Science.gov

Sample records for essential trace metals

  1. Effect of metal chelators on excretion and tissue levels of essential trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, S.K.; Jain, V.K.; Mathur, A.K.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of one, three, and six doses of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and triethylenetetramine (TETA) on the urinary excretion of Ca, Cu, Fe, and Zn, and on their levels in liver, kidneys, heart, and serum in rats, was investigated to ascertain their suitability in amelioration of metal intoxication. While excretion of all the essential trace metals examined was enhanced significantly, the tissue and serum levels of some of them either increased or decreased after administration of the chelators. The results suggest depletion of some of the endogenous trace metals from the body and their intertissue redistribution following treatment with these chelating agents.

  2. Characterization of metal-peptide complexes in feed supplements of essential trace elements.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, Alexandros; Connolly, Cathal; Power, Ronan; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    Metal chelates with biomolecules are increasingly used in animal supplementation to increase the bioavailability of essential trace elements. However, the transfer of the chelates is not well understood and speciation studies may bring a comprehensive insight to further investigate the biological uptake mechanism(s) implicated. An analytical method was developed for the characterization of the water-soluble metal complexes in animal feed supplements obtained by reaction of a metal salt with a non-GMO soybean enzymatic digest. The method was based on fractionation of the extract by size-exclusion chromatography followed by the analysis of the metal-containing fraction by reversed-phase nanoHPLC with parallel ICP MS and electrospray MS/MS detection. The metal complexes were identified in the mass spectra owing to the Cu characteristic isotopic pattern; the complexation was corroborated by the presence of a peak corresponding to the non-metallated peptide. The study demonstrated the feasibility of SEC-ICP MS to produce characteristic metal (Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe) distribution patterns, which can be of interest to test batch-to-batch reproducibility and to determine the origin of the supplement. The use of the method could be extended to animal feeds prepared using the metal-chelated complexes. Electrospray MS/MS allowed the identification of a number of Cu complexes with peptides. Four different structure conformations were modeled by means of molecular mechanics investigations to assess the chelation stability. PMID:21305120

  3. HAIR HEAVY METAL AND ESSENTIAL TRACE ELEMENT CONCENTRATION IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Tabatadze, T; Zhorzholiani, L; Kherkheulidze, M; Kandelaki, E; Ivanashvili, T

    2015-11-01

    Our study aims evaluation of level of essential trace elements and heavy metals in the hair samples of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identification of changes that are associated with autistic spectrum disorders. Case-control study was conducted at Child Development Center of Iashvili Children's Central Hospital (LD).We studied 60 children aged from 4 to 5 years old. The concentrations of 28 elements among (Ca,Zn, K, Fe, Cu, Se, Mn, Cr, S, Br, Cl, Co, Ag, V, Ni, Rb, Mo, Sr, Ti, Ba, Pb, As, Hg, Cd, Sb, Zr, Sn, Bi) them trace elements and toxic metals) were determined in scalp hair samples of children (n=30) with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and from control group of healthy children (n=30) with matched sex and age. Micro-elemental status was detected in the hair, with roentgen-fluorescence spectrometer method (Method MBИ 081/12-4502-000, Apparatus ALVAX- CIP, USA - UKRAIN) .To achieve the similarity of study and control groups, pre and postnatal as well as family and social history were assessed and similar groups were selected. Children with genetic problems, malnourished children, children from families with social problems were excluded from the study. The diagnosis of ASD were performed by pediatrician and psychologist (using M-CHAT and ADOS) according to DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders from the American Psychiatric association) criteria. The study was statistically analyzed using computer program SPSS 19. Deficiencies of essential trace microelements revealed in both group, but there was significant difference between control and studied groups. The most deficient element was zinc (92% in target and 20% in control), then - manganese (55% and 8%) and selenium (38% and 4%). In case of cooper study revealed excess concentration of this element only in target group in 50% of cases. The contaminations to heavy metals were detected in case of lead (78% and 16), mercury (43% and 10%) and cadmium (38% and 8%). The

  4. Blood concentration of essential trace elements and heavy metals in workers exposed to lead and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, W; Gromadzińska, J; Rydzyński, K

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine blood concentration of essential trace elements (Se, Zn, Cu) and toxic metals (Pb, Cd), markers of antioxidant (activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxidase dismutase and ceruloplasmin) and prooxidant processes (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) in workers exposed to Pb and Cd. Forty three male workers of the lead-acid batteries department, aged 25-52 years, and twenty two workers, including 15 women, aged 36-51 years, exposed to Cd in the alkaline batteries department were examined. The reference group consisted of 52 healthy inhabitants of the same region. It was found that Se concentration and GPx activity in both erythrocytes and plasma of Cd exposed workers were significantly lower (p < 0.001) than in the reference group. We found an inverse linear correlation between blood Se and Cd concentrations in the workers exposed to Cd (r = -0.449; p < 0.01). Moreover, the activity of erythrocyte and plasma GPx was shown to be significantly lower in the study group of workers (p < 0.001). It was observed that TBARS concentration in plasma was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the lead exposed workers than in the group without contact with Pb. Our results indicate that exposure to Pb and Cd affects the antioxidant potential of blood in workers exposed to heavy metals. PMID:11764849

  5. Subcellular partitioning of non-essential trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl) in livers of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European (Anguilla anguilla) yellow eels.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Pierron, Fabien; Couture, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2015-03-01

    We determined the intracellular compartmentalization of the trace metals Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl in the livers of yellow eels collected from the Saint Lawrence River system in Canada (Anguilla rostrata) and in the area of the Gironde estuary in France (Anguilla anguilla). Differential centrifugation, NaOH digestion and thermal shock were used to separate eel livers into putative "sensitive" fractions (heat-denatured proteins, mitochondria and microsomes+lysosomes) and detoxified metal fractions (heat-stable peptides/proteins and granules). The cytosolic heat-stable fraction (HSP) was consistently involved in the detoxification of all trace metals. In addition, granule-like structures played a complementary role in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl in both eel species. However, these detoxification mechanisms were not completely effective because increasing trace metal concentrations in whole livers were accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of most trace metals in "sensitive" subcellular fractions, that is, mitochondria, heat-denatured cytosolic proteins and microsomes+lysosomes. Among these "sensitive" fractions, mitochondria were the major binding sites for As, Cd, Pb, and Tl. This accumulation of non-essential metals in "sensitive" fractions likely represents a health risk for eels inhabiting the Saint Lawrence and Gironde environments. PMID:25635611

  6. New Perspectives on the Essential Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1985-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the 19 essential trace elements, examining: the concept of essentiality; evolution of these elements; possible future essential elements; the lanthanides and actinides; how essential trace elements work; the metalloenzymes; the nonmetals; iodine and the thyroid hormones; and antagonism among these elements. (JN)

  7. Influence of essential trace minerals and micronutrient insufficiencies on harmful metal overload in a Mongolian patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Fumio; Kagawa, Yasuo; Kawabata, Terue; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Kudoh, Hideki; Purvee, Baatar; Otgon, Jugder; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen

    2012-07-01

    Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders are prevalent in Mongolia. Our previous studies revealed a significant correlation of these diseases with high oxidative stress due to a high body burden of harmful metals, such as manganese, iron, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. This report describes a 37-year-old male Mongolian patient with multiple sclerosis and essential micronutrient deficiency. This patient demonstrated high oxidative stress, as shown by high urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels of 14.7 and 14.3 ng/mg creatinine (crea), although his hair levels of these toxic metals were markedly lower than other Mongolians. In addition, this patient was deficient not only in various essential minerals, including selenium, magnesium, copper, cobalt, vanadium, and nickel, but also in micronutrients such as vitamin B6, C, E, folic acid, niacin, and β-carotene. Furthermore, after taking 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid, a chelating agent, urinary excretion of lead, cadmium, manganese, aluminum, iron, copper, and lithium were increased 156-, 8.4-, 7.6-, 4.3-, 3.3-, 2.1-, and 2.1-fold, respectively. These results suggest that this patient suffered from a deficiency in micronutrients such as essential minerals and vitamins, which resulted in a disturbance in the ability to excrete harmful metals into the urine and hair. It is possible that a deficiency of micronutrients and a high burden of heavy metals play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Nutritional treatment may be an effective approach to this disease. PMID:21834785

  8. Limitation of productivity by trace metals in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, F.M.M.; Price, N.M. ); Hudson, R.J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Some trace metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn are essential for the growth of phytoplankton. The concentrations of these essential trace elements in seawater are so low as to limit their availability to aquatic microbiota. Trace element uptake is ultimately limited by kinetics of reaction with transport ligands or by diffusion to the cell. From what the authors know of the characteristics of the uptake systems of phytoplankton and their trace metal requirements they can estimate that Fe and Zn may at some times in some place limit phytoplankton productivity, which is in accord with available field data on trace metal enrichments.

  9. Trace metal transformations in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.; Allan, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Zygarlicke, C.J.

    1995-11-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems; (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions; and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions. Results are presented and discussed on the partitioning of trace metals and the model design for predicting trace metals behavior.

  10. Controls of Trace Metals in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruland, K. W.; Lohan, M. C.

    2003-12-01

    the impetus for such a program comes from the recognition of iron as an important micronutrient influencing global biogeochemical cycles in the oceans (Moore et al., 2002) and the potential role of other trace metals such as zinc. In particular, there is a pressing need for an expansion of the global database of dissolved iron distributions in the oceans. These measurements are needed to both initiate and verify models and to identify processes not contained in existing models.There have been a number of reviews of trace elements in seawater that form a foundation for this chapter. Among them are: Bruland (1983) on oceanographically consistent data sets; Burton and Statham (1990) on trace metals in seawater; and Donat and Bruland (1995) on trace elements in oceans. There are two reviews that deal with more of the biological role of trace metals: Bruland et al. (1991) on interactive influence of bioactive trace metals on biological production in ocean waters; and Hunter et al. (1997) on biological roles of trace metals in natural waters. A highly complementary chapter in this Treatise that deals with the influence of essential trace metals on biological processes has been written by Morel et al. (Chapter 6.05). Turning to "on-line" sources of information, Nozaki has done an excellent job perusing the available literature and compiling vertical profiles from the North Pacific for each element in a periodic table that makes an excellent figure (http://www.agu.org/eos_elec/97025e.html). Ken Johnson, a marine chemist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), has a web site with a periodic table of the elements containing a brief review of information on each element (http://www.mbari.org/chemsensor/pteo.htm).

  11. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). PMID:26707985

  12. Heavy Metals and Related Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Harry V.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of heavy metals and related trace elements in the environment, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) trace treatment in natural water and in sediments; and (2) bioaccumulation and toxicity of trace elements. A list of 466 references is presented. (HM)

  13. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints).

  14. TRACE METAL TRANSFORMATION MECHANISMS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reviews mechanisms governing the fate of trace metals during coal combustion and presents new theoretical results that interpret existing data. Emphasis is on predicting the size-segregated speciation of trace metals in pulverized-coal-fired power plant effluents. Thi...

  15. TRACE METAL TRANSFORMATION MECHANISMS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reviews mechanisms governing the fate of trace metals during coal combustion and presents new theoretical results that interpret existing data. mphasis is on predicting the size-segregated speciation of trace metals in pulverized-coal-fired power plant effluents. his ...

  16. Analytical Methods for Trace Metals. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the theoretical concepts involved in the methods listed in the Federal Register as approved for determination of trace metals. Emphasis is on laboratory operations. This course is intended for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in analytical methods for trace metals. Students should have…

  17. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  18. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  19. Trace metal transformations in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.

    1995-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  20. Trace metal transformations in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  1. Trace metal transformation in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Allen, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Holcombe, N.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to 1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, 2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and 3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  2. Trace metals in marine sediments of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Anderlini, V.C.; Mohammad, O.S.; Zarba, M.A.; Fowler, S.W.; Miramand, P.

    1982-01-01

    The report presents the results of analyses for ten trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in marine surface sediments from Kuwait and discusses the effect of grain size and total organic content on the observed concentrations of these metals. (JMT)

  3. Metals essentials for plants: the nickel case.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The long period of research that preceded the discovery of nickel (Ni) essentiality for plants constitutes a paradigmatic case of doubts and uncertainties that often occur in experimental biology. The history of the essentiality of chemical elements that are present as traces in the plant ash (micronutrients) began in the mid-Nineteenth, but it had blurred outlines until Daniel Arnon, towards the mid-twentieth century, fixed the now historic 'criteria of essentiality'. During this rather long time, seven micronutrients were recognised, step by step, as essential for higher plants, (iron, manganese, boron, Zinc, copper, molybdenum, and chloride), at first thanks to meticulous observations of deficiency symptoms and then to the culture of plant on aqueous solutions. The last element to be recognised as essential for plant nutrition was Ni, which was considered a very toxic element for more than a century. Towards the Thirties, Ni became to be regarded as a useful element by some researchers, but the ultimate proof of its essentiality was obtained only in the Eighties, when the American group of Ross M. Welch demonstrated that Ni is a cofactor of the enzyme urease. More recent research shows that Ni improves the nitrogen (N) metabolism and appears to be important for the efficiency of N fixation. PMID:23757955

  4. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART III

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  5. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  6. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  7. Correlation between some selected trace metal concentrations in six species of fish from the Arabian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, M.; Jaffar, M.

    1988-07-01

    The role of trace metals in marine ecosystems has been keenly investigated during recent years. It is known that abundance of essential trace metals regulates the metal content in the organisms by homeostatic control mechanisms, which when cease to function cause essential trace metals to act in an either acutely or chronically toxic manner. Therefore, a correlation study based on essential and non-essential trace metal concentrations is imperative for extending the existing knowledge of bioaccumulation of trace metals in marine organisms. An attempt has been made in the present investigation to bring out quantitative correlations between the concentrations of iron, copper, lead and zinc in the edible muscle tissue of six species of marine fish: Salmon (salmon sole); tuna (thunnus thynnus); pomfret silver (pampus argenteus); Pomfret black (formioniger); long tail tuna (thynnus tonggel) and Indian oil sardine (sardinella longiceps). These fish are abundantly available in Pakistan along the coastal line of the Arabian Sea and have great commercial value. The computational analysis on the trace metal correlation was conducted using an MSTAT statistical package.

  8. Trace metal transport by marine microorganisms: implications of metal coordination kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Robert J. M.; Morel, François M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have transport systems capable of accumulating essential trace metals present at low oceanic concentrations—1 pM to 1 nM. In marine phytoplankton, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni transport has been shown to involve complexation by membrane carriers. By analysing the kinetics of the transport process and accounting for the inherently slow coordination reactions of some of these metals, we predict optimum properties and minimum numbers of sites for the transport systems. Limits to trace metal uptake, and thereby to growth rates, may arise from finite space for these transport sites in the membrane, competition from other metals and the rate of diffusion to the cell. These types of nutrient limitation should exhibit different size dependencies and therefore be important in determining ecosystem structure. The concentrations of inorganically complexed species of nutrient metals remaining in the surface ocean appear to be correlated with predicted rates of metal complexation by trace metal transport sites, suggesting that kinetic liability controls the bioavailability of these metals and their rate of removal from the surface ocean.

  9. Trace metal concentrations in tropical mangrove sediments, NE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miola, Brígida; Morais, Jáder Onofre de; Pinheiro, Lidriana de Souza

    2016-01-15

    Sediment cores were taken from the mangroves of the Coreaú River estuary off the northeast coast of Brazil. They were analyzed for grain size, CaCO3, organic matter, and trace metal (Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Al, and Fe) contents. Mud texture was the predominant texture. Levels of trace metals in surface sediments indicated strong influence of anthropogenic processes, and diagenetic processes controlled the trace metal enrichment of core sediments of this estuary. The positive relationships between trace metals and Al and Fe indicate that Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations are associated mainly with Al and Fe oxy-hydroxides and have natural sources. PMID:26608507

  10. Statistical considerations for trace metal biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Daskalakis, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    Collection and chemical analysis of oysters has been done by numerous programs, including the National Status and Trends (NS and T) program, as a convenient and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring contaminant inputs into aquatic environments. It was the goal of this work to quantify the within-site variability in oysters for concentrations of several trace metals. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were collected from three sites at the Potomac River and the soft tissue of each animal was analyzed for Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The combined analytical+ within-site Percent Relative Standard Deviation (%RSD) for 20 to 23 individual samples from the same site was between 25 and 97, depending on metal. The order of increasing %RSD was Fe < Cd < Ni < Zn < Pb < Ag < Cu. Triplicate analyses of the samples revealed that the analytical error was significant relative to within-site variability only for Pb, presumably due to low concentrations of the metal. Bootstrap analysis with replacement, a statistical resampling procedure, was used to estimate population parameters for pooled samples. Simulated sampling of 10,000 pooled samples verified that the sampling error decreases exponentially with increasing number of individuals per pool. For 95 percent confidence limit the mean standard error for pooled samples of 20 oysters varied from 5% to 20%, depending on metal. The standard mean error increased by a factor of approximately 1.5 when 10 individuals were used instead of 20, and decreased by a factor of 0.6 when 50 oysters were used per pooled sample. Given these results a cost estimation of monitoring programs will be presented, and implications on trend assessments will be discussed.

  11. Consumer-producer relationships for trace metals in Chorthippus brunneus (Thunberg. )

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.S.

    1986-08-01

    The behavior of trace metals in terrestrial food chains is a subject of ecological interest, particularly in polluted environments where the potential exists for bioconcentration of metals known to be essential in trace amounts for normal plant and animal metabolism, as well as those with no known metabolic function but recognized toxicological properties. Laboratory studies of food chain relationships afford a means by which direct comparisons can be made between trace metals as a basis for interpretation of data collected from wild plant and animal populations. This study compares the behavior of three trace elements, copper, zinc and cadmium, in terms of their assimilation under experimental conditions by the herbivorous common field grasshopper, Chorthippus brunneus (Thunberg.). This voracious orthopteran is widely distributed in Britain and is particularly prominent in the restricted invertebrate community of some metal smelter-affected grasslands where it forms important seasonal prey for insectivorous small mammals.

  12. TRACE METALS AND STATIONARY CONVENTIONAL COMBUSTION PROCESSES: VOLUME 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a search of U.S. literature to identify published information about trace metals and Stationary Conventional Combustion Processes (SCCPs). It summarizes what has been published about ambient trace metals in air, water, and soils, and reviews convention...

  13. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN MAMMALIAN HAIR AND NAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data have been compiled from the available world literature on the accumulation and bioconcentration of selected toxic trace metals in human hair and nails and other mammalian hair, fur, nails, claws, and hoofs. The toxic trace metals and metalloids include antimony, arsenic, bor...

  14. Mobilization of trace metals and inorganic compounds during resuspension of anoxic sediments from Trepangier Bayou, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Heather J; Gao, Yan; Kan, Amy T; Tomson, Mason B

    2011-01-01

    The release of trace metals (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd) and inorganic compounds (As) from initially anoxic Trepangier Bayou sediments, Louisiana and the sources of the released metals were investigated. After 1 to 2 d aeration, significant amounts of trace metals (Mn, Zn, Cd, Ni, and Co) were released to the aqueous phase with increased acidity, primarily due to the oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide and ferrous iron and iron sulfide minerals. The addition of a bacterial inhibitor, NaN,, to the Trepangier sediment during resuspension inhibited metal release, suggesting that microbial catalysis can regulate metal mobilization during sediment resuspension. In a well buffered system, oxidation of iron sulfides alone did not appear to induce trace metal release. Moreover, when Trepangier sediment was resuspended in anoxic conditions at neutral pH, <1% of the trace metal content was released, whereas a significant release of metal was observed under acidic anoxic conditions. Although oxidation of iron sulfide minerals is an essential prerequisite for the release of Zn, Co, Cd, and Ni, carbonates and oxides also play a role. The trace metals and inorganic compounds investigated could be classified into three groups according to their release characteristics: (i) Mn, Zn, Cd, Ni, and Co; (ii) Fe, Pb, and As; and (iii) Cu. The groupings appeared to depend on the sources of compounds and their relative affinity, after oxidation, to iron oxyhydroxides or organic matter. PMID:21520756

  15. Dissolved Trace metal distributions and speciation in Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Cuiqin; Liu, Jihua; Shi, Xuefa

    2016-04-01

    Trace metals play an important role in marine biogeochemical cycling processes. However, owing to the lack of trace-metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, high quality data for dissolved trace metals in coastal seawaters of China are scarce. In this study, by employing stringent trace-metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, we investigated spatial distribution patterns of several dissolved trace metals (Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Ag) in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea of China, and discussed their potential sources and sinks. In general, the dissolved metal concentrations decreased from Bohai Sea to Yellow Sea, and from nearshore to offshore. Despite the severe contamination status reported in coastal seawaters of China, the trace metal concentrations found in seawater are comparable to the concentrations found in pristine coastal seawaters of the US and the EU. In the meantime, the speciation of several metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd) were also studied with the electrochemical (ASV and CLE-CSV) methods in the Yellow Sea. Natural organic ligands were found in seawaters that strongly complexed with dissolved metals. The concentrations and binding constants of the complexing ligands for each metal were reported and compared with the ones found in other coastal seawaters.

  16. Sandhopper solar orientation as a behavioural biomarker of trace metals contamination.

    PubMed

    Ungherese, Giuseppe; Ugolini, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    Although many studies have focused on trace metals accumulation, investigations of talitrid amphipods as biomarkers are rare. This study explores the possibility of using the solar orientation capacity of Talitrus saltator as a behavioural marker of exposure to two essential (Cu and Zn) and two non-essential (Cd and Hg) metals. LC(50) analyses performed before the solar orientation tests showed that the 72 h LC(50) for Hg was 0.02 ppm while the 96 h LC(50) values for Cu, Cd and Zn were 13.28 ppm, 27.66 ppm, and 62.74 ppm, respectively. The presence of metals in seawater affects the solar orientation capacity of T. saltator in a concentration-dependent manner and according to the toxicity ranking of the metals (Hg > Cu > Cd > Zn). Therefore, the solar orientation capacity of T. saltator seems to be a promising behavioural marker for exposure to trace metals. PMID:19110350

  17. Trace metal concentrations in estuaries and coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    Estuaries and coastal regions are highly variable in the physical and hydrographic conditions. As a result of heavy urbanization and industrialization of the head waters of most estuaries, there are substantial localized inputs of contaminants to the estuary. These factors combined with the flushing characteristics of individual estuaries to create relatively unique features that result in variation in the typical levels of trace metals for these systems. This makes intercomparison of the estuaries difficult. Comparability among estuaries becomes even more difficult when metals analyses are conducted without proper control of field and laboratory contamination, now firmly established in the trace metal analytical literature as a prerequisite for reliable marine trace metals analysis. This paper compares the concentrations of selected trace metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the waters of several major estuaries of the United States. The basis of comparison is that all samples war collected under rigid trace metal clean collection and analysis procedures. Generally, metal concentrations within the estuaries are similar. Metal concentrations in the higher salinity coastal regions are more similar in concentration. The comparison provides a baseline of typical concentrations of these trace metals in the coastal waters against which future analytical results can be compared.

  18. Effects of Trace Metal Concentrations on the Growth of the Coral Endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Lin, Senjie; Ho, Jiaxuan; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirements of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of Symbiodinium kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe >> Cu/Zn/Mn >> Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn, and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn, and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn, and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal inter replacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment. PMID:26903964

  19. Effects of Trace Metal Concentrations on the Growth of the Coral Endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Irene B; Lin, Senjie; Ho, Jiaxuan; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirements of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of Symbiodinium kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe > Cu/Zn/Mn > Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn, and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn, and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn, and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal inter replacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment. PMID:26903964

  20. Arsenic and Associated Trace Metals in Texas Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Herbert, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The value of groundwater has increased substantially worldwide due to expanding human consumption. Both the quantity and quality of groundwater are important considerations when constructing policies on natural resource conservation. This study is focused on evaluating groundwater quality in the state of Texas. Historical data from the Texas Water Development Board and the National Uranium Resource Evaluation were collected into a GIS database for spatial and temporal analyses. Specific attentions were placed on arsenic and other trace metals in groundwater. Recent studies in the United States have focused on isolated incidences of high arsenic occurrence, ignoring possible connections between arsenic and other trace metals. Descriptive statistics revealed strong correlations in groundwater between arsenic and other oxyanions including vanadium, selenium and molybdenum. Arsenic and associated trace metals were clustered at three physiographic hotspots, the Southern High Plains, the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas, and West Texas. A geologic survey showed that arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater follow local geologic trends. Uranium deposits and associated mineralization were found to occur in the same physiographic locations. Uranium mineralization may be a significant natural source of arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater. Recharge, evaporative concentration, and aquifer characteristics were also contributing factors to the occurrence of trace metals in Texas groundwater. Spatial statistics were used to delineate natural sources from anthropogenic inputs. Similarly, the natural background was estimated from the spatial distribution of trace metal observations in Texas groundwater.

  1. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  2. Fate of biosolids trace metals in a dryland wheat agroecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosolids land application for beneficial reuse applies varying amounts of trace metals to soils. Measuring plant-available or total soil metals is typically performed to ensure environmental protection, yet these techniques do not quantify which soil phases play important roles in terms of metal r...

  3. Trace metal enrichments in Lake Tanganyika sediments: Controls on trace metal burial in lacustrine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulson Brucker, Rebecca; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Owens, Jeremy; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the distributions of several key diagenetic reactants (C, S, Fe) and redox-sensitive trace metals (Mo, Cd, Re, U) in sediments from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa. This study includes modern sediments from a chemocline transect, which spans oxygenated shallow waters to sulfidic conditions at depth, as well as ancient sediments from a longer core (˜2 m) taken at ˜900 m water depth. Modern sediments from depths spanning ˜70-335 m are generally characterized by increasing enrichments of C, S, Mo, Cd, and U with increasing water depth but static Fe distributions. It appears that the sedimentary enrichments of these elements are, to varying degrees, influenced by a combination of organic carbon cycling and sulfur cycling. These modern lake characteristics contrast with a period of high total organic carbon (C org), total sulfur (S Tot), and trace metal concentrations observed in the 900 m core, a period which follows the most recent deglaciation (˜18-11 ky). This interval is followed abruptly by an interval (˜11-6 ky) that is characterized by lower C, S, U, and Mo. Consistent with other work we suspect that the low concentrations of S, Mo, and U may indicate a period of intense lake mixing, during which time the lake may have been less productive and less reducing as compared to the present. An alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypothesis is that changes in the lake's chemical inventory, driven by significant hydrological changes, could be influencing the distribution of sedimentary trace elements through time.

  4. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  5. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of trace metals in humid subtropical soil.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, several physicochemical properties of sub-tropical soil (up to 20 cm depth) like water holding capacity, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, texture, pH, and electrical conductivity were determined along with the trace metals, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, in order to evaluate inter-relations among the trace metals and the soil properties. The contribution of the trace metals to ecotoxicological risk was assessed using various tools. Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn contents were found to be lower than the world average, but Co, Ni, and Pb had higher contents. The trace metal concentrations were utilized to obtain the pollution index and the potential ecotoxicological aspects. The trace metals were shown to have come from similar origin and their retention in the soil was contributed by properties like organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, clay content and water holding capacity of the soil. The pollution index showed that the trace metals had the sequence of Pb (considerably polluted) > Co, Ni (moderately polluted) > Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn (unpolluted). The composite ecological risk index was the highest in agricultural land with irrigation and fertilizer use, and was the lowest in the forest land. PMID:26254205

  6. Influence of biochar amendments on marine sediment trace metal bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, G. E.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar has become a desirable material for use in agricultural application to enhance soil quality and in-situ soil and sediment remediation to immobilize organic contaminants. We investigated the effects of biochar sediment amendments on the bioavailability of a suite of inorganic trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in contaminated sediments from multiple sites in Elizabeth River, VA. We incubated sediments in microcosms with a variety of water column redox and salinity conditions and compared sediments amended with two types of woody biochar to sediments amended with charcoal activated carbon and unamended sediments. We leached sediments in artificial gut fluid mimic of the benthic invertebrate Arenicola marina as a measure of bioavailability of the trace metals analyzed. In unamended anaerobic sediments, the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction of each trace metal is 1-4% of the total sediment concentration for each metal. Initial results indicate that in anaerobic microcosms, woody biochar sediment amendments (added to 5% dry wt) decrease the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction by 30-90% for all trace metals analyzed, and have comparable performance to charcoal activated carbon amendments. However, in microcosms without controlled redox conditions, woody biochar amendments increase the bioavailable fraction of Ni and Cu by up to 80%, while decreasing the bioavailable fraction of Co, Zn, and Pb by approximately 50%; charcoal activated carbon amendments decreased the bioavailability of all trace metals analyzed by approximately 20%. In microcosms without an overlying water column, biochar and activated carbon amendments had no significant effects on trace metal bioavailability. This research demonstrates that biochar can effectively decrease the bioavailability of trace metals in marine sediments, but its efficiency is metal-specific, and environmental conditions impact biochar performance.

  7. Hair concentration of essential trace elements in adult non-exposed Russian population.

    PubMed

    Skalny, Anatoly V; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Serebryansky, Eugeny P; Demidov, Vasily A; Lobanova, Yulia N; Grabeklis, Andrei R; Berezkina, Elena S; Gryazeva, Irina V; Skalny, Andrey A; Skalnaya, Oksana A; Zhivaev, Nikolay G; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate reference values of hair trace element content are required for correct interpretation of biomonitoring data. The primary objective of the current study was to estimate the reference values of selected essential trace elements in hair of adult Russian population. Involved in current investigation were 7256 occupationally non-exposed adults aged from 20 to 60 years and living in the European part of Russia. Occipital hair essential metal and metalloid (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, V, Zn) content was estimated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The reference ranges were calculated in accordance with the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations. Women were characterized by 55, 18, 58, and 7% higher values of hair Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn content as compared to the values observed in men. At the same time, hair Cr, Fe, Se, and V concentration in men significantly exceeded the respective female values by 65, 13, 20, and 56%. Consequently, the reference ranges of essential hair trace elements content should be separately calculated for both men and women. The obtained reference ranges for hair Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, V, and Zn in men were 0.11-0.67, 0.007-0.045, 10.4-22.6, 11.1-40.5, 0.24-1.05, 0.089-0.480, 0.014-0.083, and 125.7-262.8 μg/g, respectively. The respective values estimated for women were 0.06-0.40, 0.011-0.085, 12.1-44.5, 8.9-25.6, 0.32-2.05, 0.094-0.504, 0.010-0.056, and 140.0-315.1 μg/g. The reference ranges for hair Co (0.07-0.50), Cr (0.009-0.073), Cu (11.8-29.2), Fe (9.6-31.5), Mn (0.29-1.76), Se (0.093-0.482), V (0.011-0.069), and Zn (134.7-301.9) content (μg/g) in the general cohort were also calculated. PMID:26446131

  8. Trace metal accumulation in carbonate biominerals of the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.; Galkin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    New data on trace metal (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) distribution in carbonate biominerals formed in geochemically different oceanic environments are discussed. Calcite shells of shelf and deepwater hydrothermal vent mussels as well as planktic foraminifers and pteropods from the central Atlantic Ocean have been studied. The variability in concentrations of most trace elements between different groups of calcifying organisms are usually within one order of magnitude, except for Fe and Mn, the elevated contents of which in microfossils are caused by post-sedimentation interaction. Different groups of calcifying organisms demonstrate a biogeochemical uniformity in trace metal accumulation during the biomineralization processes.

  9. Physiology and metabolism of essential trace elements: an outline.

    PubMed

    Aggett, P J

    1985-08-01

    Man depends on at least nine trace elements--iron, zinc, copper, manganese, iodine, chromium, selenium, molybdenum and cobalt--for optimum metabolic function. These elements serve a variety of functions including catalytic, structural and regulatory activities in which they interact with macromolecules such as enzymes, pro-hormones, pre-secretory granules and biological membranes. These micronutrients are involved, therefore, in all major metabolic pathways at levels which are so fundamental that the features of deficiency of many of them are protean and non-specific. In considering the metabolism of the elements themselves, they fall into two groups: those which exist normally as cations and those present as anions. The latter group are absorbed relatively easily and whole-body homeostasis is mediated mainly by renal excretion. The cations need specific pathways for absorption and their homeostasis is effected by gastrointestinal and biliary secretion. Some elements are absorbed more efficiently as organic complexes. The net achievement of the metabolic pathways for each element is to deliver it to its functional site(s) by exploiting its physicochemical characteristics to avoid interactions with other inorganic nutrients. PMID:3905079

  10. The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) as an indicator of coastal trace metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Finger, Annett; Lavers, Jennifer L; Dann, Peter; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Orbell, John D; Robertson, Bruce; Scarpaci, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Monitoring trace metal and metalloid concentrations in marine animals is important for their conservation and could also reliably reflect pollution levels in their marine ecosystems. Concentrations vary across tissue types, with implications for reliable monitoring. We sampled blood and moulted feathers of the Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) from three distinct colonies, which are subject to varying levels of anthropogenic impact. Non-essential trace metal and metalloid concentrations in Little Penguins were clearly linked to the level of industrialisation adjacent to the respective foraging zones. This trend was more distinct in blood than in moulted feathers, although we found a clear correlation between blood and feathers for mercury, lead and iron. This study represents the first reported examination of trace metals and metalloids in the blood of any penguin species and demonstrates that this high trophic feeder is an effective bioindicator of coastal pollution. PMID:26160534

  11. A primer on trace metal-sediment chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.

    1985-01-01

    In most aquatic systems, concentrations of trace metals in suspended sediment and the top few centimeters of bottom sediment are far greater than concentrations of trace metals dissolved in the water column. Consequently, the distribution, transport, and availability of these constituents can not be intelligently evaluated, nor can their environmental impact be determined or predicted solely through the sampling and analysis of dissolved phases. This Primer is designed to acquaint the reader with the basic principles that govern the concentration and distribution of trace metals associated with bottom and suspended sediments. The sampling and analysis of suspended and bottom sediments are very important for monitoring studies, not only because trace metal concentrations associated with them are orders of magnitude higher than in the dissolved phase, but also because of several other factors. Riverine transport of trace metals is dominated by sediment. In addition, bottom sediments serve as a source for suspended sediment and can provide a historical record of chemical conditions. This record will help establish area baseline metal levels against which existing conditions can be compared. Many physical and chemical factors affect a sediment's capacity to collect and concentrate trace metals. The physical factors include grain size, surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, composition, and so forth. Increases in metal concentrations are strongly correlated with decreasing grain size and increasing surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, and increasing concentrations of iron and manganese oxides, organic matter, and clay minerals. Chemical factors are equally important, especially for differentiating between samples having similar bulk chemistries and for inferring or predicting environmental availability. Chemical factors entail phase associations (with such sedimentary components as interstitial water, sulfides, carbonates, and organic

  12. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1996-10-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulate from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDS) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  13. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-10-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. The project was started on July 1, 1994 and this is the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report. Specifically, the following progress has been made during this performance period from July 1, 1997 through September 30, 1997.

  14. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-01-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  15. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-07-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  16. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-04-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  17. Sedimentary input of trace metals from the Chukchi Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Islas, A. M.; Seguré, M.; Rember, R.; Nishino, S.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of trace metals in the Arctic Ocean has implications for their global cycles, yet until recently few trace metal observations were available from this rapidly changing ocean. Profiles of dissolved Fe from recent Japanese field efforts in the Western Canada Basin (2008, 2010) indicate the broad Chukchi Shelf as a source of Fe to the halocline of the Western Canada Basin. Here we present dissolved and particulate data for crustal (Al, Mn, Fe) and non-crustal elements (Co, Cu, Zn) from the productive Chukchi Sea to characterize the sedimentary input of these metals to shelf waters contributing to the halocline layer of the Canada Basin. Water column profiles were collected in late summer 2013 onboard the R/V Mirai at 10 stations from the Bering Strait to the slope, and at a time-series (10 days) station located over the outer shelf. A narrow and variable (5-10 m) benthic boundary layer was sampled at the time-series station with highly elevated dissolved and suspended particulate metal concentrations. High metal concentrations were also observed in the subsurface at a station over Barrow Canyon where mixing is enhanced. Reactivity of suspended particulate metals was determined by the leachable vs. refractory fractions. Metal concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. Trace metal transport from the shelf to the interior will be discussed in context with shelf mechanisms contributing to this export, and to expected future changes in the Arctic Ocean.

  18. Equilibrium modeling of trace metal transport from Duluth complex rockpile

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, P.D.; Klusman, R.W.; Lapakko, K.

    1996-12-31

    Geochemical modeling was used to predict weathering processes and the formation of trace metal-adsorbing secondary phases in a waste rock stockpile containing Cu-Ni ore mined from the Duluth Complex, MN. Amorphous ferric hydroxide was identified as a secondary phase within the pile, from observation and geochemical modeling of the weathering process. Due to the high content of cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc in the primary minerals of the waste rock and in the effluent, it was hypothesized that the predicted and observed precipitant ferric hydroxide would adsorb small quantities of these trace metals. This was verified using sequential extractions and simulated using adsorption geochemical modeling. It was concluded that the trace metals were adsorbed in small quantities, and adsorption onto the amorphous ferric hydroxide was in decreasing order of Cu > Ni > Zn > Co. The low degree of adsorption was due to low pH water and competition for adsorption sites with other ions in solution.

  19. Essential and toxic trace element concentrations in different commercial veal cuts in Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M; Benedito, J L; Pereira, V; García-Vaquero, M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate essential and toxic element concentration of ten commercially available veal cuts, together with diaphragm, cardiac muscle and liver tissue from 10 animals of "Galician Supreme Veal". Essential trace elements (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Se and Zn) and toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) were determined by ICP-MS. Essential trace element concentrations ranged from 0.002-55.64mg/kg between muscles. Toxic element concentrations were very low, and high numbers of samples showed unquantifiable residues of Cd and Pb. Veal cuts including muscles with a high proportion of oxidative slow-twitch fibers (diaphragm and cardiac muscle) showed significantly higher essential trace element concentrations, the lower concentrations being found in veal cuts including glycolytic fast-twitch fibers (eye round). Our results suggest that essential and toxic trace element concentration could be used as a new meat quality parameter, or to add further value to certain products (i.e. livestock reared on extensive systems with high physical activity). PMID:27261950

  20. Clean Air Act requirements for trace-metals information

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, D.; Hunt, W.; Evans, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have expanded the requirements for trace metal and air toxics information in urban areas and added new requirements for this information in rural areas and ecosystems. Specific provisions germane to trace metals and other air toxics compounds are found in Title III, Section 112 and in Title IX, Section 901. In response to these provisions, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to conduct research in atmospheric monitoring networks in urban areas, in the Great Lakes watershed, and in regional components of a national Clean Air Act status and trends network.

  1. Biomonitor of Environmental Stress: Coral Trace Metal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N.; Hughen, K.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical reef corals are extremely sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and, as a result of environmental degradation and global climate change, coral reefs around the globe are severely threatened. Increased human population and development in tropical regions is leading to higher turbidity and silt loading from terrestrial runoff, increased pesticides and nutrients from agricultural land-use and sewage, and the release of toxic trace metals to coastal waters from industrial pollution. The uptake of these metals and nutrients within the coral skeletal aragonite is a sensitive biomonitor of environmental stresses on coral health. We analyzed 18 trace metals from the surface of coral skeletons collected in Bermuda, Indonesia and Belize to assess a range of threats to coral reef health - including climate change, agricultural runoff and pesticides, and coastal development and tourism. This surface sample network also includes samples representing 4 different coral species. Trace metal analysis was performed on an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to a high degree of accuracy and precision at extremely low (ppb) concentrations using a protocol we developed for samples less than 2 mg. Proper cleaning techniques were employed to minimize blank level concentrations for ultra-trace metal ICP-MS solution analysis. However, Zn/Ca and Ni/Ca concentrations remain below analytical detection limits. Initial results indicate that sea surface temperature proxies (e.g., Sr/Ca, B/Ca and Mg/Ca) display similar ratios between the different sites, whereas those metals associated with anthropogenic activities, such as Co, Pb and Cu, are site-specific and are linked to individual environmental stressors. Results from this study will be applied to down core trace metal records in the future. In doing so, we aim to understand the impacts of compounding environmental stresses on coral health, and to identify regional threshold values beyond which corals

  2. Trace metal contamination study on scalp hair of occupationally exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, W.; Jaffar, M. ); Mohammad, D. )

    1994-10-01

    Scalp hair is a metabolic end product that incorporates metals into its structure during the growth process. The levels of trace elements in the hair are considered to be influenced in particular by food, air and occupational exposure, and in general by race, age, sex, metabolism, hygienic condition and geographical location of individuals. Recently, trace metal content of human hair has been explored as a tool for monitoring the impact of environmental pollution on the inhabitants of a community. In this respect, the endogenous and exogenous contents of metals in hair are understood to play important role towards exposure assessment. The exogenous metal content of hair reflects exposure to the occupational, domestic and recreational environments, provided the donor is not suffering from heavy metal poisoning and depressed endogenous levels arising from dietary deficiencies. Keeping this in view, the exogenous and endogenous metal contents of scalp hair of occupationally exposed workers from various workshops were determined in the present study, both in unwashed and washed hair samples to assess the extent of metal contamination. All donors, within the age group of 6-45 years, were full-time workers of various autoworkshops situated in the densely populated and industrialized city of Lahore. ICP atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods were used for determining the levels of five non-essential and three essential elements in the scalp hair. 20 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  4. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  5. Elucidating the Composition and Distribution of Trace Metals in Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Webb, S. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coral reefs host a plethora of marine life and thereby provide a wealth of aesthetic and economic benefits to coastal countries. Anthropogenic influences, including local coastal water contamination, however threaten the health of these delicate ecosystems. Metal incorporation into carbonate minerals, the backbone of coral reefs, is known to have a large yet variable impact on carbonate structure and solubility. Yet, trace metal influences on the structure, porosity, composition, and solubility of coral skeletons is largely unknown. Here, we coupled synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (u-XRF) mapping and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy with micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) to explore the distribution and speciation of trace metals associated with corals and their impact on the carbonate structure of corals obtained from reefs varying in anthropogenic influence - Florida Keys, FL USA and the Federated States of Micronesia. Iron and copper were the most abundant metals in the biological tissue, while in some areas zinc was observed in the tissue, overlapping with the skeleton. Trace metals were not detectable in the aragonite skeletons; in fact, the distributions of Ca and Fe were anti-correlated. XANES spectra show that the iron is primarily Fe(III), likely as the poorly crystalline iron oxide ferrihydrite structure or trapped within ferretin proteins. The same trace metals were observed in corals of different species and from different environments. This in situ investigation corroborates previous studies that corals tend to incorporate iron into the biological components but not into the aragonite skeleton. Given the dominant partitioning of metals within the biological tissue rather than the coral skeleton, the specific carbon molecules responsible for metal attenuation and their fate under changing geochemical conditions and following coral death require exploration.

  6. Pyritization of trace metals in anoxic marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Diaz, Miguel A.; Morse, John W.

    1992-07-01

    The pyritization of reactive trace elements in different anoxic marine sediments was investigated to determine the importance of factors such as ∑H 2S, reactive-Fe, pyrite content and salinity in controlling this process. The areas studied included anoxic-sulfidic sediments (Baffin Bay, a hypersaline coastal lagoon from Texas and Green Canyon, a hemipelagic oil seepage area), anoxic-nonsulfidic sediments with high sedimentation rates (Atchafalaya Bay-Mississippi Delta system), hemipelagic anoxic-nonsulfidic sediments with low sedimentation rates (Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope and Orca Basin, an euxinic hypersaline basin) and organic-rich marsh sediments (Atchafalaya Bay). Results indicate that the degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) of all trace metals, except Cd, increased with increasing degree of pyritization (DOP), irrespective of the type of sedimentary environment involved. However, for As, Hg and Mo, the DTMP/DOP values were generally above the 1:1 ratio line, whereas the transition metals Co, Cu, Mn and Ni displayed a close to linear increase in DTMP with DOP and moderate incorporation into pyrite. Chromium and the class B metals Pb and Zn were also gradually incorporated into the pyrite phase but without reaching the DTMP levels exhibited by the transition metals. Cadmium was not incorporated to a significant extent. These results are consistent with the chemical attributes of these different classes of trace elements. Availability of dissolved trace metals and organic matter content are apparently important factors controlling the incorporation of Co, Cr, Cu and Ni into pyrite in anoxicsulfidic (Fe-poor and H 2S-rich) environments.

  7. Metal fractionation in sediments as a tool for assessing the availability of trace metals: The case of Apipucos Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, V. L.; Souza, V. L. B.; Nascimento, R. K.; Santos, P. N. C.; Almeida, M. G. O.; Hazin, C. A.

    2014-02-01

    The worldwide concern about trace metal pollution has been increasing in recent years due to the increase in anthropogenic trace metal inputs to the various ecosystems. The quantification of the chemical species of metals in sediments is essential for estimating the bioavailability of the metals in the environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the present level of metal pollution in the Apipucos Reservoir, Brazil, and determine its degree of toxicity to plants and animals. For this purpose, sediment cores were collected and its metal content (Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Mn, Fe, Cu) was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry after sequential extraction. The results showed that there is more Fe and Mn than other metals (Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Cu). Besides, the concentrations of Fe and Mn are very high in the exchangeable and available phases, which are mobile and available fractions in sediments. The results also indicate that Fe, Mn and Cu could be mobilized under oxidizing conditions. Lead was found mainly in the reducible phase whereas Zn was found on available and reducible phases. Cobalt and Cadmium, although included in the set of metals analyzed, were not found in the sampled sediments. Sediment dating showed that the first sedimentary layers are about 30 years old.

  8. Nanomolar Trace Metal Analysis of Copper at Gold Microband Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, A.; Dawson, K.; Sassiat, N.; Quinn, A. J.; O'Riordan, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of gold microband electrode arrays designated as a highly sensitive sensor for trace metal detection of copper in drinking water samples. Gold microband electrodes have been routinely fabricated by standard photolithographic methods. Electrochemical characterization were conducted in 0.1 M H2SO4 and found to display characteristic gold oxide formation and reduction peaks. The advantages of gold microband electrodes as trace metal sensors over currently used methods have been investigated by employing under potential deposition anodic stripping voltammetry (UPD-ASV) in Cu2+ nanomolar concentrations. Linear correlations were observed for increasing Cu2+ concentrations from which the concentration of an unknown sample of drinking water was estimated. The results obtained for the estimation of the unknown trace copper concentration in drinking was in good agreement with expected values.

  9. Trace metals and cancer: The case of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Devès, G.; Vesvres, M. H.; Simonoff, M.; Bénard, J.

    2001-07-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is one of the most established prognostic factors in neuroblastoma (NB), a young children solid tumor. Amounts of ferritin, an iron storage protein, are abnormally increased in serum of patients with advanced stage disease. N- myc amplified NB cells can synthesize zinc metalloenzymes allowing tumor invasion and metastases formation. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between N- myc amplification and trace metals in human neuroblasts. Coupling PIXE and RBS techniques, nuclear microprobe allowed to analyze elemental distributions and to determine trace metal concentrations within cultured neuroblasts characterized by various degrees of N- myc amplification. They were compared to trace metal distributions and concentrations in tumor xenograft models of human NB, after injection of cells from the same lines in athymic nude mice. Our data allowed to establish a relation between trace metal contents and mechanisms of NB oncogenesis, amplified cell lines representing more aggressive phenotypes of the disease. They should be confirmed by analysis of cultured neuroblasts and tumors issued from a non-amplified cell line transfected with the N- myc oncogene.

  10. Trace metal enrichment in agricultural soils of Jianghan Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Ying, S.; Daniel, J. N.; Bu, J.; Gan, Y.; Wang, Y.; Schaefer, M.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Coal consumption in China is increasing annually due to constantly rising energy demand. As a result, a massive amount of coal combustion byproducts, particularly in the form of fly ash, are expelled from power plants and distributed through atmospheric transport. The fly ash is eventually deposited on to land, potentially contaminating agricultural soils. Coal fly ash contains high concentration of a suite of toxic trace metals including lead, chromium, and arsenic. In this study, we surveyed the concentration of trace metals in agricultural soils at 131 sites within a 20 km radius of Yangluo Power Plant, a 2400 MW plant within the highly populated Jianghan Plain of Central China. Using X-ray fluorecence (XRF) spectrometry, the total concentration of trace metals in homogenized surface and subsurface soil samples were measured to calculate the corresponding enrichment factor at each site. Our initial findings demonstrate that Pb is enriched in a majority of sites, independent of land use, whereas As and Cr are generally not enriched in this region. Further studies using Pb isotopes as a source-tracing tool will help determine the Pb pollution's origin. Ultimately, the results of this study may inform whether crops grown within the Jianghan Plain have the potential of being contaminated by metals emitted from coal power plants.

  11. Unexpected Consequences: Gold Mining in Peru and Trace Metal Mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. Z.; Pinedo-Gonzalez, P.; Clark, K. E.; West, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Artisanal miners in the Peruvian Amazon, especially in the Madre de Dios region, are targeting fluvial deposits along riverbanks as part of a modern-day gold rush. These miners often use mercury, causing Hg pollution and ecological damage. Research on the environmental consequences of these mines has focused primarily on the fate of Hg, and to date little work has considered whether mining river sediments affects the release and cycling of other trace metals. This project measures trace metal concentrations in soil and vegetation samples developed on fluvial sediments at one mine site and two non-mine (control) sites across gradients in natural plant succession and riverbank composition. Some metals, including Pb and Mo, showed leachable metal concentrations (determined using EPA Method 2050B and ICP-MS analysis) that were lower in mine site soils than control site soils, but higher in mine site vegetation than control site vegetation. These results held across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. This suggests that metals may be preferentially mobilized from the soil and taken up by surrounding vegetation as a result of mining activities. Soils were also treated with a sequential leach to separate metals that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe and Mn oxides, bound to organic matter and in the residual phase. Initial data shows that trace metal concentrations are generally lower in all phases from mine soils vs. control soils, across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. Trace metal mobilization due to mining is facilitated by changing pH or redox conditions - e.g., by exposing buried minerals to water and oxygen. Fluvial sediments at these studied sites were already exposed during their erosion and transport, but anoxic conditions following deposition may allow a build-up of metals that are mobilized once sediments are re-worked by mining. It is also possible that Hg affects the mobility of other

  12. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  13. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead

  14. Trace metal source terms in carbon sequestration environments.

    PubMed

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO(2) or CO(2)-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO(2). Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality. PMID:23215015

  15. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  16. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  17. On nutrients and trace metals: Effects from Enhanced Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application of rock flour on suitable land ("Enhanced Weathering") is one proposed strategy to reduce the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At the same time it is an old and established method to add fertiliser and influence soil properties. Investigations of this method focused on the impact on the carbonate system, as well as on engineering aspects of a large-scale application, but potential side effects were never discussed quantitatively. We analysed about 120,000 geochemically characterised volcanic rock samples from the literature. Applying basic statistics, theoretical release rates of nutrients and potential contaminants by Enhanced Weathering were evaluated for typical rock types. Applied rock material can contain significant amounts of essential or beneficial nutrients (potassium, phosphorus, micronutrients). Their release can partly cover the demand of major crops like wheat, rice or corn, thereby increasing crop yield on degraded soils. However, the concentrations of considered elements are variable within a specific rock type, depending on the geological setting. High heavy metal concentrations are found in (ultra-) basic rocks, the class with the highest CO2 drawdown potential. More acidic rocks contain less or no critical amounts, but sequester less CO2. Findings show that the rock selection determines the capability to supply significant amounts of nutrients, which could partly substitute industrial mineral fertiliser usage. At the same time, the release of harmful trace element has to be considered. Through careful selection of regionally available rocks, benefits could be maximised and drawbacks reduced. The deployment of Enhanced Weathering to sequester CO2 and to ameliorate soils necessitates an ecosystem management, considering the release and fate of weathered elements in plants, soils and water. Cropland with degraded soils would benefit while having a net negative CO2 effect, while other carbon dioxide removal strategies, like

  18. Monitoring of trace metals in coastal sediments around Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dong-Woon; Kim, Seong-Gil; Choi, Minkyu; Lee, In-Seok; Kim, Seong-Soo; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2016-01-15

    Spatial distributions and temporal variations of trace metals in Korean coastal sediments were investigated by determining seven metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) in sediment collected from 71 stations between 2004 and 2010 (n=491). High metal concentrations were found in the southeastern coast, where there are many cities and industrial complexes, indicating that metal concentrations in Korean coastal sediment are significantly influenced by human activities associated with urbanization and industrialization. However, metal concentrations in sediment did not markedly vary temporally, which was because the coast is managed sustainably and because of the characteristics of the sediment environments. Based on the sediment quality guidelines and geoaccumulation index, Korean coastal sediments are practically unpolluted with Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn but moderately polluted with As. More intensive monitoring is required to determine the potential As sources and to understand the As geochemical cycles in Korean coastal sediments. PMID:26639653

  19. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 1. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND SURVEILLANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  20. Trace metals in edible tissues of livestock and poultry

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, M.E.; Elder, R.S.; Basu, P.; Koppenaal, G.P.

    1992-07-01

    Data from a random-sampling study are presented for trace metals in edible tissues of livestock (bovine including bull, steer, cow heifer, calf; ovine including bull, steer, cow, heifer, calf; ovine including mature sheep and lambs; porcine including market hogs, boar/stag, and slow) and poultry (including young and mature chicken, young turkey, and duck). Tissue homogenates were ashed, and residual materials were dissolved in hydrochloric acid for analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Statistical summaries of data are provided for the trace metals lead, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, and zinc. The heavy metals of toxicological concern, lead and cadmium, are emphasized in this study. Lead and cadmium were rarely detected in muscle (0.2-0.5% positive among 2314 animals sampled). Lead was also infrequently detected in liver (1.8% positive) and kidney (2.4% positive). Nearly 46% of livers analyzed were positive for cadmium, and approximately 78 of kidney samples were positive for cadmium. No regulatory limits are established in the United States for the trace metals reported in this study, although restrictions on the use of kidneys from mature poultry as human food have been established because of concern about potential cadmium levels. Kidneys from this study, more frequently than livers, bore cadmium levels that exceeded the regulatory limits of other countries or organizations. Regulatory implications of the data are discussed. 23 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  2. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency. PMID:27324564

  3. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency. PMID:27324564

  4. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency.

  5. Trace metal anomalies in bleached Porites coral at Meiji Reef, tropical South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jianxin; Feng, Yuexing; Chen, Tianran

    2016-04-01

    Coral bleaching has generally been recognized as the main reason for tropical coral reef degradation, but there are few long-term records of coral bleaching events. In this study, trace metals including chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), and yttrium (Y), were analyzed in two Porites corals collected from Meiji Reef in the tropical South China Sea (SCS) to assess differences in trace metal concentrations in bleached compared with unbleached coral growth bands. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo generally showed irregular fluctuations in both corals. Bleached layers contained high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb. Unbleached layers showed moderately high concentrations of Mn and Cu only. The different distribution of trace metals in Porites may be attributable to different selectivity on the basis of vital utility or toxicity. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo are discriminated against by both coral polyps and zooxanthellae, but Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb are accumulated by zooxanthellae and only Mn and Cu are accumulated by polyps as essential elements. The marked increase in Cu, Mn, Pb, and Sn are associated with bleaching processes, including mucus secretion, tissue retraction, and zooxanthellae expulsion and occlusion. Variation in these trace elements within the coral skeleton can be used as potential tracers of short-lived bleaching events.

  6. The effect of solid metal composition on solid metal/ liquid metal partitioning of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, N.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-12-01

    Fundamental understanding of the partitioning behaviour of elements between different core and/or mantle phases is needed to constrain processes of planetary differentiation and evolution. The partitioning behaviour of elements between solid metal and liquid metal in the Fe-S system, of relevance to core crystallisation in planetesimals and the terrestrial planets, has been investigated by several workers [1-6], most of whom [1-5] conclude that variations in partition coefficients can be explained by variations in melt composition. However, recently Stewart et al. [6] showed that the crystal-lattice strain model commonly used to describe silicate mineral - silicate melt partitioning can be applied to partially molten metallic systems. This suggests the structure of the solid metal also plays a role in determining solid metal / molten metal partitioning. Here, we investigate the effect of the structure of the solid metal in the Fe-S system on solid/liquid metal partitioning by obtaining new element partitioning data at pressures between 0.5 and 3 GPa. The effect of the solid metal is isolated from pressure-temperature-melt composition effects by performing experiments at constant P and T with two Fe-S bulk compositions on either side of the eutectic composition. In addition to the effect of solid metal composition we investigate the effects of pressure and S content on trace element partitioning behaviour and the application of the lattice strain model to our results. Starting mixtures were doped with several hundred ppm levels of trace elements Ni, Co, W, Mo, V, Nb, Ta, Sn, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mn, P, Ge,. Experiments were performed using a QUICKPress piston cylinder apparatus at the VU University, Amsterdam using alumina capsules. Experiments were heated to 1073 K at pressure and allowed to sinter for a duration of 10 hours before the temperature was raised at a rate of 50 K / min to the target value. Preliminary EPMA data for a 1 GPa experiment with FeS as the solid

  7. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  8. Behavior of trace metals in simulated gasification conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    The fate of trace metals is being investigated in two emerging coal gasification electric power-generating systems: integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC). Some of the trace metals in coal are considered air toxics when released into the atmosphere and can also cause the degradation of fuel cell efficiency as a result of contamination. The fate of trace metals during coal conversion in GCC and IGFC systems is closely tied to how the trace metals are associated in the coal and gasification conditions. Bench- and pilot-scale gasification experiments were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal to determine the partitioning of mercury, selenium, arsenic, nickel, cadmium, lead, and chromium into gas, liquid, and solid phases as a function of gasification conditions and coal composition. Entrained ash was collected from the small-scale reactor using a multicyclone and impinger sampling train. Coal analysis revealed arsenic, mercury, nickel, lead, and selenium to be primarily associated with pyrite. Chromium was associated primarily with clay minerals, and cadmium appeared to have mostly an organic association. The partitioning during gasification indicated that chromium, lead, and nickel were enriched in the small ash particulate fraction (less than 1.5 {mu}m), while arsenic, selenium, and mercury were depleted in the particulate and more enriched in the vapor-phase fraction (collected in the impingers). Oxygen contents were varied to represent both combustion and gasification systems. Most of the work was conducted at lower oxygen-to-carbon ratios. Lower oxygen-to-carbon ratios resulted in more reducing environments in the gasification system, which appeared to drive more mercury to the vapor phase. Under constant oxygen-to-carbon ratios, mercury, selenium, and cadmium showed increasing volatility with increasing reaction zone temperature.

  9. Trace metals in fleece wool and correlations with yellowness.

    PubMed

    King, A L; Millington, K R

    2013-03-01

    The presence of copper and iron in metal-doped wool has been shown previously to be associated with the production of free radicals and yellowing in photo-irradiated wool. In this study, the yellowness and trace metal content of 700 wool samples was measured to determine if photoyellowing, catalysed by metals, is a major determinant of the colour of fleece wool. Iron and copper content did not positively correlate with yellowness and yellower wool tended to have lower levels of these metals. Instead, a strong positive correlation of yellowness with the calcium, manganese and magnesium content was observed in yellow wools. High levels of calcium and magnesium is consistent with biofilm formation by Pseudomonas bacteria that have previously been associated with non-scourable staining of wool. PMID:23292316

  10. Trace metal/phytoplankton interactions in the Skagerrak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croot, P. L.; Karlson, B.; Wulff, A.; Linares, F.; Andersson, K.

    2002-06-01

    Algal community species composition, as estimated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigments and microscopy analysis, and trace metal speciation (Cu and Co) and distributions (Fe, Zn, Co and Cu) were measured along a summer transect across the Skagerrak. In waters of Baltic origin, with elevated trace metals levels, but very low macronutrients, a mix of dinoflagellates and haptophytes dominated the low biomass. In the Jutland current, which had high dissolved iron concentrations, a mixed bloom (4-6 μg/l chl a) of diatoms (major species— Leptocylindricus danica) and dinoflagellates ( Ceratium sp.) was present. In the waters of the central Skagerrak derived from the North Sea, below the low salinity Baltic water, a large diatom (major species— L. danica) bloom (7.7 μg/l) was present at 35 m. This bloom formed below the pycnocline, and was located at the nutricline for silicate. The lowest concentrations of trace metals were found in the water of North Sea origin. Synechococcus-like cyanobacteria were observed in the upper waters across the survey area, as were strong binding ligands for Cu, but no clear numerical relationship existed between them, as had been observed by Moffett [Deep-Sea Res. 42 (1995) 1273]in the Sargasso Sea. The [Co]/[Zn] hypothesis of Sunda and Huntsman [Limnol. Oceanogr. 40 (1995) 1404] for coccolithophorids and diatoms was examined using the field data collected.

  11. Mobility of trace metals in retention pond sediments.

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Ruban, V; Amblès, A

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on trace metal mobility in the sediments of several road and urban infiltration/decantation ponds in France; the trace metal concentrations are indeed high. The potential mobility of trace metals (cadmium, nickel, chromium, copper, lead and zinc) was evaluated by application of the sequential extraction BCR protocol. Results have been compared with those from the IHSS protocol, which allows for the extraction of various forms of organic matter. Cadmium is the most easily exchangeable element in the case of variations in physical-chemical conditions (50% to 60% of Cd is exchangeable and 70% to 80% of Cd remains within the fulvic acid fraction) and is thus easily releasable within an acidic medium. Zinc is also potentially mobile and stays mainly concentrated in fulvic acids, except in the case of the Ronchin sediment (more than 50% in humin). In contrast, nickel and chromium are primarily present in the residual fraction and do not exhibit high mobility. Copper and lead are concentrated in both the humic acid fraction (IHSS protocol) and the organic phase (BCR scheme); consequently, their mobility is limited. PMID:15366555

  12. Source apportionment of trace metals in river sediments: A comparison of three methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Li, Jiao; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Increasing trace metal pollution in river sediment poses a significant threat to watershed ecosystem health. Identifying potential sources of sediment metals and apportioning their contributions are of key importance for proposing prevention and control strategies of river pollution. In this study, three advanced multivariate receptor models, factor analysis with nonnegative constraints (FA-NNC), positive matrix factorization (PMF), and multivariate curve resolution weighted-alternating least-squares (MCR-WALS), were comparatively employed for source apportionment of trace metals in river sediments and applied to the Le'an River, a main tributary of Poyang Lake which is the largest freshwater lake in China. The pollution assessment with contamination factor and geoaccumulation index suggested that the river sediments in Le'an River were contaminated severely by trace metals due to human activities. With the three apportionment tools, similar source profiles of trace metals in sediments were extracted. Especially, the MCR-WALS and PMF models produced essentially the same results. Comparatively speaking, the weighted schemes might give better solutions than the unweighted FA-NNC because the uncertainty information of environmental data was considered by PMF and MCR-WALS. Anthropogenic sources were apportioned as the most important pollution sources influencing the sediment metals in Le'an River with contributions of about 90%. Among them, copper tailings occupied the largest contribution (38.4-42.2%), followed by mining wastewater (29.0-33.5%), and agricultural activities (18.2-18.7%). To protect the ecosystem of Le'an River and Poyang Lake, special attention should be paid to the discharges of mining wastewater and the leachates of copper tailing ponds in that region. PMID:26736053

  13. Trace Metals in Urban Stormwater Runoff and their Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Hall, K.; Li, L. Y.; Schreier, H.

    2009-04-01

    In past decades, due to the rapid urbanization, land development has replaced forests, fields and meadows with impervious surfaces such as roofs, parking lots and roads, significantly affecting watershed quality and having an impact on aquatic systems. In this study, non-point source pollution from a diesel bus loop was assessed for the extent of trace metal contamination of Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn in the storm water runoff. The study was carried out at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) of British Columbia, Canada. Fifteen storm events were monitored at 3 sites from the diesel bus loop to determine spatial and temporal variations of dissolved and total metal concentrations in the storm water runoff. The dissolved metal concentrations were compared with the provincial government discharge criteria and the bus loop storm water quality was also compared with previous studies conducted across the GVRD urban area. To prevent storm water with hazardous levels of contaminants from being discharged into the urban drainage system, a storm water catch basin filter was installed and evaluated for its efficiency of contaminants removal. The perlite filter media adsorption capacities for the trace metals, oil and grease were studied for better maintenance of the catch basin filter. Dissolved copper exceeded the discharge criteria limit in 2 out of 15 cases, whereas dissolved zinc exceeded the criteria in 4 out of 15 cases, and dissolved manganese was below the criteria in all of the events sampled. Dissolved Cu and Zn accounted for 36 and 45% of the total concentration, whereas Mn and Fe only accounted for 20 and 4% of their total concentration, respectively. Since they are more mobile and have higher bioaccumulation potentials, Zn and Cu are considered to be more hazardous to the aquatic environment than Fe and Mn. With high imperviousness (100%) and intensive traffic at the UBC diesel bus loop, trace metal concentrations

  14. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Physiological effects of essential metals on two detritivores: Atyaephyra desmarestii (Millet) and Echinogammarus meridionalis (Pinkster).

    PubMed

    Quintaneiro, Carla; Ranville, James F; Nogueira, António J A

    2016-06-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are essential for humans; however, input of several types of contamination has led to the degradation of these ecosystems. Thus, it is urgent to assess their health to allow actions for prevention and remediation. The level of trace metals can be enhanced by natural or anthropogenic sources. Essential metals, such as copper and zinc, become toxic when present in the environment above threshold concentrations. To evaluate the physiological effects of these 2 essential metals for 2 freshwater detritivores, the shrimp Atyaephyra desmarestii and the amphipod Echinogammarus meridionalis, acute tests were performed. Forty-eight hour median lethal concentration (LC50) values were estimated for these species using static bioassays with copper and zinc. Sublethal assays for both metals with several phases were also done to evaluate the effects on feeding behavior. The LC50 values of copper for the shrimp A. desmarestii and amphipod E. meridionalis were 0.128 mg/L and 0.050 mg/L and those of zinc were 7.951 mg/L and 11.860 mg/L, respectively. The results indicated that copper is more toxic to both species. Only E. meridionalis showed deleterious effects of copper on feeding rate. Zinc showed some tendency for feeding inhibition in both species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1442-1448. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26472099

  16. Urinary Concentrations of Toxic and Essential Trace Elements among Rural Residents in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yosuke; Umezaki, Masahiro; Jiang, Hongwei; Li, Dandan; Du, Jianwei; Jin, Yuming; Yang, Bin; Li, Bai; Li, Yufeng; Watanabe, Chiho

    2014-01-01

    Background: Toxic element exposure and essential trace element consumption may have changed after the Chinese economy transformed to a market-oriented system. The objectives of this study were to measure urinary concentrations of toxic (arsenic, cadmium, lead) and essential trace (selenium, zinc, copper) elements among rural residents in Hainan, China and to examine if variations in economic development are linked to differences in toxic and trace element exposure. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire-based survey and undertook anthropometric measurements of residents aged ≥20 years (n = 599). Urinary samples were collected and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: The median (μg/g creatinine) element concentrations were: arsenic, 73.2; cadmium, 1.8; lead, 3.1; selenium, 36.5; zinc, 371; and copper, 11.0. Intra-community variation in element concentrations was explained by age (arsenic, cadmium, zinc and copper), sex (arsenic, cadmium and selenium: higher in females; zinc: higher in males), body mass index (cadmium) and individual involvement in the market economy as indexed by agrochemical use (lead and selenium). The degree of community-level economic development, which was determined by the proportion of people living in better housing among the study communities, was positively associated with cadmium concentration. Conclusions: The degree of community-level economic development was positively associated with urinary cadmium concentration while individual involvement in the market economy was positively associated with lead and selenium. PMID:25514155

  17. Essential helix interactions in the anion transporter domain of prestin revealed by evolutionary trace analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Lavanya; Patel, Nimish; Madabushi, Srinivasan; Goddard, Julie Anne; Anjan, Venkat; Lin, Feng; Shope, Cindy; Farrell, Brenda; Lichtarge, Olivier; Davidson, Amy L; Brownell, William E; Pereira, Fred A

    2006-12-01

    Prestin, a member of the SLC26A family of anion transporters, is a polytopic membrane protein found in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian cochlea. Prestin is an essential component of the membrane-based motor that enhances electromotility of OHCs and contributes to frequency sensitivity and selectivity in mammalian hearing. Mammalian cells expressing prestin display a nonlinear capacitance (NLC), widely accepted as the electrical signature of electromotility. The associated charge movement requires intracellular anions reflecting the membership of prestin in the SLC26A family. We used the computational approach of evolutionary trace analysis to identify candidate functional (trace) residues in prestin for mutational studies. We created a panel of mutations at each trace residue and determined membrane expression and nonlinear capacitance associated with each mutant. We observe that several residue substitutions near the conserved sulfate transporter domain of prestin either greatly reduce or eliminate NLC, and the effect is dependent on the size of the substituted residue. These data suggest that packing of helices and interactions between residues surrounding the "sulfate transporter motif" is essential for normal prestin activity. PMID:17151276

  18. Trace metals geochemistry of Bengkulu river and estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, M. Lutfi; Darti, Puspa; Alwi, Wiwit; Swistoro, Eko; Sundaryono, Agus; Ruyani, Aceng

    2015-09-01

    Unique feature of Indonesian archipelago in addition to its location that settled between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean has made Indonesian seas as important parts of the world ocean system. In contrast, research on Indonesian seas including its marine geochemistry is scarce. Research findings have proven that Indonesian seas and its characteristics, such as Indonesian throughflow, are important in the seawater thermohaline circulation that affect world's global climate. The transports of mass and heat from the Pacific into the Indian Ocean are crucial for the oceanic circulation and sea surface temperatures. It is only until recently known that water masses movement could be traced using chemical elements such as Zr and Hf. In modern ocean, sources of these chemicals are mostly from continents. Chemicals had been brought to the oceans through river, estuary, coastal and eventually open seawater. We have analyzed selected important trace metals of Bengkulu river and estuary starting from upper stream of Bengkulu River to coastal seawater of the Indian Ocean. Concentrations of trace metals in the sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Dissolved and labile particulate concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, V, Sr and Zn are reported in this study.

  19. Trace metal concentrations and their transfer from sediment to leaves of four common aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Łojko, Renata; Polechońska, Ludmiła; Klink, Agnieszka; Kosiba, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of trace and alkali metals in leaves of four common helophytes, Sparganium erectum, Glyceria maxima, Phalaris arundinacea, and Phragmites australis, as well as in corresponding water and bottom sediments were investigated to ascertain plant bioaccumulation ability. Results showed that Mn and Fe were the most abundant trace metals in all plant species, while Co and Pb contents were the lowest. Leaves of species studied differed significantly in respect of element concentrations. The highest concentrations of Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Ni were noted in S. erectum while the highest contents of Co, Ca, Zn, and Cr in Phalaris arundinacea. Phragmites australis contained the lowest amounts of most elements. Concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, and Mn in all species studied and Ni in all except for Phragmites australis were higher than natural for hydrophytes. The leaves/sediment ratio was more than unity for all alkali metals as well as for Cu and Mn in Phragmites australis; Cr, Co, and Zn in Phalaris arundinacea; Cr and Mn in S. erectum; and Cr in G. maxima. High enrichment factors and high levels of toxic metals in the species studied indicated a special ability of these plants to absorb and store certain non-essential metals and, consequently, their potential for phytoremediation of contaminated aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26004561

  20. First assessment of trace metal concentration in mangrove crab eggs and other tissues, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Eduardo Vianna; Kütter, Vinicius Tavares; Marques, Eduardo Duarte; da Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2016-07-01

    The mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is widespread in the Brazilian coast, which has an important role in nutrient cycling. This species reproduces in summer and females carry eggs about a month, when they maintain contact with water and sediments. It remains unclear if trace metals can be absorbed or adsorbed by the eggs during development. The present study aims to investigate, for the first time, trace metal concentrations in ovigerous female tissues and eggs of U. cordatus in two areas with different metal pollution levels in the Southeastern Brazil. Samples were collected in two different mangroves, Guanabara Bay (GB) highly polluted environment and Paraíba do Sul River (PSR). In both populations, we observed significant increase of V, Cr, and Mn concentrations along eggs maturation. The higher metals averages were found in PSR population. This trend was reported since the 1990s and lower concentrations in GB marine organisms were attributed to reducing conditions, high organic load, and the presence of sulfide ions. These conditions restrict the bioavailability of metals in the bay, with exception of Mn. No significant differences were observed in gills and muscles. In both populations of the present study, V, Zn, As, and Pb were higher in eggs of initial stage, whereas Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cd were higher in hepatopancreas. Beside this, V, Cr, Mn, As, and Pb showed an increase concerning egg development. Thus, V, As, and Pb in eggs come from two sources previous discussed: females and environment. Zinc came mainly from females due to essential function. Those new information should be considered as one of the mechanisms of trace metal transfer to the trophic chain, between benthonic and pelagic environment. PMID:27318940

  1. Contamination from an affluent of Furnas reservoir by trace metals.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, P P; Rodrigues, L C A; Beijo, L A; Barbosa, S; Xavier, T T; Magalhães, F

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to determine concentrations and characterize trace metals distribution in an affluent of Furnas reservoir, Alfenas-MG. Water and sediment samples were taken monthly, 2010/10-2011/07 in five sites of Córrego do Pântano for subsequent determination of Pb, Cd and Zn levels by chemical analysis. The stream studied is in disagreement with Brazilian legislation for Class II water bodies (CONAMA 357). The highlights are the unsuitable concentrations of Pb for human consumption, according to Ministry of Health 2914 decree, providing risk for population. PMID:25627598

  2. Spatial uncertainty of joint health risk of multiple trace metals in rice grain in Jiaxing city, China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mingkai; Huang, Biao; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Zhao, Yongcun

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals in rice may affect human health if their concentrations reach risk levels in the human body due to long-term ingestion. In this study, concentrations of five trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) in field-sampled rice grains were measured at 285 sampling sites in Jiaxing city, China. The objective was to map the spatial distribution and uncertainty of the potential human health risk of trace metals in local rice grains at a regional scale. The probability map of multiple trace metals that tend to be hazardous was produced based on the permissible limits in Chinese National Standards. It showed higher probabilities, which exceeded the national standards, for one or more of trace metals in rice grains were mainly located in several small subareas around the center of the study area. We used the Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) index and the Total THQ (TTHQ) index to represent the potential human health risks caused by individual and multiple trace metals in local rice grains. The TTHQ was essentially regarded as an integrative uniform rice quality index in this study. Stochastic simulation was then conducted to simulate the TTHQ for mapping the spatial distribution and uncertainty of the total potential health risk. Probability maps of different risk grades for TTHQ indicated that most places were in unsafe grades. In general, maps of site-specific health risks posed by trace metals in local rice grains and associated uncertainty information are valuable to spatial decision making in agricultural planning, rice uses, and environmental management. PMID:25418210

  3. Assessment of essential elements and heavy metals content on Mytilus galloprovincialis from river Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    Santos, I; Diniz, M S; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P

    2014-06-01

    Trace elemental content was analysed in edible tissues of Mytilus galloprovincialis collected in five different sampling areas near the mouth of river Tagus estuary in Lisbon. The concentrations of essential elements (S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Sr) were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry, while toxic elements (Cr, Cd, Hg, Se and Pb) were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the essential elements K and S are present at the highest concentrations in all the studied samples reaching 2,920 and 4,520 μg g(-1) (fresh weight), respectively. The highest levels of heavy metals found were in two areas close to the city for Pb and Cd, but below the maximum allowed values. PMID:24763710

  4. Distribution and partition of trace metals in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Patrick T.; Boaventura, Geraldo R.

    2003-05-01

    The distribution of trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, U) was investigated in surface waters and associated particulates in the Amazon mainstream (Solimões and Amazon rivers). Dissolved V, Cu, As, Sr, Ba, U correlate with major ions and appear to be predominantly derived from soluble rocks occurring in the Amazon upper basin. These elements appear conservative in waters and are progressively diluted by less-concentrated waters coming from the lowland and shield areas. A monthly time series obtained at the Óbidos gauging station shows that temporal variability of trace element concentrations reflects the source, remobilization and/or biological processes occurring in the channel or in the surrounding floodplain lakes. The trace element concentrations in the particulate matter show a clear relationship with the location of the samples. V, Co, Cr, Mn, Sr, Cs and Ba concentrations are higher in the Solimões and the Rio Negro is enriched in Fe, Al and Zn. In the Rio Solimões, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Cs and Pb are almost entirely carried by the river particulate matter; Cu, Rb, Sr, Ba and U are transported mainly by the suspended particles, but a dissolved phase contributes to the transport. In the Rio Negro, the proportion of elements transported by the dissolved phase is higher for the whole set of elements. The implications of these results allow us to compute the fluxes from the Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Contribution of trace metals in structuring in situ macroinvertebrate community composition along a salinity gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2000-04-01

    Macroinvertebrates were studied along a salinity gradient in the North Sea Canal, The Netherlands, to quantify the effect of trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc) on community composition. In addition, two methods for assessing metal bioavailability (normalizing metal concentrations on organic carbon and on the smallest sediment fraction) were compared. Factor analyses showed that normalizing trace metals resulted in an improved separation of trace metals from ecological factors (depth, organic carbon, granulometry, and chloride). The variation in the macroinvertebrate data was partitioned into four sources using partial canonical correspondence analysis, with the partitions being purely ecological factors, purely trace metals, mutual ecological factors and trace metals, and unexplained. Partial canonical correspondence analysis applied to total and normalized trace metal concentrations gave similar results in terms of unexplained variances. However, normalization on organic carbon resulted in the highest percentage of variation explained by purely ecological factors and purely trace metals. Accounting for bioavailability thus improves the identification of factors affecting the in situ community structure. Ecological factors explained 45.4% and trace metals 8.6% of the variation in the macroinvertebrate community composition in the ecosystem of the North Sea Canal. These contributions were significant, and it is concluded that trace metals significantly affected the community composition in an environment with multiple stressors. Variance partitioning is recommended for incorporation in further risk assessment studies.

  6. Baseline study on essential and trace elements in polished rice from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Myung Chae; Yun, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jin-Soo; Lee, Jong-Un

    2005-09-01

    In 2000, 63 (polished) white rice samples were collected in eight administrative areas all over South Korea and analyzed for 16 elements by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Potassium had the highest content, next to Mg, Ca, Si, Zn, Na, Al and Fe. Most of the samples contained worldwide average concentrations of essential and trace elements in rice grains reported by various researches. For inter-area differences in those elements in the rice, the statistical analysis showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) among the eight administrative areas, suggesting that inter-area differences were not substantial in most cases. Thus, the present data can be used as national background levels of elements in rice produced in South Korea. Using the published data on daily consumption of rice in South Korea, it was possible to estimate the daily intake of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn via rice. The results showed that a regular consumption of rice produced in Korea plays an important role in accumulation of essential and trace elements in Korean, especially for farm-households consuming relatively large amounts of rice. PMID:16237601

  7. Trace metals in urban streams and detention ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Licsko, Z.J.; Struger, J.

    1995-12-31

    Trace metal levels were monitored over a nine month period in two urban creeks in the Hamilton Harbour watershed and in two urban stormwater retention ponds in Guelph, Ontario. Samples were collected both during dry or non-event periods and immediately after wet weather events. Both water and surficial sediment samples were collected and tested for cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc. In almost all cases during wet weather conditions, Canadian Water Quality Guidelines for the protection of freshwater aquatic life were exceeded in water for lead (>7 mg/L), copper (>4 mg/L), and zinc (>30 mg/L) . Both stormwater ponds accumulated trace metals in sediment to levels above the lowest effect level guideline for the protection and management of aquatic sediment in Ontario, and, in the case of zinc (> 820 ug/g), above the severe effect level guideline. These levels of contamination raise serious concerns about the use of these and similar facilities as habitat for biota.

  8. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Kost, Dave; Tian, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaolu; Watts, Dexter; Norton, Darrell; Wolkowski, Richard P; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. A large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance crop production. However, information is lacking concerning the potential environmental impacts of trace metals, especially Hg, in the FGD gypsum. Flue gas desulfurization and mined gypsums were evaluated to determine their ability to affect concentrations of Hg and other trace elements in soils and earthworms. The study was conducted at four field sites across the United States (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). The application rates of gypsums ranged from 2.2 Mg ha in Indiana to 20 Mg ha in Ohio and Alabama. These rates are 2 to 10 times higher than typically recommended. The lengths of time from gypsum application to soil and earthworm sampling were 5 and 18 mo in Ohio, 6 mo in Indiana, 11 mo in Alabama, and 4 mo in Wisconsin. Earthworm numbers and biomass were decreased by FGD and mined gypsums in Ohio. Among all the elements examined, Hg was slightly increased in soils and earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the control and the mined gypsum treatments. The differences were not statistically significant except for the Hg concentration in the soil at the Wisconsin site. Selenium in earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments was statistically higher than in the controls but not higher than in the mined gypsum treatments at the Indiana and Wisconsin sites. Bioaccumulation factors for nondepurated earthworms were statistically similar or lower for the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the controls for all elements. Use of FGD gypsum at normal recommended agricultural rates seems not to have a significant impact on concentrations of trace metals in earthworms and soils. PMID:25602559

  9. Daily intake of trace metals through coffee consumption in India.

    PubMed

    Suseela, B; Bhalke, S; Kumar, A V; Tripathi, R M; Sastry, V N

    2001-02-01

    The trace element contents of five varieties of instant coffee powder available in the Indian market have been analysed. Ca, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn and Pb, Cd, Cu have been determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, respectively. The metal levels in the coffee powders observed in this study are comparable with those reported for green coffe beans (Arabica and Robusta variety) reported worldwide with the exception of Sr and Zn, which were on the lower side of the reported values. Concentrations of these metals have been converted into intake figures based on coffee consumption. The daily intakes of the above metals through ingestion of coffee are 1.4 mg, 1.58 microg, 124 microg, 41.5 mg, 4.9 mg, 17.9 microg, 2.9 microg, 3.8 microg, 12.5 microg, 0.2 microg, 0.03 microg and 15.5 microg, respectively. The values, which were compared with the total dietary, intake of metals through ingestion by the Mumbai population, indicate that the contribution from coffee is less than or around 1% for most of the elements except for Cr and Ni which are around 3%. PMID:11288908

  10. Concentration levels of essential and non-essential metals in Ethiopian khat (Catha edulis Forsk).

    PubMed

    Atlabachew, Minaleshewa; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Redi, Mesfin

    2010-12-01

    The levels of essential (Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, and Co) and non-essential (Cd and Pb) metal in six different varieties of Ethiopian khat (Catha edulis Forsk, an evergreen stimulant plant) commonly consumed in the country and exported to the neighboring countries were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Known weight of oven-dried khat samples were wet-digested using 2 mL of (69-72%) HNO(3) and 2 mL of (70%) HClO(4) for 2 h and 30 min at variable temperature (120-270°C). The mineral contents in the digests were analyzed using flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The following concentrations ranges in fresh-weight basis were recorded in decreasing order: Ca (1,038-2,173 µg/g) > Mg (478.2-812.3 µg/g) > Fe (53.95-82.83 µg/g) >Zn (5.18-9.40 µg/g) >Mn (6.98-8.66 µg/g) >Cu (1.85-5.53 µg/g) > Cr (0.66-3.47 µg/g) >Co (0.41-0.80 µg/g). A wide variation in the mineral contents of khat from different region of Ethiopia was noticed. The toxic metals (Pb and Cd) were not detected in all the samples analyzed. PMID:20177815

  11. Contribution to biomonitoring of some trace metals by deciduous tree leaves in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Tomasević, M; Vukmirović, Z; Rajsić, S; Tasić, M; Stevanović, B

    2008-02-01

    Leaves of the deciduous tree species, horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) and Turkish hazel (Corylus colurna L.) were used as accumulative biomonitors of trace metal pollution in the urban area of Belgrade. Using differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry, trace metal concentrations (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd) were determined at the single leaf level (ten leaves per species, per month), during two successive years with markedly different atmospheric level of trace metals. Increased trace metal concentrations in the leaves of A. hippocastanum reflected elevated atmospheric trace metal pollution, whereas C. colurna L. did not respond accordingly. The contents of Pb and Zn in soil over the same period also followed this trend. Anatomical analyses, in young as well as in old leaves of both species, indicated typical foliar injuries of plants exposed to stressful air conditions. Water relations that correspond to leaf age may have contributed to the considerable trace metal accumulation in leaves. PMID:17505898

  12. Clean Sampling and Analysis of River and Estuarine Waters for Trace Metal Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiann, Kuo-Tung; Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Most of the trace metal concentrations in ambient waters obtained a few decades ago have been considered unreliable owing to the lack of contamination control. Developments of some techniques aiming to reduce trace metal contamination in the last couple of decades have resulted in concentrations reported now being orders of magnitude lower than those in the past. These low concentrations often necessitate preconcentration of water samples prior to instrumental analysis of samples. Since contamination can appear in all phases of trace metal analyses, including sample collection (and during preparation of sampling containers), storage and handling, pretreatments, and instrumental analysis, specific care needs to be taken in order to reduce contamination levels at all steps. The effort to develop and utilize "clean techniques" in trace metal studies allows scientists to investigate trace metal distributions and chemical and biological behavior in greater details. This advancement also provides the required accuracy and precision of trace metal data allowing for environmental conditions to be related to trace metal concentrations in aquatic environments. This protocol that is presented here details needed materials for sample preparation, sample collection, sample pretreatment including preconcentration, and instrumental analysis. By reducing contamination throughout all phases mentioned above for trace metal analysis, much lower detection limits and thus accuracy can be achieved. The effectiveness of "clean techniques" is further demonstrated using low field blanks and good recoveries for standard reference material. The data quality that can be obtained thus enables the assessment of trace metal distributions and their relationships to environmental parameters. PMID:27404762

  13. Anatomically-related variations in trace-metal concentrations in hair

    SciTech Connect

    DeAntonio, S.M.; Katz, S.A.; Scheiner, D.M.; Wood, J.D.

    1982-12-01

    Scalp-hair analysis is used as an indicator of trace-metal concentrations in the human body. The major shortcoming of this approach is the inability to differentiate between endogenous and exogenous trace metals. Our analyses show no correlation between the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, or zinc in scalp hair and pubic hair in 67 donor-matched hair samples. We interpret this as a strong indication that exogenous trace metals make a significant contribution to the results for trace metals in human hair.

  14. Regulation of essential heavy metals (Cu, Cr, and Zn) by the freshwater prawn macrobrachium malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayram, K.; Geraldine, P.

    1996-02-01

    Despite the low concentrations of heavy metals in the surrounding medium, aquatic organisms take them up and accumulate them in their soft tissues to concentrations several fold higher than those of ambient levels. Knowledge of accumulation patterns of a particular trace metal is a prerequisite for understanding the significance of an observed metal concentration in a particular animal, especially from the aspect of biomonitoring. Many marine invertebrates accumulate heavy metals without any regulation and the accumulation necessarily being associated with mechanisms to store the metals in a detoxified form. Two detoxification mechanisms have been described, both of which may occur in one specimen. Heavy metals can either be bound up in insoluble metalliferous {open_quote}granules{close_quote}, or are bound to soluble metal-binding ligands, such as metallothioneins. Some marine decapod crustaceans have an innate ability to regulate the internal concentrations of essential but potentially toxic metals within a constant level, presumably to meet their metabolic demands. However, at present, there is no such information relating to freshwater decapod crustaceans, especially shrimps which occupy a totally different environment. Macrobrachium malcolmsonii, a potential aquaculture species for freshwater is found in abundance in one of the major Indian rivers, the Cauvery. In the present study, an attempt was made to determine whether the freshwater prawn, M. malcolmsonlii, is able to regulate the three essential elements, copper, chromium and zinc, over a wide range of dissolved concentrations. These three metals were chosen because the Cauvery River receives pollutants containing these metals.

  15. Estimation of essential and trace elements in some medicinal plants by PIXE and PIGE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, K. Nomita; Sarma, H. Nandakumar; Kumar, Sanjiv

    2008-04-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) techniques are employed for the determination of essential and trace elements in some commonly used medicinal plants of north east India. Light elements such as Na, Mg, Al and P are determined by PIGE while medium Z elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr are determined by PIXE. Analysis is performed on pellets (thick targets) prepared using powders of the specimens which, in turn, are obtained following a series of processing steps. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants, with the contents of Mn and Zn being notably large in certain specimens. Medicinal properties possessed by these plants have been correlated with their elemental distribution.

  16. Blood levels of trace metals and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tracy L; Beard, John D; Umbach, David M; Allen, Kelli; Keller, Jean; Mariosa, Daniela; Sandler, Dale P; Schmidt, Silke; Fang, Fang; Ye, Weimin; Kamel, Freya

    2016-05-01

    Some trace metals may increase risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), whereas others may be beneficial. Our goal was to examine associations of ALS with blood levels of selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn). We conducted a case-control study of 163 neurologist confirmed patients from the National Registry of Veterans with ALS and 229 frequency-matched veteran controls. We measured metal levels in blood using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between ALS and a doubling of metal levels using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. ALS was inversely associated with both Se (OR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8) and Zn (OR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8). Inverse associations with Se were stronger in patients with bulbar compared to spinal onset, worse function, longer diagnostic delay, and longer collection delay; inverse associations with Zn were stronger for those with worse function and longer collection delay. In contrast, ALS was positively associated with Cu (OR=3.4, 95% CI: 1.5-7.9). For Mn, no linear trend was evident (OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.6-1.3, Ptrend=0.51). Associations of Se, Zn, Cu, and Mn with ALS were independent of one another. Adjustment for lead levels attenuated the positive association of ALS with Cu but did not change associations with Se, Zn, or Mn. In conclusion, Se and Zn were inversely associated with ALS, particularly among those with worse function, suggesting that supplementation with these metals may benefit such patients, while Cu was positively associated with ALS. Deficiencies of Se and Zn and excess Cu may have a role in ALS etiology. PMID:27085208

  17. Trace metals and radionuclides in macroalgae from Moroccan coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Benkdad, Azzouz; Laissaoui, Abdelmourhit; Tornero, Maria Victoria; Benmansour, Moncef; Chakir, ElMahjoub; Garrido, Ignacio Moreno; Moreno, Julian Blasco

    2011-11-01

    Macroalgae species Codium sp, Bangia atropurpurea, Membranoptera alata, Plocamium cartilagineum, Dictyota dichotoma, Fucus spiralis and Stypocaulon scoparia were collected from seven stations along the north coast of Morocco. Samples were analysed to determine activities of naturally occurring radionuclides ((210)Pb, U isotopes and (40)K) and concentrations of metals (Zn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, Cd, As and Cr) using radiometric and ICP-OES techniques, respectively. Metal concentrations were within ranges reported in the scientific literature, and concentrations of bio-essential elements were in the order Mn>Fe> Zn>Cu in all samples. Brown algae had the highest concentrations of almost all metals, and concentrations decreased in the order brown>red>green algae. With respect to radionuclides, the red alga P. cartilagineum had the highest activities of (210)Pb, in most cases an order of magnitude higher than for the green alga Codium sp. (234)U and (238)U activities in all algae samples were in the range 0.96- 7.61 and 1.16-6.14 Bq/kg dry weight, respectively. Our analyses of radionuclide activities and metal concentrations in marine macroalgae showed large differences among taxa. These results provide insights into which algal species should be used for biomonitoring programmes. PMID:21298402

  18. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  19. Predicting the toxicity of sediment-associated trace metals with simultaneously extracted trace metal: Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations and dry weight-normalized concentrations: A critical comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.; Cubbage, J.C.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    The relative abilities of sediment concentrations of simultaneously extracted trace metal: acid-volatile sulfide (SEM:AVS) and dry weight- normalized trace metals to correctly predict both toxicity and nontoxicity were compared by analysis of 77 field-collected samples. Relative to the SEM:AVS concentrations, sediment guidelines based upon dry weight-normalized concentrations were equally or slightly more accurate in predicting both nontoxic and toxic results in laboratory tests.

  20. Sources and Contents of Heavy Metals and Other Trace Elements in Animal Manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trace elements are natural and added components of livestock and poultry feeds. Appropriate amounts of these trace elements in the diet of livestock and poultry ensures both health and reproduction. Unfortunately, many times trace metals that are added to livestock diets by producers or feed compani...

  1. Trace metal concentrations in post-hatching cuttlefish Sepia officinalis and consequences of dissolved zinc exposure.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Charles; Caplat, Christelle; Lehodey, Jean-Paul; Milinkovitch, Thomas; Koueta, Noussithé; Cosson, Richard Philippe; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the changes of 13 trace metal and metalloid concentrations (i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn) and their subcellular fractionation in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis reared in controlled conditions between hatching and 2 months post-hatching. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations were determined. Our results highlighted contrasting changes of studied metals. Indeed, As and Fe concentrations measured in hatchlings suggested a maternal transfer of these elements in cuttlefish. The non-essential elements Ag and Cd presented the highest accumulation during our study, correlated with the digestive gland maturation. During the 6 first weeks of study, soluble fractions of most of essential trace metals (i.e. Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Se, Zn) slowly increased consistently with the progressive needs of cuttlefish metabolism during this period. In order to determine for the first time in a cephalopod how metal concentrations and their subcellular distributions are impacted when the animals are trace metal-exposed, we studied previously described parameters in juveniles exposed to dissolved Zn at environmental (i.e. 50 μg l(-1)) and sublethal (i.e. 200 μg l(-1)) levels. Moreover, oxidative stress (i.e. glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and lipid peroxidation (LPO)) was assessed in digestive gland and gills after 1 and 2 months exposures. Our results highlighted no or low ability of this stage of life to regulate dissolved Zn accumulation during the studied period, consistently with high sensitivity of this organism. Notably, Zn exposures caused a concentration-dependent Mn depletion in juvenile cuttlefish, and an increase of soluble fraction of Ag, Cd, Cu without accumulation modifications, suggesting substitution of these elements (i.e. Mn, Ag, Cd, Cu) by Zn. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations decreased in individuals most exposed to Zn. Finally, no

  2. Genetic and geological imprints of evolutionary advance: A trace metal view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickaby, R. E.; Williams, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    known to increase generally in evolution. It appears that multiple organisms, from very diverse lineages were able to recognise, manage and ultimately make use of the newly available trace metals almost simultaneously. Indeed, the development of increasing use of both Cu and Zn was essential for the synthesis and management of both messengers and connective tissue, key evolutionary steps towards multicellularity. We consider that evolution was chemically constrained, and that average changes in availability of particularly Fe, Zn and Cu, were critical for the systematic development of organisms. Williams, R. J. P., and Frausto da Silva, JJR, The Chemistry of Evolution: The Development of our Ecosystem, Elsevier, The Netherlands, 2006. Williams, R. J. P., and R. E. M. Rickaby, Evolution’s Destiny, submitted.

  3. Inhibitive potentiometric detection of trace metals with ultrathin polypyrrole glucose oxidase biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ayenimo, Joseph G; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2015-05-01

    A method, based on the inhibition of an ultrathin polypyrrole-glucose oxidase (PPy-GOx) potentiometric biosensor response, is described for the detection of Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) ions. Based on experimental conditions (0.2 M pyrrole, 500 U mL(-1) GOx, and an applied current density of 0.05 mA cm(-2) and a polymerization period of 500s) previously published by us, PPy-GOx films of approximately 55 nm thick were used to demonstrate the inhibitive potentiometric detection of selected trace metals down to 0.079 μM Cu(2+), 0.025 μM Hg(2+), 0.024 μM Pb(2+) and 0.044 μM Cd(2+). Furthermore, good linear concentration ranges were achieved for Cu(2+) (0.079-16 μM), Hg(2+) (0.025-5 μM), Pb(2+) (0.10-15 μM) and Cd(2+) (0.04-62 μM). The analysis of the nature of the inhibition of glucose oxidase in the PPy-GOx biosensor by these metals was achieved by Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots. The shapes of the curves (exponential decay, parabolic and linear) obtained for the inhibitors suggest that the inhibition by the metal ions may not be exclusively directed at the essential -SH group, but involve additional binding sites of the enzyme. Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots suggest that the inhibition is competitive for Cd(2+), while non-competitive inhibition was observed for other metal ions. The ultra-thin PPy-GOx film enabled improved permeability to the metal inhibitors than possible with conventional biosensors with thicker films and, hence, better reflects the actual inhibition effect of the trace metals on the enzyme activity. The use of the ultra-thin film also eliminated the usual need for incubation of the enzyme electrode for a long period in the presence of the inhibitors. Furthermore, a rapid recovery of the enzyme activity was achieved by simply washing the electrode with water and storing in phosphate buffer for 10-15 min. The proposed biosensing approach was successfully used for the detection of individual trace metals in tap water, achieving a 98

  4. BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF SORBENT ADDITIVES FOR TRACE METAL CAPTURE AND RETENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The suitability of six minerals; silica, diatomaceous earth, kaolin, bauxite, alumina and attapulgite clay, as potential sorbents for the capture and immobilization of trace metals was evaluated. he behavior of five trace metals; arsenic, cadmium, chromium,, lead and nickel was t...

  5. Estimation of trace metal elements in oral mucosa specimens by using SR-XRF, PIXE, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tadahide; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dissolved elements from metal dental restorations are a major concern in lesions of the oral mucosa, and the evaluation of accumulated metal elements, especially their distribution and chemical state, is essential for determining the precise effects of trace metals. In this study, X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation (SR-XRF) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) were applied for distribution analysis of the trace metal elements contained in the oral mucosa, and the chemical states of the elements were estimated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Appropriate combination of these analysis techniques, particularly SR-XRF and PIXE, to visualize the distributions of the elements in the oral mucosa allowed for the observation and evaluation of accumulated metal ions and debris. Importantly, the analyses in this study could be carried out using conventional histopathological specimens without damaging the specimens. Therefore, this method would be applicable for the detection of accumulated trace metal elements in biopsy specimens from the oral mucosa. PMID:25522792

  6. Trace metal content in distinct genotypes of human neuroblastoma cells: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Gouget, B.; Moretto, Ph.; Michelet, C.; Bénard, J.; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    1997-07-01

    Some transition metals play important regulatory roles in gene expression. The disturbance of their cellular levels could be involved in oncogene expression and tumorigenesis. Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMPA) was used to measure cellular trace metal levels (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) in two human neuroblastoma cell lines characterized by distinct genotypes. In this paper, a specific protocol established for sample preparation of neuronal cultured cells is described. Trace metal concentrations in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-91 cells exhibiting respectively a single copy, and 60 copies, of the N- myc oncogene are reported. A brief discussion on experiment design for NMPA of trace metal functions in gene expression is also presented.

  7. Final report on CCQM-K89: Trace and essential elements in Herba Ecliptae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente, Liliana; Saxby, David; Merrick, Jeffrey; Kotzeva, Boriana; Mester, Zoltan; Yang, Lu; Willie, Scott; Feng, Liuxing; Wang, Jun; Labarraque, Guillaume; Rienitz, Olaf; Wai-mei Sin, Della; Mok, Chuen-sing; Wong, Siu-kay; Ng, Chi-shing; Fung, Wai-hong; Yau, Ho-pan; Zhu, Yanbei; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung Seok; Kim, In Jung; Lim, Young Ran; Ramirez Cruz, Pedro; Mercader Trejo, Flora E.; Valle Moya, Edith; Santiago Castellanos, Itzel; del Rocio Arvizu Torres, Maria; Manzano, Judith Velina Lara; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Yu A.; Shin, Richard; Horvat, Milena; Jacimovic, Radojko; Milacic, Radmila; Yafa, Charun; Taebunpakul, Sutthinun; Kaewkhomdee, Nattikarn; Phukphatthanachai, Pranee; Cankur, Oktay; Gonca Coskun, F.; Turk, Gregory C.; Davis, W. Clay; Wood, Laura J.; Murphy, Karen E.; Entwisle, John

    2013-01-01

    The key comparison CCQM-K89 was undertaken to demonstrate the capability of participating NMIs and DIs in measuring the contents of incurred trace elements (total arsenic, cadmium and lead) and essential elements (calcium and zinc) at µg/g (for arsenic, cadmium, lead and zinc) and mg/g (for calcium) levels in a herb matrix sample by various analytical techniques. This key comparison was organized by the Government Laboratory of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (GLHK) and agreed at the Inorganic Analysis Working Group Meeting in Hindås, Sweden in October 2010 as a benchmarking exercise with arsenic (a trace element) and calcium (an essential element) chosen as the 'exemplary' elements. It was also agreed that a pilot study CCQM-P126 would be run in parallel with this key comparison. The key comparison serves to facilitate claims by participants on the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) as listed in Appendix C of the Key Comparison Database (KCDB) under the Mutual Recognition Arrangement of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM MRA). A total of 20 NMIs/DIs registered for this programme and 18 of them submitted their results. Most of the participants used microwave acid digestion methods for sample dissolution. For the instrumental determination, a variety of techniques like ICP-MS, AAS, INAA, ICP-AES were employed by the participants. For this key comparison, inorganic core capabilities have been demonstrated by concerned participants with respect to methods including ICP-MS (without isotope dilution), ID-ICP-MS, ICP-AES, INAA, AAS and ion chromatography with iteratively matrix-matched calibration on the determination of total arsenic, calcium, cadmium, lead and zinc in a matrix of herb. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for

  8. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  9. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  10. Trace metal availability and effects on benthic community structure in floodplain lakes.

    PubMed

    van Griethuysen, Corine; van Baren, Joyce; Peeters, Edwin T H M; Koelmans, Albert A

    2004-03-01

    Effects of contaminants on communities are difficult to assess and poorly understood. We analyzed in situ effects of trace metals and common environmental variables on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in floodplain lakes. Alternative measures of trace metal availability were evaluated, including total metals, metals normalized on organic carbon (OC) or clay, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), combinations of SEM and acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), and metals accumulated by detritivore invertebrates (Oligochaeta). Accumulated metal concentrations correlated positively with sediment trace metals and negatively with surface water dissolved OC. Sixty-eight percent of the variation in benthic community composition was explained by a combination of 11 environmental variables, including sediment, water, and morphological characteristics with trace metals. Metals explained 2 to 6% of the community composition when SEM-AVS or individual SEM concentrations were regarded. In contrast, total, normalized, and accumulated metals were not significantly linked to community composition. We conclude that examination of SEM or SEM - AVS concentrations is useful for risk assessment of trace metals on the community level. PMID:15285361

  11. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Mark A. Musich

    2007-02-01

    Three potential additives for controlling mercury emissions from syngas at temperatures ranging from 350 to 500 F (177 to 260 C) were developed. Current efforts are being directed at increasing the effective working temperature for these sorbents and also being able to either eliminate any potential mercury desorption or trying to engineer a trace metal removal system that can utilize the observed desorption process to repeatedly regenerate the same sorbent monolith for extended use. Project results also indicate that one of these same sorbents can also successfully be utilized for arsenic removal. Capture of the hydrogen selenide in the passivated tubing at elevated temperatures has resulted in limited results on the effective control of hydrogen selenide with these current sorbents, although lower-temperature results are promising. Preliminary economic analysis suggests that these Corning monoliths potentially could be more cost-effective than the conventional cold-gas (presulfided activated carbon beds) technology currently being utilized. Recent Hg-loading results might suggest that the annualized costs might be as high as 2.5 times the cost of the conventional technology. However, this annualized cost does not take into account the significantly improved thermal efficiency of any plant utilizing the warm-gas monolith technology currently being developed.

  12. Trace metal accumulation in sediments and benthic macroinvertebrates before and after maintenance of a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P; Muthukrishnan, Swarna; Barshatzky, Kristen; Wallace, William

    2012-04-01

    Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) require regular maintenance. The impact on trace metal concentrations in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, New York, was investigated by analyzing sediment concentrations and tissue residues of the dominant macroinvertebrates (Tubifex tubifex) prior and subsequent to maintenance. Trace metal concentrations were assessed using standard serial extraction (for sediment) and acid digestion (for tissue burdens) techniques, followed by quantitative determination using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, respectively. The results suggest that disturbance of sediment during maintenance of the BMP resulted in an increase in the most mobile fraction of trace metals, especially those associated with finer grained sediments (< 63 tm), and as a consequence, measured metal concentrations in macroinvertebrates increased. Regressions of a subset of metal concentrations (copper, lead, and zinc) in sediment and the macroinvertebrate tissue burden samples generally increased as a result of maintenance. A follow-up sampling event 9 months after maintenance demonstrated that the most readily available form of trace metal in the BMP was reduced, which supports (1) long-term sequestration of metals in the BMP and (2) that elevated bioavailability following maintenance was potentially a transient feature of the disturbance. This study suggests that in the long-term, performing sediment removal might help reduce bioavailability of trace metal concentrations in both the BMP and the receiving water to which a BMP discharges. However, alternative practices might need to be implemented to reduce trace metal bioavailability in the short-term. PMID:22834226

  13. Distribution and Potential Toxicity of Trace Metals in the Surface Sediments of Sundarban Mangrove Ecosystem, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Ramanathan, A.; Mathukumalli, B. K. P.; Datta, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, enrichment and ecotoxocity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. Geoaccumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality w.r.t. Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves.

  14. Trace and ultratrace metals in bottled waters: survey of sources worldwide and comparison with refillable metal bottles.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William

    2009-01-15

    Bottled waters from diverse natural and industrial sources are becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Several potentially harmful trace metals (Ag, Be, Li, Ge, Sb, Sc, Te, Th, U) are not monitored regularly in such waters. As a consequence, there is extremely limited data on the abundance and potential health impacts of many potentially toxic trace elements. Containers used for the storage of bottled waters might also increase trace metal levels above threshold limits established for human consumption by the EPA or WHO. Applying strict clean room techniques and sector field ICP-MS, 23 elements were determined in 132 brands of bottled water from 28 countries. In addition, leaching experiments with high purity water and various popular metal bottles investigated the release of trace metals from these containers. The threshold limits for elements such as Al, Be, Mn and U in drinking water were clearly exceeded in some waters. Several bottled waters had Li concentrations in the low mg/L range, a level which is comparable to blood plasma levels of patients treated against manic depression with Li-containing drugs. The rate of release of trace metals from metal bottles assessed after 13 days was generally low, with one exception: Substantial amounts of both Sb and Tl were released from a commercially available pewter pocket flask, exceeding international guidelines 5- and 11-fold, respectively. Trace metal levels of most bottled waters are below guideline levels currently considered harmful for human health. The few exceptions that exist, however, clearly reveal that health concerns are likely to manifest through prolonged use of such waters. The investigated coated aluminium and stainless steel bottles are harmless with respect to leaching of trace metals into drinking water. Pocket flasks, in turn, should be selected with great care to avoid contamination of beverages with harmful amounts of potentially toxic trace metals such as Sb and Tl. PMID:18990431

  15. Source and Cycling of Trace Metals and Nutrients in a Microbial Coalbed Methane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earll, M. M.; Barnhart, E. P.; Ritter, D.; Vinson, D. S.; Orem, W. H.; Vengosh, A.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The source and cycling of trace metals and nutrients in coalbed methane (CBM) systems are controlled by both geochemical processes, such as dissolution or precipitation, and biological mediation by microbial communities. CBM production by the microbes is influenced by trace metals and macronutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P). Previous studies have shown the importance of these nutrients to both enhance and inhibit methane production; however, it's not clear whether they are sourced from coal via in-situ biodegradation of organic matter or transported into the seams with groundwater recharge. To address this knowledge gap, trace metal and nutrient geochemistry and the organic content of solid coal and associated groundwater will be investigated across a hydrologic gradient in CBM wells in the Powder River Basin, MT. Sequential dissolution experiments (chemical extraction of organic and inorganic constituents) using 8 core samples of coal and sandstone will provide insight into the presence of trace metals and nutrients in coalbeds, the associated minerals present, and their mobilization. If significant concentrations of N, P, and trace metals are present in core samples, in-situ sourcing of nutrients by microbes is highly probable. The biogeochemical evolution of groundwater, as it relates to trace metal and nutrient cycling by microbial consortia, will be investigated by targeting core-associated coal seams from shallow wells in recharge areas to depths of at least 165 m and across a 28 m vertical profile that include overburden, coal, and underburden. If microbial-limiting trace metals and nutrients are transported into coal seams with groundwater recharge, we would expect to see higher concentrations of trace metals and nutrients in recharge areas compared to deeper coalbeds. The results of this study will provide novel understanding of where trace metals and nutrients are sourced and how they are cycled in CBM systems.

  16. Trace metal retention in mangrove ecosystems in Guanabara Bay, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Silva-Filho, E V; Oliveira, R R; Lacerda, L D

    2002-11-01

    Along contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., degree of trace metal contamination and mangrove forest structural development), sediments of Laguncularia racemosa-dominated mangrove stands in Guanabara Bay (SE Brazil) presented a trend of trace metal accumulation in forms with low potential of remobilization and biotic uptake. Concurrently, a relatively low transfer of sediment-bound metals to L. racemosa leaves was observed, which may moderate the metal export from the forests via leaf litter transport and the metal availability to enter in food chains based on leaf consumption. PMID:12523527

  17. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern.

    PubMed

    Anal, Jasha Momo H

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  18. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Anal, Jasha Momo H.

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  19. Microbial Influences on Trace Metal Cycling in a Meromictic Lake, Fayetteville Green Lake, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A. L.; House, C.; Kump, L.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms can exist in aquatic environments at very high cell densities of up to 1011 cells/L, and can accumulate significant quantities of trace metals. Bacteria actively take up bioactive trace metals, including Fe, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Mo, which function as catalytic centers in metalloproteins and metal-activated enzymes involved in virtually all cellular functions. In addition, bacteria may catalyze the release of trace metals from inorganic substrates by processes such as the reduction of iron and manganese oxides, suggesting that trace metal distributions within a natural environment dominated by microbial processes may be controlled primarily by microbial ecology. Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), NY, is a permanently stratified meromictic lake that has a well-oxygenated surface water mass (mixolimnion) overlying a relatively stagnant, anoxic deep water mass (monimolimnion). A chemocline separates the water masses at around 20m depth, where oxygen concentrations decrease and sulfate and methane concentrations increase. In addition, previous studies have indicated that trace metals such as V, Cr, Co, Mn, and Fe reach elevated concentrations at the chemocline. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of FGL samples from depths of up to 40m with bacterial and archaeal probes, we have shown that fluctuating redox conditions within the FGL water column correlate with significant variations in the composition and distribution of microbial populations with depth. The mixolimnion is dominated by Eubacteria, with increasing concentrations of Archaea in the lower anoxic zone. Increases in microbial cell densities coincide with increases in trace metals at the chemocline, suggesting microbial activity may be responsible for trace metal release at this boundary. 16S rRNA PCR cloning techniques are currently being used to identify dominant microbial populations at various levels within the FGL water column. Future studies will focus on the potential for these

  20. Geochronology and historical deposition of trace metals in three tropical estuaries in the Gulf of Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, Edem; Nyarko, Elvis; Hulme, Samuel; Swarzenski, Peter; Asiedu, Daniel K.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-01

    The depositional histories of trace metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) in sediment cores from three Ghanaian estuaries were reconstructed using radioisotope-derived (210Pb and 137Cs) geochronologies. A core collected from each of the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries was analyzed for trace metals and radionuclides. Lead-210 and 137Cs dating via gamma spectroscopy, and trace metal analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used in deriving sedimentation rates, geochronologies and accumulation trends of trace metals. The sedimentation rates in all three estuaries (in the range of 0.54-0.83 cm yr-1) were greater than the predicted sea level rise (∼0.33 cm yr-1) for the Accra Coast of Ghana. The 210Pb depositional rates of 6.83 dpm cm-2 y-1, 2.74 dpm cm-2 y-1 and 1.75 dpm cm-2 y-1 estimated for the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries, respectively, are higher than those recorded in other latitudes. Trace metal analysis revealed differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn between deeper and surficial layers of each core to be in the range of 10-20%, which is well within the natural variations attributed to geochemical factors. Relative to the Amisa and Volta estuaries, the temporal profiles of Al-normalized metal concentrations and estimated fluxes suggest anthropogenic processes augmented the natural fluxes of trace metals, particularly Zn into the Sakumo II estuary during the last 7 years.

  1. Presence of trace metals in aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Italy).

    PubMed

    Squadrone, S; Brizio, P; Stella, C; Prearo, M; Pastorino, P; Serracca, L; Ercolini, C; Abete, M C

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding chemical pollutant levels in farmed fish and shellfish, along with the risks associated with their consumption is still scarce. This study was designed to assess levels of exposure to 21 trace elements in fish (Dicentrarchus labrax), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected from aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Metal concentrations showed great variability in the three species; the highest values of the nonessential elements As and Cd were found in oysters while the highest levels of Al, Pb and V were found in mussels. The essential elements Cu, Mn and Zn were highest in oysters, but Fe, Cr, Ni, Se, Co and Mo levels were highest in mussels. Fish had the lowest concentrations for all trace elements, which were at least one order of magnitude lower than in bivalves. The rare earth elements cerium and lanthanum were found at higher levels in mussels than in oysters, but undetectable in fish. The maximum values set by European regulations for Hg, Cd and Pb were never exceeded in the examined samples. However, comparing the estimated human daily intakes (EHDIs) with the suggested tolerable copper and zinc intakes suggested a potential risk for frequent consumers of oysters. Similarly, people who consume high quantities of mussels could be exposed to concentrations of Al that exceed the proposed TWI (tolerable weekly intake). PMID:27179326

  2. Trace metal distribution in sediments of northern continental shelf of Crete Island, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, S. E.; Dounas, C. G.; Alexandrakis, G.; Koulouri, P.; Drakopoulos, P.

    2009-08-01

    The present study investigates the distribution of trace metals (Zn, Hg, Cd, Cu, and Pb), as indicators of pollution, in the surficial offshore shelf sediments along the northern coast of Heraklion Prefecture (Crete, Mediterranean Sea). The concentrations and the spatial distribution of the different trace metals, in relation to the sedimentological characteristics and the water circulation pattern of the entire continental shelf, are associated with human inshore sources of pollutants located along the coastline of the study area. Although the trace metal concentrations measured are higher than the background values, they are not considered to be dangerous to human health, as they are lower than the standard values given by the World Health Organisation, with only a few localised exceptions. Furthermore, results reveal the important role of local hydrodynamism that moves fine-grained material and associated trace metals offshore (seawards to wave breaking zone) and then transports them eastwards by entrapping them in the prevailing offshore shelf-water circulation.

  3. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING AND FIELD FILTRATION METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TRACE METALS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selected groundwater sampling and filtering methods were evaluated to determine their effects on field parameters and trace metal concentrations in samples collected under several types of field conditions. he study focused on sampling in conventional standpipe monitoring wells u...

  4. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  5. Characterizing the Environmental Availability of Trace Metals in Savannah River Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-03-18

    An eight step sequential extraction technique was used to characterize the environmental availability of trace metals from background and waste site soil samples collected from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS).

  6. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of heavy metals and related trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.B.; Speigel, S.J.

    1983-06-01

    A literature review of bioaccumulation and toxicity of heavy metals is presented. The most common heavy metals studied were Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Sn, Hg, and Pb. The studies dealt with heavy metals in the environment, bioconcentration, toxicity, and detoxification of heavy metals. (JMT)

  7. Distribution of trace impurities of metals during their adsorption from solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Toranov, A.N.; Evseeva, N.K.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1986-09-01

    The phase distribution of trace impurities of metals between solutions of phosphoric acid and a polymer adsorbent based on a copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene, impregnated with di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid, was investigated. The influence of the composition of the aqueous and solid phases on the distribution coefficients of trace impurities of metals is discussed. It was shown that the coefficients of interfacial distribution in the case of adsorption by an impregnated adsorbent is higher than in the case of liquid extraction.

  8. Facilitation Drives the Positive Effects of Plant Richness on Trace Metal Removal in a Biodiversity Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yuan; Chen, Tong; Bai, Yi; Qian, Bao Ying; Zhang, Chong Bang

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytoextraction is an environmentally acceptable and inexpensive technique for mine tailing rehabilitation that uses metallophyte plants. These plants reduce the soil trace metal contents to environmentally acceptable levels by accumulating trace metals. Recently, whether more trace metals can be removed by species-rich communities of these plants received great attention, as species richness has been reported having positive effects on ecosystem functions. However, how the species richness affects trace metals removal of plant communities of mine tailing is rarely known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of species richness on soil trace metal removal in both natural and experimental plant communities. The root lengths and stem heights of each plant species were measured in order to calculate the functional diversity indices. Our results showed that trace metal (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) concentrations in mine tailing soil declined as species richness increased in both the natural and experimental plant communities. Species richness, rather than functional diversity, positively affected the mineralomass of the experimental plant communities. The intensity of plant-plant facilitation increased with the species richness of experimental communities. Due to the incremental role of plant-plant facilitation, most of the species had higher biomasses, higher trace metal concentrations in their plant tissues and lower malondialdehyde concentrations in their leaves. Consequently, the positive effects of species richness on mineralomass were mostly attributable to facilitation among plants. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide clear evidence that, due to plant-plant facilitation, species richness positively affects the removal of trace metals from mine tailing soil through phytoextraction and provides further information on diversity conservation and environmental remediation in a mine tailing environment. PMID:24695538

  9. Effects of trace metal ions on secondary metabolism and the morphological development of streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Fabricio M; Goo, Kian-Sim; Ulanova, Dana

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptomyces genus are characterized by a complex life cycle and the production of many bioactive secondary metabolites. Trace metals play an important role in streptomycete metabolism and development, however, their mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on metallosensing regulators and trace metal action, as well as discuss the possible application in natural product discovery. PMID:27110673

  10. Essential, trace and toxic element concentrations in the liver of the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish (Mola mola).

    PubMed

    Perrault, Justin R; Buchweitz, John P; Lehner, Andreas F

    2014-02-15

    No studies document essential (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium), trace (barium, boron, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, zinc) or toxic element (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, thallium) concentrations in any members of the family Molidae, including the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish (Mola mola). Here, we analyzed 21 elements in the liver of one M. mola. These values were compared to liver concentrations in multiple species with spatial and dietary overlap. Concentrations of calcium (3339 ppm wet weight) and iron (2311 ppm wet weight) were extremely elevated in comparison to a number of other fish species, indicating that calcium and/or iron toxicity may have occurred in this animal. Concentrations of toxic elements were generally low, with the exception of cadmium (3.5 ppm). This study represents the first report of essential, trace and toxic elements in this species. PMID:24341944

  11. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7 ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6 ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5 ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8 ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6 ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa. PMID:26228069

  12. Insight of EDX analysis and EFTEM: are spherocrystals located in Strombidae digestive gland implied in detoxification of trace metals?

    PubMed

    Volland, Jean-Marie; Lechaire, Jean-Pierre; Frebourg, Ghislaine; Aranda, Dalila Aldana; Ramdine, Gaëlle; Gros, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Digestive tubules of Strombidae are composed by three cell types: digestive cells, vacuolated cells, and crypt cells. The last one is characterized by the presence of intracellular granules identified as spherocrystals. Such structures are known to occur in basophilic cells of gastropod digestive gland, where they are supposed to be involved in the regulation of some minerals and in detoxification. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) were used to determine the elemental content of spherocrystals in two Strombidae, Strombus gigas and Strombus pugilis. In freshly collected individuals of both species, the following elements were detected: Ca, Fe, Mg, P, and Zn. Aluminum and Mn were also detected in S. gigas. Their presence in spherocrystals indicates that, in Strombidae, spherocrystals are involved in the regulation of minerals and essential trace metals. In order to answer the question "are spherocrystals involved in nonessential trace metals scavenging?," artificial cadmium and lead exposure by both waterborne and dietary pathways was applied to S. pugilis. No evidence of cadmium (Cd(NO(3))(2)) or lead (Pb(NO(3))(2)) provided by food was found in spherocrystals. Cadmium provided in water (Cd(NO(3))(2) and CdCl(2)) causes structural modifications of the digestive gland; however, this element was not trapped in spherocrystals. These results suggest that spherocrystals are not involved in detoxification of such nonessential trace metals. PMID:21919125

  13. Determination of trace and heavy metals in some commonly used medicinal herbs in Ayurveda.

    PubMed

    Nema, Neelesh K; Maity, Niladri; Sarkar, Birendra K; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2014-11-01

    Traditionally, the herbal drugs are well established for their therapeutic benefits. Depending upon their geographical sources sometimes the trace and heavy metals' content may differ, which may lead to severe toxicity. So, the toxicological and safety assessment of these herbal drugs are one of the major issues in recent days. Eight different plant species including Aloe vera, Centella asiatica, Calendula officinalis, Cucumis sativus, Camellia sinensis, Clitoria ternatea, Piper betel and Tagetes erecta were selected to determine their heavy and trace metals content and thereby to assure their safer therapeutic application. The trace and heavy metals were detected through atomic absorption spectrometry analysis. The selected medicinal plant materials were collected from the local cultivated regions of West Bengal, India, and were digested with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid as specified. Absorbance was measured through atomic absorption spectrometer (AA 303) and the concentration of different trace and heavy metals in the plant samples were calculated. The quantitative determinations were carried out using standard calibration curve obtained by the standard solutions of different metals. The contents of heavy metals were found to be within the prescribed limit. Other trace metals were found to be present in significant amount. Thus, on the basis of experimental outcome, it can be concluded that the plant materials collected from the specific region are safe and may not produce any harmful effect of metal toxicity during their therapeutic application. The investigated medicinal plants contain trace metals such as copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) as well as heavy metals such as arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), which were present within the permissible limit. PMID:23222691

  14. Assessment of diffuse trace metal inputs into surface waters - Combining empirical estimates with process based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Steinz, André; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    As a result of mining activities since the 13th century, surface waters of the German Mulde catchment suffer from deleterious dissolved and sediment attached lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) inputs. The leaching rate of trace metals with drainage water is a significant criterion for assessing trace metal concentrations of soils and associated risks of ground water pollution. However, the vertical transport rates of trace metals in soils are difficult to quantify. Monitoring is restricted to small lysimeter plots, which limits the transferability of results. Additionally the solid-liquid-transfer conditions in soils are highly variable, primarily due to the fluctuating retention time of percolating soil water. In contrast, lateral sediment attached trace metal inputs are mostly associated with soil erosion and resulting sediment inputs into surface waters. Since soil erosion by water is related to rare single events, monitoring and empirical estimates reveal visible shortcomings. This gap in knowledge can only be closed by process based model calculations. Concerning these calculations it has to be considered, that Pb and Zn are predominantly attached to the fine-grained soil particles (<0.063 mm). The selective nature of soil erosion causes a preferential transport of these fine particles, while less contaminated larger particles remain on site. Consequently trace metals are enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. This paper aims to introduce both, a new method that allows the assessment of trace metal leaching rates from contaminated top soils for standardised transfer conditions and a process based modelling approach for sediment attached trace metal inputs into surface waters. Pb and Zn leaching rates amounts to 20 Mg ha-1 yr-1 resp. 114 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Deviations to observed dissolved trace metal yields at the Bad Düben gauging station are caused by plant uptake and subsoil retention. Sediment attached Pb and Zn input rates amounts to 114 Mg ha-1 yr

  15. Depuration effects on trace metals in Anomalocardia brasiliana (Gmelin, 1791)

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner-Kersanach, M. ); Lobo, S.E.; Silva, E.M. da )

    1994-06-01

    Bivalves have been regarded as suitable bioindicators of metal pollution in the marine and estuarine environments. However, the metal concentrations of the soft parts of individual bivalves can vary considerably depending on size variations, geographic and genetic differences, individual variability in metal uptake, ingestion of sediment particles and induction of metal-binding proteins. Metal-containing particulate matter in the gut can also be significant. These authors showed that if deputation is not carried out, then large variations in metal concentrations are more likely to occur. In the Todos os Santos Bay on the northeastern coast of Brazil, the cockle A. brasiliana is the most abundant bivalve and is well adapted to area conditions. An important source of food for many local communities, this species has been frequently used as an indicator for heavy metals pollution; however, no data have been published on metal concentrations of A. brasiliana of different size classes and on the effects of deputation on overall concentration. It is therefore important to determine the metal concentrations in A. brasiliana both from the point of view of how the concentrations relate to metal loading of the area. The effect of size upon metal concentration of shellfish has been examined by Boyden, who found that zinc in Mytilus edulis was greater in smaller individuals while cadmium was independent of size. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead in A. brasiliana collected from a site with a relatively low impact of heavy metal contamination, to examine metals in different size classes and to assess the effect of depuration on tissue concentration of the metals. These elements were selected due to their toxicity to marine organisms, when their excess as free metal may interact with cell structures and/or enzymes affecting metabolic activities. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. In situ redeposition of trace metals mobilized by CO2-charged brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigley, M.; Kampman, N.; Chapman, H. J.; Dubacq, B.; Bickle, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    Mobilization of contaminants by CO2-charged brines is one concern relating to injection of CO2 as part of carbon capture and storage projects. This study monitors the mobility of trace metals in an exhumed CO2-charged aquifer near the town of Green River, Utah (USA), where CO2-charged brines have bleached red sandstones, and concentrated trace metals at the bleaching reaction front. Mass balance calculations on the trace metal enrichments are used to calculate time-integrated fluid fluxes and show that a significant fraction of the metals mobilized by the CO2-rich brines are redeposited locally. A sequential extraction procedure on metal-enriched samples shows that these metals are incorporated into secondary carbonate and oxide phases which have been shown to grow at the CO2-promoted bleaching reaction front. We argue that while CO2-charged brines are capable of mobilizing trace metals, local metal redeposition implies that the potential for contamination of overlying freshwater aquifers is low.

  17. Trace Metals in the Early Ocean, Biological Implications, and Evolving Biospheric Redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, T. W.; Scott, C.; Gill, B. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved molybdenum abounds in modern, oxygen-rich seawater as the highly soluble molybdate ion. But this trace metal, also a nutrient essential to phytoplankton productivity, was not always so readily available. Several periods of the geologic past are noted for being euxinic (i.e., oxygen-poor and sulfide-rich) at regional or perhaps even global scales. During the Proterozoic in particular, numerous euxinic settings may have persisted in the ocean for a billion years or more following the initial rise of oxygen in the atmosphere. Under such conditions, Mo is sequestered efficiently, and corresponding limitation in the oceanic inventory may have impacted nitrogen fixation by prokaryotes, as well as uptake of fixed nitrogen by early eukaryotes. Mo is essential for nitrogen fixation and nitrate assimilation as a cofactor for nitrogenase and assimilatory nitrate reductase enzymes, respectively. Evidence for analogous limitations is emerging for portions of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic, but the potential impacts have not yet been considered. In each case, the critical arguments hang on our ability (1) to estimate oceanic extents of oxygen-poor, sulfide-rich settings for the time slice of interest and (2) to discriminate Mo drawdown in the global ocean from that occurring locally within individual basins. Traditional and emerging approaches for distinguishing local from global ancient anoxia/euxinia will be highlighted with an eye toward estimating the impact on availability of Mo and other bioessential, redox-sensitive transition metals. The context for this exploration will be the long history of evolving redox in the ocean and atmosphere from the Archean forward. The Phanerozoic examples are also associated with major biotic extinction events, and our understanding of the relationships among the primary drivers of extinction, widespread euxinic conditions, and the impact of micronutrient availability during extinction and recovery remains nascent.

  18. Distribution and pollution assessment of trace metals in seawater and sediment in Laizhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Dongwei; Zheng, Bing; Fang, Yan; Shen, Ge; Liu, Huijun

    2015-07-01

    Selected trace metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Hg) and arsenic in seawater and surface sediments of Laizhou Bay were determined, to evaluate their spatial distribution, pollution risk and potential ecological risk. Concentrations of the elements were 0.56-2.07, 0.14-0.38, 12.70-18.40, 0.014-0.094, and 1.13-2.37 μg/L in the seawater and 8.94-32.2, 0.18-0.67, 4.51-30.5, 0.006-0.058, and 5.75-15.3 mg/kg in sediments for Pb, Cd, Cu, Hg and As, respectively. High concentrations of the trace metals and arsenic in seawater and surface sediments were generally observed near the river estuary. The pollution risk result of the elements showed that Cu was the prominent trace metal pollutant in seawater, followed by Hg, Pb, Cd and As. The metal complex pollution index in seawater was at a medium level. The most important trace metal pollutant in sediments was Cd, followed by As, Cu, Pb, and Hg. Our pollution assessment suggests that trace metal pollution in Laizhou Bay sediments was at a low level. The potential ecological risk was also low in surface sediment.

  19. Modelling of trace metal uptake by roots taking into account complexation by exogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Marc, Custos; Christian, Moyne; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2010-05-01

    The context of this study is phytoextraction of soil trace metals such as Cd, Pb or Zn. Trace metal transfer from soil to plant depends on physical and chemical processes such as minerals alteration, transport, adsorption/desorption, reactions in solution and biological processes including the action of plant roots and of associated micro-flora. Complexation of metal ions by organic ligands is considered to play a role on the availability of trace metals for roots in particular in the event that synthetic ligands (EDTA, NTA, etc.) are added to the soil to increase the solubility of the contaminants. As this role is not clearly understood, we wanted to simulate it in order to quantify the effect of organic ligands on root uptake of trace metals and produce a tool which could help in optimizing the conditions of phytoextraction.We studied the effect of an aminocarboxilate ligand on the absorption of the metal ion by roots, both in hydroponic solution and in soil solution, for which we had to formalize the buffer power for the metal. We assumed that the hydrated metal ion is the only form which can be absorbed by the plants. Transport and reaction processes were modelled for a system made up of the metal M, a ligand L and the metal complex ML. The Tinker-Nye-Barber model was adapted to describe the transport of solutes M, L and ML in the soil and absorption of M by the roots. This allowed to represent the interactions between transport, chelating reactions, absorption of the solutes at the root surface, root growth with time, in order to simulate metal uptake by a whole root system.Several assumptions were tested such as i) absorption of the metal by an infinite sink and according to a Michaelis-Menten kinetics, solutes transport by diffusion with and without ii) mass flow and iii) soil buffer power for the ligand L. In hydroponic solution (without soil buffer power), ligands decreased the trace metal flux towards roots, as they reduced the concentration of hydrated

  20. Bioaccessibility of essential and non-essential metals in commercial shellfish from Western Europe and Asia.

    PubMed

    Amiard, Jean-Claude; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Charbonnier, Laetitia; Mesnil, Aurélie; Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2008-06-01

    Maximum acceptable concentrations of metals in food - based on total concentrations - have been established in many countries. To improve risk assessment, it would be better to take into account bioaccessible concentrations. A total of seven species of molluscs from France, UK and Hong Kong was examined in this study including clams, mussels, oysters, scallops and gastropods. The species which have total metal concentrations higher than the most severe food security limits are mainly oysters (all of the three studied species), the gastropod Buccinum undatum for cadmium and zinc, and scallops for cadmium. The lowest bioaccessibility (in % extractability with gut juices) was observed for silver (median for all of the species: 14%), it was moderate for lead (median: 33%) and higher for cadmium, zinc and copper (medians were respectively 54%, 65%, and 70%). In most cases, bioaccessible concentrations remained higher than the safety limits, except for cadmium in scallops and zinc in B. undatum. The influence of feeding habit (masticated or swallowed, addition of vinegar or lemon) on metal bioaccessibility in oysters is limited. On the contrary, cooking the gastropods decreased the bioaccessibility of metals, except silver. PMID:18329777

  1. ATMOSPHERIC INPUT OF TRACE METALS TO LAKE MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric bulk deposition was collected on a monthly basis in the Lake Michigan basin from September 1975 through December 1976 to determine the atmospheric loading of trace elements to Lake Michigan. The sampling network consisted of bulk collectors located at 21 locations in ...

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of the uptake of essential and xenobiotic metal cations in cells of the soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Kamnev, A A; Renou-Gonnord, M F; Antonyuk, L P; Colina, M; Chernyshev, A V; Frolov, I; Ignatov, V V

    1997-01-01

    The results of flame (FAAS) or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GFAAS) analyses are presented and discussed on the accumulation of essential metals (Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe contained in the cultivation medium) and traces of each one of the conventionally xenobiotic elements from the group V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Pb, added to the medium in concentrations (0.2 mM) which do not essentially suppress growth of the bacterial culture, in cells of the plant root-associated nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Along with the essential cations assimilated by the bacterium, Zn and Cu were found to effectively accumulate in the biomass from the environment. The uptake of Co and Ni was significantly less pronounced, whereas Pb and V appeared to be present in cells in much lower concentrations than in the cultivation medium evidently showing no tendency to be assimilated by azospirilla. The effect of the above xenobiotics on the uptake level of the four essential elements provided evidence that they may compete for the formation of biologically active complexes with substances of both intracellular and extracellular localization. The analytical data obtained are compared with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of intact vacuum-dried bacterial cells grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake. PMID:9043641

  3. Seawater-induced mobilization of trace metals from mackinawite-rich estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa N L; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A; Slavich, Peter G

    2013-02-01

    Benthic sediments in coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) drains can contain high concentrations (~1-5%) of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) as nano-particulate mackinawite. These sediments can sequester substantial quantities of trace metals. Because of their low elevation and the connectivity of drains to estuarine channels, these benthic sediments are vulnerable to rapid increases in ionic strength from seawater incursion by floodgate opening, floodgate failure, storm surge and seasonal migration of the estuarine salt wedge. This study examines the effect of increasing seawater concentration on trace metal mobilization from mackinawite-rich drain sediments (210-550 μmol g⁻¹ AVS) collected along an estuarine salinity gradient. Linear combination fitting of S K-edge XANES indicated mackinawite comprised 88-96% of sediment-bound S. Anoxic sediment suspensions were conducted with seawater concentrations ranging from 0% to 100%. We found that mobilization of some metals increased markedly with increasing ionic strength (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni) whereas Al mobilization decreased. The largest proportion of metals mobilized from the labile metal pool, operationally defined as Σexchangeable + acid-extractable + organically-bound metals, occurred in sediments from relatively fresh upstream sites (up to 39% mobilized) compared to sediments sourced from brackish downstream sites (0-11% mobilized). The extent of relative trace metal desorption generally followed the sequence Mn > Ni ≈ Cu > Zn > Fe > Al. Trace metal mobilization from these mackinawite-rich sediments was attributed primarily to desorption of weakly-bound metals via competitive exchange with marine-derived cations and enhanced complexation with Cl⁻ and dissolved organic ligands. These results have important implications for trace metal mobilization from these sediments at near-neutral pH under current predicted sea-level rise and climate change scenarios. PMID:23199454

  4. Trace Metal Acquisition by Marine Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton with Contrasting Trophic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria in the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages shape the marine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur cycles, yet they do so having adopted divergent ecological strategies. Currently, it is unknown whether these globally significant groups partition into specific niches with respect to micronutrients (e.g., trace metals) and how that may affect marine trace metal cycling. Here, we used comparative genomics to identify diverse iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc uptake capabilities in SAR11 and Roseobacter genomes and uncover surprising unevenness within and between lineages. The strongest predictors for the extent of the metal uptake gene content are the total number of transporters per genome, genome size, total metal transporters, and GC content, but numerous exceptions exist in both groups. Taken together, our results suggest that SAR11 have strongly minimized their trace metal uptake versatility, with high-affinity zinc uptake being a unique exception. The larger Roseobacter genomes have greater trace metal uptake versatility on average, but they also appear to have greater plasticity, resulting in phylogenetically similar genomes having largely different capabilities. Ultimately, phylogeny is predictive of the diversity and extent of 20 to 33% of all metal uptake systems, suggesting that specialization in metal utilization mostly occurred independently from overall lineage diversification in both SAR11 and Roseobacter. We interpret these results as reflecting relatively recent trace metal niche partitioning in both lineages, suggesting that concentrations and chemical forms of metals in the marine environment are important factors shaping the gene content of marine heterotrophic Alphaproteobacteria of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages. PMID:26729720

  5. Trace Metal Acquisition by Marine Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton with Contrasting Trophic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hogle, Shane L; Thrash, J Cameron; Dupont, Chris L; Barbeau, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria in the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages shape the marine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur cycles, yet they do so having adopted divergent ecological strategies. Currently, it is unknown whether these globally significant groups partition into specific niches with respect to micronutrients (e.g., trace metals) and how that may affect marine trace metal cycling. Here, we used comparative genomics to identify diverse iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc uptake capabilities in SAR11 and Roseobacter genomes and uncover surprising unevenness within and between lineages. The strongest predictors for the extent of the metal uptake gene content are the total number of transporters per genome, genome size, total metal transporters, and GC content, but numerous exceptions exist in both groups. Taken together, our results suggest that SAR11 have strongly minimized their trace metal uptake versatility, with high-affinity zinc uptake being a unique exception. The larger Roseobacter genomes have greater trace metal uptake versatility on average, but they also appear to have greater plasticity, resulting in phylogenetically similar genomes having largely different capabilities. Ultimately, phylogeny is predictive of the diversity and extent of 20 to 33% of all metal uptake systems, suggesting that specialization in metal utilization mostly occurred independently from overall lineage diversification in both SAR11 and Roseobacter. We interpret these results as reflecting relatively recent trace metal niche partitioning in both lineages, suggesting that concentrations and chemical forms of metals in the marine environment are important factors shaping the gene content of marine heterotrophic Alphaproteobacteria of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages. PMID:26729720

  6. Perirhinal and Postrhinal, but Not Lateral Entorhinal, Cortices Are Essential for Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Eugenie E.; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of temporal associative tasks such as trace eyeblink conditioning is hippocampus-dependent, while consolidated performance is not. The parahippocampal region mediates much of the input and output of the hippocampus, and perirhinal (PER) and entorhinal (EC) cortices support persistent spiking, a possible mediator of temporal…

  7. Mechanisms of enhanced mobilisation of trace metals by anionic surfactants in soil.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Soriano, Maria del Carmen; Degryse, Fien; Smolders, Erik

    2011-03-01

    Long-term applications of small concentrations of surfactants in soil via wastewater irrigation or pesticide application may enhance trace metal solubility. Mechanisms by which anionic surfactants (Aerosol 22, SDS and Biopower) affect trace metal solubility were assessed using batch, incubation and column experiments. In batch experiments on seven soils, the concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni and Zn in the dissolved fraction of soils increased up to 100-fold at the high application rates, but increased less than 1.5-fold below the critical micelle concentration. Dissolved metal concentrations were less than 20% affected by surfactants in long-term incubations (70 days) up to the largest dose of 200 mg C kg(-1) soil. Leaching soil columns with A22 (100-1000 mg C L(-1)) under unsaturated conditions increased trace metal concentrations in the leachates 2-4 fold over the control. Correlation analysis and speciation modelling showed that the increased solubility of metals upon surfactant application was more related to the solubilisation of soil organic matter from soil than to complexation of the metals with the surfactant. Organic matter from soil was solubilised in response to a decrease of solution Ca(2+) as a result of Ca-surfactant precipitation. At environmentally relevant concentrations, surfactant application is unlikely to have a significant effect on trace metal mobility. PMID:21163562

  8. N- myc oncogene amplification is correlated to trace metal concentrations in neuroblastoma cultured cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Benard, J.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    2000-10-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is a powerful predictor of aggressive behavior of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid tumor of the early childhood. Since N- myc overexpression - subsequent to amplification - determines a phenotype of invasiveness and metastatic spreading, it is assumed that N- myc amplified neuroblasts synthesize zinc metalloenzymes leading to tumor invasion and formation of metastases. In order to test a possible relation between N- myc oncogene amplification and trace metal contents in human NB cells, Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations have been measured by nuclear microprobe analysis in three human neuroblastoma cell lines with various degrees of N- myc amplification. Elemental determinations show uniform distribution of trace metals within the cells, but variations of intracellular trace metal concentrations with respect to the degree of N- myc amplification are highly dependent on the nature of the element. Zinc concentration is higher in both N- myc amplified cell lines (IMR-32 and IGR-N-91) than in the non-amplified cells (SK-N-SH). In contrast, intracellular iron content is particularly low in N- myc amplified cell lines. Moreover, copper concentrations showed an increase with the degree of N- myc amplification. These results indicate that a relationship exists between intracellular trace metals and N- myc oncogene amplification. They further suggest that trace metals very probably play a determinant role in mechanisms of the neuroblastoma invasiveness.

  9. Preservation of NOM-metal complexes in a modern hyperalkaline stalagmite: Implications for speleothem trace element geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Adam; Fairchild, Ian J.; Müller, Wolfgang; Dominguez-Villar, David

    2014-03-01

    We report the first quantitative study of the capture of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and NOM-complexed trace metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) in speleothems. This study combines published NOM-metal dripwater speciation measurements with high-resolution laser ablation ICPMS (LA-ICPMS) and sub-annual stable isotope ratio (δ18O and δ13C), fluorescence and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses of a fast-growing hyperalkaline stalagmite (pH ˜11) from Poole’s Cavern, Derbyshire UK, which formed between 1997 and 2008 AD. We suggest that the findings reported here elucidate trace element variations arising from colloidal transport and calcite precipitation rate changes observed in multiple, natural speleothems deposited at ca. pH 7-8. We find that NOM-metal(aq) complexes on the boundary between colloidal and dissolved (˜1 nm diameter) show an annual cyclicity which is inversely correlated with the alkaline earth metals and is explained by calcite precipitation rate changes (as recorded by kinetically-fractionated stable isotopes). This relates to the strength of the NOM-metal complexation reaction, resulting in very strongly bound metals (Co in this system) essentially recording NOM co-precipitation (ternary complexation). More specifically, empirical partition coefficient (Kd) values between surface-reactive metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) [expressed as ratio of trace element to Ca ratios in calcite and in solution] arise from variations in the ‘free’ fraction of total metal in aqueous solution (fm). Hence, differences in the preservation of each metal in calcite can be explained quantitatively by their complexation behaviour with aqueous NOM. Differences between inorganic Kd values and field measurements for metal partitioning into calcite occur where [free metal] ≪ [total metal] due to complexation reactions between metals and organic ligands (and potentially inorganic colloids). It follows that where fm ≈ 0, apparent inorganic Kd app values are also ≈0, but the

  10. Trace metal accumulation in soil and their phytoavailability as affected by greenhouse types in north China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Biao; Mao, Mingcui; Yao, Lipeng; Hickethier, Martina; Hu, Wenyou

    2015-05-01

    Long-term heavy organic fertilizer application has linked greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) with trace metal contamination in north China. Given that trace metals release from fertilizers and their availability may be affected by discrepant environmental conditions, especially temperature under different greenhouses, this study investigated Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn accumulation and contamination extent in soil as well as their phytoavailability under two major greenhouses in Tongshan, north China, namely solar greenhouse (SG) and round-arched plastic greenhouse (RAPG), to evaluate their presumed difference. The results showed significant Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn accumulation in GVP soil by comparing with those in open-field soil, but their accumulation extent and rates were generally greater in SG than those in RAPG. This may be related to more release of trace metals to soil due to the acceleration of decomposition and humification process of organic fertilizers under higher soil temperature in SG relative to that in RAPG. Overall, soil in both greenhouses was generally less polluted or moderately polluted by the study metals. Similarly, decreased soil pH and elevated soil available metals in SG caused higher trace metals in leaf vegetables in SG than those in RAPG, although there was no obvious risk via vegetable consumption under both greenhouses. Lower soil pH may be predominantly ascribed to more intensive farming practices in SG while elevated soil available metals may be attributed to more release of dissolved organic matter-metal complexes from soil under higher temperature in SG. The data provided in this study may assist in developing reasonable and sustainable fertilization strategies to abate trace metal contamination in both greenhouses. PMID:25422117

  11. Interaction Between Trace Metals, Sodium and Sorbents in Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, O.L.; Davis, S.

    1997-10-17

    The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

  12. Trophic transfer of trace metals: Subcellular compartmentalization in a polychaete and assimilation by a decapod crustacean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical form of accumulated trace metal in prey is important in controlling the bioavailataility of dietary metal to a predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of radiolabelled Ag, Cd and Zn from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians. We used 2 populations of worms with different proportions of accumulated metals in different subcellular fractions as prey, and loaded the worms with radiolabelled metals either from sediment or from solution. Accumulated radiolabelled metals were fractionated into 5 components : metal-rich granules (MRG), cellular debris, organelles, metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP), and other (heat-sensitive) proteins (HSP). Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of the metals by P. varians were measured from the 4 categories of prey (i.e. 2 populations, radiolabelled from sediment or solution). There were significant differences for each metal between the AEs from the different prey categories, confirming that origin of prey and route of uptake of accumulated trace metal will cause intraspecific differences in subsequent metal assimilation. Correlations were sought between AEs and selected fractions or combinations of fractions of metals in the prey-MRG, Trophically Available Metal (TAM = MTLP + HSP + organelles) and total protein (MTLP + HSP). TAM explained 28% of the variance in AEs for Ag, but no consistent relationships emerged between AEs and TAM or total protein when the metals were considered separately. AEs did, however, show significant positive regressions with both TAM and total protein when the 3 metals were considered together, explaining only about 21 % of the variance in each case. A significant negative relationship was observed between MRG and AE for all metals combined. The predator (P. varians) can assimilate dietary metal from a range of the fractions binding metals in the prey (N. diversicolor), with different assimilation efficiencies summated across these

  13. Delonix regia and Casuarina equisetifolia as passive biomonitors and as bioaccumulators of atmospheric trace metals.

    PubMed

    Ukpebor, Emmanuel Ehiabhi; Ukpebor, Justina Ebehirieme; Aigbokhan, Emmanuel; Goji, Idris; Onojeghuo, Alex Okiemute; Okonkwo, Anthony Chinedum

    2010-01-01

    The suitability of two common and ubiquitously distributed and exotic ornamental plant species in Nigeria-Delonix regia and Casuarina equisetifolia as biomonitors and as effective bioaccumulators of atmospheric trace metals (Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu) has been evaluated. Bark and leaf samples from these plant species were collected in June and July 2006 at five locations in Benin City. Four of the sampling sites were in areas of high traffic density and commercial activities, the fifth site is a remote site, selected to act as a control and also to provide background information for the metals. The plant samples were collected and processed using standard procedures and trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrometer. The bark of the plants was able to bioaccumulate the trace metals, especially Pb which originates from anthropogenic contributions in the city. The Pb range of 20.00-70.00 microg/g measured for the bark samples of D. regia, exceeded the normal plant Pb concentration of 0.2-20.0 microg/g and most Pb data available in literature. The bark of the plants was observed to accumulate more metals compared to the leave, while D. regia was found to be slightly better than C. equisetifolia in trace metal uptake efficiency. Spatial variations in the distributions of Pb and Zn were significant (p < 0.05), and the continuous use of leaded fuel in Nigeria was identified as the predominant source of Pb in the atmosphere. PMID:21174998

  14. Trace Metals Affect Early Maternal Transfer of Immune Components in the Feral Pigeon.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Haussy, C; Frantz, A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal early transfers of immune components influence eggs' hatching probability and nestlings' survival. They depend on females' own immunity and, because they are costly, on their physiological state. Therefore, trace metals, whether toxic and immunosuppressive (e.g., lead, cadmium, etc.) or necessary and immunostimulant (e.g., zinc, copper, iron, etc.), are likely to affect the amount of immune components transferred into the eggs. It may also vary with plumage eumelanin level, which is known to be linked to immunity, to transfer of antibodies, and to metal detoxification. In feral pigeons (Columba livia) injected with an antigen and experimentally exposed to lead and/or zinc (two highly abundant trace metals in urban areas), we measured specific antibody transfer and concentrations of two antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme and ovotransferrin) in eggs. As expected, lead had negative effects on specific antibody transfer, while zinc positively affected lysozyme egg concentrations. Moreover, eggs from lead-exposed females exhibited higher ovotransferrin concentrations; because it binds metal ions, ovotransferrin may enable egg detoxification and embryo protection. Finally, eggs' lysozyme concentrations increased with plumage darkness of females not exposed to zinc, while the relation was opposite among zinc-exposed females, suggesting that benefits and costs of plumage melanism depend on trace metal environmental levels. Overall, our study underlines the potential ecotoxicological effects of trace metals on maternal transfers of immune components and the role of plumage melanism in modulating these effects. PMID:27153130

  15. Trace metal fate in a rotary-kiln incinerator with an ionizing wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; Fournier, D.J.; Lee, J.W.; Carroll, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bismuth were relatively volatile, with an average of less than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, lead, magnesium, and strontium were relatively nonvolatile, with an average of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed with the volatilities predicted based on vapor pressure/temperature relationships, with the exception of arsenic which was much less volatile than predicted. The volatility of cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased as kiln temperature was increased; the discharge distributions of the remaining metals were not significantly affected by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals averaged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for the less volatile metals. The overall average metal collection efficiency was 43 percent.

  16. Trace metal distributions in the sediments of the Little Akaki River, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Akele, M L; Kelderman, P; Koning, C W; Irvine, K

    2016-07-01

    The levels and distribution of trace metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) at eleven water and sediment stations on the Little Akaki River (LAR) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, were determined. The binding forms of the metals in various geochemical fractions of the sediments were also quantified. The molar ratio of the sum of the simultaneously extractable metals (∑SEM) and acid-volatile sulphide (AVS)-as a measure for predicting metal-induced toxicity-was estimated. LAR trace levels in water for Cu, Zn, and, particularly Mn were, in most instances, higher than the recommended guidelines for healthy aquatic ecosystems. Total trace metal (TTM) contents in the LAR sediments at certain stations exceeded "threshold effect concentrations" and even "probable effect concentrations", especially in the cases of Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and at all stations for Mn. This became more apparent after applying "normalizations" to the relatively lower TTM adsorption capacities of coarse-grained, organic-poor sediments. Sequential extraction of the sediments showed that trace metals generally have a higher affinity for Fe-Mn oxide and organic matter/sulphidic fractions, followed by the residual fraction. Mn was relatively strongly bound to the exchangeable, carbonate bound fractions, whereas a large proportion of Cr was found in the residual fraction. The Σ[SEM]/[AVS] ratio pointed to potential metal-induced toxicity of sediments collected from seven out of the eleven stations. The results indicate that trace metal pollution pose risks to the health of ecosystems, and to human communities that use the river for a range of different purposes. PMID:27260529

  17. BASELINE LEVELS OF TRACE METALS IN BLOOD OF CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS)

    PubMed Central

    Wiedner, Ellen B.; Takeuchi, Noel Y.; Isaza, Ramiro; Barber, David

    2013-01-01

    Whole blood from 33 healthy captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) was analyzed for 12 trace elements: aluminum, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, cadmium, mercury, and lead for the purpose of estimating preliminary baseline population parameters for these minerals. Metals were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Baseline ranges for all animals and for all trace elements were comparable to normal concentrations reported in other species. This is the first report of normal trace element levels in the blood of captive elephants. PMID:22946424

  18. Trace enrichment of metal ions in aquatic environments by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mapolelo, M; Torto, N

    2004-09-01

    Sorption properties of baker's yeast cells, characterised as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated for trace enrichment of metal ions: Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) from aqueous environments. Metal concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Parameters affecting metal uptake such as solution pH, incubation time, amount of yeast biomass and effect of glucose concentration (energy source) were optimised. Further studies were carried out to evaluate the effects on metal uptake after treating yeast with glucose as well as with an organic solvent. The results showed that trace enrichment of the metals under study with yeast, depends upon the amount of yeast biomass, pH and incubation time. Treatment of yeast cells with 10-20mM glucose concentration enhanced metal uptake with exception to Cr(6+), whose metal enrichment capacity decreased at glucose concentration of 60mM. Of the investigated organic solvents THF and DMSO showed the highest and lowest capacity, respectively, to enhance metal uptake by yeast cells. Trace enrichment of metal ions from stream water, dam water, treated wastewater from a sewage plant and wastewater from an electroplating plant achieved enrichment factors (EF) varying from 1 to 98, without pre-treatment of the sample. pH adjustment further enhanced the EF for all samples. The results from these studies demonstrate that yeast is a viable trace metal enrichment media that can be used freely suspended in solution to achieve very high EF in aquatic environments. PMID:18969566

  19. Health-risk assessment of incinerator stack emissions: Trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinhong.

    1990-01-01

    The research presented in this dissertation centers on the development of a method for health risk assessment of incinerator stack emissions within the context of multiple exposure pathways and on its application to a problem of contemporary interest. The emphasis is on toxic metal emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators. A comparison of the amount of metal emissions shows that toxic metal emissions from MSW incinerators are generally of the same order of magnitude as those from hazardous waste incinerators. A hazard index for stack emitted metals based on toxicity and quantity are developed in this dissertation to screen metals which are important from a risk view-point. From this hazard index, lead and mercury are added to the known carcinogenic metals, i.e., arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and nickel as candidates for the assessment. The method presented in this dissertation consists of hazard identification and hazard quantification. If a substance is identified as a potential human carcinogen, the carcinogenicity may be related to the chemical form of a substance and the route of exposure. Regarding the carcinogenic potency of a pollutant, the chemical form of a substance and the route of exposure is investigated. This type of information with regard to carcinogenic uncertainty is incorporated into hazard quantification. The appropriate carcinogenic group of a pollutant is also identified. In order to quantify the human health risks for the 7 metals, the following are determined in this dissertation: emission factors; mass particle-size distributions; air dispersion models; exposure assessment models; population data; and unit risks or cancer potency factors.

  20. Trace metals partitioning among different sedimentary mineral phases and the deposit-feeding polychaete Armandia brevis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Hare, Landis; Galindo-Riaño, M Dolores; Siqueiros-Valencia, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) were determined in two operationally defined fractions (HCl and pyrite) in sediments from Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors (Mexico). The HCl fraction had significantly higher metal concentrations relative to the pyrite fraction in both harbors, underlining the weak tendency of most trace metals to associate with pyrite. Exceptionally, Cu was highly pyritized, with degrees of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) >80% in both harbors. Dissolved Fe flux measurements combined with solid phase Fe sulfide data indicated that 98 mt of Fe are precipitated as iron sulfides every year in Ensenada Harbor. These Fe sulfides (and associated trace metals) will remain preserved in the sediments, unless they are perturbed by dredging or sediment resuspension. Calculations indicate that dredging activities could export to the open ocean 0.20±0.13 to (0.30±0.56)×10(3) mt of Cd and Cu, respectively, creating a potential threat to marine benthic organisms. Degrees of pyritization (DOP) values in Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors were relatively low (<25%) while degrees of sulfidization (DOS) were high (~50%) because of the contribution of acid volatile sulfide. DOP values correlated with DTMP values (p≤0.001), indicating that metals are gradually incorporated into pyrite as this mineral is formed. Significant correlations were also found between DTMP values and -log(Ksp(MeS)/Ksp(pyr)) for both harbors, indicating that incorporation of trace metals into the pyrite phase is a function of the solubility product of the corresponding metal sulfide. The order in which elements were pyritized in both harbors was Zn≈Mntrace metal concentrations and metal concentrations measured in Armandia brevis (a deposit-feeding Opheliid polychaete), suggesting that these labile sedimentary metals are preferentially accumulated by the polychaete, making it a

  1. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  2. Trace metals in gills of fish from the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yakoob, S.; Bahloul, M. ); Bou-Olayan, A.H.

    1994-11-01

    Complexation of metals by coordinate linkages with appropriate organic molecules in biological tissues is an important process involved in metal accumulation by aquatic organisms. Fish respiratory systems differ from all other systems because damage to gills has immediate impacts on the rest of the fish's body. Veer et al. observed significant correlation between gill-metal concentration and whole-body weight. More nickel is accumulated in gill tissue of the catfish (Clarias batrachus) than in the liver or intestine. More cadmium is accumulated in gill tissue of the fish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and Channa punctatus (Bloch) than in the liver or kidney. When exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper, gills of the freshwater fish Labeo rohita (Hamilton) showed the highest degree of copper accumulation. Petroleum and petrochemical industry wastes contribute significantly to metal enrichment of the Arabian Gulf marine environment. Because accumulation of metal ions is significant in gills, levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb were investigated in gills of fish from potentially impacted areas along the western side of the Arabian Gulf after the 1991 oil-spill. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Trace metals in estuarine sediments from the southwestern Spanish coast.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, F

    2001-06-01

    The impact of river-transported metal pollution and industrial wastes on the metal distribution (Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb) in estuarine sediments was studied in the southwestern Spanish estuaries. Intertidal and subtidal surface sediments of the Tinto-Odiel Estuary are very highly polluted by heavy metals, with geoaccumulation indices up to 4 in the three sedimentary environments studied (channel, channel border and salt marsh). The single exception is the Punta Umbria channel, very protected from the point sources by salt marsh deposits and hydraulic processes. In the remaining two estuaries, pollution (Pb, Cu) was only significant near the harbour situated in the Piedras river mouth, whereas very low values were found in the Guadiana Estuary. In these last rivers, the enrichment factor increases from the channel to the salt marsh sediments. PMID:11468926

  4. Lead Isotopic Composition and Trace Metals in Aerosols for Source Apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, C. T.; Paytan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Transported thousands of miles away from their source, aerosols can be dispersed and deposition throughout the Earth's surface. Aerosols from natural and industrial sources have different characteristics and health impacts thus it is important to identify their sources. The lead isotopic composition and trace metals in aerosol samples collected in different regions and periods around the world can help us better understand spatial and seasonal variation of aerosol sources. Aerosol samples collected in California, Bermuda, China and the Red Sea have been analyzed. The trace metal and Pb isotopes in these samples provide information regarding the various sources of aerosols to these sites.

  5. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  6. XFM of ``Trace Metals'' in Cultured Cells: Framing the Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, J.; Chishti, Y.; Ward, J.; Vogt, S.; Finney, L.

    2011-09-01

    Encouraged by our recent x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis revealing subcellular metal relocation in two special cell types, we are working to identify the role of zinc and copper in these cells. In verifying that metal ion dynamics are not artifactual, particularly where some samples have been chemically fixed, a comparison of our past results with samples studied with cryofixation and immunofluorescence add validation to our previous findings. Our work demonstrating cryofixation in human microvascular endothelial cells and metallothionein immunofluorescence in stem cells is presented.

  7. Aquatic insects as biomonitors of trace metal contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Lynch, T.R. ); Jacobi, G.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of 13 heavy metals in water, stream sediments, and a variety of aquatic insects in the Red River above and below the Molycorp mine and mill is reported. The mine-mill complex is located between the towns of Red River and Questa and is connected by a pipeline to a tailings disposal pond located about 8 km downstream of Questa. The pipeline is adjacent the Red River. Numerous breaks have occurred in the pipeline in the past resulting in processed milled tailings being discharged directly into the river. Atomic absorption was used for metal analysis. Experimental results are presented.

  8. Trace Metals and Metalloids in Forest Soils and Exotic Earthworms in Northern New England, USA

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J.B.; Görres, J.H.; Jackson, B.P.; Friedland, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals and metalloids (TMM) in forest soils and invasive earthworms were studied at 9 uncontaminated sites in northern New England, USA. Essential (Cu, Mo, Ni, Zn, Se) and toxic (As, Cd, Pb, Hg and U) TMM concentrations (mg kg-1) and pools (mg m-2) were quantified for organic horizons (forest floor), mineral soils and earthworm tissues. Essential TMM tissue concentrations were greatest for mineral soil-feeding earthworm Octolasion cyaneum. Toxic TMM tissue concentrations were highest for organic horizon-feeding earthworms Dendobaena octaedra, Aporrectodea rosea and Amynthas agrestis. Most earthworm species had attained tissue concentrations of Pb, Hg and Se potentially hazardous to predators. Bioaccumulation factors were Cd > Se > Hg > Zn > Pb > U > 1.0 > Cu > As > Mo > Ni. Only Cd, Se Hg and Zn were considered strongly bioaccumulated by earthworms because their average bioaccumulation factors were significantly greater than 1.0. Differences in bioaccumulation did not appear to be caused by soil concentrations as earthworm TMM tissue concentrations were poorly correlated with TMM soil concentrations. Instead, TMM bioaccumulation appears to be species and site dependent. The invasive Amynthas agrestis had the greatest tissue TMM pools, due to its large body mass and high abundance at our stands. We observed that TMM tissue pools in earthworms were comparable or exceeded organic horizon TMM pools; earthworm tissue pools of Cd were up 12 times greater than in the organic horizon. Thus, exotic earthworms may represent an unaccounted portion and flux of TMM in forests of the northeastern US. Our results highlight the importance of earthworms in TMM cycling in northern forests and warrant more research into their impact across the region. PMID:25883392

  9. Trace metal storage in recent floodplain sediments along the Dill River, central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Charles W.

    2015-04-01

    Trace metals are stored in near-channel floodplain sediments along many rivers in industrial and mined watersheds of western European countries such as Germany. In this paper, I document the distribution of Cu, Pb, and Zn in 13 cores collected from near-channel floodplain sediments along a 25-km reach of the Dill River in central Germany. Mean concentrations of the three trace metals exceed background concentrations, an indication of anthropogenic enrichment along the study reach; many individual samples have concentrations several times the background levels and exceed standards for trace metals contained in the German Federal Soil Protection Act. Metal concentrations generally peak at depths of 0.2 to 0.7 m below the floodplain surface and are assumed to represent the period of maximum metal releases to the environment through upstream industrial activity, ore mining, or both. In eight of the cores, radiocarbon ages obtained below the depth of peak metal concentrations provide maximum dates for sediment accumulation of between 90 and 1700 years ago, with most ages clustering in the period of 90 to 300 years ago. The ages and depth to peak metal concentrations indicate 0.6 to 1.0 m of floodplain sedimentation over the last 150 to 300 years (0.3-0.4 cm y- 1), which exceed sedimentation amounts and rates found in surrounding watersheds. Surface sediments contain lower metal concentrations, suggesting deposition recently of cleaner sediments. Trace metals stored along the Dill River serve as a reminder that stores of contaminants exist in geomorphically sensitive locations of the fluvial system. These legacy sediments bear the chemical imprint of industrial or mining activities that no longer occur in the watershed.

  10. Seasonal variation and sources of dissolved trace metals in Maó Harbour, Minorca Island.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Soto, Marly C; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Sánchez-Quiles, David; Rodellas, Valentí; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Basterretxea, Gotzon

    2016-09-15

    The environmental conditions of semi-enclosed coastal water-bodies are directly related to the catchment, human activities, and oceanographic setting in which they are located. As a result of low tidal forcing, and generally weak currents, waters in Mediterranean harbours are poorly renewed, leading to quality deterioration. Here, we characterise the seasonal variation of trace metals (i.e. Co, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surface waters, and trace metal content in sediments from Maó Harbour, a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Our results show that most of the dissolved trace metals in the waters of Maó Harbour exhibit a marked inner-outer concentration gradient, suggesting a permanent input into the inner part of the harbour. In general, metal concentrations in the waters of Maó Harbour are higher than those in offshore waters. Concentration of Cu (21±8nM), Fe (9.2±3.2nM) and Pb (1.3±0.4nM) are particularly high when compared with other coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The concentration of some metals such as Cu and Zn increases during summertime, when the human population and boat traffic increase during the tourism season, and when resuspension from the metal enriched sediments is higher. The evaluation of the metal sources in the harbour reveals that, compared with other putative sources such as runoff, aerosol deposition and fresh groundwater discharges, contaminated sediments are the main source of the metals found in the water column, most likely through vessel-driven resuspension events. This study contributes to the understanding of the processes that control the occurrence and distribution of trace metals in Maó Harbour, thus aiding in the effective management of the harbour, and enhancing the overall quality of the seawater ecosystem. PMID:27163484

  11. Estuaries as Filters: The Role of Tidal Marshes in Trace Metal Removal

    PubMed Central

    Teuchies, Johannes; Vandenbruwaene, Wouter; Carpentier, Roos; Bervoets, Lieven; Temmerman, Stijn; Wang, Chen; Maris, Tom; Cox, Tom J. S.; Van Braeckel, Alexander; Meire, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Flux calculations demonstrate that many estuaries are natural filters for trace metals. Yet, the underlying processes are poorly investigated. In the present study, it was hypothesized that intertidal marshes contribute significantly to the contaminant filter function of estuaries. Trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were measured along a transect from the subtidal, over an intertidal flat and marsh to a restored marsh with controlled reduced tide. Metal concentrations in the intertidal and restored marsh were found to be a factor two to five higher than values in the subtidal and intertidal flat sediments. High metal concentrations and high accretion rates indicate a high metal accumulation capacity of the intertidal marshes. Overbank sedimentation in the tidal marshes of the entire estuary was calculated to remove 25% to 50% of the riverine metal influx, even though marshes comprise less than 8% of the total surface of the estuary. In addition, the large-scale implementation of planned tidal marsh restoration projects was estimated to almost double the trace metal storage capacity of the present natural tidal marshes in the estuary. PMID:23950927

  12. Fluxes and retention of trace metals in the Humber Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, G. E.; Glegg, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Humber Estuary is a physically dynamic system into which industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals have been discharged for many years. The total fluxes of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn from the Humber Estuary to the North Sea have been estimated for December 1988, May 1990 and August 1990. These fluxes have been compared to inputs into the estuary from rivers, sewage and industry as reported by the Paris Commission. A discrepancy exists between the estuarine inputs and the fluxes to the North Sea, which suggests that the estuary is acting as a trap for fine, metal-contaminated sediments. An alternative approach to flux assessment also indicates that metal retention by sediments is a major feature of the Humber Estuary. The results are discussed in the context of the recovery of the estuary from metal contamination and the consequences for the coastal zone. This critical review allows assessment of effectiveness of current management strategies and new directions for the future to be proposed.

  13. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.; Hillman, A. L.; Pompeani, D. P.; Abbott, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The remobilization of legacy contamination stored in floodplain sediments remains a threat to ecosystem and human health, particularly with potential changes in global precipitation patterns and flooding regimes. Vehicular and industrial emissions are often the dominant, recognized source of anthropogenic trace metal loadings to ecosystems today. However, loadings from early industrial activities are poorly characterized and potential sources of trace metal inputs. While potential trace metal contamination from these activities is recognized (e.g., the historical use of lead arsenate as a pesticide), the magnitude and distribution of legacy contamination is often unknown. This presentation reconstructs a lake sediment record of trace metal inputs from an oxbow lake in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sediment cores were analyzed for major and trace metal chemistry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Sediment trace metal chemistry in this approximately 250 year record (180 cm) record changes in land use and industry both in the 19th century and the 20th century. Of particular interest is early 19th century loadings of arsenic and calcium to the lake, likely attributable to pesticides and lime used in tanning processes near the lake. After this period of tanning dominated inputs, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of coal mining operations and resulting discharge of acid mine drainage to surface waters. In the 20th century portion of our record (70 -20 cm), patterns in sediment zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by the opening and closing of the nearby Donora Zinc Works and the American Steel & Wire Works, infamous facilities in the history of air quality regulation. The most recent sediment chemistry records periods include the enactment of air pollution legislation (~ 35 cm), and the phase out of tetraethyl leaded gasoline (~30 cm). Our study documents the impact of early industry in the

  14. Quantitative Trait Loci and Inter-Organ Partitioning for Essential Metal and Toxic Analogue Accumulation in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Reuscher, Stefan; Kolter, Andreas; Hoffmann, Astrid; Pillen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of both essential nutrients and chemically similar toxic analogues accumulated in cereal grains have a major impact on the nutritional quality and safety of crops. Naturally occurring genetic diversity can be exploited for the breeding of improved varieties through introgression lines (ILs). In this study, multi-element analysis was conducted on vegetative leaves, senesced flag leaves and mature grains of a set of 54 ILs of the wild ancestral Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum in the cultivated variety Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare cv. Scarlett. Plants were cultivated on an anthropogenically heavy metal-contaminated soil collected in an agricultural field, thus allowing simultaneous localization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the accumulation of both essential nutrients and toxic trace elements in barley as a model cereal crop. For accumulation of the micronutrients Fe and Zn and the interfering toxin Cd, we identified 25, 16 and 5 QTL, respectively. By examining the gene content of the introgressions, we associated QTL with candidate genes based on homology to known metal homeostasis genes of Arabidopsis and rice. Global comparative analyses suggested the preferential remobilization of Cu and Fe, over Cd, from the flag leaf to developing grains. Our data identifies grain micronutrient filling as a regulated and nutrient-specific process, which operates differently from vegetative micronutrient homoeostasis. In summary, this study provides novel QTL for micronutrient accumulation in the presence of toxic analogues and supports a higher degree of metal specificity of trace element partitioning during grain filling in barley than previously reported for other cereals. PMID:27078500

  15. From waste water treatment to land management: Conversion of aquatic biomass to biochar for soil amelioration and the fortification of crops with essential trace elements.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Paul, Nicholas A; Cole, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-07-01

    Macroalgae can be grown in industrial waste water to sequester metals and the resulting biomass used for biotechnological applications. We have previously cultivated the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium at a coal-fired power station to treat a metal-contaminated effluent from that facility. We then produced biochar from this biomass and determined the suitability of both the biomass and the biochar for soil amelioration. The dried biomass of Oedogonium cultivated in the waste water contained several elements for which there are terrestrial biosolids criteria (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se and Zn) and leached significant amounts of these elements into solution. Here, we demonstrate that these biomass leachates impair the germination and growth of radishes as a model crop. However, the biochar produced from this same biomass leaches negligible amounts of metal into solution and the leachates support high germination and growth of radishes. Biochar produced at 750 °C leaches the least metal and has the highest recalcitrant C content. When this biochar is added to a low-quality soil it improves the retention of nutrients (N, P, Ca, Mg, K and Mo) from fertilizer in the soil and the growth of radishes by 35-40%. Radishes grown in the soils amended with the biochar have equal or lower metal contents than radishes grown in soil without biochar, but much higher concentrations of essential trace elements (Mo) and macro nutrients (P, K, Ca and Mg). The cultivation of macroalgae is an effective waste water bioremediation technology that also produces biomass that can be used as a feedstock for conversion to biochar for soil amelioration. PMID:25881153

  16. Trace metal capture by various sorbents during fluidized bed coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Ghebremeskel, A.; Wang, K.S.; Hopper, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of employing suitable sorbents to capture toxic trace metallic substances during fluidized bed coal combustion. Metal capture experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm (1 inch) quartz fluidized bed combustor enclosed in an electric furnace. The metals involved were cadmium, lead, chromium, arsenic and selenium, and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and lime. In addition to the experimental investigations, potential metal-sorbent reactions were also identified through chemical equilibrium calculations based on the minimization of system free energy. The observed experimental results indicated that metal capture by sorbents can be as high as 88% depending on the metal species and sorbent involved. Results from thermodynamic equilibrium simulations suggested the formation of metal-sorbent compounds such as Pb{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(s), CdAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) and CdSiO{sub 3}(s) under the combustion conditions.

  17. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chien, Chia-Te; Post, Anton F.; Saito, Mak A.; Paytan, Adina

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined, and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 days period to (1) evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2) explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples), to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples). Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples). Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean. PMID:25653645

  18. Adsorption of trace metals to plastic resin pellets in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Luke A; Turner, Andrew; Thompson, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Plastic production pellets collected from beaches of south west England contain variable concentrations of trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) that, in some cases, exceed concentrations reported for local estuarine sediments. The rates and mechanisms by which metals associate with virgin and beached polyethylene pellets were studied by adding a cocktail of 5 μg L(-1) of trace metals to 10 g L(-1) pellet suspensions in filtered seawater. Kinetic profiles were modelled using a pseudo-first-order equation and yielded response times of less than about 100 h and equilibrium partition coefficients of up to about 225 ml g(-1) that were consistently higher for beached pellets than virgin pellets. Adsorption isotherms conformed to both the Langmuir and Freundlich equations and adsorption capacities were greater for beached pellets than for virgin pellets. Results suggest that plastics may represent an important vehicle for the transport of metals in the marine environment. PMID:22035924

  19. Authigenesis of trace metals in energetic tropical shelf environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breckel, E.J.; Emerson, S.; Balistrieri, L.S.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated authigenic changes of Fe, Mn, V, U, Mo, Cd and Re in suboxic, periodically remobilized, tropical shelf sediments from the Amazon continental shelf and the Gulf of Papua. The Cd/Al, Mo/Al, and U/Al ratios in Amazon shelf sediments were 82%, 37%, and 16% less than those in Amazon River suspended sediments, respectively. Very large depletions of U previously reported in this environment were not observed. The Cd/Al ratios in Gulf of Papua sediments were 76% lower than measurements made on several Papua New Guinea rivers, whereas U/Al ratios in the shelf sediments were enriched by approximately 20%. Other metal/Al ratios in the Papua New Guinea river suspended sediments and continental shelf sediments were not distinguishably different. Comparison of metal/Al ratios to grain size distributions in Gulf of Papua samples indicates that our observations cannot be attributed to differences in grain size between the river suspended sediments and continental shelf sediments. These two shelves constitute a source of dissolved Cd to the world ocean equal to 29-100% of the dissolved Cd input from rivers, but only 3% of the dissolved Mo input and 4% of the dissolved U input. Release of Cd, Mo, and U in tropical shelf sediments is likely a result of intense Fe and Mn oxide reduction in pore waters and resuspension of the sediments. Since we do not observe depletions of particulate Fe and Mn in the shelf sediments most of these dissolved metals must reoxidize in the overlying waters and reprecipitate. As Cd exhibits the largest losses on these tropical shelves, we examined the ability of newly formed Fe and Mn oxides to adsorb dissolved Cd using a geochemical diffuse double-layer surface complexation model and found the oxide surfaces are relatively ineffective at readsorbing Cd in seawater due to surface-site competition by Mg and Ca. If the remobilization and reoxidation of Fe and Mn occurs frequently enough before sediment is buried significant amounts of Cd may be

  20. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  1. Assessment of essential and nonessential metals and different metal exposure biomarkers in the human placenta in a population from the south of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A; Company, R; Lopes, B; Rosa, J; Cavaco, A; Castela, G; Castela, E; Olea, N; Bebianno, M J

    2012-01-01

    The general population is exposed to metals as trace amounts of metallic compounds are present in air, water, and food. Information on background exposures and biomarker concentrations of environmental chemicals in the general Portuguese population is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the levels of important nonessential metals with recognized toxicity cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) and essential metals copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), and zinc (Zn) in placentas of mothers living in south Portugal (Algarve). Due to the difficulty in establishing the effects of chemicals in a complex and variable environment, this study also aimed to examine the response of biomarkers, such as biochemical changes that occurs at subcellular levels in the presence of contaminants. The investigated biomarkers in placentas indicative of metal exposure or damage included the metallothioneins (MT), delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) (specific for Pb), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) as an index of oxidative stress damage. Moreover, HJ-BIPLOT was applied in order to identify and categorize mothers vulnerable to environmental contamination in this region. Metal concentrations in the placenta were not excessive but within the range found in most European studies. In general, the biomarkers MT and LPO were positively correlated with metal levels, while with ALAD the opposite occurred, indicating the selected battery of biomarkers were suitable to study the effects of metals on human placenta. Further, the application of multivariate analysis with HJ-BIPLOT showed that most significant factors contributing to maternal and fetal exposures via placenta were dietary and smoking habits. PMID:22788373

  2. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. PMID:25706750

  3. Trace metal preconcentration using a thioglycolate chelating resin

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.G.; Danilona-Mirzaians, R.

    1989-01-01

    A styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer resin (Amberlite XAD-4), modified with thioglycolate complexing groups, has been employed for the preconcentration of cadmium, zinc, lead and nickel from natural waters. The resin exhibits its strongest affinity for cadmium and lead but can be used to quantitatively remove all four metals from non-saline waters. With seawater samples, the resin is best only employed for the enrichment of cadmium and lead as the recovery of nickel and zinc from this medium is poor.

  4. Trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils of the river Elbe: a review.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Zunkel, Christiane; Krueger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils using the Elbe floodplains in Germany as an example of extraordinary importance because of the pollution level of its sediments and soils. Trace metal dynamics are determined by processes of retention and release, which are influenced by a number of soil properties including pH value, redox potential, organic matter, type and amount of clay minerals, iron-, manganese- and aluminum-oxides. Today floodplains act as important sinks for contaminants but under changing hydraulic and geochemical conditions they may also act as sources for pollutants. In floodplains such changes may be extremes in flooding or dry periods that particularly lead to altered redox potentials and that in turn influence the pH value, the mineralization of organic matter as well as the charge of the pedogenic oxides. Such reactions may affect the bioavailability of trace metals in soils and it can be clearly seen that the bioavailability of metals is an important factor for estimating trace metal remobilization in floodplain soils. However as bioavailability is not a constant factor, there is still a lack of quantification of metal mobilization particularly on the basis of changing geochemical conditions. Moreover, mobile amounts of metals in the soil solution do not indicate to which extent remobilized metals will be transported to water bodies or plants and therefore potentially have toxicological effects. Consequently, floodplain areas still need to be taken into consideration when studying the role and behavior of sediments and soils for transporting pollutants within river systems, particularly concerning the Water Framework Directive. PMID:19465710

  5. High concentrations of trace metals in oysters from the Patuxent River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.; Sanders, J.; Abbe, G.

    1995-12-31

    Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations from the Patuxent River have been analyzed for trace metals by a number of organizations over at least the past 19 years. During that period, high concentrations of Cu (200--500 {micro}g/g dry weight), Cd (3--7 {micro}g/g) and Ag (2--8 /{micro}g/g) have been found in oysters from the oyster bars furthest up river. In particular, Cd values in oysters from this region have had concentrations approaching or exceeding current FDA warning levels throughout the period. In previous studies it was suggested that a coal-burning power plant located in that region, Chalk Point Steam Electric Station, was responsible for the copper enrichment due to the corrosion of Cu/Ni alloy condenser tubes. However, a monthly survey of trace elements in the nearby oyster populations from 1986 to the present showed only a small decline in copper concentrations after the plant switched from Cu/Ni to Ti alloy condenser tubes in 1987. Other potential sources for trace metals in the region include municipal and industrial discharges, atmospheric deposition, and biocides (anti-fouling paint in particular). The very rapid rise in trace element concentrations in oysters with position up river, and the lack of such a response by another local bivalve, the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum), suggests that a physiological effect of low salinity stress on oysters may be in part responsible for the high concentrations of trace metals in oysters in this region.

  6. Airborne trace metals and organochlorine compounds in arctic Alaska and Siberia: How important?

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, D.H.; Allen-Gil, S.; Gubala, C.P.; Ford, J.

    1995-12-31

    Metal contaminants of anthropogenic origin identified in the arctic atmosphere and the presence of organochlorines in arctic marine mammal tissues has raised the question of the importance of long-range transport of contaminants to the Arctic. Research focused on arctic regions in Alaska and the Taimyr peninsula of north central Russia. Inland watersheds were examined for evidence of increases in trace metal flux during the past 150 years and the presence of organochlorine compounds. Fish and ground squirrels were examined for body burdens of organic contaminants and plasma biomarkers were examined to evaluate biological effects. Sediment data from several lakes suggest that over broad regions, trace metal fluxes have increased only slightly (< 10%), if at all, since the pre-industrial era. The highest metal concentrations in lake sediments are associated with known elevated geologic sources of metals within the respective watersheds. Organochlorines are present in remote inland arctic ecosystems and are most concentrated in the tissues (e.g. liver) of organisms representing higher trophic levels. Arctic Siberia and Alaska (Taimyr peninsula) are similar with regard to contaminant concentrations. However, lichen and moss data suggest that Pb from Eurasian sources does not reach arctic Alaska. The results indicate that long range, transpolar transport and deposition of trace metals is not a large scale current phenomena in the two study regions. The transport and deposition of organochlorine compounds, however, is occurring but at relatively low levels.

  7. Evaluating three trace metal contaminated sites: a field and laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Murray, P; Ge, Y; Hendershot, W H

    2000-01-01

    Selecting guidelines to evaluate elevated metals in urban brownfields is hindered by the lack of information for these sites on ecosystem structure and function. A study was performed to compare three trace metal-contaminated sites in the metropolitan Montreal area. The goal was to obtain an idea of the organisms that may be present on urban brownfields and to measure if elevated metals alter the presence and activity of the indigenous biota. Field and laboratory studies were conducted using simple methodologies to determine the extent to which microbial activity affected by trace metal content, to assess diversity of plant and soil invertebrate communities and to measure phytoaccumulation of trace metals. It was found that microbial activity, as measured by substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and nitrification, was not affected by the levels of soil Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn recorded on the sites. Seven of the 12 invertebrate groups collected were sampled on soils with similar Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations. Diversity of plant species increased as a function of the length of time the sites had been inactive. Levels of metals in plant tissue were influenced by soil characteristics and not by total soil Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. PMID:15093016

  8. Trace metal levels in fruit juices and carbonated beverages in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Williams, Akan B; Ayejuyo, Olusegun O; Ogunyale, Adekunle F

    2009-09-01

    Trace metal levels in selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages purchased in Lagos, Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Unicam model 969) equipped with SOLAAR 32 windows software. Fruit juices analysed were grape, pineapple, apple, orange, lemon juices and their brand names were used. Some carbonated drinks were also evaluated for metal levels. Trace metals investigated were Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sn, Fe, Cd and Co. Trace metal contents of fruit juices were found to be more than the metallic contents of carbonated beverages. Pb level in the fruit juices ranged from 0.08 to 0.57 mg/l but was not detected in the carbonated drinks. Concentrations of Pb in lemon juice and Mn in pineapple juice were relatively high. Cd and Co were not detected in the selected juices and beverages. Additionally, Pb, Cu, Cr and Fe were not detected in canned beverages but were present in bottled beverages. However, the metal levels of selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages were within permissible levels except for Mn in pineapple juice and Pb in lemon juice. PMID:18704729

  9. Trace metal geochemistry in mangrove sediments and their transfer to mangrove plants (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Marchand, C; Fernandez, J-M; Moreton, B

    2016-08-15

    Because of their physico-chemical inherent properties, mangrove sediments may act as a sink for pollutants coming from catchments. The main objective of this study was to assess the distribution of some trace metals in the tissues of various mangrove plants developing downstream highly weathered ferralsols, taking into account metals partitioning in the sediment. In New Caledonia, mangroves act as a buffer between open-cast mines and the world's largest lagoon. As a result of the erosion of lateritic soils, Ni and Fe concentrations in the sediment were substantially higher than the world average. Whatever the mangrove stand and despite low bioaccumulation and translocations factors, Fe and Ni were also the most abundant metals in the different plant tissues. This low bioaccumulation may be explained by: i) the low availability of metals, which were mainly present in the form of oxides or sulfur minerals, and ii) the root systems acting as barriers towards the transfer of metals to the plant. Conversely, Cu and Zn metals had a greater mobility in the plant, and were characterized by high bioconcentration and translocation factors compared to the other metals. Cu and Zn were also more mobile in the sediment as a result of their association with organic matter. Whatever the metal, a strong decrease of trace metal stock was observed from the landside to the seaside of the mangrove, probably as a result of the increased reactivity of the sediment due to OM enrichment. This reactivity lead to higher dissolution of bearing phases, and thus to the export of dissolved trace metals trough the tidal action. Cu and Zn were the less concerned by the phenomenon probably as a result of higher plant uptake and their restitution to the sediment with litter fall in stands where tidal flushing is limited. PMID:27100002

  10. Levels of PCBs and trace metals in Crab Orchard Lake sediment, benthos, zooplankton, and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.C.; Heidinger, R.C.; Call, T.

    1990-02-01

    Concentrations of trace metals and PCBs in six species of fish, zooplankton, macrobenthos, sediment, and water were studied in Crab Orchard Lake, Williamson County, Illinois. Eleven sites were chosen throughout the lake, including one site (site 10) near an abandoned dumpsite of a former electrical transformer manufacturing facility. PCB levels in the selected components from site 10 were considerably higher than the other sites. Thirty-eight percent (17/45) of fish fillets from various species at this site exceeded the 2.00 mg/kg FDA guideline for PCBs. PCB concentrations in fish were variable, and little relationship existed between age or size and PCB concentrations in most species. Common carp and channel catfish had higher PCB levels than the other species examined. Trace metals were low in fish and other components analyzed and were comparable to literature values for the midwestern United States. Mercury was the only trace metal to exhibit a significant positive relationship with age or size of fish. Mercury was also the only trace metal to exhibit biomagnification.

  11. TRACE METALS AND STATIONARY CONVENTIONAL COMBUSTION PROCESSES: VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a search of U.S. literature to identify published information about trace metals and Stationary Conventional Combustion Processes (SCCPs). The report summarizes the information found in the literature and includes specific references. It summarizes wha...

  12. Trace Metal Accumulation in Sediments and Benthic Macroinvertebrates before and after Maintenance of a Constructed Wetland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periodic maintenance of stormwater best management practices (BMP) includes the removal of accumulated sediment. The resulting impact on trace metal concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, NY was investiga...

  13. Changes in trace metals in hemolymph of baculovirus infected noctuid larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied how biologically relevant trace metals (i.e., micronutrients) in the plasma of larvae of Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) changed in response to per os baculovirus infection, larval development, and injection of heat-killed bacteria. Concentrations of plas...

  14. NOVEL MODEL DESCRIBING TRACE METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE EARTHWORM, EISENIA ANDREI: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1707 Sake, J.K., Impellitteri**, C.A., Peijnenburg, W., and Allen, H.E. Novel Model Describing Trace Metal Concentrations in the Earthworm, Eisenia andrei. Environmental Science & Technology (American Chemical Society) 35 (22):4522-4529 (2001). EPA/600/J-01/364. 12/12/2...

  15. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  16. TRACE METAL RETENTION WHEN FIRING HAZARDOUS WASTE IN A FLUIDIZED-BED INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a bench-scale fluidized-bed incinerator that will capture trace metals on the bed material when firing hazardous waste. The design is based on limited tests at an existing laboratory facility. Operating conditions, operating procedures, and equipment design a...

  17. MARSH PLANTS AS VECTORS IN TRACE METAL TRANSPORT IN OREGON TIDAL MARSHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of Pacific coast marsh plants as vectors in the flux of trace metals was studied in natural and perturbated situations. The flux of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Sr, and Zn were studied in natural stands of Carex lyngbyei, Distichlis spicata, Potentilla pacifica, and Salicornia virgin...

  18. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF EMISSIONS FOR SEVERAL TRACE METALS OVER THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A regional model for atmospheric photochemistry and particulate matter is used to predict the fate and transport of five trace metals: lead, manganese, total chromium, nickel, and cadmium over the continental United States during January and July 2001. Predicted concentrations of...

  19. TRACE METAL FATE IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH AN IONIZING WET SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. est ...

  20. Continuous renal replacement therapy amino acid, trace metal and folate clearance in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD) results in amino acid, trace metals, and folate losses, thereby adversely impacting nutrient balance. Critically ill children receiving CVVHD were studied prospectively for 5 days. Blood concentrations, amino acids, copper, zinc, man...

  1. Assessment of trace metal pollution in sediments and intertidal fauna at the coast of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ngeve, Magdalene N; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc; Kochzius, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Coastal systems act as a boundary between land and sea. Therefore, assessing pollutant concentrations at the coast will provide information on the impact that land-based anthropogenic activities have on marine ecosystems. Sediment and fauna samples from 13 stations along the whole coast of Cameroon were analyzed to assess the level of trace metal pollution in sediments and intertidal fauna. Sediments showed enrichment of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn. However, pollution of greater concern was observed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn at the northern stations. Some sites recorded trace metal levels higher than recommended in sediment quality guidelines. Species diversity was low, and high bioaccumulation of trace metals was observed in biological samples. Some edible gastropod species accumulated trace metals above the safety limits of the World Health Organization, European Medicine Agency, and the US Environment Protection Agency. Although industrial pollution is significant along Cameroon's coast, natural pollution from the volcano Mount Cameroon is also of concern. PMID:25957194

  2. Record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.J.; Thomson, J.

    1980-12-01

    The possibility that a useful, historical record of deposition might be found in a salt marsh is investigated by considering a record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh. Evidence of salt-marsh deposition dominated by riverine runoff is presented.

  3. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  4. Trends in trace organic and metal concentrations in the Pechora and Kara Seas and adjacent rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.M.; Champ, M.A.; Wade, T.L.; Kennicutt, M.C. II; Chambers, L.; Davis, T.

    1995-12-31

    Trace organic (pesticides, PCBs, PAHs and dioxin/furan) and trace metal concentrations have been measured in surficial sediment and tissue (i.e., clam, fish liver and flesh) samples from the Pechora and Kara Seas and their adjacent rivers -- Pechora, Ob and Yenisey Rivers. Total PAH, PCB and total DDT and chlordane concentrations ranged in surficial sediments from n.d. to 810 ppb, n.d.--8.7 ppb, n.d.--1.2 ppb, and n.d.--1.2 ppb, respectively, in a suite of 40 samples from the Kara Sea and its adjacent rivers. The highest concentrations of many of the trace organic and metal contaminants were found in the lower part of the Yenisey River below the salt wedge. Some trace metals (As for example) were elevated in the Pechora River dispositional plume region. Dioxin ranged from 1.36 to 413 ppt in a subset of 20 sediment samples. Higher trace organic contaminant concentrations compared to sediments were found in tissue samples from the region, especially fish liver samples. Concentrations as high as 1,114 ppb total PAHs, 89 ppb chlordane, 1,011 ppb for total DDT and 663 ppb PCBs were found in some fish liver samples. Dioxin concentrations in tissue samples ranged from 11.7 to 61 ppt. Concentrations of many trace organic and metal contaminants in these Russian marginal seas are influenced by inputs from these large Arctic rivers. Many organic contaminant concentrations in sediments are low, however detecting these compounds in tissue show they are bioavailable.

  5. Development of functional trait biomarkers for trace metal exposure in freshwater clams (Musculium spp.).

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Cody M; Wieker, Jessica; Pope, Rachelle; Brown, Chelsea; Cooper, Emily; DeWitt, Jariel; Gunselman, Samuel; Jensen, Cory; Stevens, Whitney; Yri, Jenae; Nezat, Carmen; Joyner-Matos, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to trace metals typically causes oxidative stress; these consequences are better-characterized in estuarine and marine species than in freshwater species. How cellular-level responses to metal pollution influence whole-organism and population-level traits is poorly understood. We tested whether exposure to single metals (zinc and cadmium) and to metal mixtures (water in equilibrium with sediment from a highly polluted lake) alters two ecologically-relevant traits in freshwater clams, locomotion and reproduction. Fingernail clams (Musculium spp.) from unimpacted habitats were exposed to single metals and the metal mixture for up to 49days. The single metal doses (≤5mg/L Zn and ≤20μg/L Cd) were not toxicologically meaningful as clam survival, burial, and climbing activity did not differ across treatments. Water in equilibrium with the lake sediment contained cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. Clams exposed to this metal mixture had decreased climbing activity but no change in burial activity. Metal-exposed clams had lower fecundity (number of shelled juveniles extruded by adult clams) and patterns in metal accumulation corresponded with lake sediment dose and clam activity. In contrast to the functional traits, stress protein expression and whole-clam glycogen content did not vary across treatment groups. These results indicate that fingernail clams of the genus Musculium are appropriate for development as sentinel species for metal pollution and can serve as a model for determining how metal pollution alters metabolic allocation patterns in freshwater organisms. PMID:27085374

  6. Sedimentary Trace Metal-Organic Interactions as Proxies for Oceanic Redox Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, A. M.; Lyons, T. W.; Hannigan, R.

    2007-12-01

    Knowledge of trace-metal partitioning in oceanic sediments (e.g., Fe, Mo, U, Zn) are requisite to the construction of accurate models of geochemical cycling in modern and ancient waters. Factors such as oxygen penetration depth and bottom-water redox; sedimentation rate; and supply of reactants, such as dissolved sulfide, are known to affect metal sequestration in and remobilization from coastal sediments. In addition to these factors, the flux of organic carbon (OC) and the composition of this carbon are also a key in the sequestration of these metals. Currently, however, there is an absence of quantitative information on the mass balance of metals fixed in coastal sediments through direct interactions with OC, how OC remineralization affects this mass balance, and the specific nature of the metal-OC relationship. To address these issues, we have undertaken a field-based study to test the hypothesis that porewater redox conditions are recorded in the concentrations of trace metals bound in the sedimentary OC pool. We have collected sediments from several modern anoxic/euxinic basins: the central Black Sea, the Orca Basin, the Cariaco Basin, and Effingham Inlet (Vancouver Island). These environments vary in terms of dissolved sulfide concentrations and sedimentary iron sulfide geochemistry. Additionally, the sediments are characterized by a range in OC concentrations, and proximity to terrestrial sources. Extractable organic carbon was characterized with gas chromatography, and OC-bound metals are quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The preliminary results suggest that variations in the ratios of aromatic to saturate hydrocarbons may control the speciation of metals in the organic carbon pool. Bottomwater redox may be one factor controlling this relationship, although it is currently unclear if this is due to variations in metal speciation or the direct involvement of S in the OC-metal reaction mechanism

  7. Trace metal concentrations are higher in cartilage than in bones of scaup and pochard wintering in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalisińska, Elzbieta; Salicki, Wiesław; Kavetska, Katarzyna M; Ligocki, Marek

    2007-12-15

    Bones and cartilage of two species of diving ducks: the scaup Aythya marila (n=24) and the pochard A. ferina (n=24) were studied. Scaup is protected in Poland where it spends only the winter, while pochard is a game bird, abundant and breeding in Poland. In winter, the two species form large flocks off the southern coast of the Baltic, particularly in the Szczecin Lagoon where they were collected for this study. The bones and cartilage (trachea) were assayed for concentrations (dry weight-based) of three essential metals: iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn); concentrations of the two toxic metals: lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were assayed as well. These hard tissues of the two species showed the following order of metal concentrations Zn>Fe>Pb>Cu>Cd. In scaup and pochard bones, the respective geometric mean concentrations of Zn, Fe, Pb, Cu, and Cd were 94.4 and 102.0; 20.2 and 24.7; 6.2 and 9.6; 0.19 and 0.26; 0.114 and 0.162 mg/kg. The levels of all the metals in cartilage (Zn 149.1 and 165.8; Fe 58.4 and 116.3; Pb 10.6 and 14.9; Cu 1.41 and 3.31; Cd 0.144 and 0.175 mg/kg, respectively) were higher than in the bones of A. marila and A. ferina. However, statistically significant differences were found in respect to the essential metals only (Zn, Fe, Cu). The inter-species comparisons showed the two species to differ in their cartilage concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd and in their bone concentrations of Pb and Cd. In each case, the pochard exhibited higher concentrations of metals. This study showed distinct differences between trace element accumulation by two heavily mineralised avian body parts: leg bones (tarsometatarsus) and cartilage (trachea). The results are in agreement with data reported by other workers who analysed trace metals in cartilaginous and bone components of the femoral head in homoiotherm vertebrates, including humans. Therefore it is important that intra- and inter-species comparisons of hard biological components be based on corresponding

  8. Contamination characteristics and source apportionment of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Chen, Ruihui; Li, Jiao; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Due to their toxicity and bioaccumulation, trace metals in soils can result in a wide range of toxic effects on animals, plants, microbes, and even humans. Recognizing the contamination characteristics of soil metals and especially apportioning their potential sources are the necessary preconditions for pollution prevention and control. Over the past decades, several receptor models have been developed for source apportionment. Among them, positive matrix factorization (PMF) has gained popularity and was recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a general modeling tool. In this study, an extended chemometrics model, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares based on maximum likelihood principal component analysis (MCR-ALS/MLPCA), was proposed for source apportionment of soil metals and applied to identify the potential sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir. Similar to PMF, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model can incorporate measurement error information and non-negativity constraints in its calculation procedures. Model validation with synthetic dataset suggested that the MCR-ALS/MLPCA could extract acceptable recovered source profiles even considering relatively larger error levels. When applying to identify the sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model obtained the highly similar profiles with PMF. On the other hand, the assessment results of contamination status showed that the soils around reservoir were polluted by trace metals in slightly moderate degree but potentially posed acceptable risks to the public. Mining activities, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition were identified as the potential anthropogenic sources with contributions of 24.8, 14.6, and 13.3 %, respectively. In order to protect the drinking water source of Beijing, special attention should be paid to the metal inputs to soils from mining and agricultural activities. PMID:27107989

  9. Assessment of trace metals in four bird species from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Oh, Jong-Min

    2013-08-01

    In birds, heavy metal concentrations are influenced by diet intake, migratory pattern, and residence time. In the present study, heavy metal concentrations (in microgram per gram dry weight) were measured in livers of four bird species from Korea. Iron concentrations were greater in Eurasian Woodcocks (Scolopax rusticola) than in Grey Herons (Ardea cinerea), Little Egrets (Egretta garzetta), and Schrenck's Bitterns (Ixobrychus eurhythmus). Copper concentrations in Grey Herons were significantly higher than in other species. Lead concentrations were greater in Schrenck's Bitterns and Eurasian Woodcocks than in Grey Herons and Little Egrets. Eurasian Woodcocks had higher cadmium concentrations than in other species. Zinc and manganese concentrations did not differ among species. Iron, zinc, manganese, and copper concentrations from this study were within the range of other Korean bird studies, and these concentrations were far below toxic levels. Cadmium and lead accumulation trends in each species were different, and the results might be associated with their migration pattern and residence time in Korea. Grey Herons, Little Egrets, and Schrenck's Bitterns are usually summer visitors, and Eurasian Woodcocks are passage migrants. But herons and egrets were collected in spring, autumn, and winter, but not during breeding season. They might be residents, so they could more reflect Korean cadmium and lead contaminations than Schrenck's Bitterns. However, Eurasian Woodcocks could more reflect habitats outside Korea because of their short staying time in Korea. PMID:23430066

  10. Trace metals dynamics in surface sediments investigated by DGT micro-scale measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motelica-Heino, M.; Davison, W.

    2003-05-01

    In surface sediments, metal mobility is controlled by the recruitment and turn-over of organic matter whereas sulphide is thought to control the concentration of metals in sediment pore water by removing them from the solution. DGT is a dynamic probe that measures the kinetically available fraction of metals or sulphide. DGT uses a credit card size probe inserted into the sediment that provides a snapshot of the metal distribution in the sediment, which can be uncovered by spectrochemical analytical techniques. In-situ vertical profiles and horizontal maps of trace metals at high (mm scale) and ultra-high resolution (100 μm) together with Fe, Mn and sulphide were generated from DGT probes deployed in surface sediments. Collectively, the results showed that besides vertical gradients, associated with the depletion of oxygen with depth and the degradation of organic matter by a succession of electron acceptors, small scale remobilisation of metals associated with sediment heterogeneity take place.

  11. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and

  12. The Effect of Helicobacter pylori Eradication on the Levels of Essential Trace Elements

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Yi; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Wang, Sophie S. W.; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Liu, Chung-Jung; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lu, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to compare the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection treatment on serum zinc, copper, and selenium levels. Patients and Methods. We measured the serum zinc, copper, and selenium levels in H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients. We also evaluated the serum levels of these trace elements after H. pylori eradication. These serum copper, zinc, and selenium levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results. Sixty-three H. pylori-positive patients and thirty H. pylori-negative patients were studied. Serum copper, zinc, and selenium levels had no significant difference between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative groups. There were 49 patients with successful H. pylori eradication. The serum selenium levels were lower after successful H. pylori eradication, but not significantly (P = 0.06). There were 14 patients with failed H. pylori eradication. In this failed group, the serum selenium level after H. pylori eradication therapy was significantly lower than that before H. pylori eradication therapy (P < 0.05). The serum zinc and copper levels had no significant difference between before and after H. pylori eradication therapies. Conclusion. H pylori eradication regimen appears to influence the serum selenium concentration (IRB number: KMUH-IRB-20120327). PMID:25548772

  13. Sediment properties and trace metal pollution assessment in surface sediments of the Laizhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Liu, Jian; Pei, Shaofeng; Gao, Maosheng; Hu, Gang; Kong, Xianghuai

    2015-08-01

    Spatial distribution, ecological risk, pollutant source, and transportation of trace metals in surface sediments, as well as the sediment properties, were analyzed in this study to assess the pollution status of trace metal in the Laizhou Bay, China. Results of provenance analyses indicate that surface sediments were primarily from weathering products carried by the surrounding short rivers and partially from loess matters carried by the Yellow River. Variations of trace metal concentrations were mostly controlled by the accumulation of weathering products, organic matters, and the hydrodynamics. Geoaccumulation index suggests that no Cr pollution occurred in the study area, and Cu, Pb, and Zn pollutions appeared only at a few stations. Comparatively, Cd and As pollutions were at noticeably weak to moderate level at many stations. The combination of six trace metals in this study had a 21% probability of being toxic in our study area based on sediment quality guidelines. Enrichment factors (EFs) and statistical analyses indicate that Cu, Pb, and Zn were primarily derived from the natural process of weathering. By contrast, Cd, As, and Cr (especially Cd and As) were provided by the anthropogenic activities to a large extent. Due to the dilution of coarse-grained sediments, there was even no contamination at some of stations that were obviously influenced by humans. Based on the current study of transportation process of fine-grained sediments in combination with the spatial distribution of EFs, it is found that the migration of anthropogenic trace metals was mainly controlled by the tide in the Laizhou Bay. The study suggests that an effective strategies and remedial measures should be designed and undertaken to prevent further anthropogenic Cd and As pollutions in this area in the future. PMID:25847442

  14. Speciation and Distribution of Trace Metals Associated with Iron Sulfides in the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, D. M.; Cahill, M.

    2014-12-01

    Black shales underlying the areas from Eastern Ohio, through Pennsylvania, and into Central New York State have become of economic interest lately due to the recent economic viability of shale gas extraction. Sulfide minerals such as pyrite and marcasite occurring in these shales are often the primary phases that trace metals are associated with. Trace metals can be incorporated into these sulfides via various pathways during initial shale deposition and secondary diagenesis including substitution for Fe (Co and Ni), substitution for S (As and Se), and excluded to form other sulfide phases (Cu and Zn). The manner in which these trace metals are incorporated directly influences how they are released into the environment during sulfide oxidation following shale weathering or hydraulic fracturing. The aim of this research is to examine the distribution of trace metals in iron sulfides from black shales using Synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques including micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction of shale thin sections. Marcellus Shale samples were collected from: (1) outcrops from the Oatka member in Leroy, NY and Jersey Shore, PA and the Union Springs member in Lewiston, PA, and (2) drilling core sample from Beaver Meadow, NY and Hancock Co, TN (Chattanooga shale). Analyses have shown that the sulfide grains are a combination of pyrite and marcasite. As and Se are spatially correlated with each other and within the pyrite grains. Ni is spatially correlated with larger euhedral pyrite, as well as smaller non-iron sulfide grains. Cu and Zn are not spatially correlated with the pyrite and form separate Cu- and Zn- sulfides. During iron sulfide oxidative dissolution, these differences in distribution of trace metals will affect the order and rate in which they are released into the environment.

  15. The geochemistry of redox sensitive trace metals in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Morford, J.L.; Emerson, S.

    1999-06-01

    The authors analyzed the redox sensitive elements V, Mo, U, Re and Cd in surface sediments from the Northwest African margin, the US Northwest margin and the Arabian Sea to determine their response under a range of redox conditions. Where oxygen penetrates 1 cm or less into the sediments, Mo and V diffuse to the overlying water as Mn is reduced and remobilized. Authigenic enrichments of U, Re and Cd are evident under these redox conditions. With the onset of sulfate reduction, all of the metals accumulate authigenically with Re being by far the most enriched. General trends in authigenic metal accumulation are described by calculating authigenic fluxes for the 3 main redox regimes: oxic, reducing where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm, and anoxic conditions. Using a simple diagenesis model and global estimates of organic carbon rain rate and bottom water oxygen concentrations, the authors calculate the area of sediments below 1,000 m water depth in which oxygen penetration is {le} 1 cm to be 4% of the ocean floor. They conclude that sediments where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm release Mn, V and Mo to seawater at rates of 140%--260%, 60%--150% and 5%--10% of their respective riverine fluxes, using the authigenic metal concentrations and accumulation rates from this work and other literature. These sediments are sinks for Re, Cd and U, with burial fluxes of 70%--140%, 30%--80% and 20%--40%, respectively, of their dissolved riverine inputs. They modeled the sensitivity of the response of seawater Re, Cd and V concentrations to changes in the area of reducing sediments where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm. The analysis suggests a negligible change in seawater Re concentration, whereas seawater concentrations of Cd and V could have decreased and increased, respectively, by 5%--10% over 20 kyr if the area of reducing sediments increased by a factor of 2 and by 10%--20% if the area increased by a factor of 3. The concentration variations for a factor of 2 increase in the area of

  16. Sediment concentrations of trace metals in the Berre lagoon (France): an assessment of contamination.

    PubMed

    Accornero, Alessandra; Gnerre, Rossella; Manfra, Loredana

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the concentrations of eight trace metals (Cr, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, As, Cd, and Hg) in the surficial sediments of the Berre lagoon. This is a typical Mediterranean lagoon, seriously affected by human activities since the 1930s, when it became one of the most important industrial sites in France. The overall range of concentrations is 38-428 mg kg(-1) for chromium, 50-151 mg kg(-1) for zinc, 11-48 mg kg(-1) for copper, 18-82 mg kg(-1) for lead, 18-56 mg kg(-1) for nickel, 4-10 mg kg(-1) for arsenic, 0.2-1.6 mg kg(-1) for cadmium, and 0.15-0.40 mg kg(-1) for mercury. The spatial distribution of concentrations largely mirrors the localization of major impact sources, with the most affected area restricted to a radius of a few kilometers from point sources, due to the environmental conditions of the outfall zone (fine sediments, low hydrodynamic regime, confinement), which favor the in situ accumulation of pollutants. The extent of contamination from trace metals in the lagoon sediments is evaluated through a three-pronged approach: (i) by comparison with other areas (see Table 3 for an up-to-date review of trace metal concentrations in lagoon systems and coastal regions of the world ocean); (ii) by evaluating the metal enrichment in the sediments through the calculation of concentration factors (CF) for each trace metal and by combining the CFs to estimate a Metal Pollution Index (MPI) taking into account the differences in toxicity of trace metals; and (iii) by defining a potential level of biological risk by the use of quality criteria such as the Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Effects Range-Low (ER-L) benchmarks. On the basis of the calculated CFs, sediments appear as particularly enriched with Pb and Cd throughout the lagoon and with Cr and Zn at some sites. Although no site can be classified as "unpolluted" when looking at the calculated MPIs, two regions--the Vaïne pond and the southwestern area--have been identified as critical points of

  17. Trace metals and otolith defects in mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Rolfsen, R M; Erway, L C

    1984-01-01

    Mocha mice with pigment anomalies of the coat, eyes, and inner ears also have congenital otolith defects, and they exhibit progressive cochlear degeneration. Mocha mice were first reported to exhibit otolith defects comparable to those of pallid mice. Since manganese supplementation is effective in preventing the otolith defects in pallid mice and in pastel mink, we sought to establish whether or not manganese also might be effective in mocha mice. The otolith defects of mocha mice were prevented or reduced by supplementing the pregnant dams with manganese and/or zinc. The mocha mice also exhibited high perinatal mortality that was not reduced by the supplementary metals. Surviving mocha mice have behavioral anomalies associated with their inner ear defects. Preliminary observations of auditory-evoked brainstem responses and of cochlear degeneration in the mocha mice are discussed. PMID:6736600

  18. Relationship between gastric cancer and blood trace metal levels

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Sasaki, T.; Kurasaki, M.; Kaji, H.

    1981-06-01

    The metal concentrations in whole blood, blood plasma and blood cells of the patients were compared with those of normal subjects. Significantly lower levels of Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in whole blood of the patients were found. The Cu levels in the blood cells and Zn levels in the blood plasma of patients were of definitely lower levels than those of the normal subjects. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catale (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and delta aminolevulinic dehydratase (ALAD) metal enzymes were assayed in the 30 patients and in 24 normal subjects matches in age to the patients. SOD levels in blood cells of the patients were definitely lower than those of the normal subjects. The CAT activities showed a significantly higher level in the stage II and a significantly lower level in the stage IV and metastatic groups. The activities of GPX and ALAD did not show any significant difference between the patients with gastric cancer and the normal subjects. There were significant negative correlations between CAT activity in whole blood and Cu level in whole blood and blood plasma; also, positive correlations between Zn level and in whole blood and CAT activity, and between Zn level and GPX activity in patients with gastric cancer. Moreover there were positive correlations between Zn level and SOD level in the blood cells and also a negative correlation between Zn level in blood cells and GPX activity in whole blood. These correlations suggested that there may be some important relationship between the metabolism of superoxide anion in gastric cancer patients and advanced cancer.

  19. Sensitivity of juvenile freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor (Decapoda: Parastacidae) to trace metals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahnaz; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2007-11-01

    Juvenile Cherax destructor was investigated as a potential test species for toxicity testing of trace metals in Australian freshwater systems. Adult male and female C. destructor were bred in the laboratory to obtain 4-week old juveniles, which were used in the toxicity tests. Animals were exposed to a range of concentrations of the trace metals ions copper (377-1275 microg/L), cadmium (377-1275 microg/L), nickel (300-1013 mg/L) and iron (36-168 mg/L) in static-renewal 96-h bioassays. The 96-h LC50 value for cadmium was 379, 494 microg/L for copper, 50 mg/L for iron and 327 mg/L for nickel demonstrating a decreasing toxicity of these metals to C. destructor. Comparison of LC50 values for metals for this species with those for other aquatic organisms reveals that C. destructor is less sensitive to trace metals than most other tested species. PMID:17011034

  20. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    SciTech Connect

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Trace metal partitioning in caustic calcined magnesia produced from natural magnesite.

    PubMed

    Chimenos, J M; Fernández, A I; Haurie, L; Calaf, M

    2012-01-01

    Caustic calcined magnesia from natural magnesite has been widely employed as a source of magnesium. This mineral, depending on the origin, may contain heavy metals and metalloids that can exceed the regulatory limits in some applications. In most cases, heavy metals and metalloids form solid solutions with the mineral phases of the main impurities, or even magnesium oxide itself, replacing other ions in the crystal lattice. Compared with magnesium oxide, most of these impurities such as silica and silicates are much more chemically stable even in concentrated mineral acids under normal temperature and pressure conditions. In this study, the partitioning of the trace metals was monitored using a sequential extraction procedure (SEP), and their potential solubility was determined using the pH-static leaching test. Only a small fraction of magnesium oxide derived from heavily calcined magnesia is soluble in slightly acidic media. The release of the trace metals and metalloids contained in the soluble fractions was less than 40% as determined by total digestion. It can be concluded that SEP is more accurate than total chemical digestion for setting the maximum limits of the undesirable trace metals. PMID:22217087

  2. Assessment of trace metal toxicity in soils of Raniganj Coalfield, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Supriyo Kumar; Chakrapani, Govind J

    2011-06-01

    Soil, rock and water samples were collected from India's oldest coalfield Raniganj to investigate trace metal contamination from mining activity. Our data reveal that trace metal concentration in soil samples lies above the average world soil composition; especially, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations exceed the maximum allowable concentration proposed by the European Commission for agricultural soils. In particular, Cr, Cu and Ni exceed the ecotoxicological limit, and Ni exceeds the typical value for cultivated soils. Mineral dissolution from overburden material and high adsorption capacity of laterite soil are responsible for the elevated concentrations. This is evident from enrichment factor (E (f)), geoaccumulation index (I (geo)) and metal pollution index values. Sediment quality guideline index indicates toxicity to local biota although enrichment index suggests no threat from consuming crops cultivated in the contaminated soil. PMID:20661770

  3. Source Evaluation and Trace Metal Contamination in Benthic Sediments from Equatorial Ecosystems Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Nsikak U.; Asuquo, Francis E.; Williams, Akan B.; Essien, Joseph P.; Ekong, Cyril I.; Akpabio, Otobong; Olajire, Abaas A.

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb) concentrations in benthic sediments were analyzed through multi-step fractionation scheme to assess the levels and sources of contamination in estuarine, riverine and freshwater ecosystems in Niger Delta (Nigeria). The degree of contamination was assessed using the individual contamination factors (ICF) and global contamination factor (GCF). Multivariate statistical approaches including principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis and correlation test were employed to evaluate the interrelationships and associated sources of contamination. The spatial distribution of metal concentrations followed the pattern Pb>Cu>Cr>Cd>Ni. Ecological risk index by ICF showed significant potential mobility and bioavailability for Cu, Cu and Ni. The ICF contamination trend in the benthic sediments at all studied sites was Cu>Cr>Ni>Cd>Pb. The principal component and agglomerative clustering analyses indicate that trace metals contamination in the ecosystems was influenced by multiple pollution sources. PMID:27257934

  4. Depth profiling (ICP-MS) study of trace metal 'grains' in solid asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Avin E; Bassioni, Ghada; Stephen, Sasi; Kühn, Fritz E

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of trace metal 'grains' in asphaltenes could play a significant role in enhancing refining and processing of crudes and also in providing useful information on mechanistic and migratory features linked to asphaltenes. These metals originate directly from interaction of oils with source-rock, mineral matter, and formation water and their accumulation in asphaltene matrices could vary from oil well to oil well. Suitable asphaltene samples were subjected to high-performance ICP-MS laser depth profiling (213 nm) to depths of 50 μm at 5 μm intervals. The study was conducted in the absence of standardization and characteristic intensities originating from the metals of interest were measured. Ten metal profiles were investigated (Na, Mg, Al, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Pb, V, and Ni). The experimental results showed non-uniform distribution of trace metals and identified areas where such metals agglomerate. The data suggested that certain chemical and physical conditions within the structure of asphaltenes are favorable for metal 'grain' formation at specific points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage, and has considerable scope for future studies, including mathematical modeling simulations of asphaltenes. We also found that solid asphaltenes could be a useful forerunner of scale formation. PMID:21953195

  5. Bioavailability of Sodium and Trace Metals under Direct and Indirect Effects of Compost in Urban Soils.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Maryam; Clark, O Grant; Hendershot, William H; Jutras, Pierre; Prasher, Shiv O

    2016-05-01

    The contamination of urban soil with sodium (Na) and trace metals can be one of the major concerns for groundwater contamination and street tree health. The bioavailability of Na, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in urban soil amended with 0, 5, and 10% w/w compost was evaluated at none, medium, and high contamination levels of soil mixtures. The relationship between soil properties, compost addition, contamination level and metal uptake by barley ( L.) was determined using multivariate linear regression and path analysis. The results indicated the direct negative effect of compost on metal absorption possibly through specific complexation for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. Compost can also affect the absorption of Na and Cd indirectly by means of cation exchange capacity (CEC) and pH. The degree of soil contamination with metals can affect the competition of cations for the complexing sites of the soil mixtures and, therefore, can induce changes in metal availability for plants. Compost addition to the soil also increased nutrient availability, except for ammonium (NH) and nitrate (NO). We concluded that in the short term, the addition of compost significantly reduced metal bioavailability and improved nutrient availability. However, more studies are required to monitor the long-term ability of the compost to reduce Na and trace metal bioavailability in urban soil. PMID:27136168

  6. Mercury and trace metal partitioning and fluxes in suburban Southwest Ohio watersheds.

    PubMed

    Naik, Avani P; Hammerschmidt, Chad R

    2011-10-15

    Many natural watersheds are increasingly affected by changes in land use associated with suburban sprawl and such alterations may influence concentrations, partitioning, and fluxes of toxic trace metals in fluvial ecosystems. We investigated the cycling of mercury (Hg), monomethylmercury, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc in three watersheds at the urban fringe of Dayton, Ohio, over a 13-month period. Metal concentrations were related positively to discharge in each stream, with each metal having a high affinity for suspended particles and Hg also having a noticeable association with dissolved organic carbon. Although not observed for the other metals, levels of Hg in river water varied seasonally and among streams. Yields of Hg from two of the catchments were comparable to that predicted for runoff of atmospherically deposited Hg (∼25% of wet atmospheric flux), whereas the third watershed had a significantly greater annual flux associated with greater particle-specific and filtered water Hg concentrations, presumably from a point source. Fluxes of metals other than Hg were similar among each watershed and suggestive of a ubiquitous source, which could be either atmospheric deposition or weathering. Results of this study indicate that, with the exception of Hg being increased in one watershed, processes affecting metal partitioning and loadings are similar among southwest Ohio streams and comparable to other North American rivers that are equally or less impacted by urban development. Relative differences in land use, catchment area, and presence or absence of waste water treatment facilities had little or no detectable effect on most trace metal concentrations and fluxes. This suggests that suburban encroachment on agricultural and undeveloped lands has either similarly or not substantially impacted trace metal cycling in streams at the urban fringe of Dayton and, by extension, other comparable metropolitan areas. PMID:21827962

  7. Evaluation of Toxic Metals and Essential Elements in Children with Learning Disabilities from a Rural Area of Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Sabrina Nunes; Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Moro, Angela Maria; Roehrs, Miguel; Paniz, Clovis; Baierle, Marília; Brucker, Natália; Gioda, Adriana; Barbosa, Fernando; Bohrer, Denise; Ávila, Daiana Silva; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Children’s exposure to metals can result in adverse effects such as cognitive function impairments. This study aimed to evaluate some toxic metals and levels of essential trace elements in blood, hair, and drinking water in children from a rural area of Southern Brazil. Cognitive ability and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D) activity were evaluated. Oxidative stress was evaluated as a main mechanism of metal toxicity, through the quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. This study included 20 children from a rural area and 20 children from an urban area. Our findings demonstrated increase in blood lead (Pb) levels (BLLs). Also, increased levels of nickel (Ni) in blood and increase of aluminum (Al) levels in hair and drinking water in rural children were found. Deficiency in selenium (Se) levels was observed in rural children as well. Rural children with visual-motor immaturity presented Pb levels in hair significantly increased in relation to rural children without visual-motor immaturity (p < 0.05). Negative correlations between BLLs and ALA-D activity and positive correlations between BLLs and ALA-RE activity were observed. MDA was significantly higher in rural compared to urban children (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that rural children were co-exposed to toxic metals, especially Al, Pb and Ni. Moreover, a slight deficiency of Se was observed. Low performance on cognitive ability tests and ALA-D inhibition can be related to metal exposure in rural children. Oxidative stress was suggested as a main toxicological mechanism involved in metal exposure. PMID:25329533

  8. Trace metals in Antarctica related to climate change and increasing human impact.

    PubMed

    Bargagli, R

    2000-01-01

    Metals are natural constituents of the abiotic and biotic components of all ecosystems, and under natural conditions they are cycled within and between the geochemical spheres--the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere--at quite steady fluxes. In the second half of the twentieth century, the huge increase in energy and mineral consumption determined anthropogenic emissions of several metals exceeding those from natural sources, e.g., volcanoes and windborne soil particles. In the Northern Hemisphere, the biogeochemical cycles of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and other metals were significantly altered, even in Arctic regions. On the contrary, available data on trace metal concentrations in abiotic matrices from continental Antarctica, summarized in this review, suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of Pb is probably the only one that has been significantly altered by anthropogenic emissions in Antarctica and elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, especially in the period 1950-1975. Environmental contamination by other metals from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica itself can generally only be detected in snow samples taken within a range of a few kilometers or several hundred meters from scientific stations. Local metal pollution from human activities in Antarctica may compromise studies aimed at assessing the biogeochemical cycle of trace elements and the effects of global climate change. Thus, this review focuses on concentrations of metals in atmospheric particulate, snow, surface soils, and freshwater from the Antarctic continent and surface sediments and seawater from the Southern Ocean, which can plausibly be regarded as global background values of trace elements. These baselines are also necessary in view of the construction of new stations, the expansion of existing facilities to support research, and the growth of tourism and fisheries. Despite difficulties in making comparisons with data from other remote areas of the world, concentrations of trace metals

  9. Geographic distribution of arsenic and trace metals in lotic ecosystems of the Pampa Plain, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Juan José; Troncoso, Juan José; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the geographic distribution of arsenic and other trace elements in surface waters of 39 lotic ecosystems of central Argentina was evaluated. Manganese and arsenic were the most conspicuous elements, being present in 82% and 59% of the sampled ecosystems of this region, respectively. As concentration averaged 113.69 μg L⁻¹ varying between 55 and 198 μg L⁻¹, other trace elements were hardly detected or not detected at all. It was remarkable the absence of detectable concentrations of anthropogenically derived metals as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd). PMID:21153802

  10. Distribution of dissolved and particulate trace metals in Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Hendy, I. L.; Aciego, S.; Meyer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential biolimiting micronutrient, however, the bioavailablility of Fe is dependent on source and speciation. In a high nutrient/low chlorophyll region of the ocean such as the Arctic, sea ice is an important aggregator of dissolved and particulate Fe from aerosol, lithogenic, and biogenic sources. While particulate Fe is less bioavailable than dissolved Fe, it is far more abundant in sea ice. As a result, sea ice directly enhances productivity by ice entrapment of mineral dust particulates containing Fe, which can be released into the surface ocean waters during melting. In seawater underlying sea ice, Fe can be concentrated up to two orders of magnitude higher than in the ice-free open ocean (Lannuzel et al., 2011). A transect of sea ice cores were collected in the spring of 2014 offshore of Barrow, AK, and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago to capture a gradient of sediment contributions from shelf sediments to aeolian sediments. At Barrow, AK, land fast first year ice was sampled. In the Canadian Arctic, both multi-year (pack ice) and first year (land fast) ice cores were retrieved. First year ice cores were between 100-150 cm thick and the multi year core was 195 cm thick. Cores were subsampled by depth and filtered. The resulting ice core sediments were analyzed for elemental composition, and multistep Fe-leaching experiments were conducted to determine the fraction of soluble Fe. Thus we have ascertained the solubility of particulate Fe prior to onset of melt season. Dissolved trace metals were also analyzed to ascertain changes in concentration with ice core depth of lithogenic elements (Mn, Al) and biologically important elements (Si, Mo, Cu, Zn). Preliminary results show some enrichment of lithogenic inputs near surface, indicating dust deposition, and lower portions of the cores, suggesting resuspended sediments from the continental shelf. Concentrations of some biologically important elements decrease with depth, suggesting possible

  11. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    van Griethuysen, Corine; Luitwieler, Marloes; Joziasse, Jan; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-09-01

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a severe winter inundation and a dramatic water level drop during summer. Temporal changes were interpreted using multivariate analysis and chemical equilibrium calculations. Metal concentrations in sediment increased with depth, indicating a gradual improvement of sediment quality. In contrast, dissolved metal concentrations were highest in top layers due to mobilization from oxyhydroxides and precipitation with sulfides in deeper layers. Inundation had a mobilizing effect as it stimulated resuspension and oxygenation of sediment top layers. Water table lowering combined with organic matter decomposition led to immobilization due to sulfide formation. The chemistry of the sediments was consistent with model calculations, especially for macro-elements. The results illustrate the importance of seasonality for metal risk assessment. PMID:15963368

  12. Distribution of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements among protein fractions from hepatic cytosol of European chub (Squalius cephalus L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnići, Nesrete; Dragun, Zrinka; Erk, Marijana; Raspor, Biserka

    2013-04-01

    Association of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements with cytosolic proteins of different molecular masses was described for the liver of European chub (Squalius cephalus) from weakly contaminated Sutla River in Croatia. The principal aim was to establish basic trace element distributions among protein fractions characteristic for the fish living in the conditions of low metal exposure in the water. The fractionation of chub hepatic cytosols was carried out by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC; Superdex™ 200 10/300 GL column), and measurements were performed by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). Elution profiles of essential elements were mostly characterized by broad peaks covering wide range of molecular masses, as a sign of incorporation of essential elements in various proteins within hepatic cytosol. Exceptions were Cu and Fe, with elution profiles characterized by sharp, narrow peaks indicating their probable association with specific proteins, metallothionein (MT), and ferritin, respectively. The main feature of the elution profile of nonessential metal Cd was also single sharp, narrow peak, coinciding with MT elution time, and indicating almost complete Cd detoxification by MT under the conditions of weak metal exposure in the water (dissolved Cd concentration ≤0.3 μg L(-1)). Contrary, nonessential metal Pb was observed to bind to wide spectrum of proteins, mostly of medium molecular masses (30-100 kDa), after exposure to dissolved Pb concentration of ~1 μg L(-1). The obtained information within this study presents the starting point for identification and characterization of specific metal/metalloid-binding proteins in chub hepatic cytosol, which could be further used as markers of metal/metalloid exposure or effect on fish. PMID:22886752

  13. Distribution of trace metals in anchialine caves of Adriatic Sea, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculić, Vlado; Cukrov, Neven; Kwokal, Željko; Mlakar, Marina

    2011-11-01

    This study presents results of the first comprehensive research on ecotoxic trace metals (Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn) in aquatic anchialine ecosystems. Data show the influence of hydrological and geological characteristics on trace metals in highly stratified anchialine water columns. Distribution of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn in two anchialine water bodies, Bjejajka Cave and Lenga Pit in the Mljet National park, Croatia were investigated seasonally from 2006 to 2010. Behaviour and concentrations of dissolved and total trace metals in stratified water columns and metal contents in sediment, carbonate rocks and soil of the anchialine environment were evaluated. Trace metals and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in both anchialine water columns were significantly elevated compared to adjacent seawater. Zn and Cu concentrations were the highest in the Lenga Pit water column and sediment. Elevated concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cu in Bjejajka Cave were mainly terrigenous. Significantly elevated concentrations of cadmium (up to 0.3 μg L -1) were found in the water column of Bjejajka cave, almost two orders of magnitude higher compared to nearby surface seawater. Laboratory analysis revealed that bat guano was the major source of cadmium in Bjejajka Cave. Cadmium levels in Lenga Pit, which lacks accumulations of bat guano, were 20-fold lower. Moreover, low metal amounts in carbonate rocks in both caves, combined with mineral leaching experiments, revealed that carbonates play a minor role as a source of metals in both water columns. We observed two types of vertical distribution pattern of cadmium in the stratified anchialine Bjejajka Cave water column. At lower salinities, non-conservative behaviour was characterized by strong desorption and enrichment of dissolved phase while, at salinities above 20, Cd behaved conservatively and its dissolved concentration decreased. Conservative behaviour of Cu, Pb, Zn and DOC was observed throughout the water column. After heavy rains, Cd

  14. Modeling of the distribution of heavy metals and trace elements in argan forest soil and parts of argan tree.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Faez A E; Bchitou, Rahma; Boulmane, Mohamed; Bouhaouss, Ahmed; Guillaume, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of heavy metals and trace elements from argan forest soil into the wood, leaves, almonds, and argan oil was studied. Analyzed metals were: chromium, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium. Correlations linking different behaviors of the studied heavy metals and trace elements observed by multidimensional analysis were attributed to partial-spatial variations. Whereas the RV-coefficient of wood, leaf, almond and oil groups was high, the soil group correlated poorly with the other groups. PMID:23472451

  15. Biofortification of essential nutritional compounds and trace elements in rice and cassava.

    PubMed

    Sautter, C; Poletti, S; Zhang, P; Gruissem, W

    2006-05-01

    Plant biotechnology can make important contributions to food security and nutritional improvement. For example, the development of 'Golden Rice' by Professor Ingo Potrykus was a milestone in the application of gene technology to deliver both increased nutritional qualities and health improvement to wide sections of the human population. Mineral nutrient and protein deficiency as well as food security remain the most important challenges for developing countries. Current projects are addressing these issues in two major staple crops, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and rice. The tropical root crop cassava is a major source of food for approximately 600 million of the population worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa >200 million of the population rely on cassava as their major source of dietary energy. The nutritional quality of the cassava root is not sufficient to meet all dietary needs. Rice is the staple food for half the world population, providing approximately 20% of the per capita energy and 13% of the protein for human consumption worldwide. In many developing countries the dietary contributions of rice are substantially greater (29.3% dietary energy and 29.1% dietary protein). The current six most popular 'mega' rice varieties (in terms of popularity and acreage), including Chinese hybrid rice, have an incomplete amino acid profile and contain limited amounts of essential micronutrients. Rice lines with improved Fe contents have been developed using genes that have functions in Fe absorption, translocation and accumulation in the plant, as well as improved Fe bioavailability in the human intestine. Current developments in biotechnology-assisted plant improvement are reviewed and the potential of the technology in addressing human nutrition and health are discussed. PMID:16672076

  16. BBQ charcoal combustion as an important source of trace metal exposure to humans.

    PubMed

    Susaya, Janice; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Ahn, Ji-Won; Jung, Myung-Chae; Kang, Chang-Hee

    2010-04-15

    To provide information about charcoal combustion as an important source of atmospheric trace metal pollution, 11 charcoal products were combusted and PM(10) filter samples were collected. The PM-bound metal elements were extracted by microwave acid digestion and analyzed by ICP-AES. The concentrations of trace metal elements ranged from a few to 10(5)ng m(-3) in the following order of magnitude: Zn>Pb>Mg>Ba>Cu>V>Cr>Co>Cd>Ni>Mn>Se>As. Emissions of most elements from charcoal combustion were high compared to other sources. In case of Cd, Co, and Ni, their concentrations exceeded the inhalation minimum risk levels (MRLs) of the United States Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (US-ATSDR) for chronic duration exposure by a factor of 30, 3.9, and 2.2, respectively. Likewise, Cd levels exceeded the US-ATSDR MRLs for acute-duration exposure by a factor of 10, while those of Pb and Cd exceeded air quality guideline (AQG) of the World Health Organization (WHO) by a factor of 29 and 59, respectively. Mn levels also exceeded the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Reference Air Concentrations (RfCs) by a factor of 2.7. This study shows that barbecue charcoal combustion can be an important source of trace metal emissions to the atmosphere with potential health risks. PMID:20031319

  17. Baseline trace metals in seagrass, algae, and mollusks in a southern Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Linosa Island, Sicily).

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Bocca, Beatrice; Iacobucci, Marta; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Mecozzi, Mauro; Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Trace elements were analyzed in organisms collected at five sampling stations along coastal areas of Linosa Island, Sicily (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were measured in Posidonia oceanica L. Delile tissues, the two brown algae Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy and Cystoseira sp., and the two gastropod mollusks Monodonta turbinata Born and Patella caerulea L. Seawater samples were also collected at each site to assess soluble metal concentrations and to gain relevant information on their bioaccumulation ability. Data were processed by multivariate techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis on PCA factors. The scoreplots obtained showed that the pollutant distribution is more significantly correlated with species than with sites. For seaweeds, P. oceanica was associated with higher Cd, Cu, and Zn levels; Padina species had higher Cr concentrations, and Cystoseira had higher Pb levels. For mollusks, Monodonta species had high concentrations of Cu and Cr and Patella species were associated with Cd. Some general metal bioaccumulation patterns are described but no one sampling site was more contaminated than the others. The hypothesis of Linosa island serving as a reference ecosystem for baseline trace metal levels in southern Tyrrhenian areas is indeed supported by the statistical comparison among other southern Tyrrhenian ecosystems performed with Kruskall Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. For P. oceanica leaves, P. pavonica, M. turbinata, and P. caerulea, this study confirms their usefulness as possible cosmopolitan biomonitors of trace metals in marine Mediterranean areas. PMID:19458990

  18. Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W.; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A.; Motelin, G.K.

    1998-11-01

    Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

  19. Waste ashes for use in agricultural production: II. Contents of minor and trace metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Yamasaki, S; Kimura, K

    2002-03-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the contents of 18 minor and trace metals in five typical municipal waste ashes in Japan. In the waste ashes, Li, Ga, Rb, Y, Zr had relatively higher concentrations, approximately 5-300 mg kg(-1), the remaining metal concentrations were generally approximately 0.05-20 mg kg(-1). A comparison of the metal concentrations in the waste ashes and in Japanese agricultural soils indicated that the ratios for Ga, Mo, Ag, Sb, W, Bi between sewage sludge ash (SSA) and the soils were approximately 10-100 and for the remaining metals approximately 0.2-2; the ratios between food scrap ash (FSA), animal waste ash (AWA), horticulture waste ash (HWA) and incinerator bottom ash (IBA) and the soils were approximately 0.2-5. Furthermore, an overall evaluation on the waste ashes was also carried out using factor analysis with the addition of the other 21 elements examined in a companion paper. In the waste ashes, the major nutrient elements and heavy metals were mainly described by four factors: factors 1 and 2 explained the main information of the minor and trace metals while factors 3 and 4 explained that of the major nutrient elements. Factor 2 in the score plots could be used to evaluate the potential risk of the waste ashes to agricultural soils. Of the five types of waste ashes, SSA and IBA were abundant with minor and trace metals; AWA was relatively abundant with major nutrient elements especially for K; FSA was relatively abundant with major nutrient elements except for K, while HWA was not abundant with either of them. PMID:11886086

  20. Trace metal contents of selected seeds and vegetables from oil producing areas of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Wegwu, Matthew O; Omeodu, Stephen I

    2010-07-01

    The concentrations of accumulated trace metals in selected seeds and vegetables collected in the oil producing Rivers State of Nigeria were investigated. The values were compared with those of seeds and vegetables cultivated in Owerri, a less industrialized area in Nigeria. The lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contents of the seeds obtained from Rivers State ranged between 0.10 and 0.23 microg/g dry weight, while those of the seeds cultivated in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The highest manganese (Mn) level (902 microg/g dry weight) was found in Irvingia garbonesis seeds cultivated in Rivers State. Similarly, the highest nickel (Ni) value (199 microg/g dry weight) was also obtained in I. garbonesis, however, in the seeds sampled in Owerri. The highest copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) levels (16.8, 5.27, and 26.2 microg/g dry weight, resp.) were detected in seeds collected in Rivers State. With the exception of Talinum triangulae, Ocinum gratissimum, and Piper guineese, with Pb levels of 0.09, 0.10, and 0.11 microg/g dry weight, respectively, the Pb and Cd levels in the vegetables grown in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The trace metal with the highest levels in all the vegetables studied was Mn, followed by Fe. The highest concentrations of Ni and Cu occurred in vegetables collected from Rivers State, while the highest level of Zn was observed in Piper guineese collected in Owerri, with a value of 21.4 microg/g dry weight. Although the trace metal concentrations of the seeds and vegetables collected in Rivers State tended to be higher than those of the seeds and vegetables grown in Owerri, the average levels of trace metals obtained in this study fell far below the WHO specifications for metals in foods. PMID:20658661

  1. The adaptive function of melanin-based plumage coloration to trace metals

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, M.; Gasparini, J.; Jacquin, L.; Frantz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals produced by anthropogenic activities are of major importance in urban areas and might constitute a new evolutionary force selecting for the ability to cope with their deleterious effects. Interestingly, melanin pigments are known to bind metal ions, thereby potentially sequestering them in inert body parts such as coat and feathers, and facilitating body detoxification. Thus, a more melanic plumage or coat coloration could bring a selective advantage for animals living in polluted areas. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the link between melanin-based coloration and zinc and lead concentrations in feathers of urban feral pigeons, both at capture time and after one year of captivity in standardized conditions. Results show that differently coloured pigeons had similar metal concentrations at capture time. Metal concentrations strongly decreased after one year in standardized conditions, and more melanic pigeons had higher concentrations of zinc (but not lead) in their feathers. This suggests that more melanic pigeons have a higher ability to store some metals in their feathers compared with their paler counterparts, which could explain their higher success in urbanized areas. Overall, this work suggests that trace metal pollution may exert new selective forces favouring more melanic phenotypes in polluted environments. PMID:24671830

  2. Characterization of trace metals on soot aerosol particles with the SP-AMS: detection and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, S.; Onasch, T.; Saarikoski, S.; Timonen, H.; Saarnio, K.; Sueper, D.; Rönkkö, T.; Pirjola, L.; Häyrinen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-11-01

    A method to detect and quantify mass concentrations of trace metals on soot particles by the Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was developed and evaluated in this study. The generation of monodisperse Regal black (RB) test particles with trace amounts of 13 different metals (Na, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Ba) allowed for the determination of the relative ionization efficiency of each metal relative to black carbon (RIEmeas). The observed RIEmeas / RIEtheory values were larger than unity for Na, Rb, Ca, Sr and Ba due to thermal surface ionization (TSI) on the surface of the laser-heated RB particles. Values closer to unity were obtained for the transition metals Zn, Cu, V and Cr. Mn, Fe, and Ni presented the lowest RIEmeas / RIEtheory ratios and highest deviation from unity. The latter discrepancy is unexplained; however it may be related to problems with our calibration method and/or the formation of metal complexes that were not successfully quantified. The response of the metals to the laser power was investigated and the results indicated that a minimum pump laser current of 0.6 A was needed in order to vaporize the metals and the refractory black carbon (rBC). Isotopic patterns of metals were resolved from high-resolution mass spectra, and the mass-weighted size distributions for each individual metal ion were obtained using the high-resolution particle time-of-flight (HR-PToF) method. The RIEmeas values obtained in this study were applied to the data of emission measurements in a heavy-fuel-oil-fired heating station. Emission measurements revealed a large number of trace metals, including evidence for metal oxides and metallic salts, such as vanadium sulfate, calcium sulfate, iron sulfate and barium sulfate, which were identified in the SP-AMS high-resolution mass spectra. SP-AMS measurements of Ba, Fe, and V agreed with ICP-MS analyzed filter samples within a factor of 2 when emitted rBC mass loadings were elevated.

  3. Small cetaceans found stranded or accidentally captured in southeastern Brazil: bioindicators of essential and non-essential trace elements in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Leila Soledade; de Moura, Jailson Fulgencio; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Siciliano, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    Essential (Cu, Mn, Se and Zn) and non-essential (Cd and Hg) elements were analyzed in the hepatic tissue of 22 individuals of seven different species of small cetaceans (Feresa attenuata; Orcinus orca; Pontoporia blainvillei; Sotalia guianensis; Stenella frontalis; Steno bredanensis; Tursiops truncatus) accidentally caught in fishing nets or found stranded along the northern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2001 and 2010. Atlantic spotted dolphin (S. frontalis) showed the highest levels of Cd (20.23μgg(-1), dry weight), while rough-toothed dolphin (S. bredanensis) showed the highest levels of Hg (825.9μgg(-1)dw) and Se (221.9μgg(-1)dw). Killer whale (O. orca) presented the highest levels of Cu (64.80μgg(-1)dw) and Zn (2220μgg(-1)dw), and Guiana dolphin (S. guianensis), the highest level of Mn (13.05μgg(-1)dw). Cu, Hg, Mn and Zn in the hepatic tissue of killer whale (O. orca), Cu, Hg, Mn, Se and Zn in the hepatic tissue of rough-toothed dolphin (S. bredanensis) and Cd and Zn in the hepatic tissue of Guiana dolphin (S. guianensis) were significantly higher when compared to other studies with these species around the world. No significant correlations were observed between element accumulation and sex, sexual maturity and body length. An analysis of the interelemental relationships in the Guiana dolphin specimens showed strong positive correlations between Cd and Se, Cu and Zn, and Hg and Se. Differences were observed in the bioaccumulation of elements between the analyzed species, probably related to each species feeding habit, and differences between different element concentrations in the different dolphin species were probably due to the preference for certain preys and their bioavailability in the environment. Thus, the bioavailability of the analyzed elements in the marine environment should also be taken in consideration. This study also presents the first data ever reported for pygmy killer whale (F. attenuata) regarding trace

  4. BCO-DMO: Supporting the Management and Sharing of Marine Trace Metal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N. J.; Gegg, S. R.; Groman, R. C.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Glover, D. M.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. GEOTRACES program seeks to identify processes controlling the distribution of trace elements and isotopes in the world's oceans. Quantifying marine trace elements and understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles is important for predicting the ocean's response to environmental changes, such as a changing climate and the release of elements into the ocean due to human activities. This research program is collaborative in nature and only one component within the broader International GEOTRACES program. An important part of the collaborative scientific process is having access to trustworthy, well-documented data from colleagues. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) serves as the U.S. GEOTRACES Data Assembly Center, and facilitates the management, sharing, and long-term preservation of trace element and isotope data not only from U.S. GEOTRACES researchers, but from marine biogeochemists across the United States. The BCO-DMO data managers work closely with investigators contributing their data to ensure quality and completeness of documentation to foster data discovery and re-use by potential collaborators. The BCO-DMO system provides free and open access to data and tools for discovery, mapping, visualization, and download. Trace element and isotope datasets from the recent U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect and Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruises, as well as other GEOTRACES-related projects are now available from BCO-DMO. Related data from legacy programs, including the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), are also freely available for use by investigators seeking to further the understanding of trace metal cycling in the oceans. This presentation will highlight relevant trace metal data managed by BCO-DMO as well as the tools and features that aid in data discovery, access, and visualization.

  5. Baseline sediment trace metals investigation: Steinhatchee River estuary, Florida, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, C.A.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Highley, A.B.; Donoghue, J.F.; Ragland, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. These data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with future metal concentration data measurements. The Steinhatchee River estuary is a relatively pristine bay located within the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area on the North Central Florida Gulf of Mexico coastline. The river flows 55 km through woodlands and planted pines before emptying into the Gulf at Deadman Harbor. Water quality in the estuary is excellent at present. There is minimal development within the watershed. The estuary is part of an extensive system of marshes that formed along the Florida Gulf coast during the Holocene marine transgression. Sediment accretion rate measurements range from 1.4 to 4.1 mm/yr on the basis of lead-210 measurements. Seventy-nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations, representing four lithofacies: clay- and organic-rich sands, organic-rich sands, clean quartz sands, and oyster bioherms. Samples were analyzed for texture, total organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, clay mineralogy, and major and trace-metal content. Following these analyses, metal concentrations were normalized against geochemical reference elements (aluminum and iron) and against total weight percent organic matter. Metals were also normalized granulometrically against total weight percent fines (<0.062 mm). Concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for all metals except mercury. Mercury concentrations were determined by cold-flameless atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Granulometric measurements were made by sieve and pipette analyses. Organic matter was determined by two methods: weight loss upon ignition and elemental analysis (by Carlo-Erba Furnace) of carbon and nitrogen. X

  6. Recovery of Trace and Heavy Metals from Coal Combustion Residues for Reuse and Safe Disposal: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashvani; Samadder, Sukha Ranjan; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian

    2016-06-01

    The safe disposal of coal combustion residues (CCRs) will remain a major public issue as long as coal is used as a fuel for energy production. Both dry and wet disposal methods of CCRs create serious environmental problems. The dry disposal method creates air pollution initially, and the wet disposal method creates water pollution as a result of the presence of trace and heavy metals. These leached heavy metals from fly ash may become more hazardous when they form toxic compounds such as arsenic sulfite (As2S3) and lead nitrate (N2O6Pb). The available studies on trace and heavy metals present in CCRs cannot ensure environmentally safe utilization. In this work, a novel approach has been offered for the retrieval of trace and heavy metals from CCRs. If the proposed method becomes successful, then the recovered trace and heavy metals may become a resource and environmentally safe use of CCRs may be possible.

  7. Tracing metal sources in core sediments of the artificial lake An-Dong, Korea: Concentration and metal association.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mansik; Park, Jongkyu; Cho, Dongjin; Jang, Dongjun; Kim, Miseon; Choi, Jongwoo

    2015-09-15

    The concentration and source of trace metals in the artificial lake An-Dong, which has widespread abandoned mines and a Zn smelter upstream of the drainage basin, were investigated. Soils (18ea), stream waters (15ea) and sediments (15ea) in the main channel and five tributaries downstream of the Zn smelter towards the lake (~ 50 km downstream) were collected. And two core sediments were also taken from the middle of the lake. All samples were analyzed for trace metals in bulk and in a 1N HCl-leached fraction. Although the soil and stream sediments consisted mostly of sand-sized grains, concentrations of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) were very high in all samples, including soils, stream waters and sediments at sites near the Zn smelter. However the metal concentrations decreased rapidly downstream, suggesting that the area of impact of the smelter lies within 5 km. Highly enriched metal concentrations were also found in dated core sediments from the lake; while the highest concentrations of Co, Ni, As, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb were detected in the bottom of the sediment core (dated 1980) they decreased towards 2000, and only Cu, Zn and Cd concentrations increased again in present-day samples. Since the temporal variation in metal concentrations appeared consistent with historical variation in ore mining and Zn smelter production rates, a model combining the production rates of each was developed, which estimated 3%, 12% and 7% contributions from Zn smelter compared to ore mining production rate to levels of Cu, Cd and Zn, respectively, suggesting the different pathways by different sources. In addition, analysis of Cd/Zn and Cu/Zn ratios showed that contamination from ore mining decreased from 1980 to 2000, and smelting processes were most likely responsible for metal enrichment (Cu, Cd and Zn) from 2000 to the present. PMID:25981937

  8. Dissolved trace elements and heavy metals in the Danjiangkou Reservoir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyue; Xu, Zhifang; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Quanfa

    2008-09-01

    Concentrations of trace elements and heavy metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, V and Zn) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir, the water source area of the Middle Route of China’s interbasin South to North Water Transfer Project, were analyzed using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) and compared with the national and international standards for drinking water. The results indicated that concentrations of As, Pb, Sb and Se in the Reservoir exceeded the standards and they would pose health risk for residents in the region and the water receiving areas of the interbasin water transfer project. Spatial and temporal variability of the trace elements and heavy metals in the Reservoir implies their mixed sources of natural processing and anthropogenic activities in the upper drainage of the Reservoir. The research results would help develop water resource management and conservation strategy for the interbasin water transfer project.

  9. Trace metals in the surface sediments of the intertidal Jiaozhou Bay, China: Sources and contamination assessment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangjian; Qiu, Longwei; Cao, Yingchang; Huang, Jingli; Liu, Zhaoqing; Tian, Xu; Li, Anchun; Yin, Xuebo

    2016-03-15

    The major (Al) and trace metal (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, and As) concentrations in 29 surface sediment samples from the intertidal Jiaozhou Bay (JZB) are evaluated to assess the contamination level. The results show that the overall sediment quality in the area has been obviously impacted by trace metal contamination. The geoaccumulation index and the enrichment factor values indicate that no Cr or Cu contamination has occurred on the whole, only a few stations have been polluted by As, and some areas have been polluted by Cd, Pb, and Zn. Principal component analysis suggests that the Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd are derived from anthropogenic inputs and that Cr, As, Cu, and Zn are influenced by natural weathering processes. Cu and Zn may originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. The contamination in the northeastern JZB is higher than that in other areas of the bay. PMID:26806660

  10. Effect of starvation on trace metal levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Uthe, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of bivalves as monitors of marine coastal contamination has become widespread. However, many investigations have shown that numerous factors affect contaminant concentrations, in particular trace metals, in mussels tissues. This is not surprising since some metals, e.g., copper and zinc, have well-established physiological roles, while others, such as cadmium, are toxic to higher animals and have no known physiological function. An organism can serve as a quantitative indicator of environmental contamination only if a tissue contaminant concentration or burden reflects the contamination of the animal's environment in a rational way. The authors have investigated the effect of starvation on a number of trace elements in blue mussels (mytilus edulis) to determine which elements were not eliminated as the animal starved (a burden control model) and which elements were excreted (a concentration control model) in response to decreasing tissue weight.

  11. Comparative bioaccumulation of trace metals in Penaeus stylirostris in estuarine and coastal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez-Osuna, F.; Ruiz-Fernández, C.

    1995-01-01

    Trace metal concentrations (Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Cr and Zn) have been measured in estuarine and marine shrimp P. stylirostris collected in the Pacific coast of México. Estuarine individuals (juveniles) had higher concentrations of Fe and Mn than marine individuals (adults). Size-dependent relationships were observed and differed among the elements examined. A negative slope was found for Co, Fe, Mn and Ni in estuarine juvenile shrimps, while for Cu the opposite tendency occurred. In marine adults a positive slope was observed for Cd, Co, Cr and Cu. These findings may be due to two factors: (1) that P. stylirostris spends part of its life-cycle in estuarine/lagoon environments where it is more likely to be exposed to higher levels of bioavailable trace metals (natural and anthropogenic contributions) and/or (2) different metabolic requirements of young and older specimens, which is especially applicable to copper.

  12. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  13. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe; Tu, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng

    2005-06-20

    We describe an ultrasensitive voltammetric detection of trace heavy metal ions using nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) that are based on low-site density carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The NEAs were prepared by sealing the side-walls of CNTs with an epoxy passive layer that reduces the current leakage and eliminates the electrode capacitance, leading to a low background current. This provides a high signal-to-noise ratio. The CNTs-NEAs coated with a bismuth film were used successfully for voltammetric detection of trace cadmium and lead (II) at the sub-ppb level. The detection limit of 0.04 {micro}g/L was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The attractive behavior of the new carbon NEA sensing platform holds great promise for onsite environmental monitoring and biomonitoring of toxic metals.

  14. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and trace metals reveal the environment outside the Pearl River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Xiang, Rong; Li, Tuanjie

    2013-10-15

    We investigated the distribution patterns of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages outside the Pearl River Estuary in relation to trace metals, organic carbon and sedimentary particle fractions. The study area is unpolluted to moderately polluted by Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and is completely polluted by Ni. The highest levels are found in the western coastal zone. Spatial distributions of the measured elements are strongly related to the behavior of the sedimentary clay fraction. The analyses of species abundance and community diversity as well as subsequent canonical correspondence analysis were used to reveal the relationship between foraminifera data and environmental parameters. Four sampling site groups established by factor analysis were distributed from the coastal area to the inner shelf. Their distribution patterns have a strong correlation with Cu, Pb and Ba. This research shows that benthic foraminifera can be used as bioindicators of trace metal pollutants outside the Pearl River Estuary. PMID:23972678

  15. Airborne mineral components and trace metals in Paris region: spatial and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Poulakis, E; Theodosi, C; Bressi, M; Sciare, J; Ghersi, V; Mihalopoulos, N

    2015-10-01

    A variety of mineral components (Al, Fe) and trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) were simultaneously measured in PM2.5 and PM10 fractions at three different locations (traffic, urban, and suburban) in the Greater Paris Area (GPA) on a daily basis throughout a year. Mineral species and trace metal levels measured in both fractions are in agreement with those reported in the literature and below the thresholds defined by the European guidelines for toxic metals (Cd, Ni, Pb). Size distribution between PM2.5 and PM10 fractions revealed that mineral components prevail in the coarse mode, while trace metals are mainly confined in the fine one. Enrichment factor analysis, statistical analysis, and seasonal variability suggest that elements such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Fe, and Cu are attributed to traffic, V and Ni to oil combustion while Cd and Pb to industrial activities with regional origin. Meteorological parameters such as rain, boundary layer height (BLH), and air mass origin were found to significantly influence element concentrations. Periods with high frequency of northern and eastern air masses (from high populated and industrialized areas) are characterized by high metal concentrations. Finally, inner city and traffic emissions were also evaluated in PM2.5 fraction. Significant contributions (>50 %) were measured in the traffic site for Mn, Fe, Cr, Zn, and Cu, confirming that vehicle emissions contribute significantly to their levels, while in the urban site, the lower contributions (18 to 33 %) for all measured metals highlight the influence of regional sources on their levels. PMID:25982986

  16. Feedback Interactions between Trace Metal Nutrients and Phytoplankton in the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Sunda, William G.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon) the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are also regulated by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium). Of these, iron is most limiting to phytoplankton growth and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N2) fixation rates, and thus is important in controlling ocean inventories of fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in regulating biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO2 pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO2 and CO2-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese) have lesser effects on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals control the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and recycling processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, biological release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution of marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history. PMID:22701115

  17. Feedback Interactions between Trace Metal Nutrients and Phytoplankton in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sunda, William G

    2012-01-01

    In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon) the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are also regulated by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium). Of these, iron is most limiting to phytoplankton growth and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N(2)) fixation rates, and thus is important in controlling ocean inventories of fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in regulating biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO(2) pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO(2) and CO(2)-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese) have lesser effects on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals control the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and recycling processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, biological release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution of marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history. PMID:22701115

  18. Use of Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence to Measure Trace Metal Distribution in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkous, D.; Flinn, J. M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Frederickson, C.; Jones, B. F.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2002-12-01

    X26A, National Synchrotron Light Source, was used to quantitatively evaluate the spatial distribution of trace metals, such as Zn and Cu, in brain tissue. X-ray microprobe techniques offer distinct advantages over other analytical methods by allowing analyses to be done in-situ with little or no chemical pretreatment and low detection limits (about 1 ppm). In the context of neuroscience, SXRF can provide non-destructive measurements of specific metal concentrations and distribution within nerve (brain) tissue. Neuronal tissue from organisms having undergone different normal or experimental conditions may be compared, with analytical capacities not limited by binding states of the metal (i.e., vesicular or enzymatic), as is the case with staining techniques.. Whole regions of tissue may be scanned for detectable trace metals at spatial resolutions of 10um or less using focused monochromatic x-ray beams. Here special attention has been given to zinc because it is the most common trace metal in the brain, and levels have been increasing in the environment. In this investigation, zinc concentrations present within the hilus of a rat hippocampus, and to a lesser extent in the cortex, have been shown to increase following long-term ingestion of zinc-enhanced drinking water that was associated with deficits in spatial memory. Concomitantly, copper concentrations in the internal capsule were comparatively lower. Other first order transition metals, Cr, V, Mn, and Co were not detected. In contrast, elevated levels of Zn, Cu, and Fe have been seen in amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Trace metals, anions and polybromodiphenyl ethers in settled indoor dust and their association.

    PubMed

    Kefeni, Kebede K; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2013-07-01

    Contaminants in settled indoor dust are potentially health hazardous to human. Thus, identification and quantification of toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust is of great concern. In this study, the levels of major anions ([Formula: see text]), trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, As and Pb) and polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in settled office and home dust were determined and correlations between the contaminants investigated. Depending on the available materials in both microenvironments, the most possible sources were identified. The results showed that the settled office dusts (n = 6 pooled samples from 85 offices) were more contaminated than home dusts (n = 8 homes). For anions, [Formula: see text] and Cl(-) accounted for 87 and 97% of the total office and home dust contaminants, respectively. For trace metals, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn, accounted for 98% of the contaminants in both office and home dust samples. Fe exhibited the highest percentage of 76.7 and 87.3% in office and home dust samples, respectively. For PBDEs, the mean concentrations detected in office and home dust ranged between 5.8-86.3 and 1.5-20.6 ng g(-1), respectively. The log-transformed correlation between the total concentrations of trace metals and major anions detected in offices and homes was positive for offices and negative for homes with a statistically significant values (r = 0.73, p < 0.01; r = -0.22, p < 0.01, respectively). The daily exposure rates determined for the most hazardous such as As, Cd, Pb and PBDEs congeners, relative to the individual concentrations reported in the literature in settled indoor dust, were found very lower. Therefore, maybe it is possible to expect less potential health risk. Investigation of formation of coordination compounds between trace metals and PBDEs congeners is possible; however, this requires further study. PMID:23314708

  20. Rapid amperometric detection of trace metals by inhibition of an ultrathin polypyrrole-based glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ayenimo, Joseph G; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive and reliable inhibitive amperometric glucose biosensor is described for rapid trace metal determination. The biosensor utilises a conductive ultrathin (55 nm thick) polypyrrole (PPy) film for entrapment of glucose oxidase (GOx) to permit rapid inhibition of GOx activity in the ultrathin film upon exposure to trace metals, resulting in reduced glucose amperometric response. The biosensor demonstrates a relatively fast response time of 20s and does not require incubation. Furthermore, a complete recovery of GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx biosensor is quickly achieved by washing in 2mM EDTA for only 10s. The minimum detectable concentrations achieved with the biosensor for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) by inhibitive amperometric detection are 0.48, 1.5, 1.6 and 4.0 µM, respectively. Also, suitable linear concentration ranges were achieved from 0.48-3.3 µM for Hg(2+), 1.5-10 µM for Cu(2+), 1.6-7.7 µM for Pb(2+) and 4-26 µM for Cd(2+). The use of Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots revealed that the suppressive effects observed with Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) were via non-competitive inhibition, while those of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were due to mixed and competitive inhibition. The stronger inhibition exhibited by the trace metals on GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx film was also confirmed by the low inhibition constant obtained from this analysis. The biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of trace metals in tap water samples. PMID:26653478

  1. Mapping human health risks from exposure to trace metal contamination of drinking water sources in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis; Shen, Heqing; Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Syeda Maria; Bokhari, Habib; Schäfer, Ralf B; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah

    2015-12-15

    The consumption of contaminated drinking water is one of the major causes of mortality and many severe diseases in developing countries. The principal drinking water sources in Pakistan, i.e. ground and surface water, are subject to geogenic and anthropogenic trace metal contamination. However, water quality monitoring activities have been limited to a few administrative areas and a nationwide human health risk assessment from trace metal exposure is lacking. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) and eight relevant spatial predictors, we calculated nationwide human health risk maps by predicting the concentration of 10 trace metals in the drinking water sources of Pakistan and comparing them to guideline values. GWR incorporated local variations of trace metal concentrations into prediction models and hence mitigated effects of large distances between sampled districts due to data scarcity. Predicted concentrations mostly exhibited high accuracy and low uncertainty, and were in good agreement with observed concentrations. Concentrations for Central Pakistan were predicted with higher accuracy than for the North and South. A maximum 150-200 fold exceedance of guideline values was observed for predicted cadmium concentrations in ground water and arsenic concentrations in surface water. In more than 53% (4 and 100% for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% confidence interval (CI)) of the total area of Pakistan, the drinking water was predicted to be at risk of contamination from arsenic, chromium, iron, nickel and lead. The area with elevated risks is inhabited by more than 74 million (8 and 172 million for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% CI) people. Although these predictions require further validation by field monitoring, the results can inform disease mitigation and water resources management regarding potential hot spots. PMID:26312405

  2. Temporal and spatial variations in dissolved trace metal species in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, A.; Hannigan, R.; Jones, C.

    2002-12-01

    Behavior of dissolved major (e.g., Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+) and trace elements (e.g., Sr2+, Pb2+, Ba2+, Br-, etc.) in estuarine environments is a function of several factors such as salinity, pH, suspended particles and organic material contents. The fate of these metals and their distribution will differ from one estuary to another and within a given estuary. To investigate the fate and source (anthropogenic versus resuspended input) of selected major and trace elements in Chesapeake Bay (CB), water and sediment samples were collected eastern, western shores and island areas of the Bay from July to September. Water samples were filtered (0.45\\x8Dm) and acidified (pH<2) with ultrapure nitric acid prior to their analysis for trace elements by ICP-MS. A computer code (MINTEQA) was used to study metal speciation in water samples. It was assumed that water was in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen, and therefore Fe3+ form was input in the model instead of Fe2+. As a result, MINTEQA did not have to perform redox calculations. The ratio of dissolved species to total dissolved metal indicates nonconservative behavior of major elements such Mg, Ca and K and Pb, while trace elements Sr and Ba were more conservative, in time and space. Variations in ionic strengths in different sites suggest effects of salinity and turbidity on complex formation, as ionic strength normally increases with low salinity and vice versa. Variations in spatial and temporal distribution of elements, shown in this study, are likely due to nonuniformity of the water flow regime in different zones, seasonal biological regeneration of metals from sediment and salinity gradients.

  3. LA-ICP-MS Study of Trace Elements in the Chanuskij Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petaev, Michail I.

    2005-01-01

    This progress report covers work done during the second year of the 3-year proposal. During this year we resolved many issues relevant to the analytical technique developed by us for measuring trace elements in meteoritic metals. This technique was used to measure concentrations of Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Sb, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in eight large (120 - 160 microns) metal grains from both "igneous" and "metamorphic" lithologies of the Chanuskij silicate inclusions. The first application of OUT technique to metal grains from thin sections showed some limitations. Small thickness of metal grains in the thin section limited the signal to 3-4 time-slices instead of 10- 1 1 ones in polished sections of iron meteorites studied before.

  4. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemi, M. M.; Parvin, P. Moosakhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A.; Majdabadi, A.; Abachi, S.

    2014-06-15

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  5. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, M. M.; Parvin, P.; Moosakhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Majdabadi, A.; Reyhani, A.; Abachi, S.

    2014-06-01

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  6. Volcanic output of SO/sub 2/ and trace metals: a new approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, G.; le Cloarec, M.; Pennisi, M.

    1988-01-01

    Owing to a model of volcanic emission of gases and volatiles, it was possible to normalize to /sup 210/Po the volcanic output of SO/sub 2/, Pb, Bi and other trace as well as major metals. It appears that the results concerning SO/sub 2/, Pb and Bi agree with previous estimates derived on a very different basis. The evaluation was extended to Cd, Cu, Zn, Al, Mg, Na and K. Moreover, it was observed that, even for poorly volatile major metals, the part of volcanic aerosols produced by evaporation is at least comparable to that which results from spattering.

  7. By-product metals are technologically essential but have problematic supply.

    PubMed

    Nassar, N T; Graedel, T E; Harper, E M

    2015-04-01

    The growth in technological innovation that has occurred over the past decades has, in part, been possible because an increasing number of metals of the periodic table are used to perform specialized functions. However, there have been increasing concerns regarding the reliability of supply of some of these metals. A main contributor to these concerns is the fact that many of these metals are recovered only as by-products from a limited number of geopolitically concentrated ore deposits, rendering their supplies unable to respond to rapid changes in demand. Companionality is the degree to which a metal is obtained largely or entirely as a by-product of one or more host metals from geologic ores. The dependence of companion metal availability on the production of the host metals introduces a new facet of supply risk to modern technology. We evaluated companionality for 62 different metals and metalloids, and show that 61% (38 of 62) have companionality greater than 50%. Eighteen of the 38-including such technologically essential elements as germanium, terbium, and dysprosium-are further characterized as having geopolitically concentrated production and extremely low rates of end-of-life recycling. It is this subset of companion metals-vital in current technologies such as electronics, solar energy, medical imaging, energy-efficient lighting, and other state-of-the-art products-that may be at the greatest risk of supply constraints in the coming decades. PMID:26601159

  8. Interspecific and geographical variations of trace metal concentrations in cephalopods from Tunisian waters.

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, Moncef; Metian, Marc; Hajji, Tarek; Guyot, Thierry; Ben Chaouacha-Chékir, Rafika; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-06-01

    The concentrations of six metals (Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) were investigated and compared in three tissues (arms, digestive gland, and mantle) of three cephalopod species from the Tunisian waters: the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), and the European squid (Loligo vulgaris). Whatever the species or the sites, the digestive gland displayed the highest concentrations of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, highlighting its major role in their bioaccumulation and detoxification. This is also true for Hg but only for the digestive gland of O. vulgaris. Muscle from the arms and the mantle contained thus relatively low trace metal concentrations except for Hg in L. vulgaris and S. officinalis. Geographic comparison of metal concentrations in Tunisian cephalopods from three locations indicates that higher concentrations of Ag, Pb, and Hg were observed in cephalopods from northern and eastern coasts, whereas the highest Cd levels were detected in the southeastern, reflecting different conditions of exposure. Comparing the trace element concentrations between species, Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, and Zn concentrations were the highest in the digestive gland of octopuses. This may be related to the differences in ecological features and swimming behavior among different cephalopod species. Effects of length and sex on metal levels were also considered, indicating a limited influence of sex on metal concentration. PMID:24562415

  9. Trace metal bioavailability in sediments from a reference site, Ribeira Bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Janine M M; Machado, Wilson; Santos, Joana M; Lessa, Josane A

    2016-05-15

    Surface sediments were collected near potential contamination sources impacting Ribeira Bay (Brazil), a system considered as a 'reference site' for trace metals. Physicochemical properties (pH and Eh), grain size and concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (TP), acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) and simultaneously-extracted metals (Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were analyzed. Although relatively low metal concentrations were found, correlations of Zn and Ni with high TP levels suggested an association with sewage inputs, while other metals presented associations with specific geochemical carriers (TOC, Fe and Mn compounds). AVS levels exceeding those of the sums of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (ΣSEM) by at least one order of magnitude and TOC-normalized differences between ΣSEM and AVS ((ΣSEM-AVS)/fOC) near to or below than -200μmolgOC(-1) indicated that there were sufficient AVS and TOC levels to control trace metal bioavailability in sediment pore water. PMID:26992748

  10. Trace metal geochemistry in deep hypersaline anoxic basin in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveri, Elvira; Sprovieri, Mario; Salvagio Manta, Daniela; Traina, Anna; Mazzola, Salvo

    2014-05-01

    Trace metals accumulation in marine sediments is primarily regulated by redox conditions; specifically, in the geological record, ancient anoxic sediments appear characterized by significant enrichments in redox sensitive elements. In the modern sedimentary record, examples of extreme limitations in dynamic circulation at the sea bottom are represented by the fascinating hypersaline anoxic basins, recently explored in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. These basins present a peculiar layer of "brine" (a mass water with salinity >300o) above the bottom sediments. The seawater-brine is generally located at a depth of about 3000 m below sea level with a thickness up to hundred meters. This transition zone characterized by steep pycno- and chemoclines passes with evident gradients of salinity and Eh to an extremely salty, anoxic a sulfuric seawater (brine). Here, we present geochemical results from two deep hypersaline anoxic basins discovered during two R/V Urania cruises (September 2008,2009), the Thetis and Kryos Basin (22°08'E 34°41'N, 22°01'E 34°56'N). Sediments appear depleted in organic matter (TOC 0.17-1.28o) and some redox-sensitive trace metals (As, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn) do not show the classical enrichments reported for anoxic sediments (e.g., sapropel). The only trace metal favored in the sedimentary accumulation seems to be the Mo. In particular, the documented low Mo/TOC ratios suggest strongly restricted conditions and limited deepwater renewal, and evidence the role played by the hydrographic control on redox conditions and trace metals accumulation in the studied sediments. A comparison among trace metal distribution patterns in hypersaline basins with sediments of other recent anoxic basins shows that the Cr, Ni, V and Zn concentrations are generally comparable thus suggesting similar mechanisms for metal enrichments. On the other hand, a comparison with the geochemistry of ancient anoxic sediments suggests that these anoxic hypersaline basins do not offer

  11. In vitro antiplasmodial activity, macronutrients and trace metals in the medicinal plants: Phyllanthus spp. and Alpinia conchigera Griff.

    PubMed

    Haslinda, M S; Aiyub, Z; Bakar, N K A; Tohar, N; Musa, Y; Abdullah, N R; Ibrahim, H; Awang, K

    2015-03-01

    An antiplasmodial screening of Phyllanthus debilis and Phyllanthus urinaria was carried out. The medicinal plants were extracted and evaluated for in vitro antiplasmodial activity against D10 (chloroquine-sensitive, CQS) and Gombak A (chloroquine-resistant, CQR) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The methanolic crudes from the soxhlet extraction were active against both strains however, P. urinaria (IC50 8.9 μg/ml with CQR strain) exhibited better anti-malarial activity compared to P. debilis (IC50 12.2 μg/ml with CQR strain). Furthermore, the methanolic crude of P. urinaria obtained by the cold extraction has good anti-malarial activity towards CQS (IC50 4.1 μg/ml). The concentration of macronutrients (calcium and magnesium) and trace metals (copper, manganese, iron and zinc) from three Phyllanthus species i.e. P. debilis Klein ex Wild., Phyllanthus niruri L., P. urinaria L. and Alpinia conchigera Griff. were determined using microwave digestion method and analyzed by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Standard Reference Material 1547 (peach leaves) was used to validate the method throughout this study. The recovery values were in the range of 80% to 120% which were in very good agreement with the certified values. The three Phyllanthus species and leaves of A. conchigera showed the highest concentration of calcium compared to other metals and macronutrients studied. The significant presence of all the important macronutrients and trace metals which are essential for human health and well-being substantiate their use medicinally in traditional practices. PMID:25801263

  12. Accumulation of Trace Metals by Mangrove Plants in Indian Sundarban Wetland: Prospects for Phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ranju; Favas, Paulo J C; Pratas, J; Jonathan, M P; Ganesh, P Sankar; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The work investigates on the potential of ten mangrove species for absorption, accumulation and partitioning of trace metal(loid)s in individual plant tissues (leaves, bark and root/pneumatophore) at two study sites of Indian Sundarban Wetland. The metal(loid) concentration in host sediments and their geochemical characteristics were also considered. Mangrove sediments showed unique potential in many- fold increase for most metal(loid)s than plant tissues due to their inherent physicochemical properties. The ranges of concentration of trace metal(loid)s for As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in plant tissue were 0.006-0.31, 0.02-2.97, 0.10-4.80, 0.13-6.49, 4.46-48.30, 9.2-938.1, 0.02-0.13, 9.8-1726, 11-5.41, 0.04-7.64, 3.81-52.20 μg g (-1)respectively. The bio- concentration factor (BCF) showed its maximum value (15.5) in Excoecaria agallocha for Cd, suggesting that it can be considered as a high-efficient plant for heavy metal bioaccumulation. Among all metals, Cd and Zn were highly bioaccumulated in E. agallocha (2.97 and 52.2 μg g (-1) respectively. Our findings suggest that the species may be classified as efficient metal trap for Cd in aerial parts, as indicated by higher metal accumulation in the leaves combined with BCF and translocation factor (TF) values. PMID:25581820

  13. Metabolism and toxicity of trace metals in the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Since trace metals such as mercury, cadmium, copper, and zinc can be released to the marine environment as a result of the operation of energy technologies, their potential effects on marine organisms need to be understood. Marine organisms have the capability to respond to metal exposure through acclimatization or adaptation to altered conditions. Mechanisms which may be involved in conferring such capabilities have also been identified. This research project investigated one of these mechanisms, the low molecular weight, metal-building protein MT, in relation to metal toxicity and acclimatization/adaptation. Specific topics included purification and characterization of molluscan MTs; examination of the kinetics of induction of these proteins in response to the above metals; the cellular disposition of metals in relation to induction; and metal-toxicity in relation to induction of metal-binding proteins. Studies were conducted on the bay mussel Mytilus edulis and the American oyster Crassostrea virginica. These efforts were planned to contribute to a better understanding of MTs and their relationship to toxic and adaptive responses in commercially- and ecologically-important marine animals. 23 refs.

  14. Coordination sphere of the third metal site is essential to the activity and metal selectivity of alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Koutsioulis, Dimitris; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Mäki, Seija; Guthrie, Ellen; Feller, Georges; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Heikinheimo, Pirkko

    2010-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are commercially applied enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters by a reaction involving three active site metal ions. We have previously identified H135 as the key residue for controlling activity of the psychrophilic TAB5 AP (TAP). In this article, we describe three X-ray crystallographic structures on TAP variants H135E and H135D in complex with a variety of metal ions. The structural analysis is supported by thermodynamic and kinetic data. The AP catalysis essentially requires octahedral coordination in the M3 site, but stability is adjusted with the conformational freedom of the metal ion. Comparison with the mesophilic Escherichia coli, AP shows differences in the charge transfer network in providing the chemically optimal metal combination for catalysis. Our results provide explanation why the TAB5 and E. coli APs respond in an opposite way to mutagenesis in their active sites. They provide a lesson on chemical fine tuning and the importance of the second coordination sphere in defining metal specificity in enzymes. Understanding the framework of AP catalysis is essential in the efforts to design even more powerful tools for modern biotechnology. PMID:19916164

  15. Sedimentation and associated trace metal enrichment in the riparian zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Bao, Yuhai; He, Xiubin; Zhou, Huaidong; Cao, Zhijing; Gao, Peng; Zhong, Ronghua; Hu, Yunhua; Zhang, Xinbao

    2014-05-01

    Impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir has created an artificial riparian zone with a vertical height of 30 m and a total area of 349 km(2), which has been subjected to seasonal inundation and exposure due to regular reservoir impoundment and the occurrence of natural floods. The significant alteration of hydrologic regime has caused numerous environmental changes. The present study investigated the magnitude and spatial pattern of sedimentation and metal enrichment in a typical section of the riparian zone, composed of bench terraces with previous agricultural land uses, and explored their links to the changed hydrologic regime. In particular, we measured the total sediment depths and collected surface riparian sediments and down-profile sectioned riparian soils (at 5 cm intervals) for trace metal determination. Our analysis showed that the annual average sedimentation rates varied from 0.5 to 10 cm·yr(-1) and they decreased significantly with increasing elevation. This lateral distribution was principally attributed to seasonal variations in water levels and suspended sediment concentrations. Enriched concentrations of trace metals were found both in the riparian sediments and soils, but they were generally higher in the riparian sediments than in riparian soils and followed a similar lateral decreasing trend. Metal contamination assessment showed that the riparian sediments were slightly contaminated by Ni, Zn, and Pb, moderately contaminated by Cu, and moderately to strongly contaminated by Cd; while riparian soils were slightly contaminated by As, and moderately contaminated by Cd. Trace metal enrichment in the riparian sediments may be attributed to external input of contaminated sediments produced from upstream anthropogenic sources and chemical adsorption from dissolved fractions during pure sediment mobilization and after sink for a prolonged flooding period due to reservoir impoundment. PMID:24561931

  16. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments. PMID:24191459

  17. By-product metals are technologically essential but have problematic supply

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, N. T.; Graedel, T. E.; Harper, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The growth in technological innovation that has occurred over the past decades has, in part, been possible because an increasing number of metals of the periodic table are used to perform specialized functions. However, there have been increasing concerns regarding the reliability of supply of some of these metals. A main contributor to these concerns is the fact that many of these metals are recovered only as by-products from a limited number of geopolitically concentrated ore deposits, rendering their supplies unable to respond to rapid changes in demand. Companionality is the degree to which a metal is obtained largely or entirely as a by-product of one or more host metals from geologic ores. The dependence of companion metal availability on the production of the host metals introduces a new facet of supply risk to modern technology. We evaluated companionality for 62 different metals and metalloids, and show that 61% (38 of 62) have companionality greater than 50%. Eighteen of the 38—including such technologically essential elements as germanium, terbium, and dysprosium—are further characterized as having geopolitically concentrated production and extremely low rates of end-of-life recycling. It is this subset of companion metals—vital in current technologies such as electronics, solar energy, medical imaging, energy-efficient lighting, and other state-of-the-art products—that may be at the greatest risk of supply constraints in the coming decades. PMID:26601159

  18. Distribution of Mercury and Other Trace Metals in the Wabash River, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, K.; Bonzongo, J.

    2005-12-01

    There is very little information on mercury (Hg) and other trace metals (e.g., Co, Ni, Cu) in streams of central Indiana. Published research has focused mainly on the industrialized northern part of the State, close to Chicago, and on the Ohio River valley at the southern end of the State. For rivers draining the central part of Indiana, including the Wabash River, numerous Hg-based fish advisories are posted; yet, very little to no data on Hg and trace metals in water or sediments exists. We present some of the first Hg and trace metal data for the Wabash River in central Indiana. Water and surface sediment samples were collected in the summers of 2004 and 2005 from the river section that extends from upstream of Lafayette to Terre Haute. In contrast to the Wabash River upstream reaches, this section of the river has no water inputs from tributaries that drain reservoirs, and the above two cities as well as a power plant located upstream of Terre Haute are potential sources for Hg and trace metals to the river. Total-Hg concentrations determined on filtered samples ranged from 0.57 to 1.7ng/L in samples collected in August 2004, with very little change in concentrations a year after (range: 0.61 to 0.83ng/L). Total Hg levels in non-filtered samples ranged from ~1.6 to 5.0ng/L and from 3.31 to 4.17ng/L in August 2004 and 2005, respectively. These values compare to those reported for rivers and streams in neighboring states. Dissolved trace metal concentrations are generally low (e.g., Co, Ni, Cu less than 2μg/L) and show only small increases as the Wabash River passes through Lafayette. We will examine the relationships between aqueous Hg, sedimentary Hg (0.93-16.8μg/g) and Hg in biological tissues in comparison with trends/levels reported for other US rivers with similar land use types within watersheds.

  19. Accumulation and distribution of trace metals within soils and the austral cordgrass Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Lancelotti, Julio L; Bouza, Pablo J; Marcovecchio, Jorge E

    2015-12-15

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn were determined in soils and in below- and above-ground structures of Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh (San Antonio, Río Negro, Argentina). Also, the relationship between trace metal concentrations in soils and plants was investigated to improve our knowledge regarding the ability of this plant species to take up and accumulate trace metals from the soil. Our results indicate that, within the studied salt marsh, soil trace metal concentrations follow a decreasing concentration gradient toward the sea. They show moderate pollution and a potentially negative biological effect in one site of the salt marsh. While below-ground structures reflect the soil metal concentration pattern, this is not so evident in above-ground concentrations. Also, S. densiflora is able to absorb a limited amount of metals present in the soil, the soil bioaccumulation factor being lower in sites where soil metal concentration is higher. PMID:26481413

  20. Phytotoxicity of trace metals in spiked and field-contaminated soils: Linking soil-extractable metals with toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hamels, Fanny; Malevé, Jasmina; Sonnet, Philippe; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Smolders, Erik

    2014-11-01

    Soil tests have been widely developed to predict trace metal uptake by plants. The prediction of metal toxicity, however, has rarely been tested. The present study was set up to compare 8 established soil tests for diagnosing phytotoxicity in contaminated soils. Nine soils contaminated with Zn or Cu by metal mining, smelting, or processing were collected. Uncontaminated reference soils with similar soil properties were sampled, and series of increasing contamination were created by mixing each with the corresponding soil. In addition, each reference soil was spiked with either ZnCl2 or CuCl2 at several concentrations. Total metal toxicity to barley seedling growth in the field-contaminated soils was up to 30 times lower than that in corresponding spiked soils. Total metal (aqua regia-soluble) toxicity thresholds of 50% effective concentrations (EC50) varied by factors up to 260 (Zn) or 6 (Cu) among soils. For Zn, variations in EC50 thresholds decreased as aqua regia > 0.43 M HNO3  > 0.05 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) > 1 M NH4 NO3  > cobaltihexamine > diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) > 0.001 M CaCl2 , suggesting that the last extraction is the most robust phytotoxicity index for Zn. The EDTA extraction was the most robust for Cu-contaminated soils. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of the total soil metal in the field-contaminated soils markedly explained the lower toxicity compared with spiked soils. The isotope exchange method can be used to translate soil metal limits derived from soils spiked with metal salts to site-specific soil metal limits. PMID:25053440

  1. Collection of trace metals with cationic surfactant-silica particles followed by flotation with an anionic surfactant for seawater analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kitakata, Kengo; Hiraide, Masataka

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of seawater for trace metals is important for pollution monitoring and better understanding of marine systems. The present paper describes an efficient preconcentration method for the determination of trace metals in seawater. Trace metals [Ni(II), Cu(II), Ga(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in 1,000 mL of seawater sample were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and sorbed onto silica particles covered with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride. After the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the particles were floated to the solution surface by bubbling and then collected by suction. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The rapid 200-fold preconcentration was demonstrated with certified seawater samples. PMID:22159468

  2. Accumulation and risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace metals in tropical urban soils.

    PubMed

    Khillare, P S; Hasan, Amreen; Sarkar, Sayantan

    2014-05-01

    The study deals with the combined contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals to health risk in Delhi soils. Surface soils (0-5 cm) collected from three different land-use regions (industrial, flood-plain and a reference site) in Delhi, India over a period of 1 year were characterized with respect to 16 US Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs and five trace metals (Zn, Fe, Ni, Cr and Cd). Mean annual ∑16PAH concentrations at the industrial and flood-plain sites (10,893.2 ± 2826.4 and 3075.4 ± 948.7 μg/kg, respectively) were ~15 and ~4 times, respectively, higher than reference levels. Significant spatial and seasonal variations were observed for PAHs. Toxicity potentials of industrial and flood-plain soils were ~88 and ~8 times higher than reference levels. Trace metal concentrations in soils also showed marked dependencies on nearness to sources and seasonal effects. Correlation analysis, PAH diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis (PCA) led to the identification of sources such as coal and wood combustion, vehicular and industrial emissions, and atmospheric transport. Metal enrichment in soil and the degree of soil contamination were investigated using enrichment factors and index of geoaccumulation, respectively. Health risk assessment (incremental lifetime cancer risk and hazard index) showed that floodplain soils have potential high risk due to PAHs while industrial soils have potential risks due to both PAHs and Cr. PMID:24374784

  3. Trace metals health risk appraisal in fish species of Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Yasmeen, Kousar; Mirza, Muhammad Aslam; Khan, Namra A; Kausar, Nazish; Rehman, Atta-Ur; Hanif, Muddasir

    2016-01-01

    Fish is a vital food for humans and many animals. We report an environmental monitoring study to assess the trace metals in fish species caught from Arabian Sea and commercially available in the coastal city Karachi, Pakistan. Heavy metals such as copper, iron, lead and cadmium were determined in the skin, fillet and heart of the fish species Pampus argenteus, Epinephelus chlorostigma, Rachycentron canadum, Scomberomorus commerson, Johnius belangerii, Labeo rohita, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, Trachinotus blochii, Pomadsys olivaceum and Acanthopagrus berda by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The concentration (mg kg(-1), dry weight) range was: Cd (0.00-0.041), Cu (0.006-0.189), Fe (0.413-4.952) and Pb (0.00-0.569). Cadmium, copper and iron levels were below the tolerable limits whereas concentration of lead in the skins of S. commerson, E. chlorostigma, J. belangerii, A. berda; L. argentimaculatus, fillets of J. belangerii, E. chlorostigma and in the heart of J. belangerii exceeded the recommended limits. Therefore fish skin should be discouraged as food for humans or animals. The results indicate that a number of fish species have higher concentration of heavy metals dangerous for human health. Since the fish P. olivaceum (Dhotar) has the lowest level of trace metals therefore we recommend it for breeding and human consumption. PMID:27386308

  4. Effect of Ocean Acidification on Organic and Inorganic Speciation of Trace Metals.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Mortimer, Robert J G

    2016-02-16

    Rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are causing acidification of the oceans. This results in changes to the concentrations of key chemical species such as hydroxide, carbonate and bicarbonate ions. These changes will affect the distribution of different forms of trace metals. Using IPCC data for pCO2 and pH under four future emissions scenarios (to the year 2100) we use a chemical speciation model to predict changes in the distribution of organic and inorganic forms of trace metals. Under a scenario where emissions peak after the year 2100, predicted free ion Al, Fe, Cu, and Pb concentrations increase by factors of up to approximately 21, 2.4, 1.5, and 2.0 respectively. Concentrations of organically complexed metal typically have a lower sensitivity to ocean acidification induced changes. Concentrations of organically complexed Mn, Cu, Zn, and Cd fall by up to 10%, while those of organically complexed Fe, Co, and Ni rise by up to 14%. Although modest, these changes may have significance for the biological availability of metals given the close adaptation of marine microorganisms to their environment. PMID:26807813

  5. Trace metals in the Ob and Yenisei Rivers' Estuaries (the Kara Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.

    2014-12-01

    Behavior of some trace metals (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb) in water column (soluble <0.45 µm and particulate fractions) and bottom sediments (surface and cores) along the two transects from the Ob River and Yenisei River Estuaries to the Kara Sea was studied. The length of both transects was about 700 km. Water depth was 12-63 m, O2 dissolved :5.36-9.55 ml l-1. Along the transects salinity increased from 0.07 to 34.2 psu, while the SPM' concentration decreased from 10.31 to 0.31 mg/l. Total suspended particulate matter load is more than one order of magnitude higher in the Ob River Estuary comparing to that of the Yenisei River. It has led to a significant difference between the suspended trace metals' concentrations (µg/l) in water of the two estuaries. With salinity increase along transects Fe susp., Mn susp. and Zn susp. decreased by a factor of 100-500, that has led to a growth of a relative portion of dissolved trace metals followed by their bioaccumulation (Demina et al., 2010). A strong direct correlation between suspended Cu, Fe and SPM mass concentration was found. For the first time along the Yenisei River' Estuary -the Kara Sea transect a direct positive correlation between Cu suspended and volume concentration of SPM (mg/ml3) was found, that was attributed to contribution of phytoplankton aggregates in the SPM composition. A trend of relationship between content of suspended As and pelitic fraction (2-10 µm) of SPM was firstly found in theses basins also. Study of trace metal speciation in the bottom sediments (adsorbed, associated with Fe-Mn (oxyhydr)oxides, organic matter and fixed in the mineral lattice or refractory) has revealed the refractory fraction to be prevailing (70-95% total content) for Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Cd and Pb. That means that toxic heavy metals were not available for bottom fauna. Mn was predominantly found in the adsorbed and (oxyhydr)oxides geochemically labile forms, reflecting the redox condition change

  6. Towards field trace metal speciation using electroanalytical techniques and tangential ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Adnívia Santos Costa; Parat, Corinne; Rosa, André Henrique; Pinheiro, José Paulo

    2016-05-15

    In this work we propose a trace metal speciation methodology to determine the total, free and ultrafiltered (<1 KDa) metal fractions using electrochemical methods (SCP and AGNES) and tangential ultrafiltration (UF) experiments that can easily be carried out on-site. We tested our methodology spiking Cadmium ions into two natural waters samples from Itapanhau and Sorocabinha rivers in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The limits of detection (LOD) was 1.6×10(-9) M for the total Cd(2+) determination performed by Stripping Chronopotentiometry (SCP) in the source and acidified ultrafiltered solution and 1.9×10(-9) M for the free Cd(2+) determination using Absence of gradients and Nernstian equilibrium stripping (AGNES), using a thin mercury film electrode. The total metal determination was performed by SCP in acidified samples and the results compared with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). The SCP results were adequate with a 96% of recovery from the known metal spike for the 12 samples tested. For the Itapanhau sample the free metal determined by AGNES and the ultrafiltered fraction are identical, while for the Sorocabinha the free metal in the source is significantly smaller than the ultrafiltered fraction, indicating that this sample must be rich in metal complexes with small inorganic ligands that are able to permeate the 1kDa membrane. The proposed metal speciation methodology validated in the laboratory combining UF and SCP/AGNES is able to be used in on-site experiments providing valid information regarding the total and free metal concentrations and additionally some insight on the role of small inorganic ligands to the metal complexation. PMID:26992501

  7. Review-Factors involving in fluctuation of trace metals concentrations in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Perween, Rubina

    2015-05-01

    Milk makes a significant contribution to human diet through provision of macronutrients, vitamins and minerals. The exact composition of milk varies with species among domestic animals according to their neonatal needs. It is recognized that imbalance in the quantity of minerals and trace elements is a serious health hazard especially for infants. Many studies reported the fluctuation in the level of metals in milk due to the influence of several factors such as geographical and exposure to environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic activity. Amongst all sources, industries take lion's share to alter the metal content in milk. The importance of different nutritional and toxic metals in milk from different geographical areas is discussed. PMID:26004711

  8. Trace metals in Japanese eel Anguilla japonica in relation to ecological migratory types and growth stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Dung Quang; Chino, Naoko; Shirai, Kotaro; Arai, Takaomi

    2010-04-01

    In order to understand the metal concentrations in Japanese eel Anguilla japonica, nine elements were analyzed in the livers of different migratory types of eels collected from Tokushima region (south Japan). Migratory types were defined by examining the Sr:Ca ratio in otoliths. The results showed that there were significant differences in V, Cr, Cd, and Pb concentrations among the migratory types. Mature-sea-eels show a higher risk of metal accumulation than other migratory types of eels, and the concentrations of Mn, Cu, and Zn in mature eels were significantly higher than those in immature eels. The study suggests that the eel liver is a valuable bioindicator for trace metals; however, when using the eel as a bioindicator to reveal the pollutants in aquatic systems, life history analysis should be carried out for accurate interpretation of the results.

  9. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, I. )

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Mitochondrial Protein Nfu1 Influences Homeostasis of Essential Metals in the Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmi; Park, Minji; Do, Eunsoo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein Nfu1 plays an important role in the assembly of mitochondrial Fe-S clusters and intracellular iron homeostasis in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the Nfu1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans Nfu1 localized in the mitochondria and influenced homeostasis of essential metals such as iron, copper and manganese. Marked growth defects were observed in the mutant lacking NFU1, which suggests a critical role of Nfu1 in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis and intracellular metal homeostasis in C. neoformans. PMID:25606020

  11. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace metals in insoluble particles of snow from Urumqi, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolan; Jiang, Fengqing; Wang, Shaoping; Turdi, Muyesser; Zhang, Zhaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize trace elements in snow in urban-suburb gradient over Urumqi city, China. The spatial distribution patterns of 11 trace metals in insoluble particulate matters of snow were revealed by using 102 snow samples collected in and around urban areas of Urumqi, a city suffering from severe wintertime air pollution in China. Similar spatial distribution for Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb was found and their two significant high-value areas located in the west and east, respectively, and a high-value area in the south, which were correlated with factory emissions, traffic activities, and construction fugitive dust. The high-value areas of Cr, Ni, and V occurred in the northeast corner and along main traffic paths, which were linked to oil refinery and vehicular emissions. High value of Be presented in the west of the city. The high-value area of Co in the northeast could be related to local soil. Cd and U displayed relatively even spatial patterns in the urban area. In view of distance from the urban center, e.g., from the first circular belt to the fourth circular belt, except Be, V, Cd, and U, the contents of other metals generally decreased from the first circular belt to the forth circular belt, implying the effect of human activity clearly. Additionally, prevailing northwesterly winds and occasionally southeasterly winds in winter were associated with decreased, generally, concentrations of trace metal in snow from the urban center to the southern suburb along a northwest and southeast transect. The information on concentrations and spatial distributions of these metals in insoluble particles of snow in winter will be valuable for further environmental protection and planning. PMID:25412892

  12. Trace-metal distributions in seawater and anoxic brines in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saager, Paul M.; Schijf, Johan; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    1993-04-01

    The vertical distribution of dissolved and particulate trace metals (Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd) is reported for seawater and the anoxic brines of Tyro and Bannock Basins in the eastern Mediterranean. In normal Mediterranean seawater, the distribution of dissolved trace metals is governed by water mass circulation, as well as by local input sources. For Cd and possibly Cu, steady-state behaviour is not a viable assumption, probably as a result of anthropogenic sources. In agreement with previous reports, no correlation was observed between dissolved Ni, Cu, Cd and the major nutrients. At the seawater-brine interface, all trace metals show dramatic changes in concentration. In the brines, the concentrations of dissolved Fe and Mn are strongly elevated compared to overlying waters, yet probably limited by formation of solid sulfide and/or carbonate phases. The distributions of dissolved Fe and sulfide show a remarkable mirror image of those found previously in the Orca brine (Gulf of Mexico) and the ionic concentration products are approximately the same in all three basins. The difference in absolute Fe and sulfide concentrations is thought to be caused by a high supply of Fe to Orca Basin. Concentrations of dissolved Ni, Cu and Cd in the brines are at least one order of magnitude lower than in overlying waters, most likely due to formation of solid sulfide phases. We believe these data provide the first indication of substantial nickel-sulfide (co) precipitation within an anoxic basin. Particulate metal concentrations are elevated at the seawater-brine interface and are probably associated with the presence of solid sulfide phases. In addition, the extreme density gradient at the interface will slow the sinking rate of particles and lead to accumulation of particles at the interface due to accumulation.

  13. Biomonitoring of organochlorine compounds and trace metals along the Eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia) using Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Kljaković-Gaspić, Zorana; Herceg-Romanić, Snjezana; Kozul, Darija; Veza, Jere

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the results of monitoring trace organic contaminants (17 PCBs and 7 OCPs) and 6 trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) in the coastal waters of the eastern Adriatic in 2006 using Mytilus galloprovincialis as indicator species. OCPs were found in all samples (0.07-14.3 ng g(-1)d.wt.), while in positive samples concentrations of PCBs ranged between 0.16 and 20.5 ng g(-1)d.wt. The α-HCH/γ-HCH and DDE/DDT ratios indicated recent input of γ-HCH and DDT. Spatial distributions of HCB, PCBs, DDTs and Hg were significantly correlated with population density. Although elevated concentrations of all trace metals and organic contaminants were recorded in the densely populated and industrialized areas, overall data point to relatively low level of contamination of the eastern Adriatic coast. Evaluation of the risks to human health associated with consumption of the mussels suggested that there is no health risk for moderate shellfish consumers. PMID:20696441

  14. [Water treatment systems of hemodialysis centers in Lithuania and trace metals in purified water in 2002].

    PubMed

    Skarupskiene, Inga; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Abdrachmanovas, Olegas; Ryselis, Stanislovas; Smalinskiene, Alina; Naginiene, Rima

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain information on hemodialysis chemical water quality and on water treatment systems of hemodialysis centers in Lithuania. Five trace metals (Al, Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu) were examined in the purified water (sample from a point after the water treatment system) of 28 hemodialysis centers. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was applied to measure water trace metals levels. All hemodialysis centers in Lithuania used treated water. Softeners were used by 100%, reverse osmosis by 86.2% of the centers. Concomitant use of sand filter, softeners, activated carbon, reverse osmosis was found in 72.4% of the centers. The age of the water treatment system varied from 1 to 117 months (mean=39.7+/-30.4). Concentrations of Al, Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu in the purified water of 28 hemodialysis centers did not exceed standards of the European Pharmacopoeia. There was significant decrease in the mean levels of investigated trace elements in the treated water in Lithuania in 2002 compared with examined in 1998. PMID:12761429

  15. The role of Spartina maritima and Sarcocornia fruticosa on trace metals retention in Ria Formosa, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira da Silva, Manuela; Duarte, Duarte; Isidoro, Jorge; Chícharo, Luís

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, phytoremediation has become an increasingly recognized pathway for contaminant removal from water and shallow soils. Assessing the phytoremediation potential of wetlands is complex due to variable conditions of hydrology, soil/sediment types, plant species diversity, growing season and water chemistry. Physico-chemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating contaminants. Saltmarsh plants can sequestrate and inherently tolerate high metal concentrations found in saltmarsh sediments. An increasing number of studies have been carried out to understand the role of halophyte vegetation on retention, biovailability and remediation of the pollutants in coastal areas (estuaries and lagoons). It is already known that the accumulation capacity and the pattern of metal distribution in the plant tissues vary among plant species, namely monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous, and with sediment characteristics. During the last decades, there has been a large increase in urbanization and industrialization of the area surrounding Ria Formosa. Due to this reality, anthropogenic contaminants, including trace metals, are transported via untreated sewage and agricultural effluents to several parts of the lagoon. The dominant producers are Spartina maritima (Poales: Poaceae) and Sarcocornia fruticosa (Caryophyllales: Chenopodiaceae), appearing in pure stands respectively in the lower and in the upper saltmarshes. The aim of this work was to survey, comparatively, the role of S. maritima and S. fruticosa on minor and trace element (Ag, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn), contents and distribution amongst sediment and plant tissues. Both S. maritima and S. fruticosa could fix metals from the surrounding belowground environment and accumulate metals, mainly in roots (also in rhizomes in the case of the former). Metal translocation to aerial parts of the plants was, in general, residual.

  16. Chemical Speciation of Trace Metals in Superficial Sediment from Lake Hongfeng, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiwei; Huang, Xianfei; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Cunxiong; Qin, Fanxin

    2010-11-01

    Heavy metals have been well known to cause numerous adverse effects to humans and ecological systems, and pollution of aquatic systems with heavy metals has aroused a huge public concern. The work reported in this paper deals with the distribution characteristics of trace metals (Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni) in ten surface sediments from Lake Hongfeng, situated in Guizhou Province of southwestern China. Apart from total concentration, the distribution of these metals in four fractions (exchangeable and weak acid soluble fraction (F1), reducible fraction (F2), oxidizable fraction (F3) and residual fraction (F4)) was also studied by means of an analytical procedure involving sequential chemical extraction that was proposed by the Commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR). Analysis of total concentration suggested that the mean concentrations of heavy metals under study decreased in the order of Zn>Cu>Pb>Ni, and pollution of all these heavy metals in the North Lake was more serious than that in the South Lake. Study of heavy metals chemical speciation revealed that Pb and Cu were mainly distributed in reducible and residual fractions, and Zn and Ni mainly existed in residual fraction. Therefore, special attention should be paid to Pb and Cu since they presented a large fraction distributed in the exchangeable and weak acid soluble fraction and reducible fraction that were associated with high potential bioavailability. The Pearson correlation analysis between these heavy metals distributed in different fractions and some major elements were also carried out, and the results proved that sulfur (H2S) played an important role in distribution and transformation of heavy metals, especially for Pb, Cu and Zn.

  17. Trace elements in zircon from rocks of the Katugin rare-metal deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashova, E. V.; Skublov, S. G.; Marin, Yu. B.; Lupashko, T. N.; Ilchenko, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Katugin deposit of economic Ta, Nb, Zr, U, REE, Y, and cryolite (Na3AlF6) ores is located in the Kalar district of the Chita region and classified as unique in Nb, Ta, and Y reserves hosted in rare-metal alkali granite. The distribution of trace elements (including REE) in zircon was studied for ore-bearing arfvedsonite-aegirine, biotite-riebeckite rocks, and zones of late recrystallization with nodular zircon clusters. The outer rims and marginal zones of zircon grains are depleted in almost all trace elements except for hafnium as compared with cores and central zones. Compositional features of zircon cores indicate their magmatic origin and do not prove metasomatic nature of the deposit. The similar REE patterns of zircon rims and cores, as well as other attributes assume postmagmatic or metamorphic origin of the rims.

  18. Tracking traces of transition metals present in concrete mixtures by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry studies.

    PubMed

    Bassioni, Ghada; Pillay, Alvin E; El Kadi, Mirella; Fegali, Fadi; Fok, Sai Cheong; Stephen, Sasi

    2010-01-01

    Transition metals can have a significant impact in research related to the dosage optimization of superplasticizers. It is known that the presence of transition metals can influence such doses, and the application of a contemporary instrumental method to obtain the profiles of subsisting transition elements in concrete mixtures would be useful. In this work, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is investigated as a possible tool to track traces of transition metals in concrete mixtures. Depth profiling using ICP-MS on proofed and unproofed concrete shows the presence of Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at trace intensities in the bulk of the samples under investigation. The study demonstrates that the transition metals present in the concrete sample are largely a part of the cement composition and, to a minor degree, a result of exposure to the seawater after curing. The coated concrete samples have a metal distribution pattern similar to the uncoated samples, but slight differences in intensity bear testimony to the very low levels that originate from the exposure to seawater. While X-ray diffraction fails to detect these traces of metals, ICP-MS is successful in detecting ultra-trace intensities to parts per trillion. This method is not only a useful application to track traces of transition metals in concrete, but also provides information to estimate the pore size distribution in a given sample by very simple means. PMID:21173466

  19. Metals and trace element concentrations in breast milk of first time healthy mothers: a biological monitoring study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for the newborn infant. However, since all infants cannot be breast-fed, there is a need for background data for setting adequate daily intakes. Previously, concentration data on major essential elements and some toxic elements in breast milk, based on different analytical techniques, have been published. There is no recent study on a large number of metals and trace elements in breast milk, using a sensitive analytical method for determination of low element concentrations. Methods Breast milk concentrations of 32 metals and elements in early lactation (days 14-21) were determined in a random sample of first time Swedish mothers (n = 60) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Results There were small inter-individual concentration variations in the macroelements Ca, K, Mg, P and S, and striking similarities across studies and over time, supporting a tight regulation of these elements in breast milk. Large inter-individual and over time differences were detected for Na concentrations, which may reflect an increase in salt consumption in Swedish women. Large inter-individual differences were also detected for the microelements Co, Cr, Mn and Mo, and the toxic metals As, Cd, Pb, Sb and V. Arsenic and B were positively correlated with fish consumption, indicating influence of maternal intake on breast milk concentrations. Observed differences in breast milk element concentrations across studies and over time could be attributed to the timing of sampling and a general decline over time of lactation (Cu, Fe, Mo, Zn), a possible lack of regulation of certain elements in breast milk (As, B, Co, Mn, Se) and time trends in environmental exposure (Pb), or in some cases to differences in analytical performance (Cr, Fe). Conclusions This study provides reliable updated information on a number of metals and elements in breast milk, of which some have not previously been reported. PMID:23241426

  20. [Conceptuel model of transport of trace metals (chromium and nickel) in the Sebou River--Morocco].

    PubMed

    Es-Sette, B; Ajdor, Y; Zidane, F; Fakhraddine, A; Foutlane, A

    2005-08-01

    This paper examines trace metals' behavior, mainly chromium and nickel, in Sebou River in the level located between Sidi Harazem upstream and Azib Soltane downstream. The studied level is the most exposed to pollution with heavy metals rejected by Fès stream. This often condemns tens of kilometers of Sebou and leads to a threat and an important handicap for some catches of water located downstream of the town of Fès. The purpose is then to develop a physicochemical model simulating trace metals' behavior (Cr and Ni) in Sebou River. This model combines transport phenomena (advection and dispersion) with physical and chemical processes studied in the two compartments of the river: water column and sediment as sorption, diffusion, deposition, resuspension and burial. These processes are grouped under a conceptual model diagram and converted into an equations system solved by numeric methods. The model calibration uses a data of suspended matter, nickel and chromium concentrations measured in water column and sediment. Results shown in this paper are related to model development and calibration. They are consistent with the possibility of simulating the evolution for nickel, chromium and the suspended matter concentrations along the Sebou River. PMID:16128382

  1. Association between trace element and heavy metal levels in hair and nail with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Golgis; Shahar, Suzana; Homayouni, Nasim; Rajikan, Roslee; Abu Bakar, Nor Faizah; Othman, Mohd Sham

    2012-01-01

    While associations between trace elements and heavy metals with prostate cancer are still debatable, they have been considered as risk factors for prostate cancer. Thus, this study aimed to detect any links between selected minerals and heavy metals including Se, Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe with prostate cancer. A case control study was carried out among 100 subjects (case n=50, control n=50), matched for age and ethnicity. Trace elements and heavy metals level in hair and nail samples were determined by ICP-MS. Mean selenium levels in hair and nail of the cases were significantly lower as compared to controls. A similar trend was noted for zinc in both hair and nail samples, whereas the mean level of copper was significantly higher in cases than controls. Similar elevation was noted for iron and manganese (p<0.05 for all parameters). Low levels of selenium and zinc and high levels of copper, iron and manganese appear to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies to elucidate the causal mechanisms and appropriate chemopreventive measures are needed. PMID:23167323

  2. Simultaneous Photoacoustic and Photopyroelectric Detection of Trace Gas Emissions from Some Plant Parts and Their Related Essential Oils in a Combined Detection Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Taha, M. I.; Abu-Teir, M. M.; Al-Jamal, A. J.; Eideh, H.

    The aim of this work was to establish the feasibility of the combined photoacoustic (PA) and photopyroelectric (PPE) detection of the vapours emitted from essential oils and their corresponding uncrushed leaves or flowers. Gas traces of jasmine (Jessamine (Jasminum)), mint (Mentha arvensis L.) and Damask rose (Rosa damascena Miller) and their essential oils were tested using a combined cell fitted with both a photopyroelectric film (PVDF) and a microphone in conjunction with a pulsed wideband infrared source (PWBS) source. Infrared PA and PPE absorbances were obtained simultaneously at room temperatures with excellent reproducibility and high signal-to-noise ratios. Significant similarities found between the PA and PPE spectra of the trace gas emissions of plant parts, i.e., flowers or leaves and their related essential oils show the good correlation of their emissions and that both effects are initiated by the same absorbing molecules.

  3. Bioavailability assessment of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    Bioavailability of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds has been assessed by using an in vitro dialyzability approach. The samples studied included walnuts, Brazil nuts, Macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, chestnuts, cashews, peanuts, pistachios and seeds (almond, pine, pumpkin and sunflower). Metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dialyzates and also in samples after a microwave assisted acid digestion pre-treatment. Low dialyzability percentages were found for Al, Fe and Hg; moderate percentages were found for Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl and Zn; and high dialyzability ratios were found for As, Cr and Ni. The highest dialyzability percentages were found in raw chestnuts and raw hazelnuts. Metal dialyzability was found to be negatively affected by fat content. Positive correlation was found between carbohydrate content and metal dialyzability ratios. Protein and dietary fibre content did not influence metal bioavailability. Predicted dialyzability for some metals based on fat and protein content could also be established. PMID:27006225

  4. Major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne Aquifer, Southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, M.J.; Katz, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne aquifer was characterized as part of the Florida Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Network Program, a multiagency cooperative effort concerned with delineating baseline water quality for major aquifer systems in the State. The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined and serves as the sole source of drinking water for more than 3 million people in southeast Florida. The Biscayne aquifer consists of highly permeable interbedded limestone and sandstone of Pleistocene and Pliocene age underlying most of Dade and Broward Counties and parts of Palm Beach and Monroe Counties. The high permeability is largely caused by extensive carbonate dissolution. Water sampled from 189 wells tapping the Biscayne aquifer was predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type with some mixed types occurring in coastal areas and near major canals. Major - ion is areally uniform throughout the aquifer. According to nonparametric statistical tests of major ions and dissolved solids, the concentrations of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids increased significantly with well depth ( 0.05 significance level ), probably a result of less circulation at depth. Potassium and nitrate concentrations decreased significantly with depth. Although the source of recharge to the aquifer varies seasonally, there was no statistical difference in the concentration of major ions in pared water samples from 27 shallow wells collected during wet and dry seasons. Median concentrations for barium, chromium, copper, lead, and manganese were below maximum or secondary maximum contaminant levels set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The median iron concentration only slightly exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level. The concentration of barium was significantly related (0.05 significance level) to calcium and bicarbonate concentration. No distinct areal pattern or vertical distribution of the selected trace metals was evident in water from

  5. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south-east Pacific offshore of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2016-02-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ˜ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect ( ˜ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co, and Ni were observed, and we calculated dry deposition fluxes of soluble Cu approximately an order of magnitude higher than a recent model-based estimate of total Cu deposition to the region. The model did not take account of emissions from the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru and northern Chile, and our results may indicate that these facilities constitute an important source of trace metals to the region. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  6. Nutrient and trace metals atmospheric deposition in the western Mediterranean: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, Karine; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Simeoni, Pasquale; Dulac, François

    2015-04-01

    Mediterranean Sea is a typical LNLC region particularly well adapted to assess the role of ocean-atmosphere exchanges. Throughout the summer stratification period when diffusion through the thermocline is low, atmospheric inputs become the main external source of nutrients to the surface open waters of the MS, mostly by wet deposition in the western basin.Here, we show a 3-yr time continuous series of nutrient (N, P) and trace metals (Cr, Cu, Fe, P, V, Zn) total deposition fluxes in Corsica. Between March 2008 and May 2011, a monitoring station was operated with a weekly sampling time step at Galeria (42.44°N; 8.65°E) on the western coast of Corsica in the framework of the projects DUNE (a Dust Experiment in a Low Nutrient Low Chlorophyll Ecosystem) and then ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerososl Mediterranean Experiment). Monthly fluxes were measured to assess the temporal variability of the measured elements over the Western Mediterranean. Nutrients deposition presented a clear seasonal pattern which was different for each studied nutrients, emphasizing a difference of sources for the nutrients. The results show no dust event larger than 0.68 g m-2 so that the maximum yearly flux was among the lowest ever observed in Corsica (1.7 g m-2 y-1). One dust deposition event could contribute up to 30% of yearly deposition fluxes of nutrient and trace metals, confirming the high temporal variability of atmospheric deposition. However a source apportionment work via statistical methods shows that the yearly deposition fluxes of considered nutrient and trace metals were dominated by anthropogenic sources, except for Fe. Acknowledgements: DUNE project was funded by ANR. ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is funded by CNRS/INSU, ADEME, CEA and Météo-France in the framework of the programme MISTRALS (http://www.mistrals-home.org)

  7. Atmospheric 210Pb and anthropogenic trace metals in the continental outflow to the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Sarin, M. M.; Chinni, Venkatesh

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric 210Pb and trace metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni and Zn) have been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during the continental outflow (November-March) to the Bay of Bengal (BoB). The aerosol 210Pb activity (1.3-6.6 mBq m-3) is significantly high in the wintertime (December-January) compared to model based data in the literature. The cause for higher 210Pb activity is attributed to enhanced 222Rn emanation from Alluvium in the IGP as well as lower boundary layer height. The trace metal concentrations (in ng m-3) also exhibit pronounced temporal variability (Pb: 8-296, Mn: 8-568, Cr: 4.5-33, Cu: 2.1-29.3, Ni: 2.3-14.3, Co: 0.5-1.6 and Cd: 1-29.5) and are of comparable magnitude with those documented over the BoB (Srinivas and Sarin, 2013b), suggesting dominant impact of IGP-outflow on marine atmospheric boundary layer. The enrichment factors (EFcrust) of Pb, Cd, Cu, Mn, Cr, Co and Ni in PM2.5, relative to upper continental crust, varied as 105-1561, 1265-24006, 13-87, 3-99, 7-27, 3-19 and 9-27, respectively. Significant linear relationship among trace metals and chemical species (non-sea-salt-K+, nss-SO42- and EC) emphasizes their anthropogenic source. The high concentrations and EFcrust of Pb, Cd and Cu, together with residence time of PM2.5 (2-13 days, assessed from 210Pb) in the IGP-outflow has implications to increase in the aerosol toxicity and their impact on biogeochemistry of ocean surface waters via air-sea deposition.

  8. Characterization of trace metals with the SP-AMS: detection and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, S.; Onasch, T.; Saarikoski, S.; Timonen, H.; Saarnio, K.; Sueper, D.; Rönkkö, T.; Pirjola, L.; Worsnop, D.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-06-01

    A method to detect and quantify mass concentrations of metals by the Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) was developed and evaluated in this study. The generation of monodisperse Regal black (RB) test particles with trace amounts of 13 different metals (Na, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Ba) allowed the determination of the relative ionization efficiency of each metal (RIEmeas). The ratio RIEtheory / RIEmeas presented values larger than the unity for Na, Rb, Ca, Sr and Ba due to the thermal surface ionization (TSI) on the surface of the RB particles. Values closer to the unity were obtained for the transition metals Zn, Cu, V and Cr. Mn, Fe and Ni presented the lowest RIEtheory / RIEmeas ratio and highest deviation from the unity, which was most likely related to different losses. The RIEmeas values obtained in this study were applied to the data of emission measurements in a heavy fuel oil fired heating station. Emission measurements revealed various fragmentation patterns for sulfate, probably because sulfate was mainly in the form of metallic salts (vanadium sulfate, calcium sulfate, iron sulfate and barium sulfate), which were also identified in the high-resolution mass spectrum. The response of the metals to the laser power was also investigated and the results indicated that a minimum current of 0.6 A was needed in the laser in order to vaporize the metals and the rBC. Isotopic pattern of metals was resolved from high-resolution mass spectra and the mass size distribution information of each individual ion was obtained using the high-resolution particle time-of-flight (HR-PToF).

  9. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  10. Understanding Changes to Interrelated Hydrologic and Trace Metal Cycles in Mountain Pine Beetle Infested Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearup, L.; Maxwell, R. M.; Clow, D. W.; McCray, J. E.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Changing climate in the Rocky Mountain West and worldwide has led to insect infestation and resultant tree mortality at epidemic levels. This unprecedented change in land cover is known to impact tree-scale hydrologic processes in forested watersheds, with possible implications for water quality. In this work, soil and streamwater samples from a mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested watershed were analyzed for metals and stable isotopes to understand how the loss of forest cover over large spatial and temporal extent changes interrelated hydrologic and metal transport processes. An increase in trace metal fluxes from pine forest soils is a potential result of increases in organic matter and alterations in pH. To understand the implication for MPB-infested forests, the mobility of eight metals of interest (Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) were compared from soils beneath impacted and living trees. Preliminary results from this study found significant decreases in solid - liquid partitioning coefficients among the majority of metals analyzed, particularly in organic horizon samples. These results suggest an increase in potential mobilization from deposited litter and underlying soil horizons after beetle attack. Differences were also observed between aspects, with more pronounced mobility increases on south facing slopes. Sequential extractions are underway to better elucidate the important mechanisms and possible change in metal fractionation under different tree phases. In addition to increased metal release, changes in transport processes are also possible. Stable isotopes (∂18O and ∂D) and streamwater chemistry were analyzed to distinguish potential changes of water sources. Observed increases in soil moisture under impacted trees suggest possible increases in flow through the shallow subsurface that could have implications for contaminant transport. Clarifying important metal release mechanisms at the tree scale and changes in flow processes at the watershed

  11. Size-dependent concentrations of trace metals in four Mediterranean gastropods.

    PubMed

    Cubadda, F; Conti, M E; Campanella, L

    2001-11-01

    In order to gain more information on the possible use of four gastropod species as metal biomonitors for the Mediterranean area, the influence of body weight upon Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations was studied in specimens collected at locations with different degrees of environmental pollution. The selected species were the marine snails Monodonta turbinata Born and Monodonta mutabilis Philippi, and the limpets Patella caerulea L. and Patella lusitanica Gmelin. Significant differences between metal concentrations in individuals from different stations were tested by ANCOVA on log-transformed data with log body weight as covariate. For all species a positive correlation between metal concentrations and body weight was observed, which means that the largest individuals contained the highest levels of metals. The inclusion of body weight as covariate in the statistical analysis explained from 81% to 99% of the metal variability within the organisms and enabled the achievement of improvements in the detection of differences among sites. The four selected species provided a rather univocal picture of bioavailable metal loads at the different stations of the experimental area. Except for Cd, the metal concentrations recorded at the clean stations were found to lie in the range of the lowest values reported in the literature and can be employed as useful background levels which can be referred to for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. It is concluded that in view of its distribution, unambiguous identification, resistance to pollution and accumulation patterns M. turbinata has considerable potential as a biomonitor of trace metals over the Mediterranean. PMID:11680752

  12. [The link between trace elements and metabolic syndrome/oxidative stress in essential hypertension with or without type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gouaref, Ines; Bellahsene, Zina; Zekri, Samia; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj-Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between trace elements (TE) and essential hypertension (EH) is subtle and complex. This relationship is mediated by endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, oxidative stress (OS) and athero-inflammatory state. The aim of this study was to examine the TE impact; particularly selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) as predictive type 2 diabetes biomarkers in a hypertensive subject. The study was undertaken on 400 adult patients (40-60 years), who were divided in 4 groups: hypertensive (H), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertensive-diabetic (HD) and healthy group. Patients were phenotyped regarding their metabolic syndrome profile using the NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Hypertension was defined as systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg, respectively. The SBP and DBP measurements by electronic blood pressure using Omron 705 CP(®) type. Insulin resistance was assessed by Homa-IR model. Metabolic and inflammatory parameters were determined by Cobas Integra(®); the TE investigated by mass spectrometric atomic absorption; the OS markers evaluated by Randox kits. Serum Se concentrations are reduced in all groups, concomitantly with a marked depletion GPx activity in the HD group. However, Zn levels were decreased than in H and HD groups, but unchanged in T2D group. In contrast, Mn levels are increased in all groups; whereas the Cu levels increased only in H and HD groups, concomitantly with cytosolic SOD-Cu/Zn and mitochondrial SOD-Mn depletion. The Zn/Cu ratio decreases significantly in hypertensive group but not in diabetics groups. It appears that Zn/Cu ratio reflects the transition from hypertension phase to hypertension associated with T2D. Ultimately, TE plays an important role in the hypertension pathophysiology and can be considered as predictive T2D biomarkers in hypertensive patients. PMID:27029728

  13. Identification of Trace Metal Speciation in Environment Using Z-Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Utsunomiya

    2005-01-11

    A major challenge to understanding the fate of contaminants in environment is the direct identification of trace concentrations (ppm to ppb) at the sub-micron scale. In order to efficiently characterize the trace metals in various environmental and geological samples, we have utilized high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) combined with conventional TEM techniques. In general, the image contrast observed in the HAADF-STEM is correlated to the atomic mass: heavier elements contribute to a brighter contrast. Additionally, the contrast in HAADF-STEM is characteristically independent of focus, because the image is formed by incoherent scattering. Remarkable results obtained using the advanced TEM technique are shown as an example. (1) Fine- and ultra-fine particles with heavy metals in urban aerosols from various locations were examined to investigate metal concentrations and speciation. The trace element speciation: Pb, As, Sb, La, Ce, Sr, Zn, Cr, Se, Sn, Y, Zr, Au, Ag and U have been characterized. We have identified nanocrystals of uraninite encapsulated in carbonaceous matter ({approx} 50 nm). The ''carbon-caged'' nanocrystals of uraninite are protected from the immediate oxidation that would lead to increased mobility of uranium in the environment. Still, the presence of uranium in the very fine-fraction (PM{sub 2.5}) of atmospheric particulates provides another pathway for radiation exposure [1]. (2) A direct, near atomic-scale characterization of Pb is demonstrated in zircon (3.3-4.4 Ga). Two forms of Pb have been identified: Pb concentrated at {approx}3 atom% as a nanoscale patch in zircon structure, and Pb concentrated within the amorphous domain created by fission fragment damage. The first result suggests that the Pb atoms directly substitute for Zr{sup 4+} in the zircon structure, and the latter observation demonstrates that Pb diffusion can occur through amorphous regions created by radiation damage, although

  14. Trace metal content of fish and shellfishes of the Niger delta area of Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kakulu, S.E.; Osibanjo, O.; Ajayi, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    The trace metal contents of various fish and shellfishes from the Niger delta area of Nigeria were determined. The levels in the shellfishes were higher than those in the fish, which could be due to their being bottom feeders. The levels of fish varied from <0.01-0.10 ..mu..g/g for Cd, < 0.05-3.69 ..mu..g/g for Cu, 0.49-16.52 ..mu..g/g for Fe, and 0.08-6.90 ..mu..g/g for Zn. 15 references, 1 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Metals and trace elements in tissues of Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima) from the Finnish archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hollmen, T.; Poppenga, R.H.; Hario, Martti; Kilpi, Mikael

    2000-01-01

    We sampled Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima) at five locations near coastal Finland in 1997 and 1998 for evidence of exposure to arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, lead, selenium, and zinc. Livers and kidneys were collected from adult males and females found dead and hunter-killed males, and livers were collected from ducklings. Two adult females, one of which had an ingested lead shot in its gizzard, were poisoned by lead. The concentrations of metals and trace elements that we found in tissues of eiders, other then the two lead poisoned birds, were not high enough to have independently caused mortality.

  16. Metals and trace elements in tissues of common eiders (Somateria mollissima) from the Finnish archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hollmen, T.; Poppenga, R.H.; Hario, Martti; Kilpi, Mikael

    2000-01-01

    We sampled Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima) at five locations near coastal Finland in 1997 and 1998 for evidence of exposure to arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, selenium, and zinc. Livers and kidneys were collected from adult males and females found dead and hunter-killed males, and livers were collected from ducklings. Two adult females, one of which had an ingested lead shot in its gizzard, were poisoned by lead. The concentration of metals and trace elements that we found in tissues of eiders, other than the two lead poisoned birds, were not high enough to have independently caused mortality.

  17. Latest approaches on green chemistry preconcentration methods for trace metal determination in seawater--a review.

    PubMed

    La Colla, Noelia Soledad; Domini, Claudia Elizabeth; Marcovecchio, Jorge Eduardo; Botté, Sandra Elizabeth

    2015-03-15

    Evaluation of trace metal levels in seawater samples is undertaken regularly by research groups all over the world, leading to a growing demand for techniques involving fewer toxic reagents, less time-consuming protocols and lower limits of detection. This review focuses on providing a brief but concise description of the latest methodologies developed to this end, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of the various protocols, chelating and dispersive agents and instruments used. Conclusions are drawn on the basis of the articles reviewed, highlighting improvements introduced in order to enhance the performance of the protocols. PMID:25532056

  18. The carbon isotopes ratio and trace metals content determinations in some Transylvanian fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on the carbon isotope signature and trace metal content investigated on the soil-plant-fruit pulp chain. The samples were collected from two Transylvanian areas namely Alba and Salaj. The average value of the δ13C at the soil surface was around δ13C ≈ -27%° and important differences of the δ13C values between the two studied areas were not observed. Meanwhile, differences between fruit pulp of grape juice and the pulp of pear juice relived a difference of about 1.5%° for δ13C values.

  19. The effects of trace metal exposure on agonistic encounters in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Sloman, K A; Baker, D W; Ho, C G; McDonald, D G; Wood, C M

    2003-04-10

    The effects of five trace metals, copper, cadmium, nickel, zinc and lead (presented as soluble salts) on the ability of juvenile rainbow trout to form social relationships were investigated. Comparable concentrations of the five metals in relation to their acute 96 h LC50s (concentration at which population mortality=50% at 96 h) were used (i.e. 15% of the 96 h LC50) and water quality parameters (hardness=120 mg l(-1) as CaCO(3), pH 8; DOC=3 mg l(-1)) were kept constant throughout. In the first experiment, trout exposed to sublethal concentrations of cadmium for 24 h displayed significantly lower numbers of aggressive attacks during pair-wise agonistic encounters than fish paired in the copper, nickel, zinc, lead and control water. In a second experiment, fish were exposed to the same concentration of metal for 24 h, and then returned to normal water for 24 h. When these metal pre-exposed fish were paired with non-exposed fish only cadmium pre-exposure had a significant effect on social interaction. All of the cadmium pre-exposed fish became subordinate when paired with non-exposed fish, whereas the probability of a fish pre-exposed to copper, nickel, zinc or lead becoming subordinate did not significantly differ from random. Therefore, at around 15% of the 96 h LC50, different metals exert different effects on the social behaviour of fish, suggesting potential implications for social structure and population stability. PMID:12657492

  20. Comparative effects of chelating drugs on trace metal and biochemical alterations in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Athar, M.; Hasan, S.K.; Srivastava, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    Chelation therapy is the most successful modality for the management of heavy metal poisoning. The success of these drugs stem from their multidentate polyfunctional chelating behavior. The therapeutic mechanism for chelating drugs involves their interaction with toxic metals leading to their rapid excretion from the body. However, because of their indiscriminate affinity for various metal ions, the potential interactions between these drugs and endogenous trace metals is of concern. It was, therefore, of importance to define new chelating drugs which in addition to being effective as an antidote in metal poisoning may possess low undesirable toxicity. In the present communication the authors compare the acute effect of Cyclam with those of other conventional chelating drugs namely, triethylenetetramine (TETA), reduced glutathione (GSH), ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), cyclohexanediamine tetraacetic acid (CDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and hydroxyethylenediamine triacetic acid (HEDTA) on (i) serum levels of Cu, Zn, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamyloxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and ceruloplasmin (CP); (ii) hepatic and renal levels of Cu, Mn, Zn and Fe and (iii) hepatic and renal levels of GSH, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM) at various time intervals (16, 24 and 72 hrs) after their administration to rats.

  1. Trace metals in seagrass, algae and molluscs from an uncontaminated area in the Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Campanella, L; Conti, M E; Cubadda, F; Sucapane, C

    2001-01-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were measured in specimens of four marine organisms--the seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile, the brown algae Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy, and the two gastropod molluscs Monodonta turbinata Born and Patella caerulea L.--selected as possible cosmopolitan biomonitors of trace metals in the Mediterranean area. The organisms were collected at five coastal sites in Favignana Island (Sicily, Italy), an area virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. In order to gain a more complete picture of both the environmental conditions of the experimental area and the bioaccumulation patterns of the selected organisms, soluble and total metal concentrations were determined in coastal water samples collected at the same stations. The picture of bioavailable metal loads in the different sites of the selected area provided by the four species was rather univocal. An overall trend of increased metal concentrations at the station in which the local harbour is located was clear. On the other hand, the metal concentrations recorded at the 'clean' stations generally fall in the range of the lowest values available in the literature and may be considered as useful background levels to which to refer for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. Implications in biomonitoring of the observed accumulation patterns, especially in the different tissues of Posidonia oceanica, are discussed. PMID:11202705

  2. Trace metals in surface sediments of the Taiwan Strait: geochemical characteristics and environmental indication.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuelu; Zhou, Fengxia; Lui, Hon-Kit; Lou, Jiann-Yuh; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Zhuang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    The concentration and geochemical fractionation of six trace metals related with environmental quality assessment, namely Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, in 30 surface sediments from both inshore and offshore areas of the Taiwan Strait were measured to investigate their distribution characteristics, evaluate their potential mobility, and assess their pollution status. The geoaccumulation index results indicated that, on average, the studied metals presented an order of Cd > Pb > Ni > Zn > Cu > Cr and were practically in uncontaminated status except Cd. The results of the sequential extraction analysis indicated that, on average, the studied metals were mostly accumulated in residual fraction except Cd whose concentration was the highest in the acid soluble fraction presenting a high risk to the environment, and their mobility decreased in the sequence of Cd > Pb > Ni > Cu > Zn > Cr. Based on the mean probable effect level quotients, the combination of the studied metals had an 8 % probability of being toxic at two sampling sites and had a 21 % probability of being toxic at the rest of sites. The spatial distribution of the studied metals in total concentrations and different geochemical fractions corroborated the previous findings about the possible sediment transportation routes in and around the Taiwan Strait. PMID:26514571

  3. Effects of northeast monsoon on trace metal distribution in the South China Sea off Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Adiana, G; Shazili, N A M; Marinah, M A; Bidai, J

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of trace metals in the South China Sea (SCS) were determined off the coast of Terengganu during the months of May and November 2007. The concentrations of dissolved and particulate metals were in the range of 0.019-0.194 μg/L and 50-365 μg/g, respectively, for cadmium (Cd), 0.05-0.45 μg/L and 38-3,570 μg/g for chromium (Cr), 0.05-3.54 μg/L and 21-1,947 μg/g for manganese (Mn), and 0.03-0.49 μg/L and 2-56,982 μg/g for lead (Pb). The order of mean log K D found was Cd > Cr > Pb > Mn. The study suggests that the primary sources of these metals are discharges from the rivers which drain into the SCS, in particular the Dungun River, which flows in close proximity to agricultural areas and petrochemical industries. During the northeast monsoon, levels of particulate metals in the bottom water samples near the shore were found to be much higher than during the dry season, the probable result of re-suspension of the metals from the bottom sediments. PMID:23974537

  4. Chemical speciation of trace metals emitted from Indonesian peat fires for health risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betha, Raghu; Pradani, Maharani; Lestari, Puji; Joshi, Umid Man; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-03-01

    Regional smoke-induced haze in Southeast Asia, caused by uncontrolled forest and peat fires in Indonesia, is of major environmental and health concern. In this study, we estimated carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk due to exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) as emitted from peat fires at Kalimantan, Indonesia. For the health risk analysis, chemical speciation (exchangeable, reducible, oxidizable, and residual fractions) of 12 trace metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn) in PM2.5 was studied. Results indicate that Al, Fe and Ti together accounted for a major fraction of total metal concentrations (~ 83%) in PM2.5 emissions in the immediate vicinity of peat fires. Chemical speciation reveals that a major proportion of most of the metals, with the exception of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cd, was present in the residual fraction. The exchangeable fraction of metals, which represents their bioavailability, could play a major role in inducing human health effects of PM2.5. This fraction contained carcinogenic metals such as Cd (39.2 ng m- 3) and Ni (249.3 ng m- 3) that exceeded their WHO guideline values by several factors. Health risk estimates suggest that exposure to PM2.5 emissions in the vicinity of peat fires poses serious health threats.

  5. Remobilization of trace metals from contaminated marine sediment in a simulated dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihai; Li, Xiangdong; Wai, Onyx W H; Huang, Weilin; Yan, Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this study, release and redistribution of sediment bound trace metals due to resuspension were investigated by a lid-driven elongated annular flume (LEAF). The total suspended particulate matters (SPMs) increased significantly in quantity with the raised resuspension energies and varied distinctively in particle size and mineral composition. Except for Cu, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn showed an increase in dissolved phase as the resuspension energy increased. Relatively low Cu was observed in dissolved phase whereas it owned the highest original concentration in the sediment. This is primarily due to the very low solubility of Cu sulfide. In comparison to sediment, all metals were evidently enriched in SPMs which primarily contributed to the much more fine particles (silt/clay fraction) contained in the SPMs. Metals enrichment followed the Irving-Williams order of complex stability. However, metals content varied indistinctively in the SPMs among the three selected resuspension levels. The distribution coefficients (K d) exhibited opposite trend with the increasing resuspension level with the exception of Cu. It indicated that physical and chemical characters of sediment such as grain composition, Fe/Mn, and organic matter content may also act as major factors in the release of metals and control their phase distribution in the water column. PMID:26289335

  6. Profile of trace metals accumulation in core sediment from Seine river estuary (docks basin).

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Mariam; Ouddane, Baghdad; El-Daye, Mirna; Halwani, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    The Seine is one of the most polluted rivers in Europe with respect to potentially harmful elements. It receives effluents from the upstream Paris urban and industrial area, and also local inputs from the heavily industrialized Rouen and Le Havre regions. The present study deals with this environmental topic and the concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, Hg, Zn and Cu were determined in sediment cores collected in the docks basin of Rouen harbour in 2008. The intensity of metal pollution during recent decades was evaluated using an enrichment factor (EF) and a geoaccumulation index (Igeo). The results of vertical distribution showed that the metal pollution in the past is much higher than in the surface sediment. Mercury was found to be the heaviest pollutant (with Igeo and EF exceeding 4 and 20, respectively), and Cd and Pb were the second most important pollutants. A slight contamination in Ni was observed with very low Igeo values. To estimate the sediment toxicity, simultaneously extracted metals/acid volatile sulfides ratio (SEM/AVS) was calculated. Low values of the toxicity index SEM/AVS were observed in the core sediments indicating the inexistence of metal potential toxicity. Also the concentrations of these trace metals were lower than the probable effect concentration values reported as consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for fresh water ecosystems. PMID:24191442

  7. Accumulation of Selenium and Trace Metals on Plant Litter in a Tidal Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawislanski, P. T.; Chau, S.; Mountford, H.; Wong, H. C.; Sears, T. C.

    2001-05-01

    Research in a San Francisco Bay intertidal marsh has shown the accumulation of Se and trace metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) on bagged litter of five common estuarine marsh plant species, over periods of months to a year. Metal concentrations increased as much as 150-fold relative to plant tissue initially placed in mesh litter bags. Concentrations of metals increased with the amount of time litter was submerged, though mass accumulation was moderated by the concomitant decay of the litter. The association of very fine particulate matter with the litter, as determined based on Si concentrations, was the main mechanism for enrichment. Further accumulation occurs during winter months via the sorption onto or precipitation with Fe-rich phases, particularly in lower marsh plants. The resultant annual fluxes of Se and most metals to sediments via litter were estimated to be equivalent to between 1 and 16% of the primary flux on suspended particulate matter and may be an important mechanism for scavenging dissolved and colloid-associated metals. Previous studies, which ignored the particulate contribution, may have incorrectly assumed the predominance of sorption and co-precipitation mechanisms. The degree to which litter bags enhance fine sediment trapping over natural conditions needs to be evaluated.

  8. Phase partitioning of trace metals in a contaminated estuary influenced by industrial effluent discharge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    Severe trace metal pollution due to industrial effluents releases was found in Jiulong River Estuary, Southern China. In this study, water samples were collected during effluent release events to study the dynamic changes of environmental conditions and metal partitioning among dissolved, particulate and colloidal phases controlled by estuarine mixing. Intermittent effluent discharges during low tide caused decreasing pH and dissolved oxygen, and induced numerous suspended particulate materials and dissolved organic carbon to the estuary. Different behaviors of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr and Pb in the dissolved fraction against the conservative index salinity indicated different sources, e.g., dissolved Ni from the intermittent effluent. Although total metal concentrations increased markedly following effluent discharges, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb were predominated by the particulate fraction. Enhanced adsorption onto particulates in the mixing process resulted in elevated partitioning coefficient (Kd) values for Cu and Zn, and the particle concentration effect was not obvious under such anthropogenic impacts. Colloidal proportion of these metals (especially Cu and Zn) showed positive correlations with dissolved or colloidal organic carbon, suggesting the metal-organic complexation. However, the calculated colloidal partitioning coefficients were relatively constant, indicating the excess binding capacity. Overall, the intermittent effluent discharge altered the particulate/dissolved and colloidal/soluble phase partitioning process and may further influence the bioavailability and potential toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:27061473

  9. Trace Metal Content of Sediments Close to Mine Sites in the Andean Region

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Cristina; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí; Miralles, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of heavy metal pollution in sediments close to two mine sites in the upper part of the Jequetepeque River Basin, Peru. Sediment concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn were analyzed. A comparative study of the trace metal content of sediments shows that the highest concentrations are found at the closest points to the mine sites in both cases. The sediment quality analysis was performed using the threshold effect level of the Canadian guidelines (TEL). The sediment samples analyzed show that potential ecological risk is caused frequently at both sites by As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. The long-term influence of sediment metals in the environment is also assessed by sequential extraction scheme analysis (SES). The availability of metals in sediments is assessed, and it is considered a significant threat to the environment for As, Cd, and Sb close to one mine site and Cr and Hg close to the other mine site. Statistical analysis of sediment samples provides a characterization of both subbasins, showing low concentrations of a specific set of metals and identifies the main characteristics of the different pollution sources. A tentative relationship between pollution sources and possible ecological risk is established. PMID:22606058

  10. Effect of salt, drought and metal stress on essential oil yield and quality in plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shreyasee; Koul, Monika; Bhatnagar, Ashok Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Essential oil extracted from plants is of high commercial value in medicine, cosmetics and perfumery. Enhancing yield and maintaining the quality of oil is of significant commercial importance. Production of oil in plants is dependent on various biotic and abiotic factors to which the plants are subjected during their growth. Plants are exposed to various degrees of stress on account of natural and human-induced factors. Salinization, drought and presence of heavy metals in the substratum cause substantial effect on the yield and quality of bioactive constituents in the oil. In many plants, the level and kind of stress have detrimental effects on the growth and development. This review provides an account of the studies on some common abiotic stresses to which essential oil plants are exposed during their growth period and their influence on quality and quantity of oil. The yield and quality vary in different plants and so is the response. Enhancing essential oil productivity is an important challenge, and understanding the role played by stress may offer significant advantages to the essential oil farmers and processing industry. Scientific evaluation of the data on many important but unexplored essential oil plants will also help in mitigating, ameliorating and minimizing the harmful effects caused by stress. PMID:22164806

  11. Dissolved, particulate and acid-leachable trace metal concentrations in North Atlantic precipitation collected on the Global Change Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Jickells, T.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Atmospheric inputs of trace metals into surface waters are an important pathway for the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of many trace constituents. Rainwater samples from six precipitation events were collected on board ship during legs 3 and 4 of the Global Change Expedition over the North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed for dissolved, particulate (Al and Pb), and acid-leachable trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn). Acid-leachable concentrations of the elements were similar to reported values from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans which were measured using comparable acidification procedures. Concentrations of dissolved and particulate Al and Pb were determined in rain events acid-leachable and total trace metal concentrations suggest that the acid-leachable fraction of metals can significantly underestimate total concentrations of crustal elements in rain. The solubilities of Al and Pb in precipitation were variable and mean solubilities of the elements were 13% and 45%, respectively. Recycled sea salt components were less than 14% for Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, indicating that the net trace metal flux is from the atmosphere to the oceans. Deep sea particle fluxes for these metals through the western tropical North Atlantic exceed atmospheric deposition fluxes by a factor of 18 to 41. 57 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Distribution of trace metals in the vicinity of a wastewater treatment plant on the Potomac River, Washington, DC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. P.; Muller, A. C.

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and distribution of anthropogenic-sourced trace metals in riverine and estuarine systems is challenging due to multiple and varying source functions and dynamic physiochemical conditions. Between July 2011 and November 2012, sediment and water column samples were collected from over 20 sites in the tidal-fresh Potomac River estuary, Washington, DC near the outfall of the Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (BPWTP) for measurement of select trace metals. Field observations of water column parameters (conductivity, temperature, pH, turbidity) were also made at each sampling site. Trace metal concentrations were normalized to the "background" composition of the river determined from control sites in order to investigate the distribution BPWTP-sourced in local Potomac River receiving waters. Temporal differences in the observed distribution of trace metals were attributed to changes in the relative contribution of metals from different sources (wastewater, riverine, other) coupled with differences in the physiochemical conditions of the water column. Results show that normalizing near-source concentrations to the background composition of the water body and also to key environmental parameters can aid in predicting the fate and distribution of anthropogenic-sourced trace metals in dynamic riverine and estuarine systems like the tidal-fresh Potomac River.

  13. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Rhee, D. Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D. R.; Surma, J. E.; Titus, C. H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive (<1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments (≳500 °C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190-690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations.

  14. Trace metal retention in the incorporation zone of land-applied sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Steenhuis, T.S.; McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Harrison, E.

    1999-04-15

    Recycling nutrients in wastewater sludge (biosolids) via land application is a desirable goal. However, potential movement of sludge-applied trace metals is of concern and an area of ongoing research. In this paper, the authors examine the first-order model used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for predicting losses from the zone of incorporation as part of the risk assessment that undergirded the development of Part 503 regulations. The authors found that when empirical adsorption partition coefficients from the site are used as model inputs, the US EPA model for the incorporation zone is similar to that derived from preferential flow theory and simulates well the loss of metal from the surface soil layer at an orchard site where sludge was applied 15 years earlier.

  15. Advanced Monitoring of Trace Metals Applied to Contamination Reduction of Silicon Device Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillot, P.; Martin, C.; Planchais, A.

    2011-11-01

    The detrimental effects of metallic on certain key electrical parameters of silicon devices mandates the use of state-of-the-art characterization and metrology tools as well as appropriate control plans. Historically, this has been commonly achieved in-line on monitor wafers through a combination of Total Reflectance X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) and post anneal Surface Photo Voltage (SPV). On the other hand, VPD (Vapor Phase Decomposition) combined with ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry) or TXRF is known to provide both identification and quantification of surface trace metals at lower detection limits. Based on these considerations the description of an advanced monitoring scheme using SPV, TXRF and automated VPD ICP-MS is described.

  16. The effect of hydrological factors on trace metal contamination in the river Tawe, South Wales.

    PubMed

    Bird, S C

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of nickel, copper, iron, chromium, lead, cadmium, manganese and zinc have been studied in a small river in South Wales. The river drains the contaminated industrial wasteland of the Lower Swansea Valley which is currently undergoing redevelopment and landscaping activity. The high trace metal levels found in the river waters result from weathering and erosion of this waste material, as well as from two industrial point sources of nickel, and iron and chromium. Hydrological factors found to be of importance in determining current spatial and temporal patterns of contamination included: (1) the river's available dilution at any one time, (2) antecedent river flow conditions, (3) river water pH and (4) the prevailing runoff processes in operation at any one time. The metals are present mostly in their dissolved state (i.e. > 70%), with the exception of iron and chromium which are present mostly as particulates (i.e > 80%). PMID:15092754

  17. Behavior of suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary: Size distribution and trace metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-15

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) samples were collected along a salinity gradient in the Changjiang Estuary in June 2011. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate the suspended sediments into five size fractions. The results indicated that Cr and Pb originated from natural weathering processes, whereas Cu, Zn, and Cd originated from other sources. The distribution of most trace metals in different particle sizes increased with decreasing particle size. The contents of Fe/Mn and organic matter were confirmed to play an important role in increasing the level of heavy metal contents. The Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd contents varied significantly with increasing salinity in the medium-low salinity region, thus indicating the release of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd particles. Thus, the transfer of polluted fine particles into the open sea is probably accompanied by release of pollutants into the dissolved compartment, thereby amplifying the potential harmful effects to marine organisms. PMID:26743609

  18. Effects of sewage sludge amendment on snail growth and trace metal transfer in the soil-plant-snail food chain.

    PubMed

    Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-11-01

    Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations in a soil plant (Lactuca sativa) continuum were measured after sewage sludge amendment. The effects of sewage sludge on growth and trace metal bioaccumulation in snails (Cantareus aspersus) were investigated in a laboratory experiment specifically designed to identify contamination sources (e.g., soil and leaves). Application of sewage sludge increased trace metal concentrations in topsoil. However, except Zn, metal concentrations in lettuce leaves did not reflect those in soil. Lettuce leaves were the main source of Zn, Cu, and Cd in exposed snails. Bioaccumulation of Pb suggested its immediate transfer to snails via the soil. No apparent toxic effects of trace metal accumulation were observed in snails. Moreover, snail growth was significantly stimulated at high rates of sludge application. This hormesis effect may be due to the enhanced nutritional content of lettuce leaves exposed to sewage sludge. PMID:26165994

  19. Biodegradable polymer based ternary blends for removal of trace metals from simulated industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Prakash, N; Arungalai Vendan, S

    2016-02-01

    The ternary blends consisting of Chitosan (CS), Nylon 6 (Ny 6) and Montmorillonite clay (MM clay) were prepared by the solution blending method with glutaraldehyde. The prepared ternary blends were characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The FTIR results showed that the strong intermolecular hydrogen bondings were established between chitosan, nylon 6 and montmorillonite clay. TGA showed the thermal stability of the blend is enhanced by glutaraldehyde as Crosslink agent. Results of XRD indicated that the relative crystalline of the pure chitosan film was reduced when the polymeric network was reticulated by glutaraldehyde. Finally, the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the morphology of the blend was rough and heterogenous. Further, it confirms the interaction between the functional groups of the blend components. The extent of removal of the trace metals was found to be almost the same. The removal of these metals at different pH was also done and the maximum removal of the metals was observed at pH 4.5 for both trace metals. Adsorption studies and kinetic analysis have also been made. Moreover, the protonation of amine groups is induced an electrostatic repulsion of cations. When the pH of the solution was more than 5.5, the sorption rate began to decrease. Besides, the quantity of adsorbate on absorbent was fitted as a function in Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. The sorption kinetics was tested for pseudo first order and pseudo second order reaction. The kinetic experimental data correlated with the second order kinetic model and rate constants of sorption for kinetic models were calculated and accordingly, the correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:26432371

  20. Distribution and role of trace transition metals in Glycera worm jaws studied with synchrotron microbeam techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Birkedal, Henrik; Casa, Deigo M.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2005-05-31

    A combination of position-resolved synchrotron microbeam techniques was used to explore the distribution and role of trace transition metals in the jaws of Glycera dibranchiata. The mandibles of this marine sediment worm have recently been found to be reinforced by the copper-based biomineral atacamite [Cu2(OH)3Cl]. Here we show that the system is more complex, containing zinc and iron and unmineralized copper compounds as well. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies showed that a fraction of copper is present in oxidation state, Cu(I), in contrast to the mineral that exclusively contains Cu(II). X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed traces of copper also in the jaw base devoid of mineral. Traces of iron were found as well, but occurred spatially correlated with the copper mineral, suggesting a substitution of copper atoms by iron in the atacamite mineral. Zinc was evenly dispersed throughout the jaw matrix, quite in analogy to zinc in Nereis jaw, a related worm species, where nonmineralized zinc serves to cross-link and harden the proteinaceous matrix.

  1. Tracing the migration history of metal catalysts in metal-assisted chemically etched silicon.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Küçükbayrak, Umut M; Zacharias, Margit

    2013-02-26

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of complex embedded nanopore networks in silicon requires expensive machinery and tedious sample preparation procedures such as electron tomography, also known as 3D transmission electron microscopy. In this article, we report a new, fast, powerful, and low-cost three-dimensional imaging technique with sub-5 nm resolution. This new imaging method is applied to metal-assisted chemically etched monocrystalline Si to demonstrate its capabilities. The AFEI (atomic layer deposition-fill-etch-imaging) technique consists of three simple process steps that are available in most material research settings. First the porous substrate is conformally coated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) metal oxide layer. ALD is able to penetrate deep into complex, high aspect ratio pores, as it is a sequential gas-phase deposition process. Next, the cross-section of the ALD-filled porous Si substrate is etched with high-density fluorine-based plasma processing, which yields very high selectivity toward Si (e.g., >400:1 for Si:ZnO). This step removes the bulk Si and exposes the metal oxide structures grown inside the pores. In the last step, the sample cross-section is examined using a standard scanning electron microscope at various angles, which allows precise imaging of hidden features and reconstruction of a 3D model of the embedded pore network. PMID:23368781

  2. Persistent impacts of trace metals from mining on floodplain grass communities along Soda Butte Creek, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, J.A.; Marcus, W.A.

    2000-03-01

    In Yellowstone National Park, tailings and associated trace metals from past mining have been deposited along 28 km of Soda Butte Creek by large flood events. This study documents grass species diversity, density, and biomass; trace metal concentrations in soils; and soil pH, salinity, and clay content in four selected floodplain meadows contaminated by these tailings. Trace metal levels frequently exceed acceptable concentrations for agricultural soils at sampling points within the meadows. pH levels within flood-deposited tailings are strongly to moderately acid, while pH levels outside of tailings deposits are neutral. The data analysis: (1) shows that metals and acidity associated with tailings affect plant biomass, density, and diversity; (2) documents that the vegetation/metal and vegetation/pH associations are more of a threshold than a linear relationship; and (3) suggests that other factors may be involved in structuring the community. Vegetation diversity, density, and biomass decrease at threshold levels of trace metal concentrations and soil pH in all four meadows. CuSum plots of diversity in relation to trace metal levels show a decrease in mean diversity at 315 ppm copper, 22 ppm arsenic, 4.2% iron, 65 ppm lead, and 170 ppm zinc. Densities of Phleum pratense and Poa pratensis were significantly lower (P {le} 0.001) on plots with more than 250 ppm copper. Above-ground biomass of Phleum pratense was also significantly lower on plots with copper levels above 250 ppm. Decreased mean grass density was found on plots with pH < 6.4, but the only statistically significant difference was for Juncus balticus, which had increased density on plots with pH < 6.4. In contrast to the clear impacts of trace metals and pH on vegetation, other site characteristics did not alter measured vegetation characteristics.

  3. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south east Pacific offshore of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2015-10-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ∼ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect (∼ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co and Ni were observed. These may be related to the activities of the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru or northern Chile. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17 800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  4. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p < 0.05). Strong positive correlations were found between lead and gold (r = 0.785) in the cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:21660533

  5. Trace metals in different species of mollusca, water and sediments from Taiwan coastal area.

    PubMed

    Hung, T C; Meng, P J; Han, B C; Chuang, A; Huang, C C

    2001-08-01

    Since October 1994, a long-term program of Asia/Pacific Mussel Watch: Taiwan Regional Studies has been carried out. The results indicate that trace metal contents in mollusca varied among 30 different species and the environments (water and sediments) along the Taiwan coast. The orders of bioaccumulation of trace metals in mollusca were: Cu (over 200 microg/g), Thais clavigera > Isognomon legumen > Clibanarius rivescens > Crassostrea gigas; Zn (over 700 microg/g), Moruta granulata > C. gigas > Asiatica cypraea arabica > T. clavigera; Cd (over 5 microg/g), Trochus hanleyanus > Acanthopleura japonica > Nerita albicilla > Patella flexuosa; Pb (over 2 microg/g), P. flexuosa > C. gigas > T. hanleyanus > T. clavigera > C. gigas > Capiyulum mitella; Ni (over 10 microg/g), Meretrix lusoria > Philine sp. > Littoraria scabra > Tridacna squamosa > T. hanleyanus; Cr (over 30 microg/g), Littoraria undulata > T. hanleyanus > N. albicilla > Nerita chamaelor > M. granulata; As (over 20 microg/g), Perna viridis > L. scabra; and Sn (over 5 microg/g), P. viridis > L. undulata> C. mitella> C. gigas. Their seasonal and regional variations as well as their correlation are evaluated and discussed. PMID:11482676

  6. The assessment of trace metals at gill, muscle and liver tissue in Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Engin, Mehmet Soner

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Ag, Cd and Pb were determined in Mugil cephalus of the middle Black Sea coasts by employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and microwave digestion technique. Different parts of fish samples were analysed separately such as the gill, muscle and liver. The accuracy of the results has been checked by using a certified reference material (DORM-4). The highest trace metal values determined in different parts of fish were Cr in muscle tissue (0.416 μg/g), Mn in gill tissue (52.246 μg/g), Fe in muscle tissue (11.899 μg/g), Ni in muscle tissue (108.057 μg/g), Cu in liver tissue (261.911 μg/g), As in liver tissue (4.162 μg/g), Se in liver tissue (11.418 μg/g), Ag in liver tissue (0.323 μg/g), Cd in liver tissue (1.11 μg/g) and Pb in gill tissue (3.047 μg/g). These results were also compared with various relevant literature and guidelines. PMID:25877641

  7. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  8. Redox and trace metal regulation of ion channels in the pain pathway

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. Grayson; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the clinical significance of pain disorders and the relative ineffectiveness of current therapeutics, it is important to identify alternative means of modulating nociception. The most obvious pharmacological targets are the ion channels that facilitate nervous transmission from pain sensors in the periphery to the processing regions within the brain and spinal cord. In order to design effective pharmacological tools for this purpose, however, it is first necessary to understand how these channels are regulated. A growing area of research involves the investigation of the role that trace metals and endogenous redox agents play in modulating the activity of a diverse group of ion channels within the pain pathway. In the present review, the most recent literature concerning trace metal and redox regulation of T-type calcium channels, NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors, GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptors and TRP (transient receptor potential) channels are described to gain a comprehensive understanding of the current state of the field as well as to provide a basis for future thought and experimentation. PMID:26341484

  9. Effect of Copper and Other Trace Metal Addition to Pulp and Paper Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jason; Richardson, Desmond; Stack, Karen; Lewis, Trevor

    2015-12-01

    Porous pots were used to mimic, on a laboratory scale, an industrial activated sludge plant from a thermomechanical pulp and news print paper mill. Trace metal additions of Ca, Co, Cu, Fe(III), and Mg were found to improve chemical oxygen demand removal from 82% to 86 to 87%. Copper (0.1 to 1.0 mg/L) was also found to be beneficial in significantly inhibiting the growth of filamentous bacteria, contributing to a reduction of 20 to 45% in sludge volume index (SVI) with improved settle ability and decreased bulking. However, at levels of 1.0 mg/L and higher, the concentration of Cu in the porous pot effluent would potentially exceed guidelines for receiving waters. The fate and impact of Cu was affected by the presence of other trace metals, in particular Mg and Ca. The addition of Mg or Ca along with 0.5 mg/L Cu increased the amount of Cu in the aqueous phase to levels that would potentially exceed government environmental guidelines. Calcium addition was also found to inhibit the effect of Cu in reducing filamentous bacteria and SVI. PMID:26652119

  10. Enrichment and solubility of trace metals associated with magnetic extracts in industrially derived contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lu, S G; Wang, H Y; Chen, Y Y

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic fractions (MFs) in industrially derived contaminated soils were extracted with a magnetic separation procedure. Total, soluble, and bioaccessible Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the MFs and non-magnetic fractions (NMFs) were analyzed using aqua regia and extraction tests, such as deionized water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and gastric juice simulation (GJST) test. Compared with the non-magnetic fractions, soil MFs were enriched with Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni. Extraction tests indicated that soil MFs contained higher water, TCLP, and GJST-extractable Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the soil NMFs. The TCLP-extractable Pb concentration in the MFs exceeded the USEPA hazardous waste criteria, suggesting that soil MFs have a potentially environmental pollution risk. Solubility of trace metals was variable in the different extraction tests, which has the order of GJST > TCLP > water. TCLP test showed Cu and Zn were more mobile than Cr and Pb while bioaccessibility of trace metal defined by GJST test showed the order of Cu ≈ Cr ≈ Zn > Pb. These findings suggested that the MFs in the industrially derived contaminated soils had higher possibility of polluting water bodies, and careful environmental impact assessment was necessary. PMID:22212817

  11. Microscale Biogeochemical Controls on Manganese Oxyhydroxide Biomineral Formation and Associated Trace Metal Sequestration in ARD Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, E. A.; Warren, L. A.

    2002-12-01

    Identifying the processes controlling reactive metal transport is a necessary prerequisite to the design of effective, mitigative, strategies for contaminated aqueous environments, such as acid rock drainage (ARD). Our research investigates the biogeochemical processes affecting trace metal fate in shallow tailings-associated seepage streams from a northern Ontario ARD environment (Onaping mine, Falconbridge Ltd., Sudbury, ON, Canada). Monthly, from June-Sept 2001, in situ characterization of biofilm geochemical parameters and quantification of biofilm-associated metal concentrations, by sequential extraction, was conducted on a diel scale. Results indicate that significant (p<0.05) seasonal accumulation of Mn, Ni, Co and Cr occurred within the biofilms (e.g. Ni, June: 3.60 mmol/kg; September: 25.7 mmol/kg). As much as 75%\\ of the total biofilm concentration of these elements was associated with the amorphous oxyhydroxide fraction. Further, trace metal concentrations were strongly and positively correlated to Mn concentrations in that fraction (R2 > 0.89), implying an important role for Mn oxyhydroxides as a sorbent phase in this system. On a diel basis, Mn concentrations in the amorphous oxyhydroxide fraction decreased significantly in the afternoon compared to morning or late evening values. The magnitude of the loss of Mn was correlated to shifts in the relative depth of the oxic/anoxic boundary. Fine-scale profiling of biofilm pH and O2, using microelectrodes, reflected photosynthesis and respiration; the oxic/anoxic boundary deepened and pH increased within the biofilm during daylight hours. Due to the low pH conditions of the biofilms (3.5-4.5) Mn oxyhydroxide formation is necessarily microbially-catalyzed. Therefore, although the exact mechanisms controlling Mn cycling in this fraction have yet to be elucidated, likely processes include microbially mediated Mn oxidation during non-photosynthetically active hours and abiotic dissolution during

  12. Metals and trace elements in feathers: A geochemical approach to avoid misinterpretation of analytical responses.

    PubMed

    Borghesi, Fabrizio; Migani, Francesca; Andreotti, Alessandro; Baccetti, Nicola; Bianchi, Nicola; Birke, Manfred; Dinelli, Enrico

    2016-02-15

    Assessing trace metal pollution using feathers has long attracted the attention of ecotoxicologists as a cost-effective and non-invasive biomonitoring method. In order to interpret the concentrations in feathers considering the external contamination due to lithic residue particles, we adopted a novel geochemical approach. We analysed 58 element concentrations in feathers of wild Eurasian Greater Flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus fledglings, from 4 colonies in Western Europe (Spain, France, Sardinia, and North-eastern Italy) and one group of adults from zoo. In addition, 53 elements were assessed in soil collected close to the nesting islets. This enabled to compare a wide selection of metals among the colonies, highlighting environmental anomalies and tackling possible causes of misinterpretation of feather results. Most trace elements in feathers (Al, Ce, Co, Cs, Fe, Ga, Li, Mn, Nb, Pb, Rb, Ti, V, Zr, and REEs) were of external origin. Some elements could be constitutive (Cu, Zn) or significantly bioaccumulated (Hg, Se) in flamingos. For As, Cr, and to a lesser extent Pb, it seems that bioaccumulation potentially could be revealed by highly exposed birds, provided feathers are well cleaned. This comprehensive study provides a new dataset and confirms that Hg has been accumulated in feathers in all sites to some extent, with particular concern for the Sardinian colony, which should be studied further including Cr. The Spanish colony appears critical for As pollution and should be urgently investigated in depth. Feathers collected from North-eastern Italy were the hardest to clean, but our methods allowed biological interpretation of Cr and Pb. Our study highlights the importance of external contamination when analysing trace elements in feathers and advances methodological recommendations in order to reduce the presence of residual particles carrying elements of external origin. Geochemical data, when available, can represent a valuable tool for a correct

  13. Ostracode trace metal geochemistry from Lake Tanganyika, Africa: Towards the development of a lacustrine paleothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, J.; Cohen, A. S.; Reiners, P. W.; Dettman, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The development of quantitative lacustrine paleotemperature records is critical to understanding how past climate changes influenced the ecology and hydrology of lakes. Whereas paleoecological transfer functions, TEX-86 and clumped isotopes are all widely applied methods, all have their limitations. We aim to further the development of an alternative method with wider applications: ostracode trace metal geochemistry. Trace element compositions of ostracode valves reflect discriminatory element uptake that in turn reflect ambient environmental conditions and have previously shown promise for quantitative paleotemperature determination. Understanding the specific environmental controls on element concentrations and ratios is an area of active research with much attention focusing on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios and their relationships with temperature and salinity. Here, HR-ICP-MS geochemical analyses of ostracode valves are compared to an existing TEX-86 temperature record as well as gastropod stable isotopes from Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Two ostracode species (M. opaca and R. ampla) were chosen for analyses from core LT-98-58 (1759 +/- 133 AD-modern). Molar Mg/Ca ratios for M. opaca range from .04 to .16, and a trend towards increased Mg/Ca begins around 1880 AD. Molar Mg/Ca ratios for R. ampla range from .05 to .2, and no trend is discernable. Sr/Ca ratios in both species range from .003-.006 and remain relatively stable, indicating that changes in Mg/Ca are the result of temperature rather than salinity. The M. opaca Mg/Ca record closely resembles the existing TEX-86 paleotemperature record of Tierney et al. (2010) for the past ~240 yr. We intend these preliminary results to facilitate the future research and use of ostracode trace metal geochemistry in a wide range of lakes for paleotemperature reconstruction.

  14. Trace metals in the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon and mangrove sediments of the Tanzania coast: Is there a risk to marine fauna and public health?

    PubMed

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Mdegela, Robinson H; Kochzius, Marc; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Mangroves ecosystems support livelihood and economic activities of coastal communities in the tropics and subtropics. Previous reports have documented the inefficiency of waste treatment facilities in Tanzania to contain trace metals. Therefore, the rapidly expanding coastal population and industrial sector is likely to threaten mangrove ecosystems with metal pollution. This study analysed trace metals in 60 sediment samples and 160 giant tiger prawns from the Tanzanian coast in order to document the distribution of trace metals and to establish if measured levels present a threat to mangrove fauna and are of public health importance. High levels of Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and V was observed in mangroves of river Pangani, Wami, and Rufiji. Multivariate analysis showed that they originate mainly from weathering and erosion in the river catchments. Extreme enrichment of Cd was observed in a mangrove affected by municipal sewage. The distribution of Hg, Pb, and Zn was related with urbanisation and industrial activities along the coast. The metal pollution index was high at Pangani, Saadani, and Rufiji, suggesting that these estuarine mangroves are also affected by human activities in the catchment. Moderate to considerable ecological risks were observed in all sampled mangroves, except for Kilwa Masoko. It was revealed that As, Cd, and Hg present moderate risks to fauna. High levels of Cu, Fe and Zn were observed in prawns but the level of the non-essential Cd, Hg, and Pb did not exceed the maximum allowed levels for human consumption. However, based on the trends of fish consumption in the country, weekly intake of Hg is likely to exceed provisional tolerable weekly intake level, especially in fishing communities. This calls for measures to control Hg emissions and to strengthen sewage and waste treatment in coastal cities and urban centres in the basin of major rivers. PMID:27281719

  15. Silicate-Metal Partitioning of Trace Elements: An Exploratory Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzel, D.; Jahn, S.

    2014-12-01

    Partition coefficients of trace elements are very important for the reconstruction of Earth formation and evolution processes. As such processes typically take place at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, it is still challenging to obtain experimental data. However, recent developments in super-computing facilities and in computational methods have made it possible to obtain supplementing information on melts and element partitioning from ab initio atomistic calculations. The model system used in this pilot study consists of two different melts: a simple Fe-Ni alloy representing the metal and a silicate phase with a varying ratio of Fe and Mg ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). Traces of Ni or Cr are added to each system. Molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory are initially run at 2500 K and ambient pressure, using the CPMD and CP2K software packages. Conditions are chosen so that the results can be compared to available experimental data in order to assess the feasibility of the approach and the quality of its results. However, preliminary results at increased pressure and temperature conditions that are more relevant for core formation will be presented as well. The results of the calculations include information on the melt structure, such as coordination environment, nearest neighbor distance and x-ray diffraction structure factors. The calculations at ambient pressure show that the behavior of Ni atoms in the silicate melt shows similarities to Mg and differs clearly from Fe. First results with a Cr trace show that it resembles Fe rather than Ni. Furthermore, thermodynamic integration is able to provide thermodynamic information about the exchange of trace elements between both phases. It is possible to obtain the energy difference connected to this exchange, which can then be used to estimate partition factors. First results on the Ni partitioning will be presented.

  16. Seasonal variation in soft tissue weights and trace metal burdens in the bay mussel, Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Latouche, Y.D.; Mix, M.C.

    1981-12-01

    Levels of six trace metals were measure in Mytilus edulis during a six month period. Patterns of seasonal variation were established and normal ranges of metal burdens in mussels were determined. Metals measured were vanadium, manganese, nickel, copper, zinc and cadmium. Sexually mature M. edulis, between 50 and 60 mm in size, were sampled in Yaquina Bay, Oregon at regular intervals between October 1979 and June 1980. Tissues were combined in two pools, ''somatic'' and ''gonadal''. Flame atomic absorption was used to determine concentrations of manganese, nickel, copper, and cadmium. Vanadium was determined by neutron activation analysis. With the exception of copper, all gonadal tissue burdens were greatest in late winter or early spring, at the time of gametogenesis. Somatic burdens of nickel, manganese, and zinc were maximal in early spring, while copper, cadmium and vanadium fluctuated without regard to gametogenesis or spawning. Zinc concentrations increased dramatically between days 22 and 80. Such increases may be indicative of the onset of gametogenesis. Results suggest that somatic and gonadal tissue should be considered separately when measuring metal levels. 1 table (JMT)

  17. Temporal and spatial trends for trace metals in streams and rivers across Sweden (1996-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huser, B. J.; Köhler, S. J.; Wilander, A.; Johansson, K.; Fölster, J.

    2011-07-01

    Long term data series (1996 through 2009) for trace metals were analyzed from a large number of streams and rivers across Sweden varying in tributary watershed size from 0.05 to 48 193 km2. The final data set included 139 stream sites with data for arsenic (As), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and vanadium (V). Between 7 % and 46 % of the sites analyzed showed significant trends according to the seasonal Kendall test. However, in contrast to previous studies and depositional patterns, a substantial portion of the trends were positive, especially for V (100 %), As (95 %), and Pb (68 %). Other metals (Zn and Cr) generally decreased, were mixed (Ni and Zn), or had very few trends (Co) over the study period. Trends by region were also analyzed and some showed significant variation between the north and south of Sweden. Regional trends for both Cu and Pb were positive (60 % and 93 %, respectively) in the southern region but strongly negative (93 % and 75 %, respectively) in the northern region. Kendall's τ coefficients were used to determine dependence between metals and potential in-stream drivers including total organic carbon (TOC), iron (Fe), pH, and sulphate (SO42-). TOC and Fe correlated positively and strongly with As, V, Pb, and Co while pH and SO42- generally correlated weakly, or not at all with the metals studied.

  18. Temporal and spatial trends for trace metals in streams and rivers across Sweden (1996-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huser, B. J.; Köhler, S. J.; Wilander, A.; Johansson, K.; Fölster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Long term data series (1996 through 2009) for trace metals were analyzed from a large number of streams and rivers across Sweden varying in tributary watershed size from 0.05 to 48193 km2. The final data set included 139 stream sites with data for arsenic (As), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and vanadium (V). Between 7% and 46% of the sites analyzed showed significant trends according to the seasonal Kendall test. However, in contrast to previous studies and depositional patterns, a substantial portion of the trends were positive, especially for V (100%), As (95%), and Pb (68%). Other metals (Zn and Cr) generally decreased, were mixed (Ni and Zn), or had very few trends (Co) over the study period. Trends by region were also analyzed and some showed significant variation between the north and south of Sweden. Regional trends for both Cu and Pb were positive (60% and 93%, respectively) in the southern region but strongly negative (93% and 75%, respectively) in the northern region. Kendall's τ coefficients were used to determine dependence between metals and potential in-stream drivers including total organic carbon (TOC), iron (Fe), pH, and sulphate (SO42-). TOC and Fe correlated positively and strongly with As, V, Pb, and Co while pH and SO42-generally correlated weakly, or not at all with the metals studied.

  19. Biochemical technology for the detoxification of geothermal brines and the recovery of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, Hsienjen

    1995-05-01

    Studies conducted at BNL, have shown that a cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable biochemical technology for detoxification of geothermal sludges is most satisfactory, as well as technically achievable. This technology is based on biochemical reactions by which certain extremophilic microorganisms interact with inorganic matrices of geothermal origin. The biochemical treatment of wastes generated by power plants using geothermal energy is a versatile technology adaptable to several applications beyond that of rendering hazardous and/or mixed wastes to non-hazardous by products, which meet regulatory requirements. This technology may be used for solubilization or recovery of a few metals to the isolation of many metals including radionuclides. In the metal recovery mode, an aqueous phase is generated which meets regulatory standards. The resulting concentrate contains valuable trace metals and salts which can be further converted into income generating products which can off-set the initial investment costs associated with the new biotechnology. In this paper, recent developments in this emerging technology will be discussed.

  20. Bacterial assisted degradation of chlorpyrifos: The key role of environmental conditions, trace metals and organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Saira; Hashmi, Imran; Khan, Sher Jamal

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater from pesticide industries, agricultural or surface runoff containing pesticides and their residues has adverse environmental impacts. Present study demonstrates effect of petrochemicals and trace metals on chlorpyrifos (CP) biotransformation often released in wastewater of agrochemical industry. Biodegradation was investigated using bacterial strain Pseudomonas kilonensis SRK1 isolated from wastewater spiked with CP. Optimal environmental conditions for CP removal were CFU (306 × 10(6)), pH (8); initial CP concentration (150 mg/L) and glucose as additional carbon source. Among various organic solvents (petrochemicals) used in this study toluene has stimulatory effect on CP degradation process using SRK1, contrary to this benzene and phenol negatively inhibited degradation process. Application of metal ions (Cu (II), Fe (II) Zn (II) at low concentration (1 mg/L) took part in biochemical reaction and positively stimulated CP degradation process. Metal ions at high concentrations have inhibitory effect on degradation process. A first order growth model was shown to fit the data. It could be concluded that both type and concentration of metal ions and petrochemicals can affect CP degradation process. PMID:26692411

  1. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the

  2. Effect of seasonally changing tissue weight on trace metal concentrations in the bivalve Macoma balthica in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of seasonal changes in the weight of soft tissues on temporal fluctuations in tissue concentrations of Cu and Zn was examined in 4 populations of the clam Macoma balthica sampled in San Francisco Bay for a period of 2 to 5 yr. Fluctuations in metal concentration expected from changes in tissue weight between sampling dates were estimated by assuming that whole body metal burden was constant during the sampling interval. Comparison of estimated and actual metal concentrations showed that the degree to which fluctuations in trace metal concentrations were driven by weight changes differed considerably among stations, among years at a single station, and between metals.

  3. Control of trace metal emissions during coal combustion. Technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.

    1995-10-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  4. Control of trace metal emissions during coal combustion. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.

    1995-07-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  5. Trace metal contamination influenced by land use, soil age, and organic matter in montreal tree pit soil.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Maryam; Jutras, Pierre; Clark, O Grant; Hendershot, William H; Prasher, Shiv O

    2013-09-01

    The short life span of many street trees in the Montreal downtown area may be due in part to higher than standard concentrations of trace metals in the tree pit soils. The effects of land use, soil organic matter, and time since tree planting in a given tree pit (soil age) were studied with respect to the total concentration of trace metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in soil collected from tree pits on commercial and residential streets. Contingency table analysis and multiple linear regression were applied to study how these variables were related to the total concentrations of trace metals in soil. Other variables, such as pH, street width, distance of the tree pit from the curb, and tree pit volume, were also used as input to statistical analysis to increase the analysis' explanatory power. Significantly higher concentrations of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb were observed in soils from commercial streets, possibly as a result of heavier traffic as compared with residential streets. Soil organic matter was positively correlated with the concentrations of Cu and Pb, probably due to the ability of organic matter to retain these trace metals. Nickel, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were positively correlated with the soil age presumably because trace metals accumulate in the tree pit soil over time. This knowledge can be helpful in providing soil quality standards aimed at improving the longevity of downtown street trees. PMID:24216430

  6. Release of trace metals, sulfate and complexed cyanide from soils contaminated with gas-purifier wastes: a microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Rennert, T; Mansfeldt, T

    2006-01-01

    Deposited gas-purifier wastes are commonly contaminated with trace metals, sulfate and cyanide (CN) compounds. We investigated their release from three soils contaminated with gas-purifier wastes into solution in microcosm experiments under varying redox conditions (E(H) 170-620 mV). The soils differed in pH (2.2; 4.9; 7.4) and featured low amounts of trace metals, but large amounts of total S and total CN. The pH governed trace metal release in the case of the acidic soil and CN release in the case of the slightly alkaline soil. The redox potential controlled trace metal and CN release in the case of the moderately acidic soil. Sources of dissolved SO(4)(2-) were dissolution of gypsum, desorption from Fe oxides and probably oxidation of elemental S. The geochemical behaviors of trace metals (soluble under acidic and reducing conditions) and CN (soluble under alkaline and oxidizing conditions) were diametrically opposed. PMID:16019115

  7. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (< 0.2 μm) fraction and Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, and Pb are mainly in the unfiltered fraction. At TAG and Snakepit, unfiltered copper is correlated with unfiltered cobalt, and unfiltered zinc is correlated with unfiltered cadmium and lead. At Rainbow, unfiltered zinc, cadmium and lead are correlated, but unfiltered copper and cobalt are not, indicating precipitation dynamics at Rainbow are different than those at TAG and Snakepit due to bulk geochemical differences, including a higher iron to sulfide ratio. A sequential HCl/HNO3 leaching method was used to distinguish metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  8. Content and distribution of trace metals in pristine permafrost environments of Northeastern Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antcibor, I.; Eschenbach, A.; Kutzbach, L.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Arctic regions are one of the most sensitive areas with respect to climatic changes and human impacts. Research is required to discover how the function of permafrost soils as a buffering system for metal pollutants could change in response to the predicted changes. The goal of this work is to determine the background levels of trace metals in the pristine arctic ecosystems of the Lena River Delta in Northeastern Siberia and to evaluate the possible effect of human impacts on this arctic region. The Lena River Delta represents areas with different dominating geomorphologic processes that can generally be divided between accumulation and erosion sites. Frequent changes of the river water level create different periods of sedimentation and result in the formation of stratified soils and sediment layers which are dominated either by mineral substrates with allochthonous organic matter or pure autochthonous peat. The deposited sediments that have formed the delta islands are mostly composed of sand fractions; therefore the buffering effects of clay materials can be neglected. Samoylov Island is representative of the south-central and eastern modern delta surfaces of the Lena River Delta and is selected as a pilot study site. We determined total element contents of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu, As, Pb, Co and Hg in soil horizons from different polygonal elevated rims, polygonal depressed centers and the middle floodplain. High gravimetric concentrations (related to dry mass of soil material) of Mn and Fe are found within all soil profiles and vary from 0.14 to 1.39 g kg-1 and from 10.7 to 41.2 g kg-1, respectively. While the trace element concentrations do not exceed typical crustal abundances, the maximum values of most of the metals are observed within the soil profile situated at the middle floodplain. This finding suggests that apart from the parent material the second potential source of trace metals is due to allochthonous substance input during annual flooding of the

  9. Trace Metal Associations in an Anoxic Lake: the Relative Roles of Organic Carbon and Reduced Sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulson Brucker, R.; McManus, J.; Severmann, S.; Owens, J.; Lyons, T.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the geochemistry of the trace elements Mo, U, and Re in sediments from a transect through the chemocline of Lake Tanganyika, East Africa. In addition to these relatively shallow cores (70 to 330m), we present data from a longer core representing ~30,000 years of lake history, which was taken within the sulfidic waters that lie well below the chemocline (~900m water depth). Our goal is to establish a framework for trace metal deposition within the context of organic carbon and sulfur burial - two important carrier phases for these metals. Sediment organic carbon contents are high, generally between 5 and 10 wt% at the shallow sites, and up to 16 wt% in the deep basin. Despite the very low sulfate (~35 μM) and sulfide (~30 μM) concentrations in the lake water, sediment reduced sulfur contents are up to 1.5 wt% in the shallow sites and as high as 5 wt% in the deepest sediments. Sediment C:S ratios for all study sites are consistent with these sediments generally being sulfur limited. Sediment C:S ratios decrease from ~22, which agree well with previously published freshwater values, to ~6 with increasing site depth. The lower C:S ratios are more comparable to the marine value (2.8), and suggest that a considerable amount of organic carbon must be decomposing via sulfate reduction. C:S ratios in the deepest site are highly variable, with some even lower than the marine threshold. In light of the sedimentary organic carbon and sulfur data, trace metal distributions imply that U deposition is closely associated with organic carbon deposition and is independent of sulfur cycling. In contrast, Mo behavior suggests both an association with organic carbon as well as sulfur, but is subject to poor preservation where the sediment C:S ratios are highest. Rhenium accumulation only appears significant at the deepest most sulfur-rich site, and there is a close correspondence between Mo and Re distributions. These latter observations suggest that sulfur burial is

  10. Stabilization of dissolved trace metals at hydrothermal vent sites: Impact on their marine biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Sylvia G.; Powell, Zach D.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Kuzmanovski, Stefan; Kleint, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vents have long been neglected as a significant source of several bioactive trace metals as it was assumed that elements such as Fe, Mn, and Cu etc., precipitate in extensor forming poly-metallic sulfide and oxy-hydroxy sediments in the relative vicinity of the emanation site. However, recently this paradigm has been reviewed since the stabilization of dissolved Fe and Cu from hydrothermal vents was observed [1, 2] and increased concentrations of trace metals can be traced from their hydrothermal source thousands of kilometres through the ocean basins [3]. Furthermore several independent modelling attempts have shown that not only a stabilization of dissolved hydrothermal Fe and Cu is possible [4] but also that hydrothermalism must be a significant source of Fe to be able to balance the Fe-biogeochemical cycle [5]. Here we present new data that gives further evidence of the presence of copper stabilising organic and inorganic compounds in samples characterized by hydrothermal input. We can show that there are systematic differences in copper-complexing ligands at different vent sites such as 5°S on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, Brother Volcano on the Kermadec Arc, and some shallow hydrothermal CO2 seeps in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand and the Mediterranean Sea. Quantitative and qualitative voltammetric data convincingly indicates that inorganic sulphur and organic thiols form the majority of the strong copper-complexing ligand pool in many of these hydrothermal samples. On average, the high temperature vents had a significantly higher copper binding capacity than the diffuse vents due to higher inorganic sulphur species concentrations. References: [1] Sander, S. G., et al. 2007. Organic complexation of copper in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems. Environmental Chemistry 4: 81-89 [2] Bennett, S. A., et al. 2008. The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 270: 157-167. [3] Wu J

  11. Sequential changes in trace metal, metallothionein and calmodulin concentrations in healing skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A B; Sampson, B; Rowe, A

    1999-10-01

    Metalloenzymes have an important role in repair and regenerative processes in skin wounds. Demands for different enzymes vary according to the phase in the healing cascade and constituent events. Sequential changes in the concentrations of calcium, copper, magnesium and zinc were studied in the incisional wound model in the rat over a 10 d period. Copper levels remained low (< 10 microg/g dry weight) throughout, but calcium, magnesium and zinc increased from wounding and peaked at about 5 d at a time of high inflammation, granulation tissue formation and epidermal cell proliferation. Metal concentrations declined to normal by 7 d when inflammation had regressed, re-epithelialisation of the wound site was complete and the 'normalisation' phase had commenced. Although the wound was overtly healed by 10 d, the epidermis was still moderately hyperplastic. In view of competitive binding of trace metals at membrane receptors and carrier proteins, the ratios or balance between these trace metals was examined and the significance is discussed. Using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated increases in metallothionein immunoreactivity as an indication of zinc and copper activity in the papillary dermis and in basal epidermal cells near the wound margin 1-5 d after wounding. This is consistent with metalloenzyme requirements in inflammation and fibrogenesis. Calmodulin, a major cytosolic calcium binding protein was highest in maturing keratinocytes and in sebaceous gland cells of normal skin; it was notably more abundant in the epidermis near the wound margin and in re-epithelialising areas at a time when local calcium levels were highest. PMID:10580852

  12. Spatial distribution and pollution assessment of trace metals in surface sediments of Ziqlab Reservoir, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Batayneh, Awni T; El-Radaideh, Nazem; Ghrefat, Habes; Zumlot, Taisser; Al-Rawabdeh, Abdulla M; Al-Momani, Talal; Taani, Aymen

    2015-02-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected from Ziqlab dam in northwestern Jordan to investigate the spatial distribution of selected trace metals and assess their pollution levels. The results showed that the concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Zn exceeded the environmental background values. Cd, Ni, and Cr contents were higher than the threshold effect level (TEL) in 63, 83, and 60 % of the reservoir sediments, respectively; whereas Pb, Zn, and Cu were less than the TEL limit. The concentrations of trace metals in reservoir sediment varied spatially, but their variations showed similar trends. Elevated levels of metals observed in the western part (adjacent to the dam wall) were coincided with higher contents of clay-silt fraction and total organic matters. Multivariate analysis indicated that Pb, Co, and Mn may be related to the lithologic component and/or the application of agrochemicals in the upstream agricultural farms. However, Cd and Zn concentrations were probably elevated due to inputs from agricultural sources, including fertilizers. Evaluation of contamination levels by the Sediment Quality Guidelines of the US-EPA, revealed that sediments were non-polluted to moderately polluted with Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cr, but non-polluted to moderately to heavily polluted with Ni and non-polluted with Mn. The geoaccumulation index showed that Ziqlab sediments were unpolluted with Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co, and Mn, but unpolluted to moderately polluted with Cd. The high enrichment values for Cd and Pb (>2) indicate their anthropogenic sources, whereas the remaining elements were of natural origins consistent with their low enrichment levels. PMID:25632906

  13. Bio-recovery of non-essential heavy metals by intra- and extracellular mechanisms in free-living microorganisms.

    PubMed

    García-García, Jorge D; Sánchez-Thomas, Rosina; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Free-living microorganisms may become suitable models for recovery of non-essential and essential heavy metals from wastewater bodies and soils by using and enhancing their accumulating and/or leaching abilities. This review analyzes the variety of different mechanisms developed mainly in bacteria, protists and microalgae to accumulate heavy metals, being the most relevant those involving phytochelatin and metallothionein biosyntheses; phosphate/polyphosphate metabolism; compartmentalization of heavy metal-complexes into vacuoles, chloroplasts and mitochondria; and secretion of malate and other organic acids. Cyanide biosynthesis for extra-cellular heavy metal bioleaching is also examined. These metabolic/cellular processes are herein analyzed at the transcriptional, kinetic and metabolic levels to provide mechanistic basis for developing genetically engineered microorganisms with greater capacities and efficiencies for heavy metal recovery, recycling of heavy metals, biosensing of metal ions, and engineering of metalloenzymes. PMID:27184302

  14. Humic substances and trace metals associated with Fe and Al oxides deposited in an acidic mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Wershaw, R. L.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Feder, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrous iron and aluminum oxides are deposited on the streambed in the confluence of the Snake River and Deer Creek, two streams in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The Snake River is acidic and has high concentrations of dissolved Fe and Al. These metals precipitate at the confluence with the pristine, neutral pH, Deer Creek because of the greater pH (4.5-6.0) in the confluence. The composition of the deposited oxides changes consistently with distance downstream, with the most upstream oxide samples having the greatest Fe and organic carbon content. Fulvic acid accounts for most of the organic content of the oxides. Results indicate that streambed oxides in the confluence are not saturated with respect to their capacity to sorb dissolved humic substances from streamwater. The contents of several trace metals (Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni and Co) also decrease with distance downstream and are correlated with both the Fe and organic carbon contents. Strong metal-binding sites associated with the sorbed fulvic acid are more than sufficient to account for the trace metal content of the oxides. Complexation of trace metals by sorbed fulvic acid may explain the observed downstream decrease in trace metal content.

  15. Potential human health risk assessment of trace metals via the consumption of marine fish in Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Naji, Abolfazl; Khan, Farhan R; Hashemi, Seyed Hassan

    2016-08-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the concentration of trace metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the muscle of four fish species from the Persian Gulf. Trace metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy and consumption rates advisory for minimizing chronic systemic effects in children and adults were estimated. The metals concentrations in analyzed fish samples were lower than legal limits. Cadmium target hazard quotient values suggested that the threshold to avoid the potential risk for children health is an exposure level lower than 3 meals per week. Hazard index values based on four metals (not including Pb) for the child age class were higher than those of the adult age class, suggesting that children may suffer from a higher health risk. This study provides information about the consumption limits of certain metals, in particular Cd, necessary for minimizing potential health risks resulting from human consumption. PMID:27193506

  16. Evaluation of trace metal levels in tissues of two commercial fish species in Kapar and Mersing coastal waters, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Fathi Alhashmi; Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Mazlan, A G

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on evaluating the trace metal levels in water and tissues of two commercial fish species Arius thalassinus and Pennahia anea that were collected from Kapar and Mersing coastal waters. The concentrations of Fe, Zn, Al, As, Cd and Pb in these coastal waters and muscle, liver and gills tissues of the fishes were quantified. The relationship among the metal concentrations and the height and weight of the two species were also examined. Generally, the iron has the highest concentrations in both water and the fish species. However, Cd in both coastal waters showed high levels exceeding the international standards. The metal level concentration in the sample fishes are in the descending order livers > gills > muscles. A positive association between the trace metal concentrations and weight and length of the sample fishes was investigated. Fortunately the level of these metal concentrations in fish has not exceeded the permitted level of Malaysian and international standards. PMID:22046193

  17. Evaluation of Trace Metal Levels in Tissues of Two Commercial Fish Species in Kapar and Mersing Coastal Waters, Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Fathi Alhashmi; Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Mazlan, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on evaluating the trace metal levels in water and tissues of two commercial fish species Arius thalassinus and Pennahia anea that were collected from Kapar and Mersing coastal waters. The concentrations of Fe, Zn, Al, As, Cd and Pb in these coastal waters and muscle, liver and gills tissues of the fishes were quantified. The relationship among the metal concentrations and the height and weight of the two species were also examined. Generally, the iron has the highest concentrations in both water and the fish species. However, Cd in both coastal waters showed high levels exceeding the international standards. The metal level concentration in the sample fishes are in the descending order livers > gills > muscles. A positive association between the trace metal concentrations and weight and length of the sample fishes was investigated. Fortunately the level of these metal concentrations in fish has not exceeded the permitted level of Malaysian and international standards. PMID:22046193

  18. Trace metal distribution in pristine permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its Hinterland, Northern Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antcibor, I.; Zubrzycki, S.; Eschenbach, A.; Kutzbach, L.; Bol'shiyanov, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2013-02-01

    Soils are an important compartment of ecosystems and have the ability to immobilize chemicals preventing their movement to other environment compartments. Predicted climatic changes together with other anthropogenic influences on Arctic terrestrial environments may affect biogeochemical processes enhancing leaching and migration of trace elements in permafrost-affected soils. This is especially important since the Arctic ecosystems are considered to be very sensitive to climatic changes as well as to chemical contamination. This study characterizes background levels of trace metals in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its hinterland in northern Siberia (73.5° N-69.5° N) representing a remote region far from evident anthropogenic trace metal sources. Investigations on total element contents of iron (Fe), arsenic (As), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co) and mercury (Hg) in different soil types developed in different geological parent materials have been carried out. The highest concentrations of the majority of the measured elements were observed in soils belonging to ice-rich permafrost sediments formed during the Pleistocene (ice-complex) in the Lena River Delta region. Correlation analyses of trace metal concentrations and soil chemical and physical properties at a Holocene estuarine terrace and two modern floodplain levels in the southern-central Lena River Delta (Samoylov Island) showed that the main factors controlling the trace metal distribution in these soils are organic matter content, soil texture and contents of iron and manganese-oxides. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed that soil oxides play a significant role in trace metal distribution in both top and bottom horizons. Occurrence of organic matter contributes to Cd binding in top soils and Cu binding in bottom horizons. Observed ranges of the background concentrations of the majority of trace elements were similar to

  19. Trace-metal fate in a rotary-kiln incinerator with an ionizing wet scrubber (journal article)

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; Fournier, D.J.; Lee, J.W.; Carroll, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bismuth were relatively volatile, with an average of less than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, lead, magnesium, and strontium were relatively nonvolatile, with an average of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed with the volatilities predicted based on vapor pressure/temperature relationships, with the exception of arsenic which was much less volatile than predicted. The volatility of cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased as kiln temperature was increased; the discharge distributions of the remaining metals were not significantly affected by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals averaged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for the less volatile metals. The overall average metal collection efficiency was 43 percent.

  20. Control of trace metal emissions during coal combustion. Technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.

    1996-07-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. The observed experimental results indicated that metal capture by sorbents can be as high as 91% depending on the metal species and sorbent involved. All three sorbents tested, i.e., bauxite, zeolite and lime, were observed to be capable of capturing lead and cadmium in a various degree. Zeolite and lime were able to capture chromium. Results from thermodynamic equilibrium simulations suggested the formation of metal-sorbent compounds such as Pb{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(s), CdAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) and CdSiO{sub 3}(s) under the combustion conditions. Additional experiments are being carried out to provide more statistically representative results for better understanding the metal capture process.

  1. Reactive uptake of trace metals in the hyporheic zone of a mining- contaminated stream, Pinal Creek, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Harvey, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Significant uptake of dissolved metals occurred by interaction of groundwater and surface water with hyporheic-zone sediments during transport in Pinal Creek, AZ. The extent of trace metal uptake was calculated by mass balance measurements made directly within the hyporheic zone. A conservative solute tracer injected into the stream was used to quantify hydrologic exchange with the stream and groundwater. Fractional reactive uptake of dissolved metals entering the hyporheic zone was determined at 29 sites and averaged 52 ?? 25, 27 ?? 19, and 36 ?? 24% for Co, Ni, and Zn, compared with Mn uptake of 22 ?? 19%. First-order rate constants (??(h)) of metal uptake in the hyporheic zone were determined at seven sites using the exchange rate of water derived from tracer arrival in the streambed. Reaction-time constants (1/??(h)) averaged 0.41, 0.84, and 0.38 h for Co, Ni, and Zn, respectively, and 1.3 h for Mn. In laboratory experiments with streambed sediments, metal uptake increased with preexisting Mn oxide concentration, supporting our interpretation that Mn oxides in the hyporheic zone enhance trace metal uptake. Reach-scale mass-balance calculations that include groundwater metal inputs indicated that decreases in metal loads ranged from 12 to 68% over the 7-km perennial reach depending on the metal. The decreases in metal loads are attributed to uptake of trace metals by Mn oxides in the hyporheic zone that is enhanced because of ongoing Mn oxide formation. Analysis of dissolved- metal streambed profiles and conservative solute tracers provide a valuable tool for quantifying metal uptake or release in the hyporheic zone of contaminated streams.

  2. Control of trace metal emissions during coal combustion. Technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Thomas C.

    1996-01-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold end of the process by air-pollution control devices such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions at the hot end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and capture volatized metal vapors. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. The following progress has been made during the performance period from Oct. 1, 1995 through Dec. 31, 1995: (1) Additional combustion experiments involving both coal and wood pellets were carried out in the constructed quartz fluidized bed combustor. (2) A new Buck Scientific Model 210VGP Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a continuous flow hydride generator especially for arsenic and selenium was installed for the project. (3) A paper, entitled ``Capture of Toxic Metals by Various Sorbents during Fluidized Bed Coal Combustion,`` was presented at the 1995 AIChE Annual Meeting held in Miami, November 13--17, 1995. (4) A manuscript, entitled ``Trace Metal Capture by Various Sorbents during Fluidized Bed Coal Combustion,`` was submitted to the 26th International Symposium on Combustion for presentation and for publication in the symposium proceedings. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  3. Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland as Recorded in 3-Meter Snow Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overdier, J.; Shafer, M.; Schauer, J.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Hagler, G.; Bergin, M.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. This sampling effort was one facet of our larger program with the overall objective of improving our understanding of the sourcing and post depositional diagenesis of organic carbon depositing on the Greenland ice sheet. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles of a suite of chemical variables were obtained, including: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, and comprehensive elemental and isotopic analysis. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental and isotopic analyses on the melted snow cores were carried-out using high-resolution (sector-field) ICP-MS (Finnegan Element 2). A large suite of elements were quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe. Na, Mg, Si), minor crustal elements (Ba, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti) light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn), heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W), oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V), platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt), rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb), as well as, Be, Sb, Sn, sulfur and phosphorus. Very large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) is observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, S and Sn. The later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated/sourced trace metals. Principal crustal elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na) and sulfate (S) present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. Major burial peaks are relatively uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating some consistency

  4. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams. PMID:27443453

  5. Biotechnological applications of serpentine soil bacteria for phytoremediation of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Mani; Vara Prasad, Majeti Narasimha; Freitas, Helena; Ae, Noriharu

    2009-01-01

    Serpentine or ultramafic soils are produced by weathering and pedogenesis of ultramafic rocks that are characterized by high levels of Ni, Cr, and sometimes Co, but contain low levels of essential nutrients such as N, P, K, and Ca. A number of plant species endemic to serpentine soils are capable of accumulating exceptionally high concentrations of Ni, Zn, and Co. These plants are known as metal "hyperaccumulators." The function of hyperaccumulation depends not only on the plant, but also on the interaction of the plant roots with rhizosphere microbes and the concentrations of bioavailable metals in the soil. The rhizosphere provides a complex and dynamic microenvironment where microorganisms, in association with roots, form unique communities that have considerable potential for the detoxification of hazardous materials. The rhizosphere bacteria play a significant role on plant growth in serpentine soils by various mechanisms, namely, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, utilization of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) as the sole N source, production of siderophores, or production of plant growth regulators (hormones). Further, many microorganisms in serpentine soil are able to solubilize "unavailable" forms of heavy metal-bearing minerals by excreting organic acids. In addition, the metal-resistant serpentine isolates increase the efficiency of phytoextraction directly by enhancing the metal accumulation in plant tissues and indirectly by promoting the shoot and root biomass of hyperaccumulators. Hence, isolation of the indigenous and stress-adapted beneficial bacteria serve as a potential biotechnological tool for inoculation of plants for the successful restoration of metal-contaminated ecosystems. In this study, we highlight the diversity and beneficial features of serpentine bacteria and discuss their potential in phytoremediation of serpentine and anthropogenically metal-contaminated soils. PMID:19514893

  6. Solubilization of manganese and trace metals in soils affected by acid mine runoff.

    PubMed

    Green, C H; Heil, D M; Cardon, G E; Butters, G L; Kelly, E F

    2003-01-01

    Manganese solubility has become a primary concern in the soils and water supplies in the Alamosa River basin, Colorado due to both crop toxicity problems and concentrations that exceed water quality standards. Some of the land in this region has received inputs of acid and trace metals as a result of irrigation with water affected by acid mine drainage and naturally occurring acid mineral seeps. The release of Mn, Zn, Ni, and Cu following saturation with water was studied in four soils from the Alamosa River basin. Redox potentials decreased to values adequate for dissolution of Mn oxides within 24 h following saturation. Soluble Mn concentrations were increased to levels exceeding water quality standards within 84 h. Soluble concentrations of Zn and Ni correlated positively with Mn following reduction for all four soils studied. The correlation between Cu and Mn was significant for only one of the soils studied. The soluble concentrations of Zn and Ni were greater than predicted based on the content of each of these metals in the Mn oxide fraction only. Increases in total electrolyte concentration during reduction indicate that this may be the result of displacement of exchangeable metals by Mn following reductive dissolution of Mn oxides. PMID:12931888

  7. Experimental design of an interlaboratory study for trace metal analysis of liquid fluids. [for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The accurate determination of trace metals and fuels is an important requirement in much of the research into and development of alternative fuels for aerospace applications. Recognizing the detrimental effects of certain metals on fuel performance and fuel systems at the part per million and in some cases part per billion levels requires improved accuracy in determining these low concentration elements. Accurate analyses are also required to ensure interchangeability of analysis results between vendor, researcher, and end use for purposes of quality control. Previous interlaboratory studies have demonstrated the inability of different laboratories to agree on the results of metal analysis, particularly at low concentration levels, yet typically good precisions are reported within a laboratory. An interlaboratory study was designed to gain statistical information about the sources of variation in the reported concentrations. Five participant laboratories were used on a fee basis and were not informed of the purpose of the analyses. The effects of laboratory, analytical technique, concentration level, and ashing additive were studied in four fuel types for 20 elements of interest. The prescribed sample preparation schemes (variations of dry ashing) were used by all of the laboratories. The analytical data were statistically evaluated using a computer program for the analysis of variance technique.

  8. Bioavailable trace metals in micro-tidal Thambraparani estuary, Gulf of Mannar, SE coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, M.; Viswam, Arya; Gopal, V.; Muthuswamy, S.; Kalaivanan, P.; Giridharan, L.; Jonathan, M. P.

    2014-06-01

    Thirty surface sediment samples from two different seasons pre-monsoon (PRM), post-monsoon (POM) were analyzed for texture, carbonates, organic matter (OM) and leachable trace metals (LTMs) (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd) from the micro-tidal estuary of Thambraparani river located in Gulf of Mannar, SE coast of India. Finer fractions (mud: 3-87%) and OM (2.6-8.0%) dominate the region and the concentration pattern of LTMs indicate that mostly all the metals are concentrated in the POM season than PRM. Correlation analysis indicates that LTMs are also bound with the OM, mud and are bound with Fe-Mn oxides. Pb concentration (14-103 μg g-1) exceeds the sediment quality guideline value indicating its anthropogenic origin. Low flow condition exists in the estuarine region due to the control over fresh water inflow in the upstream side and the higher concentration of metals [avg. (μg g-1) Cr 10; Cu 11; Zn 28] is due to the precipitation from estuarine water to the sediments and is also bioavailable to the marine biota in the region.

  9. Investigation of exposure rates and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.T.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    Studies have been conducted to investigate exposure rates, and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Columbia River where it borders the Hanford Site. The last major field study was conducted in 1979. With recently renewed interest in various land use and resource protection alternatives, it is important to have data that represent current conditions. Radionuclides and trace metals were surveyed in Columbia River shoreline soils along the Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). The work was conducted as part of the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The survey consisted of taking exposure rate measurements and soil samples primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates.

  10. Soil microbial communities as suitable bioindicators of trace metal pollution in agricultural volcanic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parelho, Carolina; dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo; do Carmo Barreto, Maria; Gonçalo Ferreira, Nuno; Garcia, Patrícia

    2015-04-01

    Summary: The biological, chemical and physical properties of soil confer unique characteristics that enhance or influence its overall biodiversity. The adaptive character of soil microbial communities (SMCs) to metal pollution allows discriminating soil health, since changes in microbial populations and activities may function as excellent indicators of soil pollutants. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals (TM). In our previous works, we identified priority TM affecting agricultural Andosols under different agricultural land uses. Within this particular context, the objectives of this study were to (i) assess the effect of soil TM pollution in different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) on the following soil properties: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, metabolic quotient, enzymatic activities (β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase) and RNA to DNA ratio; and (ii) evaluate the impact of TM in the soil ecosystem using the integrated biomarker response (IBR) based on a set of biochemical responses of SMCs. This multi-biomarker approach will support the development of the "Trace Metal Footprint" for different agricultural land uses in volcanic soils. Methods: The study was conducted in S. Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal). Microbial biomass carbon was measured by chloroform-fumigation-incubation-assay (Vance et al., 1987). Basal respiration was determined by the Jenkinson & Powlson (1976) technique. Metabolic quotient was calculated as the ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass C (Sparkling & West, 1988). The enzymatic activities of β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase were determined by the Dick et al. (1996) method and dehydrogenase activity by the Rossel et al. (1997) method. The RNA and DNA were co-extracted from the same

  11. Bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to the cladoceran Daphnia magna in relation to cadmium exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Rui

    The cladoceran Daphnia magna is widely used in freshwater bioassessments and ecological risk assessments. This study designed a series of experiments employing radiotracer methodology to quantify the trace metals (mainly Cd and Zn) biokinetics in D. magna under different environmental and biological conditions and to investigate the influences of different Cd exposure histories on the bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to D. magna. A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was finally applied in predicting the Cd accumulation dynamics in D. magna and the model validity under non-steady state was assessed. Cd assimilation was found in this study to be influenced by the food characteristics (e.g., metal concentration in food particles), the metal exposure history of the animals, and the genetic characteristics. Some of these influences could be interpreted by the capacity and/or competition of those metal binding sites within the digestive tract and/or the detoxifying proteins metallothionein (MT). My study demonstrated a significant induction of MT in response to Cd exposure and it was the dominant fraction in sequestering the internal nonessential trace metals in D. magna. The ratio of Cd body burden to MT might better predict the Cd toxicity on the digestion systems of D. magna than the Cd tissue burden alone within one-generational exposure to Cd. It was found that metal elimination (rate constant and contribution of different release routes) was independent of the food concentration and the dietary metal concentration, implying that the elimination may not be metabolically controlled. The incorporation of the bioenergetic-based kinetic model, especially under non-steady state, is invaluable in helping to understand the fate of trace metals in aquatic systems and potential environmental risks. The dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors rather than on genotypes implies a great potential of using biokinetics in inter-laboratory comparisons.

  12. Trace metals in resuspended fraction of settled bus dust and assessment of non-occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Lei, Tingting; Gao, Peng; Jia, Liming; Chen, Xin; Lu, Binyu; Yang, Longhai; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Trace metals (TMs) within urban public transportation systems have rarely been studied and information on related health risks is scant. This study measured TM (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, zinc, copper and lead) concentrations in resuspended fractions of settled bus dust in Harbin, China, and estimated the exposure and health risks. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for commuters was estimated for TM exposures. The average concentration of total TMs was 559μg/g (ranges from 312 to 787) among 45 bus routes in Harbin. The hazard quotient of three selected commuter groups increased in the following order: teenagersdermal contact>inhalation. PMID:27128506

  13. Trace analysis of oil-in-water by using visible LED and metal waveguide capillary.

    PubMed

    Bai, Min; Huang, Hui; Yu, Yan; Hao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Fan, Jianchao; Yan, Jun

    2016-06-27

    Trace analysis of oil-in-water (O/W) has wide applications in life science, industry and environmental monitoring (such as oil spilling). In this paper, with the aid of surfactant, diesel was dispersed in water as O/W emulsion, which can be detected by using visible LED and metal-waveguide-capillary (MWC). Due to the enhancement of optical-path and related light-droplet interaction in MWC, detecting diesel of a concentration as low as 2.14 ng/ml was realized with a 7cm long MWC. The detection limit was improved 125 fold compared with that of commercial spectrophotometer with 1 cm-cuvette. The detecting system features compact, low cost and high sensitivity. PMID:27410606

  14. Forensic Analysis of Cigarette Ash-Brand Determination Through Trace-metal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Groth, Anja C; Barnes, James H; Lewis, Cris; Murray, Cynthia K; Albahadily, Fakhrildeen; Jourdan, Thomas H

    2016-07-01

    The information inherent in cigarette ash in the form of trace-metal concentrations may be of use in a forensic context as it can indicate the brand from which the ash originated. This knowledge might help place suspects at crime scenes or determine how many people may have been present. To develop and test statistical models capable of classifying ash samples according to brand, commercial cigarettes procured in the U.S. and overseas were "smoked" using a peristaltic pump, mimicking the range of human smoking habits. Ash samples were digested in a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acid applying microwave digestion and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis of the elemental data showed intrinsic differences between brands. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis demonstrated that brand classification yields good sensitivity and specificity for a number of models tested. Varying smoking parameters did not impact the classification of ash samples. PMID:27364270

  15. Admicelle-mediated collection followed by flotation for the preconcentration of trace metals in fresh waters.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Yatsuya, Yosuke; Hiraide, Masataka

    2007-04-01

    Dithizone-impregnated admicelles were prepared by mixing silica particles with dithizone and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride in 0.1 mol L(-1) aqueous ammonia. The resulting admicelles were added to 1000 mL of sample solution and dispersed by stirring for 15 min. Traces of Ni(II), Cu(II), Ga(III), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Bi(III) in the solution were simultaneously incorporated into the admicelles at pH 7.5-9. With the aid of a rising stream of numerous tiny bubbles, the admicelles were floated on the solution surface and collected in a small sampling vessel by suction. The metals were desorbed from the admicelles with dilute nitric acid and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The proposed method offered a 100-fold multielement preconcentration and it was applicable to the analysis of river and pond waters. PMID:17386796

  16. Pulsed fast-thermal neutron analysis of trace heavy metals in cement

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, P.C.; Vourvopoulos, G.; Schultz, F.J.

    1998-09-01

    The application of pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) to the analysis of trace metals in cement is an extension of research already being conducted at Western Kentucky University. PFTNA elemental characterization of coal, explosives, and drugs, for example, provided techniques for the analysis of elements such as Ca, Pb, S, C, and O. Neutron activation analysis of Cd using thermal neutrons produced by nuclear reactors is a well-proven technique. The purpose of this study was to determine PFTNA`s minimum detection limit (MDL) for Pb, Cd, and Hg contained in a cemented matrix. This waste form constitutes a significant portion of the mixed low-level waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL).

  17. Excretion of stable isotopes in man: A valuable source of information on trace metal kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennessey, P.V.; Miller, L.V.; Westcott, J.E.; Kindstrand, L.; Hambidge, K.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The analysis of individual fecal samples collected for at least ten days following an oral dose of {sup 70}Zn provides data on transit time, absorption and the excretion of isotope that has been absorbed and then secreted back into the lumen of the intestine. The analysis of data from more than 80 human studies where enriched Zn stable isotopes were given orally has provided a valuable data base on Zn kinetics. A plot of enrichment in the fecal samples as a function of time reveals the average time of maximum appearance as well as the time limit needed for elimination of unabsorbed isotope. A plot of cumulative enrichment as a function of time reveals information on both absorption and secretion rate of absorbed isotope. This data base provides investigators with new information that they can use to optimize their data collection schemes and serves as a model for the study of other trace metals.

  18. Chemometric evaluation of trace metal concentrations in some nuts and seeds.

    PubMed

    Kafaoğlu, Burcu; Fisher, Andrew; Hill, Steve; Kara, Derya

    2014-01-01

    Seventeen trace metals in acid digests of nuts and seeds were determined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The data were subjected to chemometric evaluation using principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and cluster analysis (CA) in an attempt to classify the samples. Hazelnuts (raw and dry roasted), almonds (raw and dry roasted), sunflower seeds (black and white), peanuts (raw and dry roasted), cashew nuts, Brazil nuts, walnuts, chickpeas (raw and dry roasted), pumpkin seeds (raw and dry roasted), and pistachio nuts were used as samples. The samples were classified into seven groups by PCA and CA. All group members determined using PCA and CA were found by LDA to be correctly classified in the predicted groups. Interestingly, the chemometric evaluation indicated that the raw and roasted nuts are very close to each other even though some originated from different countries. PMID:25058626

  19. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, Philip R.; Meeker, Kimberley; Finnegan, David

    1990-11-01

    SO2 emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO2 emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing particle and (Li-7)OH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. HCl and HF emissions in 1983 are inferred to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt. Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Antarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in central Antarctica snow.

  20. Baseline values of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Trace Metals in the Yukon River, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, J.; McCarthy, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Yukon River drains an area of more than 800 km2 across Canada and Alaska. Sediments are deposited along the western coast of Alaska in the Bering and Chukchi Seas, and represent most of the sediment deposited in the Chukchi Sea. Suspended sediments, bed load sediments, and historical cores were collected from the last non-marine influenced stretch of the Yukon River and analyzed for the presence and quantity of trace metals, organic carbon, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). C14 dates from cores sampled from the delta region and intra-annual active river sampling from 2012-2013, show an annual flux of these materials within the context of a historical comparison. Grain size distributions of tested contaminants suggest contributions to the Chukchi Sea sediment budget.

  1. A first quantitative estimate of trace metal fluxes from Amazon river and its main tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, P. T.; Pinelli, M.; Boaventura, G. R.

    2003-05-01

    The trace metal (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, U) concentrations and temporal variabilities of the Amazon river and its main tributaries are studied on time series basis in the major tributaries of Amazon river (Negro, Madeira and Solimões Rivers) and at Obidos station on the Amazon mainsteem which represents 90% of the total discharge of Amazon river to the Ocean. Variations of river chemistry may reflect variations of the sources. The “Shield” rivers (as the Rio Negro) have typically depleted concentrations in As, Sr, Ba, Cu, and V as compared with Andean rivers. Elements such Mn and As are mainly transported by the flood flows. These elements are known to be concentrated in lateric (ferricrete) soils which represent 80% in the Amazon basin, suggesting that these elements are washed away in solution during the high discharge. Moreover, these elements can be stored in the surrounding floodplain areas (varzea) where deposition/resuspension cycles as well as the exchange rate between floodplain and mainstream channel may control at least partially the temporal variation of redox element concentrations such Mn and As. Implication on these results on the trace element flux from Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean is discussed.

  2. Identification of trace metal pollution in urban dust from kindergartens using magnetic, geochemical and lead isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zongmin; Sun, Guangyi; Bi, Xiangyang; Li, Zhonggen; Yu, Genhua

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, magnetic measurements were combined with geochemical analysis and stable Pb isotopic ratios to reveal the distribution and origination of trace metal pollutants in kindergarten dusts from a typical urban environment of Wuhan, central China. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) of magnetic properties was more prominent than those of individual metals. The magnetic susceptibility (MS) and trace metals (Zn, Pb, and Cu) in this study together with published results from other Chinese cities formed a liner relationship, suggesting that metal contaminants in Chinese urban areas had similar MS to metal ratios, which could be used as an indicator for identification of pollution sources between Chinese cities and the other Asian cities. Stable Pb isotopic ratios (1.1125-1.1734 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.4457-2.4679 for 208Pb/207Pb) in the urban dusts from Wuhan were characterized by higher 208Pb component in comparison with those from other Chinese cities. This result combined with principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that metal pollutants in the dusts were derived from industrial activities and coal combustion, whereas the traffic emissions were no longer a predominant pollution source in urban environment. Our study demonstrated that environmental magnetic methods could not only reveal the overall situation of trace metal contamination, but also prove evidence in the identification of pollution sources.

  3. Sex-associated differences in trace metals concentrations in and on the plumage of a common urban bird species.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Adrien; Federici, Pierre; Legoupi, Julie; Jacquin, Lisa; Gasparini, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas encompass both favorable and stressful conditions linked with human activities and pollution. Pollutants remain of major ecological importance for synanthropic organisms living in the city. Plumage of urban birds harbour trace metals, which can result from external deposition or from internal accumulation. External and internal plumage concentrations likely differ between specific trace metals, and may further differ between males and females because of potential sex-linked differential urban use, physiology or behaviour. Here, we measured the concentrations in four trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) in both unwashed and washed feathers of 49 male and 38 female feral pigeons (Columba livia) from Parisian agglomeration. We found that these concentrations indeed differed between unwashed and washed feathers, between males and females, and for some metals depended on the interaction between these factors. We discuss these results in the light of physiological and behavioural differences between males and females and of spatial repartition of the four trace metals in the city. PMID:26458927

  4. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; < 63 μm grain size) from 15 sampling sites of diverse environmental stresses covering Hugli River Estuary (HRE) and Sundarban Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:26581818

  5. Marine lake as in situ laboratory for studies of organic matter influence on speciation and distribution of trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlakar, Marina; Fiket, Željka; Geček, Sunčana; Cukrov, Neven; Cuculić, Vlado

    2015-07-01

    Karst marine lakes are unique marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. In this study, organic matter cycle and its impact on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated for the first time. Studied marine lake is small, isolated, shallow basin, with limited communication with the open sea. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of organic matter, dissolved and particulate (DOC, POC), and dissolved trace metals concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high DOC and POC concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers with appearance of sulfur species. Speciation modeling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and organic or inorganic phases, sulfides, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. The above is reflected in the composition of the sediments, which are, in addition to influence of karstic background and bathymetry of the basin, significantly affected by accumulation of detritus at the bottom of the Lake.

  6. Airborne Particulate Transport into the Amazon Basin - The Effect of Atmospheric Processing on Trace Metal Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Ochoa-Gonzalez, Raquel; Dong, Shuofei

    2014-05-01

    Dissolution of airborne particulate matter during atmospheric transport is an important process mobilizing nutrient trace metals from the solid phase and making nutrients readily available to remote marine and terrestrial ecosystems after atmospheric deposition. Recent work suggests that this process is accelerated through the effect of air pollution and the acidification of cloud droplets. Large urban areas surrounding the Amazon Basin have introduced vast amounts of anthropogenic air pollutants from industrial emissions and biomass burning, hence this mechanism is potentially important for the nutrient cycling in this area, affecting climate and environmental health alike. To this end in the context of the CLIM AMAZON project, we conducted studies to test the dissolution of mineral and road dust under atmospheric pollution conditions relevant to the region and we set up passive samplers to test particle matter reaching the Amazon Basin for evidence of atmospheric processing. Different mineral acids and deionized water at different pH were used. Batch leaching experiments with dust sourced from the Sahara/Sahel region were setup for 144 hours to simulate the transport time of particulate matter in the atmosphere. Trace metal solubility in mineral acids at low pH was up to five times higher than in deionized water, and approximately twice as high in hydrochloric acid compared to nitric acid. A kinetic model for the solubility in the leaching solutions was developed and it was in good agreement with the experimental data. Further work will test the effect of variable cloud compositions, determine key kinetic and thermodynamic parameters to improve atmospheric reaction models, and characterize the particulate matter collected with the passive samplers.

  7. Impact of trace metals on the water structure at the calcite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolthers, Mariette; Di Tommaso, Devis; De Leeuw, Nora

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate minerals play an important role in regulating the chemistry of aquatic environments, including the oceans, aquifers, hydrothermal systems, soils and sediments. Through mineral surface processes such as dissolution, precipitation and sorption, carbonate minerals affect the biogeochemical cycles of not only the constituent elements of carbonates, such as Ca, Mg, Fe and C, but also H, P and trace elements. Surface charging of the calcite mineral-water interface, and its reactivity towards foreign ions can be quantified using a surface structural model that includes, among others, the water structure at the interface (i.e. hydrogen bridging) [1,2] in accordance with the CD-MUSIC formalism [3]. Here we will show the impact of foreign metals such as Mg and Sr on the water structure around different surface sites present in etch pits and on growth terraces at the calcite (10-14) surface. We have performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of metal-doped calcite surfaces, using different interatomic water potentials. Results show that the local environment around the structurally distinct sites differs depending on metal presence, suggesting that metal substitutions in calcite affect its reactivity. The information obtained in this study will help in improving existing macroscopic surface model for the reactivity of calcite [2] and give more general insight in mineral surface reactivity in relation to crystal composition. [1] Wolthers, Charlet, & Van Cappellen (2008). Am. J. Sci., 308, 905-941. [2] Wolthers, Di Tommaso, Du, & de Leeuw (2012). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 15145-15157. [3] Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996) J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508.

  8. Trace metal distribution in pristine permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River delta and its hinterland, northern Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antcibor, I.; Eschenbach, A.; Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Soils are an important compartment of ecosystems and have the ability to buffer and immobilize substances of natural and anthropogenic origin to prevent their movement to other environment compartments. Predicted climatic changes together with other anthropogenic influences on Arctic terrestrial environments may affect biogeochemical processes enhancing leaching and migration of trace elements in permafrost-affected soils. This is especially important since Arctic ecosystems are considered to be highly sensitive to climatic changes as well as to chemical contamination. This study characterises background levels of trace metals in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River delta and its hinterland in northern Siberia (73.5-69.5° N), representing a remote region far from evident anthropogenic trace metal sources. Investigations on the element content of iron (Fe), arsenic (As), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), and mercury (Hg) in different soil types developed in different geological parent materials have been carried out. The highest median concentrations of Fe and Mn were observed in soils belonging to ice-rich permafrost sediments formed during the Pleistocene (ice-complex) while the highest median values of Ni, Pb and Zn were found in soils of both the ice-complex and the Holocene estuarine terrace of the Lena River delta region, as well as in the southernmost study unit of the hinterland area. Detailed observations of trace metal distribution on the micro scale showed that organic matter content, soil texture and iron-oxide contents influenced by cryogenic processes, temperature, and hydrological regimes are the most important factors determining the metal abundance in permafrost-affected soils. The observed range of trace element background concentrations was similar to trace metal levels reported for other pristine northern areas.

  9. Seagrasses as indicators for coastal trace metal pollution: a global meta-analysis serving as a benchmark, and a Caribbean case study.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; Lamers, Leon P M; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Eygensteyn, Jelle; de Brouwer, Jan H F; Hendriks, A Jan; Huijbers, Chantal M; van Katwijk, Marieke M

    2014-12-01

    Seagrass beds are highly productive coastal ecosystems providing a large array of ecosystem services including fisheries and carbon sequestration. As seagrasses are known to be highly sensitive to anthropogenic forcing, we evaluated the use of trace metal concentrations in seagrasses as bioindicators for trace metal pollution of coastal regions at both global and local scale. We carried out a meta-analysis based on literature data to provide a global benchmark list for trace metal accumulation in seagrasses, which was lacking in literature. We subsequently carried out a case study at the Caribbean islands of Curaçao and Bonaire to test for local-scale differences in trace metal concentrations in seagrasses, and internal metal allocation. The benchmark and local study show that trace metal concentrations in seagrass leaves, regardless of the species, can vary over a 100-1000-fold range, and are related to the level of anthropogenic pressure, making seagrasses highly valuable indicators. PMID:25250793

  10. Influence of soil composition on the major, minor and trace metal content of Velebit biomedical plants.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Michaela; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Požgaj, Martina; Pirkl, Raimund; Šilić, Tea; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2015-03-15

    The use of medical herbs for the treatment of many human diseases is increasing nowadays due to their mild features and low side effects. Not only for their healing properties, but also for their nutritive value supplementation of diet with various herbs is recommended. Thus also their analysis is of rising importance. While total elemental compositions are published for many common herbs, the origin of toxic as well as beneficial elements is not yet well investigated. Thus different indigenous medicinal plants, namely Croatian spruce (Picea abies), savory (Satureja montana L.), mountain yarrow (Achillea clavennae), showy calamint (Calamintha grandiflora), micromeria (Micromeria croatica), yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea) and fir (Abies alba) together with soil samples were collected in the National Park Northern Velebit. The macro- and trace elements content, after microwave digestion, was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study focuses on the one hand on essential elements and on the other hand on non-essential elements which are considered as toxic for humans, covering in total Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. PMID:25454388

  11. Mechanisms of trace metal sorption in Pseudomonas putida-birnessite assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, J.; Kwon, K. D.; Bargar, J. R.; Sposito, G.

    2012-04-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute strongly to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). The biogenic Mn(IV) oxide found in field settings, as well as that produced by model bacteria in laboratory culture, is typically layer-type hexagonal birnessite containing abundant cation vacancy sites and enmeshed in an organic matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In this talk I summarize the results from laboratory-scale research designed to investigate the mechanisms of metal sorption by the bacterial biomass-birnessite assemblages formed by Pseudomonas putida GB-1 when grown in the presence of 1 mM Mn(II) at circumneutral pH values. The goals of this research were first, to identify the structure of the surface complexes formed by trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu and Zn) on biogenic birnessite and second, to determine the conditions under which the bacterial cell surfaces and extracellular polymeric substances contribute to metal sorption. Macroscopic and spectroscopic experiments were performed at varying pH values (6 - 8) and over a wide-range of metal concentrations. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and first-principles calculations based on density functional theory showed that cation vacancy sites in birnessite drive mineral reactivity, but that surface speciation varies from metal to metal. For, Ni we identified two species, Ni bonded to three surface oxygen atoms vacancy sites as a triple-corner-sharing (TCS) complex and Ni incorporated at vacancy sites, with surface speciation varying with pH and surface loading. Zinc formed TCS complexes at vacancy sites, with the proportion of Zn in tetrahedral or octahedral coordination geometry influenced

  12. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  13. Trace metals, melanin-based pigmentation and their interaction influence immune parameters in feral pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Frantz, A

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the effects of trace metals emitted by anthropogenic activities on wildlife is of great concern in urban ecology; yet, information on how they affect individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems remains scarce. In particular, trace metals may impact survival by altering the immune system response to parasites. Plumage melanin is assumed to influence the effects of trace metals on immunity owing to its ability to bind metal ions in feathers and its synthesis being coded by a pleiotropic gene. We thus hypothesized that trace metal exposure would interact with plumage colouration in shaping immune response. We experimentally investigated the interactive effect between exposure to an environmentally relevant range of zinc and/or lead and melanin-based plumage colouration on components of the immune system in feral pigeons (Columba livia). We found that zinc increased anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) IgY primary response maintenance, buffered the negative effect of lead on anti-KLH IgY secondary response maintenance and tended to increase T-cell mediated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) skin response. Lead decreased the peak of the anti-KLH IgY secondary response. In addition, pheomelanic pigeons exhibited a higher secondary anti-KLH IgY response than did eumelanic ones. Finally, T-cell mediated PHA skin response decreased with increasing plumage eumelanin level of birds exposed to lead. Neither treatments nor plumage colouration correlated with endoparasite intensity. Overall, our study points out the effects of trace metals on some parameters of birds' immunity, independently from other confounding urbanization factors, and underlines the need to investigate their impacts on other life history traits and their consequences in the ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26809976

  14. Trace metal records of regional paleoenvironmental variability in Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous) black shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruse, A.M.; Lyons, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    Regional geochemical differences within a laterally continuous, cyclic Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous) shale in midcontinent North America are interpreted in light of models of glacioeustatic forcing and new views on water-column paleoredox stability and trace-metal behavior in black shale environments. Specifically, we characterize differences in transition metal (Fe, Mn, Mo, V, Ni, Zn, Pb and U) concentrations in black shales of the Hushpuckney Shale Member of the Swope Limestone in Iowa and equivalent black shale beds of the Coffeyville Formation in Oklahoma. Although C-S-Fe systematics and uniform 34S-depleted isotope ratios of pyrite indicate pervasive euxinic deposition (anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters) for these shales, regional variations can be inferred for the efficiency of Mo scavenging and for the rates of siliciclastic sedimentation as expressed in spatially varying Fe/Al ratios. Black shales in Iowa show Mo enrichment roughly five times greater than that observed in coeval euxinic shales in Oklahoma. By contrast, Fe/Al ratios in Oklahoma shales are as much as five times greater than the continental ratio of 0.5 observed in the over- and underlying oxic facies and in the coeval black shales in Iowa. Recent work in modern marine settings has shown that enrichments in Fe commonly result from scavenging in a euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. In contrast to Fe, the concentrations of other transition metals (Mo, V, Ni, Pb, Zn, U) are typically more enriched in the black shales in Iowa relative to Oklahoma. The transition metal trends in these Paleozoic shales are reasonably interpreted in terms of early fixation in organic-rich sediments due to euxinic water-column conditions. However, regional variations in (1) rates of siliciclastic input, (2) organic reservoirs, including relative inputs of terrestrial versus marine organic matter, and (3) additional inputs of metals to bottom waters from contemporaneous hydrothermal vents

  15. Rates of zinc and trace metal release from dissolving sphalerite at pH 2.0-4.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, M.R.; Gemery-Hill, P. A.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Taylor, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    High-Fe and low-Fe sphalerite samples were reacted under controlled pH conditions to determine nonoxidative rates of release of Zn and trace metals from the solid-phase. The release (solubilization) of trace metals from dissolving sphalerite to the aqueous phase can be characterized by a kinetic distribution coefficient, (Dtr), which is defined as [(Rtr/X(tr)Sph)/(RZn/X(Zn) Sph)], where R is the trace metal or Zn release rate, and X is the mole fraction of the trace metal or Zn in sphalerite. This coefficient describes the relationship of the sphalerite dissolution rate to the trace metal mole fraction in the solid and its aqueous concentration. The distribution was used to determine some controls on metal release during the dissolution of sphalerite. Departures from the ideal Dtr of 1.0 suggest that some trace metals may be released via different pathways or that other processes (e.g., adsorption, solubility of trace minerals such as galena) affect the observed concentration of metals. Nonoxidative sphalerite dissolution (mediated by H+) is characterized by a "fast" stage in the first 24-30 h, followed by a "slow" stage for the remainder of the reaction. Over the pH range 2.0-4.0, and for similar extent of reaction (reaction time), sphalerite composition, and surface area, the rates of release of Zn, Fe, Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb from sphalerite generally increase with lower pH. Zinc and Fe exhibit the fastest rates of release, Mn and Pb have intermediate rates of release, and Cd and Cu show the slowest rates of release. The largest variations in metal release rates occur at pH 2.0. At pH 3.0 and 4.0, release rates show less variation and appear less dependent on the metal abundance in the solid. For the same extent of reaction (100 h), rates of Zn release range from 1.53 ?? 10-11 to 5.72 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s; for Fe, the range is from 4.59 ?? 10-13 to 1.99 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s. Trace metal release rates are generally 1-5 orders of magnitude slower than the Zn or Fe rates

  16. Nutrients and trace metals in the northwestern Mediterranean under coastal upwelling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, Mohamed A.; Aminot, Alain; Kerouel, Roger

    1994-04-01

    Salinity, temperature, turbidity, nutrients and iron, manganese and copper were measured in 50 surface water samples collected from the Rhoˆne river and river plume, the Gulf of Lions and along a vertical profile in the open northwestern Mediterranean. The data obtained bring new information on the distribution of nutrients and trace metals in the northwestern Mediterranean under wind induced coastal upwelling. Persistent northwesterly winds lead to complex physical processes such as upwelling along the northwestern coast of the Gulf, local eddies and oscillating currents. These processes result in the redistribution of dissolved and particulate components, enriched in the upwelling water, throughout the water column. The effect of nutrient-enriched upwelling water on the primary production of the Gulf is expected to be of secondary importance relative to the river input. In addition to the enhanced wind transport of metal-rich continental dust, the effect of upwelling of the sub-thermocline water and particularly the nepheloid layer has been demonstrated. The behaviour of Fe, Mn and Cu in the mixed water appears to be governed by the common estuarine processes particularly the liquid-solid exchange. Great estuarine reactivity was exhibited by Cu and Mn.

  17. The fate and transport of mercury, methylmercury, and other trace metals in Chesapeake Bay tributaries.

    PubMed

    Lawson, N M; Mason, R P; Laporte, J M

    2001-02-01

    Six tributaries to the Chesapeake Bay were analyzed for suspended particulate matter, dissolved organic carbon, particulate organic carbon, mercury, methylmercury, lead, nickel, zinc, cadmium, chromium, and copper. This study examined the importance of flow regime, suspended particulate concentration, and watershed characteristics on the transport of mercury, methylmercury, and other trace metals. Total mercury concentrations were higher under high flow conditions which is consistent with the tendency of this metal to bind strongly to particulate matter. Methylmercury showed less flow rate dependence. Nickel, lead, and zinc concentrations responded strongly to flow rate on the Potomac River, while weaker correlations were found on the other rivers sampled. Cadmium, copper, and chromium concentrations were the least influenced by flow. Partition coefficients calculated in this study were similar to those of other estuaries and overall decreased in the order of Hg > Ni-MMHg > Cr-Pb-Zn > Cd > Cu. Watershed yield estimates and associated retention factors were calculated for the various rivers. These calculations showed that for most of the rivers, mercury was the most strongly retained within the watershed. PMID:11229005

  18. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    PubMed Central

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. PMID:24964404

  19. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  20. Trace metal occurrences in acid-insoluble residues of the Ordovician Galena Group, southeastern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, R.S.; Mossler, J.H.; Morey, G.B. ); Hauck, S.A. . Natural Resources Research Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Regional geochemical, studies on insoluble residues from Paleozoic carbonate rocks have become an integral part of the search for new Upper Mississippi Valley-type mineral deposits in the northern Midcontinent. The authors have extended these studies to southeastern Minnesota, an area well to the north of known lead-zinc deposits of commercial size and grade. In this region, a thin sequence of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician strata unconformably overlies a complex Precambrian basement. More than 500 samples of limestone and dolomite from 40 drill holes and outcrops were analyzed for 29 related trace elements. Preliminary interpretations are based on the analysis of 380 samples of the Ordovician Galena Group from 37 localities. Results indicate that anomalous concentrations of Pb, Cu, zn, As, Cd, and Ni are confined to the southern half of the Galena subgroup area and extend less than 30 miles north of the Iowa border. The anomalous areas, as well as saddles between the, have a distinct northwest trend, coincident with structural features previously recognized in the Precambrian basement. The spatial relationships of the anomalies and the lack of direct correlation imply deposition from fluids moving north out of the main lead-zinc district along structural pathways. The lack of significant anomalies in the northern part of the subcrop area implies northwest weakening of the forces driving the metal-bearing fluids, as well as a decrease over distance in the absolute metal content of the migrating fluids.

  1. Zn, Cd, S and trace metal bioaccumulation in willow (Salix spp.) cultivars grown hydroponically.

    PubMed

    McBride, M B; Martinez, C E; Kim, B

    2016-12-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) can be used to phytoremediate soils contaminated by Zn and Cd under certain conditions. In this study, the ability of 14 Salix cultivars to concentrate Cd, Zn and S in leaves was measured in hydroponic culture with 10 and 200 µM Cd and Zn, respectively, in the nutrient medium. The cultivars showed a wide range of biomass yields, tolerance to metals, and foliar concentrations of Zn and Cd, with some cultivars accumulating up to 1000 mg kg(-1) Zn, 70 mg kg(-1) Cd and 10,000 mg kg(-1) S with only mild phytotoxicity symptoms attributable to excess Zn. Cultivars with higher foliar Zn concentrations tended to have higher foliar Cd concentrations as well, and competition between Zn and Cd for uptake was observed. Exposure of Salix cultivars to Cd and Zn did not affect foliar concentrations of secondary metabolites such as polyphenols, but trace metal concentrations in leaves were significantly reduced (Fe and Cu) or increased (Mn) by exposure to excess Zn and Cd. Sulfur-XANES spectroscopy showed foliar S to be predominantly in highly oxidized (sulfate plus sulfonate) and reduced (thiol) forms, with oxidized S more prevalent in willows with the highest total S content. PMID:27216699

  2. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Surma, J.E.; Titus, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive ({lt}1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments ({approx_gt}500{degree}C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190{endash}690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  4. Calcite Precipitation and Trace Metal Partitioning in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone: Remediation of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides in Arid Western Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.; Colwell, F. ''Rick'' S.; Ingram, Jani C.; Ferris, F. Grant; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2000-07-19

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. Demonstrating in situ immobilization of these contaminants in vadose zones or groundwater plumes is a cost-effective remediation strategy. However, the implementation of in situ remediation requires definition of the mechanism that controls sequestration of the contaminants. One such mechanism for metals and radionuclides is co-precipitation of these elements in authigenic calcite and calcite overgrowths. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadose zones in the arid western U.S., can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of solid solutions. The rate at which trace metals are incorporated into calcite is a function of calcite precipitation kinetics, adsorption interactions between the calcite surface and the trace metal in solution, solid solution properties of the trace metal in calcite, and also the surfaces upon which the calcite is precipitating. A fundamental understanding of the coupling of calcite precipitation and trace metal partitioning and how this may occur in aquifers and vadose environments is lacking. The focus of the research proposed here is to investigate the facilitated partitioning of metal and radionuclides by their coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. Our specific research objectives include: (1) Elucidating the mechanisms and rates of microbially facilitated calcite precipitation and divalent cation adsorption/co-precipitation occurring in a natural aquifer and vadose zone perched water body as a result of the introduction of urea. (2) Assessing the effects of spatial variability in aquifer host rock and the associated hydro/biogeochemical processes on calcite precipitation rates and mineral phases within an aquifer and a vadose zone perched water body.

  5. Calcite Precipitation and Trace Metal Partitioning in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone: Remediation of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides in Arid Western Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.; Colwell, F. ''Rick'' S.; Ingram, Jani C.; Ferris, F. Grant; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2001-08-09

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. Demonstrating in situ immobilization of these contaminants in vadose zones or groundwater plumes is a cost-effective remediation strategy. However, the implementation of in situ remediation requires definition of the mechanism that controls sequestration of the contaminants. One such mechanism for metals and radionuclides is co-precipitation of these elements in authigenic calcite and calcite overgrowths. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadose zones in the arid western U.S., can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of solid solutions. The rate at which trace metals are incorporated into calcite is a function of calcite precipitation kinetics, adsorption interactions between the calcite surface and the trace metal in solution, solid solution properties of the trace metal in calcite, and also the surfaces upon which the calcite is precipitating. A fundamental understanding of the coupling of calcite precipitation and trace metal partitioning and how this may occur in aquifers and vadose environments is lacking. The focus of the research proposed here is to investigate the facilitated partitioning of metal and radionuclides by their coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. Our specific research objectives include: (1) Elucidating the mechanisms and rates of microbially facilitated calcite precipitation and divalent cation adsorption/co-precipitation occurring in a natural aquifer as a result of the introduction of urea. (2) Assessing the effects of spatial variability in aquifer host rock and the associated hydro/biogeochemical processes on calcite precipitation rates and mineral phases within an aquifer.

  6. Trace metal uptake by the grass Melinis repens from roadside soils and sediments, tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, C.; Lottermoser, B. G.

    2007-08-01

    This study reports on trace metal uptake by the grass species Melinis repens, growing in roadside soils and sediments in tropical northeastern Australia. Median total Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn concentrations were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in road edge soils (Cu = 61.1 mg/kg, Pb = 97.3 mg/kg, Ni = 28.6 mg/kg, Zn = 729 mg/kg) than in background soils collected away from roads (Cu = 5.8 mg/kg, Pb = 11.2 mg/kg, Ni = 3.7 mg/kg, Zn = 21 mg/kg). Significantly ( P < 0.05) elevated Zn values were recorded in the stems of the M. repens specimens growing on roadside soils (231.6 mg/kg dry weight of tissue) compared with those of grasses growing on background soils (40.8 mg/kg dry weight of tissue). Moreover, median Cu, Ni and Zn values in the roots of roadside grasses (Cu = 29.1 mg/kg, Ni = 2.73 mg/kg, Zn = 169 mg/kg) were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher than their respective levels in the roots of background M. repens samples (Cu = 5.98 mg/kg, Ni = 0.70 mg/kg, Zn = 22 mg/kg). A greenhouse experiment showed that Cu and Zn in road sediments are labile and are available for uptake by M. repens. The studied roadside soils and sediments were leached with a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-CaCl2-triethanolamine-HCl extraction solution, which proved to be a rudimentary indicator of Zn availability and uptake to the root tissue of M. repens. The results demonstrate that trace metals in roadside grasses have the potential to be directed up the food-chain as grasses are consumed by herbivores. In addition, bioavailable metal contaminants hosted by road sediments have the capacity to impact on ecosystems downstream of roads because these sediments are mobilised by road runoff waters from road surfaces into adjoining catchments.

  7. A new synthesis, characterization and application chelating resin for determination of some trace metals in honey samples by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Çankaya, Nevin; Soykan, Cengiz

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we developed a simple and rapid solid phase extraction (SPE) method for the separation/preconcentration and determination of some trace metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A new chelating resin, poly [2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)-2-oxoethyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid] (MPAEMA-co-DVB-co-AMPS), was synthesized and characterized. This chelating resin was used as a new adsorbent material for determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions. The parameters influential on the determination of this trace metals were examined. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits (DL) of the method for trace metals were found to be (3s) in the range of 0.9-2.2 μg L(-1) (n=21), the preconcentration factor was calculated as 200 and the relative standard deviation was obtained achieved as ⩽2% for n=11. The method was performed for the determination of trace metals in some honey samples and standard reference materials. PMID:26948616

  8. Trace metal and metalloid levels in surface water of Marcal River before and after the Ajka red mud spill, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea Szabó; Szabó, János; Vass, István

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and assess the dissolved concentrations of trace elements (As, Zn, Hg, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cu) in surface water of Marcal River before and after the red mud spill that occurred in Ajka, western Hungary, in October 2010. The caustic sludge flooded the surrounding settlements and polluted the nearby Torna Creek, which flows through the Marcal and Raba rivers into the Danube. A total of 92 surface water samples were collected from the Marcal River in the period of 2007-2012 and analysed for dissolved trace metal(loid)s by atomic absorption spectroscopy method. After the spill, the water management authority initially focused on acid dosing of surface waters to lower pH and was effective in lowering both pH and metal(loid) concentrations. Among the dissolved trace metal(loid)s, arsenic and nickel levels were moderately higher in the Marcal River 2 years since the spill compared to that observed in the pre-disaster period. The concentrations of dissolved trace metal(loid)s did not exceed the European water quality standards and the US Environmental Protection Agency aquatic life criteria values (excluding one sample for cadmium). PMID:23975713

  9. THE FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A VENTURI/PACKED COLUMN SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 5-week series of pilot-scale incineration tests, employing a synthetic waste feed, was performed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a venturi scrubber/p...

  10. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A SINGLE-STAGE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. ...

  11. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A VENTURI/PACKED COLUMN SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A five week series of pilot-scale incineration tests, using a synthetic waste feed, was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator. ight tests studied the fate of five hazardous constituent and four nonh...

  12. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A VENTURI/PACKED COLUMN SCRUBBER - VOLUME I: TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A five week series of pilot-scale incineration tests, using a synthetic waste feed, was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator. ight tests studied the fate of five hazardous constituent and four nonh...

  13. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF TRACE METALS IN FLUE GAS PARTICULATE FROM A PILOT-SCALE ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distributions of nine trace metals in flue gas particulate by particle size range were determined as part of a pilot-scale hazardous waste incineration test program. hese tests were conducted in the rotary kiln incinerator system at the U.S. EPA's Incineration Research Facili...

  14. Trace elements and heavy metals in the Grand Bay National Estuarine Reserve in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve has the highest biotic diversity of habitats and offer a reserve of food resources and commercially significant species. Rapid human civilization has led to accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in estuaries. The Grand Bay National Estuarin...

  15. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated trace metals. “Crustal” elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Ti), sulfate (S), and the rare earths present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. These major burial peaks are uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating consistency in net snow accumulation rates and transport vectors. A suite of trace elements (Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Tl, U) exhibit deposition patterns similar to that of the crustals and S. However, the burial patterns of several other elements (Cu, Sn, Zn, oxyanions) were weakly correlated with the crustals and other modes are apparent. The Hg profile exhibits summer peaks and is anti-correlated with most other elements, but is correlated with TOC. TOC and LMWA are, in general though, poorly correlated with most elements, indicating that post-depositional diagenesis may be significant for carbon. A principal component analysis identified four element clusters that appear to be consistent with deposition modalities and element geochemistry, and which explains 71% of total variance.

  16. Using stable isotope systematics and trace metals to constrain the dispersion of fish farm pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchinsky, A.; Shiel, A. E.; Price, M.; Weis, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Fish farming is a growing industry of great economic importance to coastal communities. Unfortunately, open-net fish farming is associated with the release of organic and metal pollution, which has the potential to adversely affect the coastal marine environment. The dispersion of fish farm pollution and its environmental impact are not well understood/quantified. Pollutants released by fish farms include organic products such as uneaten feed pellets and fish feces, as well as chemicals and pharmaceuticals, all of which may enter marine ecosystems. In this study, we took advantage of bioaccumulation in passive suspension feeding Manila Clams collected at varying distances from an open-net salmon farm located in the Discovery Islands of British Columbia. Measurements of stable C and N isotopes, as well as trace metal concentrations, in the clams were used to investigate the spread of pollutants by detecting the presence of fish farm waste in the clams’ diet. Lead isotopic measurements were used to identify other significant anthropogenic pollution sources, which may impact the study area. Clams located within the areal extent of waste discharged by a fish farm are expected to exhibit anomalous light stable isotope ratios and metal concentrations, reflecting the presence of pollutants accumulated directly from seawater and from their diet. Clams were collected in the Discovery Islands from three sites in the Octopus Islands, located 850 m, 2100 m and 3000 m north of the Cyrus Rocks salmon farm (near Quadra Island) and from a reference site on Penn Island. Light stable isotope ratios (δN = ~10‰, with little variation between sites, and δC from -14.5 to -17.3‰) of the clams suggest that the most distal site (i.e., 3000 m away) is most impacted by organic fish farm waste (i.e., food pellets and feces) and that contributions of organic waste actually decrease closer to the farm. Not surprisingly, the smallest contribution of organic waste was detected in clams

  17. Aboriginal Consumption of Estuarine Food Resources and Potential Implications for Health through Trace Metal Exposure; A Study in Gumbaynggirr Country, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Shaina; Sullivan, Caroline A.; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and resource use continues to be an essential aspect of life for many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. It is important for dietary sustenance, and also retains deep social, cultural and economic significance, playing a fundamental role in maintaining group cohesion, transferring cultural knowledge and affirming Indigenous identities. We surveyed approximately 20% of the Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal community of Nambucca Heads, New South Wales, Australia. This paper explores Gumbaynggirr Connection to Country and engagement in cultural practice. It quantifies fishing efforts and consumption of seafood within the community. We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%). Furthermore, 98% of participants eat seafood weekly or more frequently, up to more than once a day (24%). Survey results revealed that Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) and naturally recruited Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) continue to be important wild resources to the Gumbaynggirr community. Trace metals were measured in M. elongatus and S. glomerata samples collected by community participants in this study. Maximum levels prescribed in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code were not exceeded in the edible tissue for either species, however both species exceeded the generally expected levels for zinc and copper and S. glomerata samples exceeded the generally expected level for selenium. Furthermore the average dietary exposure to trace metals from consuming seafood was calculated for the surveyed population. Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. This process revealed that copper and selenium intake were both within the provisional tolerable weekly intake, while there is no guideline for zinc. Furthermore, participants relying heavily on wild resources from the Nambucca River estuary may exceed the provisional

  18. Aboriginal Consumption of Estuarine Food Resources and Potential Implications for Health through Trace Metal Exposure; A Study in Gumbaynggirr Country, Australia.

    PubMed

    Russell, Shaina; Sullivan, Caroline A; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and resource use continues to be an essential aspect of life for many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. It is important for dietary sustenance, and also retains deep social, cultural and economic significance, playing a fundamental role in maintaining group cohesion, transferring cultural knowledge and affirming Indigenous identities. We surveyed approximately 20% of the Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal community of Nambucca Heads, New South Wales, Australia. This paper explores Gumbaynggirr Connection to Country and engagement in cultural practice. It quantifies fishing efforts and consumption of seafood within the community. We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%). Furthermore, 98% of participants eat seafood weekly or more frequently, up to more than once a day (24%). Survey results revealed that Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) and naturally recruited Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) continue to be important wild resources to the Gumbaynggirr community. Trace metals were measured in M. elongatus and S. glomerata samples collected by community participants in this study. Maximum levels prescribed in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code were not exceeded in the edible tissue for either species, however both species exceeded the generally expected levels for zinc and copper and S. glomerata samples exceeded the generally expected level for selenium. Furthermore the average dietary exposure to trace metals from consuming seafood was calculated for the surveyed population. Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. This process revealed that copper and selenium intake were both within the provisional tolerable weekly intake, while there is no guideline for zinc. Furthermore, participants relying heavily on wild resources from the Nambucca River estuary may exceed the provisional

  19. Trace metal determinations by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis in the open Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Diether; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Radke, Ina

    1993-02-01

    The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), as a major component of its programme "Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment" (GIPME), maintains a long-standing project on "Open Ocean Baseline Studies of Trace Contaminants". Initially, the Atlantic Ocean and trace metals were selected. A first cruise with the RVMeteor to the eastern parts of the south and north Atlantic Ocean was successfully organized, in March and April 1990, from Cape Town (South Africa) to Funchal (Madeira, Portugal). Thirteen scientists from laboratories in Europe and North America participated with the first author as coordinator. Four deep-water stations in the Cape Basin, Angola Basin, Cape Verde Abyssal Plain and Seine Abyssal Plain were regularly sampled for at least 36 depths. Additional samples were taken between stations. Samples were distributed to participants and a similar number of additional laboratories. As a central part of our own contribution to the project, we determined the trace heavy metals manganese, nickel, copper, zinc and lead and the lighter selenium by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. Additional methods applied, interalia, were anodic stripping voltammetry for lead and cadmium and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for cadmium, using two different extraction procedures. For the TXRF, the pre-enrichment of the trace metals and the separation from the salt matrix were performed by complexation with sodium dibenzyldithiocarbamate and reverse-phase chromatography. Generally, very low levels of trace elements were found in filtered and unaltered water samples from these remote areas of the open Atlantic Ocean. Typical examples of the distributions of trace metal concentrations on depth profiles from the four deep-water stations as well as intercomparisons between the stations are presented.

  20. Organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, trace elements and metals in western pond turtle eggs from Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.; Beal, K.F.; Bury, R. Bruce; Goggans, R.

    2003-01-01

    With increased concern over the status of reptile populations globally, contaminant studies should be part of species evaluations. We analyzed eggs of western pond turtles from Fern Ridge Reservoir in western Oregon for 20 organochlorine (OC) pesticides or metabolites, 42 congener-specific polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 trace elements or metals. These eggs represent the first of this species analyzed. The OC pesticides and PCB residue concentrations in the western pond turtle eggs were generally low and similar to those found in eggs of snapping turtles from a remote site in Ontario, Canada. Western pond turtle eggs also contained mercury and chromium, which are metals of special concern. Although few reptilian eggs have been analyzed for metals, the 44.9 mug/g dry weight chromium in a western pond turtle egg in this study may be the highest reported in a reptilian egg. We found no significant difference in contaminant concentrations in eggs from nests in Oregon, where all turtle eggs failed to hatch compared to those where some eggs hatched. During this initial project, however, we were unable to assess fully the role of OCs, PCBs and other contaminants in the western pond turtle decline. Factors other than contaminants may be involved. In another study, snapping turtle eggs near the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin were much more contaminated with evidence reported of effects on sex differentiation and reproductive endocrine function. Egg hatchability, the only reproductive parameter monitored, may not be the most sensitive endpoint. Other endpoints, including endocrine function, deformity rates, growth rates, and sex determination need study.

  1. Lead and other trace metals in preeclampsia: A case-control study in Tehran, Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Yokoyama, Kazuhito . E-mail: kazuhito@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Ramezanzadeh, Fateme; Dahaghin, Mojgan; Sakai, Tadashi; Morita, Yoko; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Sato, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2006-02-15

    To assess the effects of environmental exposures to trace metals on the incidence of preeclampsia, concentrations of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), manganese (Mn), mercury, cadmium, cobalt and zinc in umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mother whole blood (MWB) were measured in 396 postpartum women without occupational exposure to metals in Tehran, Iran, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mother's ages ranged from 15 to 49 (mean 27) years. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in 31 subjects (7.8%). Levels of Pb, Sb and Mn in UCB were significantly higher in preeclampsia cases [mean+/-SD of 4.30+/-2.49{mu}g/dl, 4.16+/-2.73 and 46.87+/-15.03{mu}g/l, respectively] than in controls [3.52+/-2.09{mu}g/dl, 3.17+/-2.68 and 40.32+/-15.19{mu}g/l, respectively] (P<0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that one unit increase in the common logarithms of UCB concentration of Pb, Sb or Mn led to increase in the risk of preeclampsia several-fold; unit risks (95% CI) were 12.96 (1.57-107.03), 6.11 (1.11-33.53) and 34.2 (1.81-648.04) for Pb, Sb and Mn, respectively (P<0.05). These findings suggest that environmental exposure to Pb, Sb and Mn may increase the risk of preeclampsia in women without occupational exposure; levels of metals in UCB to be sensitive indicators of female reproductive toxicity as compared with those in mother MWB. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings, especially on Sb and Mn.

  2. Linking trace metals and agricultural land use in volcanic soils--a multivariate approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Cruz, J V; Garcia, P

    2014-10-15

    The concern about the environmental impacts caused by agriculture intensification is growing as large amounts of nutrients and contaminants are introduced into soil ecosystems. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources extensively used for agricultural purposes, with particular physical and chemical properties that may result in possible accumulation of toxic substances, such as metals. Within this particular geological context, the present study aims to evaluate the impact of different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) in trace metal (TM) soil pollution and define the tracers for each one. Physicochemical properties and TM contents in agricultural topsoils were determined. Enrichment Factors (EF) were calculated to distinguish geogenic and anthropogenic contribution to TM contents in agricultural soils. An ensemble of multivariate statistical analyses (PCA and FDA) was performed to reduce the multidimensional space of variables and samples, thus defining a set of TM as tracers of distinct agricultural farming systems. Results show that agricultural soils have low organic matter content (<5%) compared to reference soil (>30%); in addition, electric conductivity in conventional farming soils is higher (262.3 ± 162.6 μS cm(-1)) while pH is lower (5.8 ± 0.3). Regarding metal inputs, V, Ba and Hg soil contents are mainly of geogenic origin, while Li, P, K, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd and Pb result primarily from anthropogenic inputs. Li revealed to be a tracer of agricultural pollution in conventional farming soils, whereas V allowed the discrimination of traditional farming soils. This study points to agriculture as a diffuse source of anthropogenic TM soil pollution and is the first step to identify priority chemicals affecting agricultural Andosols. PMID:25093299

  3. Geochemical processes in the Onyx River, Wright Valley, Antarctica: Major ions, nutrients, trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William J.; Stage, Brian R.; Preston, Adam; Wagers, Shannon; Shacat, Joseph; Newell, Silvia

    2005-02-01

    We present data on major ions, nutrients and trace metals in an Antarctic stream. The Onyx River is located in Wright Valley (77-32 S; 161-34 E), one of a group of ancient river and glacier-carved landforms that comprise the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The river is more than 30 km long and is the largest of the glacial meltwater streams that characterize this relatively ice-free region near the Ross Sea. The complete absence of rainfall in the region and the usually small contributions of glacially derived tributaries to the main channel make this a comparatively simple system for geochemical investigation. Moreover, the lack of human impacts, past or present, provides an increasingly rare window onto a pristine aquatic system. For all major ions and silica, we observe increasing concentrations with distance from Lake Brownworth down to the recording weir near Lake Vanda. Chemical weathering rates are unexpectedly high and may be related to the rapid dissolution of ancient carbonate deposits and to the severe physical weathering associated with the harsh Antarctic winter. Of the nutrients, nitrate and dissolved reactive phosphate appear to have quite different sources. Nitrate is enriched in waters near the Lower Wright Glacier and may ultimately be derived from stratospheric sources; while phosphate is likely to be the product of chemical weathering of valley rocks and soils. We confirm the work of earlier investigations regarding the importance of the Boulder Pavement as a nutrient sink. Dissolved Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Cd are present at nanomolar levels and, in all cases, the concentrations of these metals are lower than in average world river water. We hypothesize that metal uptake and exchange with particulate phases along the course of the river may serve as a buffer for the dissolved load. Concurrent study of these three solute classes points out significant differences in the mechanisms and sites of their removal from the Onyx River.

  4. Contamination characteristics, ecological risk and source identification of trace metals in sediments of the Le'an River (China).

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Chen, Ruihui; Teng, Yanguo; Wu, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Recognizing the pollution characteristics of trace metals in river sediments and targeting their potential sources are of key importance for proposing effective strategies to protect watershed ecosystem health. In this study, a comprehensive investigation was conducted to identify the contamination and risk characteristics of trace metals in sediments of Le'an River which is a main tributary of the largest freshwater lake in China, Poyang Lake. To attain this objective, several tools and models were considered. Geoaccumulation index and enrichment factor were used to understand the general pollution characteristic of trace metals in sediments. Discriminant analysis was applied to identify the spatial variability of sediment metals. Sediment quality guidelines and potential ecological risk index were employed for ecological risk evaluation. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least square was proposed to extract potential pollution sources, as well as the application of Monte-Carlo simulation for uncertainty analysis of source identification. Results suggested that the sediments in Le'an River were considerably polluted by the investigated trace metals (Cd, Cr, As, Hg, Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni). Sediment concentrations of these metals showed significant spatial variations. The potential ecological risk lay in high level. Comparatively speaking, the metals of Cd, Cu and Hg were likely to result in more harmful effects. Mining activities and the application of fertilizers and agrochemicals were identified as the main anthropogenic sources. To protect the ecological system of Le'an River and Poyang Lake watershed, industrial mining and agricultural activities in this area should to be strictly regulated. PMID:26685780

  5. Trace/heavy metal pollution monitoring in estuary and coastal area of Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh and implicated impacts.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Maruf; Mallick, Debbrota; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf

    2016-04-15

    Using artificial mussels (AMs), this study reports and compares time-integrated level of eleven trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, Zn) in Karnafuli River estuary and coastal area of the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh. Through this study, "hot spots" of metal pollution were identified. The results may demonstrate that the Karnafuli Estuary, and adjacent coastal area of Chittagong, Bangladesh are highly polluted by high risk metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, uranium). Agricultural, domestic and industrial wastes directly discharged into the waterways have been identified as the main causes of metal pollution in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The high level of metal pollution identified may impact on local water quality, and seafood catch, livelihoods of people and public health resulting from seafood consumption. There is a need for regular monitoring to ascertain that local water quality with respect to metal levels are within acceptable levels to safeguards both environmental health and public health. PMID:26917093

  6. Assessment of trace metal contamination in stream sediments of the Tuul River, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, B.

    2011-12-01

    Thirty four sediment samples were collected in Ulaanbaatar basin, along the Tuul River which is the main source of water for the capital city Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The catchment can be divided three parts (upper, middle, and lower) according to the extent of urbanization. The upper part of the river basin is comparatively less affected by human activity and it can be represent the natural background condition. The middle part is the urban area of Ulaanbaatar and lower part extends SW of the end of the urban area mostly used for agriculture and farming activity. The present study focused on the levels of potentially toxic metals such as As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and Cr in order to assess the extent of environmental pollution and to discuss the origin of these contaminants in sediments of the Tuul River using X-ray fluorescence analyses. Metal concentrations in the sediments are discussed by comparison with average Upper Continental Crust values (UCC) and ecological risk assessment by reference to sediment quality guidelines (SQG). The results showed thet average abundances of metals are measurable contrast between upper, middle and lower parts of the river. The Upper part and its surrounding area's sediment signature indicated that more depletion comparatively other parts (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and Cr), whereas enrichment sign did not detect. However, among the Upper part sediments, two samples (NA1 and NA2) enriched with trace metals which sampled from Nalaikh area were significantly affected by coal mining activity. Most metals are (As, Pb, Zn, Cu and Ni) higher in the middle part (within the city) than the upper and lower part due to the urban activities. The small tributaries such as Selbe, Uliastai, Gachuurt and Tolgoit were significantly affected by urban activities and highest values are detected from them. Lower part significantly enriched with Cr (av 98 ppm). Highest concentration of Cr (183 ppm) was at Shuvuu which is receiving point of domestic and industrial