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Sample records for esquerda sem cec

  1. YEARBOOK CEC 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Council for Education by Correspondence, Brussels (Belgium).

    AT THE 1965 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION BY CORRESPONDENCE (CEC), HELD IN PARIS IN OCTOBER, THE MODIFIED CEC CONSTITUTION WAS ADOPTED. AT THE 1966 ANNUAL MEETING, HELD IN LONDON IN MAY, THE DELEGATES DISCUSSED BUSINESS AND EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS OF A MODEL CODE OF ETHICS. TO INVESTIGATE METHODS OF EDUCATION BY CORRESPONDENCE,…

  2. CEC Today, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Lynda C., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of five issues of "CEC Today," a membership publication of the Council for Exceptional Children. Each issue usually contains a calendar of events, news items, and columns on member benefits, advocacy efforts of CEC, activities of Student CEC, CEC in Canada, activities of the CEC divisions, professional advancement, and a…

  3. The CEC Libraries Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Gitte

    1991-01-01

    Describes a plan that has been developed by the Commission of the European Community (CEC) for libraries in Europe. Highlights include machine-readable national bibliographies and union catalogs; retrospective conversion projects; networks; user services and information technology; a pilot project using CD-ROM; and cooperative projects and…

  4. CEC's Position on School Vouchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) recognizes that children and youth with disabilities are entitled to equal access to the public education system and to all rights guaranteed by law. CEC advocates to ensure that children and youth with disabilities receive the equal access and opportunity that they deserve. By definition, vouchers…

  5. CEC Today, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kuren, Lynda, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Nine issues of the newsletter of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) include articles, news items, meeting announcements, news items of individual divisions, and professional advancement opportunities. Some major articles are: (1) "Home Schooling--A Viable Alternative for Students with Special Needs" (2) "High Stakes Testing a Mixed…

  6. CEC Today, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Lynda, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The eight issues for volume 6 of the "CEC Today," a newsletter exclusively for members of the Council for Exceptional Children, include the following featured articles: (1) "How To Set up a Classroom on a Tight Budget"; (2) "Survival Tips for First-Year Teachers"; (3) Get the Training You Need To Stay Ahead of the Curve!"; (4) "Get the IDEA!...And…

  7. CEC's New Policy--Behind the Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    CEC's new policy is a result of efforts begun in 2009 by members of CEC's Educators With Disabilities Policy Workgroup. The board-appointed workgroup was chaired by Jennifer Diliberto and included Mary Ruth Coleman, Marjorie Terhaar-Yonkers, Susan Osborne, and Stephanie Demayo. These CEC members' desire to create and support safe environments in…

  8. CEC's Policy on Educators with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) supports educators with disabilities including faculty, teacher candidates, and teachers in classrooms, schools, and institutions of higher education. Within the CEC membership, members embody a wide range of disabilities including learning, sensory, physical, and emotional areas. CEC recognizes the…

  9. Proposals accepted by the CEC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    Descriptions are given of 12 geothermal projects approved by the California Energy Commission (CEC) for inclusion on the 1988-89 state budget. Projects include an aquaculture facility for mosquistofish to be used instead of toxic chemicals to control mosquitoes, an air monitoring program at The Geysers, a water quality baseline study for the Pieta Creek Basin within The Geysers KGRA, expansion of an existing geothermal district heating system, resource assessment and exploratory drilling on the Santa Ysabel Indian Reservation, and modifications and retrofit of space and water heating systems at two hospitals.

  10. CEC's Policy on Educators with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) supports educators with disabilities including faculty, teacher candidates, and teachers in classrooms, schools, and institutions of higher education. Many educators with disabilities have learned resiliency, overcoming adversity to succeed academically. However, without appropriate support this is often…

  11. Requirements for CEC POP machine protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.

    2015-02-18

    The requirements of CEC POP machine protection system are meant to prevent damage to a vacuum chamber by a missteered electron beam. In this example, beam energy = 22 MeV, Maximal bunch charge = 5 nC, Maximal repetition rate = 78 kHz, Normalized emittance = 5 mm mrad, Minimal β-function = 1 m. From this information the requirements of the protection system can be calculated by factoring the information into equations to find beam densities and temperature excursions.

  12. High Throughput Analysis of Chiral Compounds Using Capillary Electrochromatography (CEC) and CEC-Mass Spectrometry with Cellulose Based Stationary Phases

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, William; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2014-01-01

    To fulfill the ever growing demand for rapid chiral analysis, this research presents an approach for highthroughput enantiomeric separations and sensitive detection of model chiral analytes using capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with UV and MS detection. This was achieved utilizing a short 7 cm CEC columns packed with cellulose tris (3,5-dimethyl-phenylcarbamate) (CDMPC) or sulfonated cellulose tris (3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (CDMPC-SO3) chiral stationary phases (CSPs) applying outlet side injections in CEC-UV. The separation performance was compared between CDMPC and CDMPC-SO3 CSPs for rapid enantio-separation in CEC-UV mode. In addition, using a high sensitivity UV-flow cell in combination with outlet side injections, the S/N and hence the limit of detection of chiral drug could be improved. The 7-cm packed column was also used with traditional inlet injections for CEC coupled to a low-cost single-quadrupole MS. While outlet side injection was not possible in CEC-MS due to instrumentation constraints, the combined use of a short 7 cm column packed with CDMPC-SO3 CSP provided several fold higher throughput. Both CEC-UV and CEC-MS with short packed bed has the potential for a simple, sensitive and cost-effective method for enantiomeric drug profiling in biological samples. PMID:25264392

  13. Educators' Perspectives: Survey on the 2009 CEC Advanced Content Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Lama Bergstrand; Kieran, Laura; Anderson, Christine J.

    2015-01-01

    Educators who pursue an advanced degree or certification in special education must learn and master the Advanced Content Standards as set forth by the Council for Exceptional Children. These six content standards were validated by the CEC to guide educators through the process of assuming an advanced role in special education teaching or…

  14. CEC's Policy on Safe and Positive School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) recognizes the important impact a safe and positive school climate has on the personal development and academic achievement of all students. Research has shown that schools implementing supportive and positive school climate strategies are more successful in creating environments conducive to learning. As…

  15. Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty - A Joint CEC/USNRC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Julie J.; Harper, Frederick T.

    1999-07-28

    The joint USNRC/CEC consequence uncertainty study was chartered after the development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS in the U.S. and COSYMA in Europe. Both the USNRC and CEC had a vested interest in expanding the knowledge base of the uncertainty associated with consequence modeling, and teamed up to co-sponsor a consequence uncertainty study. The information acquired from the study was expected to provide understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of current models as well as a basis for direction of future research. This paper looks at the elicitation process implemented in the joint study and discusses some of the uncertainty distributions provided by eight panels of experts from the U.S. and Europe that were convened to provide responses to the elicitation. The phenomenological areas addressed by the expert panels include atmospheric dispersion and deposition, deposited material and external doses, food chain, early health effects, late health effects and internal dosimetry.

  16. Proceedings of the CEC/USDOE workshop on uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E. ); Kelly, G.N. )

    1990-09-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly important to specify the uncertainty inherent in consequence assessments and in the models that trace radionuclides from their source, through the environment, to their impacts on human health. European and US scientists have, been independently developing and applying methods for analyzing uncertainty. It recently became apparent that a scientific exchange on this subject would be beneficial as improvements are sought and as uncertainty methods find broader application. The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the US Department of Energy (OHER/DOE), through their continuing agreement for cooperation, decided to co-sponsor the CEC/USDOE Workshop on Uncertainty Analysis. CEC's Radiation Protection Research Programme and OHER's Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain Program collaborated in planning and organizing the workshop, which was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 13 through 16, 1989. As the workshop progressed, the perspectives of individual participants, each with their particular background and interests in some segment of consequence assessment and its uncertainties, contributed to a broader view of how uncertainties are introduced and handled. This proceedings contains, first, the editors' introduction to the problem of uncertainty analysis and their general summary and conclusions. These are then followed by the results of the working groups, and the abstracts of individual presentations.

  17. CEC column behaviour of butyl and lauryl methacrylate monoliths prepared in non-aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Cantó-Mirapeix, Amparo; Herrero-Martínez, José M; Mongay-Fernández, Carlos; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto F

    2009-02-01

    Polymeric monolithic stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography were prepared using two bulk monomers, butyl methacrylate (BMA) and lauryl methacrylate (LMA), by in situ polymerization in non-aqueous media. The effect of 1,4-butanediol/1-propanol ratio on porous properties was investigated separately for each monomer, keeping the proportion of monomers to pore-forming solvents fixed at 40:60 wt:wt. Also, mixtures of BMA and LMA at different 1,4-butanediol/1-propanol ratios were studied for tailoring the morphological features of the monolithic columns. The chromatographic performance of the different columns was evaluated by means of van Deemter plots of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Mercury-intrusion porosimetry, SEM, and nitrogen-adsorption measurements were also performed in order to understand their retention behaviour and porous properties. A comparison of these features was also performed for monoliths made with one bulk monomer (BMA or LMA) and with mixtures of both. These mixed monoliths showed satisfactory efficiencies and analysis times compared with those made with one bulk monomer; thus, the BMA-LMA monoliths constitute an attractive alternative to manipulate the electrochromatographic properties of methacrylate beds in CEC. PMID:19170053

  18. NAGC-CEC Teacher Preparation Standards in Gifted and Talented Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Gifted Children, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), in collaboration with the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), and the Association for the Gifted (CEC-TAG), has developed national standards for teacher preparation programs in gifted and talented education. Typically, these programs are at the masters level, but they may also be endorsement…

  19. The CEC Professional Standards: A Foucauldian Genealogy of the Re/construction of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Jennifer Randhare

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a Foucauldian analysis of the 2003 Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Professional Standards. It examines the role of the CEC and their professional standards in the construction of the special educator and the student with disabilities and the potential implications that these constructions have for inclusive education.…

  20. CEC's Policy on Physical Restraint and Seclusion Procedures in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) recognizes access to the most effective educational strategies as the basic educational right of each child or youth with a disability. CEC believes that the least restrictive positive educational strategies should be always used to respect the child's or youth's dignity and that this especially pertains…

  1. The Mussel Watch California pilot study on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs): synthesis and next steps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maruya, Keith A.; Dodder, Nathan G.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Gregorio, Dominic; Bishop, Jonathan S.; Klosterhaus, Susan; Alvarez, David A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Bricker, Suzanne B.; Kimbrough, Kimani L.; Lauenstein, Gunnar G.

    2014-01-01

    A multiagency pilot study on mussels (Mytilus spp.) collected at 68 stations in California revealed that 98% of targeted contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were infrequently detectable at concentrations ⩽1 ng/g. Selected chemicals found in commercial and consumer products were more frequently detected at mean concentrations up to 470 ng/g dry wt. The number of CECs detected and their concentrations were greatest for stations categorized as urban or influenced by storm water discharge. Exposure to a broader suite of CECs was also characterized by passive sampling devices (PSDs), with estimated water concentrations of hydrophobic compounds correlated with Mytilus concentrations. The results underscore the need for focused CEC monitoring in coastal ecosystems and suggest that PSDs are complementary to bivalves in assessing water quality. Moreover, the partnership established among participating agencies led to increased spatial coverage, an expanded list of analytes and a more efficient use of available resources.

  2. Recent advances in nonpolar and polar organic monoliths for HPLC and CEC

    PubMed Central

    Jonnada, Murthy; Rathnasekara, Renuka; Rassi, Ziad El

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed at providing a review of the progress made in the field over the period 2011 to present in order to expand in parts on two previous reviews (S. Karenga and Z. El Rassi, Electrophoresis, 2011, 32, 90-104; D. Gunasena and Z. El Rassi, Electrophoresis, 2012, 33, 251-261). In brief, this review article describes progress made in nonpolar and polar monoliths used in reversed phase HPLC and CEC (RPC/RP-CEC) and in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/CEC (HILIC/HI-CEC), respectively. This article is by no means an exhaustive review of the literature; it is rather a survey of the recent progress made in the field with 69 references published on nonpolar and polar polymeric monoliths. PMID:25266173

  3. An adaptive, comprehensive monitoring strategy for chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in California's Aquatic Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Keith A; Schlenk, Daniel; Anderson, Paul D; Denslow, Nancy D; Drewes, Jörg E; Olivieri, Adam W; Scott, Geoffrey I; Snyder, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    A scientific advisory panel was convened by the State of California to recommend monitoring for chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in aquatic systems that receive discharge of municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent and stormwater runoff. The panel developed a risk-based screening framework that considered environmental sources and fate of CECs observed in receiving waters across the State. Using existing occurrence and risk threshold data in water, sediment, and biological tissue, the panel applied the framework to identify a priority list of CECs for initial monitoring in three representative receiving water scenarios. The initial screening list of 16 CECs identified by the panel included consumer and commercial chemicals, flame retardants, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and natural hormones. The panel designed an iterative, phased strategy with interpretive guidelines that direct and update management actions commensurate with potential risk identified using the risk-based framework and monitoring data. Because of the ever-changing nature of chemical use, technology, and management practices, the panel offered recommendations to improve CEC monitoring, including development of bioanalytical screening methods whose responses integrate exposure to complex mixtures and that can be linked to higher-order effects; development or refinement of models that predict the input, fate, and effects of future chemicals; and filling of key data gaps on CEC occurrence and toxicity. Finally, the panel stressed the need for adaptive management, allowing for future review of, and if warranted, modifications to the strategy to incorporate the latest science available to the water resources community. PMID:24129960

  4. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  5. PM APPORTIONMENT: SEM METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy combined with individual-particle X-ray analysis (CCSEM or SEM/EDX) is being used to measure the chemical and physical characteristics of ambient and source-derived particles. CCSEM can determine particle size, shape and major che...

  6. Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

    1999-12-01

    According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct

  7. Refocusing Mussel Watch on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs): the California pilot study (2009-10).

    PubMed

    Maruya, Keith A; Dodder, Nathan G; Schaffner, Rebecca A; Weisberg, Stephen B; Gregorio, Dominic; Klosterhaus, Susan; Alvarez, David A; Furlong, Edward T; Kimbrough, Kimani L; Lauenstein, Gunnar G; Christensen, John D

    2014-04-30

    To expand the utility of the Mussel Watch Program, local, regional and state agencies in California partnered with NOAA to design a pilot study that targeted contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). Native mussels (Mytilus spp.) from 68 stations, stratified by land use and discharge scenario, were collected in 2009-10 and analyzed for 167 individual pharmaceuticals, industrial and commercial chemicals and current use pesticides. Passive sampling devices (PSDs) and caged Mytilus were co-deployed to expand the list of CECs, and to assess the ability of PSDs to mimic bioaccumulation by Mytilus. A performance-based quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) approach was developed to ensure a high degree of data quality, consistency and comparability. Data management and analysis were streamlined and standardized using automated software tools. This pioneering study will help shape future monitoring efforts in California's coastal ecosystems, while serving as a model for monitoring CECs within the region and across the nation. PMID:23886247

  8. Comparisons of the separations of some neutral analytes by LC, MEKC, and CEC.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R B; Vorarat, S; Reid, R G; Boyle, S P; Moody, R R

    1999-01-01

    The relative utility of high-performance liquid chromatography, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) is examined for the separation of essentially uncharged solute mixtures. Three model systems are used for which separations by reversed-phase liquid chromatography had been established. These consisted of a set of three substituted hydroxybenzoates; a mixture of six structurally closely related steroids; and the multicomponent aminoglycoside antibiotic, teicoplanin. These sets represented a range of difficulty in achieving separations by reversed-phase LC. It was found that equivalent or better separations for all systems could be established by MEKC and CEC. Both electrophoretic techniques offer much higher peak efficiencies than LC, and MEKC is found to be superior to CEC in terms of peak efficiencies and ruggedness of operation. PMID:11315153

  9. Education for Sustainability--Looking Backward and Looking Forward--IUCN CEC Perspective on the United Nations Decade of ESD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Keith A.; Hesselink, Frits; Goldstein, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    A network of volunteers, the International Union for Conservation of Nature Commission on Education and Communication (CEC), present some reflections on their contributions towards the field of education for sustainability from 1992 to the present. Many CEC members have been thought leaders to this multidimensional field, and advocates for a more…

  10. [BO-CEC National Advisory Committee Meetings and Conference: January 21, 1974; January 13, 1975; July 15, 1975:] Appendix B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    Appendix B to the final report of the Business and Office Career Education Curriculum (BO-CEC) project contains three sections. Sections 1 and 2 briefly present the agenda, the participants, and the reports of the BO-CEC National Advisory Committee Meetings of January 1974 and January 1975. Section 3 concerns the July 1975 dissemination conference…

  11. Evaluation of State Urban Education (CEC) Programs District 19, New York City Board of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Paul; And Others

    The five State Urban Education C.E.C. programs in District 19 include Project Excellence, a recycled clinical program which provides diagnostic, referral, and educational service to elementary and junior school students who demonstrate some difficulty in their scholastic and/or emotional adjustment to school. In Operation Reading Success for Sixth…

  12. Strengthening Education to Drive Economic Development: A Manual for Replicating "The CEC Experience" in Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Karla; Walker James, Donna

    2006-01-01

    The Central Educational Center (CEC) is a unique educational experience worth replicating in Georgia and nationally. It is a bold experiment--offering required academic courses and state-of-the-art technical and occupational courses to high-school students with the opportunity for dual-enrollment college credit while still in high school. Open to…

  13. Subglacial Lake CECs: Discovery and in situ survey of a privileged research site in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Andrés.; Uribe, José; Zamora, Rodrigo; Oberreuter, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery and on-the-ground radar mapping of a subglacial lake in Antarctica, that we have named Lake CECs (Centro de Estudios Científicos) in honor of the institute we belong to. It is located in the central part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, right underneath the Institute Ice Stream and Minnesota Glacier ice divide, and has not experienced surface elevation changes during the last 10 years. The ratio between the area of the subglacial lake and that of its feeding basin is larger than those for either subglacial lakes Ellsworth or Whillans, and it has a depth comparable to that of Ellsworth and greater than that of Whillans. Its ice thickness is ˜600 m less than that over Ellsworth. The lake is very likely a system with long water residence time. The recent finding of microbial life in Lake Whillans emphasizes the potential of Subglacial Lake CECs for biological exploration.

  14. Multimedia screening of contaminants of emerging concern (CECS) in coastal urban watersheds in southern California (USA).

    PubMed

    Maruya, Keith A; Dodder, Nathan G; Sengupta, Ashmita; Smith, Deborah J; Lyons, J Michael; Heil, Ann T; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-08-01

    To examine the occurrence and fate of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and inform future monitoring of CECs in coastal urban waterways, water, sediment, and fish tissue samples were collected and analyzed for a broad suite of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), commercial and/or household chemicals, current use pesticides, and hormones in an effluent-dominated river and multiple embayments in southern California (USA). In the Santa Clara River, which receives treated wastewater from several facilities, aqueous phase CECs were detectable at stations nearest discharges from municipal wastewater treatment plants but were attenuated downstream. Sucralose and the chlorinated phosphate flame retardants tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) were most abundant in water, with maximum concentrations of 35 μg/L, 3.3 μg/L, 1.4 μg/L, and 0.81 μg/L, respectively. Triclocarban, an antimicrobial agent in use for decades, was more prevalent in water than triclosan or nonylphenol. Maximum concentrations of bifenthrin, permethrin, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and degradates of fipronil exceeded CEC-specific monitoring trigger levels recently established for freshwater and estuarine sediments by factors of 10 to 1000, respectively. Maximum fish tissue concentrations of PBDEs varied widely (370 ng/g and 7.0 ng/g for the Santa Clara River and coastal embayments, respectively), with most species exhibiting concentrations at the lower end of this range. These results suggest that continued monitoring of pyrethroids, PBDEs, and degradates of fipronil in sediment is warranted in these systems. In contrast, aqueous pharmaceutical concentrations in the Santa Clara River were not close to exceeding current monitoring trigger levels, suggesting a lower priority for targeted monitoring in this medium. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1986-1994. © 2016 SETAC

  15. Validation of the CERTS Microgrid Concept The CEC/CERTS MicrogridTestbed

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, David K.; Stevens, John; Lasseter, Robert H.; Eto,Joseph H.

    2006-06-01

    The development of test plans to validate the CERTSMicrogrid concept is discussed, including the status of a testbed.Increased application of Distributed Energy Resources on the Distributionsystem has the potential to improve performance, lower operational costsand create value. Microgrids have the potential to deliver these highvalue benefits. This presentation will focus on operationalcharacteristics of the CERTS microgrid, the partners in the project andthe status of the CEC/CERTS microgrid testbed. Index Terms DistributedGeneration, Distributed Resource, Islanding, Microgrid,Microturbine

  16. Refocusing Mussel Watch on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs): the California pilot study (2009-10)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maruya, Keith A.; Dodder, Nathan G.; Schaffner, Rebecca A.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Gregorio, Dominic; Klosterhaus, Susan; Alvarez, David A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kimbrough, Kimani L.; Lauenstein, Gunnar G.; Christensen, John D.

    2014-01-01

    To expand the utility of the Mussel Watch Program, local, regional and state agencies in California partnered with NOAA to design a pilot study that targeted contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). Native mussels (Mytilus spp.) from 68 stations, stratified by land use and discharge scenario, were collected in 2009–10 and analyzed for 167 individual pharmaceuticals, industrial and commercial chemicals and current use pesticides. Passive sampling devices (PSDs) and caged Mytilus were co-deployed to expand the list of CECs, and to assess the ability of PSDs to mimic bioaccumulation by Mytilus. A performance-based quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) approach was developed to ensure a high degree of data quality, consistency and comparability. Data management and analysis were streamlined and standardized using automated software tools. This pioneering study will help shape future monitoring efforts in California’s coastal ecosystems, while serving as a model for monitoring CECs within the region and across the nation.

  17. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering: Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (CEC) 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 joint Cryogenic Engineering and International Cryogenic Materials Conferences were held from June 28 through July 2 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa in Tucson, Arizona. As at past conferences, the international scope of these meetings was strongly maintained with 26 countries being represented by 561 attendees who gathered to enjoy the joint technical programs, industrial exhibits, special events, and natural beauty of the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The program for the joint conferences included a total of 363 presentations in the plenary, oral, and poster sessions. Four plenary talks gave in-depth discussions of the readiness of bulk superconductors for applications, the role of cryogenics in the development of the hydrogen bomb and vice versa, superconducting turboelectric aircraft propulsion and UPS's uses and plans for LNG fuel. Contributed papers covered a wide range of topics including large-scale and small-scale cryogenics, advances in superconductors and their applications. In total, 234 papers were submitted for publication of which 224 are published in these proceedings. The CEC/ICMC Cryo Industrial Expo displayed the products and services of 38 industrial exhibitors and provided a congenial venue for a reception and refreshments throughout the week as well as the conference poster sessions. Spectacular panoramic views of Saguaro National Park, the Sonoran Desert and the night time lights of Tucson set the stage for a memorable week in the American Southwest. Conference participants enjoyed scenic hikes and bike rides, exploring Old Town Tucson, hot and spicy southwestern cuisine, a nighttime lightning display and a hailstorm. Conference Chairs for 2015 were Peter Kittel, Consultant, for CEC and Michael Sumption from The Ohio State University, Materials Science Department for ICMC. Program Chairs were Jonathan Demko from the LeTourneau University for CEC and Timothy Haugan from AFRL/RQQM for ICMC, assisted by the CEC Program Vice Chair

  18. Analysis of FEL-based CeC amplification at high gain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.

    2015-05-03

    An analysis of Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) amplifier based on 1D Free Electron Laser (FEL) theory was previously performed with exact solution of the dispersion relation, assuming electrons having Lorentzian energy distribution. At high gain limit, the asymptotic behavior of the FEL amplifier can be better understood by Taylor expanding the exact solution of the dispersion relation with respect to the detuning parameter. In this work, we make quadratic expansion of the dispersion relation for Lorentzian energy distribution and investigate how longitudinal space charge and electrons’ energy spread affect the FEL amplification process.

  19. The assignment of the configuration for α-hydroxy acid esters using a CEC strategy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ruixue; Lin, Lili; Zhang, Yuheng; Wu, Wangbin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-06-21

    A simple and efficient (1)H NMR method for determining the absolute configuration of chiral α-hydroxy acid esters using a competing enantioselective conversion (CEC) strategy was developed. The α-hydroxy acid esters were acylated in the presence of Feng's chiral N,N'-dioxide-scandium(iii) complex, and the faster reaction was identified when one enantiomer of the chiral α-hydroxy acid ester was treated with both enantiomers of the ligand by NMR analysis of the reaction mixture without further purification. A mnemonic is presented to aid the assignment of the absolute configuration of the substrates. PMID:27189590

  20. A molecularly imprinted monolith for the fast chiral separation of antiparasitic drugs by pressurized CEC.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sulan; Wang, Xiaochun; Lin, Xucong; Wu, Xiaoping; Xie, Zenghong

    2010-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monoliths with (S)-ornidazole ((S)-ONZ) as the template molecule have been designed and prepared by the simple thermal polymerization of methacrylic acid, 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene dimethacrylate in the presence of a binary porogenic mixture of toluene and dodecanol. The influences of polymerization mixture composition on the chiral recognition of ONZ have been evaluated, and the imprint effect in the optimized MIP monolith has been clearly demonstrated. The new monolithic stationary phase with optimized porous property and good selectivity was used for the chiral separation of ONZ by pressurized CEC. The pressurized CEC conditions were also optimized to obtain the good chiral separation. The enantiomers were rapidly separated within 9 min on the MIP-based chiral stationary phase, whereas the chiral separation was not obtained on the nonimprinted polymer. Additionally, the proposed method has been successfully applied to the chiral separation of ONZ in tablet samples by injection of the crude sample. The cross-selectivity for similar antiparasitic drug was investigated. The results indicated that the chiral separation of secnidazole could also be obtained on the optimized MIP monolith within 14 min. PMID:20535749

  1. SEM: A Cultural Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bradley; Bourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The authors advance the concept that institutional culture is a purposeful framework by which to view SEM's utility, particularly as a cultural change agent. Through the connection of seemingly independent functions of performance and behavior, implications emerge that deepen the understanding of the influence of culture on performance outcomes…

  2. Update on the CeC PoP 704 MHz 5-cell cavity cryomodule design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Brutus, J. C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Grimm, T.; Huang, Y.; Jecks, R.; Kelly, M.; Litvinenko, V.; Pinayev, I.; Reid, T.; Skaritka, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Xu, W.; Yancey, J.; Gerbick, S.

    2015-05-03

    A 5-cell SRF cavity operating at 704 MHz will be used for the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle (CeC PoP) system under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The CeC PoP experiment will demonstrate the new technique of cooling proton and ion beams that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. The 704 MHz cavity will accelerate 2 MeV electrons from a 112 MHz SRF gun up to 22MeV. This paper provides an overview of the design, the project status and schedule of the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF for CeC PoP experiment.

  3. SEM metrology for advanced lithographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Rice, Bryan J.; Byers, Jeff; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-zvi, Maayan; Adan, Ofer; Swyers, John; Shneck, Roni Z.

    2007-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle for keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. The industry standard lithographic wavelength has evolved many times, from G-line to I-line, deep ultraviolet (DUV) based on KrF, and 193nm based on ArF. At each of these steps, new photoresist materials have been used. For the 45nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques are being considered, including immersion ArF lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability of printing 45nm node (and beyond) feature widths and pitches. This paper will show results of an evaluation of the critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM)-based metrology capabilities and limitations for the 193nm immersion and EUV lithography techniques that are suggested in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. In this study, we will print wafers with these emerging technologies and evaluate the performance of SEM-based metrology on these features. We will conclude with preliminary findings on the readiness of SEM metrology for these new challenges.

  4. CE-C(4)D method development and validation for the assay of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Paul, Prasanta; Van Laeken, Christophe; Sänger-van de Griend, Cari; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2016-09-10

    A capillary electrophoresis method with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4)D) has been developed, optimized and validated for the determination of ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is a member of the fluoroquinolone antibiotics with a broad spectrum bactericidal activity and recommended for complicated respiratory infections, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, bacterial diarrhea etc. Method development was conducted with major focus on the quality by design (QbD) approach. During method development, multiple buffers were tried at different ionic strength. However, the optimized method finally involved a very simple background electrolyte, monosodium citrate at a concentration of 10mM without pH adjustment. The optimized CE-C(4)D method involved an uncoated fused silica capillary (59/39cm, 50μm i.d.) and hydrodynamic sample injection at a pressure of 0.5 p.s.i. for 5s. The actual separation was conducted for 10min at normal polarity with a voltage of 20kV corresponding to 5.9μA current. LiCl (1mg/mL) was used as an internal standard. The optimized method is robust and accurate (recovery >98%) which rendered the ciprofloxacin peak within five minutes with good linearity (R(2)>0.999) in the concentration range of 0.0126-0.8mg/mL. The repeatability is expressed by percentage relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the relative peak areas (RPA) and it showed good repeatability both intra-day (<3%) and inter-day (3.1%). This method, proven to be free of matrix interference, showed that the estimated percent content of ciprofloxacin (102%) was within the official requirements. Moreover, due to its ease of use and robustness, the method should also be applicable in less well controlled laboratory environments. PMID:27386824

  5. Bioavailability and detoxification of cationics: II. Relationship between toxicity and CEC of cationic surfactants on Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematoda) in artificial and natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul C; Velthoven, Kirsten; Geurts, Marc; van Wijk, Dolf

    2009-04-01

    The toxicity of the dialkyl quat, didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), was used as a typical quaternary ammonium compound in studies investigating the role of sorption in reducing DDAB bioavailability in sediment and soil for natural and artificial substrates. Fatty acid derivatives are known to interact ionically with negative charged particles such as clays, humic and fulvic acids, dramatically reducing their bioavailability. Sorption potential was measured using cationic exchange capacities (CEC). The CEC of the substrates was correlated with toxicity of DDAB to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans considered to be representative of soil and sediment dwelling, free-living nematodes in terms of its sensitivity, size and feeding strategy. Decreased toxicity was found with increasing CEC for both laboratory and field substrates when tested under both soil and sediment conditions and QSARs developed. Testing under soil or sediment conditions had less impact on the toxicity than the CEC of the soil/sediment or whether the substrate was artificial or natural. Habitat preferences were observed during a test in which nematodes were placed into substrates with different CECs. The worms favoured mid-range CECs. Similar preference behaviour may be expected in the environment and a threshold CEC for likely presence of nematodes in a substrate is proposed. Coupled with the substrate toxicity QSAR, threshold CEC preference can be used to provide a no observed effect concentration for DDAB. Expressed as a molar fraction of the CEC, the QSAR obtained for DDAB may be extrapolable to other fatty amine derivatives. If supported by further experimentation and complemented with data from other sediment and soil dwellers the QSAR and threshold CEC value can be validated for use in future regulatory risk assessments of fatty amine derivatives. PMID:19286243

  6. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation Effects in Soil Water via Cations Adsorbed to High-CEC Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerter, E.; Finstad, K.; Schaefer, J.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Dawson, T. E.; Amundson, R.

    2012-12-01

    In isotope-based approaches to hydrology, soil and sediment are implicitly considered to be an inert matrix in which water resides or moves. Yet, this assumption is inconsistent with the fact that soils contain a wide range of solutes, and highly variable concentrations of chemically reactive clay particles, all of which may react with bulk water and create pools of energetically differing water with varying isotope compositions. The empirical basis of this hypothesis is the work of Sofer and Gat (1972, EPSL, 15(3)), who showed that the formation of hydration spheres around cations in aqueous solutions fractionate oxygen isotopes of water in ways that appear to be dependent on the cation's ionic potential and concentration. Because soil solutions commonly have high solid to fluid ratios, the potential for solids to create substantial pools of low free energy water, with corresponding isotope fractionation of the free and low energy waters, may be a common process. The potential for this to create measurable isotopic effects would be most evident in soils with high Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). In order to test this hypothesis, montmorillonite (CEC ≈ 100 meq/100g), kaolinite (CEC≈10) and quartz (CEC≈0) mineral powders were saturated with 3M MgCl2 and KCl solutions (separately), rinsed with methanol and dried to saturate all available CEC sites with either Mg or K cations. Triplicate sets of monominerallic-deionized water mixtures were created at 5, 25, 50, 75 and 95% gravimetric water content. Each set of samples was then subjected to one of three water extraction techniques designed to access specific "pools" of soil water: (1) direct equilibration with CO2 to sample the soil's "free water", i.e. water not adsorbed to cations via hydration spheres; (2) centrifugation to simulate permanent wilting point conditions, thereby yielding most micro-pore, macro-pore, and free water; and (3) cryogenic vacuum distillation to recover all the soil water (free, pore and

  7. Physical approach of seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua

    2010-05-01

    Numerous seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) have been reported independently and even been applied to short-term prediction of earthquakes, still SEMS are on great debates. The main concerns include the physical generation mechanism of SEMS. Thus, the study on physics of SEMS is important for understanding SEMS phenomena and strengthening the applications of SEMS. As a potential physical approach, we present an integrated working scheme, which take into account the interaction among observation, methodology and physical model. The main approach includes the following key problems: how to perform a reliable and appropriate observation; how to reveal weak SEMS signals from noisy background; how to develop physical models based on theoretical analyses and/or laboratory experiments for SEMS. This study is supported by the National R&D Special Fund for Public Welfare Industry (200808069) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (40974038, 40774028, 40821062).

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A SCALABLE, LOW-COST, ULTRANANOCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF CONTAMINANTS OF EMERGING CONCERN (CECS) - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project will develop and ready for commercialization a scalable, low-cost process for purification of water containing Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) using anodic oxidation with boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diam...

  9. Novel use of magnetic biochars for the remediation of soils contaminated by contaminants of emerging concerns (CECs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Badruddeen; Mrozik, Wojciech; Werner, David

    2016-04-01

    The advantage of using magnetic biochar over nonmagnetic biochar in amendments of contaminated soils is in the fact that the former can be easily removed from the soil matrix whenever the need arises, using simple principles of magnetism. In this study, magnetic biochar was produced using a simple co-precipitation technique. The resulting composite has about 33% (w/w) magnetic iron oxides, the presence of which resulted in modification of the biochar's surface characteristics such as BET surface area, porosity and point of zero charge. Modifications in these properties will most likely alter the CEC sorption properties of the biochar, hence the necessity for the proper evaluation of the possible trade off that exist between the need for magnetisation and altered sorption characteristics of the biochar. To achieve this, bottle point sorption experiments in aqueous solutions were conducted using activated and non-activated biochars in magnetic and nonmagnetic forms as sorbents and two pharmaceuticals -ibuprofen and diclofenac- as representative CECs. Sorption isotherms were evaluated and the data was fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Dubinin-Ashtakov and Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes isotherm models. Removal efficiencies and sorption capacities correlated well with the effective mass of pristine biochar used, therefore the sorption characteristics of both magnetic and nonmagnetic biochars are not detrimentally affected by the magnetite impregnation. Biochars in activated form show superior sorption capacities due to amplified surface area and better developed pores. Also, non-activated biochars needed to be used in higher amounts to achieve considerable level of CEC removal, thus they are more easily exhausted. Sorption was observed to decrease with a corresponding increase in solution pH. This suggests that sorption is favoured within the acidic pH range when the surfaces of the sorbents have net positive charge and the sorbates are in their neutral forms.

  10. Fast determination of prominent carotenoids in tomato fruits by CEC using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Adalid, Ana Maria; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel; Roselló, Salvador; Maquieira, Angel; Nuez, Fernando

    2007-11-01

    In this study, the major carotenoids (beta-carotene and lycopene) present in tomato fruits were analyzed by CEC with a methacrylate ester-based monolithic column. The effects of the porogenic solvent ratio, and the hydrophobicity of bulk monomer employed were examined on carotenoids separations. A fast separation of these analytes was achieved in less than 5.0 min in a mobile phase containing 35% THF, 30% ACN, 30% methanol, and 5% of a 5 mM Tris aqueous buffer, pH 8, with lauryl methacrylate-based monoliths. The CEC method was evaluated in terms of detection limit and reproducibility (retention time, area, and column preparation) with values below 1.6 microg/mL and 7.2%, respectively. The proposed procedure was successfully applied to the determination of both carotenoids in fruits of several tomato-related species and its usefulness to analyze large series of samples for nutritional quality screening trials in tomato breeding programs is demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first work that exploits the powerful and user-friendly monolithic technology for quality breeding and germplasm evaluation program purposes. PMID:17960534

  11. Determination of suxamethonium in a pharmaceutical formulation by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4)D).

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Susanne; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine; Rudaz, Serge; Bonnabry, Pascal; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2009-02-20

    A simple method based on capillary electrophoresis with a capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (CE-C(4)D) was developed for the determination of suxamethonium (SUX) in a pharmaceutical formulation. A hydro-organic mixture, consisting of 100mM Tris-acetate buffer at pH 4.2 and acetonitrile (90:10, v/v), was selected as background electrolyte (BGE). The applied voltage was 30kV, and the sample injection was performed in the hydrodynamic mode. All analyses were carried out in a fused silica capillary with an internal diameter of 50 microm and a total length of 64.5cm. Under these conditions, a complete separation between SUX, sodium ions and the main degradation products (choline) was achieved in less than 4min. The presence of acetonitrile in the BGE allowed a reduction of SUX adsorption on the capillary wall. The CE-C(4)D method was validated, and trueness values between 98.8% and 101.1% were obtained with repeatability and intermediate precision values of 0.7-1.3% and 1.2-1.6%, respectively. Therefore, this method was found appropriate for controlling pharmaceutical formulations containing suxamethonium and degradation products. PMID:19121913

  12. Neutral polar methacrylate-based monoliths for normal phase nano-LC and CEC of polar species including N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hengwen; El Rassi, Ziad

    2009-01-01

    Neutral diol methacrylate-based monoliths were developed for normal phase chromatography (NPC) and NP-CEC of polar compounds including N-glycans. Four different diol methacrylate-based monoliths were synthesized via the copolymerization of a functional monomer using either glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) or glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and a crosslinker either ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) or trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM). While the GMM-based monoliths yield in one reaction step polar diol methacrylate monoliths that are ready for use in NPC or NP-CEC, the GMA-based monoliths required a postmodification with hot sulfuric acid to convert the epoxy functions into diols before use in NPC or NP-CEC. All the four monoliths are neutral and void of fixed charges on their surfaces but yet exhibited relatively strong EOF in NP-CEC. The EOF is attributed to the adsorption of ions from the mobile phase thus forming the electric double layer necessary for producing a bulk mobile phase flow. Under the same in situ copolymerization conditions of GMM or GMA with either EDMA or TRIM, the GMM-EDMA monolith was the best choice in terms of retention, separation efficiency, EOF velocity in CEC and linear flow velocity in Nano-LC. PMID:19058161

  13. SEM probe of IC radiation sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) used to irradiate single integrated circuit (IC) subcomponent to test for radiation sensitivity can localize area of IC less than .03 by .03 mm for determination of exact location of radiation sensitive section.

  14. Sorption of organic cations to phyllosilicate clay minerals: CEC-normalization, salt dependency, and the role of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    Sorption to the phyllosilicate clay minerals Illite, kaolinite, and bentonite has been studied for a wide variety of organic cations using a flow-through method with fully aqueous medium as the eluent. Linear isotherms were observed at concentrations below 10% of the cation-exchange capacity (CEC) for Illite and kaolinite and below 1 mmol/kg (<1% CEC) for bentonite. Sorption to clays was strongly influenced by the electrolyte composition of the eluent but with a consistent trend for a diverse set of compounds on all clays, thus allowing for empirical correction factors. When sorption affinities for a given compound to a given clay are normalized to the CEC of the clay, the differences in sorption affinities between clays are reduced to less than 0.5 log units for most compounds. Although CEC-normalized sorption of quaternary ammonium compounds to clay was up to 10-fold higher than CEC-normalized sorption to soil organic matter, CEC-normalized sorption for most compounds was comparable between clays and soil organic matter. The clay fraction is thus a potentially relevant sorption phase for organic cations in many soils. The sorption data for organic cations to clay showed several regular trends with molecular structure but also showed quite a few systematic effects that we cannot explain. A model on the basis of the molecular size and charge density at the ionized nitrogen is used here as a tool to obtain benchmark values that elucidate the effect of specific polar moieties on the sorption affinity. PMID:24266737

  15. Scientific disputes that spill over into Research Ethics: interview with Maria Cecília de Souza Minayo.

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2015-09-01

    This is an interview with Maria Cecília de Souza Minayo, by university lecturers Iara Coelho Zito Guerriero and Maria Lúcia Magalhães Bosi. It reflects the heat of the current debates surrounding implementation of a specific protocol for evaluation of research in the Human and Social Sciences (HSS), vis-à-vis the current rules set by the National Health Council, which have a clearly biomedical bias. The interview covers the difficulties of introducing appropriate and fair rules for judgment of HSS projects, in the face of a hegemonic understanding of the very concept of science by biologists and medical doctors, who tend not to recognize other approaches unless those approaches adopt their frames of reference. In this case, the National Health Council becomes the arena of this polemic, leading researchers in the human and social sciences to ask themselves whether the health sector has the competency to create rules for other areas of knowledge. PMID:26331502

  16. Maria Cecília Puntel de Almeida: builder of bridges between Nursing and Public Health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Scochi, Maria José; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Peduzzi, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Professor Maria Cecília Puntel de Almeida (1944-2009) built a professional and academic career of which the main feature was her attempt to create and strengthen the interface between Nursing and Public Health in Brazil. From the beginning of her career she recognized this connection and understood the complexity of health problems and peoples' needs when seeking care. Her commitment took the form of both scientific output and also her contributions to the various fields in which she worked. As well as her contribution to the concept of the work process of nursing, she contributed to thinking on health practices and multi-professional training in the construction of a differentiated body of knowledge, which she approached from the perspective of the struggle for democracy in health and understanding of this as a right of citizenship. PMID:26691812

  17. Oxford CyberSEM: remote microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Kirkland, A.; Cockayne, D.; Meyer, R.

    2008-08-01

    The Internet has enabled researchers to communicate over vast geographical distances, sharing ideas and documents. e-Science, underpinned by Grid [1] and Web Services, has enabled electronic communications to the next level where, in addition to document sharing, researchers can increasingly control high precision scientific instruments over the network. The Oxford CyberSEM project developed a simple Java applet via which samples placed in a JEOL 5510LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) can be manipulated and examined collaboratively over the Internet. Designed with schoolchildren in mind, CyberSEM does not require any additional hardware or software other than a generic Java-enabled web browser. This paper reflects on both the technical and social challenges in designing real-time systems for controlling scientific equipments in collaborative environments. Furthermore, it proposes potential deployment beyond the classroom setting.

  18. Safety in the SEM laboratory--1981 update

    SciTech Connect

    Bance, G.N.; Barber, V.C.; Sholdice, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The article reviews recent information on hazards as they relate to safety in SEM laboratories. The first section lists the safety equipment that should be available in a SEM laboratory. Flammable and combustible liquids are discussed, and particular warnings are given concerning the fire and explosion risks associated with diethyl ether and diisopropyl ether. The possible hazards associated with electrical equipment, and the risk of X-ray emissions from EM's are briefly outlined. The hazards associated with acute and chronic toxicity of chemicals used in the EM laboratory are discussed. The need to reduce exposure to a growing list of recognizable hazardous chemicals is emphasized. This reduction can be accomplished by more extensive use of functioning fume hoods, and the use of more appropriate and effective protective gloves. Allergies and the hazards of dangerous pathogens in the SEM laboratory are discussed. The explosion and other hazards associated with cryogens, vacuum evaporators, critical point dryers, and compressed gas cylinders are emphasized.

  19. A Multi-Agency Effort for Assessing the Occurrence and Biological Impacts of CECs in Support of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the detection of a variety of contaminants for which little is known regarding their potential impact(s) on Great Lakes ecosystems. These contaminants of emerging concern, or CECs, include an assortment of industrial (e.g....

  20. X-ray nanotomography in a SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    We have developed an x-ray computer tomography (CT) add-on to perform X-ray micro- and nanotomography in any scanning electron microscope (SEM). The electron beam inside the SEM is focused on a metal target to generate x-rays. Part of the X-rays pass through the object that is installed on a rotation stage. Shadow X-ray images are collected by a CCD camera with direct photon detection mounted on the external wall of the SEM specimen chamber. An extensive description on the working principles of this micro/nano-CT add-on together with some examples of CT-scans will be given in this paper. The resolution that can be obtained with this set-up and the influence of the shape of the electron beam are discussed. Furthermore, possible improvements on this SEM-CT set-up will be discussed: replacing the backilluminated CCD with a fully depleted CCD with improved quantum efficiency (QE) for higher energies, reduces the exposure time by 6 when using metal targets with x-ray characteristic lines around 10 keV.

  1. Automated CD-SEM recipe creation: a new paradigm in CD-SEM utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Lipscomb, William; Allgair, John; Yang, Kyoungmo; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Page, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex

    2006-03-01

    As the trends in integrated circuit fabrication follow Moore's Law to smaller feature sizes, one trend seen in lithographic technology is the continually increasing use of optical enhancements such as Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). Small size perturbations are designed into the nominal feature shapes on the reticle such that the intended shape is printed. Verifying the success of OPC is critical to ramp-up and production of new process technologies. CD-SEMs are imaging tools which are capable of measuring feature sizes in any part of a chip, either in a test structure or within a circuit. A new trend in CD-SEM utilization is the implementation of automated recipe generation of complex CD-SEM recipes. The DesignGauge system uses design-to-SEM recipe creation and data collection. Once the recipe creation flow is implemented, the task of recipe creation can be accomplished within minutes. These applications enable a CD-SEM to be utilized to collect data for very complex OPC CD-SEM recipe runs which measure many different unique linewidths, spaces, and pattern placements within a circuit to check OPC success and lithographic fidelity. The data collection can provide accurate data results that can be utilized for comparing achieved feature measurements to nominal values from the design layout. This new application adds much value to the CD-SEM compared to other technologies such as OCD, as it completes the evaluation of in-circuit behavior to test structures in a scribe lane, something OCD currently cannot do. The present work evaluates the capabilities of DesignGauge, which is available for the latest-generation Hitachi S-9380II CD-SEMs. The evaluation includes rigorous tests of navigation, pattern recognition success rates, SEM image placement, throughput of recipe creation and recipe execution.

  2. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R.; Amoroso, M.

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  3. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  4. Viewing Integrated-Circuit Interconnections By SEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Russel A.; Gauldin, Robert E.; Ruiz, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    Back-scattering of energetic electrons reveals hidden metal layers. Experiment shows that with suitable operating adjustments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to look for defects in aluminum interconnections in integrated circuits. Enables monitoring, in situ, of changes in defects caused by changes in temperature. Gives truer picture of defects, as etching can change stress field of metal-and-passivation pattern, causing changes in defects.

  5. Curvelet Based Offline Analysis of SEM Images

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Syed Hamad; Haq, Nuhman ul; Hayat, Khizar; Naz, Saeeda; Haque, Ihsan ul

    2014-01-01

    Manual offline analysis, of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image, is a time consuming process and requires continuous human intervention and efforts. This paper presents an image processing based method for automated offline analyses of SEM images. To this end, our strategy relies on a two-stage process, viz. texture analysis and quantification. The method involves a preprocessing step, aimed at the noise removal, in order to avoid false edges. For texture analysis, the proposed method employs a state of the art Curvelet transform followed by segmentation through a combination of entropy filtering, thresholding and mathematical morphology (MM). The quantification is carried out by the application of a box-counting algorithm, for fractal dimension (FD) calculations, with the ultimate goal of measuring the parameters, like surface area and perimeter. The perimeter is estimated indirectly by counting the boundary boxes of the filled shapes. The proposed method, when applied to a representative set of SEM images, not only showed better results in image segmentation but also exhibited a good accuracy in the calculation of surface area and perimeter. The proposed method outperforms the well-known Watershed segmentation algorithm. PMID:25089617

  6. Multi-signal FIB/SEM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2012-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the same platform enables 3D microstructural analysis of structures using FIB for serial sectioning and SEM for imaging. Since FIB milling is a destructive technique, the acquisition of multiple signals from each slice is desirable. The feasibility of collecting both an inlens backscattered electron (BSE) signal and an inlens secondary electron (SE) simultaneously from a single scan of the electron beam from each FIB slice is demonstrated. The simultaneous acquisition of two different SE signals from two different detectors (inlens vs. Everhart-Thornley (ET) detector) is also possible. Obtaining multiple signals from each FIB slice with one scan increases the acquisition throughput. In addition, optimization of microstructural and morphological information from the target is achieved using multi-signals. Examples of multi-signal FIB/SEM tomography from a dental implant will be provided where both material contrast from the bone/ceramic coating/Ti substrate phases and porosity in the ceramic coating will be characterized.

  7. Preparation and characterization of a molecularly imprinted monolithic column for pressure-assisted CEC separation of nitroimidazole drugs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sulan; Wang, Xiaochun; Lin, Xucong; Xie, Zenghong

    2010-08-01

    A polymethacrylate-based molecularly imprinted monolithic column bearing mixed functional monomers, using non-covalent imprinting approach, was designed for the rapid separation of nitroimidazole compounds. The new monolithic column has been prepared via simple in situ polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate, using (S)-ornidazole ((S)-ONZ) as template in a binary porogenic mixture consisting of toluene and dodecanol. The composition of the polymerization mixture was systematically altered and optimized by altering the amount of monomers as well as the composition of the porogenic solvent. The column performance was evaluated in pressure-assisted CEC mode. Separation conditions such as pH, voltage, amount of organic modifier and salt concentration were studied. The optimized monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of a group of structurally related nitroimidazole drugs within 10 min in isocratic elution condition. Column efficiencies of 99 000, 80 000, 103 000, 60 000 and 99 000 plates/m were obtained for metronidazole, secnidazole, ronidazole, tinidazole and dimetridazole, respectively. Parallel experiments were carried out using molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted capillary columns. The separation might be the result of combined effects including hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and the imprinting cavities on the (S)-ONZ-imprinted monolithic column. PMID:20661943

  8. Pressurized CEC with amperometric detection using mixed-mode monolithic column for rapid analysis of chlorophenols and phenol.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lanxiang; Chen, Yankai; Yu, Xiaowei; Wu, Xiangzong; Tang, Fengxiang; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-07-01

    A simple analysis of chlorophenols (2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol) and phenol was accomplished by coupling a pressurized CEC with amperometric detection (AD). Efficient and reproducible separation of these compounds was achieved within 9 min on a capillary monolithic stationary phase bonded with octadecyl ligands and sulfonate groups, where the selectivity and the retention of analytes can be functionally controlled by optimizing experimental variables, including organic modifier content, mobile phase pH, ionic strength, working electrode potential, separation voltage, and supplementary pressure. A mixed-mode retention mechanism consisting of reverse-phase chromatographic partition, electrostatic repulsion, and electrophoresis is considered to play roles in the separation. The use of ACN-based media seems effectual in preventing the unfavorable irreversible adsorption on both wall and electrode, and offer higher sensitivity and less electrode fouling in AD of phenols. The LODs were in the range from 0.02 to 0.2 μg/mL with a wide linear dynamic range of 5000-fold, while the peak area precision ranged from 3.2 to 7.5%. The feasibility of using this method in real analysis was evaluated by recovery estimates and comparative experiment on spiked tap water samples. Good recoveries of 80-110% were achieved. Additionally, a paired t-test was used to correlate the two methods. PMID:23670637

  9. Tools to measure CD-SEM performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Jalhadi, Kiran; Deo, Sachin; Lee, Soo-Young; Joy, David

    2006-03-01

    It is important to be able to quantify the imaging performance of CD-SEMs for such purposes as verifying the specification, rechecking after a routine maintenance, or for tool matching. To perform tests such as these it is necessary to have both appropriate software for image analysis and suitable test samples. A package of 2-D Fourier transform and analysis software, designed as a plug-in for the shareware IMAGE-Java program, has been developed and is freely available on line. The requirement for a reproducible and well characterized sample has been met by using direct-write electron beam lithography to fabricate suitable Fresnel zone plate structures.

  10. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntosh, P.; Moss, A.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Wheelhouse, A.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xin, T.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  11. An occupational hygiene investigation of exposure to acrylamide and the role for urinary S-carboxyethyl-cysteine (CEC) as a biological marker.

    PubMed

    Bull, Peter J; Brooke, Richard K; Cocker, John; Jones, Katharine; Warren, Nicholas

    2005-11-01

    Acrylamide has a range of toxicological hazards including neurotoxicity and reproductive toxicity; however, occupational risk management is driven by its genotoxic and carcinogenic potential (it is classified within the EU as a Category 2 carcinogen, R45 and Category 2 mutagen, R46). Since there is the potential for skin absorption and systemic toxicity, biological monitoring may be a useful aid for the assessment of exposure via inhalation, ingestion and dermal absorption. However, there are currently no biological monitoring guidance values (BMGVs). This study describes an extensive survey of potential workplace exposure to acrylamide at the Ciba (Bradford) site to gather data suitable for a BMGV. This manufacturing site is typical within the industry as a whole and includes a cross section of activities and tasks representative of acrylamide exposure. Acrylamide is used in the manufacture of polyacrylamide based products for applications in water treatment; oil and mineral extraction; paper, paint and textile processes. Workers (62 plus 6 controls) with varying potential exposures provided a total of 275 pre shift and 247 post-shift urine samples along with 260 personal air samples. A small non-exposed control group was similarly monitored. Urine samples were analysed for S-carboxyethyl-cysteine (CEC). Airborne, surface and glove samples were analysed for acrylamide. Inhalation exposures were well controlled with values consistently below one-tenth of the UK Workplace Exposure Limit. Engineering controls, personal protective equipment and work practice, all contributed to good control of occupational exposure. CEC was found in urine samples from both exposed workers and non-occupationally exposed controls. At the low levels of exposure found, smoking made a significant contribution to urinary CEC levels. Nevertheless a correlation between urinary CEC and airborne acrylamide was found. A mixed effects model incorporating inhalation concentrations of acrylamide

  12. Solar variability observed with GMS/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu

    1987-06-01

    Daily averaged data on energetic protons, alpha particles, and electrons obtained between 1978-1986 with different channels of SEM aboard the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 'Himawari' are presented and discussed. Most solar particle events (SPEs), observed in the P2-P6 and A1-A5 channels, show a gradual rise and a further gradual decay of the particle fluxes, although some SREs displayed a sharp rise and a gradual decay. SPEs, which occurred frequently in the 1978-1979 and 1981-1982 periods, were less frequent after 1983; however, there occurred several large and energetic SREs between 1983 and 1986. Therefore, the long-term trend in the high-energy particle ejection from the sun is quite different from that in the sunspot number. The fluxes from the EL and P1 channel response, largely due to energetic particles trapped in the earth's magnetic field, show substorm-induced variations, the characteristics of which depend highly on local time.

  13. SEMS: System for Environmental Monitoring and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to establish a computational and data management system, SEMS, building on our existing system and MTPE-related research. We proposed that the new system would help support Washington University's efforts in environmental sustainability through use in: (a) Problem-based environmental curriculum for freshmen and sophomores funded by the Hewlett Foundation that integrates scientific, cultural, and policy perspectives to understand the dynamics of wetland degradation, deforestation, and desertification and that will develop policies for sustainable environments and economies; (b) Higher-level undergraduate and graduate courses focused on monitoring the environment and developing policies that will lead to sustainable environmental and economic conditions; and (c) Interdisciplinary research focused on the dynamics of the Missouri River system and development of policies that lead to sustainable environmental and economic floodplain conditions.

  14. Sem analysis zirconia-ceramic adhesion interface

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.; VERTUCCI, V.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Modern dentistry increasingly tends to use materials aesthetically acceptable and biomimetic. Among these are zirconia and ceramics for several years, a combination that now has becoming synonym of aesthetic; however, what could be the real link between these two materials and especially its nature, remains a controversial topic debated in the literature. The aim of our study was to “underline” the type of bonding that could exist between these materials. Materials and methods To investigate the nature of this bond we used a SEM microscopy (Zeiss SUPRA 25). Different bilaminar specimens: “white” zirconia Zircodent® and ceramic “Noritake®”, after being tested with loading test in bending (three-point-bending) and FEM analysis, were analyzed by SEM. Fragments’ analysis in closeness of the fracture’s point has allowed us to be able to “see” if at large magnifications between these two materials, and without the use of linear, could exist a lasting bond and the possible type of failure that could incur. Results From our analysis of the specimens’ fragments analyzed after test Equipment, it is difficult to highlight a clear margin and no-adhesion zones between the two materials, although the analysis involving fragments adjacent to the fracture that has taken place at the time of Mechanical test Equipment. Conclusions According to our analysis and with all the clarification of the case, we can assume that you can obtain a long and lasting bond between the zirconia and ceramics. Agree to the data present in the literature, we can say that the type of bond varies according to the type of specimens and of course also the type of failure. In samples where the superstructure envelops the ceramic framework Zirconium we are in the presence of a cohesive failure, otherwise in a presence of adhesive failure. PMID:27555905

  15. Nondestructive SEM for surface and subsurface wafer imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, Roy H.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Davies, Brian G.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Johnson, Darryl G.; Oxford, William V.; Smith, Craig A.

    1987-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is considered as a tool for both failure analysis as well as device characterization. A survey is made of various operational SEM modes and their applicability to image processing methods on semiconductor devices.

  16. Modelling CEC variations versus structural iron reduction levels in dioctahedral smectites. Existing approaches, new data and model refinements.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Jebril; Tournassat, Christophe; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Greneche, Jean Marc; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    tetrahedral bearing nontronites (SWa-1, GAN and NAu-1) all exhibit the same behaviour at low reduction levels. Consequently, we restricted our model to the case of moderate reduction (<30%) in low tetrahedral Fe-bearing nontronites. Our adapted model provides the relative amounts of Na(+) (p) and H(+) (ni) cations incorporated in the structure as a function of the amount of Fe reduction. Two equations enable the investigated systems to be described: p=m/(1+Kr·ω·mrel) and ni=Kr·ω·m·mrel/(1+Kr·ω·mrel); where m is the Fe(II) content, mrel, the reduction level (m/mtot), ω, the cation exchange capacity (CEC, and Kr, an empirical constant specific to the system. PMID:23810545

  17. On the Nature of SEM Estimates of ARMA Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Dolan, Conor V.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Reexamined the nature of structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, replicated the simulation experiments of P. Molenaar, and examined the behavior of the log-likelihood ratio test. Simulation studies indicate that estimates of ARMA parameters observed with SEM software are identical to those…

  18. Structural Equations and Causal Explanations: Some Challenges for Causal SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    One common application of structural equation modeling (SEM) involves expressing and empirically investigating causal explanations. Nonetheless, several aspects of causal explanation that have an impact on behavioral science methodology remain poorly understood. It remains unclear whether applications of SEM should attempt to provide complete…

  19. Description and calibration beamline SEM/Ion Chamber Current Digitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoo, D.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the following on beamline SEM/ion chamber current digitizers: Module description; testing and calibration; common setup procedures; summary of fault indications and associated causes; summary of input and output connections; SEM conversion constant table; ion chamber conversion constant table; hexadecimal to decimal conversion table; and schematic diagram.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  1. Comparison of CZE, open-tubular CEC and non-aqueous CE coupled to electrospray MS for impurity profiling of drugs.

    PubMed

    Vassort, Aurélie; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Ferguson, Paul D; Szücs, Roman; Barrett, David A

    2008-09-01

    Open-tubular CEC and non-aqueous CE (NACE) methods were developed for the analysis of six pharmaceutical compounds and their respective process-related impurities, comprising 22 analytes in total with a range of functional groups and lipophilicities. These methods were assessed for orthogonality of analyte separation with respect to existing CZE-ESI-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS methods, in order to complement a generic analytical strategy for impurity profiling of pharmaceutical compounds. Open-tubular CEC, using etched and chemically modified capillaries, induced weak reversed-phase-type interactions between some of the analytes and the bonded phases (0.811

  2. High sensitivity tracking of CD-SEM performance: QSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, S.; Huang, Jaffee; Yushmanov, P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of CD-SEMs directly affects the measured values of critical dimensions (CDs) at the time of their measurement. Tracking the performance of CD-SEMs is necessary to establish trust in their results and provide guidance for preventive maintenance and tune-ups. When the measured CDs are out of specification in manufacturing, it is crucial to determine whether this is due to process variation or the metrology tool itself. Multiple methods that use linewidth measurements have been employed thus far; however, they suffer from linewidth variations on the wafer, as well as from variations of line edge and linewidth roughness. Here, we report a method that is capable of providing a quantitative extraction of the SEM performance based on advanced algorithms. The method is independent of linewidth, line edge roughness and linewidth roughness, and has high sensitivity. This software, QSEM, was developed to automatically evaluate image quality and assign a value to that quality. The image quality value is based on multiple factors such as noise, sharpness, analysis of histograms, and contrast. The sensitivity of the software was evaluated; a good correlation between image quality results and linewidth variation due to SEM performance was established. Using QSEM to analyze SEM images allows the performance of CDSEMs to be tracked for proper calibration and preventive maintenance, as well as to resolve the dispute between failure in the process or the metrology.

  3. 3DSEM++: Adaptive and intelligent 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Holz, Jessica D; Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Owen, Heather A; He, Max M; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis of microscopic objects is a longstanding topic in several scientific disciplines, such as biological, mechanical, and materials sciences. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as a promising imaging equipment has been around for decades to determine the surface properties (e.g., compositions or geometries) of specimens by achieving increased magnification, contrast, and resolution greater than one nanometer. Whereas SEM micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D), many research and educational questions truly require knowledge and facts about their three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D surface reconstruction from SEM images leads to remarkable understanding of microscopic surfaces, allowing informative and qualitative visualization of the samples being investigated. In this contribution, we integrate several computational technologies including machine learning, contrario methodology, and epipolar geometry to design and develop a novel and efficient method called 3DSEM++ for multi-view 3D SEM surface reconstruction in an adaptive and intelligent fashion. The experiments which have been performed on real and synthetic data assert the approach is able to reach a significant precision to both SEM extrinsic calibration and its 3D surface modeling. PMID:27200484

  4. SemVisM: semantic visualizer for medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landaeta, Luis; La Cruz, Alexandra; Baranya, Alexander; Vidal, María.-Esther

    2015-01-01

    SemVisM is a toolbox that combines medical informatics and computer graphics tools for reducing the semantic gap between low-level features and high-level semantic concepts/terms in the images. This paper presents a novel strategy for visualizing medical data annotated semantically, combining rendering techniques, and segmentation algorithms. SemVisM comprises two main components: i) AMORE (A Modest vOlume REgister) to handle input data (RAW, DAT or DICOM) and to initially annotate the images using terms defined on medical ontologies (e.g., MesH, FMA or RadLex), and ii) VOLPROB (VOlume PRObability Builder) for generating the annotated volumetric data containing the classified voxels that belong to a particular tissue. SemVisM is built on top of the semantic visualizer ANISE.1

  5. Cryo-SEM of hydrated high temperature proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R; Benicewicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Alternative energy technologies, such as high temperature fuel cells and hydrogen pumps, rely on proton exchange membranes (PEM). A chemically and thermally stable PEM with rapid proton transport is sol-gel phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes. It is believed that the key to the high ionic conductivity of PA-doped PBI membranes is related to the gel morphology. However, the gel structure and general morphology of this PA-doped PBI membrane has not been widely investigated. In an effort to understand the gel morphology, two SEM sample preparation methodologies have been developed for PA-doped PBI membranes. Due to the high vacuum environment of conventional SEM, the beam-sensitivity of these membranes was reduced with a mild 120 C heat treatment to remove excess water without structural rearrangement (as verified from wide angle X-ray scattering). Cryo-SEM has also been implemented for both initial and heated membranes. Cryo-SEM is known to prevent dehydration of the specimen and reduce beam-sensitivity. The SEM cross-section image (Fig. 1A) of the heated samples exhibit 3{micro}m spheroidal features that are elongated in the direction of the casting blade. These features are distorted to 2{micro}m under conventional SEM conditions (Fig. 1B). The fine-scale gel morphology image (Fig. 2) is composed of 65nm diameter domains and 30nm walls, which resembles a cellular structure. In the future, the PA-doped PBI membranes will be cryo-microtomed and cryotransferred for elemental analysis in a TEM.

  6. Major trends in extending CD-SEM utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Yang, Kyoungmo; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Danilevsky, Alex; Parker, Cindy; Page, Lorena

    2007-03-01

    Requirements for increasingly integrated metrology solutions continue to drive applications that incorporate process characterization tools, as well as the ability to improve metrology production capability and cycle time, with a single application. All of the most critical device layers today, along with even non-critical layers, now require optical proximity correction (OPC), which must be rigorously modeled and calibrated as part of process development and extensively verified once new product reticles are released using critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM) tools. Automatic setup of complex recipes is one of the major trends in CD-SEM applications, which is adding much value to CD-SEM metrology. In addition, as integrated circuit dimensions continue to shrink, local line width variation influences the statistical confidence of a measured CD's representation of the process. A feature, called "Average CD (ACD)," measures multiple targets within the field of view (FOV). ACD allows not only measurements of a single data point representing one discrete feature, but also sampling of the mean and variance of the process. These two applications, automatic recipe creation and ACD, are combined in the second version of the DesignGauge software, which is available for the latest-generation Hitachi S-9380II CD-SEMs. DesignGauge V2 is not only capable of offline recipe creation and CD-SEM control, but it also has the ability to directly transfer design-based recipes into standard CD-SEM recipes. These recipes can be used for OPC model-building and verification as with previous DesignGauge applications. The software also provides design template-based recipe setup for production layer recipes, which yields much needed improvement to production tool utilization, as production recipes can thus be written offline for new products, improving first silicon cycle time, reducing engineering time required to generate recipes, and improving CD-SEM utilization

  7. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  8. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  9. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved. PMID:12762523

  10. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-01

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  11. Development and validation of a capillary electrophoresis method with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) for the analysis of amikacin and its related substances.

    PubMed

    El-Attug, Mohamed Nouri; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2012-09-01

    Amikacin is a semisynthetic aminoglycoside antibiotic derived from kanamycin A that lacks a strong UV absorbing chromophore or fluorophore. Due to the physicochemical properties of amikacin and its related substances, CE in combination with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) was chosen. The optimized separation method uses a BGE composed of 20 mM MES adjusted to pH 6.6 by l-histidine and 0.3 mM CTAB that was added as flow modifier in a concentration below the CMC. Ammonium acetate 20 mg.L(-1) was used as internal standard. 30 kV was applied in reverse polarity on a fused silica capillary (73/48 cm; 75 μm id). The optimized separation was obtained in less than 6 min with good linearity (R(2) = 0.9996) for amikacin base. It shows a good precision expressed as RSD on relative peak areas equal to 0.1 and 0.7% for intraday and interday, respectively. The LOD and LOQ are 0.5 mg.L(-1) and 1.7 mg.L(-1) , respectively. PMID:22965725

  12. Do SE(II) electrons really degrade SEM image quality?

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gary H; Carter, Andrew D; Joy, David C

    2013-01-01

    Generally, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, it is desirable that a high-resolution image be composed mainly of those secondary electrons (SEs) generated by the primary electron beam, denoted SE(I) . However, in conventional SEM imaging, other, often unwanted, signal components consisting of backscattered electrons (BSEs), and their associated SEs, denoted SE(II) , are present; these signal components contribute a random background signal that degrades contrast, and therefore signal-to-noise ratio and resolution. Ideally, the highest resolution SEM image would consist only of the SE(I) component. In SEMs that use conventional pinhole lenses and their associated Everhart-Thornley detectors, the image is composed of several components, including SE(I) , SE(II) , and some BSE, depending on the geometry of the detector. Modern snorkel lens systems eliminate the BSEs, but not the SE(II) s. We present a microfabricated diaphragm for minimizing the unwanted SE(II) signal components. We present evidence of improved imaging using a microlithographically generated pattern of Au, about 500 nm thick, that blocks most of the undesired signal components, leaving an image composed mostly of SE(I) s. We refer to this structure as a "spatial backscatter diaphragm." PMID:22589040

  13. Some Reflections on SEM Structures and Strategies. Part One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a pre-conference paper prepared for participants at AACRAO's Fifteenth Annual Strategic Enrollment Management Conference (SEM XV), held November 13-16, 2005, in Chicago, Illinois. This is the first of a three-part series. In this series of papers, David Kalsbeek introduces a four-fold construct for differentiating and comparing…

  14. CD SEM metrology macro CD technology: beyond the average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin D.; Michelson, Di K.; Allgair, John A.; Tam, Aviram; Chase-Colin, David; Dajczman, Asaf; Adan, Ofer; Har-Zvi, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Downscaling of semiconductor fabrication technology requires an ever-tighter control of the production process. CD-SEM, being the major image-based critical dimension metrology tool, is constantly being improved in order to fulfill these requirements. One of the methods used for increasing precision is averaging over several or many (ideally identical) features, usually referred to as "Macro CD". In this paper, we show that there is much more to Macro CD technology- metrics characterizing an arbitrary array of similar features within a single SEM image-than just the average. A large amount of data is accumulated from a single scan of a SEM image, providing informative and statistically valid local process characterization. As opposed to other technologies, Macro CD not only provides extremely precise average metrics, but also allows for the reporting of full information on each of the measured features and of various statistics (such as the variability) on all currently reported CD SEM metrics. We present the mathematical background behind Macro CD technology and the opportunity for reducing number of sites for SPC, along with providing enhanced-sensitivity CD metrics.

  15. Novel CD-SEM measurement methodology for complex OPCed patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung-Joo; Park, Won Joo; Choi, Seuk Hwan; Chung, Dong Hoon; Shin, Inkyun; Kim, Byung-Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Fukaya, Hiroshi; Ogiso, Yoshiaki; Shida, Soichi; Nakamura, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    As design rules of lithography shrink: accuracy and precision of Critical Dimension (CD) and controllability of hard OPCed patterns are required in semiconductor production. Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscopes (CD SEM) are essential tools to confirm the quality of a mask such as CD control; CD uniformity and CD mean to target (MTT). Basically, Repeatability and Reproducibility (R and R) performance depends on the length of Region of Interest (ROI). Therefore, the measured CD can easily fluctuate in cases of extremely narrow regions of OPCed patterns. With that premise, it is very difficult to define MTT and uniformity of complex OPCed masks using the conventional SEM measurement approach. To overcome these difficulties, we evaluated Design Based Metrology (DBM) using Large Field Of View (LFOV) of CD-SEM. DBM can standardize measurement points and positions within LFOV based on the inflection/jog of OPCed patterns. Thus, DBM has realized several thousand multi ROI measurements with average CD. This new measurement technique can remove local CD errors and improved statistical methodology of the entire mask to enhance the representativeness of global CD uniformity. With this study we confirmed this new technique as a more reliable methodology in complex OPCed patterns compared to conventional technology. This paper summarizes the experiments of DBM with LFOV using various types of the patterns and compares them with current CD SEM methods.

  16. 10nm three-dimensional CD-SEM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladár, András. E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Chawla, Jasmeet; Ming, Bin; Kline, Joseph R.; List, Scott; Postek, Michael T.

    2014-04-01

    The shape and dimensions of a challenging pattern have been measured using a model-based library scanning electron microscope (MBL SEM) technique. The sample consisted of a 4-line repeating pattern. Lines were narrow (10 nm), asymmetric (different edge angles and significant rounding on one corner but not the other), and situated in a complex neighborhood, with neighboring lines as little as 10 nm or as much as 28 nm distant. The shape cross-section determined by this method was compared to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and critical dimension small angle x-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) measurements of the same sample with good agreement. A recently-developed image composition method was used to obtain sharp SEM images, in which blur from vibration and drift were minimized. A Monte Carlo SEM simulator (JMONSEL) produced a model-based library that was interpolated to produce the best match to measured SEM images. Three geometrical and instrument parameterizations were tried. The first was a trapezoidal geometry. In the second one corner was significantly rounded. In the last, the electron beam was permitted to arrive with stray tilt. At each stage, the fit to the data improved by a statistically significant amount, demonstrating that the measurement remained sensitive to the new parameter. Because the measured values represent the average unit cell, the associated repeatabilities are at the tenths of a nanometer level, similar to scatterometry and other area-averaging techniques, but the SEM's native high spatial resolution also permitted observation of defects and other local departures from the average.

  17. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The first article in this two-part series focused on the need for enrollment management conceptual and organizational models to focus more intentionally and purposefully on efforts related to improving student learning, success, and persistence. Time and again, SEM is viewed from a conventional lens comprising marketing, recruitment and …

  18. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    It's now nearly ten years since the author started participating in and presenting at national conferences related to strategic enrollment management (SEM). Having entered this profession with nearly 20 years of experience in transitional initiatives related to the first-year experience and academic advisement services, she has perceived an…

  19. Three dimensional rock microstructures: insights from FIB-SEM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Martyn; Pennock, Gill; de Winter, Matthijs

    2016-04-01

    Most studies of rock microstructures investigate two-dimensional sections or thin slices of three dimensional grain structures. With advances of X-ray and electron tomography methods the 3-D microstructure can be(relatively) routinely investigated on scales from a few microns to cm. 3D studies are needed to investigate the connectivity of microstructures and to test the assumptions we use to calculate 3D properties from 2D sections. We have used FIB-SEM tomography to study the topology of melts in synthetic olivine rocks, 3D crystal growth microstructures, pore networks and subgrain structures. The technique uses a focused ion beam to make serial sections with a spacing of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Each section is then imaged or mapped using the electron beam. The 3D geometry of grains and subgrains can be investigated using orientation contrast or EBSD mapping. FIB-SEM tomography of rocks and minerals can be limited by charging of the uncoated surfaces exposed by the ion beam. The newest generation of FIB-SEMs have much improved low voltage imaging capability allowing high resolution charge free imaging. Low kV FIB-SEM tomography is now widely used to study the connectivity of pore networks. In-situ fluids can also be studied using cryo-FIB-SEM on frozen samples, although special freezing techniques are needed to avoid artifacts produced by ice crystallization. FIB-SEM tomography is complementary, in terms of spatial resolution and sampled volume, to TEM tomography and X-ray tomography, and the combination of these methods can cover a wide range of scales. Our studies on melt topology in synthetic olivine rocks with a high melt content show that many grain boundaries are wetted by nanometre scale melt layers that are too thin to resolve by X-ray tomography. A variety of melt layer geometries occur consistent with several mechanisms of melt layer formation. The nature of melt geometries along triple line junctions and quadruple points can be resolved

  20. Rapid Evaluation of Particle Properties using Inverse SEM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the final deliverable of a 3 year project whose purpose was to investigate the possibility of using simulations of X-ray spectra generated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a means to perform quantitative analysis of the sample imaged in the SEM via an inverse analysis methodology. Using the nine point Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) typically used by the US Department of Defense (DOD) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this concept is now at a TRL of 3. In other words, this work has proven the feasibility of this concept and is ready to be further investigated to address some of the issues highlighted by this initial proof of concept.

  1. Potassium determinations using SEM, FAAS and XRF: some experimental notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liritzis, I.; et al.

    The calibration of Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X- Rays Spec-trometry (SEM-EDS) for elemental quantitative analysis is an important task for characterization, provenance and absolute dating purposes. In particular the potassium determination is an im-portant contributor to dose rate assessments in luminescence and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating. Here a SEM-EDX is calibrated on different archaeological and geoarchaeological materials against standard laboratory samples as well as measured by micro X-Rays Fluorescence (μXRF) and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) techniques. A common linear relationship is obtained for most elements and certain rock types used and two clear linear regressions for two types of rocks; one for granite, diorite, microgranite and sediments and another ceramic sherds, soils, marble schists, breccia. Such linear regressions become readily available for a future fast, efficient and accu-rate way of potassium determination.

  2. Bringing SEM-contour based OPC to production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, François; Koh, Kar Kit; Jantzen, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Calibrating an accurate OPC model usually requires a lot of one-dimensional CD-SEM measurements. A promising alternative is to use a SEM image contour approach but many challenges remain to implement this technique for production. In this work a specific flow is presented to get good and reliable contours well matched with traditional CDSEM measurements. Furthermore this work investigates the importance of site selection (number, type, image space coverage) for a successful contour-based OPC model. Finally the comparison of conventional and contour based models takes into account the calibration and verification performances of both models with a possible cross verification between model data sets. Specific advantages of contour based model are also discussed.

  3. SEM-contour shape analysis method for advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke; Hibino, Daisuke; Sakai, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    The new measuring method that we developed executes a contour shape analysis that is based on the pattern edge information from a SEM image. This analysis helps to create a highly precise quantification of every circuit pattern shape by comparing the contour extracted from the SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and the ideal circuit pattern. The developed method, in the next phase, can generate four shape indices by using the analysis mass measurement data. When the shape index measured using the developed method is compared the CD, the difference of the shape index and the CD is negligibly small for the quantification of the circuit pattern shape. In addition, when the 2D patterns on a FEM wafer are measured using the developed method, the tendency for shape deformations is precisely caught by the four shape indices. This new method and the evaluation results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  4. Alternative method for monitoring an in-line CD SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Pedro P.; Dick, Susan A.; Allgair, John A.

    1997-07-01

    Semiconductor manufacturers must ensure that their in-line critical dimension scanning electron microscopes (CD-SEMs) are providing precise and reliable data on a daily basis. As with other process equipment, tool stability and production worthiness is determined by a daily qualification procedure that involves measuring a reference, etched wafer's linewidth and comparing those results to a set target mean. However, repeated exposure to a SEM creates an unacceptable increase in the measured feature's CD. This increase can be disruptive to tool qualification, requires the introduction of new reference wafers, and ultimately limits the tool's availability to production. A new method for daily qualification using a rotating daily job scheme has been developed and employed for monitoring multiple systems at Motorola MOS-13/APRDL. This new procedure allows for better statistical process control, increase the reference wafer's useful life, and provides an easier method of monitoring the tool throughout its lifetime.

  5. Achieving 50 nm lateral-resolution quantitative EDX SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) has become a very promising approach to perform Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) chemical mapping with high- lateral resolution [1]. Using voltages as low as 1.5keV, sub-10nm resolutions can be achieved. In this work, we try to take advantage of the small interaction volume in order to simplify the otherwise more complex SEM quantitative methodology. This way, phenomena such as absorption and fluorescence can be ignored and, effectively treat the quantification as with the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)-based Cliff-Lorimer method. Experimental k- factors have been obtained from a series of standards and used to quantify complex oxide phases in steels.

  6. Transcription factor CecR (YbiH) regulates a set of genes affecting the sensitivity of Escherichia coli against cefoperazone and chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Genomic SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) screening was performed for identification of the binding site of YbiH, an as yet uncharacterized TetR-family transcription factor, on the Escherichia coli genome. YbiH was found to be a unique single-target regulator that binds in vitro within the intergenic spacer located between the divergently transcribed ybiH-ybhGFSR and rhlE operons. YbhG is an inner membrane protein and YbhFSR forms a membrane-associated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while RhlE is a ribosome-associated RNA helicase. Gel shift assay and DNase footprinting analyses indicated one clear binding site of YbiH, including a complete palindromic sequence of AATTAGTT-AACTAATT. An in vivo reporter assay indicated repression of the ybiH operon and activation of the rhlE operon by YbiH. After phenotype microarray screening, YbiH was indicated to confer resistance to chloramphenicol and cefazoline (a first-generation cephalosporin). A systematic survey of the participation of each of the predicted YbiH-regulated genes in the antibiotic sensitivity indicated involvement of the YbhFSR ABC-type transporter in the sensitivity to cefoperazone (a third-generation cephalosporin) and of the membrane protein YbhG in the control of sensitivity to chloramphenicol. Taken together with the growth test in the presence of these two antibiotics and in vitro transcription assay, it was concluded that the hitherto uncharacterized YbiH regulates transcription of both the bidirectional transcription units, the ybiH-ybhGFSR operon and the rhlE gene, which altogether are involved in the control of sensitivity to cefoperazone and chloramphenicol. We thus propose to rename YbiH as CecR (regulator of cefoperazone and chloramphenicol sensitivity). PMID:27112147

  7. Interface characterization using an SEM-based micro-indentor

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Cain, M.G.; Daniel, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    The design and performance of an SEM-based microindentor, for interfacial property measurements in CMCs, is described. It enables high resolution imaging and simultaneous load/displacement monitoring with capacity and resolution of 20 N {+-} 1 mN (load) and 100 {mu}m {+-} 10 nm (displacement). Its application to measurement of interface debond and shear stresses for a wide range of fibers and monofilaments is described.

  8. Surface wave sensitivity: mode summation versus adjoint SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2011-12-01

    We compare finite-frequency phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels calculated based on frequency-domain surface wave mode summation and a time-domain adjoint method. The adjoint calculations involve a forward wavefield generated by an earthquake and an adjoint wavefield generated at a seismic receiver. We determine adjoint sources corresponding to frequency-dependent phase and amplitude measurements made using a multitaper technique, which may be applied to any single-taper measurement, including box car windowing. We calculate phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels using an adjoint method based on wave propagation simulations using a spectral element method (SEM). Sensitivity kernels calculated using the adjoint SEM are in good agreement with kernels calculated based on mode summation. In general, the adjoint SEM is more computationally expensive than mode summation in global studies. The advantage of the adjoint SEM lies in the calculation of sensitivity kernels in 3-D earth models. We compare surface wave sensitivity kernels computed in 1-D and 3-D reference earth models and show that (1) lateral wave speed heterogeneities may affect the geometry and amplitude of surface wave sensitivity; (2) sensitivity kernels of long-period surface waves calculated in 1-D model PREM and 3-D models S20RTS+CRUST2.0 and FFSW1+CRUST2.0 do not show significant differences, indicating that the use of a 1-D reference model is adequate in global inversions of long-period surface waves (periods of 50 s and longer); and (3) the differences become significant for short-period Love waves when mode coupling is sensitive to large differences in reference crustal structure. Finally, we show that sensitivity kernels in anelastic earth models may be calculated in purely elastic earth models provided physical dispersion is properly accounted for.

  9. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context.

    PubMed

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, M K; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; VAN Brempt, R; Visser, Y; Guérin, C J

    2015-08-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. PMID:25623622

  10. Characterization of some biological specimens using TEM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    The advent of novel techniques using the Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes improved observation on various biological specimens to characterize them. We studied some biological specimens using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes. We followed negative staining technique with Phosphotungstic acid using bacterial culture of Bacillus subtilis. Negative staining is very convenient technique to view the structural morphology of different samples including bacteria, phage viruses and filaments in a cell. We could observe the bacterial cell wall and flagellum very well when trapped the negative stained biofilm from bacterial culture on a TEM grid. We cut ultra thin sections from the fixed root tips of Pisum sativum (Garden pea). Root tips were pre fixed with osmium tetroxide and post fixed with uranium acetate and placed in the BEEM capsule for block making. The ultrathin sections on the grid under TEM showed the granular chromatin in the nucleus. The protein bodies and large vacuoles with the storage materials were conspicuous. We followed fixation, critical point drying and sputter coating with gold to view the tissues with SEM after placing on stubs. SEM view of the leaf surface of a dangerous weed Tragia hispida showed the surface trichomes. These trichomes when break on touching releases poisonous content causing skin irritation. The cultured tissue from in vitro culture of Albizia lebbeck, a tree revealed the regenerative structures including leaf buds and stomata on the tissue surface. SEM and TEM allow investigating the minute details characteristic morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching.

  11. Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.

    PubMed

    Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed. PMID:20155290

  12. Microstructure development in particulate composite coatings by cryo-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui

    Understanding microstructure development starting from dispersion to a final coating during drying is critical to achieve desirable microstructures and coating properties. Cryo-SEM technique is used to study the microstructure evolutions of three particulate composite coating systems: aqueous latex/ceramic nanoparticle coatings, ordered latex/ceramic nanoparticle coatings, and non-aqueous magnetic coatings. In the first study, cryo-SEM images reveal different colloidal states of two latex/ceramic nanoparticle dispersions, which confirm the DLVO theory-based calculations of total interaction energies from past research. Moreover, images at different drying stages show how nanoparticles segregate in interstitial spaces among large latex particles. As water evaporates, the latex particles consolidate, and the nanoparticles concentrate in interstitial spaces between the latex particles. With continued drying, the latex particles compact, and the nanoparticles are forced to pack more closely in the interstitial spaces. Finally, the latex particles partially coalesce to form a coherent coating. Ordered latex/nanoparticle coatings with a nanoparticle-rich surface and a latexrich body were developed by drying dispersions of monodispersed latex and nanosized ceramic particles. The nanoparticles uniformly occupy the interstitial spaces among the orderly packed latex particles near the surface, but are absent from the compacted latex structure beneath. Cryo-SEM images captured at successive drying times document two important sequences to form this unique structure. Latex particles consolidate at the airwater interface at an early drying stage, and the curved menisci among them create a pressure difference to drive a convective flow. This vertical flow then transports nanoparticles to the evaporating surface. The mechanism is supported by other evidence. The cryo-SEM technique was also applied to a non-aqueous system consisting of a solvent mixture of toluene, cyclohexanone

  13. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. PMID:21871744

  14. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must I have a SEMS program? 250.1900 Section... Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain a... provisions of this subpart and have your SEMS program in effect on or before November 15, 2011, except...

  15. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain a safety and environmental management system (SEMS) program. Your SEMS program must address the... Safety and Environmental Management Program for Offshore Operations and Facilities (API RP...

  16. CEC Special Education Advocacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook, for individuals working with people who have disabilities, is designed to empower them to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work. It is designed to help in channeling one's strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The…

  17. SEM analysis of rock varnish chemistry: A geomorphic age discriminator

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.D.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1989-07-01

    Rock varnish, a manganese- and iron-rich coating commonly found on rock surfaces in arid and semiarid regions, has long been of interest as a potential age indicator. Rock varnish has been shown to be an effective medium for dating of geomorphic surfaces over a time range of several thousand to over a million years, utilizing a ratio among minor cations ((K + Ca)/Ti) for the total volume of rock varnish. We have recently, developed a technique using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDAX) to analyze the chemistry of rock varnish. This technique has several advantages over the earlier cation ratio technique.

  18. Methodologies for evaluating CD-matching of CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ke, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Ya-Chun; Wang, Yu-His

    2009-03-01

    As CD-SEM's precision is severely controlled by sub-nanometer level, we have to evaluate not only repeatability of tools but also CD-matching between the individual tools. However, it is not easy to measure the CD-matching precisely +/- 0.1nm due to repeatability error, stability change, carryover effect, statistical fluctuation of sampling, etc. varying in the individual tools. In this work uncertainty of ABBA test is experimentally estimated with self-ABBA test. Sample's carryover trend that dominates uncertainty of the test can be checked. Mathematical consideration implements precise calculation of the ABBA test.

  19. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, MK; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; Van Brempt, R; Visser, Y; GuÉRin, CJ

    2015-01-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. Lay Description Life happens in three dimensions. For many years, first light, and then EM struggled to image the smallest parts of cells in 3D. With recent advances in technology and corresponding improvements in computing, scientists can now see the 3D world of the cell at the nanoscale. In this paper we present the

  20. Line Edge Detection and Characterization in SEM Images using Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W; Romagnoli, J A; Tringe, J W; L?tant, S E; Stroeve, P; Palazoglu, A

    2008-10-07

    Edge characterization has become increasingly important in nanotechnology due to the growing demand for precise nanoscale structure fabrication and assembly. Edge detection is often performed by thresholding the spatial information of a top-down image obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or other surface characterization techniques. Results are highly dependent on an arbitrary threshold value, which makes it difficult to reveal the nature of the real surface and to compare results among images. In this paper, we present an alternative edge boundary detection technique based on the wavelet framework. Our results indicate that the method facilitates nano-scale edge detection and characterization, by providing a systematic threshold determination step.

  1. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  2. Endobacterial morphotypes in nudibranch cerata tips: a SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuett, Christian; Doepke, Hilke

    2013-06-01

    The SEM investigation of nudibranch cerata material exhibits endobacterial morphotypes found in 12 out of 13 species tested: Aeolidia papillosa, Berghia caerulescens, Coryphella brownii, Coryphella lineata, Coryphella verrucosa, Cuthona amoena, Facelina coronata, Flabellina pedata, Dendronotus frondosus, Doto coronata, Tritonia plebeia and Janolus cristatus. Endobacteria could not be detected inside Tritonia hombergi. Endobacterial morphology found inside nudibranch species was compared to bacterial morphotypes detected earlier in tentacles of cnidarian species. SEM micrographs show endobacterial analogy among nudibranch species, but also similarity to cnidarian endobacteria investigated earlier. Of course, morphological data of microbes do not allow their identification. However, since most of these nudibranch species prey on cnidaria, it cannot be excluded that many of the endobacteria detected inside nudibranch species may originate from their cnidarian prey. Our previous data describing genetic affiliation of endobacteria from nudibranchian and cnidarian species support this assumption. Dominant coccoid endobacteria mostly exhibit smooth surface and are tightly packed as aggregates and/or wrapped in envelopes. Such bacterial aggregate type has been described previously in tentacles of the cnidarian species Sagartia elegans. Similar coccoid bacteria, lacking envelopes were also found in other nudibranch species. A different type of coccoid bacteria, characterized by a rough surface, was detected inside cerata of the nudibranch species Berghia caerulescens, and surprisingly, inside tentacles of the cnidarian species Tubularia indivisa. In contrast to cnidarian endobacteria, rod-shaped microorganisms are largely absent in nudibranch cerata.

  3. Automatic defect classification using topography map from SEM photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serulnik, Sergio D.; Cohen, Jacob; Sherman, Boris; Ben-Porath, Ariel

    2004-04-01

    As the industry moves to smaller design rules, shrinking process windows and shorter product lifecycles, the need for enhanced yield management methodology is increasing. Defect classification is required for identification and isolation of yield loss sources. Practice demonstrates that an operator relies on 3D information heavily while classifying defects. Therefore, Defect Topographic Map (DTM) information can enhance Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) capabilities dramatically. In the present article, we describe the manner in which reliable and rapid SEM measurements of defect topography characteristics increase the classifier ability to achieve fast identification of the exact process step at which a given defect was introduced. Special multiple perspective SEM imaging allows efficient application of the photometric stereo methods. Physical properties of a defect can be derived from the 3D by using straightforward computer vision algorithms. We will show several examples, from both production fabs and R&D lines, of instances where the depth map is essential in correctly partitioning the defects, thus reducing time to source and overall fab expenses due to defect excursions.

  4. SEM analysis as a diagnostic tool for photovoltaic cell degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osayemwenre, Gilbert; Meyer, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The importance of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis as a diagnostic tool for analyzing the degradation of a polycrystalline Photovoltaic cell has been studied. The main aim of this study is to characterize the surface morphology of hot spot regions (degraded) cells in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, production of hetero and multi-junction solar cells has experience tremendous growth as compared to conventional silicon (Si) solar cells. Thin film photovoltaic solar cells generally are more prone to exhibiting defects and associated degradation modes. To improve the lifetime of these cells and modules, it is imperative to fully understand the cause and effect of defects and degradation modes. The objective of this paper is to diagnose the observed degradation in polycrystalline silicon cells, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study poly-Si cells were characterize before and after reverse biasing, the reverse biasing was done to evaluate the cells' susceptibility to leakage currents and hotspots formation. After reverse biasing, some cells were found to exhibit hotspots as confirmed by infrared thermography. The surface morphology of these hotspots re

  5. Automated SEM metrology of wafers printed using a SCAA mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sunil; Ebihara, Takeaki; Levenson, David; White, Sylvia

    2002-07-01

    The massive amount of data necessary to qualify a new 100nm generation technology can be efficiency collected using a CD-SEM and analyzed using Klarity ProData. By comparing the linewidths, space widths, and pitches printed in resists with different focus, exposure does, and numerical aperture with the measured reticle parameters, one can be determine optimal processing conditions and the required biasing rules for the new technology. The Sidewall Chrome Alternating Aperture Mask, a next generation alternating phase shift mask structure, is especially suitable for this as all relevant mask features are visible from the top surface which, however, is not planar and thus can confuse optical mask inspection tools. Resist patterns with line-space pitches from 220nm to 800nm and isolated lines - as well as the reticle - were measured sing a KLA-Tencor 8250 CD-SEM and analyzed with ProData. At the isofocal dose, the 70nm line - 150nm space reticle pattern printed with equal 110 nm lines and spaces at NA equals 0.63 on a Canon FPA-5000 ES3 248 nm step and scan tool, with a process window that overlapped those of less dense approximately 100 nm features.

  6. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  7. Comparing the detection of iron-based pottery pigment on a carbon-coated sherd by SEM-EDS and by Micro-XRF-SEM.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Michael W; Washburn, Dorothy K; Ellis, E Ann; Pendleton, Bonnie B

    2014-03-01

    The same sherd was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and a micro X-ray fluorescence tube attached to a scanning electron microscope (Micro-XRF-SEM) to compare the effectiveness of elemental detection of iron-based pigment. To enhance SEM-EDS mapping, the sherd was carbon coated. The carbon coating was not required to produce Micro-XRF-SEM maps but was applied to maintain an unbiased comparison between the systems. The Micro-XRF-SEM analysis was capable of lower limits of detection than that of the SEM-EDS system, and therefore the Micro-XRF-SEM system could produce elemental maps of elements not easily detected by SEM-EDS mapping systems. Because SEM-EDS and Micro-XRF-SEM have been used for imaging and chemical analysis of biological samples, this comparison of the detection systems should be useful to biologists, especially those involved in bone or tooth (hard tissue) analysis. PMID:24600333

  8. Comparing the Detection of Iron-Based Pottery Pigment on a Carbon-Coated Sherd by SEM-EDS and by Micro-XRF-SEM

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Michael W.; Washburn, Dorothy K.; Ellis, E. Ann; Pendleton, Bonnie B.

    2014-01-01

    The same sherd was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and a micro X-ray fluorescence tube attached to a scanning electron microscope (Micro-XRF-SEM) to compare the effectiveness of elemental detection of iron-based pigment. To enhance SEM-EDS mapping, the sherd was carbon coated. The carbon coating was not required to produce Micro-XRF-SEM maps but was applied to maintain an unbiased comparison between the systems. The Micro-XRF-SEM analysis was capable of lower limits of detection than that of the SEM-EDS system, and therefore the Micro-XRF-SEM system could produce elemental maps of elements not easily detected by SEM-EDS mapping systems. Because SEM-EDS and Micro-XRF-SEM have been used for imaging and chemical analysis of biological samples, this comparison of the detection systems should be useful to biologists, especially those involved in bone or tooth (hard tissue) analysis. PMID:24600333

  9. SEM analysis of ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Johan B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Botha, A. J.; Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Kuhudzai, R. J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.; Chakraborty, P.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2013-11-01

    SiC is a material used in two future energy production technologies, firstly as a photovoltaic layer to harness the UV spectrum in high efficient power solar cells, and secondly as a diffusion barrier material for radioactive fission products in the fuel elements of the next generation of nuclear power plants. For both applications, there is an interest in the implantation of reactive and non-reactive ions into SiC and their effects on the properties of the SiC. In this study 360 keV Ag+, I+ and Xe+ ions were separately implanted into 6H-SiC and in polycrystalline SiC at various substrate temperatures. The implanted samples were also annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1600 °C for various times. In recent years, there had been significant advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the introduction of an in-lens detector combined with field emission electron guns. This allows defects in solids, such as radiation damage created by the implanted ions, to be detected with SEM. Cross-sectional SEM images of 6H-SiC wafers implanted with 360 keV Ag+ ions at room temperature and at 600 °C and then vacuum annealed at different temperatures revealed the implanted layers and their thicknesses. A similar result is shown of 360 keV I+ ions implanted at 600 °C into 6H-SiC and annealed at 1600 °C. The 6H-SiC is not amorphized but remained crystalline when implanting at 600 °C. There are differences in the microstructure of 6H-SiC implanted with silver at the two temperatures as well as with reactive iodine ions. Voids (bubbles) are created in the implanted layers into which the precipitation of silver and iodine can occur after annealing of the samples. The crystallinity of the substrate via implantation temperature caused differences in the distribution and size of the voids. Implantation of xenon ions in polycrystalline SiC at 350 °C does not amorphize the substrate as is the case with room temperature heavy ion bombardment. Subsequent

  10. SEM and SEM by EDX Analysis of Air-Processed SmBa2Cu3Oy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuga, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Diko, P.; Jirsa, M.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, M.

    The present investigation focuses on the microstructure and chemical analysis of the in-air processed SmBa2Cu3Oy (Sm-123) sample with 3 wt% BaO2 and 20 wt% Ag2O addition. DC magnetization measurements showed a sharp superconducting transition with onset Tc at around 94.5 K. The critical current density (Jc) at 77 K and zero field was 24 kA/cm2. SEM analysis indicated dispersion of submicron secondary phase particles in the Sm-123 matrix. SEM by EDX analysis confirmed that matrix chemical ratio at various locations of the pellet was uniform. Trapped magnetic field profile analysis confirmed that samples were single grain. The sample with size of 12 by 12 mm and 5 mm thickness showed the trapped field on top surface 0.26T at liquid nitrogen temperature. The results indicate that content of BaO2 is crucial for improving utilization parameters of the bulk Sm-123 material melt-processed in air.

  11. Thermal fatigue of composites: Ultrasonic and SEM evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, D.S.; Kasap, S.O. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Wacker, I.; Yannacopoulos, S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented on the evaluation of thermal fatigue in three fiber reinforced polymer composites, using ultrasonic techniques and scanning electron microscopy. The composites examined were (a) continuous carbon fibers in a vinylester matrix (b) continuous aramid fibers in a vinylester matrix and (c) randomly oriented aramid fibers in a polyphenylene matrix. Specimens of these composites were subjected to thermal fatigue by thermal cycling from [minus]25 C to 75 C. Changes in ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were monitored during thermal cycling, and scanning electron microscopy was used to qualitatively evaluate any damage. It was observed that ultrasonic attenuation is sensitive to thermal fatigue, increasing with increasing number of thermal cycles. SEM evaluations showed that the primary damage due to thermal fatigue is due to fiber-matrix debonding.

  12. Improvements to the analytical linescan model for SEM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.; Bunday, Benjamin D.

    2016-03-01

    Critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology has long used empirical approaches to determine edge locations. While such solutions are very flexible, physics-based models offer the potential for improved accuracy and precision for specific applications. Here, Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate theoretical linescans from single step and line/space targets in order to build a physics-based analytical model, including the presence of bottom footing and top corner rounding. The resulting analytical linescan model fits the Monte Carlo simulation results for different feature heights, widths, pitches, sidewall angles, bottom footing, and top corner rounding. This model has also been successfully applied to asymetric features such as sidewall spacers encountered in self-aligned double patterning.

  13. Mössbauer and SEM study of Fe Al film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Varkey; Sharma, Ram Kripal; Lakshmi, N.; Venugopalan, K.

    2006-04-01

    Fe Al alloy with Fe/Al ratio of 3:1 was first prepared by argon arc melting. It was subsequently coated on glass slide and cellophane tape using an electron beam gun system to have a thickness of 2,000 Å. X-ray diffraction spectrum of the coated sample indicates a definite texture for the film with a preferential growth along the Fe(110) plane. SEM micrographs of the film showed the presence of nano islands of nearly 3 × 1012/m2 surface density. Composition of different parts of the film was determined using EDAX. Room temperature Fe-57 Mössbauer spectrum of coated sample showed the presence a quadrupole doublet with a splitting of 0.46 mm/s, which is typical of Al-rich iron compounds. MOKE study shows an in-plane magnetic moment.

  14. Mechanical and SEM analysis of artificial comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiel, K.; Kochan, H.; Roessler, K.; Gruen, E.; Schwehm, G.; Hellmann, H.; Hsiung, P.; Koelzer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1987 experiments dealing with comet nucleus phenomena have been carried out in the DFVLR space simulation chambers. The main objective of these experiments is a better understanding of thermal behavior, surface phenomena and especially the gas dust interaction. As a function of different sample compositions and exposure to solar irradiation (xenon-bulbs) crusts of different hardness and thickness were measured. The measuring device consists of a motor driven pressure foot (5 mm diameter), which is pressed into the sample. The applied compressive force is electronically monitored. The microstructure of the crust and dust residuals is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Stress-depth profiles of an unirradiated and an irradiated model comet are given.

  15. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators. PMID:17867540

  16. Automatic evaluation of nickel alloy secondary phases from SEM images.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; Menezes, Thiago Ivo de S; Farias, Jesualdo Pereira; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative metallography is a technique to determine and correlate the microstructures of materials with their properties and behavior. Generic commercial image processing and analysis software packages have been used to quantify material phases from metallographic images. However, these all-purpose solutions also have some drawbacks, particularly when applied to segmentation of material phases. To overcome such limitations, this work presents a new solution to automatically segment and quantify material phases from SEM metallographic images. The solution is based on a neuronal network and in this work was used to identify the secondary phase precipitated in the gamma matrix of a Nickel base alloy. The results obtained by the new solution were validated by visual inspection and compared with the ones obtained by a commonly used commercial software. The conclusion is that the new solution is precise, reliable and more accurate and faster than the commercial software. PMID:21181708

  17. 30 CFR 250.1909 - What are management's general responsibilities for the SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... documented and are available at field and office locations, as appropriate for each program element. You... personnel are employed to carry out all aspects of the SEMS program. (j) Ensure that the SEMS program...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1909 - What are management's general responsibilities for the SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... documented and are available at field and office locations, as appropriate for each program element. You... personnel are employed to carry out all aspects of the SEMS program. (j) Ensure that the SEMS program...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1909 - What are management's general responsibilities for the SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... documented and are available at field and office locations, as appropriate for each program element. You... personnel are employed to carry out all aspects of the SEMS program. (j) Ensure that the SEMS program...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Must I have a SEMS program? 250.1900 Section 250.1900 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Must I have a SEMS program? 250.1900 Section 250.1900 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1924 - How will BOEMRE determine if my SEMS program is effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1924 How will BOEMRE determine if my SEMS... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How will BOEMRE determine if my SEMS program is effective? 250.1924 Section 250.1924 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION,...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1901 - What is the goal of my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1901 What is the goal of my SEMS program? The goal of your SEMS program is to promote safety and environmental protection by ensuring all personnel... Section 250.1901 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND...

  4. Multiple-Group Analysis Using the sem Package in the R System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evermann, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-group analysis in covariance-based structural equation modeling (SEM) is an important technique to ensure the invariance of latent construct measurements and the validity of theoretical models across different subpopulations. However, not all SEM software packages provide multiple-group analysis capabilities. The sem package for the R…

  5. 30 CFR 250.1911 - What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1911 What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS program meet? You must ensure that a hazards analysis (facility level) and a JSA (operations/task...

  6. 30 CFR 250.1911 - What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1911 What hazards analysis criteria must my SEMS program meet? You must ensure that a hazards analysis (facility level) and a JSA (operations/task...

  7. SEM/EDS Characterization of Ambient PM during Agricultural Burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wall, S.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected with UNC passive samplers during agricultural burns in Imperial Valley, California. Four Bermuda grass field burn events were sampled at 3-8 locations surrounding each burn. Sampling began at the start of each burn (30-60 min) and continued for 24-120 hours. During 3 of the 4 burn events, winds were calm and plumes were observed to travel straight up to the inversion layer. In one event, winds created a ground-level plume that enveloped two UNC samplers mounted on telephone poles very close to the field (0.2-0.3 miles away). Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy / energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDS) was used to measure particle sizes and elemental composition, from which mass concentrations and size distributions were calculated. The median PM2.5 and PM10 levels measured in this study were 3.4 and 20 ug/m3, respectively. To determine quantitative accuracy, UNC sampler PM2.5 results (PM< 2.5 um) were compared to PM2.5 results from four co-located, continuous-reading beta-attenuation monitors (EBAMs). The median agreement (EBAM - UNC) was 3.8 ug/m3. Manual SEM/EDS detected various distinctive species in these samples, including sea salt, spores, plant fragments, and large soot agglomerates. During the ‘plume event’, 24-hour PM2.5 exposures downwind were up to 17 times higher than that measured upwind. Numerous submicron combustion particles with carbon and oxygen only were directly observed by manual SEM/EDS in the two plume-impacted samples, along with larger ash particles enriched in potassium, sulfur, chlorine, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. CCSEM/EDS data from this event was grouped into 5 particle classes to generate size-fraction-specific pie charts. Burn-related particle types contributed 95% of the PM2.5 in the location directly impacted by the ground-level plume, compared to only 12% in the upwind location. A sample of Imperial County Bermuda grass analyzed in bulk and

  8. SEM evaluation of advanced refractory failures in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W.Keith; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Rawers, James C.

    2005-08-01

    The SEM is an invaluable tool in the evaluation of advanced refractories and their failure. A reaction vessel?s refractory liner, at minimum, must protect the reaction vessel from elevated temperatures, corrosive slag and thermal cycling. To understand the failure mechanisms ARC staff had first to determine how an advanced chrome rich refractory was attacked by various components that make up a slag. Refractory cups were made from the refractory of interest and various compounds that can be found in a slag such as CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3, NaCl were placed into the test cups and fired for 24 hours at the required temperature with the desired atmosphere. The cups are prepared for examination by embedding in epoxy and cross sectioning. SEM examination revealed how various slag compositions attacked and penetrated the refractory. The slag could corrode, free refractory grains or react with the refractory and from a new compound. It was found that the only way to measure slag component penetration was with multiple elemental X-ray maps. SiO2 penetrated deeply and in many instances moved through the cup. The knowledge of slag refractory interactions gather during cup testing was applied to actual spent refractory from reaction vessels. Obtaining samples from the reaction vessel itself proved difficult due to time constraints imposed in relining. Samples were selected based on spent brick shape, color or location in the heap of spent refractory. Sample preparation affected the results dry, water or oil coolant during cutting may dissolve reaction products. The complex reactions between the slag and refractory made for very interesting and time consuming evaluation. Elemental X-ray maps at low and high magnification combined with point analysis aided in locating regions of interest. Crystals were found growing in voids and appear to be from vapor deposition. Other crystal structures are from the slag refractory interaction. Knowledge gathered from this and other supporting

  9. Automated SEM Modal Analysis Applied to the Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. E.; Spilde, M. N.; Papike, James J.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of volume proportions of minerals, or modal analysis, is routinely accomplished by point counting on an optical microscope, but the process, particularly on brecciated samples such as the diogenite meteorites, is tedious and prone to error by misidentification of very small fragments, which may make up a significant volume of the sample. Precise volume percentage data can be gathered on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizing digital imaging and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). This form of automated phase analysis reduces error, and at the same time provides more information than could be gathered using simple point counting alone, such as particle morphology statistics and chemical analyses. We have previously studied major, minor, and trace-element chemistry of orthopyroxene from a suite of diogenites. This abstract describes the method applied to determine the modes on this same suite of meteorites and the results of that research. The modal abundances thus determined add additional information on the petrogenesis of the diogenites. In addition, low-abundance phases such as spinels were located for further analysis by this method.

  10. Automatic visual inspection of integrated circuits using an SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalp, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The author investigates the complex problem of designing an integrated-circuit inspection system that will be used in controlling an automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. To satisfy the accuracy requirements, he proposes a system that integrates information supplied by multiple intelligent (virtual) sensors. Most of his work concentrated on the design of two scanning-electron-microscope (SEM)-based, intelligent sensors. One of them extracts 3D IC surface-topography information using computer stereo-vision techniques, and the other identifies shape defects in IC patterns using the IC design file as the reference. Both of these problems are viewed as constrained contour-matching problems. In stereo matching, feature contours extracted from the left and right stereo images are matched, where in pattern-shape inspection, pattern boundary contours extracted from the image and the IC design file are matched. An optimization technique is presented for solving the matching problem that results in both cases. This general approach simplifies the task of transforming the specifications of a physical problem into a computational form and results in a modular system.

  11. XPS and SEM characterization of electrodeposited transition metals on zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonomov, J.; Stoychev, D.; Marinova, Ts

    2000-07-01

    The structure and chemical composition of electrochemically deposited cobalt, copper and cobalt+copper on zirconia have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) methods. It has been established that as-deposited metal crystallites are mainly formed on the macroconcavities of an electrochemically roughened SS 1.4301 substrate. In the facet zones, the crystallites are much smaller and have a good dispersion. In this case, the cobalt on the surface is present as Co 2+, while copper is found as Cu +. The deposited metal crystallites show no substantial changes in structure after thermal oxidation, which leads to the formation of considerably thicker oxide layers on the metal crystallites where cobalt and copper are in the Co 3+ nd Cu 2+ states. The cobalt and copper oxides obtained on ZrO 2 are characterized by good adhesion and cause no change in the specific surface area of porous zirconia films. Modification of the structure, composition and dispersion of the oxide systems under consideration is promising, with a view to their application as thin porous inorganic catalytic films.

  12. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  13. Functional inactivation of the conserved Sem1p in yeast by intrabodies.

    PubMed

    Reinman, Mirka; Jäntti, Jussi; Alfthan, Kaija; Keränen, Sirkka; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina

    2003-09-01

    Intrabody technology was applied to characterize the function and intracellular localization of a highly conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sem1 protein. DSS1, the mammalian homologue of Sem1p, is functionally conserved between yeast and mammalian cells, and in mammalian cells physically interacts with the strong tumour supressor BRCA2. Yeast and the generated intrabodies are thus expected to offer a useful system for studies on Sem1p/DSS1 function. Sem1p-specific antibody isolated from a phage display library was expressed intracellularily and targeted to either the cytosol or the nucleus of yeast cells. Analysis of the applicability of different antibody fragments as intrabodies showed that the Fab intrabody was expressed most efficiently. Expression of nuclear-targeted anti-Sem1p Fab intrabodies inhibited the growth of the sigma1278b yeast strain in a manner similar to deletion of the SEM1 gene. This indicates that the Fab intrabodies interact in vivo with Sem1p and result in inactivation of Sem1p. Localization of the Fab intrabody with or without the nuclear localization signal to the nucleus in Sem1p-dependent manner suggests that Sem1p mediates the nuclear transport of the intrabody without any targeting signal. Our results suggest that Sem1p function in yeast cells is in part manifested in the nucleus. PMID:12961755

  14. SEM simulation for 2D and 3D inspection metrology and defect review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Shimon; Schwartsband, Ishai; Khristo, Sergey; Ivanchenko, Yan; Adan, Ofer

    2014-03-01

    Advanced SEM simulation has become a key element in the ability of SEM inspection, metrology and defect review to meet the challenges of advanced technologies. It grants additional capabilities to the end user, such as 3D height measurements, accurate virtual metrology, and supports Design Based Metrology to bridge the gap between design layout and SEM image. In this paper we present SEM simulations capabilities, which take into consideration all parts of the SEM physical and electronic path, interaction between Electron beam and material, multi perspective SEM imaging and shadowing derived from proximity effects caused by the interaction of the Secondary Electrons signal with neighboring pattern edges. Optimizing trade-off between simulation accuracy, calibration procedures and computational complexity, the simulation is running in real-time with minimum impact on throughput. Experiment results demonstrate Height measurement capacities, and CAD based simulated pattern is compared with SEM image to evaluate simulated pattern fidelity.

  15. SEM investigation of Er:YAG laser apical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎlǎbuc, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Locovei, Cosmin; RǎduÅ£ǎ, Aurel

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic surgery involves the incision and flap elevation, the access to the root tip, its resection, the cavity retrograde preparation and filling it with biocompatible material that provides a good seal of the apex[1]. Apicoectomy is compulsory in endodontic surgery. The final stage involves the root retropreparation and the carrying out of the retrograde obturation. In order to perform the retrograde preparation the endodontist can use various tools such as lowspeed conventional handpieces, sonic and ultrasonic equipment. The ideal depth of the preparation should be 3 mm, exceeding this value may affect the long-term success of the obturation [2]. Resection at the depth of 3 mm reduces apical ramifications by 98% and lateral root canals by 93%. The ultrasonic retropreparation has numerous advantages compared to the dental drill. Firstly, the cavity will be in the axis of the tooth which implies a minimum destruction of the root canal morphology. The preparations are precise, and the cutting pattern is perpendicular to the long axis of the root, the advantage being the reduction in the number of dentinal tubules exposed at the resected area [3]. Therefore, the retrograde filling is the procedure when an inert and non-toxic material is compacted in the apically created cavity.[4,5]. The Er:YAG laser is the most common wavelength indicated for dental hard tissue preparation. Its natural selectivity offers a significant advantage compared to the conventional hard tissue preparation [6-9].The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the quality of Er:YAG laser apical third preparation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic method.

  16. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang Förster, Friedrich

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  17. Application of SEM and EDX in studying biomineralization in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Honghua; Kirilak, Yaowanuj

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes protocols using formalin-acetic acid-alcohol (FAA) to fix plant tissues for studying biomineralization by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and qualitative energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). Specimen preparation protocols for SEM and EDX mainly include fixation, dehydration, critical point drying (CPD), mounting, and coating. Gold-coated specimens are used for SEM imaging, while gold- and carbon-coated specimens are prepared for qualitative X-ray microanalyses separately to obtain complementary information on the elemental compositions of biominerals. During the specimen preparation procedure for SEM, some biominerals may be dislodged or scattered, making it difficult to determine their accurate locations, and light microscopy is used to complement SEM studies. Specimen preparation protocols for light microscopy generally include fixation, dehydration, infiltration and embedding with resin, microtome sectioning, and staining. In addition, microwave processing methods are adopted here to speed up the specimen preparation process for both SEM and light microscopy. PMID:24357384

  18. A PDZ protein regulates the distribution of the transmembrane semaphorin, M-SemF.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Kalb, R G; Strittmatter, S M

    1999-05-14

    M-SemF is a membrane-associated, neurally enriched member of the semaphorin family of axon guidance signals. We considered whether the cytoplasmic domain of M-SemF might possess a signaling function and/or might control the distribution of M-SemF on the cell surface. We identify a PDZ-containing neural protein as an M-SemF cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (SEMCAP-1). SEMCAP-2 is a closely related nonneuronal protein. SEMCAP-1 has recently also been identified as GIPC, by virtue of its interaction with the RGS protein GAIP in vitro (De Vries, L., Lou, X., Zhao, G., Zheng, B., and Farquhar, M. G. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 95, 12340-12345). Expression studies support the notion that SEMCAP-1(GIPC) interacts with M-SemF, but not GAIP, in brain. Lung SEMCAP-2 and SEMCAP-1(GIPC) are potential partners for both GAIP and M-SemF. The protein interaction requires the single PDZ domain of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) and the carboxyl-terminal four residues of M-SemF, ESSV. While SEMCAP-1(GIPC) also interacts with SemC, it does not interact with other proteins containing a class I PDZ binding motif, nor does M-SemF interact with other class I PDZ proteins. Co-expression of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) induces the redistribution of dispersed M-SemF into detergent-resistant aggregates in HEK293 cells. Thus, SEMCAP-1(GIPC) appears to regulate the subcellular distribution of M-SemF in brain, and SEMCAPs could link M-SemF to G protein signal transduction pathways. PMID:10318831

  19. 30 CFR 250.1927 - What happens if BOEMRE finds shortcomings in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1927 What happens if BOEMRE finds... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What happens if BOEMRE finds shortcomings in my SEMS program? 250.1927 Section 250.1927 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT,...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1912 - What criteria for management of change must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1912 What criteria for... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What criteria for management of change must my SEMS program meet? 250.1912 Section 250.1912 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1902 - What must I include in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1902 What must I include in my SEMS program? You... Environmental Management Program Elements) (see §§ 250.1920) (13) Recordkeeping (Records and Documentation) and....1902 Section 250.1902 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1916 - What criteria for mechanical integrity must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1916 What criteria for... SEMS program meet? 250.1916 Section 250.1916 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... environmental or safety consequences. These procedures must address the following: (a) The design,...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1909 - What are management's general responsibilities for the SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1909 What are... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are management's general responsibilities for the SEMS program? 250.1909 Section 250.1909 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY...

  4. Shocked Quartz in the SEM: Distinction Between Amorphous and Healed PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    Combined SEM techniques show that different CL signatures of PDFs are related to fresh and healed microstructures of PDFs and host quartz. This is confirmed by TEM results. A combination of SEM techniques can give the same type of information as TEM.

  5. Some Esoteric Aspects of SEM that Its Practitioners Should Want to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozeboom, William W.

    2009-01-01

    The topic of this article is the interpretation of structural equation modeling (SEM) solutions. Its purpose is to augment structural modeling's metatheoretic resources while enhancing awareness of how problematic is the causal significance of SEM-parameter solutions. Part I focuses on the nonuniqueness and consequent dubious interpretability of…

  6. The Effects of Sample Size, Estimation Methods, and Model Specification on SEM Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; And Others

    A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to investigate the effects of sample size, estimation method, and model specification on structural equation modeling (SEM) fit indices. Based on a balanced 3x2x5 design, a total of 6,000 samples were generated from a prespecified population covariance matrix, and eight popular SEM fit indices were…

  7. Strategic Enrolment Management (SEM) in Self-Financed Higher Education of Hong Kong: Evaluation and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Peggy; Galbraith, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the dimensions of strategic enrolment management (SEM) tie to the success metrics in the area of enrolment, retention and graduation from senior and programme management perspectives of a self-financed institution in Hong Kong. The literature on SEM has demonstrated that managing enrolment is a global…

  8. SEM and FIB-SEM investigations on potential gas shales in the Dniepr-Donets Basin (Ukraine): pore space evolution in organic matter during thermal maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misch, D.; Mendez-Martin, F.; Hawranek, G.; Onuk, P.; Gross, D.; Sachsenhofer, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    Porosity and permeability are essential parameters for reservoir rocks. Techniques developed for conventional reservoir rocks characterized by large pores, cannot be applied to study gas shales. Therefore, high resolution techniques are increasingly used to determine reservoir quality of shale gas plays. Within the frame of the recent study, Upper Visean black shales (“Rudov Beds”) from the Dniepr-Donets-Basin (DDB, Ukraine) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, conventional SEM imaging and FIB/BIB-SEM. According to SEM and FIB/BIB-SEM data, nanopores are not abundant in primary macerals (e.g., vitrinite) even in overmature rocks, whereas they develop within secondary organic matter (bitumen) formed mainly at gas window maturity. Frequently occurring sub-micrometre porosity, probably related to gas generation from bituminous organic matter, was detected within mudstones at a vitrinite reflectance > 2.0 % Rr. However, such pores have also been detected occasionally in solid bitumen at oil window maturity (0.9 % Rr). Authigenic nanoscale clay minerals and calcite occur within pyrobitumen at gas window maturity. Furthermore, Rudov Beds can be subdivided into mineralogical facies zones by SEM imaging and X-ray diffraction. A basin-centred, brittle siliceous facies is most likely caused by increased contribution from deeper water radiolaria and is separated from a marginal clayey and carbonate-rich facies.

  9. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. PMID:26855204

  10. From patterns to causal understanding: Structural equation modeling (SEM) in soil ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Powell, Jeff R; Grace, James B.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    In this perspectives paper we highlight a heretofore underused statistical method in soil ecological research, structural equation modeling (SEM). SEM is commonly used in the general ecological literature to develop causal understanding from observational data, but has been more slowly adopted by soil ecologists. We provide some basic information on the many advantages and possibilities associated with using SEM and provide some examples of how SEM can be used by soil ecologists to shift focus from describing patterns to developing causal understanding and inspiring new types of experimental tests. SEM is a promising tool to aid the growth of soil ecology as a discipline, particularly by supporting research that is increasingly hypothesis-driven and interdisciplinary, thus shining light into the black box of interactions belowground.

  11. Model-based approaches to synthesize microarray data: a unifying review using mixture of SEMs.

    PubMed

    Martella, F; Vermunt, J K

    2013-12-01

    Several statistical methods are nowadays available for the analysis of gene expression data recorded through microarray technology. In this article, we take a closer look at several Gaussian mixture models which have recently been proposed to model gene expression data. It can be shown that these are special cases of a more general model, called the mixture of structural equation models (mixture of SEMs), which has been developed in psychometrics. This model combines mixture modelling and SEMs by assuming that component-specific means and variances are subject to a SEM. The connection with SEM is useful for at least two reasons: (1) it shows the basic assumptions of existing methods more explicitly and (2) it helps in straightforward development of alternative mixture models for gene expression data with alternative mean/covariance structures. Different specifications of mixture of SEMs for clustering gene expression data are illustrated using two benchmark datasets. PMID:21948997

  12. Tillandsia stricta Sol (Bromeliaceae) leaves as monitors of airborne particulate matter-A comparative SEM methods evaluation: Unveiling an accurate and odd HP-SEM method.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Martha Lima; de Melo, Edésio José Tenório; Miguens, Flávio Costa

    2016-09-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) has been included among the most important air pollutants by governmental environment agencies and academy researchers. The use of terrestrial plants for monitoring PM has been widely accepted, particularly when it is coupled with SEM/EDS. Herein, Tillandsia stricta leaves were used as monitors of PM, focusing on a comparative evaluation of Environmental SEM (ESEM) and High-Pressure SEM (HPSEM). In addition, specimens air-dried at formaldehyde atmosphere (AD/FA) were introduced as an SEM procedure. Hydrated specimen observation by ESEM was the best way to get information from T. stricta leaves. If any artifacts were introduced by AD/FA, they were indiscernible from those caused by CPD. Leaf anatomy was always well preserved. PM density was determined on adaxial and abaxial leaf epidermis for each of the SEM proceedings. When compared with ESEM, particle extraction varied from 0 to 20% in air-dried leaves while 23-78% of particles deposited on leaves surfaces were extracted by CPD procedures. ESEM was obviously the best choice over other methods but morphological artifacts increased in function of operation time while HPSEM operation time was without limit. AD/FA avoided the shrinkage observed in the air-dried leaves and particle extraction was low when compared with CPD. Structural and particle density results suggest AD/FA as an important methodological approach to air pollution biomonitoring that can be widely used in all electron microscopy labs. Otherwise, previous PM assessments using terrestrial plants as biomonitors and performed by conventional SEM could have underestimated airborne particulate matter concentration. PMID:27357408

  13. Characterisation of nanoparticles by means of high-resolution SEM/EDS in transmission mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Rades, S.; Salge, T.; Mielke, J.; Ortel, E.; Schmidt, R.

    2016-02-01

    Advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enable the high-resolution imaging of single nanoparticles (NPs) with sizes well below 10 nm. The SEM analysis in transmission mode (T-SEM) of NPs on thin film supports has many benefits when compared to the analysis of NPs on bulk substrates. The enhanced material (mass - thickness) contrast of the T-SEM imaging mode is well suited for in-depth and, particularly valuable, to very accurate, traceable, lateral dimensional measurements of NPs. Compared to samples prepared on bulk substrates, T-SEM with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) achieves a drastically improved spatial resolution of the emitted X-rays. The poor signal-to-noise ratio of the X-ray spectra emitted by a single nanoparticle (NP) can be improved by the use of high-sensitivity (high collection solid angle) silicon drift (SDD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). The EDS spectral imaging of a single NP with a spatial resolution below 10 nm has become possible. This is demonstrated by means of various examples of nanostructures. Advanced data processing of T-SEM/EDS results sets the stage for the automated classification of NPs by feature analysis. This method combines the detection of morphological structures of interest by image processing of T-SEM micrographs with the chemical classification by EDS.

  14. Application of the SEM to the measurement of solar cell parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Andrews, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are described which make use of the SEM to measure the minority carrier diffusion length and the metallurgical junction depth in silicon solar cells. The former technique permits the measurement of the true bulk diffusion length through the application of highly doped field layers to the back surfaces of the cells being investigated. It is shown that the secondary emission contrast observed in the SEM on a reverse-biased diode can depict the location of the metallurgical junction if the diode has been prepared with the proper beveled geometry. The SEM provides the required contrast and the option of high magnification, permitting the measurement of extremely shallow junction depths.

  15. Three-dimensional characterization of Gd nanoparticles using STEM-in-SEM tomography in a dual-beam FIB-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Leer, Brandon; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Cheng, Huikai

    2015-10-01

    Serial sectioning using the FIB and subsequent imaging of the same FIB-exposed surface by both FIB microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a DualBeam has proven especially useful to study the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of complex engineered materials systems. The technique was first introduced as an automated process in 2004 and since then has established itself as one of the primary applications for FIB and DualBeams. While state-of-the-art systems can produce datasets with a z-axis slice thickness of 3-5 nm, FIB nanotomography remains a destructive technique and is limited in resolution by the z-axis slice thickness. Electron tomography is another technique used to visualize 3D structures within a transmission electron microscope used in TEM or STEM mode. Using a thin sample focused on a region of interest, the electron beam passes through the specimen incrementally tilting around the center of the region of interest as images are acquired sequentially on a camera (TEM) or a Detector (STEM). The resulting images are reconstructed into a 3D volume using a variety of algorithms including Weighted Back Projection (WBP), or Serial Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). Low energy STEM in SEM is a routine analysis in SEMs and DualBeam FIB-SEM instrumentation for morphological characterization and ultra high-resolution imaging. With a DualBeam or SEM configured with a solid state silicon diode STEM detector and a stage with adequate tilt freedom, it is possible to acquire a sufficient number of images for 3D reconstruction using STEM tomography in SEMs and DualBeam instruments. A thin section sample of gadolinium nanoparticles ranging in size up to 50 nm mounted on an aluminum substrate was prepared using in-situ lift-out (INLO) by FIB. The sample was thinned using 30 kV Ga+ FIB to approximately 125 nm. Using an in-situ stage with 360 degree continuous tilt, the thin section was imaged every 1 degree with 30 keV SEM and the STEM detector through

  16. Advantages and Limits of the Multi SEM-EDX-RAMAN Coupling for Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, R.; Di Carlo, I.; Coelho, G.; Branquet, Y.; Champallier, R.; Lahfid, A.; Bourrat, X.

    2014-06-01

    Advantages and limitations of EDX-SEM-Raman coupling via the characterization of two geomaterials: (i) an epidote obtained through a hydrothermal synthesis; and (ii) mother of pearl samples subjected to external stresses will be discussed.

  17. Mathematical model of the seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) in non crystalline substances

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, L. C. C.; Yahya, N.; Daud, H.; Shafie, A.

    2012-09-26

    The mathematical model of seismic electromagnetic waves in non crystalline substances is developed and the solutions are discussed to show the possibility of improving the electromagnetic waves especially the electric field. The shear stress of the medium in fourth order tensor gives the equation of motion. Analytic methods are selected for the solutions written in Hansen vector form. From the simulated SEMS, the frequency of seismic waves has significant effects to the SEMS propagating characteristics. EM waves transform into SEMS or energized seismic waves. Traveling distance increases once the frequency of the seismic waves increases from 100% to 1000%. SEMS with greater seismic frequency will give seismic alike waves but greater energy is embedded by EM waves and hence further distance the waves travel.

  18. Why semicarbazide (SEM) is not an appropriate marker for the usage of nitrofurazone on agricultural animals.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Richard H; Verzegnassi, Ludovica; Seefelder, Walburga; Racault, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive global database on semicarbazide (SEM) in foodstuffs and food ingredients is presented, with over 4000 data collected in foods such as seafood (crustaceans, fish powders), meat (beef, chicken powders), dairy products (e.g. raw milk, milk powders, whey, sweet buttermilk powder, caseinate, yoghurt, cheese), honey and other ingredients. The results provide evidence that the presence of SEM in certain dairy ingredients (whey, milk protein concentrates) is a by-product of chemical reactions taking place during the manufacturing process. Of the dairy ingredients tested (c. 2000 samples), 5.3% showed traces of SEM > 0.5 µg/kg. The highest incidence of SEM-positive samples in the dairy category were whey (powders, liquid) and milk protein concentrates (35% positive), with up to 13 µg/kg measured in a whey powder. Sweet buttermilk powder and caseinate followed, with 27% and 9.3% positives, respectively. SEM was not detected in raw milk, or in yoghurt or cheese. Of the crustacean products (shrimp and prawn powders) tested, 44% were positive for SEM, the highest value measured at 284 µg/kg. Fish powders revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of positive samples (25%); in this case, fraudulent addition of shellfish shells or carry-over during processing cannot be excluded. Overall, the data provide new insights into the occurrence of SEM (for dairy products and fish powders), substantially strengthening the arguments that SEM in certain food categories is not a conclusive marker of the use of the illegal antibiotic nitrofurazone. PMID:26359628

  19. Feature evaluation of complex hysteresis smoothing and its practical applications to noisy SEM images.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2013-01-01

    Quality of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image is strongly influenced by noise. This is a fundamental drawback of the SEM instrument. Complex hysteresis smoothing (CHS) has been previously developed for noise removal of SEM images. This noise removal is performed by monitoring and processing properly the amplitude of the SEM signal. As it stands now, CHS may not be so utilized, though it has several advantages for SEM. For example, the resolution of image processed by CHS is basically equal to that of the original image. In order to find wide application of the CHS method in microscopy, the feature of CHS, which has not been so clarified until now is evaluated correctly. As the application of the result obtained by the feature evaluation, cursor width (CW), which is the sole processing parameter of CHS, is determined more properly using standard deviation of noise Nσ. In addition, disadvantage that CHS cannot remove the noise with excessively large amplitude is improved by a certain postprocessing. CHS is successfully applicable to SEM images with various noise amplitudes. PMID:23184364

  20. Raman-in-SEM, a multimodal and multiscale analytical tool: performance for materials and expertise.

    PubMed

    Wille, Guillaume; Bourrat, Xavier; Maubec, Nicolas; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2014-12-01

    The availability of Raman spectroscopy in a powerful analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows morphological, elemental, chemical, physical and electronic analysis without moving the sample between instruments. This paper documents the metrological performance of the SEMSCA commercial Raman interface operated in a low vacuum SEM. It provides multiscale and multimodal analyses as Raman/EDS, Raman/cathodoluminescence or Raman/STEM (STEM: scanning transmission electron microscopy) as well as Raman spectroscopy on nanomaterials. Since Raman spectroscopy in a SEM can be influenced by several SEM-related phenomena, this paper firstly presents a comparison of this new tool with a conventional micro-Raman spectrometer. Then, some possible artefacts are documented, which are due to the impact of electron beam-induced contamination or cathodoluminescence contribution to the Raman spectra, especially with geological samples. These effects are easily overcome by changing or adapting the Raman spectrometer and the SEM settings and methodology. The deletion of the adverse effect of cathodoluminescence is solved by using a SEM beam shutter during Raman acquisition. In contrast, this interface provides the ability to record the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum of a phase. In a second part, this study highlights the interest and efficiency of the coupling in characterizing micrometric phases at the same point. This multimodal approach is illustrated with various issues encountered in geosciences. PMID:25016590

  1. SEM Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Expectations of higher education leaders are high, varied, and numerous. Leaders are expected not only to be visionary, decisive, and articulate, but also to share information, purposes, commitments, and struggles. Effective leaders must know and understand their faculty and staff; insist on realism; set clear goals and priorities; follow through;…

  2. Recent improvement of a FIB-SEM serial-sectioning method for precise 3D image reconstruction - application of the orthogonally-arranged FIB-SEM.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionWe installed the first "orthogonally-arranged" FIB-SEM in 2011. The most characteristic point of this instrument is that the FIB and SEM columns are perpendicularly mounted; this is specially designed to obtain a serial-sectioning dataset more accurately and precisely with higher contrast and higher spatial resolution compare to other current FIB-SEMs [1]. Since the installation in 2011, we have developed the hardware and methodology of the serial-sectioning based on this orthogonal FIB-SEM. In order to develop this technique, we have widely opened this instrument to every researcher of all fields. In the presentation, I would like to introduce some of application results that are obtained by users of this instrument. The characteristic points of the orthogonal systemFigure 1 shows a difference between the standard and the orthogonal FIB-SEM systems: In the standard system, shown in Fig.1(a), optical axes of a FIB and a SEM crosses around 60deg., while in the orthogonal system (Fig.1(b)), they are perpendicular to each other. The standard arrangement (a) is certainly suitable for TEM lamellae preparation etc. because the FIB and the SEM can see the same position simultaneously. However, for a serial-sectioning, it is not to say the best arrangement. One of the reasons is that the sliced plane by the FIB is not perpendicular to the electron beam so that the background contrast is not uniform and observed plane is distorted. On the other hand, in case of the orthogonally-arranged system,(b), these problems are resolved. In addition, spatial resolution can keep high enough even in a low accelerating voltage (e.g. 500V) because a working distance is set very small, 2mm. From these special design, we can obtain the serial-sectioning dataset from rather wide area (∼100um) with high spatial resolution (Max. 2×2×2nm). As this system has many kinds of detectors: SE, ET, Backscatter Electron(Energy-selective), EDS, EBSD, STEM(BF&ADF), with Ar+ ion-gun and a

  3. Information server test case: the effects of probe current stability on CD-SEM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Susan; Weller, Ron; Tomasco, Richard; Keese, Bill; Spaniola, Nick; Maeda, Tatsuya; Takenouchi, Kenichi; Page, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex; Williams, Roger; Berger, Daniel; Ward, Brandon

    2005-05-01

    There are many factors to consider when monitoring the stability of CD-SEM tools in the semiconductor manufacturing environment. With decreasing feature size and high aspect ratio dimensions, metrology tool calibration, stability, monitoring and matching play a more significant role in obtaining consistent CD measurements. It is not easy to separate the cause of outlier CD measurements. Tool owners need to consider all possible factors when matching across toolsets. For example, the tool should demonstrate repeatable electrical beam alignments in order to minimize the contribution of CD-SEM drift to measurement error. In order to overcome error in CD measurement caused by CD-SEM tool drift, it is important to monitor critical tool parameters that can produce shifts in CD measurements. Probe current is a critical CD-SEM parameter that affects CD measurement precision. Drifts in probe current can be the result of instabilities in the emission current, accumulation of contamination on the objective aperture, or misalignment of the SEM optics. Since measurement precision is impacted by drifts in probe current, Hitachi and HP began monitoring probe current on HP"s S9000 CD-SEMs in an effort to understand Ip drift effect on CD measurements. HP and Hitachi utilized an Information Server system, which was developed by Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., to facilitate data collection. Information server is a web-based program which will archive and monitor many parameters of Hitachi CD-SEM tools. Hitachi Applications Engineers worked with HP Metrology Engineering to put the capability in place. In this paper, we will address probe current instability and its impact on CD measurements. We will explore the relationship between probe current, CD data, and errors in pattern recognition caused by probe current and alignment drift.

  4. Musculoskeletal (MSK) and Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) in General Practice (GP): A Novel GP-based MSK and SEM Clinic for Managing Musculoskeletal symptoms in a GP

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints are common within primary care (1) (2) (3) but some General Practitioners (GPs)/family physicians do not feel comfortable managing these symptoms (3), preferring to refer onto hospital specialists or Integrated Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services (ICATs). Long waiting times for hospital outpatient reviews are a major cause of patient inconvenience and complaints (4). We therefore aimed to establish a GP-ran MSK and sport and exercise medicine (SEM) clinic based within a Belfast GP surgery that would contribute to a sustainable improvement in managing these common conditions within primary care as well as reducing waiting times for patients with these conditions to see a specialist. This shift from hospital-based to community-based management is in-keeping with recent policy changes within the UK health-system, including Transforming Your Care within Northern Ireland (NI) (5). The GP-ran MSK and SEM clinic was held monthly within a Belfast GP practice, staffed by one GP with a specialist interest in MSK and SEM conditions and its performance was reviewed over a three month period. Parameters audited included cases seen, orthopaedic and x-ray referral rates and secondary care referrals comparing the GP practice's performance to the same time period in the previous year as well as patient satisfaction questionnaires. PMID:26733320

  5. BIB-SEM of representative area clay structures paving towards an alternative model of porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Houben, M.; Hemes, S.; Klaver, J.

    2012-04-01

    A major contribution to understanding the sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation in clay-rich geomaterials is based on detailed investigation of the rock microstructures. However, the direct characterization of pores in representative elementary area (REA) and below µm-scale resolution remains challenging. To investigate directly the mm- to nm-scale porosity, SEM is certainly the most direct approach, but it is limited by the poor quality of the investigated surfaces. The recent development of ion milling tools (BIB and FIB; Desbois et al, 2009, 2011; Heath et al., 2011; Keller et al., 2011) and cryo-SEM allows respectively producing exceptional high quality polished cross-sections suitable for high resolution porosity SEM-imaging at nm-scale and investigating samples under wet conditions by cryogenic stabilization. This contribution focuses mainly on the SEM description of pore microstructures in 2D BIB-polished cross-sections of Boom (Mol site, Belgium) and Opalinus (Mont Terri, Switzerland) clays down to the SEM resolution. Pores detected in images are statistically analyzed to perform porosity quantification in REA. On the one hand, BIB-SEM results allow retrieving MIP measurements obtained from larger sample volumes. On the other hand, the BIB-SEM approach allows characterizing porosity-homogeneous and -predictable islands, which form the elementary components of an alternative concept of porosity/permeability model based on pore microstructures. Desbois G., Urai J.L. and Kukla P.A. (2009) Morphology of the pore space in claystones - evidence from BIB/FIB ion beam sectioning and cryo-SEM observations. E-Earth, 4, 15-22. Desbois G., Urai J.L., Kukla P.A., Konstanty J. and Baerle C. (2011). High-resolution 3D fabric and porosity model in a tight gas sandstone reservoir: a new approach to investigate microstructures from mm- to nm-scale combining argon beam cross-sectioning and SEM imaging . Journal of Petroleum Science

  6. Environmental SEM and dye penetration observation on resin-tooth interface using different light curing method.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the effects of different light curing methods on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using the dye penetration test and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on cervical regions. The teeth were restored with Clearfil Liner Bond 2 V adhesive and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composites. These resins were cured with a conventional light-curing method or a slow-start curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the dye penetration test to evaluate marginal sealing and adaptation of the resin composites to the cavity walls. These resin-tooth interfaces were then observed using environmental SEM. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios during polymerization, suggests high compensation for polymerization stress using the slow-start curing method. There was a high correlation between dye penetration test and environmental SEM observation. PMID:26830828

  7. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of CD-SEM images for linewidth and critical dimension metrology.

    PubMed

    Li, Y G; Zhang, P; Ding, Z J

    2013-01-01

    In semiconductor industry, strict critical dimension control by using a critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) is an extremely urgent task in near-term years. A Monte Carlo simulation model for study of CD-SEM image has been established, which is based on using Mott's cross section for electron elastic scattering and the full Penn dielectric function formalism for electron inelastic scattering and the associated secondary electron (SE) production. In this work, a systematic calculation of CD-SEM line-scan profiles and 2D images of trapezoidal Si lines has been performed by taking into account different experimental factors including electron beam condition (primary energy, probe size), line geometry (width, height, foot/corner rounding, sidewall angle, and roughness), material properties, and SE signal detection. The influences of these factors to the critical dimension metrology are investigated, leading to build a future comprehensive model-based library. PMID:22887037

  9. Orientation mapping by transmission-SEM with an on-axis detector.

    PubMed

    Fundenberger, J J; Bouzy, E; Goran, D; Guyon, J; Yuan, H; Morawiec, A

    2016-02-01

    Conventional orientation mapping in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a valuable technique for characterizing crystalline materials, but its application to ultrafine or nano-grain materials is limited by its spatial resolution. The resolution can be increased by collecting transmission diffraction patterns in SEM. In previous works, such patterns were collected using off-axis detectors in nearly vertical position. To avoid some drawbacks of such arrangement, a new configuration was devised in which the scintillator is located underneath the thin foil on the optical axis of the microscope, and the light is reflected towards the camera by a mirror. This simple configuration gives intense patterns even at very low probe currents, and can be potentially used for collecting maps of relatively high spatial resolution. Example maps reveal details with dimensions of about 5nm. Because of its resolution and geometric simplicity, the proposed configuration will open new opportunities in SEM-based characterization of nanocrystalline materials. PMID:26624512

  10. Self-Expanding Metal Stent (SEMS): an innovative rescue therapy for refractory acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Ona, Mel A.; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis or less commonly splenic vein thrombosis. Pharmacological and endoscopic interventions are cornerstones in the management of variceal bleeding but may fail in 10 – 15 % of patients. Rescue therapy with balloon tamponade (BT) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be required to control refractory acute variceal bleeding effectively but with some limitations. The self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a covered, removable tool that can be deployed in the lower esophagus under endoscopic guidance as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis for refractory AVB. Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety of SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Methods: In this review article, we have performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series describing SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, limitations, and complications are discussed. Results: At present, 103 cases have been described in the literature. Studies have reported 97.08 % technical success rates in deployment of SEMS. Most of the stents were intact for 4 – 14 days with no major complications reported. Stent extraction had a success rate of 100 %. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 96 % of cases with only 3.12 % found to have rebleeding after placement of SEMS. Stent migration, which was the most common complication, was observed in 21 % of patients. Conclusion: SEMS is a safe and effective alternative approach as a rescue therapy for refractory AVB. PMID:26135101

  11. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  12. Characterization of Polycapillary Optics in a TES Microcalorimeter EDS System Installed on an SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, A.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Yasuda, K.; Maeno, H.; Shiiyama, K.; Tanaka, K.

    2015-10-01

    Energy-dispersive spectroscopic measurements are performed using a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for advanced research at Kyushu University. Because the sensitive area of the TES microcalorimeter is about 0.02~mm2 , polycapillary optics is used to collect the X-rays emitted by the SEM specimen on the TES microcalorimeter. The X-ray transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is obtained by analyzing the X-ray energy spectra measured by the TES microcalorimeter. The obtained transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is reproduced by the calculated results of the simulation.

  13. STEM mode in the SEM for the analysis of cellular sections prepared by ultramicrotome sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondow, N.; Harrington, J.; Brydson, R.; Brown, A.

    2012-07-01

    The use of the dual imaging capabilities of a scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector is highlighted in the analysis of samples with importance in the field of nanotoxicology. Cellular uptake of nanomaterials is often examined by transmission electron microscopy of thin sections prepared by ultramicrotome sectioning. Examination by SEM allows for the detection of artefacts caused by sample preparation (eg. nanomaterial pull-out) and the complementary STEM mode permits study of the interaction between nanomaterials and cells. Thin sections of two nanomaterials of importance in nanotoxicology (cadmium selenide quantum dots and single walled carbon nanotubes) are examined using STEM mode in the SEM.

  14. Characterization of Polycapillary Optics in a TES Microcalorimeter EDS System Installed on an SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, A.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Yasuda, K.; Maeno, H.; Shiiyama, K.; Tanaka, K.

    2016-08-01

    Energy-dispersive spectroscopic measurements are performed using a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for advanced research at Kyushu University. Because the sensitive area of the TES microcalorimeter is about 0.02~mm2, polycapillary optics is used to collect the X-rays emitted by the SEM specimen on the TES microcalorimeter. The X-ray transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is obtained by analyzing the X-ray energy spectra measured by the TES microcalorimeter. The obtained transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is reproduced by the calculated results of the simulation.

  15. CEC Handbook for Strengthening Grassroots Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook is designed: (1) to empower individuals working with people who have disabilities to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work; and (2) to help them to channel their strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The handbook…

  16. Automated flow for site definition and CD measurement with a SEM for use in mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotsch, Christian; Haffner, Henning; Ruebekohl, Christian; Buechner, Bettine

    2002-12-01

    The continuous tightening of CD and registration specifications demands most advanced metrology equipment and highly sophisticated logistics and measurement strategies. Not only the smallness of structures but also the increasing number of measurement sites is a challenge. Until recently, CD measurements in mask mass production were done at a handful of different positions using mainly optical microscopy. The measurement locations were usually picked randomly according to the visual image and some general rules that were agreed upon between lithographers and the mask shop. In this paper we describe a flow for SEM based CD measurement in automated production. A new type of instances is introduced solely to provide a simple and effective way for transferring the desired measurement locations from design to a mask shop. Therefore, we use the new CATS features that allow highly automated and flexible off-line preparation of measurement jobs. On the KLA-Tencor 8250-R CD-SEM we furthermore utilize its capability of converting CATS output files into fully functional SEM measurement jobs with large numbers of sites and multiple steps of pattern recognition. A comparison of results obtained with the CATS jobs with those of native SEM jobs proves the consistency of data.

  17. Probing Liquid Surfaces under Vacuum Using SEM and TOF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.

    2011-08-07

    Applying vacuum-based molecular probes of liquid surfaces would aid many environmental, biological, and industrial studies. However the high vapor pressure of water and most organic solvents largely prohibit this use. We report a newly developed versatile and self-contained vacuum interface for high-vapor pressure liquid surfaces, and its application in a time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOFSIMS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The self-contained module requires no wires or tubing connections to the outside of the instrument. It uses a microfluidic channel with a 3 micrometer diameter window into the flowing fluid beneath it. This window supports the liquid against the vacuum by the liquid’s surface tension, while limiting the high-density vapor region traversed by the probe beams to only a few microns. This aperture size also limits temperature and concentration changes due to evaporation of the solvent. The beam damage caused by the probe beams is largely negligible, as the flowing liquid surface self-renews. We demonstrate the performance of this microfluidic interface for in situ liquid surface TOFSIMS (ISLS-TOFSIMS) and SEM (ISLS-SEM) for chemical analysis of liquid surfaces. This device enables in situ liquid (ISL) studies in a wide range of vacuum analytical methods beyond SEM and TOFSIMS.

  18. Subjective Values of Quality of Life Dimensions in Elderly People. A SEM Preference Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a Thurstonian model in the framework of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to assess preferences among quality of life dimensions for the elderly. Data were gathered by a paired comparison design in a sample comprised of 323 people aged from 65 to 94 years old. Five dimensions of quality of life were evaluated: Health,…

  19. Promoting Positive Attitudes between Mainstreamed SEM Students and Regular Students in an Elementary School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Madge E.

    Because handicapped and nonhandicapped students in a Pennsylvania elementary school were not sucessfully mainstreamed and lacked social skills, a practicum was devised to (1) teach social behavior skills to socially/emotionally maladjusted (SEM) students, and (2) present social skill intervention strategies promoting a positive attitude between…

  20. 30 CFR 250.1920 - What are the auditing requirements for my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1920 What are the auditing requirements... program? 250.1920 Section 250.1920 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... subpart and API RP 75 to identify areas in which safety and environmental performance needs to be...

  1. The Application of SEM to Behavioral Research in Oncology: Past Accomplishments and Future Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnoll, Robert A.; Fang, Carolyn Y.; Manne, Sharon L.

    2004-01-01

    The past decade has seen a tremendous growth in the use of structural equation modeling (SEM) to address research questions in 2 subfields of behavioral science: cancer prevention and control (e.g., determinants of cancer screening adherence) and behavioral oncology (e.g., determinants of psychosocial adjustment among cancer patients or…

  2. A Sandwich-Type Standard Error Estimator of SEM Models with Multivariate Time Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Chow, Sy-Miin; Ong, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Structural equation models are increasingly used as a modeling tool for multivariate time series data in the social and behavioral sciences. Standard error estimators of SEM models, originally developed for independent data, require modifications to accommodate the fact that time series data are inherently dependent. In this article, we extend a…

  3. 30 CFR 250.1920 - What are the auditing requirements for my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... program? (a) Your SEMS program must be audited by an accredited ASP according to the requirements of this... agent of the ASP, and must not have any affiliation with the operator. The remaining team members may be chosen from your personnel and those of the ASP. The audit must be comprehensive and include all...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1920 - What are the auditing requirements for my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... program? (a) Your SEMS program must be audited by an accredited ASP according to the requirements of this... agent of the ASP, and must not have any affiliation with the operator. The remaining team members may be chosen from your personnel and those of the ASP. The audit must be comprehensive and include all...

  5. SEM studies of the structure of the gels prepared from untreated and radiation modified potato starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Sartowska, Bożena; Królak, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Potato starch was irradiated with a 60Co gamma rays using doses of 5, 10, 20 and 30 kGy. Gels containing ca. 9.1% of starch were prepared by heating the starch suspensions in the heating chamber stabilized at 100 °C. Four procedures were applied for preparation of the samples in regard to SEM studies and the ability to observe the radiation effect by SEM was assessed for each method. Differences were observed between the SEM images recorded for the non-irradiated samples prepared using all the methods, and those irradiated. Images of the non-irradiated gels indicate generally a honey-comb structure, while smooth areas but with oriented fractures has appeared after irradiation. Modification of gel structure corresponds to the applied dose. The results were related to the process of gel formation (as observed by means of the hot stage microscope) to decrease in swelling power of the irradiated starch and to decreased viscosity of the resulting gels. It can be concluded that the differences in structural properties of gels shown by SEM result probably due to the better homogenization of the gels formed after radiation induced degradation.

  6. 3D reconstruction of SEM images by use of optical photogrammetry software.

    PubMed

    Eulitz, Mona; Reiss, Gebhard

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) surface of an object to be examined is widely used for structure analysis in science and many biological questions require information about their true 3D structure. For Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) there has been no efficient non-destructive solution for reconstruction of the surface morphology to date. The well-known method of recording stereo pair images generates a 3D stereoscope reconstruction of a section, but not of the complete sample surface. We present a simple and non-destructive method of 3D surface reconstruction from SEM samples based on the principles of optical close range photogrammetry. In optical close range photogrammetry a series of overlapping photos is used to generate a 3D model of the surface of an object. We adapted this method to the special SEM requirements. Instead of moving a detector around the object, the object itself was rotated. A series of overlapping photos was stitched and converted into a 3D model using the software commonly used for optical photogrammetry. A rabbit kidney glomerulus was used to demonstrate the workflow of this adaption. The reconstruction produced a realistic and high-resolution 3D mesh model of the glomerular surface. The study showed that SEM micrographs are suitable for 3D reconstruction by optical photogrammetry. This new approach is a simple and useful method of 3D surface reconstruction and suitable for various applications in research and teaching. PMID:26073969

  7. Teacher's Corner: Structural Equation Modeling with the Sem Package in R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, John

    2006-01-01

    R is free, open-source, cooperatively developed software that implements the S statistical programming language and computing environment. The current capabilities of R are extensive, and it is in wide use, especially among statisticians. The sem package provides basic structural equation modeling facilities in R, including the ability to fit…

  8. Intra-uterine devices, A SEM study on the Dalkon Shield.

    PubMed

    Guidoin, R; Courtney, J M; Brault, R; Domurado, D; Haggis, G H

    1976-01-01

    A SEM study carried on intra-uterine devices (Dalkon Shield) is reported. The poor manufacturing of the devices is stressed, which could increase their efficiency but also the risks of penetration, or worse, perforation. The solution for the future could be copper bearing intra-uterine devices coated by hydrogels. This should maintain efficiency and improve security. PMID:1276332

  9. 13 Years of SOHO/CELIAS/SEM Calibrated Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, D.; Didkovsky, L.; Wieman, S.; Gangopadhyay, P.

    2008-12-01

    A verified and updated version of the calibrated SOHO/CELIAS/SEM (absolute) solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) measurements from the beginning of the mission in 1996 through the present is available at the University of Southern California Space Sciences Center website. To complete this new version, six (1999- 2006) sounding rocket under-flights were analyzed using measurements from both a very stable Rare Gas (Ne) Ionization Cell (RGIC) and a clone of the flight SEM instrument. These sounding rocket under-flights have provided a number of reference points that have been compared with the solar flux data published on our web site (last revised in 2000). These reference points are in good agreement with the solar cycle EUV flux for the 30.4 nm first order (26 nm to 34 nm) SEM channels, indicating a very small (less than 1 percent) averaged difference from the published flux for the six under-flights. Thirteen years of continuous and accurate SEM data will continue to provide important information about short term (solar flares) and long term (solar cycle) changes of EUV solar irradiance, and will be used for advancing solar models, for more accurate Earth atmosphere drag models, ionization proxies, and atmospheric dynamics generally, and will also provide solar EUV measurement overlap with the new SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), to be launched in 2009.

  10. 30 CFR 250.1920 - What are the auditing requirements for my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designated and qualified personnel according to the requirements of this subpart and API RP 75, Section 12... thirteen elements of your SEMS program to evaluate compliance with the requirements of this subpart and API... audit plan and procedures must meet or exceed all of the recommendations included in API RP 75...

  11. Combination of FTIR and SEM for Identifying Freshwater-Cultured Pearls from Different Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satitkune, Somruedee; Monarumit, Natthapong; Boonmee, Chakkrich; Phlayrahan, Aumaparn; Promdee, Kittiphop; Won-in, Krit

    2016-03-01

    The freshwater-cultured pearl ( Chamberlainia hainesiana species) is an organic gemstone mainly composed of calcium carbonate mineral including calcite, aragonite and vaterite phases. Generally, the quality of freshwater-cultured pearl is based on its luster. The high luster pearl is full of the aragonite phase without vaterite phase. On the other hand, the low luster pearl consists of aragonite and vaterite phases. These data could be proved by the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As the results, the high luster pearl similarly shows the FTIR spectrum of aragonite phase, and also, it shows the hexagonal shape of aragonite for the SEM image. On the other hand, the FTIR spectrum of low luster pearl has been pointed to the mixture component among aragonite and vaterite phases, and based on the SEM image; the irregular form is also interpreted to the mixture of aragonite and vaterite phases. This research concludes that the quality of freshwater-cultured pearls can be identified by the combination data of FTIR spectra and SEM images. These techniques are suitable for applied gemology.

  12. Situational Effects May Account for Gain Scores in Cognitive Ability Testing: A Longitudinal SEM Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matton, Nadine; Vautier, Stephane; Raufaste, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Mean gain scores for cognitive ability tests between two sessions in a selection setting are now a robust finding, yet not fully understood. Many authors do not attribute such gain scores to an increase in the target abilities. Our approach consists of testing a longitudinal SEM model suitable to this view. We propose to model the scores' changes…

  13. The Great War and Remembrance in Jose Leon Machado's "Memoria das Estrelas sem Brilho"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Milton M.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes Jose Leon Machado's novel, "Memoria das Estrelas sem Brilho," as a multilayered historical novel in which a war story provides a background for comments on aspects of early twentieth-century Portuguese society, such as male bonding, religion, sexual mores, and social stratification. (Contains 11 notes.)

  14. Maximum Likelihood Dynamic Factor Modeling for Arbitrary "N" and "T" Using SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkle, Manuel C.; Oud, Johan H. L.; von Oertzen, Timo; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-01-01

    This article has 3 objectives that build on each other. First, we demonstrate how to obtain maximum likelihood estimates for dynamic factor models (the direct autoregressive factor score model) with arbitrary "T" and "N" by means of structural equation modeling (SEM) and compare the approach to existing methods. Second, we go beyond standard time…

  15. 30 CFR 250.1915 - What criteria for training must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What criteria for training must be in my SEMS program? 250.1915 Section 250.1915 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... understanding of, and adherence to, the current operating procedures, using periodic drills, to verify...

  16. The Capabilities and Applications of FY-3A/B SEM on Monitoring Space Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Li, J.; Yu, T.; Xue, B.; Wang, C.; Zhang, X.; Cao, G.; Liu, D.; Tang, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Environment Monitor (SEM), on board the Chinese meteorological satellites, FengYun-3A/B has the abilities to measure proton flux in 3-300 Mev energy range and electron flux in 0.15-5.7 Mev energy range. SEM can also detect the heavy ion compositions, satellite surface potential, the radiation dose in sensors, and the single events. The space environment information derived from SEM can be utilized for satellite security designs, scientific studies, development of radiation belt models, and space weather monitoring and disaster warning. In this study, the SEM's instrument characteristics are introduced and the post-launch calibration algorithm is presented. The applications in monitoring space weather events and the service for manned spaceflights are also demonstrated.; The protons with particle energy over 10 Mev are called "killer particles". These particles may damage the satellite and cause disruption of satellite's system. The protons flux of 10 M-26 Mev energy band reached 5000 in the SPE caused by a solar flare with CME during the period of 2012.01.23 to 2012.01.27 as shown in the figure. THE COMPARISONS OF HEAVY IONS (2010.11.11-2010.12.15)t;

  17. CD measurement evaluation on periodic patterns between optic tools and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongkyoo; Kim, Munsik; Oh, Sunghyun; Han, Oscar

    2006-10-01

    As feature size is shrinking and MEEF (Mask error enhancement factor) is increasing, CD measurement accuracy is more important, and CD SEM is widely used to replace optic tools because of their resolution. But CD-SEM is not representing the effect of Cr profile or transmittance of light which is transferred to wafer. Recently, new OCD (optic CD) tool which use scatterometry (Spectroscopic Ellipsometry) *1) is introduced to compensate the demerit of SEM of low through-put and reflected surface information of mask. This scatterometry tool can be used only on periodic pattern like DRAM. And this tool must be calibrated on each pattern type and shape. This calibration is the barrier to use this scatterometry method to mask process where all masks are processed one time. In this work, new optical CD measurement method which use conventional optic microscope of transmitted and reflected light with high resolution lens of DUV on periodic patterns is introduced. To enhance the accuracy of measurement, interpolating method and FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) are used. CD measurement results of linearity by optic CD, SE and CD-SEM were compared on several patterns. And CD variations on full field of image were evaluated on L/S patterns and active layer of DRAM.

  18. Morphological modelling of three-phase microstructures of anode layers using SEM images.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bassam; Willot, François; Jeulin, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    A general method is proposed to model 3D microstructures representative of three-phases anode layers used in fuel cells. The models are based on SEM images of cells with varying morphologies. The materials are first characterized using three morphological measurements: (cross-)covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. They are measured on segmented SEM images, for each of the three phases. Second, a generic model for three-phases materials is proposed. The model is based on two independent underlying random sets which are otherwise arbitrary. The validity of this model is verified using the cross-covariance functions of the various phases. In a third step, several types of Boolean random sets and plurigaussian models are considered for the unknown underlying random sets. Overall, good agreement is found between the SEM images and three-phases models based on plurigaussian random sets, for all morphological measurements considered in the present work: covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. The spatial distribution and shapes of the phases produced by the plurigaussian model are visually very close to the real material. Furthermore, the proposed models require no numerical optimization and are straightforward to generate using the covariance functions measured on the SEM images. PMID:26765069

  19. 3D SEM for surface topography quantification - a case study on dental surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glon, F.; Flys, O.; Lööf, P.-J.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-03-01

    3D analysis of surface topography is becoming a more used tool for industry and research. New ISO standards are being launched to assist in quantifying engineering surfaces. The traditional optical measuring instrumentation used for 3D surface characterization has been optical interferometers and confocal based instrumentation. However, the resolution here is limited in the lateral dimension to the wavelength of visible light to about 500 nm. The great advantage using the SEM for topography measurements is the high flexibility to zoom from low magnifications and locating interesting areas to high magnification of down to nanometer large surface features within seconds. This paper presents surface characterization of dental implant micro topography. 3D topography data was created from SEM images using commercial photogrammetric software. A coherence scanning interferometer was used for reference measurements to compare with the 3D SEM measurements on relocated areas. As a result of this study, measurements emphasizes that the correlation between the accepted CSI measurements and the new technology represented by photogrammetry based on SEM images for many areal characterization parameters are around or less than 20%. The importance of selecting sampling and parameter sensitivity to varying sampling is high-lighted. Future work includes a broader study of limitations of the photogrammetry technique on certified micro-geometries and more application surfaces at different scales.

  20. Prescriptive Statements and Educational Practice: What Can Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Offer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal structural equation modeling (SEM) can be a basis for making prescriptive statements on educational practice and offers yields over "traditional" statistical techniques under the general linear model. The extent to which prescriptive statements can be made will rely on the appropriate accommodation of key elements of research design,…

  1. 30 CFR 250.1916 - What criteria for mechanical integrity must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What criteria for mechanical integrity must my... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1916 What criteria for mechanical... instructions to ensure the mechanical integrity and safe operation of equipment through inspection,...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1916 - What criteria for mechanical integrity must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What criteria for mechanical integrity must my... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1916 What criteria for mechanical... instructions to ensure the mechanical integrity and safe operation of equipment through inspection,...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1916 - What criteria for mechanical integrity must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What criteria for mechanical integrity must my... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1916 What criteria for mechanical... instructions to ensure the mechanical integrity and safe operation of equipment through inspection,...

  4. High-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM).

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Konoto, Makoto; Koike, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have developed spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) with a 5-nm resolution. The secondary electron optics is very important, as it needs to transfer a sufficient number of secondary electrons to the spin polarimeter, due to the low efficiency of the polarimeter. The optics was designed using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program of the secondary electron trajectories, and it achieves highly efficient collection and transport of the secondary electrons even though the distance between the sample and the objective lens exit of the electron gun remains short. Moreover, the designed optics enables us to obtain clear SEM images in the spin SEM measurement and to precisely adjust the probe beam shape. These functions lead to images with high spatial resolution and sufficient signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. This optics has been installed in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) spin SEM chamber with a Schottky-type electron gun for the probe electron beam. We observed recorded bits on a perpendicular magnetic recording medium and visualized small irregularities in the bit shapes around the track edges and bit boundaries. The high resolution of 5 nm was demonstrated by observing the smallest domain composed by a single grain in the recording medium. PMID:19840986

  5. 30 CFR 250.1912 - What criteria for management of change must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What criteria for management of change must my... change must my SEMS program meet? (a) You must develop and implement written management of change... prior to their implementation. (d) The following items must be included in your management of...

  6. Why Isn't Talent Development on the IEP? SEM and the Twice Exceptional Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Susan; Novak, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Why isn't talent development included on the Individual Educational Plan of 2E students? Twice exceptional students have unique issues that respond especially well to a talent development approach especially within the context of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model. Through case studies and a review of successful projects using SEM with at risk…

  7. 30 CFR 250.1902 - What must I include in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... following SEMS program elements: (1) General (see § 250.1909) (2) Safety and Environmental Information (see § 250.1910) (3) Hazards Analysis (see § 250.1911) (4) Management of Change (see § 250.1912) (5) Operating Procedures (see § 250.1913) (6) Safe Work Practices (see § 250.1914) (7) Training (see §...

  8. 30 CFR 250.1902 - What must I include in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following SEMS program elements: (1) General (see § 250.1909) (2) Safety and Environmental Information (see § 250.1910) (3) Hazards Analysis (see § 250.1911) (4) Management of Change (see § 250.1912) (5) Operating Procedures (see § 250.1913) (6) Safe Work Practices (see § 250.1914) (7) Training (see §...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1902 - What must I include in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following SEMS program elements: (1) General (see § 250.1909) (2) Safety and Environmental Information (see § 250.1910) (3) Hazards Analysis (see § 250.1911) (4) Management of Change (see § 250.1912) (5) Operating Procedures (see § 250.1913) (6) Safe Work Practices (see § 250.1914) (7) Training (see §...

  10. 78 FR 50079 - Information Collection Activities: Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS); Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement [Docket ID BSEE-2013-0005; OMB Control Number 1014-0017: 134E1700D2 EEEE500000 ET1SF0000.DAQ000] Information Collection Activities: Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS); Proposed...

  11. Marginal integrity and microleakage of direct and indirect composite inlays: SEM and stereomicroscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Celiberto, Leonardo; Dechichi, Paula; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct and indirect composite inlays by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty bovine incisors were ground to obtain an incisal platform, simulating the occlusal surface of a human molar. Each tooth received two 8 degrees proximal cavities with cervical finishing line prepared in dentine or enamel. One of the cavities was filled with Filtek Z250/Single Bond, using the direct technique, and the other was filled with with Solidex/Rely X ARC/Single Bond, using the indirect technique. The samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and placed in a 50% silver nitrate solution for 6 hours in a dark container. Next, the samples were washed under running water, immersed in a developing solution and exposed to fluorescent light for 12 hours. The teeth were then severed and evaluated for dye penetration by stereomicroscopy and SEM. There were no significant differences between the direct and indirect techniques for the cervical finishing line in enamel, but for the finishing line in dentin, the indirect technique allowed less microleakage than the direct technique. SEM analysis showed leakage similar to that observed by stereomicroscopic analysis. The use of stereomicroscopic and SEM evaluations improves microleakage analysis. PMID:16491259

  12. Levels of mineral nutrients in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated biological specimens: a comparison of EDS data collected in the environmental SEM and a conventional cryo-SEM.

    PubMed

    Egerton-Warburton, L M; Griffin, B J

    1994-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) was compared in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated tissues using the Environmental SEM (ESEM) and conventional cryo-SEM, respectively. Analysis of globoid inclusions of Eucalyptus calophylla seed from two soil types demonstrated that higher levels of cations (K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) occurred in seeds from soils containing higher levels of Al, while EDS-detectable levels of S and P were dependent upon the techniques utilised. Cumulative changes in ESEM-EDS-detectable levels of S and P were characterized by collecting cumulative spectra from nutrient standards and compared with those for K. Progressive increases in K occurred and were consistent with an enriching effect. Levels of S and P increased during early analysis (40-60 sec live time) and decreased thereafter. The semi-conductive nature of biological samples, the loss of anions and gain of cations from the net negatively-charged electron interaction volume contributed to an electrochemical bias. These local modifications in fluid chemistry were reversible. Dehydration effects also occurred in stable, 'wet' samples. These differences indicated that EDS in ESEM may be limited to cations rather than anions, and that changes in fluid electrochemistry and dehydration may affect the level and distribution of elements. PMID:7881898

  13. Cryo-SEM study of nanostructure development of latex dispersions and block copolymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaobo

    High resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was used to study the physics of latex film formation. Fast freezing, controlled freeze-drying and annealing under vacuum, followed by room-temperature and cryogenic SEM demonstrated that van der Waals force alone can compact a latex coating under conditions devoid of surface tension and capillary forces. Rewetting tests of the annealed coatings shed light on distinguishing elastic and viscoelastic deformation. Key factors affecting the freeze-thaw (F/T) stability of polymer latexes were studied. The nanostructural changes during freeze-thaw cycles were visualized by cryo-SEM. Reducing Tg and modulus of the polymer, latex particle size, amount of protective functional groups, molecular weight and addition of coalescent all lead to reduced F/T stability. Both the freezing and thawing rates have strong impact on F/T stability. Both functional acid monomer type and degree of neutralization in pre-emulsion greatly influence the ability of the latex and titanium dioxide (TiO 2) particles to interact with each other which prevents TiO2 particle aggregation. Latexes incorporated with vinylphosphonic or itaconic acid show better TiO2 efficiency than latexes with acrylic acid or methacrylic acid. For acid monomers with high water solubility, higher degree of neutralization in pre-emulsion yields in general lower TiO 2 efficiency. Cryo-SEM was employed to further understand the nature of nanostructure deduced by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) for poly(butadiene- b-ethylene oxide) diblock copolymers solutions, as a function of copolymer concentration and block copolymer composition. The SAXS measurements and cryo-SEM images reveal a new type of network morphology, comprised of a random arrangement of interconnected cylinders, in addition to the other classical structures.

  14. High resolution SEM imaging of gold nanoparticles in cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A; Soroka, Y; Frušić-Zlotkin, M; Popov, I; Kohen, R

    2014-12-01

    The growing demand of gold nanoparticles in medical applications increases the need for simple and efficient characterization methods of the interaction between the nanoparticles and biological systems. Due to its nanometre resolution, modern scanning electron microscopy (SEM) offers straightforward visualization of metallic nanoparticles down to a few nanometre size, almost without any special preparation step. However, visualization of biological materials in SEM requires complicated preparation procedure, which is typically finished by metal coating needed to decrease charging artefacts and quick radiation damage of biomaterials in the course of SEM imaging. The finest conductive metal coating available is usually composed of a few nanometre size clusters, which are almost identical to the metal nanoparticles employed in medical applications. Therefore, SEM monitoring of metal nanoparticles within cells and tissues is incompatible with the conventional preparation methods. In this work, we show that charging artefacts related to non-conductive biological specimen can be successfully eliminated by placing the uncoated biological sample on a conductive substrate. By growing the cells on glass pre-coated with a chromium layer, we were able to observe the uptake of 10 nm gold nanoparticles inside uncoated and unstained macrophages and keratinocytes cells. Imaging in back scattered electrons allowed observation of gold nanoparticles located inside the cells, while imaging in secondary electron gave information on gold nanoparticles located on the surface of the cells. By mounting a skin cross-section on an improved conductive holder, consisting of a silicon substrate coated with copper, we were able to observe penetration of gold nanoparticles of only 5 nm size through the skin barrier in an uncoated skin tissue. The described method offers a convenient modification in preparation procedure for biological samples to be analyzed in SEM. The method provides high

  15. AxiSEM and instaseis: Fast simulation of global wavefields across the frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; Stähler, S. C.; Hosseini, K.; Leng, K.

    2015-12-01

    We present our seismic modeling methods AxiSEM and instaseis. These methods exploit recent developments in high-performance computing and suitable numerical methods for seismic wave propagation, while operating efficiently across the vast observable frequency spectrum of global waves in sparse yet realistic structures. AxiSEM (www.axisem.info and geodynamics.org) relies upon axisymmetric (including spherically symmetric) models, thereby satisfying a large fraction of observable data. The benefit of this method lies in the resultant dimensional collapse to two numerical dimensions, whereby the third azimuthal dimension is tackled analytically. For high-frequency wave propagation, this leads to 3-4 orders of magnitude speedup in computational cost compared to 3D domain discretizations. AxiSEM is highly scalable and accommodates efficient implementations of viscoelasticity and anisotropy. We will present benchmarks, data comparisons, a diverse range of applications from inner-core anisotropy to noise modeling and lowermost mantle structures, and wavefields for sensitivity kernels. We also touch upon ongoing efforts for linking computational cost to structural complexity in the vein of Occam's razor, eventually allowing for an adaptive rendition of 1D, 2D and 3D structures at optimally low computational cost, as well as 1D/3D hybrid approaches. Instaseis (www.instaseis.net) is a methodology to extract full, broadband and accurate waveforms instantaneously from wavefield databases computed with AxiSEM. This "once-and-for-all solution" relies on reciprocity and requires only two AxiSEM simulations to construct the databases, while allowing for arbitrary parameter changes (e.g. source, processing, structure) instantaneously with modest computational cost and storage requirements. The instaseis python package is integrated with ObsPy, contains a graphical user interface, and can be used for source inversion, noise simulations, finite-fault modeling, waveform tomography

  16. GPU accelerated Monte-Carlo simulation of SEM images for metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Hagen, C. W.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we address the computation times of numerical studies in dimensional metrology. In particular, full Monte-Carlo simulation programs for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image acquisition are known to be notoriously slow. Our quest in reducing the computation time of SEM image simulation has led us to investigate the use of graphics processing units (GPUs) for metrology. We have succeeded in creating a full Monte-Carlo simulation program for SEM images, which runs entirely on a GPU. The physical scattering models of this GPU simulator are identical to a previous CPU-based simulator, which includes the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering and also refinements for low-voltage SEM applications. As a case study for the performance, we considered the simulated exposure of a complex feature: an isolated silicon line with rough sidewalls located on a at silicon substrate. The surface of the rough feature is decomposed into 408 012 triangles. We have used an exposure dose of 6 mC/cm2, which corresponds to 6 553 600 primary electrons on average (Poisson distributed). We repeat the simulation for various primary electron energies, 300 eV, 500 eV, 800 eV, 1 keV, 3 keV and 5 keV. At first we run the simulation on a GeForce GTX480 from NVIDIA. The very same simulation is duplicated on our CPU-based program, for which we have used an Intel Xeon X5650. Apart from statistics in the simulation, no difference is found between the CPU and GPU simulated results. The GTX480 generates the images (depending on the primary electron energy) 350 to 425 times faster than a single threaded Intel X5650 CPU. Although this is a tremendous speedup, we actually have not reached the maximum throughput because of the limited amount of available memory on the GTX480. Nevertheless, the speedup enables the fast acquisition of simulated SEM images for metrology. We now have the potential to investigate case studies in CD-SEM metrology, which otherwise would take unreasonable

  17. Rotational Scanning Electron Micrographs (rSEM): A novel and accessible tool to visualize and communicate complex morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, David K-B; Brunke, Adam J.; Akkari, Nesrine; Souza, Carina Mara; Pape, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract An accessible workflow is presented to create interactive, rotational scanning electron micrographs (rSEM). These information-rich animations facilitate the study and communication of complex morphological structures exemplified here by male arthropod genitalia. Methods are outlined for the publication of rSEMs on the web or in journal articles as SWF files. Image components of rSEMs were archived in MorphBank to ensure future data access. rSEM represents a promising new addition to the toolkit of a new generation of digital taxonomy. PMID:24146547

  18. FIB–SEM tomography of 4th generation PWA 1497 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziętara, Maciej Kruk, Adam Gruszczyński, Adam Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-15

    The effect of creep deformation on the microstructure of the PWA 1497 single crystal Ni-base superalloy developed for turbine blade applications was investigated. The aim of the present study was to characterize quantitatively a superalloy microstructure and subsequent development of rafted γ′ precipitates in the PWA 1497 during creep deformation at 982 °C and 248 MPa up to rupture. The PWA1497 microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FIB–SEM electron tomography. The 3D reconstruction of the PWA1497 microstructure is presented and discussed. - Highlights: • The microstructure of PWA1497 superalloy was examined using FIB–SEM tomography. • In case of modern single crystal superalloys, measurements of A{sub A} are adequate for V{sub V}. • During creep the γ channel width increases from 65 to 193 nm for ruptured specimen. • Tomography is a useful technique for quantitative studies of material microstructure.

  19. SEM Technique for Depth Profiling the Morphology of Diblock Copolymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher; Park, Miri; Chaikin, Paul; Register, Richard; Adamson, Doug

    1996-03-01

    We present a novel technique which allows the investigation of thin film diblock copolymer microphase morphology on a variety of substrates and at different film depths. Using a high resolution, low voltage Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), we examined the topology and underlying morphology of styrene-butadiene diblock copolymer films. In order to enhance the contrast between the styrene and butadiene regions, we stained the butadiene with osmium tetraoxide. The internal morphology of the diblock copolymer film was exposed by using a non-selective fluorine-based reactive ion etching (RIE) technique. By controlling the depth of the RIE, we can effectively peel off one monolayer at a time. By alternating between RIE and SEM, we can examine the diblock copolymer film morphology at different depths. We also investigated the relationship between island formation and internal polymer microstructure. This work was supported by the NSF under DMR 9400362.

  20. Phase and amplitude patterns in DySEM mappings of vibrating microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, M.-A.; Sturm, H.; Holschneider, M.

    2013-05-01

    We use a dynamic scanning electron microscope (DySEM) to analyze the movement of oscillating micromechanical structures. A dynamic secondary electron (SE) signal is recorded and correlated to the oscillatory excitation of scanning force microscope (SFM) cantilever by means of lock-in amplifiers. We show, how the relative phase of the oscillations modulate the resulting real part and phase pictures of the DySEM mapping. This can be used to obtain information about the underlying oscillatory dynamics. We apply the theory to the case of a cantilever in oscillation, driven at different flexural and torsional resonance modes. This is an extension of a recent work (Schröter et al 2012 Nanotechnology 23 435501), where we reported on a general methodology to distinguish nonlinear features caused by the imaging process from those caused by cantilever motion.

  1. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati; Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-01

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H2N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm-1. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  2. Low voltage imaging and X-ray microanalysis in the SEM: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuhrer, R.; Moran, K.

    2016-02-01

    Low voltage imaging, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray mapping has become very important for the investigation of nanomaterials and their surfaces. This is especially true for low voltage imaging of non-conductive samples and beam sensitive samples. Operating the SEM at lower accelerating voltage allows for greater surface sensitivity, the ability to minimize charging effects, nanometre scale lateral X-ray spatial resolution and nanoscale X-ray depth sensitivity. Determining the correct accelerating voltage for imaging in a SEM is dependent on the instrument's operating performance at low voltage, the material being viewed, and other factors that limit effectiveness of low voltage microanalysis, which will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Photoacoustic and SEM analysis of fracture bone callus to different consolidation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomelí Mejia, P. A.; Urriolagoitia, G.; Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Cruz Orea, A.; Lecona Butron, H.; Villegas Castrejón, H.

    2005-06-01

    The Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to perform a study of fractured bone callus to different consolidation times. From these techniques we obtained optical absorption spectra and pictures of male rat fractured bones at different consolidation times. From these spectra it was possible to observe the presence of p-Nitrophenylphosphatase, characteristic phosphatase in rat fractured bones through their absorption peaks which were compared with characteristic reported peaks in the literature for this phosphatase. In this study we showed that p-Nitrophenylphosphatase could be considered as an indicator of the repair process of bone fractures. Through the complementary SEM analysis it was possible to obtain different pictures as the callus grows in the time.

  4. Multi-scale characterization by FIB-SEM/TEM/3DAP.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, T; Sepehri-Amin, H; Sasaki, T T; Hono, K

    2014-11-01

    In order to improve properties of functional materials, it is important to understand the relation between the structure and the properties since the structure has large effect to the properties. This can be done by using multi-scale microstructure analysis from macro-scale to nano and atomic scale. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with focused ion beam (FIB), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and 3D atom probe (3DAP) are complementary analysis tools making it possible to know the structure and the chemistry from micron to atomic resolution. SEM gives us overall microstructural and chemical information by various kinds of detectors such as secondary electron, backscattered electron, EDS and EBSD detectors. Also, it is possible to analyze 3D structure and chemistry via FIB serial sectioning. In addition, using TEM we can focus on desired region to get more complementary information from HRTEM/STEM/Lorentz images, SAED/NBD patterns and EDS/EELS to see the detail micro or nano-structure and chemistry. Especially, combination of probe Cs corrector and split EDS detectors with large detector size enable us to analyze the atomic scale elemental distribution. Furthermore, if the specimen has a complicated 3D nanostructure, or we need to analyze light elements such as hydrogen, lithium or boron, 3DAP can be used as the only technique which can visualize and analyze distribution of all constituent atoms of our materials within a few hundreds nm area. Hence, site-specific sample preparation using FIB/SEM is necessary to get desired information from region of interest. Therefore, this complementary analysis combination works very well to understand the detail of materials.In this presentation, we will show the analysis results obtained from some of functional materials by Carl Zeiss CrossBeam 1540EsB FIB/SEM, FEI Tecnai G(2) F30, Titan G2 80-200 TEMs and locally build laser assisted 3DAP. As the one of the example, result of multi-scale characterization for

  5. A Data Matrix Method for Improving the Quantification of Element Percentages of SEM/EDX Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple 2D M N matrix involving sample preparation enables the microanalyst to peer below the noise floor of element percentages reported by the SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/ energy dispersive x-ray) analysis, thus yielding more meaningful data. Using the example of a 2 3 sample set, there are M = 2 concentration levels of the original mix under test: 10 percent ilmenite (90 percent silica) and 20 percent ilmenite (80 percent silica). For each of these M samples, N = 3 separate SEM/EDX samples were drawn. In this test, ilmenite is the element of interest. By plotting the linear trend of the M sample s known concentration versus the average of the N samples, a much higher resolution of elemental analysis can be performed. The resulting trend also shows how the noise is affecting the data, and at what point (of smaller concentrations) is it impractical to try to extract any further useful data.

  6. Characterising palladium-silver and palladium-nickel alloy membranes using SEM, XRD and PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuler, J. N.; Lorenzen, L.; Sanderson, R. D.; Prozesky, V.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1999-10-01

    Palladium alloy membranes were prepared by successive electroless plating steps on an alumina-zirconia support membrane. Palladium, silver and nickel were deposited in layers and then the metal films were heat treated for 5 h in a hydrogen atmosphere at 650°C. The topography of the metal coatings and cross-sections of the films (before and after heating) were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD was used to determine the crystal phase of the alloy coatings. Both SEM and XRD provide only surface information and therfore micro-PIXE was used to extract depth information of the alloy coating. Concentration profiles across the thickness of the films were constructed to determine penetration of the coating into the support membrane pores during electroless plating and to investigate diffusion of coated layers during the heating step.

  7. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-24

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H{sub 2}N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm{sup −1}. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  8. Applications of coal-mineral association determined by SEM-AIA to physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Straszheim, W.E.

    1993-10-01

    Analysis of the association of minerals with coal using scanning electron microscope-based automated image analysis (SEM-AIA) is described and applied to physical coal cleaning. Results are expressed with regard to both density-based and surface-based cleaning processes. Samples of nominal 200-mesh Pittsburgh No. 8 coal used in column flotation experiments were analyzed by SEM-AIA to predict cleanability for both types of cleaning and for individual minerals. Results indicated good liberation of minerals based on particle mineral matter content and thus predicted good cleanability by density-based methods. Results also showed poor liberation of pyrite compared to other minerals when particles were categorized according to surface appearance, thus indicating poor cleanability. Predictions were generally borne out by actual separations although additional factors besides liberation appear to be hindering the cleanability of pyrite by column flotation.

  9. Profile Monitor SEMs for the NuMI Beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Indurthy, Dharmaraj; Kopp, Sacha; Proga, Marek; Pavlovich, Zarko

    2004-11-10

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) project will extract 120-GeV protons from the FNAL Main Injector in 8.56-{mu}sec spills of 4 x 1013 protons every 1.9 sec. We have designed secondary emission monitor (SEM) detectors to measure beam profile and halo along the proton beam transport line. The SEMs are Ti foils 5 {mu}m in thickness segmented in either 1-mm or 0.5-mm pitch strips, resulting in beam loss {approx}5 x 10-6. We discuss aspects of the mechanical design, calculations of expected beam heating, and results of a beam test at the 8-GeV transport line to MiniBoone at FNAL.

  10. Combined AES, LEED, SEM and TEM characterizations of CuSi(100) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbücken, M.; Métois, J. J.; Mathiez, P.; Salvan, F.

    1985-10-01

    CuSi(100) interfaces prepared under UHV at different substrate temperatures ( TS) have been characterized using in-situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as well as ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). At room temperature (RT), the film grows in a layer by layer like mode. With increasing TS, the intensity of the Cu M 2,3VV (61 eV) Auger transition decreases and at TS = 500°C no Cu Auger signal could be measured below θ ˜ 100. Yet SEM and TEM observations of these deposits show islands in epitaxial relation with the substrate. It can be determined from TEM images that these islands are covered with a Si skin ( ˜ 50 Å; thick) and that they are deeply implanted in the Si substrate. This explains the AES measurements.

  11. Compensation of CD-SEM image-distortion detected by View-Shift Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Osamu; Kawasaki, Takahiro; Kawada, Hiroki

    2012-03-01

    Local-distortion of CD-SEM image can be detected and compensated by a unique technique: View-Shift method. As design rule of semiconductor device is getting shrunk, metrology by critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) is not only for measuring dimension but also shape, such as 2D contour of hot-spot pattern and OPC calibration-pattern. Accuracy of the shape metrology is dependent on the local image-distortion that consists of two components: magnification distortion and shape distortion. The magnification distortion can be measured by pitchcalibration method, that measures pitch of an identical line pattern at a lot of locations in image. However, this method cannot measure the shape distortion, that is for instance, bending of a uniform-width line. To measure accurately and quickly the image-distortion, we invented the View-Shift method, in which images of uniquetexture sample are taken before and after an image-shift by about 100nm. Between the two images we measure displacements of the unique-textures found at each grid-point spread over the image. Variation of the local displacements indicates the local image-distortion. In this work, we demonstrate a method to compensate the image-distortion detected by the View-Shift method. Due to the image-distortion, edge-points determined in SEM-image have already been dislocated. Such dislocation can be relocated to compensate the detected local-distortion. Onsite and on-demand compensation right before CD-SEM measurement for process monitoring is possible because we can quickly apply the View-Shift method and complete the compensation in a few minutes.

  12. Final Report - SRNL Agreement #AC51296V SEM, FIB, TEM Studies of CZT Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z R; Graham, G A; Teslich, N E

    2007-08-28

    The aims of this study are: (1) to characterize the surfaces of samples 3-7-8-3 and 4-1-3 using SEM, FIB and TEM techniques; (2) identify raised surface features; (3) prepare FIB-TEM lift-out sections from identified raised surfaces; and (4) perform detailed TEM characterization of FIB Sections. Focusing on the composition and crystallinity of the phases within the sections, including impurities.

  13. Does your SEM really tell the truth? How would you know? part 3: vibration and drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András. E.; Cizmar, Petr

    2014-09-01

    This is the third of a series of papers discussing various causes of measurement uncertainty in scanned particle beam instruments, and some of the solutions researched and developed at NIST. Scanned particle beam instruments especially the scanning electron microscope (SEM) have gone through tremendous evolution to become indispensable tools for many and diverse scientifi c and industrial applications. These improvements have signifi cantly enhanced their performance and made them far easier to operate. But, ease of operation has also fostered operator complacency. In addition, the user-friendliness has reduced the need for extensive operator training. Unfortunately, this has led to the concept that the SEM is just another expensive digital camera or another peripheral device connected to a computer and that all of the issues related to obtaining quality data have been solved. Hence, a person (or company) using these instruments may be lulled into thinking that all of the potential pitfalls have been fully eliminated and they believe everything they see on the micrograph is always correct. But, as described in this and the earlier presentations this may not be the case. The fi rst paper in this series discussed some of the issues related to signal generation in the SEM, including instrument calibration, electron beam-sample interactions and the need for physics-based modelling to understand the actual image formation mechanisms to properly interpret SEM images. The second paper, discussed another major issue confronting the microscopist: specimen contamination and methods of contamination elimination. This third paper, discusses vibration and drift and some useful solutions.

  14. Nanomanufacturing concerns about measurements made in the SEM Part III: vibration and drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András. E.; Cizmar, Petr

    2014-08-01

    Many advanced manufacturing processes employ scanning electron microscopes (SEM) for on-line critical measurements for process and quality control. This is the third of a series of papers discussing various causes of measurement uncertainty in scanned particle beam instruments, and some of the solutions researched and developed at NIST. Scanned particle beam instruments especially the scanning electron microscope have gone through tremendous evolution to become indispensable tools for many and diverse scientifi c and industrial applications. These improvements have signifi cantly enhanced their performance and made them far easier to operate. But, ease of operation has also fostered operator complacency. In addition, the user-friendliness has reduced the need for extensive operator training. Unfortunately, this has led to the concept that the SEM is just another expensive digital camera or another peripheral device connected to a computer and that all of the issues related to obtaining quality data have been solved. Hence, a person (or company) using these instruments may be lulled into thinking that all of the potential pitfalls have been fully eliminated and they believe everything they see on the micrograph is always correct. But, as described in this and the earlier presentations this may not be the case. The fi rst paper in this series discussed some of the issues related to signal generation in the SEM, including instrument calibration, electron beam-sample interactions and the need for physics-based modelling to understand the actual image formation mechanisms to properly interpret SEM images. The second paper, discussed another major issue confronting the microscopist: specimen contamination and methods of contamination elimination. This third paper, discusses vibration and drift and some useful solutions.

  15. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  16. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  17. Verification of SOHO/CELIAS/SEM EUV Flux Calibration Based on Seven Sounding Rocket Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S.

    2009-05-01

    A verified and updated version of the calibrated SOHO/CELIAS/SEM (absolute) solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) measurements from the beginning of the mission in 1996 through the present is available at the University of Southern California Space Sciences Center website (www.usc.edu/dept/space_science). To complete this new version, seven (1996- 2006) sounding rocket under-flights were analyzed using measurements from both a very stable Rare Gas (Ne) Ionization Cell (RGIC) and a clone of the flight SEM instrument. These sounding rocket under-flights have provided a number of reference points that have been compared with the solar flux data published on our web site (last revised in 2000). These reference points are in good agreement with the solar cycle EUV flux for the 30.4 nm first order (26 nm to 34 nm) SEM channels, indicating a very small (less than 1 percent) averaged difference from the best revised published flux for the seven under- flights. After providing thirteen years of accurate and near continuous data (with the exception of the SOHO "vacation"), SEM continues to give important information about short term (solar flares) and long term (solar cycle) changes of EUV solar irradiance. These data are useful for advancing solar models, for more accurate Earth atmosphere drag models, ionization proxies, and atmospheric dynamics generally, and will also provide solar EUV measurement overlap with the new SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), to be launched in 2009. This work was supported by NASA grants NNG05WC09G and NNX08AM94G.

  18. Accurate and traceable dimensional metrology with a reference CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladár, András E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Cizmar, Petr; Oral, Martin; Postek, Michael T.

    2008-03-01

    NIST is currently developing two Reference scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which are based on FEI Nova 600* variable vacuum, and on FEI Helios* dual-beam instruments. These were installed in the new Advanced Metrology Laboratory at NIST where the temperature variation is under 0.1 C° and the humidity variation is under 1%. Both SEMs are equipped with field emission electron guns and are capable of better than 1 nm spatial resolution. The ESEM has large sample capability, allowing for measurements on 200 mm wafers, 300 mm wafers and 150 mm photolithography masks, with a 100 mm by 100 mm measurement area in the center. The dual-beam instrument's laser stage will work on smaller samples and has a 50 mm by 50 mm measurement area. The variable vacuum instrument is especially suitable for measurements on a large and diverse set of samples without the use of conductive coating. These will be among the most scrutinized of SEMs. A detailed, thorough work of combined measurements and optimization of the SEMs themselves is underway, which includes the assessment of resolution, signal transfer characteristics, distortion and noise characteristics in various working modes. Accurate three-dimensional modeling, including all aspects of beam formation, signal generation, detection and processing is under development. Establishment of modeling and measurement methods to ascertain the threedimensional shape and size of the electron beam is also underway. All these are needed to properly interpret the obtained data in accurate, physics-based measurements and will permit three-dimensional size and shape determination on a scale ranging from a few nanometers up to a few centimeters. Accuracy and traceability will be ensured through calibrated laser interferometry.

  19. SEM/EDS analysis for problem solving in the food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Wayne D.

    2015-10-01

    For forensic investigation in the food industry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a powerful, often non-destructive, instrumental analysis tool to provide information about: • Identification of inorganic (and some organic) materials found as foreign contaminants in food products returned by consumers or detected during quality control inspections in the production facilities • Identification of wear particles found in production lines • Distribution of materials within a matrix • Corrosion and failure analysis of production equipment The identification of materials by SEM/EDS is accomplished through a combination of morphology by SEM imaging and the elemental composition of the material by EDS. Typically, the EDS analysis provides a qualitative spectrum showing the elements present in the sample. Further analysis can be done to quantify the detected elements in order to further refine the material identification. Metal alloys can often be differentiated even within the same family such as 300 Series stainless steels. Glass types can be identified by the elemental composition where the detected elements are quantified as the oxides of each element. In this way, for example, common window glass is distinguishable from insulation glass used in many ovens. Wear particles or fragments from breakage can find their way into food products. SEM/EDS analysis of the materials is an important resource to utilize when trying to determine the original source. Suspected source materials can then be sampled for comparative analysis. EDS X-ray mapping is another tool that is available to provide information about the distribution of materials within a matrix. For example, the distribution of inorganic ingredients in a dried food helps to provide information about the grind and blend of the materials.

  20. WebSEM: an assessment of K-12 remote microscopy efforts.

    PubMed

    Chumbley, A E; Chumbley, L S

    2007-01-01

    Within the past 10 years a number of institutions have developed and instituted systems and programs that enable remote control of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Geared toward use by teachers and educators in K-12 classrooms, these systems have offered access to advanced instrumentation to thousands of students over the past decade. However, despite the enormous potential and promise associated with remote microscopy, the reality has been that most such systems are not utilized to their fullest extent. This is partly due to time constraints on the instrument; many such systems are an integral part of the research and/or teaching focus of the institution that offers the service, and as such, K-12 educators are forced to compete with institutional demands. Often this restricts the amount of lessons that can be conducted to a relatively small number, in rather narrowly defined windows of opportunity. However, even when such constraints do not exist, the number of lessons typically requested remains disappointingly low, and the lessons that are conducted are usually simple examinations lacking in depth. In an effort to determine why the promise of K-12 remote microscopy has not been fully realized, a number of assessments have been carried out at Iowa State University in relation to operation and use of the WebSEM, the Web-controllable SEM operated by the Materials Science and Engineering Department of Iowa State University as a part of Project ExCEL, the Extended Classroom for Enhanced Learning. These assessments indicate that the key to successful use of advanced equipment in K-12 classrooms depends less upon hardware than it does upon local instructional situations. Establishing a personal relationship between the SEM operator and the teacher in the classroom appears to be the best way to increase current use of remote microscopy. PMID:17330251

  1. Nanomanufacturing concerns about measurements made in the SEM part IV: charging and its mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András. E.

    2015-08-01

    This is the fourth part of a series of tutorial papers discussing various causes of measurement uncertainty in scanned particle beam instruments, and some of the solutions researched and developed at NIST and other research institutions. Scanned particle beam instruments especially the scanning electron microscope (SEM) have gone through tremendous evolution to become indispensable tools for many and diverse scientifi c and industrial applications. These improvements have signifi cantly enhanced their performance and made them far easier to operate. But, the ease of operation has also fostered operator complacency. In addition, the user-friendliness has reduced the apparent need for extensive operator training. Unfortunately, this has led to the idea that the SEM is just another expensive "digital camera" or another peripheral device connected to a computer and that all of the problems in obtaining good quality images and data have been solved. Hence, one using these instruments may be lulled into thinking that all of the potential pitfalls have been fully eliminated and believing that, everything one sees on the micrograph is always correct. But, as described in this and the earlier papers, this may not be the case. Care must always be taken when reliable quantitative data are being sought. The fi rst paper in this series discussed some of the issues related to signal generation in the SEM, including instrument calibration, electron beam-sample interactions and the need for physics-based modeling to understand the actual image formation mechanisms to properly interpret SEM images. The second paper has discussed another major issue confronting the microscopist: specimen contamination and methods to eliminate it. The third paper discussed mechanical vibration and stage drift and some useful solutions to mitigate the problems caused by them, and here, in this the fourth contribution, the issues related to specimen "charging" and its mitigation are discussed relative

  2. Study of SEM induced current and voltage contrast modes to assess semiconductor reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the scanning electron microscopy study was to review the failure history of existing integrated circuit technologies to identify predominant failure mechanisms, and to evaluate the feasibility of their detection using SEM application techniques. The study investigated the effects of E-beam irradiation damage and contamination deposition rates; developed the necessary methods for applying the techniques to the detection of latent defects and weaknesses in integrated circuits; and made recommendations for applying the techniques.

  3. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  4. Comparative SEM evaluation of three solvents used in endodontic retreatment: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Scelza, Miriam F Zaccaro; Coil, Jeffrey M; Maciel, Ana Carolina de Carvalho; Oliveira, Lílian Rachel L; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2008-01-01

    This study compared, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the efficacy of three solvents on the removal of filling materials from dentinal tubules during endodontic retreatment. Forty human maxillary canines with straight canals were prepared according to a crown-down technique and enlarged to a#30 apical file size, before obturation with gutta-percha and a zinc-oxide-eugenol based sealer. The samples were stored for 3 months before being randomly assigned to four groups: chloroform (n=10), orange oil (n=10), eucalyptol (n=10) and control (n=10). Solvents were applied to a reservoir created on the coronal root third using Gates Glidden drills. The total time for retreatment using the solvents was 5 minutes per tooth. Following retreatment the roots were split longitudinally for SEM evaluation. SEM images were digitized, analyzed using Image ProPlus 4.5 software, and the number of dentinal tubules free of filling material from the middle and apical thirds was recorded. No significant difference was found among the solvent groups regarding the number of dentinal tubules free of root filling remnants in the middle and apical root thirds (p>0.05). However, the control group had fewer dentinal tubules free of filling material (p<0.05). Under the tested conditions, it may be concluded that there was no significant difference among the solvents used to obtain dentinal tubules free of filling material remnants. PMID:19089285

  5. Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin: FT-Raman and SEM studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Bitar, Renata Andrade; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Resende, Erick B. P. S.; Jara, Walter A. A.; Martin, Airton A.

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated the molecular and morphological changes on dentin elements after the Er:YAG laser irradiation. Six human third molars were selected and the occlusal one-third of the crown was removed. The dentin surface was schematically divided into areas corresponding to four surface treatments groups: Control (Group C): 37% phosphoric acid etching; Group I: Er:YAG laser 80mJ; Group II: Er:YAG laser 120mJ; Group III: Er:YAG laser 180mJ. The characterization was performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-Transformed Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) before and after the treatments. A reduction of the relative intensity for the spectra was observed in the Group II and III samples. The SEM photomicrographies revealed open dentin tubules in the control group specimens. The groups I, II and III presented partially open dentin tubules. SEM images showed that the laser-irradiated dentin surface was not favorable to the diffusion of monomers. The chemical information obtained by Raman spectroscopy showed that higher laser energies (180 mJ) affected more the phosphate, carbonate and the organic components of dentin.

  6. SEM Characterization of an Irradiated Monolithic U-10Mo Fuel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. F. Jue; A. B. Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization of irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with differing amounts of matrix Si have been reported. However, to date, no results of SEM analysis of irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel plates have been reported. This paper describes the first SEM characterization results for an irradiated monolithic U-10Mo fuel plate. Two samples from this fuel plate were characterized. One sample was produced from the low-flux side of the fuel plate, and another was produced at the high-flux side of the fuel plate. This characterization focused on the microstructural features present at the U-10Mo foil/cladding interface, particularly the interaction zone that had developed during fabrication and irradiation. In addition, the microstructure of the foil itself was investigated, along with the morphology of the observed fission gas bubbles. It was observed that a Si-rich interaction layer was present at the U-10Mo foil/cladding interface that exhibited relatively good irradiation behavior, and within the U-10Mo foil the microstructural features differed in some respects from what is typically seen in the U-Mo powders of an irradiated dispersion fuel.

  7. Generation of large field SEM image by panorama composition technology for nano-order measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Hojyo, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has a pressing need for a method to accurately evaluate the global shape deformation of a photomask pattern. We thus propose a novel composition technique for a large field panorama image of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The proposed method optimises the arrangement of segmented imaging regions (SIRs), which are components of a panorama image, on the basis of the design data of the photomask pattern layout. The quantity of the line pattern segment, which is a clue to the connection in an overlapping region between adjoining SIRs and the connectability of any two SIRs, is evaluated. As a result of the optimisation, it is guaranteed that all SIR images can be connected theoretically. For 30 evaluation points, the maximum connection error of the SIR images was 1.5 nm in a simulation using pseudo-SEM images. The maximum total measurement error, which includes the connection error and CD measurement error from the panorama image, is estimated at 2.5 nm. This error was equivalent to about 1.4% of the photomask line width (target: 3%). The experiments using real SEM images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. It was visually confirmed that a large field, high-resolution and seamless panorama image can be generated.

  8. High-resolution, low-voltage SEM for true surface imaging and analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaksch, H; Martin, J P

    1995-10-01

    A novel design concept for the electron optical column has been implemented in the realization of a new ultra-high performance SEM. A compound magnetic/ electrostatic objective lens is at the heart of the high-performance column: the imaging aberrations of this new lens type decrease with decreasing beam energy. Any beam cross-over between the electron source (Schottky FE-gun) and the sample has been eliminated in order to avoid broadening of the beam energy spread (Boersch effect). A high beam energy is maintained throughout the column regardless of the electron probe energy selected by the operator. This protects the beam against the effect of stray fields and minimizes any loss of beam brigthness due to stochastic electron-electron interactions. The new SEM achieves outstanding resolution, particularly at the low beam energies (3 nm achievable at E(PE) = 1 keV). The secondary electrons emitted by the sample are detected with very high efficiency by an internal annular detector situated above the final lens. Due to the low imaging aberration level, a high current can easily be focused in a very small probe, thus making the new SEM ideally suited for high-resolution, quantitative X-ray analysis. PMID:15048503

  9. Characterization of CD-SEM metrology for iArF photoresist materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Orji, N. G.; Piscani, Emil; Cochran, Dan; Byers, Jeff; Allgair, John; Rice, Bryan J.; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-zvi, Maayan; Adan, Ofer

    2008-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle for keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 45 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques are being considered, including immersion ArF lithography (iArF) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print 45 nm node (and beyond) feature widths and pitches. In a previous paper ("SEM Metrology for Advanced Lithographies," Proc SPIE, v6518, 65182B, 2007), we compared the effects of several types of resists, ranging from deep ultraviolet (DUV) (248 nm) through ArF (193 nm) and iArF to extreme UV (EUV, 13.5 nm). iArF resists were examined, and the results from the available resist sample showed a tendency to shrink in the same manner as the ArF resist but at a lower magnitude. This paper focuses on variations of iArF resists (different chemical formulations and different lithographic sensitivities) and examine new developments in iArF resists during the last year. We characterize the resist electron beam induced shrinkage behavior under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluate the shrinkage magnitude on mature resists as well as R&D resists. We conclude with findings on the readiness of SEM metrology for these challenges.

  10. In situ SEM Study of Lithium Intercalation in individual V2O5 Nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Cothren, Joshua E.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2015-01-08

    Progress in rational engineering of Li-ion batteries requires better understanding of the electrochemical processes and accompanying transformations in the electrode materials on multiple length scales. In spite of recent progress in utilizing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze these materials, in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was mostly overlooked as a powerful tool that allows probing these phenomena on the nano and mesoscale. In this paper, we report on in situ SEM study of lithiation in a V2O5-based single-nanobelt battery with ionic liquid electrolyte. Coupled with cyclic voltammetry measurements, in situ SEM revealed the peculiarities of subsurface intercalation, formation ofmore » solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) and electromigration of liquid. We observed that single-crystalline vanadia nanobelts do not undergo large-scale amorphization or fracture during electrochemical cycling, but rather transform topochemically with only a slight shape distortion. Lastly, the SEI layer seems to have significant influence on the lithium ion diffusion and overall capacity of the single-nanobelt battery.« less

  11. STEM-in-SEM high resolution imaging of gold nanoparticles and bivalve tissues in bioaccumulation experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Negrete, C A; Jiménez de Haro, M C; Blasco, J; Soto, M; Fernández, A

    2015-05-01

    The methodology termed scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-in-SEM) has been used in this work to study the uptake of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (average particle sizes of 23.5 ± 4.0 nm) into tissue samples upon in vitro exposure of the dissected gills of the Ruditapes philippinarum marine bivalve to the nanoparticle suspensions. The STEM-in-SEM methodology has been optimized for achieving optimum resolution under SEM low voltage operating conditions (20-30 kV). Based on scanning microscope assessments and resolution testing (SMART), resolutions well below 10 nm were appropriately achieved by working at magnifications over 100k×, with experimental sample thickness between 300 and 200 nm. These relatively thick slices appear to be stable under the beam and help avoid NP displacement during cutting. We herein show that both localizing of the internalized nanoparticles and imaging of ultrastructural disturbances in gill tissues are strongly accessible due to the improved resolution, even at sample thicknesses higher than those normally employed in standard TEM techniques at higher voltages. Ultrastructural imaging of bio-nano features in bioaccumulation experiments have been demonstrated in this study. PMID:25685960

  12. CD-SEM tool stability and tool-to-tool matching management using image sharpness monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Ishibashi, Yasuhiko; Yamazaki, Yuichiro; Kono, Akemi; Maeda, Tatsuya; Miura, Akihiro; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Hibino, Daisuke

    2009-03-01

    As device feature size reduction continues, requirements for Critical Dimension (CD) metrology tools are becoming stricter. For sub-32 nm node, it is important to establish a CD-SEM tool management system with higher sensitivity for tool fluctuation and short Turn around Time (TAT). We have developed a new image sharpness monitoring method, PG monitor. The key feature of this monitoring method is the quantification of tool-induced image sharpness deterioration. The image sharpness index is calculated by a convolution method of image sharpness deterioration function caused by SEM optics feature. The sensitivity of this methodology was tested by the alteration of the beam diameter using astigmatism. PG monitor result can be related to the beam diameter variation that causes CD variation through image sharpness. PG monitor can detect the slight image sharpness change that cannot be noticed by engineer's visual check. Furthermore, PG monitor was applied to tool matching and long-term stability monitoring for multiple tools. As a result, PG monitor was found to have sufficient sensitivity to CD variation in tool matching and long-term stability assessment. The investigation showed that PG monitor can detect CD variation equivalent to ~ 0.1 nm. The CD-SEM tool management system using PG monitor is effective for CD metrology in production.

  13. SEM Observation of Hydrous Superabsorbent Polymer Pretreated with Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Tetsuya; Mochizuki, Eiko; Kishida, Shoko; Iwasaki, Kazuki; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), which is a liquid salt at or below room temperature, shows peculiar physicochemical properties such as negligible vapor pressure and relatively-high ionic conductivity. In this investigation, we used six types of RTILs as a liquid material in the pretreatment process for scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of hydrous superabsorbent polymer (SAP) particles. Very clear SEM images of the hydrous SAP particles were obtained if the neat RTILs were used for the pretreatment process. Of them, tri-n-butylmethylphosphonium dimethylphosphate ([P4, 4, 4, 1][DMP]) provided the best result. On the other hand, the surface morphology of the hydrous SAP particles pretreated with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C4mim][BF4]) was damaged. The results of SEM observation and thermogravimetry analysis of the hydrous SAP pretreated with the RTILs strongly suggested that most water in the SAP particles are replaced with RTIL during the pretreatment process. PMID:24621609

  14. In-SEM Raman microspectroscopy coupled with EDX--a case study of uranium reference particles.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Elżbieta A; Pointurier, Fabien; Marie, Olivier; Truyens, Jan; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2014-02-01

    Information about the molecular composition of airborne uranium-bearing particles may be useful as an additional tool for nuclear safeguards. In order to combine the detection of micrometer-sized particles with the analysis of their molecular forms, we used a hybrid system enabling Raman microanalysis in high vacuum inside a SEM chamber (SEM-SCA system). The first step involved an automatic scan of a sample to detect and save coordinates of uranium particles, along with X-ray microanalysis. In the second phase, the detected particles were relocated in a white light image and subjected to Raman microanalysis. The consecutive measurements by the two beams showed exceptional fragility of uranium particles, leading to their ultimate damage and change of uranium oxidation state. We used uranium reference particles prepared by hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride to test the reliability of the Raman measurements inside the high vacuum. The results achieved by the hybrid system were verified by using a standalone Raman microspectrometer. When deposited on exceptionally smooth substrates, uranyl fluoride particles smaller than 1000 nm could successfully be analyzed with the SEM-SCA system. PMID:24336357

  15. Tin amalgam mirrors: investigation by XRF, SEM-EDS, XRD and EPMA-WDS mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizio, E.; Orsega, E. F.; Sommariva, G.; Falcone, R.

    2013-06-01

    Ancient mirrors were constituted by a tin-mercury amalgam layer superimposed to a glass sheet. This was the only one method used until the nineteenth century, when the wet silvering process was invented. The tin amalgam is a binary alloy of tin and mercury constituted by two different phases: a mercury-rich liquid phase and a tin-rich solid phase. The amalgam alteration produces mercury loss and a general growth of the solid crystalline phase. In addition, tin dioxide and monoxide are formed with a consequent decrease of the amalgam adhesion to the glass. These degradation phenomena led to reduction or disappearance of the mirror reflective power. The aim of this study was the characterization of the amalgam layers of eight mirror samples dating during the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and by a Scanning Electron Microscope with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and for the first time on this type of alloy by X-ray Fluorescence and EPMA-WDS (Electron Probe Micro Analysis with Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry) elemental mapping. The contents of tin, mercury, and some trace elements in the amalgam layers have been determined. The investigation of the superficial patterns of the amalgam by SEM, EPMA-WDS mapping, and SEM-EDS allowed a first understanding of some morphologies and processes of the degradation of the amalgam layer.

  16. COMPARATIVE SEM EVALUATION OF THREE SOLVENTS USED IN ENDODONTIC RETREATMENT: AN EX VIVO STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam F. Zaccaro; Coil, Jeffrey M.; Maciel, Ana Carolina de Carvalho; Oliveira, Lílian Rachel L.; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2008-01-01

    This study compared, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the efficacy of three solvents on the removal of filling materials from dentinal tubules during endodontic retreatment. Forty human maxillary canines with straight canals were prepared according to a crown-down technique and enlarged to a#30 apical file size, before obturation with gutta-percha and a zinc-oxide-eugenol based sealer. The samples were stored for 3 months before being randomly assigned to four groups: chloroform (n=10), orange oil (n=10), eucalyptol (n=10) and control (n=10). Solvents were applied to a reservoir created on the coronal root third using Gates Glidden drills. The total time for retreatment using the solvents was 5 minutes per tooth. Following retreatment the roots were split longitudinally for SEM evaluation. SEM images were digitized, analyzed using Image ProPlus 4.5 software, and the number of dentinal tubules free of filling material from the middle and apical thirds was recorded. No significant difference was found among the solvent groups regarding the number of dentinal tubules free of root filling remnants in the middle and apical root thirds (p>0.05). However, the control group had fewer dentinal tubules free of filling material (p<0.05). Under the tested conditions, it may be concluded that there was no significant difference among the solvents used to obtain dentinal tubules free of filling material remnants. PMID:19089285

  17. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. PMID:25173605

  18. Modelling and analysis of FMS productivity variables by ISM, SEM and GTMA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vineet; Raj, Tilak

    2014-09-01

    Productivity has often been cited as a key factor in a flexible manufacturing system (FMS) performance, and actions to increase it are said to improve profitability and the wage earning capacity of employees. Improving productivity is seen as a key issue for survival and success in the long term of a manufacturing system. The purpose of this paper is to make a model and analysis of the productivity variables of FMS. This study was performed by different approaches viz. interpretive structural modelling (ISM), structural equation modelling (SEM), graph theory and matrix approach (GTMA) and a cross-sectional survey within manufacturing firms in India. ISM has been used to develop a model of productivity variables, and then it has been analyzed. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are powerful statistical techniques. CFA is carried by SEM. EFA is applied to extract the factors in FMS by the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 20) software and confirming these factors by CFA through analysis of moment structures (AMOS 20) software. The twenty productivity variables are identified through literature and four factors extracted, which involves the productivity of FMS. The four factors are people, quality, machine and flexibility. SEM using AMOS 20 was used to perform the first order four-factor structures. GTMA is a multiple attribute decision making (MADM) methodology used to find intensity/quantification of productivity variables in an organization. The FMS productivity index has purposed to intensify the factors which affect FMS.

  19. Quality classification via Raman identification and SEM analysis of carbon nanotube bundles using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khedher, M. A.; Pezeshki, C.; McHale, J. L.; Knorr, F. J.

    2007-09-01

    One of the major obstacles for successful mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is performing quick and precise characterization of the properties of a given batch of nanotubes. In this paper, we have identified a set of intermediate steps that will lead to a comprehensive, scalable set of procedures for analyzing nanotubes. The proposed methodology was originated with data processing of Raman spectra of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) turfs and image enhancement of SEM micrographs. Image analysis techniques of SEM images were employed and stereological relations were determined for SEM images of CNT structures; these results were utilized to estimate the morphology of the turf (i.e. CNTs alignment and curvature) using an artificial neural networks (ANN) classifier. This model was also used to investigate the link between Raman spectra of CNTs and the quality of the turf morphology. This novel methodology will improve our capability to control the quality of the grown nanotubes through the use of this system in a supervised growth environment.

  20. Direct comparison of AFM and SEM measurements on the same set of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    This article is the first step in the development of a hybrid metrology combining AFM and SEM techniques for measuring the dimensions of a nanoparticle population in 3D space (X,Y,Z). This method exploits the strengths of each technique on the same set of nanoparticles. AFM is used for measuring the nanoparticle height and the measurements along X and Y axes are deduced from SEM images. A sampling method is proposed in order to obtain the best deposition conditions of SiO2 and gold nanoparticles on mica or silicon substrates. Only the isolated nanoparticles are taken into account in the histogram of size distribution. Moreover, a semi-automatic Matlab routine has also been developed to process the AFM and SEM images, measure and count the nanoparticles. This routine allows the user to exclusively select the isolated nanoparticles through a control interface. The measurements have been performed on spherical-like nanoparticles to test the method by comparing the results obtained with both techniques.

  1. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. Results: The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:26705463

  2. Combined AC-STEM and FIB-SEM Characterization of Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Kotula, P.; Yoon, H.; Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    We examine shale samples with state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) and focused ion beam-scanning electron (FIB-SEM) microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pore space incorporates electron tomography using the AC-TEM and serial sectioning by FIB-SEM. Chemical analysis by X-ray energy dispersive microscopy reveals composition of pore-lining phases at ~ 1 nm resolution. Our methods reveal the left tail of the pore size distribution that FIB-SEM techniques typically do not capture (pore sizes < 7 nm). Water in pores of this size will deviate from those of bulk water, which can influence non-Darcy flow and mechanical response. The impact of these small pores on fluid and coupled tracer transport is examined by computation fluid dynamics using 3D pore reconstructions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Syngine: On-Demand Synthetic Seismograms from the IRIS DMC based on AxiSEM & Instaseis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, Martin; Hutko, Alex; Krischer, Lion; Trabant, Chad; Stähler, Simon; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    2016-04-01

    This presentation highlights the IRIS DMC's Synthetics Engine (Syngine), a new on-demand synthetic seismogram service (ds.iris.edu/ds/products/syngine/) that complements the time series data IRIS has traditionally distributed. The synthetics are accessible using a web service for user specified source-receiver combinations and a variety of Earth models. Syngine is designed to be extremely fast, making it feasible to request large numbers of source-receiver combinations. This capability supports studying variations in source properties, Earth models or temporal changes in instrument responses. We have computed a set of global-scale databases of Green's functions using the spectral-element method AxiSEM (www.axisem.info , see also abstract EGU2016-9008) for selected well known spherically symmetric Earth models (PREM, IASP91, AK135f...) with anisotropy and attenuation. Fine-scale models have resolution from 1 to about 100 sec periods with durations of 60 minutes; lower resolution models extend to a few hours duration. Behind the scenes, the web service runs Instaseis (www.instaseis.net), a system that rapidly calculates broadband synthetic seismograms from the pre-calculated Green's functions. Receivers may be specified at arbitrary coordinates or using real network and station codes, which are resolved using metadata at the DMC. The service also provides optional, on-demand processing methods, including convolution with a specified moment tensor (specified explicitly or by GCMT ID) and one of a few source-time functions with variable duration. The interface is designed to be callable by scripts and to support automated processing workflows. The DMC also provides a user-friendly command line Fetch script to download selections of synthetics. This new resource provides a powerful tool in multiple research areas where synthetic seismograms are useful. Regarding the Instaseis/AxiSEM functionality, one only needs to perform two forward calculations with AxiSEM for a

  4. AxiSEM: Exploiting structural complexity for efficient wave propagation across the scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin; Leng, Kuangdai; Stähler, Simon; Krischer, Lion; Hosseini, Kasra

    2016-04-01

    Our open-source seismic modeling method AxiSEM (www.axisem.info) is presented a backbone for numerous further extensions, including accurate and efficient wave propagation in 3D Earth models, a database mode (www.instaseis.net), local domains, hybrid methods, and waveform sensitivity kernels for tomography. Our general mantra is to enable wave propagation across the observable frequency spectrum in a most efficient manner by adapting the methodology directly to the level of structural complexity, in the vein of Occam's razor. The basic AxiSEM approach relies upon axisymmetric (including spherically symmetric) models, thereby satisfying a large fraction of observable data. The benefit of this method stems from the resultant dimensional collapse to two numerical dimensions, whereby the third azimuthal dimension is tackled analytically. For high-frequency wave propagation, this leads to 3-4 orders of magnitude speedup in computational cost compared to 3D domain discretizations. AxiSEM is highly scalable anywhere between laptops and supercomputers, and includes novel, optimized implementations of viscoelasticity and anisotropy. We present benchmarks, data comparisons, a range of unique applications from inner-core anisotropy to noise modeling and lowermost mantle structures. 1D structures are exploited by instaseis, a methodology to extract full, broadband and accurate waveforms instantaneously from wavefield databases computed with AxiSEM. A webservice built on instaseis ("syngine") has been launched at IRIS (see abstract EGU2016-8190) to generate on-demand synthetics up to 1Hz for prominent Earth models. 3D structures are tackled by our recent extension AxiSEM3D: We expand the wavefield in the azimuthal dimension in Fourier series, leading to a drastic computational cost speedup compared to classic 3D methods (up to a factor of 100), especially in the high-frequency regime. We will show benchmarks for typical global tomographic models and sketch our approach to

  5. The effect of SEM imaging on the Ar/Ar system in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Sherlock, S.; Lee, M.; Kelley, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Complex microtextures form in K-feldspar crystals as they cool and are affected by deuteric alteration. This complex structure is the cause of variable closure temperatures for Ar-Ar, a phenomenon which has been utilized in multi domain diffusion (MDD) modelling to recover thermal histories [1]. However, there has been substantial controversy regarding the precise interaction between feldspar microtextures and Ar-diffusion [2,3]. A number of studies have addressed this issue using coupled SEM imaging and Ar/Ar UV laser ablation microprobe (UV-LAMP) analysis on the same sample, to enable direct comparison of microtextures with Ar/Ar age data [4]. Here we have tested the idea that SEM work may affect Ar/Ar ages, leading to inaccurate results in subsequent Ar/Ar analyses. Three splits of alkali feldspar from the Dartmoor Granite in SW England were selected for Ar/Ar UV-LAMP analysis. Split 1 (“control”) was prepared as a polished thick section for Ar/Ar analysis. Split 2 (“SEM”) was prepared as a polished thick section, was chemically-mechanically polished with colloidal silica and underwent SEM imaging (uncoated) and focussed ion beam (FIB) milling (gold coated); electron beam damage in the SEM was maximised by leaving the sample at high magnification for eight minutes. Split 3 (“Etch”) is a cleavage fragment that was etched with HF vapour and underwent low to moderate magnification SEM imaging. The control split gave a range of laser-spot ages consistent with the expected cooling age of the granite and high yields of radiogenic 40Ar* (>90%). The area of the “SEM” split that experienced significant electron beam damage gave younger than expected ages and 40Ar* yields as low as 57%. These are interpreted as a combination of implantation of atmospheric Ar and local redistribution of K within the sample. The area of “SEM” that underwent FIB milling gave ages and 40Ar* yields comparable to the control split, suggesting that the Au-coat minimises FIB

  6. Effects of Data Nonnormality and Other Factors on Fit Indices and Parameter Estimates for True and Misspecified SEM Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; And Others

    A Monte Carlo study was conducted to assess the effects of some potential confounding factors on structural equation modeling (SEM) fit indices and parameter estimates for both true and misspecified models. The factors investigated were data nonnormality, SEM estimation method, and sample size. Based on the fully crossed and balanced 3x3x4x2…

  7. CD-SEM image-distortion measured by view-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Osamu; Kawasaki, Takahiro; Matsui, Miyako; Kawada, Hiroki

    2011-03-01

    As the design rule for semiconductor device shrinks, metrology for the critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) is not only for measuring the dimension but also the shape, such as 2D contour of hot-spot pattern and OPC calibration-pattern. Accuracy of the shape metrology is dependent on distortion of CD-SEM image. The distortion of magnification in horizontal direction (i.e. x-direction) can be measured by pitch-calibration method, that measures pitch of identical vertical line patterns while view-shifting the identical pitch in x-direction. However, the number of measurement point could not be sufficient because this method requires long measurement time. Not only the horizontal magnification but also vertical magnification (i.e. y-direction) and shear deformation (i.e. distortion of shape) are necessary to keep highly accurate measurement. In this paper we introduce the view-shift method for quick and accurate measurement of the image-distortion. From using this method, both local distortion of magnification and shape can be measured in horizontal and vertical directions at once. Firstly, two SEM-images of evaluation sample are taken. The sample should have a lot of unique features, e.g. Textured-Silicon. View-shift about one ninth of the image size should be done by two images, and There are a lot of unique features in overlapped region between two images. As distribution of the unique features, displacement between two images indicates the local image-distortion. The dislocation of sample contour from distortion is estimated from the local-distortion. The image-dislocation on a tool evaluated in this paper is less than 0.5 nm. It is a tolerated size for current device process. However, it could be increased under the noisy external environment.

  8. High-resolution seismic array imaging based on an SEM-FK hybrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Chen, Chin-wu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Basini, Piero; Liu, Qinya

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution seismic array imaging based on teleseismic recordings using full numerical wave simulations. We develop a hybrid method that interfaces a frequency-wavenumber (FK) calculation, which provides analytical solutions to 1-D layered background models with a spectral-element (SEM) numerical solver to calculate synthetic responses of local media to plane-wave incidence.This hybrid method accurately deals with local heterogeneities and discontinuity undulations, and represents an efficient tool for the forward modelling of teleseismic coda (including converted and scattered) waves. We benchmark the accuracy of the SEM-FK hybrid method against FK solutions for 1-D media. We then compute sensitivity kernels for teleseismic coda waves by interacting the forward teleseismic waves with an adjoint wavefield, produced by injecting coda waves as adjoint sources, based on adjoint techniques. These sensitivity kernels provide the basis for mapping variations in subsurface discontinuities, density and velocity structures through non-linear conjugate-gradient methods. We illustrate various synthetic imaging experiments, including discontinuity characterization, volumetric structural inversion for the crust or subduction zones. These tests show that using pre-conditioners based upon the scaled product of sensitivity kernels for different phases, combining finite-frequency traveltime and waveform inversion, and/or adopting hierarchical inversions from long- to short-period waveforms could reduce the non-linearity of the seismic inverse problem and speed up its convergence. The encouraging results of these synthetic examples suggest that inversion of teleseismic coda phases based on the SEM-FK hybrid method and adjoint techniques is a promising tool for structural imaging beneath dense seismic arrays.

  9. Hybrid OPC modeling with SEM contour technique for 10nm node process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Keiichiro; Halle, Scott; Miller, Marshal; Graur, Ioana; Saulnier, Nicole; Dunn, Derren; Okai, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Komuro, Hitoshi; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Hojo, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid OPC modeling is investigated using both CDs from 1D and simple 2D structures and contours extracted from complex 2D structures, which are obtained by a Critical Dimension-Scanning Electron Microscope (CD-SEM). Recent studies have addressed some of key issues needed for the implementation of contour extraction, including an edge detection algorithm consistent with conventional CD measurements, contour averaging and contour alignment. Firstly, pattern contours obtained from CD-SEM images were used to complement traditional site driven CD metrology for the calibration of OPC models for both metal and contact layers of 10 nm-node logic device, developed in Albany Nano-Tech. The accuracy of hybrid OPC model was compared with that of conventional OPC model, which was created with only CD data. Accuracy of the model, defined as total error root-mean-square (RMS), was improved by 23% with the use of hybrid OPC modeling for contact layer and 18% for metal layer, respectively. Pattern specific benefit of hybrid modeling was also examined. Resist shrink correction was applied to contours extracted from CD-SEM images in order to improve accuracy of the contours, and shrink corrected contours were used for OPC modeling. The accuracy of OPC model with shrink correction was compared with that without shrink correction, and total error RMS was decreased by 0.2nm (12%) with shrink correction technique. Variation of model accuracy among 8 modeling runs with different model calibration patterns was reduced by applying shrink correction. The shrink correction of contours can improve accuracy and stability of OPC model.

  10. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons bymore » Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.« less

  11. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons by Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.

  12. A Web Resource for Lab Activities Using SEM, EDX and Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argast, A.; Tennis, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    A resource that facilitates undergraduate activities centered on the development of perthitic textures is available at http://www.geosci.ipfw.edu/sem/semedx.html. The web site provides a coherent set of data and images from a perthite and an anorthoclase sample. Backscatter and secondary electron images, plane- and cross-polarized light images, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) data from 13 points on the perthite and 31 points on the anorthoclase (including spectra and results files with data expressed as wt. and atomic percents) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) data are available. Care has been taken to match the areas examined by light and electron methods, allowing students to directly compare the data available from each technique. Brief descriptions of the various methods are provided. The available information can be the basis for many different exercises. Those without easy access to mircoprobes or EDX spectrometers will find the spectra useful for discussions of microchemical techniques. Different phases can be identified in the light and SEM images. The chemical results can be used to calculate formulas. (In addition to the feldspar, the anorthoclase phenocryst contains olivine, clinopyroxene, ulvospinel, apatite and glass.) Feldspar compositions can be plotted to illustrate compositional differences in perthite and anorthoclase. Glass compositions from the interior and margins of the anorthoclase phenocrysts can be compared. Numerous other possibilities, of varying levels of complexity, exist. The perthite (from Perth, Ontario) and the anorthoclase (from Mt. Erebus, Antarctica) were purchased from Wards Natural Science. There are many students with little or no access to data derived from EDX, SEM, XRD and similar techniques. It is our responsibility to find ways to make this information more universally available to all students.

  13. FIB-SEM Tomography Probes the Mesoscale Pore Space of an Individual Catalytic Cracking Particle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The overall performance of a catalyst particle strongly depends on the ability of mass transport through its pore space. Characterizing the three-dimensional structure of the macro- and mesopore space of a catalyst particle and establishing a correlation with transport efficiency is an essential step toward designing highly effective catalyst particles. In this work, a generally applicable workflow is presented to characterize the transport efficiency of individual catalyst particles. The developed workflow involves a multiscale characterization approach making use of a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM). SEM imaging is performed on cross sections of 10.000 μm2, visualizing a set of catalyst particles, while FIB-SEM tomography visualized the pore space of a large number of 8 μm3 cubes (subvolumes) of individual catalyst particles. Geometrical parameters (porosity, pore connectivity, and heterogeneity) of the material were used to generate large numbers of virtual 3D volumes resembling the sample’s pore space characteristics, while being suitable for computationally demanding transport simulations. The transport ability, defined as the ratio of unhindered flow over hindered flow, is then determined via transport simulations through the virtual volumes. The simulation results are used as input for an upscaling routine based on an analogy with electrical networks, taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of the pore space over greater length scales. This novel approach is demonstrated for two distinct types of industrially manufactured fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles with zeolite Y as the active cracking component. Differences in physicochemical and catalytic properties were found to relate to differences in heterogeneities in the spatial porosity distribution. In addition to the characterization of existing FCC particles, our method of correlating pore space with transport efficiency does also allow for an up-front evaluation of

  14. To Evaluate the Efficacy of an Innovative Irrigant on Smear Layer Removal – SEM Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Vridhachalam Ganapathy; Subbiya, Arunajatesan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The goal of endodontic therapy is to completely eliminate the microorganisms and the smear layer from the root canal in order to provide a good seal of the root filling materials. Aim The aim of this study was to find a viable alternative irrigant, which is easily available with less erosion and clinically acceptable smear layer removal by comparing the efficacy of EDTA and commercially available super-oxidized water, named Oxum, as a final rinse on smear layer removal and erosion in relation to coronal, middle and apical thirds of radicular dentin using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis. Materials and Methods Freshly extracted 30 human lower second premolar teeth with straight roots and type I canal anatomy were selected. The root canals were cleaned and shaped using Universal Protaper Rotary System. Irrigation was performed with 1 ml of 2.5% of NaOCl solution after each instrument change. The final irrigation (5 ml) sequence was as follows: Group I- 17% EDTA, Group II – OXUM, and Group III - 0.9% saline (control) for one minute. Then, the root canals were finally irrigated with 5ml of distilled water to remove any precipitate. The roots were then gently split into two halves using a chisel and subjected to SEM analysis. Results The SEM photomicrographs were evaluated by two independent examiners and Mann Whitney results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two examiners. Non-parametric statistical analysis of all experimental groups showed significant difference between coronal, middle and apical third for smear layer removal with p-value<0.05. For erosion, in group II (oxum) showed statistically significant difference between coronal, middle and apical third and it showed significantly less dentine erosion when compared to EDTA. Conclusion Within the limitations of the present study, Oxum the commercially available super-oxidized water proved to be equally effective in smear layer removal with less

  15. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be

  16. Correlation of two-photon in vivo imaging and FIB/SEM microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, L; Hummel, E; Zimmerman, H; Zou, C; Burgold, S; Rietdorf, J; Herms, J

    2015-08-01

    Advances in the understanding of brain functions are closely linked to the technical developments in microscopy. In this study, we describe a correlative microscopy technique that offers a possibility of combining two-photon in vivo imaging with focus ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) techniques. Long-term two-photon in vivo imaging allows the visualization of functional interactions within the brain of a living organism over the time, and therefore, is emerging as a new tool for studying the dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, light microscopy has important limitations in revealing alterations occurring at the synaptic level and when this is required, electron microscopy is mandatory. FIB/SEM microscopy is a novel tool for three-dimensional high-resolution reconstructions, since it acquires automated serial images at ultrastructural level. Using FIB/SEM imaging, we observed, at 10 nm isotropic resolution, the same dendrites that were imaged in vivo over 9 days. Thus, we analyzed their ultrastructure and monitored the dynamics of the neuropil around them. We found that stable spines (present during the 9 days of imaging) formed typical asymmetric contacts with axons, whereas transient spines (present only during one day of imaging) did not form a synaptic contact. Our data suggest that the morphological classification that was assigned to a dendritic spine according to the in vivo images did not fit with its ultrastructural morphology. The correlative technique described herein is likely to open opportunities for unravelling the earlier unrecognized complexity of the nervous system. PMID:25786682

  17. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  18. Application of Decision Tree Algorithm for classification and identification of natural minerals using SEM-EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaş, Efe; Akin, Lutfiye; Evren Çubukçu, H.; Artuner, Harun

    2015-07-01

    A mineral is a natural, homogeneous solid with a definite chemical composition and a highly ordered atomic arrangement. Recently, fast and accurate mineral identification/classification became a necessity. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometers integrated with Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) are used to obtain rapid and reliable elemental analysis or chemical characterization of a solid. However, mineral identification is challenging since there is wide range of spectral dataset for natural minerals. The more mineralogical data acquired, time required for classification procedures increases. Moreover, applied instrumental conditions on a SEM-EDS differ for various applications, affecting the produced X-ray patterns even for the same mineral. This study aims to test whether C5.0 Decision Tree is a rapid and reliable method algorithm for classification and identification of various natural magmatic minerals. Ten distinct mineral groups (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, apatite, amphibole, plagioclase, K-feldspar, zircon, magnetite, biotite) from different igneous rocks have been analyzed on SEM-EDS. 4601 elemental X-ray intensity data have been collected under various instrumental conditions. 2400 elemental data have been used to train and the remaining 2201 data have been tested to identify the minerals. The vast majority of the test data have been classified accurately. Additionally, high accuracy has been reached on the minerals with similar chemical composition, such as olivine ((Mg,Fe)2[SiO4]) and orthopyroxene ((Mg,Fe)2[SiO6]). Furthermore, two members from amphibole group (magnesiohastingsite, tschermakite) and two from clinopyroxene group (diopside, hedenbergite) have been accurately identified by the Decision Tree Algorithm. These results demonstrate that C5.0 Decision Tree Algorithm is an efficient method for mineral group classification and the identification of mineral members.

  19. Using Rock SEM Image to Create Pore-scale Finite Element Calculation Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianjun, Liu; Lijun, Lin; Youjun, Ji

    Micro-scale numerical simulation were often used to study the deformation, flow or heat transfer mechanism of material, among the simulation, one important step is to get simulation mesh. Taking rock as an example, this paper illustrated a method of creating pore-scale finite element calculation mesh from rock Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image with image processing toolbox of MATLAB, Algolab Raster to Vector Conversion Toolkit and COMSOL Multiphysics software. It established a more accurate numerical model of the microscopic pore structure of rock. Simulation results demonstrate that the method is efficiency in the application of image processing and the study of microscopic pore structure.

  20. Characterization of the jet perforation crushed zone by SEM and image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asadi, M.; Preston, P.W. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a method to measure porosity and permeability alteration of the crushed zone with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. A new phenomenon, shock metamorphism, was used to evaluate shock-wave penetration. Berea sandstone samples were prepared with a modification of the API recommended practice for test-sample preparation. Samples were perforated with low- and medium-penetration shaped charges. Analysis of the low-charge shot sample indicated an average porosity reduction of 25% and an average permeability reduction of 55% in the crushed zone. The sample shot with the medium-penetration shaped charge shoved planar-element shock metamorphism.

  1. A high signal-to-noise ratio toroidal electron spectrometer for the SEM.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H Q; Osterberg, M; Khursheed, A

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a high signal-to-noise ratio electron energy spectrometer attachment for the scanning electron microscope (SEM), designed to measure changes in specimen surface potential from secondary electrons and extract specimen atomic number information from backscattered electrons. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the spectrometer can in principle detect specimen voltage changes well into the sub-mV range, and distinguish close atomic numbers by a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 20. The spectrometer has applications for quantitatively mapping specimen surface voltage and atomic number variations on the nano-scale. PMID:21740873

  2. The effectiveness of dentine adhesives as demonstrated by dye penetration and SEM investigations.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, S M; Pearson, G J

    1990-07-01

    A previous investigation identified three types of cuspal movement that occur as a result of polymerization shrinkage when extracted molar teeth are filled with a microfine or hybrid composite used in conjunction with a dentine adhesive. That investigation was extended further by dye penetration and SEM studies of the margin, involving assessment of the degree of dye penetration and marginal integrity around the restoration. These studies indicate that there may be a failure of the adhesive bond between tooth and composite/adhesive complex which correlates with little or no cuspal movement. Failure within the tooth structure itself was also observed in a number of cases. PMID:2213330

  3. Recent Optical and SEM Characterization of Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator Diamond on Silicon Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.; Ross, D. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McNamara, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the 4 Genesis solar wind concentrator collectors was a silicon substrate coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) in which to capture solar wind. This material was designed for analysis of solar nitrogen and noble gases [1, 2]. This particular collector fractured during landing, but about 80% of the surface was recovered, including a large piece which was subdivided in 2012 [3, 4, 5]. The optical and SEM imaging and analysis described below supports the subdivision and allocation of the diamond-on-silicon (DOS) concentrator collector.

  4. SEM study on the dorsal lingual surface of the flying squirrel, Petaurista leucogenys.

    PubMed

    Emura, S; Tamada, A; Hayakawa, D; Chen, H; Jamali, M; Taguchi, H; Shoumura, S

    1999-09-01

    The dorsal lingual surface of the flying squirrel was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Filiform (FI), fungiform (FU), foliate (FO) and vallate papillae (VA) were observed. The FI were distributed over the entire dorsal surface of the tongue. In the region of the VA, the FI appeared as giant cones. The FU were present as rounded bodies scattered over the dorsal surface of the tongue. They were relatively scarce and appear to be concentrated around the edges of the tongue. The FO were observed on the posterolateral regions of the tongue. The flying squirrel showed the triangular arrangement of the three VA, with the apex of the triangle directed posteriorly. PMID:10560016

  5. SEM Characterization of Extinguished Grains from Plasma-Ignited M30 Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinkennon, A.; Birk, A.; DelGuercio, M.; Kaste, P.; Lieb, R.; Newberry, J.; Pesce-Rodriguez, R.; Schroeder, M.

    2000-01-01

    M30 propellant grains that had been ignited in interrupted closed bomb experiments were characterize by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Previous chemical analysis of extinguished grains had given no indications of plasma-propellant chemical interactions that could explain the increased burning rates that had been previously observed in full-pressure closed bomb experiments. (This does not mean that there is no unique chemistry occurring with plasma ignition. It may occur very early in the ignition event and then become obscured by the burning chemistry.) In this work, SEM was used to look at grain morphologies to determine if there were increases in the surface areas of the plasma-ignited grains which would contribute to the apparent increase in the burning rate. Charges were made using 30 propellant grains (approximately 32 grams) stacked in two tiers and in two concentric circles around a plastic straw. Each grain was notched so that, when the grains were expelled from the bomb during extinguishment, it could be determined in which tier and which circle each grain was originally packed. Charges were ignited in a closed bomb by either a nickel wire/Mylar-capillary plasma or black powder. The bomb contained a blowout disk that ruptured when the pressure reached 35 MPa, and the propellant was vented into a collection chamber packed with polyurethane foam. SEM analysis of the grains fired with a conventional black powder igniter showed no signs of unusual burning characteristics. The surfaces seemed to be evenly burned on the exteriors of the grains and in the perforations. Grains that had been subjected to plasma ignition, however, had pits, gouges, chasms, and cracks in the surfaces. The sides of the grains closest to the plasma had the greatest amount of damage, but even surfaces facing the outer wall of the bomb had small pits. The perforations contained gouges and abnormally burned regions (wormholes) that extended into the web. The SEM photos indicated that

  6. Prediction of betavoltaic battery output parameters based on SEM measurements and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Eugene B

    2016-06-01

    An approach for a prediction of (63)Ni-based betavoltaic battery output parameters is described. It consists of multilayer Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the depth dependence of excess carrier generation rate inside the semiconductor converter, a determination of collection probability based on the electron beam induced current measurements, a calculation of current induced in the semiconductor converter by beta-radiation, and SEM measurements of output parameters using the calculated induced current value. Such approach allows to predict the betavoltaic battery parameters and optimize the converter design for any real semiconductor structure and any thickness and specific activity of beta-radiation source. PMID:27017084

  7. Resolving Differences in Absolute Irradiance Measurements Between the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM and the SDO/EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    The Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) onboard SOHO has measured absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray solar irradiance nearly continuously since January 1996. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO, in operation since April of 2010, measures solar irradiance in a wide spectral range that encompasses the band passes (26 - 34 nm and 0.1 - 50 nm) measured by SOHO/SEM. However, throughout the mission overlap, irradiance values from these two instruments have differed by more than the combined stated uncertainties of the measurements. In an effort to identify the sources of these differences and eliminate them, we investigate in this work the effect of reprocessing the SEM data using a more accurate SEM response function (obtained from synchrotron measurements with a SEM sounding-rocket clone instrument taken after SOHO was already in orbit) and time-dependent, measured solar spectral distributions - i.e., solar reference spectra that were unavailable prior to the launch of the SDO. We find that recalculating the SEM data with these improved parameters reduces mean differences with the EVE measurements from about 20 % to less than 5 % in the 26 - 34 nm band, and from about 35 % to about 15 % for irradiances in the 0.1 - 7 nm band extracted from the SEM 0.1 - 50 nm channel.

  8. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Lindsey, Laurence F; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2) (65.54 µm per side) at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) system, which were only 66.59 µm(2) (8.160 µm per side) at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2) and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm). Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems. PMID:23555711

  9. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.; Bentur, A. . E-mail: bentur@tx.technion.ac.il; Kovler, K.

    2007-01-15

    A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation on SEM images using cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Kiani, M A; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2014-01-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay noise reduction filtering is designed to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. This approach is found to present better result when compared with two existing techniques: nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. When applied to evaluate the quality of SEM images, noise can be eliminated efficiently with optimal choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time. PMID:24164248

  11. Application of SEM-based contours for OPC model weighting and sample plan reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal; Hitomi, Keiichiro; Halle, Scott; Graur, Ioana; Bailey, Todd

    2015-03-01

    Continued improvements in SEM contour extraction capabilities have enabled calibrating more accurate OPC models for advanced technology nodes using a hybrid approach, combining CDs for 1D structures and full contour measurements for more complex 2D patterns. Previous work has addressed various components of contour modeling including alignment, edge detection, CD to contour consistency, and image parameter space coverage. This study covers weighting strategies for CDs compared to contours. Additionally the total number of structures in a sample plan can be reduced by incorporating contours for model calibration due to the increased number of evaluation points they provide. Repeated measurements of the same structure at separate locations are used to extract SEM contours across several instances. The average measurements from these locations can then be used for OPC model calibration. Using 14nm process data, it is shown that including more contours in hybrid OPC model calibration leads to improved model verification. Within an appropriate range, higher weight on the contour patterns leads to improved model verification on measurement sites unseen by the calibration set. Calibrating a model with fewer contour structures, but at higher weight shows improvement over standard CD only model calibration.

  12. SEM-contour shape analysis based on circuit structure for advanced systematic defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a practicable measurement technique that can help to achieve reliable inspections for systematic defects in advanced semiconductor devices. Systematic defects occurring in the design and mask processes are a dominant component of integrated circuit yield loss in nano-scaled technologies. Therefore, it is essential to ensure systematic defects are detected at an early stage of wafer fabrication. In the past, printed pattern shapes have been evaluated by human eyes or by taking manual critical dimension (CD) measurements. However, these operations are sometimes unstable and inaccurate. Last year, we proposed a new technique for taking measurements by using a SEM contour [1]. This technique enables a highly precise quantification of various complex 2D shaped patterns by comparing a contour extracted from a SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and an ideal pattern. We improved this technique to enable the carrying out of inspections suitable for every pattern structure required for minimizing the process margin. This technique quantifies a pattern shape of a target-layer pattern using information on a multi-layered circuit structure. This enabled it to confirm the existence of a critical defect in a circuit connecting upper/lower-layers. This paper describes the improved technique and the evaluation results obtained in evaluating it in detail.

  13. Modification of the microstructure of the films formed by gamma irradiated starch examined by SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, K.; Sartowska, B.

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the effect of gamma irradiation carried out for starch on the microstructure of the films prepared using the starch and its composition with sodium laurate (NaLau) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Potato starch was irradiated with 60Co gamma rays applying a dose of 30 kGy. Films were prepared by the solution casting method with the addition of 30 wt% glycerol as a plasticizer. Films containing NaLau and CTAB were prepared after performing the procedure, leading to starch-surfactant complexes. Mechanical tests and wetting angle measurements were performed for the films. SEM observations were carried out for the surfaces, fractures and/or sections of the films subjected to chemical fixation and for the dried films. The films obtained using irradiated starch are characterized by a smoother and more homogeneous structure as compared to those based on the non-irradiated starch. Besides, a number of small precipitates were observed on the films surfaces after drying and the number of those precipitates seemed to be higher after irradiation. The results can be related to differences in the microstructure of gels formed on the intermediate step of the films preparation and to the presence of two phases in the system and might serve for explanation of the radiation induced improvement of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties, a modification of the mechanical properties of the films, as well as for the changes of those properties resulting after storage.

  14. Characterization of a hydroxyapatite sputtered film subject to hydrothermal treatment using FE-SEM and STEM.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, K; Aoki, H; Masuzawa, T

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated onto a titanium substrate using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The sputtered film was crystallized using a hydrothermal treatment. The films were observed using X-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX).It was observed that the surface of the hydrothermally-treated film was covered with globular particles. The FE-SEM observations indicated that these particles were composed of columnar grains with a grain size of 20-50 nm. In the STEM cross-sectional observation of the HA-Ti interface, HA crystalline phase regions were observed, in part, in the non-crystalline phase layer of the as-sputtered film. After the hydrothermal treatment, the HA layer crystallized; the HA crystallization proceeded to a distance of 30 nm above the titanium surface. From an EDX line scan analysis, the titanium oxide layer was not observed at the HA-Ti interface of the as-sputtered film; however, in the hydrothermally-treated film, the titanium oxide layer, with a 15 nm thickness, was observed between the mixing layer and the titanium substrate. The formation of titanium oxide at the HA-Ti interface would contribute to the adhesion improvement of the sputtered film following the hydrothermal treatment. PMID:22072082

  15. Ecosystem Models as Support to Eutrophication Management in the North Atlantic Ocean (EMoSEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Geneviève; Billen, Gilles; Desmit, Xavier; Garnier, Josette; Gypens, Nathalie; Lancelot, Christiane; Lenhart, Hermann; Los, Hans; Mateus, Marcos; Ménesguen, Alain; Neves, Ramiro; Troost, Tineke; van der Molen, Johan

    2013-04-01

    One of the leading challenges in marine science and governance is to improve scientific guidance of management measures to mitigate eutrophication nuisances in the EU seas. Existing approaches do not integrate the eutrophication process in space (continuum river-ocean) and in time (past, present and future status). A strong need remains for (i) knowledge/identification of all the processes that control eutrophication and its consequences, (ii) consistent and harmonized reference levels assigned to each eutrophication-related indicator, (iii) identification of the main rivers directly or indirectly responsible for eutrophication nuisances in specific areas, (iv) an integrated transboundary approach and (v) realistic and scientific-based nutrient reduction scenarios. The SEAS-ERA project EMoSEM aims to develop and combine the state-of-the-art modelling tools describing the river-ocean continuum in the North-East Atlantic (NEA) continental seas. This will allow to link the eutrophication nuisances in specific marine regions to anthropogenic inputs, trace back their sources up to the watersheds, then test nutrient reduction options that might be implemented in these watersheds, and propose consistent indicators and reference levels to assess the Good Environmental Status (GES). At the end, EMoSEM will deliver coupled river-coastal-sea mathematical models and will provide guidance to end-users (policy- and decision makers) for assessing and combating eutrophication problems in the NEA continental waters.

  16. CD bias reduction in CD-SEM linewidth measurements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Maki; Meessen, Jeroen; Shishido, Chie; Watanabe, Kenji; Minnaert-Janssen, Ingrid; Vanoppen, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The linewidth measurement capability of the model-based library (MBL) matching technique was evaluated experimentally. This technique estimates the dimensions and shape of a target pattern by comparing a measured SEM image profile to a library of simulated line scans. The simulation model uses a non-linear least squares method to estimate pattern geometry parameters. To examine the application of MBL matching in an advanced lithography process, a focus-exposure matrix wafer was prepared with a leading-edge immersion lithography tool. The evaluation used 36 sites with target structures having various linewidths from 45 to 200 nm. The measurement accuracy was evaluated by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a reference measurement system. The results of a first trial indicated that two or more solutions could exist in the parameter space in MBL matching. To solve this problem, we obtained a rough estimation of the scale parameter in SEM imaging, based on experimental results, in order to add a constraint in the matching process. As a result, the sensitivity to sidewall variation in MBL matching was improved, and the measurement bias was reduced from 22.1 to 16 nm. These results indicate the possibility of improving the CD measurement capability by applying this tool parameter appropriately.

  17. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, Matthew I. Fullwood, David T.

    2013-09-15

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM.

  18. Marginal adaptation of newer root canal sealers to dentin: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Polineni, Swapnika; Bolla, Nagesh; Mandava, Pragna; Vemuri, Sayesh; Mallela, Madhusudana; Gandham, Vijaya Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the marginal adaptation of three newer root canal sealers to root dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human single-rooted teeth with completely formed apices were taken. Teeth were decoronated, and root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10) based upon the sealer used. Group 1 - teeth were obturated with epoxy resin sealer (MM-Seal). Group 2 - teeth were obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) based sealer (MTA Fillapex), Group 3 - teeth were obturated with bioceramic sealer (EndoSequence BC sealer). Later samples were vertically sectioned using hard tissue microtome and marginal adaptation of sealers to root dentin was evaluated under coronal and apical halves using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and marginal gap values were recorded. Results: The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple post hoc test. The highest marginal gap was seen in Group 2 (apical-16680.00 nm, coronal-10796 nm) and the lowest marginal gap was observed in Group 1 (apical-599.42 nm, coronal-522.72 nm). Coronal halves showed superior adaptation compared to apical halves in all the groups under SEM. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study epoxy resin-based MM-Seal showed good marginal adaptation than other materials tested. PMID:27563187

  19. Interpretation of secondary electron images obtained using a low vacuum SEM.

    PubMed

    Toth, M; Thiel, B L; Donald, A M

    2003-01-01

    Charging of insulators in a variable pressure environment was investigated in the context of secondary electron (SE) image formation. Sample charging and ionized gas molecules present in a low vacuum specimen chamber can give rise to SE image contrast. "Charge-induced" SE contrast reflects lateral variations in the charge state of a sample caused by electron irradiation during and prior to image acquisition. This contrast corresponds to SE emission current alterations produced by sub-surface charge deposited by the electron beam. "Ion-induced" contrast results from spatial inhomogeneities in the extent of SE signal inhibition caused by ions in the gaseous environment of a low vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM). The inhomogeneities are caused by ion focusing onto regions of a sample that correspond to local minima in the magnitude of the surface potential (generated by sub-surface trapped charge), or topographic asperities. The two types of contrast exhibit characteristic dependencies on microscope operating parameters such as scan speed, beam current, gas pressure, detector bias and working distance. These dependencies, explained in terms of the behavior of the gaseous environment and sample charging, can serve as a basis for a correct interpretation of SE images obtained using a low vacuum SEM. PMID:12505757

  20. The use of SEM/EDS analysis to distinguish dental and osseus tissue from other materials.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Ward, Dennis C; Braz, Valéria S; Stewart, John

    2002-09-01

    With increasing frequency, relatively small, fragmentary evidence thought to be osseous or dental tissue of human origin is submitted to the forensic laboratory for DNA analysis with the request for positive identification. Prior to performing DNA analysis, however, it is prudent to first perform a presumptive test or "screen" to determine whether the questioned material may be eliminated from further consideration. When material is shown not to be consistent with bone/teeth, DNA testing is not performed. When such determinations cannot be made from gross morphological features, elemental analysis can be indicative. This presumptive test is made possible by applying scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in conjunction with an X-ray spectral database recently developed by the FBI laboratory. This database includes spectra for many different materials including known examples of bone and tooth from many different contexts and representing the full range of taphonomic conditions. Results of SEM/EDS analysis of evidence can be compared to these standards to determine if they are consistent with bone and/or tooth and, if not, then what the material might represent. Analysis suggests that although the proportions and amounts of calcium and phosphorus are particularly important in differentiating bone and tooth from other materials, other minor differences in spectral profile can also provide significant discrimination. Analysis enables bone and tooth to be successfully distinguished from other materials in most cases. Exceptions appear to be ivory, mineral apatite, and perhaps some types of corals. PMID:12353578

  1. Mapping the Complex Morphology of Cell Interactions with Nanowire Substrates Using FIB-SEM

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mikkel R. B.; Łopacińska, Joanna; Schmidt, Michael S.; Skolimowski, Maciej; Abeille, Fabien; Qvortrup, Klaus; Mølhave, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Using high resolution focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) we study the details of cell-nanostructure interactions using serial block face imaging. 3T3 Fibroblast cellular monolayers are cultured on flat glass as a control surface and on two types of nanostructured scaffold substrates made from silicon black (Nanograss) with low- and high nanowire density. After culturing for 72 hours the cells were fixed, heavy metal stained, embedded in resin, and processed with FIB-SEM block face imaging without removing the substrate. The sample preparation procedure, image acquisition and image post-processing were specifically optimised for cellular monolayers cultured on nanostructured substrates. Cells display a wide range of interactions with the nanostructures depending on the surface morphology, but also greatly varying from one cell to another on the same substrate, illustrating a wide phenotypic variability. Depending on the substrate and cell, we observe that cells could for instance: break the nanowires and engulf them, flatten the nanowires or simply reside on top of them. Given the complexity of interactions, we have categorised our observations and created an overview map. The results demonstrate that detailed nanoscale resolution images are required to begin understanding the wide variety of individual cells’ interactions with a structured substrate. The map will provide a framework for light microscopy studies of such interactions indicating what modes of interactions must be considered. PMID:23326412

  2. Identification of possible sources of particulate matter in the personal cloud using SEM/EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Teri L.; Williams, Ronald W.

    2004-10-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) conducted the Baltimore Particulate Matter (PM) Epidemiology-Exposure Study of the Elderly during the summer of 1998. The study design included PM2.5 samples obtained from elderly (65+ years of age) retirement facility residents using personal exposure sampling devices. These sampling devices were also used to obtain PM2.5 samples at fixed locations within the personal monitoring subjects' apartments. Selected personal and apartment samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy with individual-particle X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), providing a qualitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of geological and trace element particles collected within these micro-environments at the retirement facility. This information was used to identify possible indoor source particles. The manual surveys of the personal samples revealed that some particles larger than 2.5 μm reached the filter surface. Using SEM/EDX, several particle types with possible indoor origins were identified. The Al-Zr-Cl particle is likely to have originated from a personal antiperspirant product. Particles with a talc or alumino-silicate composition point to cosmetics as a possible source. Large cadmium-containing particles were also found, which may indicate the use of art pigments or ceramic glazes, or emissions from television screen phosphors. A greater variety of particles was observed in a personal sample compared with its corresponding fixed-location apartment sample.

  3. Assessment of partial nitrification reactor performance through microbial population shift using quinone profile, FISH and SEM.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Annachhatre, A P

    2007-12-01

    In engineered systems, biological nitrogen removal through partial nitrification to nitrite is of great interest. Accordingly, effect of operating parameters such as pH, DO and temperature on the accumulation of ammonia-oxidizers was investigated. pH of 8, DO of 0.3-0.5mg/l and temperature of 35 degrees C yielded a ratio of 0.9-1.5 of NO(2)N:NH(4)N in the effluent suitable as a feed for Anammox reactor. Microbial population shift during start-up was assessed using quinone profile, SEM and FISH. UQ-8 in the biomass, which is the predominant quinone in ammonia-oxidizers, increased from 24.8% on Day 1 to 61.2% on Day 136. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in the reactor showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria gradually outcompeted other bacteria and was the dominant population. The morphology and inner structure of the granular sludge was observed using SEM and the photographs indicated that the aerobic granular sludge showed a shift towards spherical and small rod-shaped clusters. PMID:17257833

  4. The survival of metallic residues from gunshot wounds in cremated bone: a SEM-EDX study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Brandone, Alberto; Rizzi, Agostino; Mazzarelli, Debora; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    The research and analysis of gunshot residues has a relevant role in the examination of gunshot wounds. Nevertheless, very little literature exists concerning gunshot wounds on charred material. In this study, 16 adult bovine ribs (eight still with soft tissues and eight totally skeletonized) underwent a shooting test with two types of projectiles (9 mm full metal-jacketed bullet and 9 mm unjacketed bullet). Each rib then underwent a charring process in an electric oven, reaching the stage of complete calcination at 800°C. The area of each entrance wound was analyzed before and after the carbonization process via a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). In each sample, metallic residues composed of lead, barium, and antimony were found. These metallic residues were thus preserved also after exposure to the extremely high temperatures reached within the oven, especially with unjacketed bullets, although the particles seem to be more irregular in shape as a result of the heating process. In conclusion, this study proved that gunshot residues survive extremely high temperatures and can be detected via SEM/EDX even in cases of charred tissues. PMID:22249273

  5. Dental materials as an aid for victim identification: examination of calcined remains by SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.

    2010-06-01

    Detection and identification of human remains in situations in which they are calcined, disarticulated, and fragmented may be a challenging task. In such situations the non-biological materials that may be present in the dentition can provide the best evidence available for potential identification. Four human jaw segments were utilized. A known combination of dental resins was placed in each segment, when possible. Other restorations, pre-existing in the cadavers, were retained. The jaw segments were cremated in a commercial cremation oven for 2.5 hrs at 1010C. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) was used to analyze the dentition and fragmented debris. Analysis with SEM/EDS demonstrated the ability to confirm brand of known dental resins placed in each cadaver. In addition, pre-existing materials in each jaw segment were profiled and a likely brand name suggested. It was shown that microscopic fragments of heat-altered materials could be identified and classified, adding another level of certainty in victim identification.

  6. Compositional and technological features of glazed pottery from Aosta Valley (Italy): a SEM-EDS investigation.

    PubMed

    Gulmini, Monica; Appolonia, Lorenzo; Framarin, Patrizia; Mirti, Piero

    2006-11-01

    Twelve finds from archaeological excavations carried out in the Aosta region (Italy) were studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDS). The archaeological samples were shards of glazed pottery dating from the fourth to the seventh century AD. Analysis of ceramic bodies revealed a general homogeneity in composition among the studied samples and the use of a noncalcareous clay for their manufacture; however, two shards stand out due to their high iron contents. Glazes proved to be high-lead products with more than 70% PbO in all of the samples investigated but one. For the latter, a composition poorer in lead and richer in silicon, aluminium and iron was found. SEM observation of the contact region between body and glaze suggests that the vitreous coatings were mostly obtained by applying the glazing components onto the unfired clay body; moreover, a comparison between clay and glaze compositions suggests the use of a lead compound mixed with a silica-rich material, not a lead compound by itself. PMID:17028850

  7. Examining network dynamics after traumatic brain injury using the extended unified SEM approach.

    PubMed

    Hillary, F G; Medaglia, J D; Gates, K M; Molenaar, P C; Good, D C

    2014-09-01

    The current study uses effective connectivity modeling to examine how individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) learn a new task. We make use of recent advancements in connectivity modeling (extended unified structural equation modeling, euSEM) and a novel iterative grouping procedure (Group Iterative Multiple Model Estimation, GIMME) in order to examine network flexibility after injury. The study enrolled 12 individuals sustaining moderate and severe TBI to examine the influence of task practice on connections between 8 network nodes (bilateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, inferior parietal lobule, and Crus I in the cerebellum). The data demonstrate alterations in networks from pre to post practice and differences in the models based upon distinct learning trajectories observed within the TBI sample. For example, better learning in the TBI sample was associated with diminished connectivity within frontal systems and increased frontal to parietal connectivity. These findings reveal the potential for using connectivity modeling and the euSEM to examine dynamic networks during task engagement and may ultimately be informative regarding when networks are moving in and out of periods of neural efficiency. PMID:23138853

  8. Determination of DICD best focus by top-down CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Lim, Hui Kow; Ng, Teng H.

    2002-07-01

    As critical-dimension shrink below 0.18 micrometers , the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for more accurate decision of process window center. However in practical fabrication, we found that top-down CD-SEM showed its limitations in process window center determination, especially for the best focus. For instance, in some extreme focus situation, resist pattern will show a severe undercutting profile which will affect the DICD reading by top-down CD-SEM with fixed measurement algorithm. This kind of DICD measurement error will finally affect the process window center determination (especially best focus) and in-line DICD monitoring, which will lead to the cost of scrap and loss of time for trouble-shooting. In this paper, we will present a detailed study of DICD best focus determination in case of top-down DICD by experiment and simulation. Further a possible solution to this problem will be described in the latter part of this paper.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION BY SEM OF THE PYROCARBON FIBER COATING IN 2D-SIC/CVI-SIC

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.

    2011-03-23

    The previous report examined electrical conductivity (EC) data from RT to 800°C for several forms of two-dimensional silicon carbide composite made with a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) matrix (2D-SiC/CVI-SiC), an important quantity needed for the design of an FCI. We found that both in-plane and transverse EC-values for 2D-SiC/CVI-SiC strongly depended on the total thickness of the highly conductive pyrocarbon (PyC) fiber coating and the alignment of the carbon coating network. Furthermore, the transverse EC depended on the degree of interconnectivity of this network. For our EC-modeling efforts we used either “nominal” coating thickness values provided by the composite fabricator or we made thickness estimates based on a limited number of fiber cross-section examinations using SEM. Because of the importance of using a truly representative coating thickness value in our analysis, we examined numerous new SEM cross-sectional views to reassess the reliability of our limited number of original coating thickness measurements as well as to obtain an estimate of the variation in thickness values for different composite configurations.

  10. Toward global waveform tomography with the SEM: Improving upper-mantle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, S. W.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past three decades, advances in theory and improved quality and coverage of global seismic data have lead to progressively higher-resolution global images of earth structure. While long-wavelength velocity structure correlates well across recent global models, notable differences remain - particularly in the amplitudes and gradients of velocity anomalies, crucial to characterizing the respective roles of temperature and composition in mantle dynamics. Establishing better constraints on these features represents a critical open problem, toward which advanced full-waveform modeling using finite-frequency approaches may be applied. Over the last 20 years, we have developed a full-waveform inversion methodology based on asymptotic normal mode coupling theory (Li and Romanowicz, 1995) and applied it to global elastic and anelastic tomography (e.g. Mégnin and Romanowicz, 2000; Gung and Romanowicz, 2004). The approximate synthetic waveforms thus computed can now easily be replaced by more accurate numerical synthetics, albeit at a considerably higher computational cost. As a first step toward this goal, the SEMum upper-mantle VS model of Lekic and Romanowicz (2011) was developed using the spectral element method (SEM: Komatitsch and Vilotte, 1998) to invert fundamental and higher mode surface waves (T ≥ 60s) of over 200 well-distributed global events. A coupled-SEM scheme was used to speed computation (cSEM: Capdeville, et al. 2003), combining SEM in the mantle with an efficient modal solution in a 1D core. The crust was implemented as a radially-anisotropic equivalent smooth model (e.g. Backus, 1962), adjusted to fit a global surface-wave dispersion dataset (Shapiro and Ritzwoller, 2002). A uniform 60km crustal thickness allowed us to take large time steps, further speeding computation. The lower mantle was fixed to 3D model SAW24B16 (Mégnin and Romanowicz, 2000). SEMum exhibits stronger VS anomalies in the uppermost 200km, while also attaining good

  11. Closed-form SEM solution to the transient far-field response of a thin-wire antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoorfar, Ahmad

    1994-05-01

    A closed-form SEM representation for the transient far-field response of a thin-wire cylindrical antenna is derived, and explicit expressions for all of the corresponding SEM parameters are presented. In particular, a so-called time-dependent natural far-field mode is introduced, and its corresponding integral is analytically evaluated. Excellent agreements with the numerical results are obtained.

  12. Investigation of hidden periodic structures on SEM images of opal-like materials using FFT and IFFT.

    PubMed

    Stephant, Nicolas; Rondeau, Benjamin; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Cody, Jason A; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to use fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT) to investigate hidden periodic structures on SEM images. We focused on samples of natural, play-of-color opals that diffract visible light and hence are periodically structured. Conventional sample preparation by hydrofluoric acid etch was not used; untreated, freshly broken surfaces were examined at low magnification relative to the expected period of the structural features, and, the SEM was adjusted to get a very high number of pixels in the images. These SEM images were treated by software to calculate autocorrelation, FFT, and IFFT. We present how we adjusted SEM acquisition parameters for best results. We first applied our procedure on an SEM image on which the structure was obvious. Then, we applied the same procedure on a sample that must contain a periodic structure because it diffracts visible light, but on which no structure was visible on the SEM image. In both cases, we obtained clearly periodic patterns that allowed measurements of structural parameters. We also investigated how the irregularly broken surface interfered with the periodic structure to produce additional periodicity. We tested the limits of our methodology with the help of simulated images. PMID:24752811

  13. A Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for In-Situ Mars Surface Sample Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jerman, G. A.; Harvey, R. P.; Doloboff, I. J.; Neidholdt, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) project, funded by the NASA Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO) Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES), will build upon previous miniaturized SEM designs and recent advancements in variable pressure SEM's to design and build a SEM to complete analyses of samples on the surface of Mars using the atmosphere as an imaging medium. This project is a collaboration between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), electron gun and optics manufacturer Applied Physics Technologies, and small vacuum system manufacturer Creare. Dr. Ralph Harvery and environmental SEM (ESEM) inventor Dr. Gerry Danilatos serve as advisors to the team. Variable pressure SEMs allow for fine (nm-scale) resolution imaging and micron-scale chemical study of materials without sample preparation (e.g., carbon or gold coating). Charging of a sample is reduced or eliminated by the gas surrounding the sample. It is this property of ESEMs that make them ideal for locations where sample preparation is not yet feasible, such as the surface of Mars. In addition, the lack of sample preparation needed here will simplify the sample acquisition process and allow caching of the samples for future complementary payload use.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative determination of micro-inclusions by automated SEM/EDX analysis.

    PubMed

    Nuspl, Markus; Wegscheider, Wolfhard; Angeli, Johann; Posch, Wilhelm; Mayr, Michael

    2004-06-01

    With the help of an automated SEM/EDX analysis system non-metallic micro-inclusions in steel can be detected on a metallographically prepared surface area. The system makes it possible to determine position, size, shape and composition of each particle. Usually more than 1000 inclusions are found on one scan area. Therefore a new offline evaluation method has been developed to classify the large amount of inclusions and calculate specific size and shape data. A summary sheet is created to show the area contents and the mean values of all important properties for each class. Size and XY distributions as well as binary and ternary phase diagrams are drawn to depict the results. The strengths of this analytical technique are demonstrated by evaluation of an LC (low-carbon) steel. Alumina, common spinel, sulfide and oxisulfide inclusions could be identified as dominant inclusion types in LC steel. PMID:14985907

  15. Establishing aeolian particulate 'fingerprints' in an airport environment using magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sue; Hoon, Stephen R.; Richardson, Nigel; Bennett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from aviation activity on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment, in particular, may be derived from a wide range of potential sources including aircraft; vehicles; ground support equipment and buildings. In order to investigate and remediate potential problem sources, it is important to be able to identify characteristic particulate 'fingerprints' which would allow source attribution, particularly respirable particulates. To date the identification of such 'fingerprints' has remained elusive but remains a key research priority for the aviation industry (Webb et al, 2008). In previous PM studies, environmental magnetism has been used as a successful technique for discriminating between different emission types and particulate sources in both urban and industrial environments (e.g. Hunt et al 1984; Lecoanet et al 2003, Jones et al 2015). Environmental magnetism is a non-destructive and relatively rapid technique involving the use of non-directional, rock magnetic measurements to characterise the mineral magnetic properties of natural and anthropogenic materials. In other studies scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has also been used as an effective characterisation technique for the investigation of grain size and morphology of PM derived from vehicle emissions (e.g. Bucko et al 2010) and fossil fuel combustion sources (Kim et al 2009). In this study, environmental magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX have been used to characterise dusts from specific aircraft sources including engines, brakes and tyres. Furthermore, these methods have also been applied to runway (both hard and grass covered surfaces), taxiway and apron dusts collected during extensive environmental sampling at Manchester International Airport, UK in order to

  16. Mössbauer and SEM study of Fe-Al film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Varkey; Sharma, Ram Kripal; Lakshmi, N.; Venugopalan, K.

    Fe-Al alloy with Fe/Al ratio of 3:1 was first prepared by argon arc melting. It was subsequently coated on glass slide and cellophane tape using an electron beam gun system to have a thickness of 2,000 Å. X-ray diffraction spectrum of the coated sample indicates a definite texture for the film with a preferential growth along the Fe(110) plane. SEM micrographs of the film showed the presence of nano islands of nearly 3 x 1012/m2 surface density. Composition of different parts of the film was determined using EDAX. Room temperature Fe-57 Mössbauer spectrum of coated sample showed the presence a quadrupole doublet with a splitting of 0.46 mm/s, which is typical of Al-rich iron compounds. MOKE study shows an in-plane magnetic moment.

  17. SEM, EDX, infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the silicate mineral yuksporite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Theiss, Frederick L; Romano, Antônio Wilson

    2015-02-25

    The mineral yuksporite (K,Ba)NaCa2(Si,Ti)4O11(F,OH)⋅H2O has been studied using the combination of SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy shows a single pure phase with cleavage fragment up to 1.0 mm. Chemical analysis gave Si, Al, K, Na and Ti as the as major elements with small amounts of Mn, Ca, Fe and REE. Raman bands are observed at 808, 871, 930, 954, 980 and 1087 cm(-1) and are typical bands for a natural zeolite. Intense Raman bands are observed at 514, 643 and 668 cm(-1). A very sharp band is observed at 3668 cm(-1) and is attributed to the OH stretching vibration of OH units associated with Si and Ti. Raman bands resolved at 3298, 3460, 3562 and 3628 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations. PMID:25240833

  18. APT mass spectrometry and SEM data for CdTe solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba R.; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei

    2016-03-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) data acquired from a CAMECA LEAP 4000 XHR for the CdS/CdTe interface for a non-CdCl2 treated CdTe solar cell as well as the mass spectrum of an APT data set including a GB in a CdCl2-treated CdTe solar cell are presented. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data showing the evolution of sample preparation for APT and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) electron beam induced current (EBIC) are also presented. As a result, these data show mass spectrometry peak decomposition of Cu and Te within an APT dataset, the CdS/CdTe interface of an untreated CdTe solar cell, preparationmore » of APT needles from the CdS/CdTe interface in superstrate grown CdTe solar cells, and the preparation of a cross-sectional STEM EBIC sample.« less

  19. Using the Hitachi SEM to engage learners and promote next generation science standards inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshew, D. E.

    2014-09-01

    In this study participants will learn how the Hitachi TM3000 scanning electron microscope (SEM) played a central role in one school's movement towards Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and promoted exceptional student engagement. The device was used to create high quality images that were used by students in a variety of lab activities including a simulated crime scene investigation focusing on developing evidence based arguments as well as a real world conservation biology study. It provided opportunities for small group and independent investigations in support of NGSS, and peer-peer mentoring. Furthermore, use of the device was documented and were included to enhance secondary students' college and scholarship applications, all of which were successful.

  20. SEM, EDX, Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the silicate mineral yuksporite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Theiss, Frederick L.; Romano, Antônio Wilson

    2015-02-01

    The mineral yuksporite (K,Ba)NaCa2(Si,Ti)4O11(F,OH)ṡH2O has been studied using the combination of SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy shows a single pure phase with cleavage fragment up to 1.0 mm. Chemical analysis gave Si, Al, K, Na and Ti as the as major elements with small amounts of Mn, Ca, Fe and REE. Raman bands are observed at 808, 871, 930, 954, 980 and 1087 cm-1 and are typical bands for a natural zeolite. Intense Raman bands are observed at 514, 643 and 668 cm-1. A very sharp band is observed at 3668 cm-1 and is attributed to the OH stretching vibration of OH units associated with Si and Ti. Raman bands resolved at 3298, 3460, 3562 and 3628 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations.

  1. Online SEM investigation of microcrack characteristics of concretes at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xishu . E-mail: xshwang@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wu Bisheng; Wang Qingyuan

    2005-07-01

    Detecting and quantifying microcracking damage in microscopy has become an integral aspect of concrete technology. Better methods that have emerged over the last decade have led to improved understanding of the failure mechanisms and consequent effect on mechanical properties of concretes. This paper focuses on the applications of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in situ observations of concrete and the description of their microcrack characteristics at different temperatures. For the sake of brevity, nondestructive evaluations of large-scale cracking, such as delaminations and spalling, have not been addressed here. The microcracks propagation is a critical factor at high temperatures. These results indicated that the thermal energy plays an important role in microcracking and propagation of these concretes and reflected that there are different fracture types with changing the microstructure of concretes. The thermal mismatch of mixed materials play a significant role in the microcracking damage of concrete.

  2. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  3. In situ TEM/SEM electronic/mechanical characterization of nano material with MEMS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuelin, Wang; Tie, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Hongjiang, Zeng; Qinhua, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Our investigation of in situ observations on electronic and mechanical properties of nano materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the help of traditional micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been reviewed. Thanks to the stability, continuity and controllability of the loading force from the electrostatic actuator and the sensitivity of the sensor beam, a MEMS tensile testing chip for accurate tensile testing in the nano scale is obtained. Based on the MEMS chips, the scale effect of Young's modulus in silicon has been studied and confirmed directly in a tensile experiment using a transmission electron microscope. Employing the nanomanipulation technology and FIB technology, Cu and SiC nanowires have been integrated into the tensile testing device and their mechanical, electronic properties under different stress have been achieved, simultaneously. All these will aid in better understanding the nano effects and contribute to the designation and application in nano devices.

  4. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre-reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surfaces of the graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composites presently pretreated prior to bonding with polyimide adhesive contained variable amounts of a fluoropolymer, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lap shear strengths were determined for unaged samples and for those aged over 500- and 1000-hour periods at 177 and 232 C. Unaged sample lap strengths, which were the highest obtained, exhibited no variation with surface pretreatment, but a significant decrease is noted with increasing aging temperature. These thermally aged samples, however, had increased surface fluorine concentration, while a minimal concentration was found in unaged samples. SEM demonstrated a progressive shift from cohesive to adhesive failure for elevated temperature-aged composites.

  5. Low-vacuum SEM analyses of ceramic tiles with emphasis on glaze defects characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopar, Tinkara Ducman, Vilma

    2007-11-15

    The behaviour of glazed building ceramics exposed to different environment (weathering, chemicals, etc.) is determined by microstructural features; in many cases structural and surface defects at the micro- or nanometre scale are crucial for the functional properties of products. Many testing methods for materials characterization of a variety of ceramic products, physical and chemical methods, are time-consuming, large quantities of samples are needed, and are usually destructive. This paper illustrates the use of low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) as fast and almost non-destructive, as only a small amount of sample is needed. Examples are given of various surface and structural properties of building ceramics, for the identification of the material deterioration process as a result of environmental impact.

  6. SEM observation and wettability of variously processed and fractured surface of dental zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarumi, Naoyoshi; Uo, Motohiro; Yamaga, Eiji; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    Current dental zirconia has several problems in clinical application such as chipping, fracture and detachment. To reduce these problems the surface after various treatments was analyzed by SEM observation, contact angle measurement and surface roughness measurement, and compared. The surface after mirror polishing was smooth. Porcelain layering was smooth except large formed grooves by bubbles. After sandblast and tribochemical treatments, the surfaces showed several micron-sized caving with micron to submicron-level irregularities. Sandblast and tribochemical treatments with the lager roughness had the smaller water contact angle than silicone wheel polishing. Clinically fractured surface of zirconia showed a more complex structure than manually fractured surface, which may be due to the various mode of stress to be imposed repetitively to various direction.

  7. Development of soft X-ray emission spectrometer for EPMA/SEM and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Murano, T.; Takakura, M.; Asahina, S.; Terauchi, M.; Koike, M.; Imazono, T.; Koeda, M.; Nagano, T.

    2016-02-01

    A newly developed wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometer (WD-SXES) with two kinds of gratings, JS50XL and JS200N, were installed on electron probe microanalysers (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). The new detector covers the energy range from 50 to 210 eV with an energy resolution of better than 0.2 eV at Al-L emission on Al metal. With this low energy range and high energy resolution, various kinds of X-ray lines of K, L, M, N emission spectra from lithium to uranium could be observed and chemical state analysis carried out. This WD-SXES has also a high potential for analysing trace light elements under 100 ppm. The design, having no mechanically scanning components, allows parallel spectral acquisition over the entire energy range of each grating (50 to 170 eV and 70 to 210 eV).

  8. Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

    2007-03-21

    Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

  9. Discovering New Minerals at Micron to Nanoscales: A SEM-EBSD-EPMA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    2014-12-01

    With high-resolution analytical field emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer, we are now capable to characterize Earth and planetary materials easier and faster down to nanoscales. Nanofeatures (such as inclusions, exsolution, zonation, coatings, pores) in minerals and rocks are being discovered. Nanominerals and nanoparticles are being revealed. New minerals and new materials are being identified. During our ongoing nanomineralogy investigation since 2006, more than twenty five new minerals have been discovered at micron to nanoscales. Fifteen of them are from the Allende meteorite, including new refractory minerals like allendeite, hexamolybdenum, tistarite, panguite and kangite, which are among the first solids formed in our solar system. Each of the new extraterrestrial minerals reveals distinctive forming environments, providing insights into nebula or parent-body processes. Presented here are a few nanomineralogy projects demonstrating how to find and characterize new minerals with an integrated SEM-EBSD-EPMA approach.

  10. Variations in surface roughness of seven orthodontic archwires: an SEM-profilometry study

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshan, Vahid; Pousti, Maryam; Rahimi, Hajir; Shariati, Mahsa; Aghamohamadi, Bahareh

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness (SR) of 2 types of orthodontic archwires made by 4 different manufacturers. Methods This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 35 specimens of 7 different orthodontic archwires, namely, 1 nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire each from the manufacturers American Orthodontics, OrthoTechnology, All-Star Orthodontics, and Smart Technology, and 1 stainless steel (SS) archwire each from the manufacturers American Orthodontics, OrthoTechnology, and All-Star Orthodontics. After analyzing the composition of each wire by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, the SR of each wire was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface profilometry. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α < 0.05). Results The average SR of NiTi wires manufactured by Smart Technology, American Orthodontics, OrthoTechnology, and All-Star Orthodontics were 1,289 ± 915 A°, 1,378 ± 372 A°, 2,444 ± 369 A°, and 5,242 ± 2,832 A°, respectively. The average SR of SS wires manufactured by All-Star Orthodontics, OrthoTechnology, and American Orthodontics were 710 ± 210 A°, 1,831 ± 1,156 A°, and 4,018 ± 2,214 A°, respectively. Similar to the results of profilometry, the SEM images showed more defects and cracks on the SS wire made by American Orthodontics and the NiTi wire made by All-Star Orthodontics than others. Conclusions The NiTi wire manufactured by All-Star Orthodontics and the SS wire made by American Orthodontics were the roughest wires. PMID:23112943

  11. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes. PMID:24767501

  12. Barite in Marine Sediments: new Insights From a Quantitative SEM/EDS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, E.; Rabouille, C.; Martinez, G.; Lefevre, I.; Reyss, J.; Van Beek, P.; Jeandel, C.

    2001-12-01

    Barite (BaSO4) in marine sediments appears to be related to biological activity in surface ocean waters. Two formation mechanisms have been proposed including abiotic precipitation in sulfate-rich microenvironments within decaying organic matter and biotic precipitation by living microorganisms. Barite is thus considered as a proxy of export production and is widely used for paleo-productivity reconstruction. Direct barite determination is not achieved by currently used methods which rely on the measurement of total barium by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) or instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and correction of the detrital barium contribution. Due to the relatively large and variable barium concentration of the different detrital phases involved, these methods introduce large uncertainties on the determination of bio-Ba, especially in clay-rich and barite-poor sediments. We have developed a new technique based on the direct counting of individual barite crystals using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled to an automated X-ray microanalysis system (EDS) which allows the measurement of the absolute concentration of bio-Ba over a wide range of concentrations without matrix correction. The technique was applied to the determination of bio-Ba in surface sediments and trap samples from low-to-medium productivity regions in the North Atlantic Tropical ocean (EUMELI cruise), in surface sediments from the Southern Indian ocean (ANTARES cruise) and in a piston core from the Central North Pacific ocean (LL44-GPC3). A comparison with bio-Ba estimates obtained by the two classical methods, INAA and ICP-MS, demonstrates the interest of the SEM/EDS technique for the determination of bio-Ba in marine sediments. Furthermore, barite abundance and size distribution between trap samples and surface sediments at the EUMELI sites suggest contrasted barite preservations.

  13. Detection of metal residues on bone using SEM-EDS--part II: Sharp force injury.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, D; Mazzarelli, D; Porta, D; Rizzi, A; Cattaneo, C

    2012-11-30

    Scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) is extensively seen in the literature for the improvement of the macroscopic analysis of sharp lesions, but very few indications concerning its real potential in the forensic context, particularly in forensic anthropology, are at the moment available. This paper represents a pilot study for the analysis of the behaviour of metallic residues found on bone after sharp force injury. Fourteen lesions were made on human bone (radius), cleaned of all soft tissues, with seven different sharp tools (three metal instruments, three metal saws and a baked-clay knife). Tools and lesions underwent SEM-EDS. From 3 to 18 particles were detected on each lesion, whose diameter was included between 0.5 and 150 μm. In 58% of cases, particle composition was concordant with the instrument used. The results seem to suggest that sharp force injury frequently leaves relatively few residues on bone, particularly in the case of common types of metal. Saws showed slightly more contamination with other residues than knives, which may be explained by the capability of the saw's teeth to retain the residues of previously encountered material. In addition, metal residues related to the tool used to cut the bone were located on the edges/walls of lesions in the case of saw marks, whereas they were more frequently found on the kerf floor in the case of knives/scissors, with the exception of the baked clay knife which when it leaves residues at all, seemed to leave them equally divided between the floor, the edges and the surrounding bone. PMID:22995046

  14. Further studies of specimen volume changes during processing for SEM: including some plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Boyde, S

    1980-01-01

    The dimensions of specimens undergoing preparation for examination in the SEM were measured throughout the preparative sequence or at various important stages. The tissues studied included 15-day mouse embryo limbs (MEL), small blocks of adult mouse liver and brain, and potato tuber. The animal tissues were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde (GA) in 0.15M cacodylate buffer, and the potatoe tissue in 2% GA in water. The effects of various secondary fixation and other treatments were investigated. The results show that lithium salts cause a reduction in the shrinkage of MEL in 100% ethanol but this effect was not significant in the other tissues investigated, and did not persist in specimens stored after critical point drying (CPD). All CPD specimens were shrunken. However postosmication and treatment with uranyl acetate (UAc) and cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) all reduced specimen shrinkage in 100% ethanol and after critical point drying. The volume gains with Os + UAc and Os + CPC are both very significant, but it was found that these larger specimens shrank more on storage. Thus rapid examination in the SEM is recommended. Ethanol and Freon 113 were compared as intermediate fluids and it was found that ethanol-CO2 critical point dried specimens shrank more before and after CPD than Freon 113-CO2 specimens. The latter technique is, therefore, to be recommended. Potato tissue shrinks in 30% ethanol, whereas animal tissues all swell in this concentration. The potato tissue also shrank very litte on critical point drying in contrast to the animal tissue specimens. PMID:6999595

  15. Enhanced defect of interest [DOI] monitoring by utilizing sensitive inspection and ADRTrue SEM review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Remo; Zeiske, Ulrich; Shabtay, Saar; Beyer, Mirko; Yerushalmi, Liran; Goshen, Oren

    2011-03-01

    As semiconductor process design rules continue to shrink, the ability of optical inspection tools to separate between true defects and nuisance becomes more and more difficult. Therefore, monitoring Defect of Interest (DOI) become a real challenge (Figure 1). This phenomenon occurs due to the lower signal received from real defects while noise levels remain almost the same, resulting in inspection high nuisance rate, which jeopardizes the ability to provide a meaningful, true defect Pareto. A non-representative defect Pareto creates a real challenge to a reliable process monitoring (Figure 4). Traditionally, inspection tool recipes were optimized to keep data load at a manageable level and provide defect maps with ~10% nuisance rate, but as defects of interest get smaller with design rule shrinkage, this requirement results in a painful compromise in detection sensitivity. The inspection is usually followed by defect review and classification using scanning electron microscope (SEM), the classification done manually and it is performed on a small sample of the inspection defect map due to time and manual resources limitations. Sample is usually 50~60 randomly selected locations, review is performed manually most of the times, and manual classification is performed for all the reviewed locations. In the approach described in this paper, the inspection tool recipe is optimized for sensitivity rather than low nuisance rate (i.e. detect all DOI with compromising on a higher nuisance rate). Inspection results with high nuisance rate introduce new challenges for SEM review methodology & tools. This paper describe a new approach which enhances process monitoring quality and the results of collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials® and GLOBALFOUNDRIES® utilizing Applied Materials ADRTrueTM & SEMVisionTM capabilities. The study shows that the new approach reveals new defect types in the Pareto, and improves the ability to

  16. Confirmatory analysis of field-presumptive GSR test sample using SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toal, Sarah J.; Niemeyer, Wayne D.; Conte, Sean; Montgomery, Daniel D.; Erikson, Gregory S.

    2014-09-01

    RedXDefense has developed an automated red-light/green-light field presumptive lead test using a sampling pad which can be subsequently processed in a Scanning Electron Microscope for GSR confirmation. The XCAT's sampling card is used to acquire a sample from a suspect's hands on the scene and give investigators an immediate presumptive as to the presence of lead possibly from primer residue. Positive results can be obtained after firing as little as one shot. The same sampling card can then be sent to a crime lab and processed on the SEM for GSR following ASTM E-1588-10 Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry, in the same manner as the existing tape lifts currently used in the field. Detection of GSR-characteristic particles (fused lead, barium, and antimony) as small as 0.8 microns (0.5 micron resolution) has been achieved using a JEOL JSM-6480LV SEM equipped with an Oxford Instruments INCA EDS system with a 50mm2 SDD detector, 350X magnification, in low-vacuum mode and in high vacuum mode after coating with carbon in a sputter coater. GSR particles remain stable on the sampling pad for a minimum of two months after chemical exposure (long term stability tests are in progress). The presumptive result provided by the XCAT yields immediate actionable intelligence to law enforcement to facilitate their investigation, without compromising the confirmatory test necessary to further support the investigation and legal case.

  17. New controlled environment vitrification system for preparing wet samples for cryo-SEM.

    PubMed

    Ge, H; Suszynski, W J; Davis, H T; Scriven, L E

    2008-01-01

    A new controlled environment vitrification system (CEVS) has been designed and constructed to facilitate examination by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) of initial suspension state and of microstructure development in latex, latex-composite and other coatings while they still contain solvent. The new system has a main chamber with provisions for coating as well as drying, and for well-controlled plunging into cryogen. An added subsidiary chamber holds samples for drying or annealing over minutes to days before they are returned to the main chamber and plunged from it. In the main chamber, samples are blade-coated on 5 x 7 mm pieces of silicon wafer and held at selected temperature and humidity for successively longer times, either there or after transfer along a rail into the subsidiary chamber. They are then placed in the sample holder mounted on the plunge rod, so as to permit adjustment of the sample's attitude when it plunges, at controlled speed, into liquid ethane at its freezing point, to a chosen depth, in order to solidify the sample without significant shear or freezing artifacts. The entries of plunging samples and related sample holders into liquid ethane were recorded with a high-speed, high-resolution Photron digital camera. The data were interpreted with a new hypothesis about the width of the band of extremely rapid cooling by deeply subcooled nucleate boiling below the line of entry. Complementary cryo-SEM images revealed that the freezing rate and surface shearing of a sample need to be balanced by adjusting the plunging attitude. PMID:18173650

  18. SEM-EDS, EPMA and MRS analysis of neo-crystallisations on weathered glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, R.; Nardone, M.; Sodo, A.; Sommariva, G.; Vallotto, M.; Verità, M.

    2010-02-01

    When a glass is exposed to the atmosphere the combined action of water and environmental elements leads to the weathering of the glass surface. Both the chemical composition of the glass and the environmental parameters influence the mechanism of glass weathering mainly consisting in the formation of a layer of hydrated leached glass and salt deposits. The study of these phenomena is very important for both industrial and cultural heritage applications. In order to study the weathering mechanism of glasses exposed outdoor the chemical composition of the glass and the chemical and mineralogical nature of the reaction products should be determined. X-ray micro-analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and electron probe microanalysis (WD-EPMA) are traditionally employed in this type of investigation. Nevertheless particular compounds are hardly detected with this technique (for ex. nitrates) and no direct information can be obtained on the mineralogical features of the reaction products. Moreover, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) cannot be successfully used because of the very low amounts of deposited material. This work reports the results of a combined complementary X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WD-XRF), SEM-EDS, WD-EPMA and μ-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) investigation on the surfaces of an industrial float glass and a glass reproducing the low-durable glass of ancient stained windows exposed sheltered outdoor for 6 months. The investigation enabled the identification and characterisation of different reaction products (soluble salts) confirming the need of this analytical approach for the study of the glass weathering process.

  19. The role of different toothpastes on preventing dentin erosion: an SEM and AFM study®.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco; Vigorelli, Paolo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was the evaluation of new formulation toothpastes on preventing dentin erosion produced by a soft drink (Coca Cola®), using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fifty dentin specimens were divided in treatment and control halves and were than assigned to 5 groups of 10 specimens each: group 1a: intact dentin, group 1b: dentin + soft drink, group 2a: intact dentin + Biorepair Plus-Sensitive Teeth®, group 2b: dentin + soft drink + Biorepair Plus-Sensitive Teeth®, group 3a: intact dentin + Biorepair Plus-Total Protection®, group 3b: dentin + soft drink + Biorepair Plus-Total Protection®, group 4a: intact dentin + Sensodyne Repair & Protect®, group 4b: dentin + soft drink + Sensodyne Repair & Protect®, group 5a: intact dentin + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief®, group 5b: dentin + soft drink + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief®. The surface of each specimen was imaged by AFM and SEM. Comparing specimens of group a and b (no demineralization and demineralization), a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in Rrms values was registered. Comparing b groups, all the analyzed toothpastes tended to remineralize the dentine surface in different extent. Biorepair Plus-Total Protection® and Sensodyne Repair & Protect® provided higher protective effect against dentin demineralization. PMID:23784952

  20. Crystal polymer interaction with new injectable bone substitute; SEM and Hr TEM study.

    PubMed

    Daculsi, G; Rohanizadeh, R; Weiss, P; Bouler, J M

    2000-04-01

    A composite constituted of calcium phosphate (CaP) granules and a hydrophilic polymer as a carrier (hydroxy-propyl-methyl cellulose, HPMC) was developed to be an injectable bone substitute (IBS, CNRS patent). IBS is a composite and not an ionic cement. The composite obtained is ready to use and sterile. Chemical interactions between organic and inorganic components appeared during the association of the two. The interactions of the CaP and the polymer have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe (EDX), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HrTEM) SEM revealed a degradation of the granules into smaller particles while EDX was unable to show significant changes in the Ca/P ratio during aging of the composite. With Hr TEM, however, we observed hydrolysis (process of dissolution and precipitation) from the surface to about 13 nm into the HA crystals and occasional dissolution with precipitation of beta-TCP crystals. In HA, the first zone of interaction consisted of a single layer of small globular crystals of 2 to 3 nm in diameter. Numerous lattice patterns in all three axes could be observed. Under the globular crystals zone, the inter-reticular distances of the single crystals appeared enlarged by 1.2% (from 0.817 to 0.827 nm). The enlargement seems to correspond to diffusion of HPO(4) into the crystal lattice. In beta-TCP crystals, dissolution was observed to be several nanometers deep, but globular surface precipitation rarely was observed. With time or after steam sterilization, no changes were observed. These data demonstrate the strong interactions of the hydrophylic polymer with calcium phosphate, but only in the first several nanometers of thickness. PMID:10644956

  1. The Role of Sexually Explicit Material (SEM) in the Sexual Development of Black Young Same-Sex-Attracted Men

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Harper, Gary W.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school-and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent men ages 15–19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one’s sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., “top” or “bottom”); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA young men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who maybe accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  2. SemFunSim: A New Method for Measuring Disease Similarity by Integrating Semantic and Gene Functional Association

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Peng; Peng, Jiajie; Wang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    Background Measuring similarity between diseases plays an important role in disease-related molecular function research. Functional associations between disease-related genes and semantic associations between diseases are often used to identify pairs of similar diseases from different perspectives. Currently, it is still a challenge to exploit both of them to calculate disease similarity. Therefore, a new method (SemFunSim) that integrates semantic and functional association is proposed to address the issue. Methods SemFunSim is designed as follows. First of all, FunSim (Functional similarity) is proposed to calculate disease similarity using disease-related gene sets in a weighted network of human gene function. Next, SemSim (Semantic Similarity) is devised to calculate disease similarity using the relationship between two diseases from Disease Ontology. Finally, FunSim and SemSim are integrated to measure disease similarity. Results The high average AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) (96.37%) shows that SemFunSim achieves a high true positive rate and a low false positive rate. 79 of the top 100 pairs of similar diseases identified by SemFunSim are annotated in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) as being targeted by the same therapeutic compounds, while other methods we compared could identify 35 or less such pairs among the top 100. Moreover, when using our method on diseases without annotated compounds in CTD, we could confirm many of our predicted candidate compounds from literature. This indicates that SemFunSim is an effective method for drug repositioning. PMID:24932637

  3. Antireflux versus conventional self-expanding metallic Stents (SEMS) for distal esophageal cancer: results of a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Coron, E.; David, G.; Lecleire, S.; Jacques, J.; Le Sidaner, A.; Barrioz, T.; Coumaros, D.; Volteau, C.; Vedrenne, B.; Bichard, P.; Boustière, C.; Touchefeu, Y.; Brégeon, J.; Prat, F.; Le Rhun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are commonly used in the palliation of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma. However, they predispose to gastroesophageal reflux when deployed across the gastroesophageal junction. The aims of this study were to: 1) assess the influence of the antireflux valve on trans-prosthetic reflux (primary outcome); and 2) compare the results of SEMS with and without antireflux valve in terms of reflux symptoms, quality of life (QOL), improvement of dysphagia and adverse events (secondary outcomes). Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in nine centers. Carcinomas were locally advanced (47 %) or metastatic. After randomization, patients received either a covered SEMS with antireflux valve (n = 20) or a similar type of SEMS with no antireflux device but assigned to standard proton pump inhibitor therapy and postural advice (n = 18). Trans-prosthetic reflux was assessed at day 2 using a radiological score based on barium esophagography performed after Trendelenburg maneuver and graded from 0 (no reflux) to 12 (maximum). Monthly telephone interviews were conducted for Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) scoring from 0 (excellent) to 5 (poor), QOL assessment (based on the Reflux-Qual Simplifié scoring system) from 0 (poor) to 100 (excellent), dysphagia scoring from 0 (no dysphagia) to 5 (complete dysphagia) and regurgitation scoring from 0 (no regurgitation) to 16 (maximum). Results: No difference was noted in terms of age, sex, size of lesion, prosthesis length or need for dilation prior to SEMS placement. No difficulty in placing SEMS nor complications were noted. Radiological scores of reflux were found to be significantly lower in patients with an antireflux stent compared to the conventional stent and associated measures. The regurgitation scores were significantly decreased in patients with antireflux stents during the first 2 months after stent placement and

  4. Toward global waveform tomography of the whole mantle using SEM: Efficient simulation of the global wavefield using a homogenized crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, S. W.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    As global waveform-modeling schemes rooted in perturbation theory are supplanted by fully numerical alternatives, such as the Spectral Element Method (e.g. SEM: Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002), the improved wavefield accuracy for complex 3D structures also carries increased computational cost. Lekic and Romanowicz (2010) inverted waveforms of fundamental and higher mode surface waves for a radially anisotropic upper-mantle Vs model using SEM (SEMum). The SEM computations were made feasible by an appropriate choice of cutoff period (T≥ 60 s.), as well as the implementation of a homogenized anisotropic crustal layer based on fitting of short period group velocity dispersion curves. These choices allowed for an efficient SEM mesh undeformed by true Moho topography. Further, instead of homogenization of a possibly biased a priori crustal model, Lekic and Romanowicz jointly inverted for the crustal layer, constrained by surface wave group velocity dispersion maps for T≥ 25 s. We are currently developing a radially anisotropic Vs model of the whole mantle using SEM, following an approach broadly similar to that employed in SEMum. Extension of this methodology to imaging of lower-mantle structure requires the inclusion of a body wave dataset, and thus shorter-period modeling of the global wavefield (T≥ 32 s.). While this period range dictates finer sampling of our SEM mesh, reduced computational cost is still possible through the crustal homogenization scheme. Here, we first discuss the development of an analogous homogenized crustal model and its validity for both the fundamental and higher mode surface wave and the body wave datasets. We focus on maintaining a simplified Moho topography, thus obviating expensive deformation of the SEM mesh, while accurately treating valuable surface-reflected body wave phases (ex: multiple ScS). Second, we discuss implications of treating the crust in this manner for the overall inversion methodology. In particular, we intend to

  5. F360 and F6 Skytaper: SEM evaluation of cleaning efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dagna, Alberto; Gastaldo, Giulia; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Root canal preparation may produce a large quantity of smear layer that covers canal walls. Single-file systems have recently appeared, with the aim of reducing the number of steps and files to reach a correct endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate by SEM the root canal walls after instrumentation with F360 (Komet, Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany) and F6 Skytaper (Komet, Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany), in order to evaluate the presence/absence of smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules on the root canal walls at coronal, middle, and apical third of each sample. Methods Twenty single-rooted freshly extracted teeth were selected and divided into 2 groups. For each group root canals were shaped with F360 (Komet, Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany) and F6 Skytaper (Komet, Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany) instruments under irrigation with 5,25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Specimens were fractured longitudinally and analyzed by SEM at standard magnification of 5000x. The presence/absence of smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules at the coronal, middle, and apical third of each canal were evaluated using a 5-step scale for scores. Numeric data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U statistical tests and significance was predetermined at P <0.05. Results This study did not reveal differences among two groups at the coronal and apical third. The apical third showed the highest values of scores for all Ni-Ti systems used. Significant differences in smear layer scores were recorded among the Ni-Ti systems at middle canal level (P < 0.05), where F6 Skytaper showed significantly lower scores than F360. Conclusions Within the limitation of this study, F360 and F6 Skytaper rotary instruments seem to be effective in shaping root canals with good debridement from canal walls, without significant differences between the two systems as it regards the coronal third and the apical third, the area

  6. Osteoblast-osteocyte transformation. A SEM densitometric analysis of endosteal apposition in rabbit femur

    PubMed Central

    Pazzaglia, Ugo E; Congiu, Terenzio; Sibilia, Valeria; Quacci, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Transformation of osteoblasts into osteocytes is marked by changes in volume and cell shape. The reduction of volume and the entrapment process are correlated with the synthesis activity of the cell which decreases consequently. This transformation process has been extensively investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) but no data have yet been published regarding osteoblast-osteocyte dynamic histomorphometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) densitometric analysis was carried out to determine the osteoblast and open osteocyte lacunae density in corresponding areas of a rabbit femur endosteal surface. The lining cell density was 4900.1 ± 30.03 n mm−2, the one of open osteocyte lacunae 72.89 ± 22.55 n mm−2. This corresponds to an index of entrapment of one cell every 67.23 osteoblasts (approximated by defect). The entrapment sequence begins with flattening of the osteoblast and spreading of equatorial processes. At first these are covered by the new apposed matrix and then also the whole cellular body of the osteocyte undergoing entrapment. The dorsal aspect of the cell membrane suggests that closure of the osteocyte lacuna may be partially carried out by the same osteoblast-osteocyte which developed a dorsal secretory territory. A significant proportion of the endosteal surface was analysed by SEM, without observing any evidence of osteoblast mitotic figures. This indicates that recruitment of the pool of osteogenic cells in cortical bone lamellar systems occurs prior to the entrapment process. No further additions occurred once osteoblasts were positioned on the bone surface and began lamellar apposition. The number of active osteoblasts on the endosteal surface exceeded that of the cells which become incorporated as osteocytes (whose number was indicated by the number of osteocyte lacunae). Therefore such a balance must be equilibrated by the osteoblasts' transformation in resting lining cells or by apoptosis. The current work

  7. Detailed microstructure of two-phase lower mantle mineral analogs from SEM and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela; Mariani, Elisabetta; Dawson, Karl

    2016-04-01

    The rheology and viscosity of the lower mantle influence convection, heat transport through the mantle, slab subduction, and many surface processes. Plastic flow in the lower mantle depends on the deformation mechanics of its constituent mineral phases - mostly bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, with a smaller percent of the rheologically weaker ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O. For deformation in a (mostly) two-phase system with large strength contrast, such as in the lower mantle, microstructure greatly influences deformation and rheology. We examined microstructures of an analog two-phase system of the lower mantle before and after deformation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Halite (NaCl) and neighborite (NaMgF3) were used as analogs to lower mantle minerals ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and bridgmanite MgSiO3, respectively, and deformed up to 50% strain at 4 GPa confining pressure and average strain rates of 2×10‑3 s‑1in the D-DIA. One goal of our microstructural analysis is to help determine whether deformation in the bulk of the lower mantle occurs by diffusion creep or by dislocation creep, which has been long debated. Previous X-ray diffraction and microtomography studies of these samples (Kaercher et al. submitted) show the weaker NaCl is likely interconnected at just 15 percent volume and greatly reduces crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in NaMgF3, while NaCl itself develops either very little or heterogeneous CPO. New SEM and EBSD results show that NaCl deforms primarily by subgrain rotation recrystallization (a recrystallization mechanism active during dislocation creep) at 200° C, resulting in drastically reduced grain sizes. While we have less information for the NaMgF3 due to difficulties polishing soft, hydrophilic NaCl and harder NaMgF3 together, it appears that NaMgF3 grains remain the same size. This suggests that periclase may control deformation in the lower mantle resulting in a weaker, more

  8. Characterizing the 65nm through-pitch sensitivity to scanner parameters by CD SEM and scatterometry metrologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Jason; Chen, Alek

    2009-12-01

    Processes of 65nm node are applied on a scanner (TWINSCAN XT1700i) for this experiment. The five adjustable scanner parameters investigated are dose, focus scan range, NA, σ_width, and σ_center of the illumination pupil. The test reticle contains a range of pitches, each with a variety of biases sufficient for selecting the target CD at each pitch. It can be used for exposing patterns for both CD SEM and scatterometry. The minimum and maximum pitches of the 1D line/space pattern are 135 and 500nm, respectively, and no assist feature is added for the isolated pitches. Seventeen pitches are selected for generating the through-pitch curve, and they are the most sensitive ones to this illumination setting. Two metrology tools are used to measure the printed features, i.e. CD SEM and scatterometry. MCD (Middle CD) measured by scatterometry is compared with CD SEM data for the OPE curve. A very consistent offset between two metrologies is presented through the pitches; the R2 value is greater than 0.98 for point to point of CD SEM versus MCD correlation. In addition to the CD measurements, scatterometry provides SWA information, which is verified to correlate linearly with focus variations. Based on the metrology data, results of this study demonstrate that the OCD data are as reliable as the CD SEM measurements.

  9. Mapping chemical elements on the surface of orthodontic appliance by SEM-EDX

    PubMed Central

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Wołowiec, Paulina; Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Czopor, Wojciech; Berniczei-Royko, Adam; Vegh, Andras; Gedrange, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background During orthodontic treatment, the various elements that constitute the fixed appliance undergo different processes. As a result of a change of the surface, elution/coverage of metals on the surface can be observed in the process of corrosion/passivation. Material/Methods Scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system (SEM-EDX) was used to analyze the composition of stainless steel elements of orthodontic fixed appliances (before and after orthodontic treatment), to obtain the composition of the surface of the elements. The analyzed elements were: brackets (Victory Series APC PLUS 022, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); wires (0.017×0.025, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); and bands (37+, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). Results The results showed a decrease of chromium and iron contribution to the surface, with increase of oxygen content in used vs. new elements of the appliance. Conclusions Our results confirm the formation of oxides (passivation layer) on the surface of stainless steel as a result of the presence of the orthodontic appliance in patients’ oral cavities. PMID:24857929

  10. Low cost environmental sensors for Spaceflight : NMP Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Buelher, Martin G.; Brinza, D.; Patel, J. U.

    2005-01-01

    An outstanding problem in spaceflight is the lack of adequate sensors for monitoring the space environment and its effects on engineering systems. By adequate, we mean low cost in terms of mission impact (e.g., low price, low mass/size, low power, low data rate, and low design impact). The New Millennium Program (NMP) is investigating the development of such a low-cost Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) package for inclusion on its technology validation flights. This effort follows from the need by NMP to characterize the space environment during testing so that potential users can extrapolate the test results to end-use conditions. The immediate objective of this effort is to develop a small diagnostic sensor package that could be obtained from commercial sources. Environments being considered are: contamination, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, cosmic radiation, EMI, and temperature. This talk describes the requirements and rational for selecting these environments and reviews a preliminary design that includes a micro-controller data logger with data storage and interfaces to the sensors and spacecraft. If successful, such a sensor package could be the basis of a unique, long term program for monitoring the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems.

  11. Low Cost Environmental Sensors for Spaceflight: NMP Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Buehler, Martin G.; Brinza, D.; Patel, J. U.

    2005-01-01

    An outstanding problem in spaceflight is the lack of adequate sensors for monitoring the space environment and its effects on engineering systems. By adequate, we mean low cost in terms of mission impact (e.g., low price, low mass/size, low power, low data rate, and low design impact). The New Millennium Program (NMP) is investigating the development of such a low-cost Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) package for inclusion on its technology validation flights. This effort follows from the need by NMP to characterize the space environment during testing so that potential users can extrapolate the test results to end-use conditions. The immediate objective of this effort is to develop a small diagnostic sensor package that could be obtained from commercial sources. Environments being considered are: contamination, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, cosmic radiation, EMI, and temperature. This talk describes the requirements and rational for selecting these environments and reviews a preliminary design that includes a micro-controller data logger with data storage and interfaces to the sensors and spacecraft. If successful, such a sensor package could be the basis of a unique, long term program for monitoring the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems.

  12. SEM analysis of defects and wear on Ni-Ti rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Werington Borges; da Silva, Celso Monteiro; Lage-Marques, José Luiz; Habitante, Sandramarcia; da Rosa, Luiz Carlos Laureano; de Medeiros, João Marcelo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    SEM analysis of endodontic instruments from a Ni-Ti rotary system was assessed, before and after using them, considering their defects and deformations. Twenty Twisted File®, BioRąCe®, Mtwo®, and EndoWave® instruments were micrographed at 190× magnification. The files were washed and micrographed again to view alterations as to the presence or absence of irregular edges, grooves, microcavities, and scraping. Simulated root canal preparations were performed using these instruments. The instruments were cleaned and received a microscopic analysis after being used five times. After analysis tests were tested using Fisher's exact test and Kappa to evaluate the concordance among examiners. There was a statistically significant difference with respect to deformations between Twisted File® and other instruments (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in strains between the other groups (p > 0.05). All Twisted File® instruments showed the same defects; however damage were lower than those found in BioRace® and Mtwo®. The Endowave® did not show the same defects. In accordance with the data we conclude that the presence of defects was higher in Twisted File® instruments as the instruments and BioRace® Mtwo® brand, the defect rate was smaller and Endowave® instruments had no defects. Regarding the presence of wear after five uses among the groups all instruments showed changes in their cutting blades. PMID:24395626

  13. Radiometric, SEM and XRD investigation of the Chituc black sands, southern Danube Delta, Romania.

    PubMed

    Margineanu, R M; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Celarel, Aurelia; Gomoiu, Claudia-Mariana; Costea, C; Dumitras, Delia; Ion, Adriana; Duliu, O G

    2014-12-01

    The black sand of the Chituc marine sand bank, northern of the city of Navodari (Romania), presents anomalous high radioactivity. Field measurements recorded in some places dose rate up to 200 nSv/h, significantly overpassing the average value of 44 ± 20 nSv/h along the entire Southern sector of Romanian Black Sea shore. Gamma ray spectrometry performed on both Slanic-Prahova Underground Low Background Laboratory and Geological Institute of Romania Radiometric Facilities showed with clarity the dominance of (228)Ac radioisotope in the 50 microns fraction together with the (226)Ra and traces of (40)K. No significant amount of anthropogenic (137)Cs was identified. Based on radiometric as well as on SEM-EDAX and XRD determinations we come to the conclusion that the evidenced radioactivity could be attributed to both uranium and thorium series in the zircon and monazite fractions and to a lesser extent to potassium in the feldspars. PMID:25181034

  14. Quantitative analysis of mouse pancreatic islet architecture by serial block-face SEM

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Zhang, G.; Cai, T.; Xu, H.; Notkins, A.L.; Leapman, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) to measure parameters that describe the architecture of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, microscopic endocrine organs that secrete insulin and glucagon for control of blood glucose. By analyzing entire mouse islets, we show that it is possible to determine (1) the distributions of alpha and beta cells, (2) the organization of blood vessels and pericapillary spaces, and (3) the ultrastructure of the individual secretory cells. Our results show that the average volume of a beta cell is nearly twice that of an alpha cell, and the total mitochondrial volume is about four times larger. In contrast, nuclear volumes in the two cell types are found to be approximately equal. Although the cores of alpha and beta secretory granules have similar diameters, the beta granules have prominent halos resulting in overall diameters that are twice those of alpha granules. Visualization of the blood vessels revealed that every secretory cell in the islet is in contact with the pericapillary space, with an average contact area of 9 ± 5% of the cell surface area. Our data show that consistent results can be obtained by analyzing small numbers of islets. Due to the complicated architecture of pancreatic islets, such precision cannot easily be achieved by using TEM of thin sections. PMID:25448885

  15. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High Chromium Cast Irons Using SEM and Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Zhou, Jinming; Turba, Krystof; Ståhl, Jan-Eric

    2015-01-01

    The effects of composition changes and heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high-chromium white cast irons were studied in order to characterize possible improvements in product performance and machinability. Materials characterization was performed using nanoindentation, SEM, and EDS techniques. Present results show that changes in carbon and silicon contents as well as heat treatment strongly affect the mechanical properties and their variation in the material. In the as-cast condition, the sample with relatively lower carbon and silicon contents has an austenite-martensite matrix and is much harder than the sample with relatively higher carbon and silicon contents having more eutectic carbides in a bainite matrix. Annealing leads to softening of the materials relative to the as-cast condition, with the relatively higher carbon-silicon material being marginally harder due to the presence of more eutectic carbides. A similar trend is seen after the hardening treatment, and the presence of primary carbide can restrict the extent of hardening due to the loss of alloying elements from the matrix.

  16. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  17. Fabrication of digital rainbow holograms and 3-D imaging using SEM based e-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Firsov, An; Firsov, A; Loechel, B; Erko, A; Svintsov, A; Zaitsev, S

    2014-11-17

    Here we present an approach for creating full-color digital rainbow holograms based on mixing three basic colors. Much like in a color TV with three luminescent points per single screen pixel, each color pixel of initial image is presented by three (R, G, B) distinct diffractive gratings in a hologram structure. Change of either duty cycle or area of the gratings are used to provide proper R, G, B intensities. Special algorithms allow one to design rather complicated 3D images (that might even be replacing each other with hologram rotation). The software developed ("RainBow") provides stability of colorization of rotated image by means of equalizing of angular blur from gratings responsible for R, G, B basic colors. The approach based on R, G, B color synthesis allows one to fabricate gray-tone rainbow hologram containing white color what is hardly possible in traditional dot-matrix technology. Budgetary electron beam lithography based on SEM column was used to fabricate practical examples of digital rainbow hologram. The results of fabrication of large rainbow holograms from design to imprinting are presented. Advantages of the EBL in comparison to traditional optical (dot-matrix) technology is considered. PMID:25402115

  18. SEM-EBSD based Realistic Modeling and Crystallographic Homogenization FE Analyses of LDH Formability Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-05-01

    Homogenization algorithm is introduced to the elastic/crystalline viscoplastic finite element (FE) procedure to develop multi-scale analysis code to predict the formability of sheet metal in macro scale, and simultaneously the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in micro scale. The isotropic and kinematical hardening lows are employed in the crystalline plasticity constitutive equation. For the multi-scale structure, two scales are considered. One is a microscopic polycrystal structure and the other a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. We measure crystal morphologies by using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), and define a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE) of micro ploycrystal structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition of crystal orientation distribution. Since nonlinear multi-scale FE analysis requires large computation time, development of parallel computing technique is needed. To realize the parallel analysis on PC cluster system, the dynamic explicit FE formulations are employed. Applying the domain partitioning technique to FE mesh of macro continuum, homogenized stresses based on micro crystal structures are computed in parallel without solving simultaneous linear equation. The parallel FEM code is applied to simulate the limit dome height (LDH) test problem and hemispherical cup deep drawing problem of aluminum alloy AL6022, mild steel DQSK, high strength steel HSLA, and dual phase steel DP600 sheet metals. The localized distribution of thickness strain and the texture evolution are obtained.

  19. Using a university characterization facility to educate the public about microscopes: light microscopes to SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Nancy; Henderson, Walter

    2015-10-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN)1is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. The NNIN education office is located at the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. At Georgia Tech we offer programs that integrate the facility and its resources to educate the public about nanotechnology. One event that has proved highly successful involves using microscopes in our characterization suite to educate a diverse audience about a variety of imaging instruments. As part of the annual Atlanta Science Festival (ATLSF)2 we provided an event entitled: "What's all the Buzz about Nanotechnology?" which was open to the public and advertised through a variety of methods by the ATLSF. During the event, we provided hands-on demos, cleanroom tours, and activities with three of our microscopes in our recently opened Imaging and Characterization Facility: 1. Keyence VHX-600 Digital Microscope; 2. Hitachi SU823 FE-SEM; and 3. Hitachi TM 3000. During the two hour event we had approximately 150 visitors including many families with school-aged children. Visitors were invited to bring a sample for scanning with the TM-3000. This paper will discuss how to do such an event, lessons learned, and visitor survey results.

  20. The structure of montmorillonite gels revealed by sequential cryo-XHR-SEM imaging.

    PubMed

    Mouzon, Johanne; Bhuiyan, Iftekhar U; Hedlund, Jonas

    2016-03-01

    Imaging by extreme high resolution-scanning electron microscopy (XHR-SEM) with a monochromated and decelerated beam was applied on 5% (wt/wt) Na and Ca-montmorillonite gels frozen by high pressure freezing (HPF). In order to visualize the three-dimensional structure and the contacts between clay platelets, a new approach was developed. It consists in recording a sequence of micrographs on a region of interest during controlled sublimation. This simple method allows to rewind and to relate the instantaneous configuration between several particles to their original position in the hydrated state. Consequently, aggregates of parallel platelets (i.e. curved tactoids) were present in the Ca-sample and the instantaneous position of these aggregates in the course of sedimentation was revealed. The Na-sample consisted of a continuous network of flexible platelets sharing mostly face-to-face (FF) contacts caused by jamming at the relatively high concentration of the suspension (5% (wt/wt)), which was above the gel transition. Yet individual platelets belonging to the smallest size fraction were observed to be fully dispersed within the entangled structure, which confirmed the repulsive character of the gel. Substructures consisting of several platelets connected by FF-associations were also evidenced. The origin and potential impact of such substructures on the occurrence of the sol-gel transition and birefringence are discussed. PMID:26641566

  1. SEM Analysis of MTAD Efficacy for Smear Layer Removal from Periodontally Affected Root Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Houshmand, B.; Ghandi, M.; Nekoofar, MH.; Gholamii, Gh. A.; Tabor, R. K.; Dummer, P. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Biopure® MTAD (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, USA) has been developed as a final irrigant following root canal shaping to remove intracanal smear layer. Many of the unique properties of MTAD potentially transfer to the conditioning process of tooth roots during periodontal therapy. The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of MTAD on the removal of smear layer from root surfaces. Materials and Methods Thirty two longitudinally sectioned specimens from 16 freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with advanced periodontal disease were divided into four groups. In group 1 and 2, the root surfaces were scaled using Gracey curettes. In group 3 and 4, 0.5 mm of the root surface was removed using a fissure bur. The specimens in group 1 and 3 were then irrigated by normal saline. The specimens in groups 2 and 4 were irrigated with Biopure MTAD. All specimens were prepared for SEM and scored according to the presence of smear layer. Results MTAD significantly increased (P=0.001) the smear layer removal in both groups 2 and 4 compared to the associated control groups, in which only saline was used. Conclusion MTAD increased the removal of the smear layer from periodontally affected root surfaces. Use of MTAD as a periodontal conditioner may be suggested. PMID:22509454

  2. A holistic metrology approach: hybrid metrology utilizing scatterometry, CD-AFM, and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Yan, Bin Bin; Jiang, Yun Tao; Kelling, Mark; Hartig, Carsten; Allgair, John; Ebersbach, Peter; Sendelbach, Matthew; Rana, Narender; Katnani, Ahmad; Mclellan, Erin; Archie, Chas; Bozdog, Cornel; Kim, Helen; Sendler, Michael; Ng, Susan; Sherman, Boris; Brill, Boaz; Turovets, Igor; Urensky, Ronen

    2011-03-01

    Shrinking design rules and reduced process tolerances require tight control of CD linewidth, feature shape, and profile of the printed geometry. The Holistic Metrology approach consists of utilizing all available information from different sources like data from other toolsets, multiple optical channels, multiple targets, etc. to optimize metrology recipe and improve measurement performance. Various in-line critical dimension (CD) metrology toolsets like Scatterometry OCD (Optical CD), CD-SEM (CD Scanning Electron Microscope) and CD-AFM (CD Atomic Force Microscope) are typically utilized individually in fabs. Each of these toolsets has its own set of limitations that are intrinsic to specific measurement technique and algorithm. Here we define "Hybrid Metrology" to be the use of any two or more metrology toolsets in combination to measure the same dataset. We demonstrate the benefits of the Hybrid Metrology on two test structures: 22nm node Gate Develop Inspect (DI) & 32nm node FinFET Gate Final Inspect (FI). We will cover measurement results obtained using typical BKM as well as those obtained by utilizing the Hybrid Metrology approach. Measurement performance will be compared using standard metrology metrics for example accuracy and precision.

  3. Novel use of the CO2 laser on dental hard tissues: an SEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Chomsky, Doron; Raif, Joshua

    1997-05-01

    There is great interest in dentistry to find a replacement for the dental drill which is a great source fear in dental patients. Lasers have been considered a potential replacement. Hard tissue use of lasers on dental tissues has been slow in development has had very limited acceptance by the dental community. The ultimate goal is to develop a laser which can remove both healthy and diseased dental hard tissues and dental materials. The CO2 laser surgical applications on sot tissues has been reported by many authors. It is hard tissue applications have had very few published reports. The thermal effects of this laser on hard tissues precluded its use on hard tissues. A new CO2 laser has been developed to reduce the thermal effects on dentin and enamel. Powers of 3-5 watts were used to ablate the buccal surface of extracted human molar teeth. These teeth were gold coated and evaluated under scanning electron microscopy. The results show some melting of the dentin and enamel, however patent dentinal tubules are evident and there appears to be a non-thermal cutting of the enamel at the boarder of the cut surface. In conclusion these very preliminary results appear to show that this new CO2 laser can cut dentin and enamel efficiently and with very little thermal effect as seen under SEM.

  4. Analysis of submicron defects using an SEM-Auger defect review tool

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton D.; Watson, David G.; Paul, Dennis F.; Clough, Stephen P.

    1998-11-24

    The challenges associated with analyzing semiconductor defects become greater as the device design rule decreases. According to the SIA National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, the current metrology requirement for particle analysis is 90 nm with the need to analyze 75 nm particles by the year 2001. These dimensional requirements are beyond the typical capabilities of current SEM/EDX defect review tools. Auger Electron Spectroscopy is a powerful method for measuring the surface composition of localized regions, and has been identified in the SIA roadmap as a primary technique for particle analysis. The ability of a state-of-the-art Auger defect review tool (DRT) to provide secondary electron and high spatial resolution elemental images is particularly effective in characterizing the often complex structure of semiconductor defects. Examples of Auger analysis from defects found at various process steps, on both unpatterned and patterned whole wafers, are shown. These examples highlight the ability of Auger to analyze both thin and laterally small or complex defects.

  5. Vision-Based Haptic Feedback for Remote Micromanipulation in-SEM Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolopion, Aude; Dahmen, Christian; Stolle, Christian; Haliyo, Sinan; Régnier, Stéphane; Fatikow, Sergej

    2012-07-01

    This article presents an intuitive environment for remote micromanipulation composed of both haptic feedback and virtual reconstruction of the scene. To enable nonexpert users to perform complex teleoperated micromanipulation tasks, it is of utmost importance to provide them with information about the 3-D relative positions of the objects and the tools. Haptic feedback is an intuitive way to transmit such information. Since position sensors are not available at this scale, visual feedback is used to derive information about the scene. In this work, three different techniques are implemented, evaluated, and compared to derive the object positions from scanning electron microscope images. The modified correlation matching with generated template algorithm is accurate and provides reliable detection of objects. To track the tool, a marker-based approach is chosen since fast detection is required for stable haptic feedback. Information derived from these algorithms is used to propose an intuitive remote manipulation system that enables users situated in geographically distant sites to benefit from specific equipments, such as SEMs. Stability of the haptic feedback is ensured by the minimization of the delays, the computational efficiency of vision algorithms, and the proper tuning of the haptic coupling. Virtual guides are proposed to avoid any involuntary collisions between the tool and the objects. This approach is validated by a teleoperation involving melamine microspheres with a diameter of less than 2 μ m between Paris, France and Oldenburg, Germany.

  6. Plexiform vascular structures in the human digital dermal layer: a SEM--corrosion casting morphological study.

    PubMed

    Manelli, A; Sangiorgi, S; Ronga, M; Reguzzoni, M; Bini, A; Raspanti, M

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the impressive diversity of vascular plexiform structures of the hypodermal layer of human skin. We chose the human body site with the highest concentration of dermal corpuscles, the human digit, and processed it with the corrosion casting technique and scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM). This approach proved to be the best tool to study these microvascular architectures, free from any interference by surrounding tissues. We took high-definition pictures of the vascular network of sweat glands, thermoreceptorial and tactile corpuscles, the vessels constituting the glomic bodies and those feeding the hair follicles. We observed that the three-dimensional disposition of these vessels strictly depends on the shape of the corpuscles supplied. We could see the tubular vascularization of the excretory duct of sweat glands and the ovoid one feeding their bodies, sometimes made up of two lobes. In some cases, knowledge of these morphological data regarding the normal disposition in space and intrinsic vascularization structure of the dermal corpuscles can help to explain many of the physiopathological changes occurring during chronic microangiopathic diseases. PMID:16982473

  7. Elastic strain tensor measurement using electron backscatter diffraction in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Dingley, David J; Wilkinson, Angus J; Meaden, Graham; Karamched, Phani S

    2010-08-01

    The established electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique for obtaining crystallographic information in the SEM has been adapted to permit elastic strain measurement. Basically, the displacement of crystallographic features in an EBSD pattern, such as zone axes, which result from strain in a crystal, is determined by comparing those same features as they appear in a pattern from an unstrained region of the crystal. The comparison is made by cross-correlation of selected regions in the two patterns. Tests show that the sensitivity to displacement measurement is 1 part in 10 000, which translates to a strain sensitivity of 2 parts in 10 000. Eight components of the strain tensor are determined directly and the ninth is calculated using the fact that the free surface of the sample is traction-free. Examples discussed are taken from studies of a lenticular fracture in germanium, the strain distribution surrounding a carbide precipitate in a nickel base alloy and grain boundary studies in another nickel base alloy. PMID:20634548

  8. Detection of metal residues on bone using SEM-EDS. Part I: Blunt force injury.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Markéta; Porta, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Rizzi, Agostino; Drozdová, Eva; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-11-30

    Previous studies have indicated that metal particles remain on bone after sharp force injury or gunshot and that their detection by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) could greatly help in tool identification. However, the presence of metal particles on bone surfaces in the context of blunt force trauma has never been assessed experimentally. For this reason the present paper represents an experimental study of the behaviour of metal residues on bone following blunt force injury. Ten fresh sub-adult bovine metatarsal bones were manually cleaned of soft tissues. They were then struck by metal bars (copper, iron or aluminium) on the external surface of the mid-diaphysis. All blunt metal instruments used in this study left a sign in the form of single particles, a smear or a powder-like deposit on the bone surface. The residues of all three metal implements were detected on the bone surface, 0.3-10 mm from the fracture border. The presence of metal particles was confirmed in all samples struck with iron and copper and in two of six aluminium samples; no particles were detected on the negative control. Chemical composition of residues highly corresponded with the composition of applied bars. PMID:22989600

  9. Kr implantation into heavy ion irradiated monolithic U-Mo/Al systems: SIMS and SEM investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweifel, T.; Valle, N.; Grygiel, C.; Monnet, I.; Beck, L.; Petry, W.

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, high performance research and material test reactors are aiming to convert their fuel from high enriched uranium towards low enriched ones. High density U-Mo/Al based nuclear fuels are considered as a promising candidate for this conversion. However, during in-pile test irradiations, the formation of an interdiffusion layer (IDL) between the U-Mo and the Al matrix is observed, caused by irradiation enhanced U-Al interdiffusion processes. This IDL accumulates fission gases at the IDL/matrix interfaces. Together, these two effects strongly reduce the performance of this new fuel type. Recently, the out-of-pile technique of heavy ion irradiation (127I) on U-Mo/Al layer systems proved to be an alternative to time-consuming in-pile test irradiations for certain fuel behaviour aspects. Here we present SIMS and SEM investigations of non-conventional 82Kr implantation into previously heavy ion irradiated U-Mo/Al layer systems. It is shown that Kr accumulates inside μm large porosities at the IDL/matrix interfaces. This critical accumulation of μm-sized large gas bubbles is directly related to the presence of the irradiation induced IDL. Without IDL no critical accumulation of fission gas bubbles occurs.

  10. Raman and SEM analysis of a biocolonised hot spring travertine terrace in Svalbard, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Benning, Liane G; Edwards, Howell GM

    2007-01-01

    Background A profile across 8 layers from a fossil travertine terrace from a low temperature geothermal spring located in Svalbard, Norway has been studied using both Raman spectroscopy and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) techniques to identify minerals and organic life signals. Results Calcite, anatase, quartz, haematite, magnetite and graphite as well as scytonemin, three different carotenoids, chlorophyll and a chlorophyll-like compound were identified as geo- and biosignatures respectively, using 785 and/or 514 nm Raman laser excitation wavelengths. No morphological biosignatures representing remnant microbial signals were detected by high-resolution imaging, although spectral analyses indicated the presence of organics. In contrast, in all layers, Raman spectra identified a series of different organic pigments indicating little to no degradation or change of the organic signatures and thus indicating the preservation of fossil biomarker compounds throughout the life time of the springs despite the lack of remnant morphological indicators. Conclusion With a view towards planetary exploration we discuss the implications of the differences in Raman band intensities observed when spectra were collected with the different laser excitations. We show that these differences, as well as the different detection capability of the 785 and 514 nm laser, could lead to ambiguous compound identification. We show that the identification of bio and geosignatures, as well as fossil organic pigments, using Raman spectroscopy is possible. These results are relevant since both lasers have been considered for miniaturized Raman spectrometers for planetary exploration. PMID:17697380

  11. Contaminant source apportionment by PIMMS lead isotope analysis and SEM-image analysis.

    PubMed

    McGill, R A; Pearce, J M; Fortey, N J; Watt, J; Ault, L; Parrish, R R

    2003-03-01

    By combining scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis and laser ablation plasma ionisation multi-collector mass spectrometry (LA-PIMMS), high precision lead isotope analyses can be obtained from individual metal-rich particles. Soils from Wolverhampton and Nottingham were sampled on the basis of high Pb concentrations or brownfield location. Pressed powder pellets of each were rastered by LA-PIMMS to obtain a bulk Pb-isotope signature. The results plot along an apparent mixing line between the major sources of lead contamination in the UK, that is UK ore deposits and alkyl-lead from petrol additives (Australian ore). Two particularly lead-rich soils were chosen to investigate the lead distribution and isotope variability between size and density fractions. The fine-grained and low-density fractions contained most of the lead and have Pb-isotope ratios comparable with the bulk soils. By contrast, the small, lead-enriched denser fractions contained only a minor proportion of the total lead but Pb-isotope signatures indicating relative enrichment in one or other of the end-members from the mixing line. Further characterisation of individual Pb-rich grains is in progress. PMID:12901075

  12. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Alaa; Al-Rasheed, Fellwa; Alnajjar, Fatimah; Al-Abdulwahab, Bander; Al-Badah, Abdulhakeem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd). Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules. PMID:25383343

  13. Integrated electrical and SEM-based defect characterization for rapid yield ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbon, Jacob; Levin, Lior; Bokobza, Ofer; Shimshi, Rinat; Dutta, Manjari; Zhang, Brian; Ciplickas, Dennis; Pham, Teri; Jensen, Jim

    2004-04-01

    Challenges of the new nanometer processes have complicated the yield enhancement process. The systematic yield loss component is increasing, due to the complexity and density of the new processes and the designs that are developed for them. High product yields can now only be achieved when process failure rates are on the order of a few parts per billion structures. Traditional yield ramping techniques cannot ramp yields to these levels and new methods are required. This paper presents a new systematic approach to yield loss pareto generation. The approach uses a sophisticated Design-of-Experiments (DOE) approach to characterize systematic and random yield loss mechanisms in the Back End Of the Line (BEOL). Sophisticated Characterization Vehicle (CV)TM test chips, fast electrical test and Automatic Defect Localization (ADL) are critical components of the method. Advanced statistical analysis and visualization of the detected and localized electrical defects provides a comprehensive view of the yield loss mechanisms. In situations where the defects are not visible in a SEM of the structure surface, automated FIB and imaging is used to characterize the defect. The combined approach provides the required resolution to appropriately characterize parts per billion failure rates.

  14. SEM Characterization of the High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Adam Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; M. Teague

    2014-04-01

    During irradiation, the microstructure of U-7Mo evolves until at a fission density near 5x1021 f/cm3 a high-burnup microstructure exists that is very different than what was observed at lower fission densities. This microstructure is dominated by randomly distributed, relatively large, homogeneous fission gas bubbles. The bubble superlattice has collapsed in many microstructural regions, and the fuel grain sizes, in many areas, become sub-micron in diameter with both amorphous fuel and crystalline fuel present. Solid fission product precipitates can be found inside the fission gas bubbles. To generate more information about the characteristics of the high-fission density microstructure, three samples irradiated in the RERTR-7 experiment have been characterized using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a focused ion beam. The FIB was used to generate samples for SEM imaging and to perform 3D reconstruction of the microstructure, which can be used to look for evidence of possible fission gas bubble interlinkage.

  15. Establishing aeolian particulate 'fingerprints' in an airport environment using magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sue; Hoon, Stephen R.; Richardson, Nigel; Bennett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from aviation activity on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment, in particular, may be derived from a wide range of potential sources including aircraft; vehicles; ground support equipment and buildings. In order to investigate and remediate potential problem sources, it is important to be able to identify characteristic particulate 'fingerprints' which would allow source attribution, particularly respirable particulates. To date the identification of such 'fingerprints' has remained elusive but remains a key research priority for the aviation industry (Webb et al, 2008). In previous PM studies, environmental magnetism has been used as a successful technique for discriminating between different emission types and particulate sources in both urban and industrial environments (e.g. Hunt et al 1984; Lecoanet et al 2003, Jones et al 2015). Environmental magnetism is a non-destructive and relatively rapid technique involving the use of non-directional, rock magnetic measurements to characterise the mineral magnetic properties of natural and anthropogenic materials. In other studies scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has also been used as an effective characterisation technique for the investigation of grain size and morphology of PM derived from vehicle emissions (e.g. Bucko et al 2010) and fossil fuel combustion sources (Kim et al 2009). In this study, environmental magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX have been used to characterise dusts from specific aircraft sources including engines, brakes and tyres. Furthermore, these methods have also been applied to runway (both hard and grass covered surfaces), taxiway and apron dusts collected during extensive environmental sampling at Manchester International Airport, UK in order to

  16. ToF-SIMS and SEM-EDS analysis of the surface of chosen bioindicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkowska, M. I.; Pawlaczyk, A.; Rogowski, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and scanning electron microscopy with field emission equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) were applied in order to investigate the surface of chosen biological indicators such as bark, needles and hair. All samples were collected from the urban areas of the Lodz city region, recognized as one of the most polluted in Poland. The high resolution of the applied techniques provides good separation of signals from different chemical species. High detection sensitivity enables an analysis of crucial elements and/or molecules. It was found that the surface of the materials studied was in general covered by many exogenous particles, suggesting, from the monitoring purpose point of view, their possible anthropogenic origin. The preliminary results obtained revealed that these techniques can be successfully used in environmental analysis of various biological samples and can provide detailed information about distribution and composition of airborne pollutants within the sample surfaces studied as well as initiate a renewed interest in the exposure study.

  17. Microscopic characterization of FO/PRO membranes--a comparative study of CLSM, TEM and SEM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ning; Wei, Jing; She, Qianhong; Pacheco, Federico; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-09-18

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (including forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO)) have received increasing attention in recent decades. The performance of an FO/PRO membrane is significantly limited by internal concentration polarization, which is a strong function of the membrane support layer pore structure. The objective of the current study was to develop microscopic characterization methods for quantitative/semiquantitative analysis of membrane pore structure (both pore diameter and porosity distribution across membrane thickness). The use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for noninvasive characterization of the internal pore structure of FO/PRO membranes is reported for the first time. By performing optical sectioning, information on pore diameter, porosity depth profile and pore connectivity can be obtained. The CLSM porosity results are further compared to those obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and reasonably good agreement was observed. A comparison of these characterization methods reveals their complementary nature, and a combination of these techniques may allow a more comprehensive understanding of membrane structure. The current study also provided a comprehensive insight into the pore structure of commercially available FO/PRO membranes. PMID:22897436

  18. Raman, SEM-EDS and XRPD investigations on pre-Columbian Central America "estucado" pottery.

    PubMed

    Casanova Municchia, Annalaura; Micheli, Mario; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Toledo, Michelle; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Lo Mastro, Sergio; Sodo, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen different colored fragments from six selected pre-Columbian estucado ceramics from El Salvador have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The peculiarity of this kind of ceramics consist of the unusual presence of a white engobe, traditionally termed stucco, between the ceramic body and the decoration elements, hence the name estucado ceramics. The aim of this work was to study the unusual manufacturing technique and to identify the chemical composition of the engobe and of the pigment palette. The results showed that the stucco layer is made of clay (kaolinite) with traces of titanium oxide (anatase). Remarkably, this is the same composition of the white pigments used for the decoration layer, thus excluding an early use of natural titanium oxide as a white pigment in the estucado productions as suggested in previous investigations. Moreover, the presence of kaolinite and anatase both in the stucco and in the decoration layer suggests a cold-working or low temperature technique. The red, yellow and green decorations were realized by the use of natural ochre, while in all the blue and gray decorations Maya blue pigment was identified. Finally, an amorphous carbon pigment of vegetal origin and manganese oxide were used to obtain black pigments. PMID:26641285

  19. Raman, SEM-EDS and XRPD investigations on pre-Columbian Central America "estucado" pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova Municchia, Annalaura; Micheli, Mario; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Toledo, Michelle; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Lo Mastro, Sergio; Sodo, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen different colored fragments from six selected pre-Columbian estucado ceramics from El Salvador have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The peculiarity of this kind of ceramics consist of the unusual presence of a white engobe, traditionally termed stucco, between the ceramic body and the decoration elements, hence the name estucado ceramics. The aim of this work was to study the unusual manufacturing technique and to identify the chemical composition of the engobe and of the pigment palette. The results showed that the stucco layer is made of clay (kaolinite) with traces of titanium oxide (anatase). Remarkably, this is the same composition of the white pigments used for the decoration layer, thus excluding an early use of natural titanium oxide as a white pigment in the estucado productions as suggested in previous investigations. Moreover, the presence of kaolinite and anatase both in the stucco and in the decoration layer suggests a cold-working or low temperature technique. The red, yellow and green decorations were realized by the use of natural ochre, while in all the blue and gray decorations Maya blue pigment was identified. Finally, an amorphous carbon pigment of vegetal origin and manganese oxide were used to obtain black pigments.

  20. Using SEM Analysis on Ion-Milled Shale Surface to Determine Shale-Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Mickler, P. J.; Nicot, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to document and assess shale-fluid interaction during hydraulic fracturing (HF) in order to understand its impact on flowback water chemistry and rock property. A series of autoclave experiments were conducted to react shale samples from major oil and gas shales with synthetic HF containing various additives. To better determine mineral dissolution and precipitation at the rock-fluid interface, ion-milling technique was applied to create extremely flat rock surfaces that were examined before and after the autoclave experiments using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors. This method is able to reveal a level of detail not observable on broken surface or mechanically polished surface. It allows direct comparison of the same mineral and organic matter particles before and after the reaction experiments. Minerals undergone dissolution and newly precipitated materials are readily determined by comparing to the exact locations before reaction. The dissolution porosity and the thickness of precipitates can be quantified by tracing and measuring the geometry of the pores and precipitates. Changes in porosity and permeability were confirmed by mercury intrusion capillary tests.

  1. Reconstruction of the Solar EUV Irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM and PROBA2/LYRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, M.; Delouille, V.; Mampaey, B.; Verbeeck, C.; Del Zanna, G.; Ermolli, I.; Kretzschmar, M.; Dominique, M.; Wieman, S. R.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2013-12-01

    The solar EUV spectrum has important effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. For a detailed investigation of these effects it is important to have a constistent data series of the EUV spectral irradiance available. Here, we present the reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance based on PSPT and SOHO/EIT images and along with synthetic spectra calculated for six different coronal features representing the brightness variation of the solar atmosphere. The EIT images are segmented with the SPoCA tool which allows to identify the features based on a consistent brightness classification for each feature. With the SOLMOD code we then calculate intensity spectra for 10 nm to 100 nm for each of the coronal feature. Weighting the intensity spectra with the area covered by each of the features yields the temporal variation of the EUV spectrum. The reconstructed time series is then validated against the spectral irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM and PROBA2/LYRA. Our approach leads to a very good agreement between the reconstructed and the observed spectral irradiance. This is an important step towards the understanding of the variations of the solar EUV spectrum and ultimately its effect on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  2. Dressing living organisms in a thin polymer membrane, the NanoSuit, for high-vacuum FE-SEM observation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Isao; Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ishii, Daisuke; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2014-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has made remarkable progress and has become an essential tool for observing biological materials at microscopic level. However, various complex procedures have precluded observation of living organisms to date. Here, a new method is presented by which living organisms can be observed by field emission (FE)-SEM. Using this method, active movements of living animals were observed in vacuo (10(-5)-10(-7) Pa) by protecting them with a coating of thin polymer membrane, a NanoSuit, and it was found that the surface fine structure of living organisms is very different from that of traditionally fixed samples. After observation of mosquito larvae in the high vacuum of the FE-SEM, it was possible to rear them subsequently in normal culture conditions. This method will be useful for numerous applications, particularly for electron microscopic observations in the life sciences. PMID:24824083

  3. Image contrast enhancement of Ni/YSZ anode during the slice-and-view process in FIB-SEM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Sheng; Takayama, Akiko; Matsumura, Syo; Koyama, Michihisa

    2016-03-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a widely used and easily operational equipment for three-dimensional reconstruction with flexible analysis volume. It has been using successfully and increasingly in the field of solid oxide fuel cell. However, the phase contrast of the SEM images is indistinct in many cases, which will bring difficulties to the image processing. Herein, the phase contrast of a conventional Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anode is tuned in an FIB-SEM with In-Lens secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron detectors. Two accessories, tungsten probe and carbon nozzle, are inserted during the observation. The former has no influence on the contrast. When the carbon nozzle is inserted, best and distinct contrast can be obtained by In-Lens SE detector. This method is novel for contrast enhancement. Phase segmentation of the image can be automatically performed. The related mechanism for different images is discussed. PMID:26599978

  4. Enhanced DySEM imaging of cantilever motion using artificial structures patterned by focused ion beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, M.-A.; Ritter, M.; Holschneider, M.; Sturm, H.

    2016-03-01

    We use a dynamic scanning electron microscope (DySEM) to map the spatial distribution of the vibration of a cantilever beam. The DySEM measurements are based on variations of the local secondary electron signal within the imaging electron beam diameter during an oscillation period of the cantilever. For this reason, the surface of a cantilever without topography or material variation does not allow any conclusions about the spatial distribution of vibration due to a lack of dynamic contrast. In order to overcome this limitation, artificial structures were added at defined positions on the cantilever surface using focused ion beam lithography patterning. The DySEM signal of such high-contrast structures is strongly improved, hence information about the surface vibration becomes accessible. Simulations of images of the vibrating cantilever have also been performed. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with the experimental images.

  5. Morphology of the European species of the aphid genus Eulachnus (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae) - A SEM comparative and integrative study.

    PubMed

    Kanturski, Mariusz; Karcz, Jagna; Wieczorek, Karina

    2015-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods were used for the first time to elucidate the external morphology of the European species of the genus Eulachnus (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae), a representative genus of the conifer-feeding aphids tribe Eulachnini. We examined and compared the external morphology of apterous and alate viviparous females from the parthenogenetic generation as well as oviparous females and alate males belonging to the sexual generation. FE-SEM images based on HMDS and cryo-SEM preparation techniques revealed better image quality than the CPD technique in regard to surface tension and morphological signs of cell deteriorations (i.e., existence of depressions, drying artifacts and membrane blebs). Three morphologically different species groups "agilis", "brevipilosus" and "cembrae" were proposed due to the differences in head, antennae, legs and dorsal chaetotaxy as well as dorsal sclerotization. The most characteristic features and differences of representatives of these groups are presented and discussed. PMID:26021259

  6. The influence of surface chemistry on GSR particles: using XPS to complement SEM/EDS analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoeble, A. J.; Strohmeier, Brian R.; Piasecki, John D.

    2010-06-01

    Gunshot residue particles (GSR) were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to illustrate the size, shape, morphology, and elemental composition normally observed in particulate resulting from a discharged firearm. Determining the presence of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), and barium (Ba), barring other elemental tags, fused together in a single particle with the correct morphology, is all that is required for the positive identification of GSR. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), however, can reveal more detailed information on surface chemistry than SEM/EDS. XPS is a highly surface-sensitive (<= ~10 nm), non-destructive, analytical technique that provides qualitative information for all elements except hydrogen and helium. Nanometer-scale sampling depth and its ability to provide unique chemical state information make XPS a potential technique for providing important knowledge on the surface chemistry of GSR that complements results obtained from SEM/EDS analysis.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae. PMID:20119894

  8. The risk assessment of heavy metals in Futian mangrove forest sediment in Shenzhen Bay (South China) based on SEM-AVS analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Minwei; Shen, Xiaoxue; Li, Ruili; Qiu, Guoyu

    2015-08-15

    The risks of heavy metal in Futian mangrove forest sediment were assessed using the acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) methods. The results indicated that AVS distributions were more variable than the SEM distributions at all 16 sampling sites. The positive correlation between AVS and SEM indicated that their similar formative and existing conditions and that AVS acted as an important carrier for SEM. The major SEM component was Zn (69.7.3-94.2%), whereas the Cd contribution (the most toxic metal present) to SEM was no more than 1%. The possible adverse effects caused by heavy metals at ten sampling sites may be due to higher levels of SEMs, rather than AVSs. The total organic carbon (TOC) was an important metal-binding phase in the sediments. Taking into account the TOC concentration, there were no adverse effects due to heavy metals in any of the Futian mangrove forest sediments. PMID:26028168

  9. Combined SIMS, NanoSIMS, FTIR, and SEM Studies of OH in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenfelder, J. L.; Le Voyer, M.; Rossman, G. R.; Guan, Y.; Bell, D. R.; Asimow, P. D.; Eiler, J.

    2010-12-01

    The accurate analysis of trace concentrations of hydrogen in NAMs is a long-standing problem, with wide-ranging implications in geology and planetology. SIMS and FTIR are two powerful and complementary analytical tools capable of measuring concentrations down to levels of less than 1 ppm H2O. Both methods, however, are subject to matrix effects and rely on other techniques such as manometry or nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantitative calibration. We compared FTIR and SIMS data for a wide variety of NAMs: olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, pyrope and grossular garnet, rutile, zircon, kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite. Some samples were also characterized using high-resolution FE-SEM to assess the potential contribution of submicrocopic inclusions to the analyses. For SIMS, we use high mass resolution (≥5000 MRP) to measure 16O1H, using 30Si and/or 18O as reference isotopes. We use both primary standards, measured independently using manometry or NRA (e.g., [1]), and secondary standards, measured using polarized FTIR referenced back to calibrations developed on primary standards. Our major focus was on on olivine, for which we collected repeated calibration data with both SIMS and NanoSIMS, bracketing measurements of H diffusion profiles in both natural and experimentally annealed crystals at levels of 5-100 ppm H2O. With both instruments we establish low blanks (≤5 ppm) and high precision (typically less than 5% 2-σ errors in 16O1H/30Si), critical requirements for the low concentration levels being measured. Assessment of over 300 analyses on 11 olivines allows us to evaluate the suitability of different standards, several of which are in use in other laboratories [2,3,4]. Seven olivines, with 0-125 ppm H2O, give highly reproducible results and allow us to establish well-constrained calibration slopes with high correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.98-99), in contrast to previous studies [2,3,4]. However, four kimberlitic megacrysts with 140-243 ppm H

  10. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  11. Advanced CD-SEM metrology for qualification of DSA patterns using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeshi; Konishi, Junko; Ikota, Masami; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Seino, Yuriko; Sato, Hironobu; Kasahara, Yusuke; Azuma, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) applying chemical epitaxy is one of the promising lithographic solutions for next generation semiconductor device manufacturing. Especially, DSA lithography using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process is obviously one of candidates which could be the first generation of DSA applying PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) for sub-15nm dense line patterning . DSA can enhance the pitch resolutions, and can mitigate CD errors to the values much smaller than those of the originally exposed guiding patterns. On the other hand, local line placement error often results in a worse value, with distinctive trends depending on the process conditions. To address this issue, we introduce an enhanced measurement technology of DSA line patterns with distinguishing their locations in order to evaluate nature of edge placement and roughness corresponding to individual pattern locations by using images of CD-SEM. Additionally correlations among edge roughness of each line and each space are evaluated and discussed. This method can visualize features of complicated roughness easily to control COOL process. As a result, we found the followings. (1) Line placement error and line placement roughness of DSA were slightly different each other depending on their relative position to the chemical guide patterns. (2) In middle frequency area of PSD (Power Spectral Density) analysis graphs, it was observed that shapes were sensitively changed by process conditions of chemical stripe guide size and anneals temperature. (3) Correlation coefficient analysis using PSD was able to clarify characteristics of latent defect corresponding to physical and chemical property of BCP materials.

  12. Porcelain laminate veneer conditioning for orthodontic bonding: SEM-EDX analysis.

    PubMed

    Aksakalli, Sertac; Ileri, Zehra; Yavuz, Tevfik; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, Nilgun

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface treatments and laser irradiation on the bond strength of brackets bonded to porcelain laminate veneer. Porcelain laminate veneer specimens were embedded in the centers of acrylic resin blocks. Thirty-nine teeth were used for shear bond strength testing and the remaining three (one tooth for each group) were used for evaluation of the debonded bracket interface. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups, each containing 13 specimens. The details of the groups are as follows: Group SB, sandblasting with alumina particles (50 μm); Group HFA, 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching; Group ER, erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er: YAG) irradiation (from 1 mm distance, 2 W, 10 Hz for 10 s). After conditioning, the upper central brackets were bonded to the porcelain surfaces. Porcelain laminate veneers were examined under stereomicroscope for adhesive remnant index and surface damage after debonding. The highest shear bond strength values were obtained with Group HFA (10.8 ± 3.8 MPa) and Group ER (9.3 ± 1.5 MPa), whereas Group SB revealed the lowest values. Scanning electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis revealed that the silicon level in the porcelain decreased after debonding in all groups. The sandblasting method did not demonstrate any ideal bond strength values; however, the 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching and Er: YAG laser did. There were no significant differences among all groups in terms of laminate surface damages. The Er: YAG laser therefore can be selected for ideal bond strength and minimal damage to porcelain laminates. PMID:25344891

  13. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  14. On the importance of FIB-SEM specific segmentation algorithms for porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Salzer, Martin; Thiele, Simon; Zengerle, Roland; Schmidt, Volker

    2014-09-15

    A new algorithmic approach to segmentation of highly porous three dimensional image data gained by focused ion beam tomography is described which extends the key-principle of local threshold backpropagation described in Salzer et al. (2012). The technique of focused ion beam tomography has shown to be capable of imaging the microstructure of functional materials. In order to perform a quantitative analysis on the corresponding microstructure a segmentation task needs to be performed. However, algorithmic segmentation of images obtained with focused ion beam tomography is a challenging problem for highly porous materials if filling the pore phase, e.g. with epoxy resin, is difficult. The gray intensities of individual voxels are not sufficient to determine the phase represented by them and usual thresholding methods are not applicable. We thus propose a new approach to segmentation that pays respect to the specifics of the imaging process of focused ion beam tomography. As an application of our approach, the segmentation of three dimensional images for a cathode material used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is discussed. We show that our approach preserves significantly more of the original nanostructure than a thresholding approach. - Highlights: • We describe a new approach to the segmentation of FIB-SEM images of porous media. • The first and last occurrences of structures are detected by analysing the z-profiles. • The algorithm is validated by comparing it to a manual segmentation. • The new approach shows significantly less artifacts than a thresholding approach. • A structural analysis also shows improved results for the obtained microstructure.

  15. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas. PMID:25891789

  16. Evaluation of methods for noise-free measurement of LER/LWR using synthesized CD-SEM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Pargon, Erwine

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the effects of noise on LER/LWR parameters when they are measured through the analysis of top-down CD-SEM images. To this end, first we present a methodology for the generation of synthesized CD-SEM images including resist lines with predetermined CD/pitch and LER/LWR parameters in which the noise level can be tuned at will. The sources of noise can be the shot noise of SEM electron beam (Poisson-type) and the microscope electronics (Gaussian-type). Then we use the generated CD-SEM images to evaluate three methods devised for the reduction of noise effects and the extraction of noise-free LER/LWR parameters. The first method (called fractal method) is presented for first time while the next two (model filtering and Power Spectral Density) have been already proposed and applied in literature. We compare the output of each method with the noise-less LER/LWR parameters for various noise levels, number of images and LER/LWR initial parameters and discuss their advantages and limitations.

  17. 30 CFR 250.1917 - What criteria for pre-startup review must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What criteria for pre-startup review must be in... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1917 What criteria for pre-startup review...-startup safety and environmental review for new and significantly modified facilities that are subject...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1917 - What criteria for pre-startup review must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What criteria for pre-startup review must be in... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1917 What criteria for pre-startup review...-startup safety and environmental review for new and significantly modified facilities that are subject...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1917 - What criteria for pre-startup review must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What criteria for pre-startup review must be in... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1917 What criteria for pre-startup review...-startup safety and environmental review for new and significantly modified facilities that are subject...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1919 - What criteria for investigation of incidents must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1919 What... with serious safety or environmental consequences and require investigation of incidents that...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1918 - What criteria for emergency response and control must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1918 What... safety and environmental information (§ 250.1910); and (c) Training and Drills incorporating...

  2. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  3. 30 CFR 250.1917 - What criteria for pre-startup review must be in my SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What criteria for pre-startup review must be in my SEMS program? 250.1917 Section 250.1917 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... is current. (d) Hazards analysis recommendations have been implemented as appropriate. (e)...

  4. A SEM Model in Assessing the Effect of Convergent, Divergent and Logical Thinking on Students' Understanding of Chemical Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamovlasis, D.; Kypraios, N.; Papageorgiou, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to an instrument assessing students' understanding of chemical change. The instrument comprised items on understanding the structure of substances, chemical changes and their interpretation. The structural relationships among particular groups of items are investigated and analyzed using…

  5. In situ SEM and ToF-SIMS analysis of IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles at aqueous surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Rodek, Gene; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we report new results of in situ study of 5 nm goat anti-mouse IgG gold nanoparticles in a novel portable vacuum compatible microfluidic device using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The unique feature of the liquid flow cell is that the detection window is open to the vacuum allowing direct probing of the liquid surface. The flow cell is composed of a silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and it is fully compatible with vacuum operations for surface analysis. The aperture can be drilled through the 100 nm SiN membrane using a focused ion beam. Characteristic signals of the conjugated gold nanoparticles were successfully observed through the aperture by both energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in SEM and ToF-SIMS. Comparison was also made among wet samples, dry samples, and liquid sample in the flow cell using SEM/EDX. Stronger gold signal can be observed in our novel portable device by SEM/EDX compared with the wet or dry samples, respectively. Our results indicate that analyses of the nanoparticle components are better made in their native liquid environment. This is made possible using our unique microfluidic flow cell.

  6. SEM with Missing Data and Unknown Population Distributions Using Two-Stage ML: Theory and Its Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Lu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This article provides the theory and application of the 2-stage maximum likelihood (ML) procedure for structural equation modeling (SEM) with missing data. The validity of this procedure does not require the assumption of a normally distributed population. When the population is normally distributed and all missing data are missing at random…

  7. Surface-epitope masking (SEM): an immunological subtraction approach for developing monoclonal antibodies targeting surface-expressed molecules.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neil I; Fisher, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    An immunological subtraction approach, surface-epitope masking (SEM), is described that permits the efficient and selective production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacting with both known and unknown molecules expressed on the cell surface. The tenet underlying SEM involves blocking (masking) of shared antigens between two target populations, a "driver" and a "tester," and using appropriately modified surface-masked "tester" cells to generate MAbs reacting with surface antigens unique to the "tester population" that differentiate the two antigen sources. SEM has been employed to develop MAbs that react with the multidrug resistance surface-expressed P-glycoprotein (MDR-1) and the human interferon-gamma receptor and two potentially novel tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) expressed on the surface of prostate carcinoma and breast carcinoma cells. In principle, the SEM approach provides an uncomplicated and effective means of developing MAbs, which can also be used to identify genes, associated with important cellular processes involved in normal physiology, such as growth, aging, differentiation, and development. In addition, this strategy is amenable to produce MAbs and identify genes associated with specific disease states, including cancer, neurodegeneration, autoimmunity, and infection with pathogenic agents. PMID:18217690

  8. Helping Students and the Bottom Line: Creating a Module-Based Academic Program to Drive SEM Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    The chief academic officer to whom the author once reported gave him the freedom to be creative in implementing their institution's then-new, three-year strategic enrollment management (SEM) plan. For the fall 2010 semester, they had already exceeded projected net-tuition dollar amounts for the entire academic year. Just five months prior to…

  9. The Structure of Memory in Infants and Toddlers: An SEM Study with Full-Terms and Preterms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.; Van Rossem, Ronan

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable dispute about the nature of infant memory. Using SEM models, we examined whether popular characterizations of the structure of adult memory, including the two-process theory of recognition, are applicable in the infant and toddler years. The participants were a cohort of preterms and full-terms assessed longitudinally--at 1,…

  10. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) for Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Ratings; Multiple Group Invariance Analysis across Scales with Different Response Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazaheri, Mehrdad; Theuns, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluates three hypothesized models on subjective well-being, comprising life domain ratings (LDR), overall satisfaction with life (OSWL), and overall dissatisfaction with life (ODWL), using structural equation modeling (SEM). A sample of 1,310 volunteering students, randomly assigned to six conditions, rated their overall life…

  11. SEM characterization of anatomical variation in chitin organization in insect and arthropod cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Williams, Lee; Hung, Albert; Nowlin, Kyle; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    The cuticles of insects and arthropods have some of the most diverse material properties observed in nature, so much so that it is difficult to imagine that all cutciles are primarily composed of the same two materials: a fibrous chitin network and a matrix composed of cuticle proteins. Various factors contribute to the mechanical and optical properties of an insect or arthropod cuticle including the thickness and composition. In this paper, we also identified another factor that may contribute to the optical, surface, and mechanical properties of a cuticle, i.e. the organization of chitin nanofibers and chitin fiber bundles. Self-assembled chitin nanofibers serve as the foundation for all higher order chitin structures in the cuticles of insects and other arthropods via interactions with structural cuticle proteins. Using a technique that enables the characterization of chitin organization in the cuticle of intact insects and arthropod exoskeletons, we demonstrate a structure/function correlation of chitin organization with larger scale anatomical structures. The chitin scaffolds in cuticles display an extraordinarily diverse set of morphologies that may reflect specific mechanical or physical properties. After removal of the proteinaceous and mineral matrix of a cuticle, we observe using SEM diverse nanoscale and micro scale organization of in-situ chitin in the wing, head, eye, leg, and dorsal and ventral thoracic regions of the periodical cicada Magicicada septendecim and in other insects and arthropods. The organization of chitin also appears to have a significant role in the organization of nanoscale surface structures. While microscale bristles and hairs have long been known to be chitin based materials formed as cellular extensions, we have found a nanostructured layer of chitin in the cuticle of the wing of the dog day annual cicada Tibicen tibicens, which may be the scaffold for the nanocone arrays found on the wing. We also use this process to examine

  12. Reconstructing Pre-Fragmentation Bubble Size Distributions from Volcanic Ash using Stereo SEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahagian, D. L.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G. K.; Genareau, K.

    2010-12-01

    We have conducted an analysis of bubble (BSD) and ash particle (PSD) size distributions for ashes from two contrasting eruptions. The first is the May, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens (MSH), a dacitic plinian eruption that spread ash over a large area of the Western U.S. The second is the basaltic sub-plinian 1974 eruption of Fuego (Guatemala), which was confined to local deposition with less variation of ash PSDs. Four successive small explosive eruptions of Fuego produced less than 0.02 km3 of dense rock equivalent (DRE) in a dispersal area of 80 km from the volcano. In contrast, the May 1980 plinian eruption of Mount St. Helens resulted in a distal fallout leading to a large subaerial ash deposit as far away as 325 km from the volcano. Pyroclastic flows added extensive fine material to the eruption column resulting in extensive ash dispersal. MSH samples were collected from a range of distances away from the vent, while collection of samples from Fuego was limited to nearer regions due to the lesser dispersal of the ash. Technique- Stereo SEM analysis of BSD of eruptions products (ash) to determine the pre-fragmentation properties of ash-producing magma bodies. This information is normally considered lost due to fragmentation of bubbles in late stages of eruptions. However, using SSEM, we have devised a technique to determine the pre-fragmentation BSDs that reflect the conduit processes of bubble nucleation and growth, and magma rise history. Using standard off-the-shelf software (Alicona MeX) to create Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of individual ash particles, we built a database of ash surface characteristics. These surfaces include imprints of bubbles that exploded during fragmentation. We use the curvature of these imprints to reconstruct the complete bubbles, using newly developed software we call “Bubblemaker” that extrapolates the measured DEMs using best-fit ellipsoids of revolution (not necessarily spherical). We have now reconstructed the bubble

  13. Sol-gel synthesis, phase composition, morphological and structural characterization of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2: XRD, FTIR, SEM, 3D SEM and solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareiva, Simonas; Klimavicius, Vytautas; Momot, Aleksandr; Kausteklis, Jonas; Prichodko, Aleksandra; Dagys, Laurynas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas; Sakirzanovas, Simas; Balevicius, Vytautas; Kareiva, Aivaras

    2016-09-01

    Aqueous sol-gel chemistry route based on ammonium-hydrogen phosphate as the phosphorus precursor, calcium acetate monohydrate as source of calcium ions, and 1,2-ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetracetic acid (DCTA), or tartaric acid (TA), or ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol (GL) as complexing agents have been used to prepare calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, CHAp). The phase transformations, composition, and structural changes in the polycrystalline samples were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The local short-range (nano- and mezo-) scale effects in CHAp were studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The spatial 3D data from the SEM images of CHAp samples obtained by TA, EG and GL sol-gel routes were recovered for the first time to our knowledge.

  14. Waveform Modeling of 3D Structure of D" Region Using A Coupled SEM/Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Gung, Y.; Capadeville, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2003-12-01

    The presence of strong lateral heterogeneity in D" is now well documented and presents challenges for seismic modeling. The main challenges are the limited global sampling of D" and the theoretical limits of validity of the present modeling tools, such as standard ray theory and mode approaches. We use coupled normal mode/Spectral Element Method (SEM) to compute synthetic seismograms of Sdiff in the D" part of a tomographic model(SAW24b16, Mégnin and Romanowicz, 2000) down to corner frequency 1/12s. SEM allows to take into account strong heterogeneity in a rigorous manner. The coupled method is much faster than standard SEM, when the numerical part of the computation is restricted to the D" region. In the rest of the mantle, the wave field is computed using efficient normal mode summation. As a first step, we consider a radially symmetric model outside of the D" region, and compare Sdiff synthetics with observed waveforms for a collection of deep earthquakes, for which the effect of strong heterogeneity in the crust and upper mantle is avoided. Observed and synthetic travel time trends are very consistent and in many cases the observed residuals are significantly larger. This indicates that the tomographic model only represents the smooth features of the real structure. Observed waveform amplitudes and SEM synthetics are somewhat less consistent. We compare the predictions for 800 Sdiff phases using SEM with those obtained by more approximate methods : ray theory and NACT (Non-linear asymptotic coupling theory, a normal mode perturbation approach). We discuss systematic trends in the travel times predicted by the different methods, compared to observations. Starting with the tomographic model, and correcting for mantle structure outside of D" using approximate NACT predictions, we next invert for perturbations to the tomographic model, using the coupled SEM/mode computation for the forward part of the modeling, in several regions of D" under the Pacific, which are

  15. Iowa community college Science, Engineering and Mathematics (SEM) faculty: Demographics and job satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogotzke, Kathy

    hours a semester and are expected to conduct research and publish their findings. In addition, community colleges often have what is referred to as an "open door" policy of admission meaning that students are not required to have a particular score on a college placement test, such as the ACT or SAT, nor are they required to have a specified high school grade point average or rank. Most 4-year colleges and universities require a minimum score on a college placement test in addition to a minimum high school grade point average or rank. Because of these differing entrance requirements, or lack thereof, community colleges often have a higher percentage of students needing remedial or developmental coursework. This dissertation reports on data collected from a survey administered to full-time faculty at all 15 community colleges in Iowa. The survey was administered using Qualtrics software with assistance from the Office of Community College Research and Policy at Iowa State University. The results of the study were used to further examine who community college science, engineering and mathematics (SEM) faculty are in terms of their demographics and background, along with investigating factors from the survey that contribute to their overall job satisfaction. Multiple regression analysis on these variables along with gender and age examined different models for predicting overall job satisfaction.

  16. Application of Automated SEM-EDS Based Mineral Identification Systems to Problems in Metamorphic Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, Robert; Barrow, Wendy; Rollinson, Gavyn

    2010-05-01

    Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) based mineral identification systems such as QEMSCAN have been in development for over 20 years, primarily as a tool to understand mineral liberation and element distribution in metal mining industry. This powerful technique is now being used in non mining applications such as metamorphic petrology where accurate mineral identification and metamorphic fabrics are key to deciphering the metamorphic history of samples. The QEMSCAN was developed by CSIRO for application in the mining industry where it is used to understand mineralogy, texture, mineral associations, the presence of gangue minerals and deleterious elements that may potentially interfere with mineral processing and planning, and the overall impact of mineralogy on grinding and flotation processes. It is capable of identifying most rock-forming minerals in milliseconds from their characteristic x-ray spectra. The collected x-ray spectra are compared to entries in a database containing the species identification profiles (SIPs) and are assigned a label accordingly. QEMSCAN is capable of searching large sample areas at high resolution resulting in the accurate and precise determination of all minerals present. Reports that were originally developed for the mining geologist can be equally useful to the petrologist, e.g. phase/mineral maps, modal mineral abundances and mineral association reports. Identification of key minerals is of great importance to determining the petrologic history of a sample. These key minerals may be few in number and present as small microinclusions (less than 100 μm) making them difficult to identify, if at all, with the petrographic microscope. Therefore, imaging by electron-microprobe or scanning electron microscope are the methods traditionally used. However, because of the small field of view available on these instruments at a magnification necessary to resolve micron sized relicts and

  17. Integration of the ProActive Suite and the semantic-oriented monitoring tool SemMon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funika, Wlodzimierz; Caromel, Denis; Koperek, Pawel; Kupisz, Mateusz

    In this paper we present our semantic-based approach to the monitoring of distributed applications built with the ProActive Parallel Suite framework. It is based on a semantic description of what is to be monitored, it's measurable capabilities, and related operations. We explore the ability to adapt a semantic-oriented monitoring tool, SemMon to ProActive. The latter provides a stable environment for development of parallel applications, while SemMon is aimed at semantic-oriented performance monitoring support, originally designed for distributed Java applications. We introduce a uniform monitoring environment model which describes the resources provided by ProActive and supports JMX-based notifications. A sample monitoring session is provided as well as plans for further research.

  18. Characterization Of Multi-layered Fish Scales (Atractosteus spatula) Using Nanoindentation, X-ray CT, FTIR, and SEM

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Paul G.; Rodriguez, Rogie I.; Moser, Robert D.; Williams, Brett A.; Poda, Aimee R.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Lafferty, Brandon J.; Kennedy, Alan J.; Chandler, Mei Q.

    2014-01-01

    The hierarchical architecture of protective biological materials such as mineralized fish scales, gastropod shells, ram’s horn, antlers, and turtle shells provides unique design principles with potentials for guiding the design of protective materials and systems in the future. Understanding the structure-property relationships for these material systems at the microscale and nanoscale where failure initiates is essential. Currently, experimental techniques such as nanoindentation, X-ray CT, and SEM provide researchers with a way to correlate the mechanical behavior with hierarchical microstructures of these material systems1-6. However, a well-defined standard procedure for specimen preparation of mineralized biomaterials is not currently available. In this study, the methods for probing spatially correlated chemical, structural, and mechanical properties of the multilayered scale of A. spatula using nanoindentation, FTIR, SEM, with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and X-ray CT are presented. PMID:25046233

  19. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part B: SEM/ESCA analysis of fracture surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Widyani, E.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion was studied with emphasis on the characterization of surface oxide layers, the analysis of fracture surfaces, and the interaction of matrices and fibers. A number of surface features of the fractured lap shear samples were noted in the SEM photomicrographs including the beta phase alloy of the Ti 6-4 adherend, the imprint of the adherend on the adhesive failure surface, increased void density for high temperature samples, and the alumina filler particles. Interfacial failure of some of the fractured lap shear samples is invariably characterized by the appearance of an ESCA oxygen photopeak at 530.3 eV assigned to the surface oxide layer of Ti 6-4 adherend. The effect of grit blasting on carbon fiber composites is evident in the SEM analysis. A high surface fluorine concentration on the composite surface is reduced some ten fold by grit blasting.

  20. Effects of Citric Acid and Desensitizing Agent Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Neha, Mahajan; Vandana, Laxman K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors which bring about mineralisation changes in a dentinal structure leading to dentin. The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the dentinal tubular changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth subsequent to the application of citric acid,strontium acetate based sodium fluoride (SAF) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dentin specimens from healthy fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth were included in the study. Each of them was grouped into acid treated and SAF treatment groups. Using SEM, the photomicrographs (3500x) of dentin specimens were evaluated. Results showed while there was a significant difference in tubular width of partial occlusion ≤ 25%, being more in fluorosed group compared to nonfluorosed group after application SAF. Application of desensitising agents demonstrated higher number of dentinal tubular occlusion and diameter reduction in nonfluorosed dentin compared to fluorosed dentin. Summary: Root biomodification and desensitising agent procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and non-fluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:25870716

  1. Characterization of multi-layered fish scales (Atractosteus spatula) using nanoindentation, X-ray CT, FTIR, and SEM.

    PubMed

    Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Williams, Brett A; Poda, Aimee R; Seiter, Jennifer M; Lafferty, Brandon J; Kennedy, Alan J; Chandler, Mei Q

    2014-01-01

    The hierarchical architecture of protective biological materials such as mineralized fish scales, gastropod shells, ram's horn, antlers, and turtle shells provides unique design principles with potentials for guiding the design of protective materials and systems in the future. Understanding the structure-property relationships for these material systems at the microscale and nanoscale where failure initiates is essential. Currently, experimental techniques such as nanoindentation, X-ray CT, and SEM provide researchers with a way to correlate the mechanical behavior with hierarchical microstructures of these material systems1-6. However, a well-defined standard procedure for specimen preparation of mineralized biomaterials is not currently available. In this study, the methods for probing spatially correlated chemical, structural, and mechanical properties of the multilayered scale of A. spatula using nanoindentation, FTIR, SEM, with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and X-ray CT are presented. PMID:25046233

  2. Nanomanipulation and electrical behaviour of a single gold nanowire using in-situ SEM-FIB-nanomanipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Luxmoore, I.; Forster, M. D.; Cullis, A. G.; Inkson, B. J.

    2008-08-01

    Gold nanowires were successfully fabricated by a DC electrodeposition technique into Anodic Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. The microstructure of 55nm gold nanowires released from AAO templates was observed by SEM and TEM to be polycrystalline, with a bamboo-type structure and grain sizes 20nm to several micrometers. Individual gold nanowires were picked up from bundles of gold nanowires using a super-sharp W tip attached to an in-situ Kleindiek nanomanipulator fitted in a SEM-FIB. The picked-up gold nanowires were then deposited onto a silicon wafer, or connected between two nanomanipulator tips, to fabricate single nanowire nano-circuits for electrical testing. The electrical properties of single manipulated nanowires are compared to that of bundles of gold nanowires for the two circuit types. The lowest resistance is achieved by connecting the gold nanowires between two FIB-milled tungsten tips.

  3. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM-EDS: using the full set of available X-ray lines.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S A; Midgley, P A

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM-EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  4. Healing of broken multiwalled carbon nanotubes using very low energy electrons in SEM: a route toward complete recovery.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Neha; Misra, Abhishek; Hazra, Kiran Shankar; Roy, Soumyendu; Bajpai, Reeti; Mohapatra, Dipti Ranjan; Misra, D S

    2011-03-22

    We report the healing of electrically broken multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using very low energy electrons (3-10 keV) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Current-induced breakdown caused by Joule heating has been achieved by applying suitably high voltages. The broken tubes were examined and exposed to electrons of 3-10 keV in situ in SEM with careful maneuvering of the electron beam at the broken site, which results in the mechanical joining of the tube. Electrical recovery of the same tube has been confirmed by performing the current-voltage measurements after joining. This easy approach is directly applicable for the repairing of carbon nanotubes incorporated in ready devices, such as in on-chip horizontal interconnects or on-tip probing applications, such as in scanning tunneling microscopy. PMID:21344873

  5. SEM evaluation of human gingival fibroblasts growth onto CAD/CAM zirconia and veneering ceramic for zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Zizzari, Vincenzo; Borelli, Bruna; De Colli, Marianna; Tumedei, Margherita; Di Iorio, Donato; Zara, Susi; Sorrentino, Roberto; Cataldi, Amelia; Gherlone, Enrico Felice; Zarone, Fernando; Tetè, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim To evaluate the growth of Human Gingival Fibroblasts (HGFs) cultured onto sample discs of CAD/CAM zirconia and veneering ceramic for zirconia by means of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis at different experimental times. Methods A total of 26 experimental discs, divided into 2 groups, were used: Group A) CAD/CAM zirconia (3Y-TZP) discs (n=13); Group B) veneering ceramic for zirconia discs (n=13). HGFs were obtained from human gingival biopsies, isolated and placed in culture plates. Subsequently, cells were seeded on experimental discs at 7,5×103/cm2 concentration and cultured for a total of 7 days. Discs were processed for SEM observation at 3h, 24h, 72h and 7 days. Results In Group A, after 3h, HGFs were adherent to the surface and showed a flattened profile. The disc surface covered by HGFs resulted to be wider in Group A than in Group B samples. At SEM observation, after 24h and 72h, differences in cell attachment were slightly noticeable between the groups, with an evident flattening of HGFs on both surfaces. All differences between Group A and group B became less significant after 7 days of culture in vitro. Conclusions SEM analysis of HGFs showed differences in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation, especially in the early hours of culture. Results showed a better adhesion and cell growth in Group A than in Group B, especially up to 72h in vitro. Differences decreased after 7 days, probably because of the rougher surface of CAD/CAM zirconia, promoting better cell adhesion, compared to the smoother surface of veneering ceramic. PMID:24611089

  6. Morphological and Structural Changes on Human Dental Enamel After Er:YAG Laser Irradiation: AFM, SEM, and EDS Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Olea-Mejìa, Oscar Fernando; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the morphological and structural changes of the enamel after irradiation with the Er:YAG laser. Background data: A previous study showed that subablative Er:YAG laser irradiation produced undesirable morphological changes on the enamel surface, such as craters and cracks; however, the enamel acid resistance was not increased. Methods: Fifty-two samples of human enamel were divided into four groups (n = 13): Group I was the control (no laser irradiation), whereas Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 100 mJ (7.5 J/cm2), and 150 mJ (11 J/cm2), respectively, at 10 Hz with water spray. The morphological changes were observed by AFM and SEM. The weight percentages (wt%) of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) were determined in the resultant craters and their periphery using EDS. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests were performed (p ≤ 0.05) to distinguish significant differences among the groups. Results: The AFM images showed cracks with depths between 250 nm and 750 nm for Groups II and IV, respectively, and the widths of these cracks were 5.37 μm and 2.58 μm. The interior of the cracks showed a rough surface. The SEM micrographs revealed morphological changes. Significant differences were detected in Ca, P, and Cl in the crater and its periphery. Conclusions: AFM observations showed triangular-shaped cracks, whereas craters and cracks were evident by SEM in all irradiated samples. It was not possible to establish a characteristic chemical pattern in the craters. PMID:21417912

  7. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM. PMID:25879382

  8. Staining plastic blocks with triiodide to image cells and soft tissues in backscattered electron SEM of skeletal and dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A

    2012-01-01

    Backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) is an invaluable method for studying the histology of the hard, mineralised components of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) or other resin embedded skeletal and dental tissues. Intact tissues are studied in micro-milled or polished block faces with an electron-optical section thickness of the order of a half to one micron and with the area of the section as big as a whole--large or small--bone organ. However, BSE SEM does not give information concerning the distribution of uncalcified, 'soft', cellular and extracellular matrix components. This can be obtained by confocal microscopy of the same block and the two sorts of images merged but the blocks have to be studied in two microscope systems. The present work shows a new, simple and economic approach to visualising both components by using the triiodide ion in Lugol's iodine solution to stain the block surface prior to the application of any conductive coating--and the latter can be omitted if charging is suppressed by use of poor vacuum conditions in the SEM sample chamber. The method permits the use of archival tissue, and it will be valuable in studies of both normal growth and development and pathological changes in bones and joints, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and tissue adaptation to implants. PMID:22828992

  9. Optimizing an SEM-based 3D surface imaging technique for recording bond coat surface geometry in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazmohamadi, Sina; Jordan, Eric H.

    2012-12-01

    Creation of three-dimensional representations of surfaces from images taken at two or more view angles is a well-established technique applied to optical images and is frequently used in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The present work describes specific steps taken to optimize and enhance the repeatability of three-dimensional surfaces reconstructed from SEM images. The presented steps result in an approximately tenfold improvement in the repeatability of the surface reconstruction compared to more standard techniques. The enhanced techniques presented can be used with any SEM friendly samples. In this work the modified technique was developed in order to accurately quantify surface geometry changes in metallic bond coats used with thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to provide improved turbine hot part durability. Bond coat surfaces are quite rough, and accurate determination of surface geometry change (rumpling) requires excellent repeatability. Rumpling is an important contributor to TBC failure, and accurate quantification of rumpling is important to better understanding of the failure behavior of TBCs.

  10. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  11. Qualitative SEM/EDS analysis of microleakage and apical gap formation of adhesive root-filling materials

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho; FRANCCI, Carlos; BOMBANA, Antonio C.; KENSHIMA, Silvia; BARROSO, Lúcia P.; D'AGOSTINO, Liz Z.; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the correspondence between gap formation and apical microleakage in root canals filled with epoxy resin-based (AH Plus) combined or not with resinous primer or with a dimethacrylate-based root canal sealer (Epiphany). Material and Methods Thirty-nine lower single-rooted human premolars were filled by the lateral condensation technique (LC) and immersed in a 50-wt% aqueous silver nitrate solution at 37ºC (24 h). After longitudinal sectioning, epoxy resin replicas were made from the tooth specimens. Both the replicas and the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gaps were observed in the replicas. Apical microleakage was detected in the specimens by SEM/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The data were analyzed statistically using an Ordinal Logistic Regression model and Analysis of Correspondence (α=0.05). Results Epiphany presented more regions containing gaps between dentin and sealer (p<0.05). There was correspondence between the presence of gaps and microleakage (p<0.05). Microleakage was similar among the root-filling materials (p>0.05). Conclusions The resinous primer did not improve the sealing ability of AH Plus sealer and the presence of gaps had an effect on apical microleakage for all materials. PMID:22858699

  12. Labyrinths, columns and cavities: new internal features of pollen grain walls in the Acanthaceae detected by FIB-SEM.

    PubMed

    House, Alisoun; Balkwill, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    External pollen grain morphology has been widely used in the taxonomy and systematics of flowering plants, especially the Acanthaceae which are noted for pollen diversity. However internal pollen wall features have received far less attention due to the difficulty of examining the wall structure. Advancing technology in the field of microscopy has made it possible, with the use of a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM), to view the structure of pollen grain walls in far greater detail and in three dimensions. In this study the wall structures of 13 species from the Acanthaceae were investigated for features of potential systematic relevance. FIB-SEM was applied to obtain precise cross sections of pollen grains at selected positions for examining the wall ultrastructure. Exploratory studies of the exine have thus far identified five basic structural types. The investigations also show that similar external pollen wall features may have a distinctly different internal structure. FIB-SEM studies have revealed diverse internal pollen wall features which may now be investigated for their systematic and functional significance. PMID:26698154

  13. Microhardness, chemical etching, SEM, AFM and SHG studies of novel nonlinear optical crystal -L-threonine formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumantha Rao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness studies of novel LTF crystal reported first time in the literature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface studies are done by AFM, chemical etching and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From SHG studies, it is known that LTF is potential NLO crystal. -- Abstract: The crystal L-threonine formate, an organic NLO crystal was synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis reveals pyramidal shaped minute crystallites on the growth surface. The etching study indicates the occurrence of etch pit patterns like striations and step like pattern. The mechanical properties of LTF crystals were evaluated by mechanical testing which reveals certain mechanical characteristics like elastic stiffness constant (C{sub 11}) and young's modulus (E). The Vickers and Knoop microhardness studies have been carried out on LTF crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. AFM image shows major hillock on growth surface. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency has been tested by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and found to be about 1.21 times in comparison with standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals.

  14. A novel approach for FE-SEM imaging of wood-matrix polymer interface in a biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Adya P; Anderson, Ross; Park, Byung-Dae; Nuryawan, Arif

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interface between polymer and biomass in composite products is important for developing high performance products, as the quality of adhesion at the interface determines composite properties. For example, with greater stiffness compared to polymer matrix, such as that of high density polyethylene, the wood component enhances stiffness of wood-polymer composites, provided there is good adhesion between composite components. However, in composites made from wood flour (wood particles) and synthetic resins it is often difficult to clearly resolve particle-matrix interfaces in the conventionally employed microscopy method that involves SEM examination of fractured faces of composites. We developed a novel approach, where composites made from high density polyethylene and wood flour were examined and imaged with a FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) in transverse sections cut through the composites. Improved definition of the interface was achieved using this approach, which enabled a more thorough comparison to be made of the features of the interface between wood particles and the matrix in composites with and without a coupling agent, as it was possible to clearly resolve the interfaces for particles of all sizes, from large particles consisting of many cells down to tiny cell wall fragments, particularly in composites that did not incorporate the coupling agent used to enhance particle adhesion with the matrix polymer. The method developed would be suitable particularly for high definition SEM imaging of a wide range of composites made combining wood and agricultural residues with synthetic polymers. PMID:24063951

  15. SEM-EDX analysis of an unknown "known" white powder found in a shipping container from Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Douglas C.

    2009-05-01

    In 2008, an unknown white powder was discovered spilled inside of a shipping container of whole kernel corn during an inspection by federal inspectors in the port of Baltimore, Maryland. The container was detained and quarantined while a sample of the powder was collected and sent to a federal laboratory where it was screened using chromatography for the presence of specific poisons and pesticides with negative results. Samples of the corn kernels and the white powder were forwarded to the Food and Drug Administration, Forensic Chemistry Center for further analysis. Stereoscopic Light Microscopy (SLM), Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM/EDX), and Polarized Light Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy (PLM-IR) were used in the analysis of the kernels and the unknown powder. Based on the unique particle analysis by SLM and SEM as well as the detection of the presence of aluminum and phosphorous by EDX, the unknown was determined to be consistent with reacted aluminum phosphide (AlP). While commonly known in the agricultural industry, aluminum phosphide is relatively unknown in the forensic community. A history of the use and acute toxicity of this compound along with some very unique SEM/EDX analysis characteristics of aluminum phosphide will be discussed.

  16. The SEM Risk Behavior (SRB) Model: A New Conceptual Model of how Pornography Influences the Sexual Intentions and HIV Risk Behavior of MSM.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, J Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Smolenski, Derek J; Brady, Sonya S; Horvath, Keith J; Grey, Jeremy A; Rosser, B R Simon

    2012-01-01

    While the effects of sexually explicit media (SEM) on heterosexuals' sexual intentions and behaviors have been studied, little is known about the consumption and possible influence of SEM among men who have sex with men (MSM). Importantly, conceptual models of how Internet-based SEM influences behavior are lacking. Seventy-nine MSM participated in online focus groups about their SEM viewing preferences and sexual behavior. Twenty-three participants reported recent exposure to a new behavior via SEM. Whether participants modified their sexual intentions and/or engaged in the new behavior depended on three factors: arousal when imagining the behavior, pleasure when attempting the behavior, and trust between sex partners. Based on MSM's experience, we advance a model of how viewing a new sexual behavior in SEM influences sexual intentions and behaviors. The model includes five paths. Three paths result in the maintenance of sexual intentions and behaviors. One path results in a modification of sexual intentions while maintaining previous sexual behaviors, and one path results in a modification of both sexual intentions and behaviors. With this model, researchers have a framework to test associations between SEM consumption and sexual intentions and behavior, and public health programs have a framework to conceptualize SEM-based HIV/STI prevention programs. PMID:23185126

  17. The SEM Risk Behavior (SRB) Model: A New Conceptual Model of how Pornography Influences the Sexual Intentions and HIV Risk Behavior of MSM

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, J. Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Smolenski, Derek J.; Brady, Sonya S.; Horvath, Keith J.; Grey, Jeremy A.; Rosser, B. R. Simon

    2012-01-01

    While the effects of sexually explicit media (SEM) on heterosexuals’ sexual intentions and behaviors have been studied, little is known about the consumption and possible influence of SEM among men who have sex with men (MSM). Importantly, conceptual models of how Internet-based SEM influences behavior are lacking. Seventy-nine MSM participated in online focus groups about their SEM viewing preferences and sexual behavior. Twenty-three participants reported recent exposure to a new behavior via SEM. Whether participants modified their sexual intentions and/or engaged in the new behavior depended on three factors: arousal when imagining the behavior, pleasure when attempting the behavior, and trust between sex partners. Based on MSM’s experience, we advance a model of how viewing a new sexual behavior in SEM influences sexual intentions and behaviors. The model includes five paths. Three paths result in the maintenance of sexual intentions and behaviors. One path results in a modification of sexual intentions while maintaining previous sexual behaviors, and one path results in a modification of both sexual intentions and behaviors. With this model, researchers have a framework to test associations between SEM consumption and sexual intentions and behavior, and public health programs have a framework to conceptualize SEM-based HIV/STI prevention programs. PMID:23185126

  18. High-resolution 3D analyses of the shape and internal constituents of small volcanic ash particles: The contribution of SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonlanthen, Pierre; Rausch, Juanita; Ketcham, Richard A.; Putlitz, Benita; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Grobéty, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of small volcanic ash particles is fundamental to our understanding of magma fragmentation, and in transport modeling of volcanic plumes and clouds. Until recently, the analysis of 3D features in small objects (< 250 μm) was either restricted to extrapolations from 2D approaches, partial stereo-imaging, or CT methods having limited spatial resolution and/or accessibility. In this study, an X-ray computed-tomography technique known as SEM micro-CT, also called 3D X-ray ultramicroscopy (3D XuM), was used to investigate the 3D morphology of small volcanic ash particles (125-250 μm sieve fraction), as well as their vesicle and microcrystal distribution. The samples were selected from four stratigraphically well-established tephra layers of the Meerfelder Maar (West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany). Resolution tests performed on a Beametr v1 pattern sample along with Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray emission volumes indicated that a spatial resolution of 0.65 μm was obtained for X-ray shadow projections using a standard thermionic SEM and a bulk brass target as X-ray source. Analysis of a smaller volcanic ash particle (64-125 μm sieve fraction) showed that features with volumes > 20 μm3 (~ 3.5 μm in diameter) can be successfully reconstructed and quantified. In addition, new functionalities of the Blob3D software were developed to allow the particle shape factors frequently used as input parameters in ash transport and dispersion models to be calculated. This study indicates that SEM micro-CT is very well suited to quantify the various aspects of shape in fine volcanic ash, and potentially also to investigate the 3D morphology and internal structure of any object < 0.1 mm3.

  19. A novel approach to TEM preparation with a (7-axis stage) triple-beam FIB-SEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Jamil J.

    2015-10-01

    Preparation of lamellae from bulk to grid for Cs-corrected Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation has mostly become routine work on the latest FIB-SEM systems, with standardized techniques that often are left to automation for the initial steps. The finalization of lamellae however, has mostly become, non-routine, non-repeatable and often driven by user experience level in most cases to produce high quality damage-less cross section. Materials processing of the latest technologies, with ever-shrinking Nano-sized structures pose challenges to modern FIB-SEM systems. This can often lead to specialized techniques and hyper-specific functions for producing ultra-thin high quality lamellae that often are lab specific, preventing practical use of such techniques across multiple materials and applications. Several factors that should be incorporated in processing fine structured materials successfully include how the use of electron and ion scan conditions can affect a thin section during ion milling, the type of ion species applied for material processing during the finalization of lamellae with gallium ions or of a smaller ion species type such as Ar/Xe, sample orientation of the lamella during the thinning process which is linked to ion beam incident angle as a direct relationship in the creation of waterfall effects or curtain effects, and how software can be employed to aid in the reduction of these artifacts with reproducible results regardless of FIB-SEM experience for site-specific lift outs. A traditional TEM preparation was performed of a fine structure specimen in pursuit of a process technique to produce a high quality TEM lamella which would address all of the factors mentioned. These new capabilities have been refined and improved upon during the FIB-SEM design and development stages with an end result of a new approach that yields an improvement in quality by the reduction of common ion milling artifacts such as curtain effects, amorphous

  20. Distant functional connectivity for bimanual finger coordination declines with aging: an fMRI and SEM exploration

    PubMed Central

    Kiyama, Sachiko; Kunimi, Mitsunobu; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Although bimanual finger coordination is known to decline with aging, it still remains unclear how exactly the neural substrates underlying the coordination differ between young and elderly adults. The present study focused on: (1) characterization of the functional connectivity within the motor association cortex which is required for successful bimanual finger coordination, and (2) to elucidate upon its age-related decline. To address these objectives, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with structural equation modeling (SEM). This allowed us to compare functional connectivity models between young and elderly age groups during a visually guided bimanual finger movement task using both stable in-phase and complex anti-phase modes. Our SEM exploration of functional connectivity revealed significant age-related differences in connections surrounding the PMd in the dominant hemisphere. In the young group who generally displayed accurate behavior, the SEM model for the anti-phase mode exhibited significant connections from the dominant PMd to the non-dominant SPL, and from the dominant PMd to the dominant S1. However, the model for the elderly group's anti-phase mode in which task performance dropped, did not exhibit significant connections within the aforementioned regions. These results suggest that: (1) the dominant PMd acts as an intermediary to invoke intense intra- and inter-hemispheric connectivity with distant regions among the higher motor areas including the dominant S1 and the non-dominant SPL in order to achieve successful bimanual finger coordination, and (2) the distant connectivity among the higher motor areas declines with aging, whereas the local connectivity within the bilateral M1 is enhanced for the complex anti-phase mode. The latter may underlie the elderly's decreased performance in the complex anti-phase mode of the bimanual finger movement task. PMID:24795606

  1. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  2. Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging of planar deformation features and tectonic deformation lamellae in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, M. F.; Drury, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are essential proof for the correct identification of meteorite impact structures and related ejecta layers, but can be confused with tectonic deformation lamellae. The only completely reliable method to demonstrate the shock origin of suspected (sub-) planar microstructures, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, is costly and time consuming. We have used a cathodoluminescence (CL) detector attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to image both PDFs and tectonic deformation lamellae in quartz to demonstrate the potential of a simple method to identify PDFs and define characteristics that allow their distinction from tectonic deformation lamellae. In both limited wavelength grayscale and composite color SEM-CL images, PDFs are easily identified. They are straight, narrow, well-defined features, whereas tectonic deformation lamellae are thicker, slightly curved, and there is often no clear boundary between lamella and host quartz. Composite color images reveal two types of CL behavior in PDFs: either they emit a red to infrared CL signal or they are nonluminescent. The color of the CL signal emitted by tectonic deformation lamellae ranges from blue to red. For comparison, we also imaged several shocked quartz grains at cryogenic temperature. In most cases, the PDF characteristics in cryo-CL images do not differ significantly from those in images recorded at room temperature. We conclude that SEM-CL imaging, especially when color composites are used, provides a promising, practical, low cost, and nondestructive method to distinguish between PDFs and tectonic lamellae, even when the simplest CL techniques available are used.

  3. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography☆

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin ‘slices’ (5–10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred μm3 provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER–Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge “trans-ER” sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation. PMID:24135121

  4. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin 'slices' (5-10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred μm(3) provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER-Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge "trans-ER" sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation. PMID:24135121

  5. A new protocol to detect light elements in estuarine sediments by X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDS).

    PubMed

    Miguens, Flavio Costa; de Oliveira, Martha Lima; Marins, Rozane Valente; de Lacerda, Luiz Drude

    2010-01-01

    The analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to determine the presence and distribution of atomic elements in mineralogy. However, the detection of light elements such as carbon is difficult to obtain with standard energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and usual proceedings for SEM. This study proposes a new protocol to detect calcium carbonate by SEM/EDS using sediments from the Jaguaribe River estuary, NE Brazil, as a model. Handmade gold mounting discs (Au stubs) were used as sample support and samples were adhered with inexpensive glue (Loctite Super_Bonder) or directly disposed on the Au stubs. CaCO(3) and NaCl for chemical analysis were used as control and counterproof to the carbon adhesive tape. Control salts EDS analyses indicate that the method was efficient to detect light elements. Sediments obtained from different depths in the core sampled at the Jaguaribe River estuary consist of particles and aggregates with diverse morphology that covers a wide range of particle or aggregate size. Morphology and dimensions were similar for all core depths. Analysis of samples disposed on gold mounting disc without glue showed that sediment bulk particles usually presented small particles adhering on the surface. Clay minerals were predominant but silica was also often identified. Calcium was a trace element in a small number of sediment bulk particles. Biological and non-biological calcium carbonates, including nanoparticles, were identified in all core depths. X-ray emitted from Au stub did not interfere in the CaCO(3) EDS analysis. Calcium carbonate particles from sediments were identified using this novel approach. PMID:20388618

  6. A New Approach to Studying Biological and Soft Materials Using Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, D. J.; Morrissey, F.; Lich, B. H.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last decade techniques such as confocal light microscopy, in combination with fluorescent labelling, have helped biologists and life scientists to study biological architectures at tissue and cell level in great detail. Meanwhile, obtaining information at very small length scales is possible with the combination of sample preparation techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is well known for the determination of surface characteristics and morphology. However, the desire to understand the three dimensional relationships of meso-scale hierarchies has led to the development of advanced microscopy techniques, to give a further complementary approach. A focused ion beam (FIB) can be used as a nano-scalpel and hence allows us to reveal internal microstructure in a site-specific manner. Whilst FIB instruments have been used to study and verify the three-dimensional architecture of man made materials, SEM and FIB technologies have now been brought together in a single instrument representing a powerful combination for the study of biological specimens and soft materials. We demonstrate the use of FIB SEM to study three-dimensional relationships for a range of length scales and materials, from small-scale cellular structures to the larger scale interactions between biomedical materials and tissues. FIB cutting of heterogeneous mixtures of hard and soft materials, resulting in a uniform cross-section, has proved to be of particular value since classical preparation methods tend to introduce artefacts. Furthermore, by appropriate selection, we can sequentially cross-section to create a series of 'slices' at specific intervals. 3D reconstruction software can then be used to volume-render information from the 2D slices, enabling us to immediately see the spatial relationships between microstructural components.

  7. Determination of chemical composition of individual airborne particles by SEM/EDX and micro-Raman spectrometry: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, E. A.; Buczynska, A.; Novakovic, V.; Kuduk, R.; Van Grieken, R.

    2009-04-01

    The strategies for sampling and analysis by SEM/EDX and micro-Raman spectrometry for individual airborne particles analysis as applied at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) by the MITAC group have been reviewed. Microbeam techniques provide detailed information concerning the origin, formation, transport, reactivity, transformation reactions and environmental impact of particulate matter. Moreover, some particles of certain chemical properties have been recognized as a threat for human health and cultural heritage objects. However, the small sizes of particles result in specific problems with respect to single particle analysis. Development of equipment and software for improvement of analysis and quantification are reported.

  8. Comparative SEM study on the effect of different demineralization methods with tetracycline HCl on healthy root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Işik, G; Ince, S; Sağlam, F; Onan, U

    1997-09-01

    Periodontal regeneration through the use of root demineralization received a lot of interest in periodontology. Topical application of acid to dentin surfaces produced a zone of demineralization, exposing dentin collagen fibrils and opening dentin tubules. In this study, the in vitro effects of different tetracycline HCl application techniques were investigated. According to the results of this SEM study, it may be desirable to apply tetracycline HCl using burnishing technique to expose maximum intertubular fibrils and for the tubular openings. However, this technique should be studied when placed in an in vivo system. PMID:9378828

  9. Rapid characterisation of archaeological midden components using FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX and micro-XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillito, Lisa-Marie; Almond, Matthew J.; Nicholson, James; Pantos, Manolis; Matthews, Wendy

    2009-07-01

    Samples taken from middens at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Turkey have been analysed using IR spectroscopy backed up by powder XRD and SEM-EDX. Microcomponents studied include fossil hackberries (providing evidence of ancient diet and seasonality), mineral nodules (providing evidence of post-depositional change) and phytoliths (mineralised plant cells, providing evidence of usage of plant species). Finely laminated ashy deposits have also been investigated allowing chemical and mineralogical variations to be explored. It is found that many layers which appear visually to be quite distinctive have, in fact, very similar mineralogy.

  10. SEM/EDS analysis of boron in waste glasses with ultrathin window detector and digital pulse processor

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of boron in waste glasses and in the reaction products that form during the reaction of glass is important for understanding the reaction kinetics and mechanism of glass corrosion. Two borosilicate waste glasses (1.55 and 3.47 wt% B) have been analyzed by SEM/EDS. The 1.55 wt% is the lowest B concentration detected with EDS. However, the B peaks severely overlap with the C peaks due to the carbon films used for conductive layers, but this problem can be solved by subtracting the C peaks, and possibly even lower B content could be detected by EDS with the digital pulse processor.

  11. Analysis of Ash Adhesion Behavior at High Temperature Condition by Using Computer controlled FE-SEM with Heat Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hamiya, H.; Yamada, H.; Tukada, M.; Naito, M.

    2002-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the increasing mechanism of cohesive and adhesive force of ash powders from a coal combustion system at high-temperature conditions, a new observation system, which was composed of computer controlled FE-SEM and chamber unit for the heat treatment, was developed. By using this system, the liquid phase formation on the surface of pressurized fluidized bed coal combustion ash samples was observed after heat treatment at 1123 K, which temperature was corresponding to the rapid increasing temperature of adhesion behavior of ash powder samples.

  12. SEM-based system for 100nm x-ray tomography for the analysis of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuet, P.; Laloum, D.; Audoit, G.; Torrecillas, R.; Gaillard, F.-X.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a good candidate for 3D imaging at high resolution. However, the difficult access to 3rd generation synchrotron sources is prohibitive for daily analyses and we present hereafter a step towards x-ray nanotomography using a laboratory system. To have a lens-free system, we use the electron beam of an SEM to produce x-rays through the interaction between the SEM electron beam and a metallic anode. The inherent x-ray source size can be properly shaped using different anode materials and geometries. This flexible system makes it possible to perform xray imaging at energies of up to 10keV and resolution down to 100nm. Because of a low SNR, the exposure time is long and forces to have a low angular sampling. This is counterbalanced by using algebraic reconstruction algorithms. The technique has been applied to the study of plasma FIB-prepared macroporous silicon samples. Those samples come from the controlled porosification of 200mm silicon wafer, with thicknesses from few nm to few hundreds of micrometers. We quantified the 3D pore network, which is of interest for the optimization of the production of such materials.

  13. In-situ SEM investigation of sub-microscale deformation fields around a crack-tip in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhao, C. W.; Xing, Y. M.; Hou, X. H.; Fan, Z. C.; Jin, Y. J.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A combination of in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA) was used to study the deformation fields around a crack-tip in single-crystal silicon under uniaxial tensile load. The sub-microscale silicon pillars grating was fabricated using holographic lithography followed by inductively coupled plasma etching. A series of SEM images of dynamic crack with the sub-microscale grating were obtained during tensile testing. The strain fields around the crack-tip were mapped by GPA. The strain fields were compared with the linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions. It was determined that the deformation is performed around the crack-tip area. The normal strain εxx and shear strain εxy are nearly zero, and the strain fields are dominated by the normal strain εyy component. With the increase of displacement load, the crack propagated mainly along the [010] crystal direction and the strains around the crack-tip increased gradually. It is noted that the theoretical prediction is lower than the experimental results from 0 to 2 μm ahead of the crack-tip. However, the agreement between experimental results and theoretical prediction is very good far from the crack-tip (>2 μm).

  14. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  15. The effects of extracts of chewing sticks (Salvadora persica) on healthy and periodontally involved human dentine: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Almas, K

    2001-01-01

    The popularity and availability of chewing sticks (Salvadora persica) in the Asia, Middle East and Africa make them a commonly used oral hygiene tool in those societies. Salvador persica chewing stick called miswak is frequently used in Saudi Arabia. The antimicrobial effects of miswak has been well documented. The aim of this study is to find our the effect of aqueous extracts of miswak on healthy and periodontally involved human dentine with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in vitro. 25% aqueous extract of freshly prepared miswak solution was used for the study. Twelve human premolars teeth (6 healthy and 6 with periodontal disease) recently extracted for orthodontic and periodontal reasons were used. 24 SEM specimens were prepared and treated with miswak extract with different conditions e.g. soaking and burnishing with miswak extract. Soaking the healthy and periodontally diseased root dentine in miswak extract resulted in partial removal of smear layer and occlusion of dentinal tubules was observed in dentine specimens burnished with miswak solution. Further research is needed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of miswak on etched human dentine at higher concentrations. PMID:11808063

  16. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup; Flo, Trude Helen; Halaas, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  17. Three-Phase 3D Reconstruction of a LiCoO2 Cathode via FIB-SEM Tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen K; Wang, Jun; Barnett, Scott A; Faber, Katherine T

    2016-02-01

    Three-phase three-dimensional (3D) microstructural reconstructions of lithium-ion battery electrodes are critical input for 3D simulations of electrode lithiation/delithiation, which provide a detailed understanding of battery operation. In this report, 3D images of a LiCoO2 electrode are achieved using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), with clear contrast among the three phases: LiCoO2 particles, carbonaceous phases (carbon and binder) and the electrolyte space. The good contrast was achieved by utilizing an improved FIB-SEM sample preparation method that combined infiltration of the electrolyte space with a low-viscosity silicone resin and triple ion-beam polishing. Morphological parameters quantified include phase volume fraction, surface area, feature size distribution, connectivity, and tortuosity. Electrolyte tortuosity was determined using two different geometric calculations that were in good agreement. The electrolyte tortuosity distribution versus position within the electrode was found to be highly inhomogeneous; this will lead to inhomogeneous electrode lithiation/delithiation at high C-rates that could potentially cause battery degradation. PMID:26765538

  18. Coastal surface sediment quality assessment in Leizhou Peninsula (South China Sea) based on SEM-AVS analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Lin, Jin-qin; Liang, Yan-yan; Gan, Hua-yang; Zeng, Xiang-yun; Duan, Zhi-peng; Liang, Kai; Liu, Xing; Huo, Zhen-hai; Wu, Chang-hua

    2014-07-15

    Surface sediments from the coastal area of the Leizhou Peninsula in the South China Sea were collected and analyzed and the potential ecological risks in the area were assessed based on acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) model. The AVS levels are between 0.109 and 55.6 μmol g(-1), with the average at 4.45 μmol g(-1). The high AVS-concentration zones include the aquaculture areas of Liusha Bay and the densely populated areas of Zhanjiang Bay. The simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) range from 0.026 μmol g(-1) to 8.61 μmol g(-1), with the average at 0.843 μmol g(-1). Most of high SEM-concentration stations were located in ports or aquaculture zones. Most of the coastal surface sediments of the Leizhou Peninsula (90%) had no adverse biological effects according to the criterion proposed by USEPA (2005); while adverse effects were uncertain in some stations (8%); even in 2 stations (2%) adverse biological effects may be expected. PMID:24880682

  19. Characterisation of the weapon used in a patricide by SEM/EDS analysis of a microscopic trace from the object.

    PubMed

    Muccino, Enrico; Giovanetti, Giulio Federico; Crudele, Graziano Domenico Luigi; Gentile, Guendalina; Marchesi, Matteo; Rancati, Alessandra; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a case of patricide. The murder was characterised by multiple blunt traumas and asphyxia. A mass of contused wounds was localised to the head and neck, and included the complete avulsion of the left eye (by an unknown tool), which was recovered near the cadaver. This case is of interest due to the possibility of identifying microscopic traces of the object that was used for the homicide by examining the skin margins around the ocular injury. The analysis was conducted using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). Analysis of the skin margins allowed microscopic inorganic traces to be detected, which were identified as ceramic material. This result focused the attention of the investigation on a small fish-shaped statue that had been previously found by the police when examining the crime scene. The use of SEM/EDX was therefore essential in determining a match between the microscopic traces detected on the perilesional skin and the composition of the statue. This led to the suspicion that the statue was the murder weapon. PMID:26700496

  20. Chemical state information of bulk specimens obtained by SEM-based soft-X-ray emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koshiya, Shogo; Satoh, Futami; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Handa, Nobuo; Murano, Takanori; Koike, Masato; Imazono, Takashi; Koeda, Masaru; Nagano, Tetsuya; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Oue, Yuki; Yonezawa, Zeno; Kuramoto, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    Electron-beam-induced soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) that uses a grating spectrometer has been introduced to a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) for characterizing desired specimen areas of bulk materials. The spectrometer was designed as a grazing incidence flat-field optics by using aberration corrected (varied line spacing) gratings and a multichannel plate detector combined with a charge-coupled device camera, which has already been applied to a transmission electron microscope. The best resolution was confirmed as 0.13 eV at Mg L-emission (50 eV), which is comparable with that of recent dedicated electron energy-loss spectroscopy instruments. This SXES-SEM instrument presents density of states of simple metals of bulk Mg and Li. Apparent band-structure effects have been observed in Si L-emission of Si wafer, P L-emission of GaP wafer, and Al L-emissions of intermetallic compounds of AlCo, AlPd, Al2Pt, and Al2Au. PMID:24625988

  1. Oxidative alteration of spent fuel in a silica-rich environment: SEM/AEM investigation and geochemical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,YIFENG; XU,HUIFANG

    2000-03-14

    Correctly identifying the possible alteration products and accurately predicting their occurrence in a repository-relevant environment are the key for the source-term calculation in a repository performance assessment. Uraninite in uranium deposits has long been used as a natural analog to spent fuel in a repository because of their chemical and structural similarity. In this paper, a SEM/AEM investigation has been conducted on a partially alternated uraninite sample from a uranium ore deposit of Shinkolobwe of Congo. The mineral formation sequences were identified: uraninite {yields} uranyl hydrates {yields} uranyl silicates {yields} Ca-uranyl silicates or uraninite {yields} uranyl silicates {yields} Ca-uranyl silicates. Reaction-path calculations were conducted for the oxidative dissolution of spent fuel in a representative Yucca Mountain groundwater. The predicted sequence is in general consistent with the SEM observations. The calculations also show that uranium carbonate minerals are unlikely to become major solubility-controlling mineral phases in a Yucca Mountain environment. Some discrepancies between model predictions and field observations are observed. Those discrepancies may result from poorly constrained thermodynamic data for uranyl silicate minerals.

  2. Production of calcite nanocrystal by a urease-positive strain of enterobacter ludwigii and study of its structure by SEM.

    PubMed

    Ghashghaei, Sara; Emtiazi, Giti

    2013-10-01

    The present research aimed at evaluating the effects of urease enzyme and increasing pH on calcite nanocrystal formation. Unlike some researches, the results showed that CaCO3 precipitation is not a general phenomenon among the bacteria and if a bacterium has not this ability, it will not be able to produce calcite even with an increase in pH. All urease-positive bacteria had this ability, while only some urease-negative bacteria were able to produce calcite. Production and characterization of nanocrystals on precipitating medium were shown primarily by light microscopy and then confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Crystallite particle size was determined using Scherrer formula that was sub-100-nm in all samples. Based on qualitative and quantitative studies, strain C8 was selected as the best calcite-producing strain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this isolate has 99 % similarity with Enterobacter ludwigii. 16S rRNA sequence of isolate was deposited in GenBank with accession number JX666242. The morphology and exact composition of nanocrystalline particles were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). According to data obtained by SEM, we suggest that nanocrystals of CaCO3 adhere to bacteria and each other to form small aggregates and then complex crystalline networks to trap bacteria. Many holes are present in these crystalline networks that seem to be due to the aggregation of nanocrystals. PMID:23677144

  3. Physical distribution of Ni, Pb and Zn in reclaimed mine soils observed by FE-SEM with an EDS detector.

    PubMed

    Asensio, V; Covelo, E F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to physically demonstrate the associations between Ni, Pb and Zn and the different soil components. To achieve this, several soil samples were observed by field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) detector. The samples came from mine sites vegetated and/or amended with wastes (sewage sludges and paper mill residues). The concentrations of metals in the different soil fractions were quantified by a chemical sequential extraction in a previous study. The sorption capacity of the soils was evaluated with sorption experiments using the batch method. We corroborated the results obtained by the sequential extraction of metals as well as the sorption experiments with the observations from the FE-SEM with the EDS. We physically observed the associations between Ni, Pb and Zn and oxides, organic matter and clays. We also observed PbCaCO3 crystals in one of the soils, presumably formed during the sorption experiment. As it is not possible to know with complete certainty how Pb was retained by calcium in this soil by only using chemical methods, the use of microscopic techniques is crucial to ascertain how metals are associated with the different soil fractions. PMID:25940484

  4. An XPS and SEM evaluation of six chemical and physical techniques for cleaning of contaminated titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Mouhyi, J; Sennerby, L; Pireaux, J J; Dourov, N; Nammour, S; Van Reck, J

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse clinically failed and retrieved implants prior to and after cleaning by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as compared to unused controls. Six different chemical and physical techniques for cleaning of contaminated titanium implants were evaluated: 1) rinsing in absolute ethanol for 10 min, 2) cleaning in ultrasonic baths containing trichloroethylene (TRI) and absolute ethanol, 10 min in each solution, 3) abrasive cleaning for 30 s, 4) cleaning in supersaturated citric acid for 30 s, 5) cleaning with continuous CO2-laser in dry conditions at 5 W for 10 s, 6) cleaning with continuous CO2-laser in wet conditions (saline) at 5 W for 10 s. SEM of failed implants showed the presence of contaminants of varying sizes and XPS showed almost no titanium but high carbon signals. XPS of unused titanium implants showed lower levels of titanium as previously reported, probably due to contamination of carbon which increased with time in room air. Cleaning of used implants in citric acid followed by rinsing with deionized water for 5 min followed by cleaning in ultrasonic baths with TRI and absolute ethanol gave the best results with regard to macroscopical appearance and surface composition. However, as compared to the unused implants the results from an element composition point of view were still unsatisfactory. It is concluded that further development and testing of techniques for cleaning of organically contaminated titanium is needed. PMID:10530133

  5. Observation by SEM/EDXS of leached layers on SRL-165 glass from 5-year MIIT test

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, P.B.; Buechele, A.C.

    1993-12-31

    Long-term tests on the durability of nuclear waste glasses, both under laboratory conditions and in actual burial environments, have shown that after periods of several months or years the rates of glass corrosion can show unexpected increases. In burial tests in brine environments the growth of the thickness of the surface layer during years 3 to 5 as revealed by SIMS and SEM measurements was found to be faster than expected on the basis of findings during the first 2 years. In this paper we report on our SEM-EDXS observations of a 5 year burial sample of SRL-165 glass from the MIIT test, and compare our findings to those of other studies, especially SIMS measurements. Our average thickness measurement for the leached layer at the glass-metal interface is 3.70 {mu}m, but wide variation is observed, as well as evidence of partial loss of the leached layer in some areas. A thicker, better retained layer is observed on the glass-brine interface near the core heater averaging 8 to 12 {mu}m in thickness with occasional local attack producing leached layers of greater depth, in one case nearly 40 {mu}m. These findings show that it is important to extend durability tests to long periods in order to establish a reliable basis for predictive modeling of long-term glass durability.

  6. Surface functionalization of silica microparticles for capillary electrochromatography (CEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, T.J.; Anex, D.S.; Rognlien, J.

    1997-01-01

    We derivatized small (0.5 -3 {mu}m) silica particles by silating their surfaces with long-chain alkyl substituted silanes. These functionalized particles were packed into 100 {mu}m capillaries and used as stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography. The particles supported electroosmotic flow in mixtures of acetonitrile and aqueous buffer (4 mM sodium tetraborate or 2mM TRIS). The columns were used to separate mixtures of organic analytes demonstrating the effectiveness of the functionalized stationary phase.

  7. CEC Selected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention: Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    Selected papers on behavioral disorders include the following: aggression as an indicator for rehabilitative efforts by Herbert Grossman; the evaluation of differential low rate conditioning procedures on destructive behavior by Christine Walken; a modification for non-directive therapy by Robert V. Turner; Piaget, Skinner and a comprehensive…

  8. CEC Selected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention: The Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    Presentations on the gifted include the following: theoretical principles in differential education by Virgil S. Ward; the relationship of educational theories and program evaluation by Joseph S. Renzulli; applications of theory in curricular development by Louise Ann Schifferli; teacher-pupil interaction patterns in classes for the gifted by Fred…

  9. CEC Selected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention: Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    The following articles on mental retardation are provided: translating research findings into classroom activity; camping programs; a measurement device for educable mentally retarded adolescents on their self-concept as a worker; an investigation of the Doman-Delacato Theory in a trainable program in the public schools; and problems of sex…

  10. A commentary on the role of sexually explicit media (SEM) in the transmission and prevention of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM).

    PubMed

    Rosser, B R Simon; Grey, Jeremy A; Wilkerson, J Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Brady, Sonya S; Smolenski, Derek J; Horvath, Keith J

    2012-08-01

    Although research has been conducted over the last half century to test the hypothesis that pornography, or sexually explicit media (SEM), influences behavior, information regarding usage and its effect on men who have sex with men (MSM) is limited. It is important for researchers studying online risk factors for HIV to consider the relationship between SEM consumption and risky sexual behavior, particularly given the exponential increase in SEM exposure as a result of the near-compulsory use of the Internet. In this commentary, we review findings regarding this relationship from studies of international and heterosexual populations. We then suggest future directions for research regarding MSM in the United States and practical applications of such research if the results from other populations extend to them. Research suggests there might be ways to use SEM to create innovative approaches to online HIV prevention, particularly among such at-risk populations as youth and MSM of lower socio-economic statuses. PMID:22252476

  11. Young's modulus and SEM analysis of leg bones exposed to simulated microgravity by hind limb suspension (HLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Niravkumar D.; Mehta, Rahul; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine composition of the leg bone tissue of rats that were exposed to simulated microgravity by Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for one week. The leg bones were cross sectioned, cleaned of soft tissues, dried and sputter coated, and then placed horizontally on the stage of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysis. Interaction of a 17.5 keV electron beam, incident from the vertical direction on the sample, generated images using two detectors. X-rays emitted from the sample during electron bombardment were measured with an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) feature of SEM using a liquid-nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 144 eV at 5.9 keV (25Mn Kα x-ray). Kα- x-rays from carbon, oxygen, phosphorus and calcium formed the major peaks in the spectrum. Relative percentages of these elements were determined using a software that could also correct for ZAF factors namely Z(atomic number), A(X-ray absorption) and F(characteristic fluorescence). The x-rays from the control groups and from the experimental (HLS) groups were analyzed on well-defined parts (femur, tibia and knee) of the leg bone. The SEM analysis shows that there are definite changes in the hydroxyl or phosphate group of the main component of the bone structure, hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2], due to hind limb suspension. In a separate experiment, entire leg bones (both from HLS and control rats) were subjected to mechanical stress by mean of a variable force. The stress vs. strain graph was fitted with linear and polynomial function, and the parameters reflecting the mechanical strength of the bone, under increasing stress, were calculated. From the slope of the linear part of the graph the Young's modulus for HLS bones were calculated and found to be 2.49 times smaller than those for control bones.

  12. Young's modulus and SEM analysis of leg bones exposed to simulated microgravity by hind limb suspension (HLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Niravkumar D.; Mehta, Rahul; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2013-04-19

    The aim of this study was to determine composition of the leg bone tissue of rats that were exposed to simulated microgravity by Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for one week. The leg bones were cross sectioned, cleaned of soft tissues, dried and sputter coated, and then placed horizontally on the stage of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysis. Interaction of a 17.5 keV electron beam, incident from the vertical direction on the sample, generated images using two detectors. X-rays emitted from the sample during electron bombardment were measured with an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) feature of SEM using a liquid-nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 144 eV at 5.9 keV ({sub 25}Mn K{sub {alpha}} x-ray). K{sub {alpha}}- x-rays from carbon, oxygen, phosphorus and calcium formed the major peaks in the spectrum. Relative percentages of these elements were determined using a software that could also correct for ZAF factors namely Z(atomic number), A(X-ray absorption) and F(characteristic fluorescence). The x-rays from the control groups and from the experimental (HLS) groups were analyzed on well-defined parts (femur, tibia and knee) of the leg bone. The SEM analysis shows that there are definite changes in the hydroxyl or phosphate group of the main component of the bone structure, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}], due to hind limb suspension. In a separate experiment, entire leg bones (both from HLS and control rats) were subjected to mechanical stress by mean of a variable force. The stress vs. strain graph was fitted with linear and polynomial function, and the parameters reflecting the mechanical strength of the bone, under increasing stress, were calculated. From the slope of the linear part of the graph the Young's modulus for HLS bones were calculated and found to be 2.49 times smaller than those for control bones.

  13. Distribution of coniferin in freeze-fixed stem of Ginkgo biloba L. by cryo-TOF-SIMS/SEM.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Dan; Hanaya, Yuto; Akita, Takuya; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Masato; Kuroda, Katsushi; Yagami, Sachie; Takama, Ruka; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the role of coniferin in planta, semi-quantitative cellular distribution of coniferin in quick-frozen Ginkgo biloba L. (ginkgo) was visualized by cryo time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (cryo-TOF-SIMS/SEM) analysis. The amount and rough distribution of coniferin were confirmed through quantitative chromatography measurement using serial tangential sections of the freeze-fixed ginkgo stem. The lignification stage of the sample was estimated using microscopic observations. Coniferin distribution visualized at the transverse and radial surfaces of freeze-fixed ginkgo stem suggested that coniferin is stored in the vacuoles, and showed good agreement with the assimilation timing of coniferin to lignin in differentiating xylem. Consequently, it is suggested that coniferin is stored in the tracheid cells of differentiating xylem and is a lignin precursor. PMID:27510918

  14. Distribution of coniferin in freeze-fixed stem of Ginkgo biloba L. by cryo-TOF-SIMS/SEM

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Dan; Hanaya, Yuto; Akita, Takuya; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Masato; Kuroda, Katsushi; Yagami, Sachie; Takama, Ruka; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the role of coniferin in planta, semi-quantitative cellular distribution of coniferin in quick-frozen Ginkgo biloba L. (ginkgo) was visualized by cryo time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (cryo-TOF-SIMS/SEM) analysis. The amount and rough distribution of coniferin were confirmed through quantitative chromatography measurement using serial tangential sections of the freeze-fixed ginkgo stem. The lignification stage of the sample was estimated using microscopic observations. Coniferin distribution visualized at the transverse and radial surfaces of freeze-fixed ginkgo stem suggested that coniferin is stored in the vacuoles, and showed good agreement with the assimilation timing of coniferin to lignin in differentiating xylem. Consequently, it is suggested that coniferin is stored in the tracheid cells of differentiating xylem and is a lignin precursor. PMID:27510918

  15. Calibration of ultra high speed laser engraving processes by correlating influencing variables including correlative evaluation with SEM and CLSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Vaupel, Matthias; Nirnberger, Robert; Weinberger, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    Laser engraving is used for decades as a well-established process e. g. for the production of print and embossing forms for many goods in daily life, e. g. decorated cans and printed bank notes. Up to now it is more or less a so-called fire-and-forget process. From the original artist's plan to the digitization, then from the laser source itself (with electronic signals, RF and plasma discharge regarding CO2 lasers) to the behavior of the optical beam delivery — especially if an AOM is used — to the interaction of the laser beam with the material itself is a long process chain. The most recent results using CO2 lasers with AOMs and the research done with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) — as a set for correlative microscopy to evaluate the high speed engraving characteristics — are presented in this paper.

  16. SEM in situ MiniCantilever Beam Bending of U-10Mo/Zr/Al Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mook, William; Baldwin, Jon K.; Martinez, Ricardo M.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2014-06-16

    In this work, the fracture behavior of Al/Zr and Zr/dU-10Mo interfaces was measured via the minicantilever bend technique. The energy dissipation rates were found to be approximately 3.7-5 mj/mm2 and 5.9 mj/mm2 for each interface, respectively. It was found that in order to test the Zr/U-10Mo interface, location of the hinge of the cantilever was a key parameter. While this test could be adapted to hot cell use through careful alignment fixturing and measurement of crack lengths with an optical microscope (as opposed to SEM, which was used here out of convenience), machining of the cantilevers via MiniMill in such a way as to locate the interfaces at the cantilever hinge, as well as proper placement of a femtosecond laser notch will continue to be key challenges in a hot cell environment.

  17. Furthering Chemical and Geophysical Computations: Analysis of SACROC SEM and CT images to obtain pore percentage, size, and connectivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, A. J.; Purcell, C. C.; Harbert, W. P.; Soong, Y.; Kutchko, B. G.; Kennedy, S.; McIntryre, D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory of the United States Department of Energy, in collaboration with the Bureau of Economic Geology in Austin, Texas has been involved in an extensive study of the many aspects involved in the injection of CO2 into the 2042 meter deep Permian reef structure at the SACROC field. Subsamples of reef limestone cores used for seismic velocity measurements were obtained. XRD determined the sample to be ~99% Calcite and ~1% Dolomite with a small amount of impurities. Preliminary petrographic slides revealed a vuggy porosity. We acquired CT scans of a SACROC limestone core at the Morgantown NETL site. We also acquired a high pixel resolution (112 MB) SEM secondary electron image of the reef limestone at RJ Lee Group. By using ArcMap , we created a tool that groups grayscale ranges into three categories, cleans boundaries between groups, and produces a polygon map of the macropores, micropores, and matrix. The darkest areas in the SEM image were cavern-like pores and were thus called macropores. Micropores, the brightest regions, are textured micrite faces that create many, small pore spaces. Using ImageJ, the CT and Arc pore maps were analyzed to reveal pore shape statistics. Average pore perimeter, average pore area, and pore connectivity is essential for chemistry experiments that will emulate time exposure of CO2 to limestone. Further, ImageJ allows us to obtain pore orientation information. This is important in understanding the anisotropic conditions that may or may not affect seismic data. The image is 10240x11264 pixels which correspond to ~ 8890.00x9780.00 micrometers. Micro- and macropores combined, there were 613744 pores mapped. Differing statistical methods revealed differing results. For example, the average pore perimeter was ~28 microns while the average pore area was <1 square micron. This inconsistency is due to pores sharing boundaries, being contained by one another, or being lighter colored crystals. We used two

  18. In situ electromigration damage in Al interconnect lines in the SEM and the influence of grain orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerke, Axel; Wendrock, Horst; Wetzig, Klaus

    1999-11-01

    Unpassivated AlSiCu interconnects (thickness 1 μm, width 8 and 1.4 μm, on SiO2) were tested for electromigration in situ in the SEM under accelerated loading conditions. To examine the influence of grain orientation on electromigration damage, orientation mapping of the interconnects was carried out prior to testing using the EBSD technique (Electron BackScatter Diffraction or Backscatter Kikuchi Pattern). Damage micrographs and orientation data were correlated with respect to microstructure (polycrystalline/bamboo), deviation from <111> fibre texture and grain boundary properties (axis/angle, CSL model). It was found that not the deviation from <111> fibre texture, but the misorientation class of individual grain boundaries and their course in relation to the current direction are decisive factors for the damage location where the fatal defects occur.

  19. Investigation of structural resorption behavior of biphasic bioceramics with help of gravimetry, μCT, SEM, and XRD.

    PubMed

    de Wild, Michael; Amacher, Fabienne; Bradbury, Christopher R; Molenberg, Aart

    2016-04-01

    Resorbable bone substitute materials are widely used for bone augmentation after tumor resection, parallel to implant placement, or in critical size bone defects. In this study, the structural dissolution of a biphasic calcium phosphate bone substitute material with a hydroxyapatite (HA)/tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ratio of 60/40 was investigated by repeatedly placing porous blocks in EDTA solution at 37 °C. At several time points, the blocks were investigated by SEM, µCT, and gravimetry. It was found that always complete 2-3 µm sized grains were removed from the structure and that the β-TCP is dissolved more rapidly. This selective dissolution of the β-TCP grains was confirmed by XRD measurements. The blocks were eroded from the outside toward the center. The structure remained mechanically stable because the central part showed a delayed degradation and because the slower dissolving HA grains preserved the integrity of the structure. PMID:25952407

  20. Utilization of profilometry, SEM, AFM and contact angle measurements in describing surfaces of plastic floor coverings and explaining their cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Saarikoski, I.; Sjöberg, A.-M.; Hautala, M.

    2005-06-01

    The tendency to soil and cleanability of ten commercial plastic floor coverings: eight vinyl (PVC) floor coverings, one vinyl composite tile and one plastic composite tile, were examined. Floor coverings were soiled with inorganic, organic and biological soil. The cleanability was measured both by bioluminescence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and colorimetrically. The surface topography was studied by AFM, SEM and with a profilometer. From the 2D- and 3D-profilometric measurements several characteristic parameters of the surface profiles were extracted. The tendency to soil and cleanability were compared with the characteristics of the surface. A weak correlation was found between roughness and soilability but no correlation between roughness and cleanability. Roughness had no correlation with contact angle.