the Avogadro constant International determination of the Avogadro constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2011-04-01

    This issue of Metrologia collects papers about the results of an international research project aimed at the determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, by counting the atoms in a silicon crystal highly enriched with the isotope 28Si. Fifty years ago, Egidi [1] thought about realizing an atomic mass standard. In 1965, Bonse and Hart [2] operated the first x-ray interferometer, thus paving the way to the achievement of Egidi's dream, and soon Deslattes et al [3] completed the first counting of the atoms in a natural silicon crystal. The present project, outlined by Zosi [4] in 1983, began in 2004 by combining the experiences and capabilities of the BIPM, INRIM, IRMM, NIST, NPL, NMIA, NMIJ and PTB. The start signal, ratified by a memorandum of understanding, was a contract for the production of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si. The enrichment process was undertaken by the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building in St Petersburg. Subsequently, a polycrystal was grown in the Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod and a 28Si boule was grown and purified by the Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung in Berlin. Isotope enrichment made it possible to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, to determine the Avogadro constant with unprecedented accuracy, and to fulfil Egidi's dream. To convey Egidi's 'fantasy' into practice, two 28Si kilogram prototypes shaped as quasi-perfect spheres were manufactured by the Australian Centre for Precision Optics; their isotopic composition, molar mass, mass, volume, density and lattice parameter were accurately determined and their surfaces were chemically and physically characterized at the atomic scale. The paper by Andreas et al reviews the work carried out; it collates all the findings and illustrates how Avogadro's constant was obtained. Impurity concentration and gradients in the enriched crystal were measured by infrared spectroscopy and taken into

  19. The Hubble constant and dark energy from cosmological distance measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2008-04-15

    We study how the determination of the Hubble constant from cosmological distance measures is affected by models of dark energy and vice versa. For this purpose, constraints on the Hubble constant and dark energy are investigated using the cosmological observations of cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia supernovae. When one investigates dark energy, the Hubble constant is often a nuisance parameter; thus it is usually marginalized over. On the other hand, when one focuses on the Hubble constant, simple dark energy models such as a cosmological constant and a constant equation of state are usually assumed. Since we do not know the nature of dark energy yet, it is interesting to investigate the Hubble constant assuming some types of dark energy and see to what extent the constraint on the Hubble constant is affected by the assumption concerning dark energy. We show that the constraint on the Hubble constant is not affected much by the assumption for dark energy. We furthermore show that this holds true even if we remove the assumption that the universe is flat. We also discuss how the prior on the Hubble constant affects the constraints on dark energy and/or the curvature of the universe.

  20. Tiempo para un cambio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltjer, L.

    1987-06-01

    En la reunion celebrada en diciembre dei ano pasado informe al Consejo de mi deseo de terminar mi contrato como Director General de la ESO una vez que fuera aprobado el proyecto dei VLT, que se espera sucedera hacia fines de este aAo. Cuando fue renovada mi designacion hace tres aAos, el Consejo conocia mi intencion de no completar los cinco aAos dei contrato debido a mi deseo de disponer de mas tiempo para otras actividades. Ahora, una vez terminada la fase preparatoria para el VLT, Y habiendose presentado el proyecto formalmente al Consejo el dia 31 de marzo, y esperando su muy probable aprobacion antes dei termino de este ano, me parece que el 10 de enero de 1988 presenta una excelente fecha para que se produzca un cambio en la administracion de la ESO.

  1. Comparison of entrainment in constant volume and constant flux dense currents over sloping bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.; Nayamatullah, M.; Cenedese, C.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional high resolution large eddy simulations (LES) are employed to simulate lock-exchange and constant flux dense flows over inclined surface with the aim of investigating, visualizing and describing the turbulent structure and the evolution of bottom-propagating compositional density current at the channel bottom. The understanding of dynamics of density current is largely determined by the amount of interfacial mixing or entrainment between the ambient and dense fluids. No previous experimental or numerical studies have been done to estimate entrainment in classical lock-exchange system. The differences in entrainment between the lock-exchange and constant flux are explored. Comparing the results of flat bed with inclined surface results, flow exhibits significant differences near the leading edge or nose of the front of the density currents due to inclination of surface. Further, the instabilities are remarkably enhanced resulting Kelvin-Helmholtz and lobe-cleft type of instabilities arises much earlier in time. In this study, a brief analysis of entrainment on lock-exchange density current is presented using different bed slopes and a set of reduced gravity values (g'). We relate the entrainment value with different flow parameters such as Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re).

  2. Strong resetting of the mammalian clock by constant light followed by constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongmin; Seo, Dong-oh; Bell, Elijah; von Gall, Charlotte; Lee, Choogon

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian molecular circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates locomotor activity rhythms as well as clocks in peripheral tissues (Reppert and Weaver, 2002; Ko and Takahashi, 2006). Constant light (LL) can induce behavioral and physiological arrhythmicity, by desynchronizing clock cells in the SCN (Ohta et al., 2005). We examined how the disordered clock cells resynchronize by probing the molecular clock and measuring behavior in mice transferred from LL to constant darkness (DD). The circadian locomotor activity rhythms disrupted in LL become robustly rhythmic again from the beginning of DD, and the starting phase of the rhythm in DD is specific, not random, suggesting that the desynchronized clock cells are quickly reset in an unconventional manner by the L:D transition. By measuring mPERIOD protein rhythms, we showed that the SCN and peripheral tissue clocks quickly become rhythmic again in phase with the behavioral rhythms. We propose that this resetting mechanism may be different from conventional phase shifting, which involves light-induction of Period genes (Albrecht et al., 1997; Shearman et al., 1997; Shigeyoshi et al., 1997). Using our functional insights, we could shift the circadian phase of locomotor activity rhythms by 12 hours using a 15-hour LL treatment: essentially producing phase reversal by a single light pulse, a feat that has not been reported previously in wild-type mice and that has potential clinical utility. PMID:19005049

  3. Measuring liquid crystal elastic constants with free energy perturbations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Abhijeet A; Whitmer, Jonathan K; Guzmán, Orlando; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-02-14

    A first principles method is proposed to calculate the Frank elastic constants of nematic liquid crystals. These include the constants corresponding to standard splay, twist and bend deformations, and an often-ignored surface-like contribution known as saddle-splay. The proposed approach is implemented on the widely studied Gay-Berne (3, 5, 2, 1) model [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys., 1981, 74, 3316], and the effects of temperature and system size on the elastic constants are examined in the nematic phase. The results of simulations for splay, twist, and bend elastic constants are consistent with those from previous literature reports. The method is subsequently applied to the saddle-splay elastic constant k24 which is found to exist at the limits of the Ericksen inequalities governing positive definite free energy. Finally, extensions of the method are discussed that present a new paradigm for in silico measurements of elastic constants. PMID:24837037

  4. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2005-09-15

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q2 data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q2-behavior over the complete Q2-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  5. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  6. On multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváč, Adam

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an algebraic formula producing infinitely many exact solutions of the constant astigmatism equation {z}{yy}+{(1/z)}{xx}+2=0 from a given seed. A construction of corresponding surfaces of constant astigmatism is then a matter of routine. As a special case, we consider multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation defined as counterparts of famous multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon equation. A few particular examples are surveyed as well.

  7. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed. PMID:11801051

  8. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  9. Negative Dielectric Constant Material Based on Ion Conducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Metamaterials or artificial negative index materials (NIMs) have generated great attention due to their unique and exotic electromagnetic properties. One exemplary negative dielectric constant material, which is an essential key for creating the NIMs, was developed by doping ions into a polymer, a protonated poly(benzimidazole) (PBI). The doped PBI showed a negative dielectric constant at megahertz (MHz) frequencies due to its reduced plasma frequency and an induction effect. The magnitude of the negative dielectric constant and the resonance frequency were tunable by doping concentration. The highly doped PBI showed larger absolute magnitude of negative dielectric constant at just above its resonance frequency than the less doped PBI.

  10. Scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with negative coupling constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.; Eby, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of a Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor gravitation theory with a negative coupling constant is considered. The admissibility of a negative-coupling theory is investigated, and a simplified cosmological solution is obtained which allows a negative derivative of the gravitation constant. It is concluded that a Brans-Dicke theory with a negative coupling constant can be a viable alternative to general relativity and that a large negative value for the coupling constant seems to bring the original scalar-tensor theory into close agreement with perihelion-precession results in view of recent observations of small solar oblateness.

  11. Are the Truly Constant Constants of Nature? How is the Real Material Space and its Structure?

    SciTech Connect

    Luz Montero Garcia, Jose de la; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    In a concise and simplified way, some matters of authors' theories -Unified Theory of the Physical and Mathematical Universal Constants and Quantum Cellular Structural Geometry-, an only one theoretical main body MN2. This investigation has as objective the search of the last cells that base the existence, unicity and harmony of matter, as well as its structural-formal and dynamic-functional diversity. The quantitative hypothesis is demonstrated that 'World is one, is one; but it is one Arithmetic-Geometric-Topological-Dimensional and Structural-Cellular-Dynamic one, simultaneously'. In the Frontiers of Fundamental Physics such last cells are the cells of own Real Material Space of whose whole accretion, interactive and staggered all the existing one at all the hierarchic levels arises, cells these below which make no sense to speak of structure and, therefore, of existence. The cells of the Real Material Space are its 'Atoms'. Law of Planetary Systems or '4th Kepler's Law'.

  12. Constant-Operating-Resistance Hot-Wire Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of lead-wire-resistance changes with temperature nullified. Constant-operating-resistance hot-wire probe uses two sets of leads. Exposed to identical conditions, comparison of resistance gives change in sensing element itself. Data taken in more convenient manner, with advantage of not having to constantly check for possible changes in lead resistance and consequently readjust potentiometer.

  13. Force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Fawcett, V.

    The force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide have been calculated using a simple valence force-field approximation with interaction constants. Several revisions are proposed to the existing vibrational assignments for the As(CN) 3 species and the vibrational assignments for P(CN) 3 are confirmed.

  14. A Simple Apparatus for Determining Ionization and Solubility Product Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerardi, Gary

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple conductivity apparatus for the determination of ionization and solubility product constants of various substances. The uses of the apparatus in determining the ionization constant of a weak monoprotic acid and in measuring the rate of diffusion of ions through a membrane are also presented. (HM)

  15. Dielectric constant of water at very high temperature and pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Pertinent statistical mechanical theory is combined with the available measurements of the dielectric constant of water at high temperature and pressure to predict that property at still higher temperature. The dielectric constant is needed in connection with studies of electrolytes such as NaCl/H2O at very high temperature. PMID:16593342

  16. Decay constants of p and d wave heavy light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Veseli, Sinisa; Dunietz, Isard

    1996-07-01

    We investigate decay constants of P- and D-wave heavy-light mesons within the mock-meson approach. Numerical estimates are obtained using the relativistic quark model. We also comment on recent calculations of heavy-light pseudo-scalar and vector decay constants.

  17. Resource Letter FC-1: The physics of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Newell, David B.

    2010-04-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the physics of fundamental constants and their values as determined within the International System of Units (SI). Journal articles, books, and websites that provide relevant information are surveyed. Literature on redefining the SI in terms of exact values of fundamental constants is also included.

  18. Enhancement of Compton scattering by an effective coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2011-08-15

    A robust thermodynamic argument shows that a small reduction of the effective coupling constant {alpha} of QED greatly enhances the low-energy Compton-scattering cross section and that the Thomson scattering length is connected to a fundamental scale {lambda}. A discussion provides a possible quantum interpretation of this enormous sensitivity to changes in the effective coupling constant {alpha}.

  19. Measuring Boltzmann's Constant with Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present two experiments to measure Boltzmann's constant--one of the fundamental constants of modern-day physics, which lies at the base of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The experiments use very basic theory, simple equipment and cheap and safe materials yet provide very precise results. They are very easy and…

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  1. Essential nature of Newton's constant in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We point out that in unimodular gravity Newton's constant is an essential coupling, i.e. it is independent of field redefinitions. We illustrate the consequences of this fact by a calculation in a standard simple approximation, showing that in this case the renormalization group flow of Newton's constant is gauge and parametrization independent.

  2. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  3. Using Constant Time Delay to Teach Braille Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Jonathan; Ivy, Sarah; Hatton, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay has been identified as an evidence-based practice to teach print sight words and picture recognition (Browder, Ahlbrim-Delzell, Spooner, Mims, & Baker, 2009). For the study presented here, we tested the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach new braille words. Methods: A single-subject multiple baseline…

  4. Electrical detection of ortho-para conversion in fullerene-encapsulated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Benno; Mamone, Salvatore; Concistrè, Maria; Alonso-Valdesueiro, Javier; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2015-08-01

    Water exists in two spin isomers, ortho and para, that have different nuclear spin states. In bulk water, rapid proton exchange and hindered molecular rotation obscure the direct observation of two spin isomers. The supramolecular endofullerene H2O@C60 provides freely rotating, isolated water molecules even at cryogenic temperatures. Here we show that the bulk dielectric constant of this substance depends on the ortho/para ratio, and changes slowly in time after a sudden temperature jump, due to nuclear spin conversion. The attribution of the effect to ortho-para conversion is validated by comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum theory. The change in dielectric constant is consistent with an electric dipole moment of 0.51+/-0.05 Debye for an encapsulated water molecule, indicating the partial shielding of the water dipole by the encapsulating cage. The dependence of bulk dielectric constant on nuclear spin isomer composition appears to be a previously unreported physical phenomenon.

  5. Cosmological constant: a lesson from Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Stefano; Liberati, Stefano; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2012-02-17

    The cosmological constant is one of the most pressing problems in modern physics. We address this issue from an emergent gravity standpoint, by using an analogue gravity model. Indeed, the dynamics of the emergent metric in a Bose-Einstein condensate can be described by a Poisson-like equation with a vacuum source term reminiscent of a cosmological constant. The direct computation of this term shows that in emergent gravity scenarios this constant may be naturally much smaller than the naive ground-state energy of the emergent effective field theory. This suggests that a proper computation of the cosmological constant would require a detailed understanding about how Einstein equations emerge from the full microscopic quantum theory. In this light, the cosmological constant appears as a decisive test bench for any quantum or emergent gravity scenario. PMID:22401190

  6. Extended temperature dependence of elastic constants in cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Telichko, A V; Sorokin, B P

    2015-08-01

    To extend the theory of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in cubic crystals beyond the second- and third-order elastic constants, the fourth-order elastic constants, as well as the non-linearity in the thermal expansion temperature dependence, have been taken into account. Theoretical results were represented as temperature functions of the effective elastic constants and compared with experimental data for a number of cubic crystals, such as alkali metal halides, and elements gold and silver. The relations obtained give a more accurate description of the experimental temperature dependences of second-order elastic constants for a number of cubic crystals, including deviations from linear behavior. A good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data has been observed. PMID:25819879

  7. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio

    2009-01-15

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  8. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125I and 103Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S(K)) standard for 125I seeds and has also established an S(K) standard for 103Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (inverted V) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of dose rate constant and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of dose rate constant. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that dose rate constant may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S(K) and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for dose rate constant was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of dose rate constant as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated dose rate constant for 125I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within +/-1%. For the 103Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the +/-7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for dose rate constant proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known. PMID:11213926

  9. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey (Urey H. C. [1947] The thermodynamic properties of isotopic substances. J. Chem. Soc. 562-581) to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by ?? = (Kex)1/n, where n is the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example 13C16O18O and 1H2H18O. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions can be expressed as ratios of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions. Knowledge of the equilibrium constant for the dominant isotopic species can then be used to calculate the individual isotope equilibrium constants. Individual isotope equilibrium constants are calculated for the reaction CO2g = CO2aq for all species that can be formed from 12C, 13C, 16O, and 18O; for the reaction between 12C18 O2aq and 1H218Ol; and among the various 1H, 2H, 16O, and 18O species of H2O. This is a subset of a larger number of equilibrium constants calculated elsewhere (Thorstenson D. C. and Parkhurst D. L. [2002] Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models. Water-Resources Investigation Report 02-4172. U.S. Geological Survey). Activity coefficients, activity-concentration conventions for the isotopic variants of H2O in the solvent 1H216Ol, and salt effects on isotope fractionation have been included in the derivations. The effects of nonideality are small because of the chemical similarity of different isotopic species of the same molecule or ion. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation

  10. A Graphical Procedure for the Simultaneous Determination of the Distribution Constant of Iodine and the Stability Constants of Trihalide Anions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahwa, I. A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a graphical procedure which allows the distribution constant of iodine to be determined simultaneously with the trihalide anion stability constant. In addition, the procedure extends the experimental chemistry from distribution equilibria to important thermodynamic and bonding features. Advantages of using the procedure are also…