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Sample records for established human breast

  1. Establishment of two new cell lines derived from human breast carcinomas with HER-2/neu amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, P.; Leibovitz, A.; Dalton, W.; Villar, H.; Kute, T.; Davis, J.; Nagle, R.; Trent, J.

    1991-01-01

    Two human cell lines (UACC-812 and 893), both containing significant amplification of the HER-2/neu gene, were established from biopsy specimens of breast carcinomas. One patient had Stage II breast carcinoma; the other had metastatic disease. Characterisation of these lines has revealed that both are highly aneuploid containing multiple clonal chromosome alterations, have doubling times near 100 h, and are oestrogen and progesterone receptor negative. Electron microscopy demonstrates that both lines contain numerous microvilli, cytoplasmic filaments, multivesicular bodies, and desmosomes. Immunoblot analysis for P-glycoprotein using the monoclonal antibody C219 was negative for both patient cell lines. These relatively rare cell lines may represent a useful model to investigate human breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1674877

  2. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. PMID:26997127

  3. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  4. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. PMID:22099158

  5. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Gulsen, Gultekin; Su, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature. PMID:26692524

  6. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  7. Immunoreactive opioid peptides in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scopsi, L.; Balslev, E.; Brünner, N.; Poulsen, H. S.; Andersen, J.; Rank, F.; Larsson, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    Opioid peptides have a variety of actions on inter alia pituitary hormone secretion and the immune system. Release of endogenous opioids has been found to stimulate growth of experimental breast cancers and opiate receptor blockers have reduced the growth of chemically induced rat breast tumors. Opioid peptides may therefore play a role in human breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinomas from 61 premenopausal women were immunocytochemically analyzed for the presence of opioid peptide immunoreactivity. Positive staining was unambiguously identified in 34 of the tumors (56%). In addition, a medullary carcinoma was positive. In a smaller series of tumors, opioid peptide immunoreactive cells were detected in both primary tumors and metastases. Positive tumor cells were usually few and scattered. Therefore, underestimates of their true frequency of occurrence are likely to have occurred, making accurate correlations with clinical behavior and estrogen receptor status difficult. No correlations with estrogen receptors were established for the unambiguously opioid peptide-positive tumors. Many of the positive tumors also stained with antibodies to gamma-endorphin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, suggesting the presence of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in them. However, peptides derived from other opioid precursors also may be present in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:2464945

  8. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  9. GSK-3 inhibition overcomes chemoresistance in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ugolkov, Andrey; Gaisina, Irina; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D; White, Kevin; Kozikowski, Alan; Jain, Sarika; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Giles, Francis; O'Halloran, Thomas; Cryns, Vincent L; Mazar, Andrew P

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is an emerging therapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that the pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 by two novel small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors, 9-ING-41 and 9-ING-87, reduced the viability of breast cancer cells but had little effect on non-tumorigenic cell growth. Moreover, treatment with 9-ING-41 enhanced the antitumor effect of irinotecan (CPT-11) against breast cancer cells in vitro. We next established two patient-derived xenograft tumor models (BC-1 and BC-2) from metastatic pleural effusions obtained from patients with progressive, chemorefractory breast cancer and demonstrated that 9-ING-41 also potentiated the effect of the chemotherapeutic drug CPT-11 in vivo, leading to regression of established BC-1 and BC-2 tumors in mice. Our results suggest that the inhibition of GSK-3 is a promising therapeutic approach to overcome chemoresistance in human breast cancer, and identify the GSK-3 inhibitor 9-ING-41 as a candidate targeted agent for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:27424289

  10. Reovirus oncolysis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kara L; Coffey, Matthew C; Hirasawa, Kensuke; Demetrick, Douglas J; Nishikawa, Sandra G; DiFrancesco, Lisa M; Strong, James E; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-20

    We have previously shown that human reovirus replication is restricted to cells with an activated Ras pathway, and that reovirus could be used as an effective oncolytic agent against human glioblastoma xenografts. This study examines in more detail the feasibility of reovirus as a therapeutic for breast cancer, a subset of cancer in which direct activating mutations in the ras proto-oncogene are rare, and yet where unregulated stimulation of Ras signaling pathways is important in the pathogenesis of the disease. We demonstrate herein the efficient lysis of breast tumor-derived cell lines by the virus, whereas normal breast cells resist infection in vitro. In vivo studies of reovirus breast cancer therapy reveal that viral administration could cause tumor regression in an MDA-MB-435S mammary fat pad model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Reovirus could also effect regression of tumors remote from the injection site in an MDA-MB-468 bilateral tumor model, raising the possibility of systemic therapy of breast cancer by the oncolytic agent. Finally, the ability of reovirus to act against primary breast tumor samples not propagated as cell lines was evaluated; we found that reovirus could indeed replicate in ex vivo surgical specimens. Overall, reovirus shows promise as a potential breast cancer therapeutic. PMID:11916487

  11. Epigenetic Effects of Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Verduci, Elvira; Banderali, Giuseppe; Barberi, Salvatore; Radaelli, Giovanni; Lops, Alessandra; Betti, Federica; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    A current aim of nutrigenetics is to personalize nutritional practices according to genetic variations that influence the way of digestion and metabolism of nutrients introduced with the diet. Nutritional epigenetics concerns knowledge about the effects of nutrients on gene expression. Nutrition in early life or in critical periods of development, may have a role in modulating gene expression, and, therefore, have later effects on health. Human breast milk is well-known for its ability in preventing several acute and chronic diseases. Indeed, breastfed children may have lower risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, and also of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity and related-disorders. Beneficial effects of human breast milk on health may be associated in part with its peculiar components, possible also via epigenetic processes. This paper discusses about presumed epigenetic effects of human breast milk and components. While evidence suggests that a direct relationship may exist of some components of human breast milk with epigenetic changes, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Studies have to be conducted to clarify the actual role of human breast milk on genetic expression, in particular when linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases, to potentially benefit the infant’s health and his later life. PMID:24763114

  12. Nondestructive testing of the human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockburn, William

    1999-03-01

    The utilization of thermal imaging in the evaluation of the human breast has been for the past two decades a highly effective form of screening for breast cancer and other breast disease. The procedure however, is not without controversy and a continuing debate concerning the competitive paradox with mammography as the gold standard in breast cancer screening/detection still exists. This paper and its accompanying oral presentation at Thermosense XXI will provide a brief historic overview of breast thermal imaging and will explore the authors concepts of the paradigm shift which needs to occur in order for breast thermal imaging to gain acceptance in the scientific, medical, and public communities. Early thermal imaging equipment sold for medical application were based on liquid crystal detector plates, or electronic low band infrared detectors. While the final output of these devices was quite colorful and impressive, they lacked the quantification necessary to accurately measure temperature from a medical perspective, and as such, many false positive findings and papers were produced which damaged the early credibility of the procedure. The author has previously suggested appropriate changes in both technology and in utilization protocol for correction of errors which have hindered the advancement and indeed, the further development and implementation of this most beneficial quantitative diagnostic tool.

  13. Effects of thyroid hormones on human breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Linda C; Salazar, Eddie P; Kane, Staci R; Liu, Nan

    2008-03-01

    The involvement of estrogens in breast cancer development and growth has been well established. However, the effects of thyroid hormones and their combined effects with estrogens are not well studied. We investigated the response of human breast cancer cells to thyroid hormone, particularly the role of T3 in mediating cell proliferation and gene expression. We demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol (E2) or triiodothyronine (T3) promoted cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines. The E2- or T3-dependent cell proliferation was suppressed by co-administration of the ER antagonist ICI. We also demonstrated that T3 could enhance the effect of E2 on cell proliferation in T47-D cells. Using an estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated luciferase assay, we determined that T3 was able to induce the activation of ERE-mediated gene expression in MCF-7 cells, although the effects were much weaker than that induced by E2. These results suggest that T3 can promote breast cancer cell proliferation and increase the effect of E2 on cell proliferation in some breast cancer cell lines and thus that T3 may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. PMID:18328691

  14. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  15. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  16. Establishment and characterization of two primary breast cancer cell lines from young Indian breast cancer patients: mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandrangi, Santhi Latha; Raju Bagadi, Sarangadhara Appala; Sinha, Navin Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Dada, Rima; Lakhanpal, Meena; Soni, Abha; Malvia, Shreshtha; Simon, Sheeba; Chintamani, Chintamani; Mohil, Ravindar Singh; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Saxena, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Two novel triple negative breast cancer cell lines, NIPBC-1 and NIPBC-2 were successfully established from primary tumors of two young breast cancer patients aged 39 and 38 years respectively, diagnosed as infiltrating duct carcinoma of breast. Characterization of these cell lines showed luminal origin with expression of epithelial specific antigen and cytokeratin 18 and presence of microfilaments and secretary vesicles, microvilli, tight junctions and desmosomes on ultra-structural analysis. Both the cell lines showed anchorage independent growth and invasion of matrigel coated membranes. Karyotype analysis showed aneuploidy, deletions and multiple rearrangements in chromosomes 7, 9, X and 11 and isochromosomes 17q in both the cell lines. P53 mutational analysis revealed no mutation in the coding region in both the cell lines; however NIPBC-2 cell line showed presence of heterozygous C/G polymorphism, g.417 C > G (NM_000546.5) resulting in Arg/Pro allele at codon 72 of exon 4. Screening for mutations in BRCA1&2 genes revealed presence of three heterozygous polymorphisms in exon 11 of BRCA1 and 2 polymorphisms in exons 11, and14 of BRCA2 gene in both the cell lines. Both the cell lines showed presence of CD 44+/24-breast cancer stem cells and capability of producing mammosphere on culture. The two triple negative breast cancer cell lines established from early onset breast tumors can serve as novel invitro models to study mechanisms underlying breast tumorigenesis in younger age group patients and also identification of new therapeutic modalities targeting cancer stem cells. PMID:24502646

  17. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  18. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  19. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  20. Florida Teacher Establishes Constitutional Right to Breast-Feed Her Baby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A kindergarten teacher in the Orange County (Florida) school system has established the constitutional right to breast-feed her baby. The author concludes that policy directives should be narrowly drawn to further important educational interests, which should result in sounder policies and reduced litigation. (WD)

  1. Establishing operational stability--developing human infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Max A; Byers, Ernest J; Stingley, Preston; Sheridan, Robert M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, Toyota has come under harsh scrutiny as a result of several recalls. These well publicized mishaps have not only done damage to Toyota's otherwise sterling reputation for quality but have also called into question the assertions from a phalanx of followers that Toyota's production system (generically referred to as TPS or Lean) is the best method by which to structure one's systems of operation. In this article, we discuss how Toyota, faced with the pressure to grow its business, did not appropriately cadence this growth with the continued development and maintenance of the process capabilities (vis a vis the development of human infrastructure) needed to adequately support that growth. We draw parallels between the pressure Toyota faced to grow its business and the pressure neurointerventional practices face to grow theirs, and offer a methodology to support that growth without sacrificing quality. PMID:21990652

  2. Isoflavones in human breast milk and other biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Franke, A A; Custer, L J; Tanaka, Y

    1998-12-01

    We established a method for using HPLC and diode-array ultraviolet scanning to quantitate soy isoflavonoids in foods and in human plasma, urine, and breast milk. The analytes occurring as glycoside conjugates were hydrolyzed enzymatically before HPLC analysis if extracted from biological matrices or were subjected to direct HPLC analysis after extraction from foods. We monitored the isoflavones daidzein, genistein, glycitein, formononetin, and biochanin-A and their mammalian metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin in human plasma, urine, and breast milk. Analytes were identified by absorbance patterns, fluorometric and electrochemical detection. and comparison with internal and external standards. In addition, we identified analytes by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after trimethylsilylation. The HPLC method was also used to measure concentrations of isoflavones and their glucoside conjugates in various soy-based infant formulas. Total isoflavone concentrations varied between 155 and 281 mg/kg. After one woman received a moderate challenge with 20 g roasted soybeans (equivalent to 37 mg isoflavones), we detected mean total isoflavone concentrations of approximately 2.0 micromol/L in plasma, 0.2 micromol/L in breast milk, and 3.0 micromol/h in urine. According to our measurements, with adjustment for body weight, isoflavonoid exposure is 4-6 times higher in infants fed soy-based formula than in adults eating a diet rich in soyfoods (approximately 30 g/d). Implications of the presented results for the potential cancer-preventing activity of isoflavones by exposing newborn infants to these phytochemicals are discussed. PMID:9848518

  3. Is human cytomegalovirus associated with breast cancer progression?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may be associated with breast cancer progression. However, the role of HCMV infection in breast cancer remains controversial. We aimed to assess whether HCMV genes (UL122 and UL83) could be detected in breast carcinomas and reinvestigated their possible association with breast cancer progression. DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues was analyzed by real-time PCR. We investigated 20 fibroadenomas and 27 primary breast carcinomas (stages II, III, and IV). Findings Two carcinomas were positive for HCMV, one was positive for two TaqMan viral detection probes, and one was positive for a sole TaqMan viral detection probe (UL83), whereas the remainder of the samples was negative. Conclusions Samples studied showed no association between HCMV infection and breast cancer progression. PMID:23557440

  4. Human breast milk provides better antioxidant capacity than infant formula.

    PubMed

    Oveisi, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Naficeh; Jannat, Behrooz; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Behfar, Abd-Ol-Azim; Jannat, Forouzandeh; Mokhtarinasab, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    Human milk contains all of the constituents that are required for the optimal growth and development of a neonate. It supports the development of brain, immune, and physiological systems. This study aimed to consider the significance of breast milk in preventing oxidative stress by comparing total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in breast and formula milk for premature infants, demonstrating the relationship between TAC in breast milk and postnatal age in days. The Ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP) method was used to spectophotometrically measure of TAC in breast and formula milk. One hundred and fourty (n = 140) lactating mothers agreed to participate in the study. TAC was also measured in two brands of formula milk (n = 80). The Range of TAC in human breast milk was 234.27-1442.31 μM and in two formula was 160.04-630.92 μM. The average TAC was significantly higher in breast milk (642.94 ± 241.23 μM) compared to formula milk (280.986 ± 100.34 μM) p < 0.0001. The TAC of breast milk was increased with some nutritional parameter such as increased consumption of cheese, vegetables, fruits, bread and nuts. Infants' height at the birthday was directly correlated with antioxidant capacity of breast milk, whilst a reversed correlation was observed between TAC in breast milk and infant age. Based on our results, it is concluded that the TAC of breast milk is varied and affected by nutrition. It is alo observed that TAC is significantly higher in breast milk than formula, which means that breast milk provides better antioxidant potency than infant formula. PMID:24381611

  5. Nodal signaling promotes a tumorigenic phenotype in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirsammer, Gina; Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V; Gilgur, Alina; Hyser, Matthew; Atkinson, Janis; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2014-12-01

    The Ras-ERK pathway is deregulated in approximately a third of human cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin. In aggressive, triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers, most tumors display increased MEK and ERK phosphorylation and exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of Kras or EGFR mutant tumors; however, Ras family genetic mutations are uncommon in triple-negative breast cancer and EGFR mutations account for only a subset of these tumors. Therefore, the upstream events that activate MAPK signaling and promote tumor aggression in triple-negative breast cancers remain poorly defined. We have previously shown that a secreted TGF-β family signaling ligand, Nodal, is expressed in breast cancer in correlation with disease progression. Here we highlight key findings demonstrating that Nodal is required in aggressive human breast cancer cells to activate ERK signaling and downstream tumorigenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental knockdown of Nodal signaling downregulates ERK activity, resulting in loss of c-myc, upregulation of p27, G1 cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and decreased tumorigenicity. The data suggest that ERK activation by Nodal signaling regulates c-myc and p27 proteins post-translationally and that this cascade is essential for aggressive breast tumor behavior in vivo. As the MAPK pathway is an important target for treating triple-negative breast cancers, upstream Nodal signaling may represent a promising target for breast cancer diagnosis and combined therapies aimed at blocking ERK pathway activation. PMID:25073112

  6. Nodal signaling promotes a tumorigenic phenotype in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirsammer, Gina; Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V.; Gilgur, Alina; Hyser, Matthew; Atkinson, Janis; Kirschmann, Dawn A.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-ERK pathway is deregulated in approximately a third of human cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin. In aggressive, triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers, most tumors display increased MEK and ERK phosphorylation and exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of Kras or EGFR mutant tumors; however, Ras family genetic mutations are uncommon in triple-negative breast cancer and EGFR mutations account for only a subset of these tumors. Therefore, the upstream events that activate MAPK signaling and promote tumor aggression in triple-negative breast cancers remain poorly defined. We have previously shown that a secreted TGF-β family signaling ligand, Nodal, is expressed in breast cancer in correlation with disease progression. Here we highlight key findings demonstrating that Nodal is required in aggressive human breast cancer cells to activate ERK signaling and downstream tumorigenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental knockdown of Nodal signaling downregulates ERK activity, resulting in loss of c-myc, upregulation of p27, G1 cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and decreased tumorigenicity. The data suggest that ERK activation by Nodal signaling regulates c-myc and p27 proteins post-translationally and that this cascade is essential for aggressive breast tumor behavior in vivo. As the MAPK pathway is an important target for treating triple-negative breast cancers, upstream Nodal signaling may represent a promising target for breast cancer diagnosis and combined therapies aimed at blocking ERK pathway activation. PMID:25073112

  7. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  8. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices. PMID:25689794

  9. No evidence for TSLP pathway activity in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Sadacca, Benjamin; Reyal, Fabien; Zollinger, Raphaël; Michea, Paula; Sirven, Philémon; Pattarini, Lucia; Martínez-Cingolani, Carolina; Guillot-Delost, Maude; Nicolas, André; Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Soumelis, Vassili

    2016-08-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that primes dendritic cells for Th2 induction. It has been implicated in different types of allergic diseases. Recent work suggested that TSLP could play an important role in the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression, in particular in breast cancer. In this study we systematically assessed the production of TSLP at the mRNA and protein levels in several human breast cancer cell lines, large-scale public transcriptomics data sets, and primary human breast tumors. We found that TSLP production was marginal, and concerned less than 10% of the tumors, with very low mRNA and protein levels. In most cases TSLP was undetectable and found to be expressed at lower levels in breast cancer as compared to normal breast tissue. Last, we could not detect any functional TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression neither on hematopoietic cells nor on stromal cells within the primary tumor microenvironment. We conclude that TSLP-TSLPR pathway activity is not significantly detected within human breast cancer. Taken together, these observations do not support TSLP targeting in breast cancer. PMID:27622057

  10. Human papillomavirus and breast cancer in Iran: a meta- analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Mousavi, Tahoora; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer using meta- analysis. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified reviewing the national and international databases. We also increased the search sensitivity by investigating the references as well as interview with research centers and experts. Finally, quality assessment and implementation of inclusion/exclusion criteria determined the eligible articles for meta-analysis. Based on the heterogeneity observed among the results of the primary studies, random effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence of HPV infection and also pooled odds ratio between HPV and developing breast cancer using Stata SE V. 11 software. Results: This meta- analysis included 11 primary studies investigating the HPV infection prevalence among 1539 Iranian women. Pooled prevalence (95% confidence interval) of HPV infection among Iranian women with breast cancer was estimated as of 23.6% (6.7- 40.5), while, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between HPV infection and developing breast cancer was estimated as of 5.7% (0.7- 46.8). Conclusion: This meta- analysis showed a high prevalence of HPV infection among women with breast cancer. We also found that the odds of developing breast cancer among women with breast cancer was more than that of women without breast cancer. PMID:27114791

  11. Adiponectin mediates antiproliferative and apoptotic responses in human MCF7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dieudonne, Marie-Noelle; Bussiere, Marianne; Dos Santos, Esther; Leneveu, Marie-Christine; Giudicelli, Yves . E-mail: biochip@wanadoo.fr; Pecquery, Rene

    2006-06-23

    It is well established that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer and that blood levels of adiponectin, a hormone mainly secreted by white adipocytes, are inversely correlated with the body fat mass. As adiponectin elicits anti-proliferative effects in some cell types, we tested the hypothesis that adiponectin could influence human breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth. Here we show that MCF-7 cells express adiponectin receptors and respond to human recombinant adiponectin by reducing their growth, AMPkinase activation, and p42/p44 MAPkinase inactivation. Further, we demonstrate that the anti-proliferative effect of adiponectin involves activation of cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle. These findings suggest that adiponectin could act in vivo as a paracrine/endocrine growth inhibitor towards mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, adipose adiponectin production being strongly reduced in obesity, this study may help to explain why obesity is a risk factor of developing breast cancers.

  12. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  13. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances. PMID:18809466

  14. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  15. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  16. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  17. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  18. Reliable Establishment of Human Sarcoma Xenografts in the Nude Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tinkey, Peggy T.; Milas, Mira

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. The ability to establish consistent human tumor xenografts in experimental animals is a crucial part of preclinical investigations.The goal of this study was to develop a method of establishing a human tumor xenograft in the leg of a nude rat for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatments of human extremity sarcoma. Methods and results. Initial attempts to produce sarcoma nodules by subcutaneous injection of a human leiomyosarcoma tumor cell suspension (SKLMS-1) resulted in tumor nodule formation in only four of 10 sites (40%).The xenograft method was modified to include younger nude rats of a different source and substrain (HSD:rnu/rnu, 5–9 weeks old), treated with 500 cGy whole-body irradiation, and the transplantation of tumor cells or small tumor fragments which had been embedded in Matrigel.These changes improved the tumor take rate per site to 52/52 (100%).Tumor nodules demonstrated rapid and progressive growth and histological features consistent with the original human sarcoma. Discussion. Successful human leiomyosarcoma establishment in these nude rats permits the investigation of sarcoma biology and treatment with surgical procedures for which a mouse model would be inadequate. In this study we identified modifications in technique which enhanced the xenografting of a leiomyosarcoma cell line in nude rats; these techniques may increase tumor take rates for other tumor types as well. PMID:18521275

  19. Gene Expression Analysis in Human Breast Cancer Associated Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dylan T.; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M. J.; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J. Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5–72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel

  20. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  1. The Oncogenic Potential of Human Cytomegalovirus and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herbein, Georges; Kumar, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading causes of cancer-related death among women. The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that originate from cells lining the milk-forming ducts of the mammary gland. Numerous articles indicate that breast tumors exhibit diverse phenotypes depending on their distinct physiopathological signatures, clinical courses, and therapeutic possibilities. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a multifaceted highly host specific betaherpesvirus that is regarded as asymptomatic or mildly pathogenic virus in immunocompetent host. HCMV may cause serious in utero infections as well as acute and chronic complications in immunocompromised individual. The involvement of HCMV in late inflammatory complications underscores its possible role in inflammatory diseases and cancer. HCMV targets a variety of cell types in vivo, including macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, stromal cells, neuronal cells, smooth muscle cells, and hepatocytes. HCMV can be detected in the milk after delivery and thereby HCMV could spread to adjacent mammary epithelial cells. HCMV also infects macrophages and induces an atypical M1/M2 phenotype, close to the tumor-associated macrophage phenotype, which is associated with the release of cytokines involved in cancer initiation or promotion and breast cancer of poor prognosis. HCMV antigens and DNA have been detected in tissue biopsies of breast cancers and elevation in serum HCMV IgG antibody levels has been reported to precede the development of breast cancer in some women. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of HCMV in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. PMID:25202681

  2. COX-2-mediated stimulation of the lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Timoshenko, A V; Chakraborty, C; Wagner, G F; Lala, P K

    2006-01-01

    Increased expression of COX-2 or VEGF-C has been correlated with progressive disease in certain cancers. Present study utilized several human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, Hs578T and MDA-MB-231, varying in COX-2 expression) as well as 10 human breast cancer specimens to examine the roles of COX-2 and prostaglandin E (EP) receptors in VEGF-C expression or secretion, and the relationship of COX-2 or VEGF-C expression to lymphangiogenesis. We found a strong correlation between COX-2 mRNA expression and VEGF-C expression or secretion levels in breast cancer cell lines and VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Expression of LYVE-1, a selective marker for lymphatic endothelium, was also positively correlated with COX-2 or VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Inhibition of VEGF-C expression and secretion in the presence of COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitors or following downregulation of COX-2 with COX-2 siRNA established a stimulatory role COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis by breast cancer cells. EP1 as well as EP4 receptor antagonists inhibited VEGF-C production indicating the roles of EP1 and EP4 in VEGF-C upregulation by endogenous PGE2. Finally, VEGF-C secretion by MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited in the presence of kinase inhibitors for Her-2/neu, Src and p38 MAPK, indicating a requirement of these kinases for VEGF-C synthesis. These results, for the first time, demonstrate a regulatory role of COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis (and thereby lymphangiogenesis) in human breast cancer, which is mediated at least in part by EP1/EP4 receptors. PMID:16570043

  3. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  4. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Yohei; Mukohyama, Junko; Nakamura, Shun-ichi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression. PMID:26712794

  5. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li-Hong; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Shu-Fen; Tong, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  6. Analysis of human breast tissues with Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Jianhong; Yu, Fan; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to study normal, benign and malignant human breast tissues. The Raman spectrum of normal breast tissue recorded with 514.5 nm line of Ar + laser excitation contains features attributed to carotenoids and lipids. The CH II bending mode near 1447 cm -1 in normal tissue shifts up to 1454 cm -1 in diseased tissues (benign and malignant). The band near 1660 cm -1 in normal tissue is narrow and sharp; whereas the band is broaden in the diseased tissues. In the region of C-H stretching mode, the 2902-/2860-cm -1 intensity ratio shows differences among normal, benign and malignant breast tissues. The ratio is the smallest in carcinoma tissue. The observed spectra differences may be used to probe breast lesion. The results show that Raman spectroscopic technique may have clinical applications.

  7. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  8. [Establishing and operating a human biobank. Ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Jahns, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Particularly in the past decade which has been marked by efforts to foster individualized/personalized medicine the need for well-characterized high-quality collections of human biological material has significantly increased. When establishing and operating a human biobank the interests and the "freedom" of biomedical research must always be weighed against the interests and rights of patients and/or donors; in this process ethical aspects should be considered systematically. In addition, the importance of quality control and quality assurance has largely increased in human biobanking, both from a scientific and even more from an ethical point of view, because donated biological materials are potentially stored for decades and (on request) might serve for currently not foreseeable biomedical research purposes. In addition, the compatibility of national human biobanks with international biobank networks becomes increasingly important. PMID:26753862

  9. Antiviral activity of purified human breast milk mucin.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; Kotwal, Girish J; Lotz, Zoë E; Tyler, Marilyn G; Abrahams, Melissa; Rodriques, Jerry; Kahn, Delawir; Mall, Anwar S

    2007-01-01

    Human breast milk is known to contain numerous biologically active components which protect breast fed infants against microbes, viruses, and toxins. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize the breast milk mucin and determine its anti-poxvirus activity. In this study human milk mucin, free of contaminant protein and of sufficient quantity for further analysis, was isolated and purified by Sepharose CL-4B gel filtration and cesiumchloride density-gradient centrifugation. Based on the criteria of size and appearance of the bands and their electrophoretic mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, Western blotting together with the amino acid analysis, it is very likely that the human breast milk mucin is MUC1. It was shown that this breast milk mucin inhibits poxvirus activity by 100% using an inhibition assay with a viral concentration of 2.4 million plaque-forming units/ml. As the milk mucin seems to aggregate poxviruses prior to their entry into host cells, it is possible that this mucin may also inhibit other enveloped viruses such as HIV from entry into host cells. PMID:17361093

  10. Zeranol stimulates proliferation and aromatase activation in human breast preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Saiyi; Liu, Shouchun; Chen, Suhua; Lin, Huajuan; Wang, Weimin; Qin, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Aromatase is a crucial enzyme for the biosynthesis of estrogens and is involved in the process of breast carcinogenesis. Concerns have been raised regarding the effects of environmental estrogens as potential regulators of aromatase expression in human breast cells. Zeranol is a non‑steroidal agent with potent estrogenic activity, which is widely used as a growth promoter for cattle in certain countries. The present study hypothesized that aromatase expression and activity may be elevated by low dose zeranol exposure, providing a source of estrogens that may stimulate cell proliferation. In the present study, primary cultured human breast preadipocytes were used as an in vitro model. The effects of zeranol on cell proliferation were measured using the MTS assay, aromatase expression levels were determined by immunocytochemical staining and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, and aromatase enzyme activity and estrogen production were analyzed using corresponding assay kits. The results demonstrated that low dose zeranol (2‑50 nM) was able to significantly promote cell proliferation, aromatase mRNA expression, aromatase activity and estrogen production in primary cultured human breast preadipocytes, thus suggesting that zeranol may act as an aromatase activator. The findings of the present study suggest that zeranol promotes breast cancer cell growth by stimulating aromatase activation and increasing estrogen biosynthesis in adipose tissue. PMID:27220457

  11. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  12. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  13. Human breast cancer invasion and aggression correlates with ECM stiffening and immune cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, Y Y; Liphardt, J; Hwang, E S; Weaver, V M

    2015-10-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  14. Significance of Heterogeneous Twist2 Expression in Human Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yubin; Zhang, Nini; Xu, Jinfei; Ding, Zhijie; Zong, Rongrong; Liu, Zuguo

    2012-01-01

    Background Twist2 (Dermo1) has been shown to mediate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote tumor invasion and even metastasis. However, the involvement of EMT in breast cancer progression is highly debated, partially due to clinical observations showing that the majority of human breast carcinoma metastases express E-cadherin and maintain their epithelial morphology. The molecular mechanism by which Twist2 participates in EMT of breast cancer in vivo remains poorly understood. Methods We examined Twist2 expression pattern in human breast carcinomas by western blot and tissue microarray, and analyzed Twist2 cellular localization by confocal microscopy, cell fractionation and other approaches. Results Twist2 expression was significantly increased in breast cancer. Cytoplasmic Twist2 positive cancer cells expressing E-cadherin on the cellular membrane were mainly located at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases, while cancer cells with nuclear Twist2 clearly showed loss of E-cadherin and were detected at the invasive front in ductal breast carcinomas. In addition, ectopically stable-expressed Twist2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Collectively, these data indicate that upregulation of cytoplasmic Twist2 is correlated with tumor histological type and tumor metastasis in human breast cancers. Conclusion The differential cellular distribution of Twist2 may be associated with tumor progression. The cytoplasmic Twist2 in cancer cells at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases contributes to the maintenance of epithelial cancer characteristics expressing E-cadherin in a noninvasive state, while the nuclear Twist2 at the cancer invasion front activates EMT to deprive epithelial property of neoplastic cells, thus facilitating invasion and metastasis. These findings suggest that heterogeneous expression of Twist2 in tumors may have a functional link to tumor progression. PMID:23133563

  15. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins. PMID:26535413

  16. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Richard; Harismendy, Olivier; Pu, Minya; Crain, Brian; Yost, Shawn; Frazer, Kelly A.; Rana, Brinda; Hasteh, Farnaz; Wallace, Anne; Parker, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal) pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC) mutations/ # total HC mutations). Methods Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48) and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value <0.01), across renal cell, testicular, and colorectal cancer. The CLS test correctly classified all validation samples but one, which it appears may have been incorrectly classified in the published data. As proof-of-concept we then applied the CLS test to two new cases of invasive synchronous bilateral breast cancer at our institution, each with one hormone receptor positive (ER+/PR+/HER2-) lobular and one triple negative ductal carcinoma. High confidence mutations were identified by exome sequencing and results were validated using deep targeted sequencing. The first tumor pair had CLS of 81% (p-value < 10–15), supporting clonality. In the second pair, no common mutations of 184 variants were validated (p-value >0.99), supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the

  17. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  18. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P.; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S.M.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Hidalgo Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  19. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miranda, Alfredo Hidalgo; Liu, Edison T

    2014-10-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  20. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  1. Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunpeng; Zhu, Changjun; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Linwei; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih Hsin

    2010-09-01

    Microtubule (MT) kinesin motor proteins orchestrate various cellular processes (e.g. mitosis, motility and organelle transportation) and have been implicated in human carcinogenesis. Kif18A, a plus-end directed MT depolymerase kinesin, regulates MT dynamics, chromosome congression and cell division. In this study, we report that Kif18A is overexpressed in human breast cancers and Kif18A overexpression is associated with tumor grade, metastasis and poor survival. Functional analyses reveal that ectopic overexpression of Kif18A results in cell multinucleation, whereas ablation of Kif18A expression significantly inhibits the proliferative capability of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Kif18A not only affects the critical mitotic function of Kif18A but also decreases cancer cell migration by stabilizing MTs at leading edges and ultimately induces anoikis of cells with inactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway. Together, our results indicate that Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human breast cancer. PMID:20595236

  2. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  3. Establishment and characterization of unique human gallbladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mila; Koike, Naoto; Yanagimoto, Go; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Kaul, Sunil; Hirano, Takashi; Emura, Fabian; Kashiwagi, Hironobu; Kawamoto, Toru; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Saijo, Kaoru; Ohno, Tadao; Miwa, Masanao; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2004-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has a dismal prognosis. Understanding the disease at the biological, genetic, molecular, cellular, and clinical level is essential for effective diagnostics and therapeutics. However, the currently established gallbladder cell lines are insufficient for better understanding and further research. The aim of our present study was to establish and characterize human gallbladder cancer cell lines. We established 5 cell lines from resected specimens of gallbladder cancers. These cell lines revealed typical tumor histopathological characteristics. We examined growth characteristics and the colony-forming ability of established cell lines in terms of their cell cycle parameters, expression of tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen; CEA, carbohydrated antigen 19-9; CA19-9, MUC-1 and c-kit) and the oncogene c-erbB2 by flow cytometer. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with specific gene probes was performed to detect changes in the gene copy numbers. Human origin of cell lines was confirmed by chromosomal analysis. Cells maintained differentiation characteristics of the original tumors. The doubling time of different cell lines varied from 30 to 96 h. All 5 cell lines formed colonies in the colony forming assays and expressed CEA, CA19-9, MUC-1 and the oncogene c-erbB2 and showed chromosomal aneuploidy. CGH analysis demonstrated gain of chromosomal region bearing SRC, RAB1, and PAP in all cell lines and hTERT in 4 cell lines. These newly established cell lines might serve as a useful model for studying the molecular pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer. Furthermore, they may serve as a model for testing new therapeutics against gallbladder cancer. These chromosomal aberrations and imbalances provide a starting point for molecular analyses of genomic regions and genes in gallbladder carcinogenesis. PMID:15067341

  4. Establishment and Characterization of Immortalized Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaixuan; Koike, Chika; Yoshida, Toshiko; Okabe, Motonori; Fathy, Moustafa; Kyo, Satoru; Kiyono, Tohru; Saito, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEs) have a low immunogenic profile and possess potent immunosuppressive properties. HAEs also have several characteristics similar to stem cells, and they are discarded after parturition. Thus, they could potentially be used in cell therapy with fewer ethical problems. HAEs have a short life, so our aim is to establish and characterize immortalized human amniotic epithelial cells (iHAEs). HAEs were introduced with viral oncogenes E6/E7 and with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to create iHAEs. These iHAEs have proliferated around 200 population doublings (PDs) for at least 12 months. High expression of stem cell markers (Oct 3/4, Nanog, Sox2, Klf4) and epithelial markers (CK5, CK18) were detected by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These iHAEs were expanded in ultra-low-attachment dishes to form spheroids similarly to epithelial stem/precursor cells. High expression of mesenchymal (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) and somatic (CD24, CD29, CD271, Nestin) stem cell markers was detected by flow cytometry. The iHAEs showed adipogenic, osteogenic, neuronal, and cardiac differentiation abilities. In conclusion, the immortalization of HAEs with the characteristics of stem cells has been established, allowing these iHAEs to become useful for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:23298399

  5. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  6. Paeonol reverses paclitaxel resistance in human breast cancer cells by regulating the expression of transgelin 2.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiangxia; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Sasa; Lu, Jun; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2014-06-15

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a first-line antineoplastic drug that is commonly used in clinical chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. However, the occurrence of drug resistance in chemotherapeutic treatment has greatly restricted its use. There is thus an urgent need to find ways of reversing paclitaxel chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. Plant-derived agents have great potential in preventing the onset of the carcinogenic process and enhancing the efficacy of mainstream antitumor drugs. Paeonol, a main compound derived from the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa, has various biological activities, and is reported to have reversal drug resistance effects. This study established a paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/PTX) and applied the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay, MTT assay, flow cytometry, transfection assay, Western blotting and the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the reversing effects of paeonol and its underlying mechanisms. It was found that transgelin 2 may mediate the resistance of MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel by up-regulating the expressions of the adenosine-triphosphate binding cassette transporter proteins, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Furthermore, the ability of paeonol to reverse paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer was confirmed, with a superior 8.2-fold reversal index. In addition, this study found that paeonol down-regulated the transgelin 2-mediated paclitaxel resistance by reducing the expressions of P-gp, MRP1, and BCRP in MCF-7/PTX cells. These results not only provide insight into the potential application of paeonol to the reversal of paclitaxel resistance, thus facilitating the sensitivity of breast cancer chemotherapy, but also highlight a potential role of transgelin 2 in the development of paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer. PMID:24680370

  7. Prevalence of human papilloma virus among women with breast cancer since 2005-2009 in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Manzouri, Leila; Salehi, Rasoul; Shariatpanahi, Shervin; rezaie, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA has been detected in breast carcinoma by different laboratorial techniques, suggesting that the virus could play a role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Materials and Methods: It was a descriptive study. Systematic random sampling was used for selecting 55 cases of breast cancer and 51 controls of benign breast lesions from the file of Seyedshohada hospital of Isfahan since 2005-2009. A total of 106 paraffin-embedded specimens were selected and HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV DNA. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 software using descriptive statistic, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Out of 55 malignant and 51 benign breast specimens, 18.2% (10) and 13.7% (7) were positive to HPV DNA, respectively (P = 0.53); 70% (7) malignant and 43% (3) benign breast specimens were positive to high-risk HPV genotypes. In malignant specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-16 (3.6%) and HPV-11 (3.6%), respectively. In benign specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-31 (3.9%) and HPV-43 (3.9%), respectively. Among malignant and benign specimens, ductal carcinoma and fibro adenoma were the most common lesions positive to different types of HPV, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the presence of HPV genome in both malignant and benign tumor tissues in women with breast lesions in Isfahan; therefore, further larger epidemiologic studies need to be analyzed to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:24627883

  8. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer. PMID:23958056

  9. Genomic signature induced by pregnancy in the human breast.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Gabriela A; Heulings, Rebecca; Mailo, Daniel A; Russo, Patricia A; Sheriff, Fathima; Russo, Irma H; Moral, Raquel; Russo, Jose

    2006-02-01

    We have postulated that the lifetime protective effect of an early pregnancy against breast cancer is due to the complete differentiation of the mammary gland characterized by a specific genomic signature imprinted by the physiological process of pregnancy. For demonstrating this hypothesis we compared the genomic profile of the epithelium and the stroma of normal breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties performed in postmenopausal parous and nulliparous women. The epithelium and the stroma were separately dissected using laser capture microdissection (LCM) and the RNA of each compartment and each sample was isolated, amplified using PCR methodology, and hybridized to cDNA glass-microarrays containing 40,000 human cDNA features. The separation of the epithelial compartment from the interlobular stroma of Lob 1 using LCM allowed us to determine that the epithelial component contained 4,828 genes that were equally expressed in both nulliparous and parous women. There were 73 known genes that included immune-modulation-, DNA repair-, programmed cell death-, chromatin remodeling- and transcription-related genes, whereas in the breast of nulliparous women there were 20 different known genes that were upregulated. Our data provide evidence that breast tissues of postmenopausal parous women express in both the epithelial and the stromal compartments numerous genes that differ significantly from those present in breast tissues of post-menopausal nulliparous women, which could be important contributors to the genomic signature induced by an early full term pregnancy. PMID:16391795

  10. Combined effects of lapatinib and bortezomib in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and activity of bortezomib against lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuandong; Niu, Xiuqing; Luo, Jianmin; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Kunwei

    2010-10-01

    Lapatinib and bortezomib are highly active against breast cancer cells. Breast cancer patients who initially respond to lapatinib may eventually manifest acquired resistance to this treatment. Thus, the identification of novel agents that may prevent or delay the development of acquired resistance to lapatinib is critical. In the current study, we show that the combination of lapatinib and bortezomib results in a synergistic growth inhibition in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and that the combination enhances apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells. Importantly, we found that the combination of lapatinib plus bortezomib more effectively blocked activation of the HER2 pathway in SK-BR-3 cells, compared with monotherapy. In addition, we established a model of acquired resistance to lapatinib by chronically challenging SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells with increasing concentrations of lapatinib. Here, we showed that bortezomib notably induced apoptosis of lapatinib-resistant SK-BR-3 pools and further inhibited HER2 signaling in the resistant cells. Taken together, the current data indicate a synergistic interaction between lapatinib and bortezomib in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of these two noncross-resistant targeted therapies. The combination of lapatinib and bortezomib may be a potentially novel approach to prevent or delay the onset of acquired resistance to lapatinib in HER2-overxpressing/estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers. PMID:20701607

  11. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Stefanie R; Sameni, Mansoureth; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F; Moin, Kamiar

    2012-12-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer.To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyper plasia(MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L,reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression. PMID:23667900

  12. Abrus agglutinin is a potent anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic agent in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Sujit K; Behera, Birendra; Nandini Das, Durgesh; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Sinha, Niharika; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Patra, Samir K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Sarkar, Siddik; Menezes, Mitchell E; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Maiti, Tapas K; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2016-07-15

    Abrus agglutinin (AGG), a plant lectin isolated from the seeds of Abrus precatorius, has documented antitumor and immunostimulatory effects in murine models. To examine possible antitumor activity against breast cancer, we established human breast tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice and intraperitoneally administered AGG. AGG inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis as confirmed by monitoring the expression of Ki-67 and CD-31, respectively. In addition, TUNEL positive cells increased in breast tumors treated with AGG suggesting that AGG mediates anti-tumorigenic activity through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. On a molecular level, AGG caused extrinsic apoptosis through ROS generation that was AKT-dependent in breast cancer cells, without affecting primary mammary epithelial cells, suggesting potential cancer specificity of this natural compound. In addition, using HUVECs, AGG inhibited expression of the pro-angiogenic factor IGFBP-2 in an AKT-dependent manner, reducing angiogenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the present results establish that AGG promotes both apoptosis and anti-angiogenic activities in human breast tumor cells, which might be exploited for treatment of breast and other cancers. PMID:26914517

  13. Establishing a Program for Individuals at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cadiz, Fernando; Kuerer, Henry M.; Puga, Julio; Camacho, Jamile; Cunill, Eduardo; Arun, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our need to create a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer development led us to research the available data on such programs. In this paper, we summarize our findings and our thinking process as we developed our own program. Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Even though there are known risk factors for breast cancer development, approximately 60% of patients with breast cancer have no known risk factor, although this situation will probably change with further research, especially in genetics. For patients with risk factors based on personal or family history, different models are available for assessing and quantifying risk. Assignment of risk levels permits tailored screening and risk reduction strategies. Potential benefits of specialized programs for women with high breast cancer risk include more cost -effective interventions as a result of patient stratification on the basis of risk; generation of valuable data to advance science; and differentiation of breast programs from other breast cancer units, which can result in increased revenue that can be directed to further improvements in patient care. Guidelines for care of patients at high risk for breast cancer are available from various groups. However, running a high-risk breast program involves much more than applying a guideline. Each high-risk program needs to be designed by its institution with consideration of local resources and country legislation, especially related to genetic issues. Development of a successful high-risk program includes identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; developing a promotion plan; choosing a risk assessment tool; defining “high risk”; and planning screening and risk reduction strategies for the specific population served by the program. The information in this article may be useful for other institutions considering creation of programs for patients with high breast cancer risk. PMID:23833688

  14. Establishing a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cadiz, Fernando; Kuerer, Henry M; Puga, Julio; Camacho, Jamile; Cunill, Eduardo; Arun, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our need to create a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer development led us to research the available data on such programs. In this paper, we summarize our findings and our thinking process as we developed our own program. Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Even though there are known risk factors for breast cancer development, approximately 60% of patients with breast cancer have no known risk factor, although this situation will probably change with further research, especially in genetics. For patients with risk factors based on personal or family history, different models are available for assessing and quantifying risk. Assignment of risk levels permits tailored screening and risk reduction strategies. Potential benefits of specialized programs for women with high breast cancer risk include more cost -effective interventions as a result of patient stratification on the basis of risk; generation of valuable data to advance science; and differentiation of breast programs from other breast cancer units, which can result in increased revenue that can be directed to further improvements in patient care. Guidelines for care of patients at high risk for breast cancer are available from various groups. However, running a high-risk breast program involves much more than applying a guideline. Each high-risk program needs to be designed by its institution with consideration of local resources and country legislation, especially related to genetic issues. Development of a successful high-risk program includes identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; developing a promotion plan; choosing a risk assessment tool; defining "high risk"; and planning screening and risk reduction strategies for the specific population served by the program. The information in this article may be useful for other institutions considering creation of programs for patients with high breast cancer risk. PMID:23833688

  15. Subtractive transcriptomics : establishing polarity drives human endothelial morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D. A.; Zhang, W.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Buell, M. E.; Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2006-04-15

    Although investigations of mature normal and tumor-derived capillaries have resulted in characterization of these structures at the phenotypic level, less is known regarding the initial molecular cues for cellular assembly of endothelial cells into human capillaries. Here, we employ a novel combination of microenvironmental manipulation and microarray data filtration over narrowly delineated temporal data series to identify the morphogenesis component apart from the proliferation component, as pooled human microvascular-derived endothelial cells are induced to form capillary-like structures in vitro in a murine tumor-derived matrix. The 217 morphogenesis-specific genes identified using this subtractive transcriptomics approach are mostly independent of the angiogenic proteins currently used as therapeutic targets for aberrant angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate 20% of these transcripts. Immunofluorescent analysis of proliferating and tube-forming cells validates at the protein level the morphogenesis-specific expression pattern of 16 of the 217 gene products identified. The transcripts that are selectively up-regulated in tube-forming endothelial cells reveal a temporal expression pattern of genes primarily associated with intracellular trafficking, guided migration, cytoskeletal reorganization, cellular adhesion, and proliferation inhibition. These data show that a sequential upregulation of genes that establish and maintain polarity occurs during migration and morphogenesis of in vitro human endothelial cells undergoing tubulogenesis; some of which may well be effective as novel antiangiogenic drug targets.

  16. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Le; Serra, Stefano; Law, Calvin; Wei, Alice; Stockley, Tracy L; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are increasing in incidence yet the cause of these tumors remains unknown. Familial associations have shed light on the genetic basis of some of these tumors, but sporadic tumors seem to have primarily epigenetic dysregulation. The rarity of cell lines and animal models has been a barrier to studies of treatment modalities. We set out to develop a xenograft model of gastrointestinal NETs. Primary human NETs were collected at the time of surgery under sterile conditions and xenografted into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was measured and when tumors reached 1500 mm(3), they were excised and half was re-xenografted through multiple generations. The other half was bisected; a part was frozen and a part was fixed for morphologic and immunohistochemical characterization as well as molecular validation of fidelity of a successful xenograft. Of 106 human NETs, seven were successfully engrafted of which only one tumor was successfully propagated for eight passages. Two years later, the tumor retains its neuroendocrine features and similarity to the original primary human tumor. It has retained expression of keratin as well as chromogranin A reactivity. The establishment of a NET xenograft provides a model for further study of the biological behavior of these tumors and can be used to examine the in vivo effects of various medical and targeted radiotherapeutic agents on tumor growth. PMID:27067082

  17. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  18. Establishing an immortalized human osteoprecursor cell line: OPC1.

    PubMed

    Winn, S R; Randolph, G; Uludag, H; Wong, S C; Hair, G A; Hollinger, J O

    1999-10-01

    The present studies evaluated the feasibility of establishing a conditionally immortalized osteoprecursor cell line derived from human fetal bone tissue. Primary cultures were transfected with a plasmid in which the Mx-1 promoter drives the expression of SV40 T-antigen when activated by human A/D interferon. Several neomycin (G418)-resistant colonies were characterized for cell growth and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity. The clone, designated OPC1 (osteoblastic precursor cell line 1), which exhibited the highest ALP enzyme activity at passage 10 (P10), was selected for additional osteogenic phenotypic characterization. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) phenotyping revealed abundant mRNA for osteocalcin (OC), osteonectin (ON), osteopontin (OP), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHr), ALP, and procollagen type I (ProI). In addition, the levels of quantitative RT-PCR product of ON, OP, PTHr, and ProI mRNAs exhibited a marked up-regulation when maintained in medium containing an osteogenic supplement (OS). The ability to stimulate osteogenic differentiation was characterized in postconfluent OPC1 cells maintained in tissue culture medium supplemented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) either with or without an OS. All treatment groups exhibited a striking up-regulation of ALP enzyme activity that coincided with ALP histochemical observations. Postconfluent cells also exhibited the ability to form mineralized nodules under all treatments (confirmed by von Kossa histochemical staining and calcium deposition). An enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA) was utilized to measure intact human OC from the OPC1 line under the various treatments. Abundant OC was evident in the tissue culture medium indicating de novo sythesis and release from the OPC1 line under appropriate conditions. The clonal human-derived OPC1 line represents a homogeneous osteogenic cell line that not only has maintained a consistent bone phenotype from P

  19. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    PubMed

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  20. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  1. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve. PMID:26473610

  2. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve. PMID:26473610

  3. Function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) mediate the activation of the Ras signaling pathway that is over activated in many human cancers. The RasGRP3, an activator of H-Ras and R-Ras protein exerts oncogenic effects and the overexpression of the protein is observed in numerous malignant cancer types. Here, we investigated the putative alteration of expression and potential function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer. Methods The RasGRP3 and phosphoRasGRP3 expressions were examined in human invasive ductal adenocarcinoma derived samples and cell lines (BT-474, JIMT-1, MCF7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-453, T-47D) both in mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (Western blot; immunohistochemistry) levels. To explore the biological function of the protein, RasGRP3 knockdown cultures were established. To assess the role of RasGRP3 in the viability of cells, annexin-V/PI staining and MitoProbe™ DilC1 (5) assay were performed. To clarify the function of the protein in cell proliferation and in the development of chemotherapeutic resistance, CyQuant assay was performed. To observe the RasGRP3 function in tumor formation, the Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model was used. To investigate the role of the protein in Ras-related signaling Q-PCR and Western blot experiments were performed. Results RasGRP3 expression was elevated in human breast tumor tissue samples as well as in multiple human breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of RasGRP3 expression in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis in MCF7 cells, and sensitized T-47D cells to the action of drugs Tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin). Gene silencing of RasGRP3 reduced tumor formation in mouse xenografts as well. Inhibition of RasGRP3 expression also reduced Akt, ERK1/2 and estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation downstream from IGF-I insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation confirming the functional

  4. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  5. Dysregulated expression of adamalysin-thrombospondin genes in human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sarah; Scott, Stuart D; Sassoon, Elaine M; Williams, Mark R; Jones, J Louise; Girling, Anne C; Ball, Richard Y; Edwards, Dylan R

    2004-04-01

    The adamalysin-thrombospondin (ADAMTS) proteinases are a relatively newly described branch of the metzincin family that contain metalloproteinase, disintegrin, and thrombospondin motifs. They have been implicated in various cellular events, including cleavage of proteoglycans, extracellular matrix degradation, inhibition of angiogenesis, gonadal development, and organogenesis. However, in many cases, their normal physiological roles and their potential for dysregulation in malignancy remain to be established. The expression profile of ADAMTS1-20 in human breast carcinoma was undertaken by real-time PCR using RNA isolated from malignant tumors, nonneoplastic mammary tissue, and breast cancer cell lines to identify altered regulation that may have potential pathogenetic and prognostic significance. Our studies show that seven of the ADAMTS genes (ADAMTS1, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 18) are consistently down-regulated in breast carcinomas with respect to nonneoplastic mammary tissue, irrespective of the heterogeneity of the samples and the tumor type or grade (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001 for each gene). Conversely, ADAMTS4, 6, 14, and 20 are consistently up-regulated in breast carcinomas (P = 0.005, P < 0.0001, P = 0.003, and P = 0.001, respectively). ADAMTS2, 7, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, and 19 show no significant difference between the sample types. ADAMTS1, 2, 7, 8, 10, and 12 are expressed predominantly in stromal fibroblasts. ADAMTS3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 13-20 inclusive are expressed predominantly in myoepithelial cells; all appear to be relatively poorly expressed in luminal epithelial cells. ADAMTS15 has emerged as being an independent predictor of survival, with RNA expression levels significantly lower (P = 0.007) in grade 3 breast carcinoma compared with grade 1 and 2 breast carcinoma. PMID:15073121

  6. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Methods Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Results Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Conclusions Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic targets. Furthermore, dogs

  7. [Establishment and biological characterization of human medulloblastoma cell lines].

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Shimizu, K; Tamura, K; Okamoto, Y; Matsui, Y; Moriuchi, S; Park, K; Mabuchi, E; Yamamoto, K; Hayakawa, T

    1989-07-01

    Two cell lines of human medulloblastoma (ONS-76 and ONS-81) were established, and their biological characteristics were investigated. The cell line, ONS-76, was established from a tumor specimens obtained from a large cerebellar tumor of a 2-year-old girl. The pathological diagnosis was a typical medulloblastoma. The other cell line, ONS-81, was derived from a metastatic tumor in right frontal lobe of a 9-year-old girl. The tumor specimens were minced into fragments approximately 1 mm in diameter and cultured in plastic culture flasks in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated fetal calf serum (FCS) and 50% patients serum. The cells growing as a monolayer were subcultured in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FCS and initially with L-glutamine, sodium pyruvate, and nonessential amino acid. Microscopically, both cultured cells exhibited various morphological appearances, and this morphological heterogeneity seemed to be specific for medulloblastoma cells. The in vitro population doubling time of ONS-76 and ONS-81 were 18.6 and 19.2 hr, respectively. The ONS-76 and ONS-81 cells formed subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as serial transplantable xenograft, and these tumors had a microscopic appearance similar to that of the original medulloblastoma. Ultrastructurally++, the cultured cells showed primitive, undifferentiated appearance, and no neuronal or glial structures were not seen. Immunohistochemical studies showed that both cells expressed neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and neurofilament protein (NFP 200 K, 145 K), but glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S-100 protein were not detected. The NFP immunoreactivities of both cultured cells were demonstrated as abnormal perinuclear deposits.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2818910

  8. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes. PMID:26099605

  9. Modeling of response to endocrine therapy in a panel of human luminal breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cottu, P; Marangoni, E; Assayag, F; de Cremoux, P; Vincent-Salomon, A; Guyader, Ch; de Plater, L; Elbaz, C; Karboul, N; Fontaine, J J; Chateau-Joubert, S; Boudou-Rouquette, P; Alran, S; Dangles-Marie, V; Gentien, D; Poupon, M-F; Decaudin, D

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major complication of luminal breast cancer and studies of the biological features of hormonal resistance are limited by the lack of adequate preclinical models. The aim of this study is to establish and characterize a panel of primary human luminal breast carcinoma xenografts, and to evaluate their response to endocrine therapies. Four hundred and twenty-three tumor fragments obtained directly from patients have been grafted in the interscapular fatpad of Swiss nude mice. After stable engraftment with estradiol supplementation, xenografted tumors have been validated by conventional pathology and immunohistochemistry examination, and additional molecular studies. In vivo tumor growth and response to different endocrine treatments were evaluated. We have engrafted 423 tumors including 314 ER+ tumors, and 8 new luminal breast cancer xenografts have been obtained (2.5%). Tumor take was much lower for luminal tumors than for non-luminal tumors (2.5 vs. 24.7%, P < 0.0001), and was associated with two independent criteria, i.e., ER status (P < 0.0001) and a high grade tumor (P = 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses performed on patient's tumors and xenografts showed striking similarities in the tumor morphology as well as in the expression level of ER, PR, and HER2. Response to hormone therapy, evaluated in 6 luminal models, showed different sensitivities, thus exhibiting heterogeneity similar to what is observed in the clinic. We have established a panel of primary human luminal breast cancer xenografts, recapitulating the biological and clinical behaviors of patient tumors, and therefore suitable for further preclinical experiments. PMID:22002565

  10. A comparative study of canine and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, L N

    1979-01-01

    The incidence of mammary tumours in the bitch is probably three times as great as in women. While many of these tumours are mixed mammary tumours about one-third are carcinomas which resemble human breast carcinomas. Allowing for differences in life span, the age at onset is similar in both species. The World Health Organization classification of tumours and dysplasias of the canine mammary gland follows as far as possible the WHO classification for human breast tumours. Clinical staging of canine mammary tumours has now been completed. Some prognostic factors are similar in both species but regional lymph node metastasis does not seem to be of major importance in the bitch; mitotic activity may also not be as important as in women. Metastatic spread is broadly similar in both species except that involvement of the liver and skeleton is not as common in the bitch as in women. In older normal Beagles hyperplastic and neoplastic nodules commonly appear in the mammary gland, and they occur earlier in animals receiving large doses of progestogens. This has produced problems for the drug industry when conducting long-term carcinogenicity tests on progestogens present in the human contraceptive pill. Despite considerable endocrinological differences between the two species, oophorectomy is sparing for breast cancer in both. As in women, oestrogen and progesterone receptors have been detected in mammary carcinomas in bitches. Canine tumours can be grown in tissue culture but cloned cell lines have not yet been obtained. Transplantation can be made into nude mice and immunosuppressed neonatal dogs. The prognosis following mastectomy for invasive tubular adenocarcinoma and invasive solid carcinoma in the bitch is poor and these histological types make the best models for breast cancer in women. International trials are planned using chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy following mastectomy and, as results can be obtained within 3 years of commencement, it is expected that

  11. Persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk from Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shinsuke; Kunisue, Tatsuya

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we concisely reviewed the contamination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in human breast milk collected from Asian countries such as Japan, China, Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, and Indonesia during 1999-2003. Dioxins, PCBs, CHLs in Japanese, and DDTs in Vietnamese, Chinese, Cambodian, Malaysian, and HCHs in Chinese, Indian, and HCB in Chinese breast milk were predominant. In India, levels of dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) in the mothers living around the open dumping site were notably higher than those from the reference site and other Asian developing countries, indicating that significant pollution sources of DRCs are present in the dumping site of India and the residents there have been exposed to relatively higher levels of these contaminants possibly via bovine milk. PMID:16949712

  12. [Establishment and identification of the near-infrared fluorescence labeled exosomes in breast cancer cell lines].

    PubMed

    Li, Taiming; Lan, Wenjun; Huang, Can; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Exosomes, a population of extracellular membrane vesicles of 30-100 nm in diameter, play important roles in cell biological functions, intercellular signal transduction and especially in cancer diagnosis and therapy. To better apply exosomes in mechanistic study of breast cancer signal transduction, we constructed recombinant eukaryotic expression vector expressing the near-infrared fluorescence protein and CD63 fusion protein through cloning iRFP682 gene and exosomal marker protein CD63 gene into plasmid containing the ITR of AAV. The constructed plasmids were co-transfected with helper plasmid in AAV-293 cell lines and were packaged into rAAV. After titer measurement, the recombinant plasmids were transfected into breast cancer cell lines. The cell lines that stably expressing near-infrared fluorescence protein were selected by fluorescence. Through isolation, purification and identification, we finally obtained a new biomarker: iRFP682 labeled exosomes secreted by breast cancer cell lines, which could be used in further studies of the distribution and signal transduction of exosomes in breast cancer microenvironment. PMID:27232491

  13. Cystathionine: A novel oncometabolite in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sen, Suvajit; Kawahara, Brain; Mahata, Sushil K; Tsai, Rebecca; Yoon, Alexander; Hwang, Lin; Hu-Moore, Kayla; Villanueva, Carissa; Vajihuddin, Abdulqadir; Parameshwar, Pooja; You, Michelle; Bhaskar, Divya Lakshmi; Gomez, Omar; Faull, Kym F; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we have identified cystathionine (CTH), a sulfur containing metabolite, to be selectively enriched in human breast cancer (HBC) tissues (∼50-100 pmoles/mg protein) compared with undetectable levels in normal breast tissues. The accumulation of CTH, specifically in HBC, was attributed to the overexpression of cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), its synthesizing enzyme, and the undetectable levels of its downstream metabolizing enzyme, cystathionine gamma lyase (CGL). Interestingly both CBS and CGL could not be detected in normal breast tissues. We further observed that CTH protected HBC cells against excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis. Moreover, CTH promoted both mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in HBC cells. As both the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum are key organelles regulating the onset of apoptosis, we reasoned that endogenous CTH could be contributing towards increasing the apoptotic threshold in HBC cells. An increased apoptotic threshold is a hallmark of all cancer types, including HBC, and is primarily responsible for drug resistance. Hence this study unravels one of the possible pathways that may contribute towards drug resistance in HBC. PMID:27311614

  14. Analysis of DLC-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Plaumann, Marlies; Seitz, Susanne; Frege, Renate; Estevez-Schwarz, Lope; Scherneck, Siegfried

    2003-06-01

    The chromosome region 8p12-p22 shows frequent allelic loss in many neoplasms, including breast cancer (BC). The DLC-1 gene, located on 8p21-p22, might be a candidate tumor suppressor gene in this region. To evaluate the involvement of DLC-1 in breast carcinogenesis we studied DLC-1 mRNA expression in a panel of 14 primary human BC and the corresponding normal breast cells as well as 8 BC cell lines. Low levels or absence of DLC-1 mRNA were observed in 57% of primary BC and 62.5% of BC cell lines, respectively. We could not find any correlation between DLC-1 mRNA expression and deletions at the DLC-1 locus. Transfection of the gene into DLC-1 deficient T-47D cells raised the DLC-1 mRNA level and resulted in inhibition of cell growth and reduced colony-forming capacity. Our results indicate a role of DLC-1 in BC carcinogenesis. PMID:12759748

  15. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Hieken, Tina J; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C; Knutson, Keith L; Kalari, Krishna R; Yao, Janet Z; Baddour, Larry M; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  17. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hieken, Tina J.; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C.; Knutson, Keith L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Yao, Janet Z.; Baddour, Larry M.; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  18. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  19. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    PubMed

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  20. The intersection of cancer and aging: establishing the need for breast cancer rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; Cappola, Anne R; Stricker, Carrie T; Sweeney, Carol; Norman, Sandra A

    2007-05-01

    The increasing success of treatments for common cancers has resulted in growing awareness of the unique health care needs of cancer survivors. Cancer treatments can be toxic and have long-lasting effects on health, potentially accelerating the aging process and producing associated declines in physical function. In this synthesis of the literature, we critically examine the strength of existing evidence that breast cancer diagnosis and treatment are associated with a disproportionate decline in physical function compared with the effects of living without cancer for the same number of years. There is some observational epidemiologic evidence that women treated for breast cancer report greater declines in physical function than their peers. Discerning the factors associated with such declines and their clinical significance remains to be addressed. Physiologic, psychological, and behavioral changes associated with both aging and cancer treatment are reviewed. Parallels are proposed between existing preventive and rehabilitative programs and possibilities for similar interventions aimed at preventing, reversing, or halting declines in physical function in cancer survivors. Finally, a program of research is proposed to evaluate whether there is some subset of breast cancer survivors for whom prevention or rehabilitation of functional status declines is needed, as well as development of targeted, mechanistically driven interventions. PMID:17507607

  1. Decreased Mitochondrial Mutagenesis during Transformation of Human Breast Stem Cells into Tumorigenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun Hyun; Lee, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Joon Yup; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2016-08-01

    Rare stochastic mutations may accumulate during dormancy of stem-like cells, but technical limitations in DNA sequencing have limited exploring this possibility. In this study, we employed a recently established deep-sequencing method termed Duplex Sequencing to conduct a genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial (mt) DNA mutations in a human breast stem cell model that recapitulates the sequential stages of breast carcinogenesis. Using this method, we found significant differences in mtDNA among normal stem cells, immortal/preneoplastic cells, and tumorigenic cells. Putative cancer stem-like cell (CSC) populations and mtDNA copy numbers increased as normal stem cells become tumorigenic cells. Transformed cells exhibited lower rare mutation frequencies of whole mtDNA than did normal stem cells. The predicted mtDNA rare mutation pathogenicity was significantly lower in tumorigenic cells than normal stem cells. Major rare mutation types in normal stem cells are C>T/G>A and T>C/A>G transitions, while only C>T/G>A are major types in transformed cells. We detected a total of 1,220 rare point mutations, 678 of which were unreported previously. With only one possible exception (m10342T>C), we did not find specific mutations characterizing mtDNA in human breast CSCs; rather, the mitochondrial genome of CSCs displayed an overall decrease in rare mutations. On the basis of our work, we suggest that this decrease (in particular T>C/A>G transitions), rather than the presence of specific mitochondrial mutations, may constitute an early biomarker for breast cancer detection. Our findings support the hypothesis that the mitochondrial genome is altered greatly as a result of the transformation of normal stem cells to CSCs, and that mtDNA mutation signatures may aid in delineating normal stem cells from CSCs. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4569-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197159

  2. N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids of Marine Origin and Multifocality in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Goupille, Caroline; Vildé, Anne; Arbion, Flavie; Body, Gilles; Chevalier, Stephan; Cottier, Jean Philippe; Bougnoux, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective The microenvironment of breast epithelial tissue may contribute to the clinical expression of breast cancer. Breast epithelial tissue, whether healthy or tumoral, is directly in contact with fat cells, which in turn could influence tumor multifocality. In this pilot study we investigated whether the fatty acid composition of breast adipose tissue differed according to breast cancer focality. Methods Twenty-three consecutive women presenting with non-metastatic breast cancer underwent breast-imaging procedures including Magnetic Resonance Imaging prior to treatment. Breast adipose tissue specimens were collected during breast surgery. We established a biochemical profile of adipose tissue fatty acids by gas chromatography. We assessed whether there were differences according to breast cancer focality. Results We found that decreased levels in breast adipose tissue of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, the two main polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids of marine origin, were associated with multifocality. Discussion These differences in lipid content may contribute to mechanisms through which peritumoral adipose tissue fuels breast cancer multifocality. PMID:26812254

  3. Polyamines in human breast milk for preterm and term infants.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Zamora, J; Sabater-Molina, M; Rodríguez-Palmero, M; Rivero, M; Bosch, V; Nadal, J M; Zamora, S; Larqué, E

    2013-08-28

    Maternal milk is the first source of exogenous polyamines for the newborn. Polyamines modulate gut maturation in neonates, but no studies are available on polyamine concentration in human milk of preterm babies, even though they could be important for their immature gut. The present study aimed to determine polyamine concentration in human breast milk of mothers with preterm or term infants during the first month of lactation. Human milk samples were obtained during the first month of lactation from twenty-seven mothers with preterm babies and twelve mothers with babies born at term. The polyamine concentration in human milk was quantified by HPLC. During the first month of lactation, the total polyamine concentration was significantly higher in preterm milk than in term milk samples (7590 (SD 4990) v. 4660 (SD 4830) nmol/l, respectively (P ¼ 0·034)), as well as individual polyamine concentrations. Polyamine concentration in mature milk for preterm babies was significantly higher than that in mature milk for babies at term, and a similar trend was observed in colostrum and transition human milk. The spermidine/spermine ratio was higher in transition milk in preterm v. term samples, while in mature milk, the ratio was significantly lower in preterm than in term babies. In conclusion, the polyamine concentration was significantly higher in human milk for preterm than for term infants. This and the different spermidine/spermine ratios could influence the gut development of premature babies. PMID:23286699

  4. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4+ T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy. PMID:24870377

  5. [Binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein to human breast cancer detected by tissue microarrays].

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Gao, Rui-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2010-05-01

    This study is to investigate the binding capability of lidamycin apoprotein (LDP), an enediyne-associated apoprotein of the chromoprotein antitumor antibiotic family, to human breast cancer and normal tissues, the correlation of LDP binding capability to human breast cancer tissues and the expression of tumor therapeutic targets such as VEGF and HER2. In this study, the binding capability of LDP to human breast cancer tissues was detected with tissue microarray. The correlation study of LDP binding capability to human breast tumor tissues and relevant therapeutic targets was performed on breast cancer tissue microarrays. Immunocytochemical examination was used to detect the binding capability of LDP to human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. As a result, tissue microarray showed that LDP staining of 73.2% (30/41) of breast cancer tissues was positive, whereas that of 48.3% (15/31) of the adjacent normal breast specimens was positive. The difference between the tumor and normal samples was significant (Chi2 = 4.63, P < 0.05). LDP immunoreactivity in breast cancer correlated significantly with the overexpression of VEGF and HER2 (P < 0.001 and < 0.01, r = 0.389 and 0.287, respectively). Determined with confocal immunofluorescent analysis, LDP showed the binding capability to mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells. It is demonstrated that LDP can bind to human breast cancer tissues and there is significant difference between the breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal tissues. Notably, the binding reactivity shows positive correlation with the expression of VEGF and HER2 in breast carcinoma tissues. The results imply that LDP may have a potential use as targeting drug carrier in the research and development of new anticancer therapeutics. This study may provide reference for drug combination of LDM and other therapeutic agents. PMID:20931759

  6. Bone-Targeted Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer – All Well-Established Knowledge?

    PubMed Central

    Gampenrieder, Simon P.; Rinnerthaler, Gabriel; Greil, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bone-targeted therapies like bisphosphonates (zoledronic acid or pamidronate) or denosumab are recommended in all patients with metastatic breast cancer and bone metastases, whether they are symptomatic or not. The choice between these 2 different agents, however, remains open. In this review, we critically discuss the emerging evidence for direct anti-tumor activity of bone-targeting agents, the utility of bone turnover markers for treatment decision and efficacy prediction, as well as the safety and financial aspects of bisphosphonates and denosumab. Furthermore, we provide a possible therapeutic algorithm, and present new pharmacologic agents which are being investigated for the treatment of metastatic bone disease. PMID:25759612

  7. QSAR analysis of drug excretion into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Meskin, M S; Lien, E J

    1985-09-01

    Breast feeding has increased by approximately 25% in the United States during the past decade and this trend appears to be continuing. The number of drugs available to lactating women is also growing at a rapid pace. The excretion of drugs into breast-milk presents a potential danger to infants. In spite of this, little is known about the excretion of drugs into breast-milk. The ability to predict which drugs are potential hazards would be very useful in the clinical setting. This study quantitatively correlates the human milk to plasma concentration ratio of various basic and acidic drugs (log M/P) with the square root of the molecular weight, the partition coefficient (log P) and the degree of dissociation (log U/D). For basic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both log P and log U/D. High lipophilicity favours protein binding and reduces the amount of drug available for diffusion into milk. Therefore, as log P increases, the log M/P decreases. The negative-dependence on log U/D indicates that the higher the degree of dissociation of the base in plasma, the greater the log M/P will be. This fits well with the concept of ion-trapping. A strong base is more likely to be transferred and then trapped in milk which has a lower pH than plasma. For acidic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both square root (MW) and log P. The negative-dependence on square root (MW) suggests that large molecules are less likely to be able to diffuse into the milk. A negative-dependence on log P appears to hold true for bases and acids. Log M/P decreases as log P increases. This is probably due to increased protein binding by lipophilic drugs through non-specific hydrophobic interaction with plasma protein. PMID:4066977

  8. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  9. Prostaglandin E2 production and metabolism in human breast cancer cells and breast fibroblasts. Regulation by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Schrey, M. P.; Patel, K. V.

    1995-01-01

    Malignant human breast tumours contain high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, the mechanisms controlling PGE2 production in breast cancer are unknown. This in vitro study investigates the capacity for PGE2 synthesis and metabolism in several human breast cancer cell lines and early passage human breast fibroblasts and seeks to identify potential regulatory factors which may control these pathways. Basal PGE2 production rose up to 30-fold in breast fibroblast lines on addition of exogenous arachidonic acid (10 microM), whereas no such changes were observed in six out of seven cancer cell lines, with the exception of modest increases in MDA-MB-231 cells. Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) also induced PGE2 production in breast fibroblasts in the presence of excess substrate, consistent with cyclo-oxygenase induction by the cytokine. Under these conditions only Hs578T cells and MDA-MB-231 cells demonstrated large increases in PGE2 in response to IL-1 beta or phorbol ester; no such responses were seen in MCF-7, T47-D, ZR-75-1, BT-20 or CLF-90-1 cells. In the absence of added arachidonate, bradykinin (BK) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), potentiated PGE2 production in IL-1 beta-treated fibroblasts, possibly by mobilising endogenous substrate. PGE2 also stimulated ET-1 production by breast cancer cells. In co-cultures with T47-D cells both basal and stimulated PGE2 production by breast fibroblasts was greatly reduced. This appeared to be due to metabolic inactivation by the cancer cell since T47-D cells readily converted PGE2 to 15-keto-PGE2. This apparent 15-hydroxy-PG dehydrogenase activity was stimulated by TPA and inhibited by cycloheximide. In conclusion, breast fibroblasts, particularly under the influence of inflammatory mediators, provide a potentially rich source for PGE2 production in breast tumours, whereas significant contributions from the epithelial tumour component may be restricted to cancer cells exhibiting an invasive phenotype. Metabolic inactivation by

  10. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:27001628

  11. Blockade of MUC1 expression by glycerol guaiacolate inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Colon, J; Madero-Visbal, R; Isley, B; Konduri, S D; Baker, C H

    2010-10-01

    We sought to determine whether administration of glycerol guaiacolate at an optimal biological dose inhibits human breast cancer cell growth. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with glycerol guaiacolate and the therapeutic efficacy and biological activity of this drug was investigated on breast cancer cell growth. MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of overectamized female athymic nude mice. Ten days later, animals were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of glycerol guaiacolate for six weeks. Tumor size and volume was monitored and immunohistochemistry analysis on MUC1, p21 and ki-67 was performed. Glycerol guaiacolate decreased breast cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, decreased cell migration, and caused G1 cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate inhibits MUC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and significantly increased p21 expression in human breast cancer cells as well as induced PARP cleavage. Similarly, glycerol guaiacolate inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo as well as enhanced p21 expression and decreased breast tumor cell proliferation (ki-67 expression). Collectively, our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate decreased MUC1 expression and enhanced cell growth inhibition by inducing p21 expression in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that glycerol guaiacolate may provide a novel and effective approach for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:21184665

  12. Evidence of Gene–Environment Interactions between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Established Environmental Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John L.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; The GENICA Network; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Management; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine M.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene–environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4×10−6) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1×10−4). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01–1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96–1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16–1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85–0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14–1.85) in those who drank ≥20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3×10−5), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11–1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92–1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors

  13. Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum.

    PubMed

    Barr, L; Metaxas, G; Harbach, C A J; Savoy, L A; Darbre, P D

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of five esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) were measured using HPLC-MS/MS at four serial locations across the human breast from axilla to sternum using human breast tissue collected from 40 mastectomies for primary breast cancer in England between 2005 and 2008. One or more paraben esters were quantifiable in 158/160 (99%) of the tissue samples and in 96/160 (60%) all five esters were measured. Variation was notable with respect to individual paraben esters, location within one breast and similar locations in different breasts. Overall median values in nanograms per gram tissue for the 160 tissue samples were highest for n-propylparaben [16.8 (range 0-2052.7)] and methylparaben [16.6 (range 0-5102.9)]; levels were lower for n-butylparaben [5.8 (range 0-95.4)], ethylparaben [3.4 (range 0-499.7)] and isobutylparaben 2.1 (range 0-802.9). The overall median value for total paraben was 85.5 ng g(-1) tissue (range 0-5134.5). The source of the paraben cannot be identified, but paraben was measured in the 7/40 patients who reported never having used underarm cosmetics in their lifetime. No correlations were found between paraben concentrations and age of patient (37-91 years), length of breast feeding (0-23 months), tumour location or tumour oestrogen receptor content. In view of the disproportionate incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant, paraben concentrations were compared across the four regions of the breast: n-propylparaben was found at significantly higher levels in the axilla than mid (P = 0.004 Wilcoxon matched pairs) or medial (P = 0.021 Wilcoxon matched pairs) regions (P = 0.010 Friedman ANOVA). PMID:22237600

  14. Establishment, operation and development of a donor human milk bank.

    PubMed

    Biasini, Augusto; Stella, Marcello; Malaigia, Laura; China, Mariachiara; Azzalli, Milena; Laguardia, Maria Chiara; Rizzo, Vittoria

    2013-10-01

    Human milk is very valuable in premature infant nutrition. The collection, screening, processing and distribution of donor human milk are described in this report. These activities take place in the Donor Human Milk Bank (DHMB) of the Large Romagna Area (LRA) in Italy, the development of which is also described here. Over the years, the activities of this bank, which is located in Cesena Hospital, in the center of the LRA, have developed from an informal and domestic-level activity to become a multistep controlled process designed to prevent the possibility of disease transmission. This little food-supply industry, run by a multi-disciplinary team with strict rules and diverse responsibilities, complies with the Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) system. PMID:23891355

  15. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  16. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. PMID:26335952

  17. Altered serotonin physiology in human breast cancers favors paradoxical growth and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The breast microenvironment can either retard or accelerate the events associated with progression of latent cancers. However, the actions of local physiological mediators in the context of breast cancers are poorly understood. Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical local regulator of epithelial homeostasis in the breast and other organs. Herein, we report complex alterations in the intrinsic mammary gland serotonin system of human breast cancers. Methods Serotonin biosynthetic capacity was analyzed in human breast tumor tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry for tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1). Serotonin receptors (5-HT1-7) were analyzed in human breast tumors using the Oncomine database. Serotonin receptor expression, signal transduction, and 5-HT effects on breast cancer cell phenotype were compared in non-transformed and transformed human breast cells. Results In the context of the normal mammary gland, 5-HT acts as a physiological regulator of lactation and involution, in part by favoring growth arrest and cell death. This tightly regulated 5-HT system is subverted in multiple ways in human breast cancers. Specifically, TPH1 expression undergoes a non-linear change during progression, with increased expression during malignant progression. Correspondingly, the tightly regulated pattern of 5-HT receptors becomes dysregulated in human breast cancer cells, resulting in both ectopic expression of some isoforms and suppression of others. The receptor expression change is accompanied by altered downstream signaling of 5-HT receptors in human breast cancer cells, resulting in resistance to 5-HT-induced apoptosis, and stimulated proliferation. Conclusions Our data constitutes the first report of direct involvement of 5-HT in human breast cancer. Increased 5-HT biosynthetic capacity accompanied by multiple changes in 5-HT receptor expression and signaling favor malignant progression of human breast cancer cells (for example, stimulated proliferation

  18. Antitumor effects of crocin on human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pengwei; Lin, Huan; Gu, Yuanting; Li, Lin; Guo, Hong; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    Crocin is a chemical extracted from saffron and it is the most important kind of pigment of saffron. It has been proposed as a promising candidate for cancer prevention. In this study, we investigate the growth inhibition and the apoptosis of MCF-7 cells induced by Crocin, and explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that Crocin can significantly inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, and induce their apoptosis through mitochondrial signaling pathways including the activation of Caspase-8, upregulation of Bax, the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and the release of cytochrome c. The studies showed that Crocin induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells partially through caspase-8 mediated mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, we postulate that Crocin might have cancer-preventive and cancer-therapeutic benefit for human breast cancer. PMID:26884946

  19. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C.; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B.; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Levenson, Richard M.; Lowe, John B.; Liu, Scot D.; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression employed as part of the diagnostic work-up for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI will provide new insights by integrating tissue microarchitecture with highly multiplexed protein expression patterns, and will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  20. Establishment and characterization of five new human renal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Beniers, A. J.; Peelen, W. P.; Schaafsma, H. E.; Beck, J. L.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) primary tumors were xenografted into BALB/c nu/nu mice. Five of the tumors (NU-10, NU-12, NU-20, NU-22, and NU-28) gave rise to serially transplantable tumors that were further characterized. Histology, DNA index, immunohistochemical characteristics, growth rate, and clonogenic potential were followed from primary tumor to the 5th to 15th transplant passage. Only one of the tumors (NU-20) showed remarkable instability for all tested parameters in the first five transplant passages. Histology of the other tumors was essentially the same to the histology of the primary tumors, although differences between human and host-derived vessels were apparent. DNA index values in general showed a trend toward an aneuploid character of the xenografts. Immunohistochemical analyses showed a loss of intensity of staining but a concomitant rise in the fraction of positively staining cells with antibodies against cytokeratins, vimentin, tumor-associated antigens, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Human leukocyte antigen class II antigen expression showed a loss of intensity as well as a decrease in the fraction of positive cells. Tumor doubling time was lowest in transplant passage number 0, and stable growth was noticed in transplant passages 1 through 4. Clonogenic potential of four of the lines was higher for the xenografts than for the primary tumors. The authors conclude that, on xenografting, histologic characteristics of the primary tumor are essentially conserved. Progression in the first transplant passages, however, results in tumors with a more aggressive character. Images Figure 1 PMID:1739137

  1. Pharmacokinetic interactions of breast cancer chemotherapeutics with human doxorubicin reductases.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Skarka, Adam; Havrankova, Jana; Wsol, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DTX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CYC) or tamoxifen (TMX) are combined with doxorubicin (DOX) in first-line chemotherapy regimens that are indicated for breast cancer patients. Although the efficacies of these drugs in combination treatments have been demonstrated in clinical practice, their possible interference with DOX metabolism has not been described in detail to date. In the present study, we investigated the possible interactions of human carbonyl reducing enzymes with 5-FU, PTX, DTX, CYC and TMX. First, the reducing activities of carbonyl reducing enzymes toward DOX were tested using incubations with purified recombinant enzymes. In the subsequent studies, we investigated the possible effects of the tested anticancer agents on the DOX-reducing activities of the most potent enzymes (AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1) and on the DOX metabolism driven by MCF7, HepG2 and human liver cytosols. In both of these assays, we observed that CYC and its active metabolites inhibited DOX metabolism. In the final study, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1 expression levels following exposure to the tested cytostatics in MCF7 and HepG2 cells. Consequently, no significant changes in the expression levels of tested enzymes were detected in either cell line. Based on these findings, it is feasible to presume that inhibition rather than induction plays a role in the interactions of the tested anticancer agents with DOX-reducing enzymes. In conclusion, our results describe important molecular events that occur during combination breast cancer therapies and might modulate pharmacokinetic DOX resistance and/or behaviour. PMID:25986883

  2. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  3. STAT3 Establishes an Immunosuppressive Microenvironment during the Early Stages of Breast Carcinogenesis to Promote Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laura M; Broz, Miranda L; Ranger, Jill J; Ozcelik, John; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Zuo, Dongmei; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Hallett, Michael T; Krummel, Matthew; Muller, William J

    2016-03-15

    Immunosurveillance constitutes the first step of cancer immunoediting in which developing malignant lesions are eliminated by antitumorigenic immune cells. However, the mechanisms by which neoplastic cells induce an immunosuppressive state to evade the immune response are still unclear. The transcription factor STAT3 has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis and tumor immunosuppression in advanced disease, but its involvement in early disease development has not been established. Here, we genetically ablated Stat3 in the tumor epithelia of the inducible PyVmT mammary tumor model and found that Stat3-deficient mice recapitulated the three phases of immunoediting: elimination, equilibrium, and escape. Pathologic analyses revealed that Stat3-deficient mice initially formed hyperplastic and early adenoma-like lesions that later completely regressed, thereby preventing the emergence of mammary tumors in the majority of animals. Furthermore, tumor regression was correlated with massive immune infiltration into the Stat3-deficient lesions, leading to their elimination. In a minority of animals, focal, nonmetastatic Stat3-deficient mammary tumors escaped immune surveillance after a long latency or equilibrium period. Taken together, our findings suggest that tumor epithelial expression of Stat3 plays a critical role in promoting an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment during breast tumor initiation and progression, and prompt further investigation of Stat3-inhibitory strategies that may reactivate the immunosurveillance program. PMID:26719528

  4. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  5. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  6. Establishing criteria for human mesenchymal stem cell potency.

    PubMed

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Rai, Bina; Sathiyanathan, Padmapriya; Puan, Kia Joo; Rötzschke, Olaf; Hui, James H; Raghunath, Michael; Stanton, Lawrence W; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to identify critical determinants of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) potency using in vitro and in vivo attributes of cells isolated from the bone marrow of age- and sex-matched donors. Adherence to plastic was not indicative of potency, yet capacity for long-term expansion in vitro varied considerably between donors, allowing the grouping of MSCs from the donors into either those with high-growth capacity or low-growth capacity. Using this grouping strategy, high-growth capacity MSCs were smaller in size, had greater colony-forming efficiency, and had longer telomeres. Cell-surface biomarker analysis revealed that the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) criteria did not distinguish between high-growth capacity and low-growth capacity MSCs, whereas STRO-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha were preferentially expressed on high-growth capacity MSCs. These cells also had the highest mean expression of the mRNA transcripts TWIST-1 and DERMO-1. Irrespective of these differences, both groups of donor MSCs produced similar levels of key growth factors and cytokines involved in tissue regeneration and were capable of multilineage differentiation. However, high-growth capacity MSCs produced approximately double the volume of mineralized tissue compared to low-growth capacity MSCs when assessed for ectopic bone-forming ability. The additional phenotypic criteria presented in this study when combined with the existing ISCT minimum criteria and working proposal will permit an improved assessment of MSC potency and provide a basis for establishing the quality of MSCs prior to their therapeutic application. PMID:25752682

  7. Frondoside A inhibits human breast cancer cell survival, migration, invasion and the growth of breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Al Marzouqi, Nadia; Iratni, Rabah; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Arafat, Kholoud; Ahmed Al Sultan, Mahmood; Yasin, Javed; Collin, Peter; Mester, Jan; Adrian, Thomas E; Attoub, Samir

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5 μM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5 μM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5 μM at 24 h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100 μg/kg/dayi.p. for 24 days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:21741966

  8. Automated quantification of aligned collagen for human breast carcinoma prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Conklin, Matthew W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mortality in cancer patients is directly attributable to the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to distant sites from the primary tumor. This migration of tumor cells begins with a remodeling of the local tumor microenvironment, including changes to the extracellular matrix and the recruitment of stromal cells, both of which facilitate invasion of tumor cells into the bloodstream. In breast cancer, it has been proposed that the alignment of collagen fibers surrounding tumor epithelial cells can serve as a quantitative image-based biomarker for survival of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. Specific types of collagen alignment have been identified for their prognostic value and now these tumor associated collagen signatures (TACS) are central to several clinical specimen imaging trials. Here, we implement the semi-automated acquisition and analysis of this TACS candidate biomarker and demonstrate a protocol that will allow consistent scoring to be performed throughout large patient cohorts. Methods: Using large field of view high resolution microscopy techniques, image processing and supervised learning methods, we are able to quantify and score features of collagen fiber alignment with respect to adjacent tumor-stromal boundaries. Results: Our semi-automated technique produced scores that have statistically significant correlation with scores generated by a panel of three human observers. In addition, our system generated classification scores that accurately predicted survival in a cohort of 196 breast cancer patients. Feature rank analysis reveals that TACS positive fibers are more well-aligned with each other, are of generally lower density, and terminate within or near groups of epithelial cells at larger angles of interaction. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the utility of a supervised learning protocol for streamlining the analysis of collagen alignment with respect to tumor stromal boundaries. PMID:25250186

  9. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  10. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT...; Processing Requirements § 381.152 Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food....

  11. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  12. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  13. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  14. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Patel, K V; Schrey, M P

    1995-03-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  15. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K. V.; Schrey, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  16. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  17. Ultra-small volume interdigital sensors for the measurement of human breast milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, A.; Pang, W. W.; Lai, C. T.; Hartmann, P.

    2007-12-01

    A palm-size interdigital impedance sensor incorporating a 10 μL sample reservoir, temperature sensor and hybrid heater was fabricated to determine the feasibility of measuring macronutrients in ultra-small volumes of human breast milk. Comparisons with previous measurements of homogenized cows milk show excellent agreement with fat measurement. Human breast milk however shows no correlation with fat but a surprising correlation with protein. Our investigations and proposed methods to improve the correlation and measurement accuracy are discussed.

  18. Dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in human breast milk collected in the area of Taranto (Southern Italy): first case study.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Zianni, Rosalia; Anzillotta, Giuseppe; Palma, Achille; Vitacco, Vincenzo; Scrano, Laura; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2013-03-01

    We report on the content of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in 15 breast milk samples of nursing women living in the city of Taranto (Southern, Italy) or nearby. Breast milk samples were collected over the 2008-2009 period and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) upon accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) using acetone/n-hexane mixture 1:1 (v/v). The method was validated demonstrating good performing features. Profiles of PCDD/PCDF congeners in breast milk samples exhibited a prevalence of PCDFs compared to PCDDs. Toxic equivalents (TEQs in picogram per gram fat) of four breast milk were far above the legal limit for human consumption of 3.0 pg/g; their estimated daily and weekly dietary intake were almost 5-20 and 10-40 times higher, respectively, than the tolerable intake values established by the World Health Organization. PMID:23344638

  19. Gadd45a levels in human breast cancer are hormone receptor dependent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gadd45a is a member of the Gadd45 family of genes that are known stress sensors. Gadd45a has been shown to serve as an effector in oncogenic stress in breast carcinogenesis in murine models. The present study was aimed at clarifying the expression of Gadd45a in human breast cancer and its correlation with clinicopathologic features. Methods The expression levels of Gadd45a in breast tissue samples of female breast surgery cases were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a Gadd45a antibody. Percent staining was determined and statistical analyses were applied to determine prognostic correlations. Results 56 female breast surgery cases were studied: Normal (11), Luminal A (9), Luminal B (11), HER2+ (10), Triple Negative (15). There was a highly significant difference in percent Gadd45a staining between groups [Mean]: Normal 16.3%; Luminal A 65.3%; Luminal B 80.7%; HER2+ 40.5%; TN 32%, P < 0.001, ANOVA. Gadd45a IHC levels for Normal cases found 82% negative/low. Luminal A breast cancer cases were found to be 67% high. Luminal B breast cancers were 100% high. Her2+ cases were 50% negative/low. Triple Negative cases were 67% negative/low. This difference in distribution of Gadd45a levels across breast cancer receptor subtypes was significant, P = 0.0009. Conclusions Gadd45a levels are significantly associated with hormone receptor status in human breast cancer. Normal breast tissue displays low Gadd45a levels. High Gadd45a levels are associated with Luminal A and Luminal B subtypes. Absence of hormone receptors in Triple Negative subtype is associated with Negative/Low levels of Gadd45a. Further studies are indicated to elucidate the role of Gadd45a in breast cancer as a potential prognosticator or target for treatment. PMID:23706118

  20. Apoptotic effect of tannic acid on fatty acid synthase over-expressed human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fangyuan; Liang, Yan; Jiang, Bing; Li, Xiabing; Xun, Hang; He, Wei; Lau, Hay Tong; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Novel therapies and chemo-therapeutic drugs are urgently needed to be developed for the treatment of breast cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that fatty acid synthase (FAS) plays an important role in breast cancer, for the expression of FAS is significantly higher in human breast cancer cells than in normal cells. Tannic acid (TA), a natural polyphenol, possesses significant biological functions, including bacteriostasis, hemostasis, and anti-oxidant. Our previous studies demonstrated that TA is a natural FAS inhibitor whose inhibitory activity is stronger than that of classical FAS inhibitors, such as C75 and cerulenin. This study further assessed the effect and therapeutic potential of TA on FAS over-expressed breast cancer cells, and as a result, TA had been proven to possess the functions of inhibiting intracellular FAS activity, down-regulating FAS expression in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Since high-expressed FAS is recognized as a molecular marker for breast cancer and plays an important role in cancer prognosis, these findings suggest that TA is a potential drug candidate for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26349913

  1. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  2. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human food is prepared in any room or compartment.... When an article (including, but not being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human...

  3. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human food is prepared in any room or compartment.... When an article (including, but not being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human...

  4. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human food is prepared in any room or compartment.... When an article (including, but not being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human...

  5. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees...

  6. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees...

  7. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees...

  8. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees...

  9. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  10. Weightlessness acts on human breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassy, J.; Portet, S.; Beil, M.; Millot, G.; Fauvel-Lafève, F.; Gasset, G.; Schoevaert, D.

    2003-10-01

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress-dependent cell changes. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labeling was performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Several main phenomena were observed in weightlessness: The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser. More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation was reduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade. Microtubules were altered in many cells. The results reported in the first point are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubules. We discuss here the different mechanisms involved in weightlessness alteration of microtubules: i) alteration of their self-organization by reaction-diffusion processes, and a mathematical model is proposed, ii) activation or desactivation of microtubules stabilizing proteins, acting on both microtubule and microfilament networks in cell cortex.

  11. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  12. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  13. Molecular homology and difference between spontaneous canine mammary cancer and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E; Northrup, Nicole C; Rodriguez, Carlos O; O'Regan, Ruth M; Dalton, Stephen; Zhao, Shaying

    2014-09-15

    Spontaneously occurring canine mammary cancer represents an excellent model of human breast cancer, but is greatly understudied. To better use this valuable resource, we performed whole-genome sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, RNA-seq, and/or high-density arrays on twelve canine mammary cancer cases, including seven simple carcinomas and four complex carcinomas. Canine simple carcinomas, which histologically match human breast carcinomas, harbor extensive genomic aberrations, many of which faithfully recapitulate key features of human breast cancer. Canine complex carcinomas, which are characterized by proliferation of both luminal and myoepithelial cells and are rare in human breast cancer, seem to lack genomic abnormalities. Instead, these tumors have about 35 chromatin-modification genes downregulated and are abnormally enriched with active histone modification H4-acetylation, whereas aberrantly depleted with repressive histone modification H3K9me3. Our findings indicate the likelihood that canine simple carcinomas arise from genomic aberrations, whereas complex carcinomas originate from epigenomic alterations, reinforcing their unique value. Canine complex carcinomas offer an ideal system to study myoepithelial cells, the second major cell lineage of the mammary gland. Canine simple carcinomas, which faithfully represent human breast carcinomas at the molecular level, provide indispensable models for basic and translational breast cancer research. PMID:25082814

  14. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer. PMID:26669511

  15. Persistent Pesticides in Human Breast Milk and Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Ida N.; Skakkebæk, Niels E.; Toppari, Jorma; Virtanen, Helena E.; Shen, Heqing; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Petersen, Jørgen H.; Jensen, Tina K.; Main, Katharina M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Prenatal exposure to some pesticides can adversely affect male reproductive health in animals. We investigated a possible human association between maternal exposure to 27 organochlorine compounds used as pesticides and cryptorchidism among male children. Design Within a prospective birth cohort, we performed a case–control study; 62 milk samples from mothers of cryptorchid boys and 68 from mothers of healthy boys were selected. Milk was collected as individual pools between 1 and 3 months postpartum and analyzed for 27 organochlorine pesticides. Results Eight organochlorine pesticides were measurable in all samples (medians; nanograms per gram lipid) for cases/controls: 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p′-DDE): 97.3/83.8; β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH): 13.6/12.3; hexachlorobenzene (HCB): 10.6/8.8; α -endosulfan: 7.0/6.7; oxychlordane: 4.5/4.1; 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p′-DDT): 4.6/4.0; dieldrin: 4.1/3.1; cis-heptachloroepoxide (cis-HE): 2.5/2.2. Five compounds [octachlorostyrene (OCS); pentachlorobenzene, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p′-DDD); o,p′-DDT; mirex] were measurable in most samples (detection rates 90.8–99.2%) but in lower concentrations. For methoxychlor, cis-chlordane, pentachloroanisole (PCA), γ -HCH, 1,1-dichloro-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2,2(4-chlorophenyl)ethane, trans-chlordane, α -HCH, and o,p′-DDE, both concentrations and detection rates were low (26.5–71.5%). Heptachlor, HCH (δ, ɛ ), aldrin, β-endosulfan and trans-heptachloroepoxide were detected at negligible concentrations and low detection rates and were not analyzed further. Seventeen of 21 organochlorine pesticides [p,p′-DDT, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, o,p′-DDT, HCH (α , β, γ ), HCB, PCA, α -endosulfan, cis-HE, chlordane (cis-, trans-) oxychlordane, methoxychlor, OCS, and dieldrin] were measured in higher median concentrations in case milk than in control milk. Apart from trans-chlordane (p = 0

  16. VIS-NIR spectrum analysis for distinguishing tumor and normal human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yuan; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Xiang; Liu, Caihua; Wang, Jing; Xue, Xingbo; Zhu, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer require an effective method for early breast diagnosis. In order to investigate the optical differences among malignant tumor, benign tumor and normal human breast tissue, a commercial spectrophotometer combined with single integrating sphere was used to measure the optical properties of different types of breast tissue in the wavelength range of 400 nm to 2200 nm in vitro. The hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) are used as the standard, and to find the find possible optical markers from the corresponding absorption or scattering spectra. This work is not only used for in vitro rapid optical diagnosis, but very helpful to develop innovative optical diagnosis of breast tumor in vivo.

  17. Analysis of HOX gene expression patterns in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Hyo Jung; Park, Byeong Woo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are highly conserved transcription factors that determine the identity of cells and tissues along the anterior-posterior body axis in developing embryos. Aberrations in HOX gene expression have been shown in various tumors. However, the correlation of HOX gene expression patterns with tumorigenesis and cancer progression has not been fully characterized. Here, to analyze putative candidate HOX genes involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis and progression, the expression patterns of 39 HOX genes were analyzed using breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived breast tissues. In vitro analysis revealed that HOXA and HOXB gene expression occurred in a subtype-specific manner in breast cancer cell lines, whereas most HOXC genes were strongly expressed in most cell lines. Among the 39 HOX genes analyzed, 25 were chosen for further analysis in malignant and non-malignant tissues. Fourteen genes, encoding HOXA6, A13, B2, B4, B5, B6, B7, B8, B9, C5, C9, C13, D1, and D8, out of 25 showed statistically significant differential expression patterns between non-malignant and malignant breast tissues and are putative candidates associated with the development and malignant progression of breast cancer. Our data provide a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of HOX gene expression in breast cancer and the possible involvement of HOX genes in tumor progression. PMID:23820980

  18. Breastfeeding: breast milk banks and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Choto, R G

    1990-12-01

    HIV in infants and children in Zimbabwe is virtually limited to vertical transmission. Less than 5 cases of transfusion acquired HIV infections have been documented to date. Zimbabwe was the third country in the world after the United States, to screen transfusion blood and blood products. The controversy of HIV transmission through breast milk is still far from resolved. In developing countries, breast-milk substitutes for formulae are not only prohibitively expensive but dangerous because of unhygienic and economic constraints. The paper argues the case for continued breast-feeding of infants by their HIV seropositive mothers. PMID:2092885

  19. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  20. Growth characteristics and metastatic properties of human breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Visonneau, S.; Cesano, A.; Torosian, M. H.; Miller, E. J.; Santoli, D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the growth and metastatic potential of two human breast cancer cell lines and 16 patient-derived biopsy specimens, representing the most common histological types of breast carcinomas, upon subcutaneous implantation into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The method of engraftment we used, based on implantation of intact tissue specimens and complete immunosuppression of the host, provided an easier system to grow human breast carcinoma specimens in mouse models and resulted in a 50% success rate of tumor take. No correlation was found between growth in SCID mice and pathological diagnosis, grading, or estrogen/progesterone receptor expression by the tumor biopsy specimen. Serial passage of the tumor fragments in SCID mice resulted in increased metastasis rates and more rapid emergence of a palpable tumor mass. A tumor from a patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which grew aggressively and metastasized in 100% of the female SCID mice, was also successfully engrafted in 100% of nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID female mice, but systemic spread was minimal. Fragments of the same tumor grew in only 33% of male SCID mice with very limited metastases. A strong correlation (r = 0.997) was observed between tumor burden and the presence of soluble (serum) interleukin-2 receptor, a marker associated with a subset of human breast tumors. All together, these data indicate the usefulness of SCID/human breast tumor xenografts for measuring tumor progression and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9588898

  1. DEAD-box helicase DP103 defines metastatic potential of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Myoung; Hay, Hui Sin; Lee, Moon Hee; Goh, Jen Nee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Sen, Yin Ping; Lim, See Wee; Yousef, Einas M; Ong, Hooi Tin; Thike, Aye Aye; Kong, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhengsheng; Mendoz, Earnest; Sun, Wei; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lobie, Peter E; Lim, Yoon Pin; Yap, Celestial T; Zeng, Qi; Sethi, Gautam; Lee, Martin B; Tan, Patrick; Goh, Boon Cher; Miller, Lance D; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zhu, Tao; Gaboury, Louis; Tan, Puay Hoon; Hui, Kam Man; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-09-01

    Despite advancement in breast cancer treatment, 30% of patients with early breast cancers experience relapse with distant metastasis. It is a challenge to identify patients at risk for relapse; therefore, the identification of markers and therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancers is imperative. Here, we identified DP103 as a biomarker and metastasis-driving oncogene in human breast cancers and determined that DP103 elevates matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) levels, which are associated with metastasis and invasion through activation of NF-κB. In turn, NF-κB signaling positively activated DP103 expression. Furthermore, DP103 enhanced TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) phosphorylation of NF-κB-activating IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), leading to increased NF-κB activity. Reduction of DP103 expression in invasive breast cancer cells reduced phosphorylation of IKK2, abrogated NF-κB-mediated MMP9 expression, and impeded metastasis in a murine xenograft model. In breast cancer patient tissues, elevated levels of DP103 correlated with enhanced MMP9, reduced overall survival, and reduced survival after relapse. Together, these data indicate that a positive DP103/NF-κB feedback loop promotes constitutive NF-κB activation in invasive breast cancers and activation of this pathway is linked to cancer progression and the acquisition of chemotherapy resistance. Furthermore, our results suggest that DP103 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25083991

  2. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  3. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Major BRCA Mutations in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohtasebi, Parinaz; Rassi, Hossein; Maleki, Fatemeh; Hajimohammadi, Sameh; Bagheri, Zahra; Fakhar Miandoab, Malihe; Naserbakht, Mahdieh

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is a multistep disease and infection with a DNA virus could play a role in one or more of the steps in this pathogenic process. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of several cancers. In this study, we investigated HPV genotypes associated with breast cancer and its relationship with BRCA mutation for the detection of familial breast cancer. We analyzed 84 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 38 familial breast cancer and 46 nonfamilial breast cancer samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and clinical parameters. Overall prevalence of HPV infection was 27 of 84: 10 (37.03%) HPV-16, 9 (29.62%) HPV-18, 4 (14.81%) HPV-11, 1 (3.7%) HPV-31, 1 (3.7%) HPV-33, and 2 (7.4%) HPV35. Furthermore, 17 mtDNA4977 deletions and 5 5382insC mutations were detected from 38 familial breast cancer samples. Our results demonstrate that infection with HPV was prevalent among Iranian women with familial breast cancer and the testing of mtDNA4977 deletions and 5382insC mutations in combination with clinical parameters as major risk factors can serve in the identification of familial breast cancer. PMID:27186947

  4. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  5. MMTV mouse models and the diagnostic values of MMTV-like sequences in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Pankaj; Frazier, Donna P; Kendig, Robert D; Maglic, Dejan; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kai, Fumitake; Taneja, Neetu K; Inoue, Kazushi

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transgenic mice are excellent models for breast cancer as they allow for the targeted expression of various oncogenes and growth factors in neoplastic transformation of mammary glands. Numerous MMTV-LTR-driven transgenic mouse models of breast cancer have been created in the past three decades, including MMTV-neu/ErbB2, cyclin D1, cyclin E, Ras, Myc, int-1 and c-rel. These transgenic mice develop mammary tumors with different latency, histology and invasiveness, reflecting the oncogenic pathways activated by the transgene. Recently, homologous sequences of the env gene of MMTV have been identified in approximately 40% of human breast cancers, but not in normal breast or other types of cancers, suggesting possible involvement of mammary tumor virus in human breast carcinogenesis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the association of MMTV provirus with progesterone receptor, p53 mutations and advanced-stage breast cancer. Thus, the detection of MMTV-like sequences may have diagnostic value to predict the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:19580428

  6. Infrequent mutation of ATBF1 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yingfa; Otto, Kristen B; Wang, Mingrong; Chen, Ceshi; Zhou, Wei; Subramanian, Krithika; Vertino, Paula M; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2007-02-01

    Deletion at chromosome 16q is frequent in prostate and breast cancers, suggesting the existence of one or more tumor suppressor genes in 16q. Recently, the transcription factor ATBF1 at 16q22 was identified as a strong candidate tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and loss of ATBF1 expression was associated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, we examined mutation, expression, and promoter methylation of ATBF1 in 32 breast cancer cell lines. Only 2 of the 32 cancer cell lines had mutations, although 18 nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. In addition, 24 of 32 (75%) cancer cell lines had reduced ATBF1 mRNA levels, yet promoter methylation was not involved in gene silencing. These findings suggest that ATBF1 plays a role in breast cancer through transcriptional downregulation rather than mutations. PMID:16932943

  7. Human T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression reflect ERα/ERβ ratios in rat and human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Evers, N M; van de Klundert, T M C; van Aesch, Y M; Wang, S; de Roos, W K; Romano, A; de Haan, L H J; Murk, A J; Ederveen, A G H; Rietjens, I M C M; Groten, J P

    2013-09-01

    T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression and constant ERα expression can be used to investigate effects of varying ERα/ERβ ratios on estrogen-induced cellular responses. This study defines conditions at which ERα/ERβ ratios in T47D-ERβ cells best mimic ERα/ERβ ratios in breast and other estrogen-sensitive tissues in vivo in rat as well as in human. Protein and mRNA levels of ERα and ERβ were analyzed in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to a range of tetracycline concentrations and compared to ERα and ERβ levels found in breast, prostate, and uterus from rat and human origin. The ERα/ERβ ratio in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to >150ng/ml tetracycline is comparable to the ratio found in rat mammary gland and in human breast tissue. The ERα/ERβ ratio of other estrogen-sensitive rat and human tissues can also be mimicked in T47D-ERβ cells. The ERα/ERβ ratio found in MCF-7 and native T47D breast cancer cell lines did not reflect ratios in analyzed rat and human tissues, which further supports the use of T47D-ERβ cells as model for estrogen-responsive tissues. Using 17β-estradiol and the T47D-ERβ cells under the conditions defined to mimic various tissues it could be demonstrated how these different tissues vary in their proliferative response. PMID:23680332

  8. Targeted Glycoproteomic Identification of Biomarkers for Human Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Karen L.; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Lim, Jae-Min; Porterfield, Mindy; Johnson, Rachelle; O’Regan, Ruth M.; Wells, Lance; Tiemeyer, Michael; Pierce, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is a dynamic post-translational modification that changes during the development and progression of various malignancies. During the oncogenesis of breast carcinoma, the glycosyltransferase known as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Va (GnT-Va) transcript levels and activity are increased due to activated oncogenic signaling pathways. Elevated GnT-V levels leads to increased β(1,6)-branched N-linked glycan structures on glycoproteins that can be measured using a specific carbohydrate binding protein or lectin known as L-PHA. L-PHA does not bind to nondiseased breast epithelial cells, but during the progression to invasive carcinoma, cells show a progressive increase in L-PHA binding. We have developed a procedure for intact protein L-PHA-affinity enrichment, followed by nanospray ionization mass spectrometry (NSI-MS/MS), to identify potential biomarkers for breast carcinoma. We identified L-PHA reactive glycoproteins from matched normal (nondiseased) and malignant tissue isolated from patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Comparison analysis of the data identified 34 proteins that were enriched by L-PHA fractionation in tumor relative to normal tissue for at least 2 cases of ductal invasive breast carcinoma. Of these 34 L-PHA tumor enriched proteins, 12 are common to all 4 matched cases analyzed. These results indicate that lectin enrichment strategies targeting a particular glycan change associated with malignancy can be an effective method of identifying potential biomarkers for breast carcinoma. PMID:18271524

  9. Comparative evaluation of establishing a human gut microbial community within rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Bleich, André; Oxley, Andrew P.A.; Kahl, Silke; Janus, Lydia M.; Smoczek, Anna; Nahrstedt, Hannes; Pils, Marina C.; Taudien, Stefan; Platzer, Matthias; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbial community is determined by host genetics and environmental factors, where alterations in its structure have been associated with the onset of different diseases. Establishing a defined human gut microbial community within inbred rodent models provides a means to study microbial-related pathologies, however, an in-depth comparison of the established human gut microbiota in the different models is lacking. We compared the efficiency of establishing the bacterial component of a defined human microbial community within germ-free (GF) rats, GF mice and antibiotic-treated specific pathogen-free mice. Remarkable differences were observed between the different rodent models. While the majority of abundant human-donor bacterial phylotypes were established in the GF rats, only a subset was present in the GF mice. Despite the fact that members of the phylum Bacteriodetes were well established in all rodent models, mice enriched for phylotypes related to species of Bacteroides. In contrary to the efficiency of Clostridiales to populate the GF rat in relative proportions to that of the human-donor, members of Clostridia cluster IV only poorly colonize the mouse gut. Thus, the genetic background of the different recipient rodent systems (that is, rats and mice) strongly influences the nature of the populating human gut microbiota, determining each model’s biological suitability. PMID:22572831

  10. Claudin-20 promotes an aggressive phenotype in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tracey A; Lane, Jane; Ozupek, Hulya; Jiang, Wen G

    2013-01-01

    Claudin-20 is a member of the Claudin family of transmembrane proteins located in the tight junction (TJ) of cells of epithelial origin. Due to the increasing evidence supporting the role of TJ proteins in preventing tumor cell metastatic behavior, this study sought to evaluate the distribution of Claudin-20 in human breast cancer and the effect of Claudin-20 overexpression in human breast cancer cells. Q-PCR data from breast cancer primary tumors (n = 114) and matched background tissue (n = 30) showed that high claudin-20 expression was correlated with poor survival of patients with breast cancer (p = 0.022). Following transformation of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 with a Claudin-20 expression construct functional assays were performed to ascertain changes in cell behavior. Claudin-20 transformed cells showed significantly increased invasion (p < 0.005) and were significantly less adhesive than wild type cells (p < 0.05). There was no effect on growth (either in vitro or in vivo) for either cell line. Overexpression of Claudin-20 resulted in reduced transepithelial resistance (induced by the motogen HGF at 25 ng/ml, p = 0.0007). Interestingly, this was not mirrored by paracellular permeability, as overexpression of Claudin-20 caused a decrease in permeability. The introduction of Claudin-20 into human breast cancer cells resulted in breast cancer cells with an aggressive phenotype and reduced trans-epithelial resistance. There was no corresponding decrease in paracellular permeability, indicating that this Claudin has a differential function in epithelial TJ. This provides further insight into the importance of correctly functioning TJ in preventing the progression of human breast cancer. PMID:24665404

  11. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  12. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity by purified human breast milk mucin (MUC1) in an inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; de Beer, Corena; Lotz, Zoë E; Tyler, Marilyn G; Kahn, Delawir; Mall, Anwar S

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that breast-feeding is responsible for approximately 40% of the HIV transmissions from HIV-positive mothers to children. Human breast milk, however, is known to contain numerous biologically active components which protect breast-fed infants against bacteria, viruses, and toxins. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize breast milk mucin and to determine its anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and caesium chloride isopycnic density gradient purification were used to isolate and purify the mucin. Following Western blotting and amino acid analysis, an HIV-1 inhibition assay was carried out to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity of crude breast milk and purified milk mucin (MUC1) by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). SDS-PAGE analysis of the mucin, together with its amino acid composition and Western blotting, suggested that this purified mucin from human breast milk was MUC1. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified milk mucin (MUC1) inhibited the HIV-1 activity by approximately 97%, there was no inhibition of the HIV-1 activity by crude breast milk. Although the reason for this is not clear, it is likely that because the MUC1 in crude milk is enclosed by fat globules, there may not be any physical contact between the mucin and the virus in the crude breast milk. Thus, there is a need to free the mucin from the fat globules for it to be effective against the virus. PMID:17878743

  14. A new marker for breast cancer diagnosis, human epididymis protein 4: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, Umut Riza; Gunaldi, Meral; Isiksacan, Nilgun; Gündüz, Seyda; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Kocoglu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer type in women. Tumor markers have been widely used for assessing the treatment response and early diagnosis of recurrence. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is expressed in ductal carcinoma of the breast tissue; however, its serum levels and their diagnostic and prognostic potential in breast cancer have not been investigated, which was therefore the aim of the present study. The serum levels of HE4 were determined in 36 breast cancer patients, 11 ovarian cancer patients and 16 healthy volunteers. The association between clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer and serum HE4 levels was investigated. A significant difference in the median serum levels of HE4 was identified between breast cancer patients, ovarian cancer patients and healthy volunteers (P=0.013). The cutoff value for the prediction of breast cancer was determined at >13.24 pmol/l for HE4, with a sensitivity of 61.11%, specificity of 68.75%, positive predictive value of 81.48%, negative predictive value of 44.0% and accuracy of 63.46%. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the serum levels of HE4 and cancer antigen 15–3 was determined (r=0.399, P=0.026). To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to determine the diagnostic value of serum HE4 for breast cancer. A significant elevation of serum HE4 levels in patients with breast cancer compared with that in healthy controls was identified. HE4 may serve as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:27446579

  15. 31P MRSI and 1H MRS at 7 T: initial results in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Dennis W J; van de Bank, Bart L; Raaijmakers, Alexander; Korteweg, Mies A; Possanzini, Cecilia; Boer, Vincent O; van de Berg, Cornelius A T; van de Bosch, Maurice A A J; Luijten, Peter R

    2011-12-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the noninvasive determination of important biomarkers of human (breast) tumor metabolism using high-field (7-T) MRI and MRS. (31) P MRSI at this field strength was used to provide a direct method for the in vivo detection and quantification of endogenous biomarkers. These encompass phospholipid metabolism, phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. A double-tuned, dual-element transceiver was designed with focused radiofrequency fields for unilateral breast imaging and spectroscopy tuned for optimized sensitivity at 7 T. T(1) -weighted three-dimensional MRI and (1) H MRS were applied for the localization and quantification of total choline compounds. (31) P MRSI was obtained within 20 min per subject and mapped in three dimensions over the breast with pixel volumes of 10 mL. The feasibility of monitoring in vivo metabolism was demonstrated in two patients with breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, validated by ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR and compared with data from an age-matched healthy volunteer. Concentrations of total choline down to 0.4 mM could be detected in the human breast in vivo. Levels of adenosine and other nucleoside triphosphates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine and their glycerol diesters detected in glandular tissue, as well as in tumor, were mapped over the entire breast. Altered levels of these compounds were observed in patients compared with an age-matched healthy volunteer; modulation of these levels occurred in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive MRI and MRS study in patients with breast cancer, which reveals detailed information on the morphology and phospholipid metabolism from volumes as small as 10 mL. This endogenous metabolic information may provide a new method for the noninvasive assessment of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in breast cancer treatment. PMID

  16. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in human breast milk from several Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Muto, Mamoru; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Prudente, Maricar; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were determined in 89 human breast milk samples collected from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. Among the targeted PFRs, tris(2-chloroexyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the predominant compounds and were detected in more than 60% of samples in all three countries. The concentrations of PFRs in human breast milk were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the Philippines (median 70 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) than those in Japan (median 22 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) and Vietnam (median 10 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). The present results suggest that the usage of products containing PFRs in the Philippines is higher than those of Japan and Vietnam. Comparing with a previous literature survey in Sweden, the levels of PFRs in human breast milk from the Philippines were 1.5-2 times higher, whereas levels in Japan and Vietnam were 4-20 times lower, suggesting that these differences might be due to their variation in the usage of flame-retarded products utilized in each country. When daily intake of PFRs to infants via human breast milk was estimated, some individuals accumulated tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and TCEP were close to reference dose (RfD). This is the first report to identify PFRs in human breast milk samples from Asian countries. PMID:24630247

  17. Genome Sequence of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Bottacini, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the draft genome of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, isolated from human milk. This species, usually isolated from caries lesions, is taxonomically related to the genus Bifidobacterium. The genetic information of IPLA 20019 enhances our understanding of the adaptation of this P. denticolens strain from human breast milk. PMID:22887674

  18. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  19. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  20. Plasma proteome profiling of a mouse model of breast cancer identifies a set of up-regulated proteins in common with human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Faca, Vitor M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Kasarda, A Erik; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Newcomb, Lisa; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Gina; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; McIntosh, Martin W; Kemp, Christopher J; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-04-01

    We have applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach, combining isotopic labeling extensive intact protein separation and mass spectrometry, for high confidence identification of protein changes in plasmas from a mouse model of breast cancer. We hypothesized that a wide spectrum of proteins may be up-regulated in plasma with tumor development and that comparisons with proteins expressed in human breast cancer cell lines may identify a subset of up-regulated proteins in common with proteins expressed in breast cancer cell lines that may represent candidate biomarkers for breast cancer. Plasma from PyMT transgenic tumor-bearing mice and matched controls were obtained at two time points during tumor growth. A total of 133 proteins were found to be increased by 1.5-fold or greater at one or both time points. A comparison of this set of proteins with published findings from proteomic analysis of human breast cancer cell lines yielded 49 proteins with increased levels in mouse plasma that were identified in breast cancer cell lines. Pathway analysis comparing the subset of up-regulated proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer cell lines with other up-regulated proteins indicated a cancer related function for the former and a host-response function for the latter. We conclude that integration of proteomic findings from mouse models of breast cancer and from human breast cancer cell lines may help identify a subset of proteins released by breast cancer cells into the circulation and that occur at increased levels in breast cancer. PMID:18311905

  1. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID

  2. Revisiting a role for a mammary tumor retrovirus in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Brian; Gunzburg, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    There remains great controversy as to whether mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), the etiological agent of mammary cancer in mice, or a closely related human retrovirus, plays a role in the development of breast cancer in humans. On one hand, retroviruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known causative agents of cancer (in the case of HIV, albeit, indirectly), but attempts to associate other retroviruses with human cancers have been difficult. A recent, high profile, example has been the postulated involvement of another mouse virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, in human prostate cancer, which is now thought to be due to contamination. Here, we review some of the more recent evidence for and against the involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer and suggest future studies that may allow a definitive answer to this conundrum. PMID:23580334

  3. EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MUTAGENIC ARYL AMINES IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND DNA ADDUCTS IN EXFOLIATED BREAST-DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatic (AA) and heterocyclic amines (HAA) are ubiquitous environmental mutagens present in combustions emissions, fried meats, tobacco smoke, etc., and are suspect human mammary carcinogens. To determine the presence of aryl amines in breast tissue and fluid, we examined exfol...

  4. Integrin α6/Akt/Erk signaling is essential for human breast cancer resistance to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Zhou, Rui; Zhao, Yanxia; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Integrin α6 (ITGA6), a transmembrane glycoprotein adhesion receptor protein, is widely upregulated in many types of tumors and promotes migration and invasion in cancer cells. However, the role that the ITGA6-associated signaling network plays in radiosensitivity in breast cancer has not been described. The expression of ITGA6 was examined in human breast cancer and normal breast cell lines using western blot analysis. We also explored the role of ITGA6 in the regulation of radiation sensitivity in breast cancer using the colony formation assays, cell cycle analyses, apoptosis assays and immunofluorescence analyses. The results showed that the protein and mRNA expression levels of ITGA6 was higher in breast cancer cells than in normal cells. ITGA6 protectived responses to radiotherapy in breast cancer cells by altering cell apoptosis, DNA damage repair and cell-cycle regulation. Furthermore, ITGA6 enhanced radiation resistance via PI3K/Akt and MEK/Erk signaling. In addition, overexpressing ITGA6 promoted radiation resistance in cells, and this effect was neutralized by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and MEK inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these findings indicate that ITGA6 might be involved in a mechanism that underlies radiation resistance and that ITGA6 could be a potential target for therapies aimed at overcoming radiation resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27624978

  5. Chemopreventive effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in estrogen-negative human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Joo; Kim, Mi Jie; Kim, Ha Ryong; Yi, Min Sun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Oh, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Excessive level of estrogen is considered as a main cause of breast cancer, therefore, many studies have focused on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, even though ER-negative cancer has a poor prognosis than ER-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the anti-cancer effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) in estrogen-independent breast cancer. GBE has been traditionally used as a platelet activating factor, a circulatory stimulant, a tonic, and anti-asthmatic drug, and anti-cancer agent. However, anti-cancer effects of GBE on ER-negative breast cancer have not been proved yet. In this study, we tested chemotherapeutic potential of GBE in the MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) human breast cancer cell line. Our results showed that cytotoxicity effects of GBE in MDA-MB-231 lead to DNA fragmentation at high concentrations (500 and 1,000 μg/ml). Caspase-3 was significantly activated and mRNA levels of apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2 and Bax) were altered. These results indicate that GBE induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. It is presumed that GBE has chemopreventive effects in ER-independent breast cancer through anti-proliferation and apoptosis-inducing activities. PMID:23335025

  6. Establishment of human ovarian serous carcinomas cell lines in serum free media.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhuangyu; Hooley, Jeffrey; Smith, Douglas H; Young, Peter; Roberts, Penelope E; Mather, Jennie P

    2012-03-01

    Ovarian cancers are the fifth leading cause of cancer death among US woman. The majority of ovarian cancers belong to a category of serous adenocarcinomas. This type of cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage of the disease. Surgical debulking, followed by chemotherapy is the current treatment. Half of all patients will die within 5 years of diagnosis of the disease. Poor survival may be due to disease progression as a consequence of development of drug resistance, cancer cell heterogeneity within the tumor, or the persistence of cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are defined as a minority cell type in the tumor, which retains the capacity, through asymmetric division, for self-renewal as well as differentiation into multiple cell types. Through this process, CSC can regenerate the entire tumor phenotype and subsequent metastases. Initial in vitro work in the area of solid tumor CSC biology has focused on the isolation and propagation of cells with CSC-like properties from breast and colon tumors. Breast and colon cell lines with CSC-like properties have been isolated and maintained in vitro for extended periods of time. The in vitro maintenance of these CSC requires growth in hormone-supplemented serum-free media and the use of matrix or growth as tumor spheres (Roberts, Ricci-Vitiani et al., Cammareri et al.). Based on the pioneering work generating breast and colon CSC, our lab has begun to develop methods for the establishment cell lines with CSC-like properties from additional solid tumors. In this article, we describe methods, using defined medium, which allow for the successful establishment of continuous cell cultures from a minority cell type within serous ovarian cancers. The cell lines established using these methods grow in serum-free hormone-supplemented medium either as a monolayer on a matrix, or as tumor spheres in suspension. These cells express markers previously reported for tumor stem cells, including CD44 and CD133, and form tumors

  7. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Papa, V; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A; Giuffrida, D; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G B; Brand, R; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0.95 + 0.68, P less than 0.001) and in six normal specimens obtained from reduction mammoplasty (0.84 +/- 0.78, P less than 0.001). The insulin receptor content in breast cancer tissues was also higher than in any normal tissue investigated including liver (Pezzino, V., V. Papa, V. Trischitta, A. Brunetti, P.A. Goodman, M.K. Treutelaar, J.A. Williams, B.A. Maddux, R. Vigneri, and I.D. Goldfine, 1989. Am. J. Physiol. 257:E451-457). The insulin receptor in breast cancer retained its ability to both bind insulin and undergo insulin-induced tyrosine kinase activation. Immunostaining of the specimens revealed that the insulin receptor was present in malignant epithelial cells, but was not detected in stromal and inflammatory cells. Univariant analysis revealed that the insulin receptor content of the tumors correlated positively with tumor size (P = 0.014), histological grading (P = 0.030), and the estrogen receptor content (P = 0.035). There were no significant correlations between insulin receptor content and the age, body weight, menopausal status, and nodal involvement of the patients. These studies indicate, therefore, that the insulin receptor content is increased in breast cancers and raise the possibility that the insulin receptor may have a role in the biology of these tumors. Images PMID:2243127

  8. Disposition of hop prenylflavonoids in human breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bolca, Selin; Li, Jinghu; Nikolic, Dejan; Roche, Nathalie; Blondeel, Phillip; Possemiers, Sam; De Keukeleire, Denis; Bracke, Marc; Heyerick, Arne; van Breemen, Richard B.; Depypere, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Hop-derived products may contain xanthohumol (XN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN). To evaluate the potential health effects of these prenylflavonoids on breast tissue, their concentration, nature of metabolites, and biodistribution were assessed and compared to 17β-estradiol (E2) exposure. In this dietary intervention study, women were randomly allocated to hop (n=11; 2.04 mg XN, 1.20 mg IX, and 0.1 mg 8-PN per supplement) or control (n=10). After a run-in of ≥4d, 3 supplements were taken daily during 5d preceding an aesthetic breast reduction. Blood and breast biopsies were analyzed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Upon hop administration, XN and IX concentrations ranged between 0.72–17.65 nmol/L and 3.30–31.50 nmol/L, and between 0.26– 5.14 pmol/g and 1.16–83.67 pmol/g in hydrolyzed serum and breast tissue, respectively. 8-PN however, was only detected in samples of moderate and strong 8-PN producers (0.43–7.06 nmol/L and 0.78–4.83 pmol/g). Phase I metabolism appeared to be minor (~10%), whereas extensive glucuronidation was observed (>90%). Total prenylflavonoids showed a breast adipose/glandular tissue distribution of 38/62 and their derived E2-equivalents were negligible compared to E2 in adipose (384.6±118.8 fmol/g, P=0.009) and glandular (241.6±93.1 fmol/g, P<0.001) tissue, respectively. Consequently, low doses of prenylflavonoids are unlikely to elicit estrogenic responses in breast tissue. PMID:20486208

  9. Disposition of hop prenylflavonoids in human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Bolca, Selin; Li, Jinghu; Nikolic, Dejan; Roche, Nathalie; Blondeel, Phillip; Possemiers, Sam; De Keukeleire, Denis; Bracke, Marc; Heyerick, Arne; van Breemen, Richard B; Depypere, Herman

    2010-07-01

    Hop-derived products may contain xanthohumol (XN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN). To evaluate the potential health effects of these prenylflavonoids on breast tissue, their concentration, nature of metabolites, and biodistribution were assessed and compared with 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) exposure. In this dietary intervention study, women were randomly allocated to hop (n=11; 2.04 mg XN, 1.20 mg IX, and 0.1 mg 8-PN per supplement) or control (n=10). After a run-in of >or=4 days, three supplements were taken daily for 5 days preceding an aesthetic breast reduction. Blood and breast biopsies were analyzed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Upon hop administration, XN and IX concentrations ranged between 0.72 and 17.65 nmol/L and 3.30 and 31.50 nmol/L, and between 0.26 and 5.14 pmol/g and 1.16 and 83.67 pmol/g in hydrolyzed serum and breast tissue, respectively. 8-PN however, was only detected in samples of moderate and strong 8-PN producers (0.43-7.06 nmol/L and 0.78-4.83 pmol/g). Phase I metabolism appeared to be minor (approximately 10%), whereas extensive glucuronidation was observed (> 90%). Total prenylflavonoids showed a breast adipose/glandular tissue distribution of 38/62 and their derived E(2)-equivalents were negligible compared with E(2) in adipose (384.6+/-118.8 fmol/g, p=0.009) and glandular (241.6+/-93.1 fmol/g, p<0.001) tissue, respectively. Consequently, low doses of prenylflavonoids are unlikely to elicit estrogenic responses in breast tissue. PMID:20486208

  10. Degradation of endothelial basement membrane by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C.; Shiu, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    During metastasis, it is believed that tumor cells destroy the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels in order to disseminate through the circulatory system. By radioactively labeling the extracellular matrix produced by primary endothelial cells in vitro, the ability of human breast cancer cells to degrade BM components was studied. We found that T-47D, a human breast cancer line, was able to degrade significant amounts of (35S)methionine-labeled and (3H)proline-labeled BM, but not 35SO4-labeled BM. Six other tumor cell lines of human breast origin were assayed in the same manner and were found to degrade BM to varying degrees. Several non-tumor cell lines tested showed relatively little degrading activity. The use of serum-free medium greatly enhanced degradation of the BM by tumor cells, suggesting a role for naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors in the serum. Direct cell contact with the BM was required for BM degradation, suggesting that the active enzymes are cell associated. The addition of hormones implicated in the etiology of breast cancer did not significantly alter the ability of T-47D cells to degrade the BM. The use of this assay affords future studies on the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  11. Alterations in replication timing of cancer-related genes in malignant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Andrew; Sinha, Seema; Marella, Narasimharao; Berezney, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    The replication timing of nine genes commonly involved in cancer was investigated in the MCF10 cell lines for human breast cancer progression. Six of these nine genes are part of a constellation of tumor suppressor genes that play a major role in familial human breast cancer (TP53, ATM, PTEN, CHK2, BRCA1, and BRCA2). Three other genes are involved in a large number of human cancers including breast as either tumor suppressors (RB1 and RAD51) or as an oncogene (cMYC). Five of these nine genes (TP53, RAD51, ATM, PTEN, and cMYC) show significant differences (P < 0.05) in replication timing between MCF10A normal human breast cells and the corresponding malignant MCF10CA1a cells. These differences are specific to the malignant state of the MCF10CA1a cells since there were no significant differences in the replication timing of these genes between normal MCF10A cells and the non-malignant cancer MCF10AT1 cells. Microarray analysis further demonstrated that three of these five genes (TP53, RAD51, and cMYC) showed significant changes in gene expression (≥2-fold) between normal and malignant cells. Our findings demonstrate an alteration in the replication timing of a small subset of cancer-related genes in malignant breast cancer cells. These alterations partially correlate with the major transcriptional changes characteristic of the malignant state in these cells. PMID:23161755

  12. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, F.; Pagliazzi, M.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy.

  13. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer. PMID:24129958

  14. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  15. Down-regulation of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 3 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klus, G T; Rokaeus, N; Bittner, M L; Chen, Y; Korz, D M; Sukumar, S; Schick, A; Szallasi, Z

    2001-07-01

    In previous studies using cDNA microarray analysis, we have identified an expressed sequence tag which is consistently down-regulated in six human breast tumor cell lines. In the current study, we have determined this tag to be part of the mRNA sequence of human desmocollin 3, a member of the cadherin superfamily of proteins and an integral component of desmosomes. Desmosomes are sites of adhesion between adjacent cells in layers of epithelia, as well as in some non-epithelial tissues, and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue structure. Northern analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis showed that desmocollin 3 is present in normal and immortalized human mammary epithelial cells, but consistently exhibits a significant, and often complete, down-regulation in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors, both at the mRNA and protein levels. PMID:11408939

  16. Determination of optical parameters of human breast tissue from spatially resolved fluorescence: a diffusion theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Maya S.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Raju, Narisetti Sundar; Pradhan, Asima

    2002-07-01

    We report the measurement of optical transport parameters of pathologically characterized malignant tissues, normal tissues, and different types of benign tumors of the human breast in the visible wavelength region. A spatially resolved steady-state diffuse fluorescence reflectance technique was used to estimate the values for the reduced-scattering coefficient (mu's) and the absorption coefficient (mua) of human breast tissues at three wavelengths (530, 550, and 590 nm). Different breast tissues could be well differentiated from one another, and different benign tumors could also be distinguished by their measured transport parameters. A diffusion theory model was developed to describe fluorescence light energy distribution, especially its spatial variation in a turbid and multiply scattering medium such as human tissue. The validity of the model was checked with a Monte Carlo simulation and also with different tissue phantoms prepared with polystyrene microspheres as scatterers, riboflavin as fluorophores, and methylene blue as absorbers.

  17. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites. PMID:23118918

  18. The Outcome of Breast Cancer Is Associated with National Human Development Index and Health System Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Pan, Tao; Ye, Juan; Zhang, Suzhan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a worldwide threat to female health with patient outcomes varying widely. The exact correlation between global outcomes of breast cancer and the national socioeconomic status is still undetermined. Mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) of breast cancer was calculated with the contemporary age standardized incidence and mortality rates for countries with data available at GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The MIR matched national human development indexes (HDIs) and health system attainments were respectively obtained from Human Development Report and World Health Report. Correlation analysis, regression analysis, and Tukey-Kramer post hoc test were used to explore the effects of HDI and health system attainment on breast cancer MIR. Our results demonstrated that breast cancer MIR was inversely correlated with national HDI (r = -.950; P < .001) and health system attainment (r = -.898; P < .001). Countries with very high HDI had significantly lower MIRs than those with high, medium and low HDI (P < .001). Liner regression model by ordinary least squares also indicated negative effects of both HDI (adjusted R2 = .903, standardize β = -.699, P < .001) and health system attainment (adjusted R2 =. 805, standardized β = -.009; P < .001), with greater effects in developing countries identified by quantile regression analysis. It is noteworthy that significant health care disparities exist among countries in accordance with the discrepancy of HDI. Policies should be made in less developed countries, which are more likely to obtain worse outcomes in female breast cancer, that in order to improve their comprehensive economic strength and optimize their health system performance. PMID:27391077

  19. Expression of microRNA-370 in human breast cancer compare with normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Mollainezhad, Halimeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Pourazar, Abbasali; Salehi, Mansoor; Andalib, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths from cancer in the woman. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are known critical player in carcinogenesis. The role of miR-370 in malignancies remains controversial because of its levels varying in different cancers according to its targets while the role of miR-370 in breast cancer has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study was to identify the expression pattern of miR-370 in human breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent healthy tissue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two fresh frozen tissues (normal and malignant) from patients with breast cancer were examined for miR-370 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method at 2013. Results: We observed up-regulation (six-fold higher) of miR-370 in breast cancer tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Tumor samples in stage III, invasive ductal type, larger tumor size, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2+, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor−, P53 − status showed significantly increased expression in miR-370. Conclusion: Together, miR-370 may acts as an onco-miRNA, and it may have a novel role in breast cancer. Detection of miR-370 and its targets could be helpful as a diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27563639

  20. Different apoptotic effects of saxifragifolin C in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Ji-Yun; Kwak, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Byung Oh; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is currently the most common form of cancer affecting women. Recent studies have reported that triterpenoid saponins isolated from Androsace umbellata exhibit anti-proliferative effects in several types of cancer cells. However, the cytotoxic effect of saxifragifolin C (Saxi C) on breast cancer cells remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vitro anti-tumor activity of Saxi C in human breast cancer cells. Our data indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells were more sensitive than MCF-7 cells to Saxi C treatment. In addition, Saxi C inhibited cell survival through the induction of reactive oxygen species and the caspase-dependent pathway in the MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas MCF-7 cells treated with Saxi C underwent the apoptotic cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Although Saxi C treatment resulted in the induction of activation of MAPKs in both types of human breast cancer cells, p38 MAPK and JNK, but not ERK1/2, appeared to be involved in Saxi C-induced apoptosis. Moreover, ERα-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells remained alive, whereas the survival of shERα-transfected MCF-7 cells decreased. Taken together, Saxi C induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells via different regulatory mechanisms, and ERα status might be essential for regulating Saxi C-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Thus, Saxi C is a potential chemotherapeutic agent in breast cancer. PMID:26965415

  1. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro. PMID:25242400

  2. Aquaporin-5: A Marker Protein for Proliferation and Migration of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Jun; Park, Ji-Young; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Kwon, Tae-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) is a family of transmembrane proteins for water transport. Recent studies revealed that AQPs are likely to play a role in tumor progression and invasion. We aimed to examine the potential role of AQP5 in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Expression of AQP5 mRNA and protein was seen in human breast cancer cell line (both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) by RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Immunoperoxidase labeling of AQP5 was observed at ductal epithelial cells of human breast tissues. In benign tumor, AQP5 labeling was mainly seen at the apical domains of ductal epithelial cells. In contrast, in invasive ductal carcinoma, prominent AQP5 labeling was associated with cancer cells, whereas some ducts were unlabeled and apical polarity of AQP5 in ducts was lost. Cell proliferation (BrdU incorporation assay) and migration of MCF7 cells were significantly attenuated by lentivirus-mediated AQP5-shRNA transduction. Hyperosmotic stress induced by sorbitol treatment (100 mM, 24 h) reduced AQP5 expression in MCF7 cells, which was also associated with a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration. Taken together, prominent AQP5 expression in breast cancer cells with the loss of polarity of ductal epithelial cells was seen during the progression of breast carcinoma. shRNA- or hyperosmotic stress-induced reduction in AQP5 expression of MCF7 cells was associated with significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. In conclusion, AQP5 overexpression is likely to play a role in cell growth and metastasis of human breast cancer and could be a novel target for anti-breast cancer treatment. PMID:22145049

  3. [Menstrual blood and human milk. Reflections and new proposals on breast-feeding in ancient Greece].

    PubMed

    Pedrucci, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Within a larger study on breast-feeding in ancient Greece, we dwelt on four subjects (the superstitions concerning menstrual blood, milk and dairy products consumption by the Athenians, different kinds of milk and beliefs related to the transmission of hereditary characteristics through human milk, the connection between milk, breast and madness) on which we have identified a certain number of neglected sources. Starting from these, we can gain not only some mosaic tiles of the overall fragmentary view on habits and beliefs about breast-feeding, but also, more generally, helpful hints on some aspects of the Greek world and mentality that we barely know. In attempting to reach some general conclusions, we have also considered the iconographic sources, trying to explain, in part at least, the reason for the almost complete absence of scenes of breast-feeding in the archaic and classical art. PMID:24527558

  4. Raman microspectroscopy of Hematoporphyrins. Imaging of the noncancerous and the cancerous human breast tissues with photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Brozek-Pluska, B; Kopec, M

    2016-12-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with fluorescence were used to study the distribution of Hematoporphyrin (Hp) in noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues. The results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissue and to identify differences in the distribution and photodegradation of Hematoporphyrin, which is a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT), photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of cancer. Presented results show that Hematoporphyrin level in the noncancerous breast tissue is lower compared to the cancerous one. We have proved also that the Raman intensity of lipids and proteins doesn't change dramatically after laser light irradiation, which indicates that the PDT treatment destroys preferably cancer cells, in which the photosensitizer is accumulated. The specific subcellular localization of photosensitizer for breast tissues samples soaked with Hematoporphyrin was not observed. PMID:27376758

  5. Cell turnover in the "resting" human breast: influence of parity, contraceptive pill, age and laterality.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T. J.; Ferguson, D. J.; Raab, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Morphological identification of cell multiplication (mitosis) and cell deletion (apoptosis) within the lobules of the "resting" human breast is used to assess the response of the breast parenchyma to the menstrual cycle. The responses are shown to have a biorhythm in phase with the menstrual cycle, with a 3-day separation of the mitotic and apoptotic peaks. The study fails to demonstrate significant differences in the responses between groups defined according to parity, contraceptive-pill use or presence of fibroadenoma. However, significant differences are found in the apoptotic response according to age and laterality. The results highlight the complexity of modulating influences on breast parenchymal turnover in the "resting" state, and prompt the investigation of other factors as well as steroid hormones and prolactin in the promotion of mitosis. The factors promoting apoptosis in the breast are still not clear. PMID:7126427

  6. The integrin alpha 6 beta 1 promotes the survival of metastatic human breast carcinoma cells in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wewer, U. M.; Shaw, L. M.; Albrechtsen, R.; Mercurio, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    The role of the integrin alpha 6 beta 1 in breast carcinoma progression was studied by targeted elimination of this integrin in MDA-MB-435 cells, a human breast carcinoma cell line that is highly metastatic in athymic mice. The strategy used is based on the finding that expression of a cytoplasmic domain deletion mutant of the beta 4-integrin subunit (beta 4-delta CYT) in MDA-MB-435 cells eliminates formation of the alpha 6 beta 1 heterodimer. MDA-MB-435 cells that lacked alpha 6 beta 1 expression (beta 4-delta CYT transfectants) formed tumors in athymic mice that were suppressed in their growth and that exhibited a significant increase in apoptosis in comparison to the control tumors. Unlike the control MDA-MB-435 cells, the beta 4-delta CYT transfectants were unable to establish metastatic foci in the lungs. Also, the control transfectants grew substantially better than the beta 4-delta CYT transfectants in the liver after intrahepatic injection because of extensive apoptosis in the beta 4-delta CYT transfectants. These data suggest that a major function of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin in breast carcinoma is to facilitate tumorigenesis and promote tumor cell survival in distant organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9358743

  7. Quercetin inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via Bcl-2 and Bax regulation.

    PubMed

    Duo, Jian; Ying, Guo-Guang; Wang, Guo-Wen; Zhang, Li

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the breast. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the flavonoid compound quercetin on the growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Varying concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 µM) of quercetin were applied to cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells for defined lengths of time. At 50 to 200 µM doses, quercetin significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells assessed by MTT colorimetry, in both dose- and time-dependent manners (P<0.05). The compound also increased apoptosis after 48 h of exposure (P<0.05). Furthermore, following quercetin treatment Bcl-2 expression decreased significantly while Bax expression increased significantly (P<0.05). In brief, quercetin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The mechanisms behind these effects may stem from the downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression and upregulation of Bax expression. PMID:22447039

  8. Establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Aneuploidy is observed in the majority of human cancers and is considered to be causally related to carcinogenesis. Although malignant aneuploid cells are suggested to develop from polyploid cells formed in precancerous lesions, the mechanisms of this process remain elusive. This is partly because no experimental model is available where nontransformed polyploid human cells propagate in vitro. We previously showed that proliferative tetraploid cells can be established from normal human fibroblasts by treatment with the spindle poison demecolcine (DC). However, the limited lifespan of these cells hampered detailed analysis of a link between chromosomal instability and the oncogenic transformation of polyploid cells. Here, we report the establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from the telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblast cell line TIG-1. Treatment of immortalized diploid cells with DC for 4 days resulted in proliferation of cells with tetraploid DNA content and near-tetraploid/tetraploid chromosome counts. Established tetraploid cells had functional TP53 despite growing at almost the same rate as diploid cells. The frequency of clonal and sporadic chromosome aberrations in tetraploid cells was higher than in diploid cells and in one experiment, gradually increased with repeated subculture. This study suggests that tetraploid cells established from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts can be a valuable model for studying chromosomal instability and the oncogenic potential of polyploid cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917432

  9. Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew L.; McNulty, Nathan P.; Zhao, Yue; Leip, Douglas; Mitra, Robi D.; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The human gut microbiota is a metabolic organ whose cellular composition is determined by a dynamic process of selection and competition. To identify microbial genes required for establishment of human symbionts in the gut, we developed an approach (insertion-sequencing, or INSeq) based on a mutagenic transposon that allows capture of adjacent chromosomal DNA to define its genomic location. We used massively parallel sequencing to monitor the relative abundance of tens of thousands of transposon mutants of a saccharolytic human gut bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as they established themselves in wild-type and immunodeficient gnotobiotic mice, in the presence or absence of other human gut commensals. In vivo selection transforms this population, revealing functions necessary for survival in the gut: we show how this selection is influenced by community composition and competition for nutrients (vitamin B12). INSeq provides a broadly applicable platform to explore microbial adaptation to the gut and other ecosystems. PMID:19748469

  10. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Promotes Apoptosis in Human Breast Epithelial × Breast Cancer Hybrids, but Not in Parental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Sabrina; Tosun, Songuel; Troost, Gabriele; Keil, Silvia; Zaenker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the group of pathogen recognition receptors known to play a crucial role in the innate immune system. In cancer, TLR expression is still debated controversially due to contradictory results reporting that both induction of apoptosis as well as tumor progression could depend on TLR signaling, whereby recent data rather indicate a pro-tumorigenic effect. The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression due to findings revealing that fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit properties like an increased metastatogenic capacity and an increased drug resistance. Thus, M13MDA435 hybrid cell lines, which derived from spontaneous fusion events between human M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells and human MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, were investigated. Cultivation of cells in the presence of the TLR4 ligand LPS potently induced apoptosis in all hybrid clones, but not in parental cells, which was most likely attributed to differential kinetics of the TLR4 signal transduction cascade. Activation of this pathway concomitant with NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α expression was solely observed in hybrid cells. However, induction of LPS mediated apoptosis was not TNF-α dependent since TNF-α neutralization was not correlated to a decreased amount of dead cells. In addition to TNF-α, LPS also caused IFN-β expression in hybrid clones 1 and 3. Interestingly, hybrid clones differ in the mode of LPS induced apoptosis. While neutralization of IFN-β was sufficient to impair the LPS induced apoptosis in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrids, the amount of apoptotic M13MDA435-2 and -4 hybrid cells remained unchanged in the presence of neutralizing IFN-β antibodies. In summary, the fusion of non-LPS susceptible parental human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells gave rise to LPS susceptible hybrid cells, which is in view with the cell fusion hypothesis that hybrid cells could exhibit novel

  12. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Promotes Apoptosis in Human Breast Epithelial × Breast Cancer Hybrids, but Not in Parental Cells.

    PubMed

    Fried, Sabrina; Tosun, Songuel; Troost, Gabriele; Keil, Silvia; Zaenker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the group of pathogen recognition receptors known to play a crucial role in the innate immune system. In cancer, TLR expression is still debated controversially due to contradictory results reporting that both induction of apoptosis as well as tumor progression could depend on TLR signaling, whereby recent data rather indicate a pro-tumorigenic effect. The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression due to findings revealing that fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit properties like an increased metastatogenic capacity and an increased drug resistance. Thus, M13MDA435 hybrid cell lines, which derived from spontaneous fusion events between human M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells and human MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, were investigated. Cultivation of cells in the presence of the TLR4 ligand LPS potently induced apoptosis in all hybrid clones, but not in parental cells, which was most likely attributed to differential kinetics of the TLR4 signal transduction cascade. Activation of this pathway concomitant with NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α expression was solely observed in hybrid cells. However, induction of LPS mediated apoptosis was not TNF-α dependent since TNF-α neutralization was not correlated to a decreased amount of dead cells. In addition to TNF-α, LPS also caused IFN-β expression in hybrid clones 1 and 3. Interestingly, hybrid clones differ in the mode of LPS induced apoptosis. While neutralization of IFN-β was sufficient to impair the LPS induced apoptosis in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrids, the amount of apoptotic M13MDA435-2 and -4 hybrid cells remained unchanged in the presence of neutralizing IFN-β antibodies. In summary, the fusion of non-LPS susceptible parental human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells gave rise to LPS susceptible hybrid cells, which is in view with the cell fusion hypothesis that hybrid cells could exhibit novel

  13. Isolation, immortalization, and characterization of a human breast epithelial cell line with stem cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2002-01-01

    The epithelial compartment of the human breast comprises two distinct lineages: the luminal epithelial and the myoepithelial lineage. We have shown previously that a subset of the luminal epithelial cells could convert to myoepithelial cells in culture signifying the possible existence of a progenitor cell. We therefore set out to identify and isolate the putative precursor in the luminal epithelial compartment. Using cell surface markers and immunomagnetic sorting, we isolated two luminal epithelial cell populations from primary cultures of reduction mammoplasties. The major population coexpresses sialomucin (MUC+) and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA+) whereas the minor population has a suprabasal position and expresses epithelial specific antigen but no sialomucin (MUC−/ESA+). Two cell lines were further established by transduction of the E6/E7 genes from human papilloma virus type 16. Both cell lines maintained a luminal epithelial phenotype as evidenced by expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-1 and occludin, and by generation of a high transepithelial electrical resistance on semipermeable filters. Whereas in clonal cultures, the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line was luminal epithelial restricted in its differentiation repertoire, the suprabasal-derived MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line was able to generate itself as well as MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cells and Thy-1+/α-smooth muscle actin+ (ASMA+) myoepithelial cells. The MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line further differed from the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line by the expression of keratin K19, a feature of a subpopulation of epithelial cells in terminal duct lobular units in vivo. Within a reconstituted basement membrane, the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line formed acinus-like spheres. In contrast, the MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line formed elaborate branching structures resembling uncultured terminal duct lobular units both by morphology and marker expression. Similar structures were obtained by

  14. Does Dietary Iodine Regulate Oxidative Stress and Adiponectin Levels in Human Breast Milk?

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 847–853. PMID:24001137

  15. Does dietary iodine regulate oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-02-10

    Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. PMID:24001137

  16. Self-assembly structure formation during the digestion of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Salentinig, Stefan; Phan, Stephanie; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-01-26

    An infant's complete diet, human breast milk, is the basis for its survival and development. It contains water-soluble and poorly water-soluble bioactive components, metabolic messages, and energy, all of which are made bioavailable during the digestion process in the infant's gastrointestinal tract. Reported is the first discovery of highly geometrically organized structures formed during the digestion of human breast milk under simulated in vivo conditions using small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Time of digestion, pH, and bile salt concentration were found to have symbiotic effects gradually tuning the oil-based environment inside the breast milk globules to more water-like structures with high internal surface area. The structure formation is necessarily linked to its function as carriers for poorly water-soluble molecules in the digestive tract of the infant. PMID:25482918

  17. Chemopreventive properties of 3,3'-diindolylmethane in breast cancer: evidence from experimental and human studies.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Ho, Emily; Strom, Meghan B

    2016-07-01

    Diet is a modifiable factor associated with the risk of several cancers, with convincing evidence showing a link between diet and breast cancer. The role of bioactive compounds of food origin, including those found in cruciferous vegetables, is an active area of research in cancer chemoprevention. This review focuses on 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), the major bioactive indole in crucifers. Research of the cancer-preventive activity of DIM has yielded basic mechanistic, animal, and human trial data. Further, this body of evidence is largely supported by observational studies. Bioactive DIM has demonstrated chemopreventive activity in all stages of breast cancer carcinogenesis. This review describes current evidence related to the metabolism and mechanisms of DIM involved in the prevention of breast cancer. Importantly, this review also focuses on current evidence from human observational and intervention trials that have contributed to a greater understanding of exposure estimates that will inform recommendations for DIM intake. PMID:27261275

  18. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  19. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  20. Selective Human Estrogen Receptor Partial Agonists (ShERPAs) for Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rui; Patel, Hitisha K; Gutgesell, Lauren M; Zhao, Jiong; Delgado-Rivera, Loruhama; Pham, Thao N D; Zhao, Huiping; Carlson, Kathryn; Martin, Teresa; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Moore, Terry W; Tonetti, Debra A; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2016-01-14

    Almost 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), represents the standard of care for many patients; however, 30-50% develop resistance, underlining the need for alternative therapeutics. Paradoxically, agonists at ERα such as estradiol (E2) have demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with heavily treated breast cancer, although side effects in gynecological tissues are unacceptable. A drug that selectively mimics the actions of E2 in breast cancer therapy but minimizes estrogenic effects in other tissues is a novel, therapeutic alternative. We hypothesized that a selective human estrogen receptor partial agonist (ShERPA) at ERα would provide such an agent. Novel benzothiophene derivatives with nanomolar potency in breast cancer cell cultures were designed. Several showed partial agonist activity, with potency of 0.8-76 nM, mimicking E2 in inhibiting growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Three ShERPAs were tested and validated in xenograft models of endocrine-independent and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer, and in contrast to E2, ShERPAs did not cause significant uterine growth. PMID:26681208

  1. Presence of human papillomavirus in breast cancer and its association with prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andreína; Bianchi, Gino; Feltri, Adriana Pesci; Pérez, Marihorgen; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer accounts for 16% of all female cancers worldwide, and in Venezuela, it is the leading cause of death among women. Recently, the presence of high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated in breast cancer and has been associated with histopathological features of the tumours. In Venezuela, there is no study which determines the association between the presence of HPV in breast cancer and the histopathological features. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the presence of HPV in the different types of breast cancer, according to their molecular classification, based on the expression of ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67. With this purpose in mind, we assessed the presence of the HPV genome in 24 breast cancer samples diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma, by the INNO-LIPA genotyping extra kit and the evaluation of the markers ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67 by immunohistochemistry. The viral genome was found in 41.67% of the total number of samples, 51 being the most frequent genotype with 30.77%, followed by types 18 and 33, with 23.08%, respectively. Most tumours were found in the group of luminal A, with a low range of Ki67 expression. The presence of HPV in breast tumours could affect their growth pattern and metastatic power. PMID:26180547

  2. Plasma membrane calcium-ATPase 2 and 4 in human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Jae; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R. . E-mail: G.Monteith@pharmacy.uq.edu.au

    2005-11-25

    There is evidence to suggest that plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) isoforms are important mediators sssof mammary gland physiology. PMCA2 in particular is upregulated extensively during lactation. Expression of other isoforms such as PMCA4 may influence mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation and aberrant regulation of PMCA isoform expression may lead or contribute to mammary gland pathophysiology in the form of breast cancers. To explore whether PMCA2 and PMCA4 expression may be deregulated in breast cancer, we compared mRNA expression of these PMCA isoforms in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell lines using real time RT-PCR. PMCA2 mRNA has a higher level of expression in some breast cancer cell lines and is overexpressed more than 100-fold in ZR-75-1 cells, compared to non-tumorigenic 184B5 cells. Although differences in PMCA4 mRNA levels were observed between breast cell lines, they were not of the magnitude observed for PMCA2. We conclude that PMCA2 mRNA can be highly overexpressed in some breast cancer cells. The significance of PMCA2 overexpression on tumorigenicity and its possible correlation with other properties such as invasiveness requires further study.

  3. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for X-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to 2D mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission X-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for X-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 seconds, was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent. PMID:24869902

  4. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines. PMID:26215372

  5. Overexpression of neogenin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingsong; Liang, Fang; Ke, Yang; Huo, Yanping; Li, Mingchuang; Li, Yanyan; Yue, Junmin

    2015-07-01

    Neogenin has been documented as playing an important role in cancer development. Although an elevated expression of neogenin has been detected in human breast cancer, the role of neogenin in breast cancer cells is not clearly understood. In the present study, we investigated neogenin in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. We found that neogenin overexpression markedly reduced the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (P<0.05). Neogenin overexpression resulted in a reduction in the apoptosis rate. Inhibition of neogenin expression by neogenin siRNA dramatically promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells, whereas it inhibited cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that BMP-2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 which was inhibited by neogenin overexpression. The present study demonstrates that neogenin may be a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Neogenin may serve as a potential diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:25998984

  6. Establishment of a quantitative PCR system for discriminating chitinase-like proteins: catalytically inactive breast regression protein-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mice and humans produce chitinase-like proteins (CLPs), which are highly homologous to chitinases but lack chitinolytic activity. Mice express primarily three CLPs, including breast regression protein-39 (BRP-39) [chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1) or 38-kDa glycoprotein (gp38k)], Ym1 (Chi3l3) and Ym2 (Chi3l4). Recently, CLPs have attracted considerable attention due to their increased expression in a number of pathological conditions, including asthma, allergies, rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors. Although the exact functions of CLPs are largely unknown, the significance of their increased expression levels during pathophysiological states needs to be determined. The quantification of BRP-39, Ym1 and Ym2 is an important step in gaining insight into the in vivo regulation of the CLPs. Methods We constructed a standard DNA for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) by containing three CLPs target fragments and five reference genes cDNA in a one-to-one ratio. We evaluated this system by analyzing the eight target cDNA sequences. Tissue cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription from total RNA from four embryonic stages and eight adult tissues were analyzed using the qPCR system with the standard DNA. Results We established a qPCR system detecting CLPs and comparing their expression levels with those of five reference genes using the same scale in mouse tissues. We found that BRP-39 and Ym1 were abundant in the mouse lung, whereas Ym2 mRNA was abundant in the stomach, followed by lung. The expression levels of BRP-39 and Ym1 in the mouse lung were higher than those of two active chitinases and were comparable to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a housekeeping gene which is constitutively expressed in all tissues. Conclusion Our results indicate that catalytically inactive BRP-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in normal mouse lung. PMID:25294623

  7. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  8. Establishment and characterization of a human monocytoid leukemia cell line, CTV-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Chiu, C; Chiou, T; Maeda, S; Chiang, H; Tzeng, C; Sugiyama, T; Chiang, B N

    1984-08-01

    A new human monocytoid leukemic cell line, CTV-1, was established from a patient with relapsed acute monoblastic leukemia. The characteristics of this cell line were evaluated by morphologic and cytochemical analyses, electron-microscopy, chromosome study, surface marker analysis and a study of differentiation potential with tumor-promoting agents. PMID:6593267

  9. Human breast cancer cells enhance self tolerance by promoting evasion from NK cell antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Mamessier, Emilie; Sylvain, Aude; Thibult, Marie-Laure; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Castellano, Rémy; Gonçalves, Anthony; André, Pascale; Romagné, François; Thibault, Gilles; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François; Moretta, Alessandro; Olive, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    NK cells are a major component of the antitumor immune response and are involved in controlling tumor progression and metastases in animal models. Here, we show that dysfunction of these cells accompanies human breast tumor progression. We characterized human peripheral blood NK (p-NK) cells and malignant mammary tumor-infiltrating NK (Ti-NK) cells from patients with noninvasive and invasive breast cancers. NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and normal breast tissue were used as controls. With disease progression, we found that expression of activating NK cell receptors (such as NKp30, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and CD16) decreased while expression of inhibitory receptors (such as NKG2A) increased and that this correlated with decreased NK cell function, most notably cytotoxicity. Importantly, Ti-NK cells had more pronounced impairment of their cytotoxic potential than p-NK cells. We also identified several stroma-derived factors, including TGF-β1, involved in tumor-induced reduction of normal NK cell function. Our data therefore show that breast tumor progression involves NK cell dysfunction and that breast tumors model their environment to evade NK cell antitumor immunity. This highlights the importance of developing future therapies able to restore NK cell cytotoxicity to limit/prevent tumor escape from antitumor immunity. PMID:21841316

  10. Dietary Stearate Reduces Human Breast Cancer Metastasis Burden in Athymic Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda M.; Toline, Eric C.; Desmond, Renee; Siegal, Gene P.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Hardy, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Stearate is an 18-carbon saturated fatty acid found in many foods in the western diet, including beef and chocolate. Stearate has been shown to have anti-cancer properties during early stages of neoplastic progression. However, previous studies have not investigated the effect of dietary stearate on breast cancer metastasis. In this study, we present evidence that exogenously supplied dietary stearate dramatically reduces the size of tumors that formed from injected human breast cancer cells within the mammary fat pads of athymic nude mice by approximately 50% and partially inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis burden in the lungs in this mouse model system. This metastatic inhibition appears to be independent of primary tumor size, as stearate fed animals that had primary tumors comparable in size to littermates fed either a safflower oil enriched diet or a low fat diet had reduced lung metastasis. Also stearate fed mice sub-groups had different primary tumor sizes but no difference in metastasis. This anti-metastasis effect may be due, at least in part, to the ability of stearate to induce apoptosis in these human breast cancer cells. Overall, this study suggests the possibility of dietary manipulation with selected long-chain saturated fatty acids such as stearate as a potential adjuvant therapeutic strategy for breast cancer patients wishing to maximize the suppression of metastatic disease. PMID:19267249

  11. Upregulation of GRIM-19 inhibits the growth and invasion of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Ye; Jiang, Tong; Geng, Wei; Yuan, Jiuli; Zhang, Duo

    2015-08-01

    Gene associated with retinoid-interferon (IFN)-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19), a novel IFN-β/retinoic acid-inducible gene product, has been identified as a potential tumor suppressor, which is associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. GRIM-19 has been demonstrated to be downregulated in the ovarian tissue of patients with breast cancer, however, its role in breast cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying GRIM-19 was constructed and then transfected into the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line to examine its effects on breast cancer cell growth, migration and invasion using several in vitro approaches. The results demonstrated that upregulation GRIM-19 in the MCF7 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis. Additionally, upregulation of GRIM-19 also suppressed the secretion of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It was also demonstrated that the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was downregulated by the expression of GRIM-19. These results revealed that overexpression of the GRIM-19 gene may be an effective approach to control the growth and invasion of human breast cancer cells. PMID:25955394

  12. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  13. Dietary stearate reduces human breast cancer metastasis burden in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lynda M; Toline, Eric C; Desmond, Renee; Siegal, Gene P; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Hardy, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Stearate is an 18-carbon saturated fatty acid found in many foods in the western diet, including beef and chocolate. Stearate has been shown to have anti-cancer properties during early stages of neoplastic progression. However, previous studies have not investigated the effect of dietary stearate on breast cancer metastasis. In this study, we present evidence that exogenously supplied dietary stearate dramatically reduces the size of tumors that formed from injected human breast cancer cells within the mammary fat pads of athymic nude mice by approximately 50% and partially inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis burden in the lungs in this mouse model system. This metastatic inhibition appears to be independent of primary tumor size, as stearate fed animals that had primary tumors comparable in size to littermates fed either a safflower oil enriched diet or a low fat diet had reduced lung metastasis. Also stearate fed mice sub-groups had different primary tumor sizes but no difference in metastasis. This anti-metastasis effect may be due, at least in part, to the ability of stearate to induce apoptosis in these human breast cancer cells. Overall, this study suggests the possibility of dietary manipulation with selected long-chain saturated fatty acids such as stearate as a potential adjuvant therapeutic strategy for breast cancer patients wishing to maximize the suppression of metastatic disease. PMID:19267249

  14. Diffuse Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Human Breast for Quantitative Oximetry with Depth Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang

    -axis detection method, we incorporated an additional detector to acquire a second set of image independently. We then proposed an inner-product approach to associate absorption structures detected in the on-axis image with those detected in the off-axis image. The spatial coordinate difference for the same structure between the two images is directly related to the depth of the corresponding structure, and the monotonic dependence can be quantified by perturbation theory of the diffusion equation. A preliminary phantom study shows good agreement between the measured and the actual depth of embedded structures, and human measurements show the capability to assign a depth coordinate to the more complex absorption structures inside the breast.

  15. Breast-feeding and human immunodeficiency virus infection: assessment of knowledge among clinicians in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Murila, Florence; Obimbo, Moses M; Musoke, Rachel; Tsikhutsu, Isaac; Migiro, Santau; Ogeng'o, Julius

    2015-02-01

    In Kenya, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence ranks among the highest in the world. Approximately 60 000 infections yearly are attributed to vertical transmission including the process of labour and breast-feeding. The vast of the population affected is in the developing world. Clinical officers and nurses play an important role in provision of primary health care to antenatal and postnatal mothers. There are a few studies that have explored the clinicians' knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV and in relation to vertical transmission this being a vital component in prevention of maternal-to-child transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicians' knowledge on HIV in relation to breast-feeding in Kenya. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess knowledge of 161 clinical officers and nurses serving in the maternity and children' wards in various hospitals in Kenya. The participants were derived from all district and provincial referral facilities in Kenya. A preformatted questionnaire containing a series of questions on HIV and breast-feeding was administered to clinicians who were then scored and analyzed. All the 161 participants responded. Majority of clinicians (92%) were knowledgeable regarding prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Regarding HIV and breast-feeding, 49.7% thought expressed breast milk from HIV-positive mothers should be heated before being given. Majority (78.3%) thought breast milk should be given regardless of availability of alternatives. According to 74.5% of the participants, exclusive breast-feeding increased chances of HIV transmission. Two-thirds (66.5%) would recommend breast-feeding for mothers who do not know their HIV status (66.5%). This study observes that a majority of the clinicians have inadequate knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV. There is need to promote training programmes on breast-feeding and transmission of HIV from mother to child. This can be done as in

  16. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  17. Regulation of gene expression in human mammary epithelium: effect of breast pumping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the molecular regulation of human milk production because of limitations in obtaining mammary tissue from lactating women. Our objectives were to evaluate whether RNA isolated from breast milk fat globules (MFGs) could be an alternative to mammary biopsies and to determine whether...

  18. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiulong Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A.

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  19. Establishment of a cell line producing bone morphogenetic protein from a human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, K; Yoshikawa, H; Masuhara, K; Sugamoto, K; Tsuda, T; Aoki, Y; Ono, K; Sakamoto, Y

    1989-07-01

    A human osteosarcoma cell line was established from a biopsy specimen from a 13-year-old girl. The osteosarcoma tissue was maintained in athymic nude mice (Balb C nu/nu) by serial transplantation for three years. The tumor was excised from a host mouse and digested with collagenase. The isolated cells were cultured by 98 passages in 14 months, and clones of osteosarcoma cells were obtained by limiting dilution. A clone named human osteosarcoma cell 6 (H-OS-6) that showed the osteoblastic phenotypes of productions of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and alkaline phosphatase and a response to human parathyroid hormone (h-PTH 1-34) was selected. The morphology of its chromosomes indicated its human origin. This human osteosarcoma cell line is unique in producing BMP under in vitro conditions. PMID:2545399

  20. The establishment of a human myeloma cell line elaborating lambda-light chain protein.

    PubMed

    Niho, Y; Shibuya, T; Yamasaki, K; Kimura, N

    1984-05-01

    A human myeloma cell line (KMM-56) producing lambda-light chain protein was established in vitro by cultivation of the cells in the pleural effusion obtained from a patient with IgD-lambda-myeloma. The cells proliferate in suspension and do not aggregate or attach to the culture dish. Surface marker analysis revealed that the cells were negative for E-rosette, and surface immunoglobulin. Immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, and immunofluorescence with various antibodies demonstrated no heavy chains, while lambda-light chains were detected in the cytoplasm of the cells. Using the immunodiffusion technique, only lambda-light chains were detected in the frozen and thawed cell extract, the concentrated supernatant of the cell culture, and the urine of the patient. Electron microscopic examination revealed the plasmablastoid appearance of the cells. This cell line may be useful for future studies of human immunoglobulin genes and for the material of human-human hybridoma, which could produce monoclonal human immunoglobulin. PMID:6429256

  1. Asymmetric segregation of template DNA strands in basal-like human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and methods Stem or progenitor cells from healthy tissues have the capacity to co-segregate their template DNA strands during mitosis. Here, we set out to test whether breast cancer cell lines also possess the ability to asymmetrically segregate their template DNA strands via non-random chromosome co-segregation, and whether this ability correlates with certain properties attributed to breast cancer stem cells (CSCs). We quantified the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA strands in 12 human breast cancer cell lines, and correlated the frequency to molecular subtype, CD44+/CD24-/lo phenotype, and invasion/migration ability. We tested if co-culture with human mesenchymal stem cells, which are known to increase self-renewal, can alter the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA in breast cancer. Results We found a positive correlation between asymmetric segregation of template DNA and the breast cancer basal-like and claudin-low subtypes. There was an inverse correlation between asymmetric segregation of template DNA and Her2 expression. Breast cancer samples with evidence of asymmetric segregation of template DNA had significantly increased invasion and borderline significantly increased migration abilities. Samples with high CD44+/CD24-/lo surface expression were more likely to harbor a consistent population of cells that asymmetrically segregated its template DNA; however, symmetric self-renewal was enriched in the CD44+/CD24-/lo population. Co-culturing breast cancer cells with human mesenchymal stem cells expanded the breast CSC pool and decreased the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA. Conclusions Breast cancer cells within the basal-like subtype can asymmetrically segregate their template DNA strands through non-random chromosome segregation. The frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA can be modulated by external factors that influence expansion or self-renewal of CSC populations. Future

  2. Establishment, characterization, and successful adaptive therapy against human tumors of NKG cell, a new human NK cell line.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Ma, Juan; Chen, Yongyan; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Haiming; Ling, Bin; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in adoptive cellular immunotherapy against certain human cancers. This study aims to establish a new human NK cell line and to study its role for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 54 patients to establish the NK cell line. A new human NK cell line, termed as NKG, was established from a Chinese male patient with rapidly progressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. NKG cells showed LGL morphology and were phenotypically identified as CD56(bright) NK cell with CD16(-), CD27(-), CD3(-), αβTCR(-), γδTCR(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), CD19(-), CD161(-), CD45(+), CXCR4(+), CCR7(+), CXCR1(-), and CX3CR1(-). NKG cells showed high expression of adhesive molecules (CD2, CD58, CD11a, CD54, CD11b, CD11c), an array of activating receptors (NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKG2D, NKG2C), and cytolysis-related receptors and molecules (TRAIL, FasL, granzyme B, perforin, IFN-γ). The cytotoxicity of NKG cells against tumor cells was higher than that of the established NK cell lines NK-92, NKL, and YT. NKG cell cytotoxicity depended on the presence of NKG2D and NKp30. When irradiated with 8 Gy, NKG cells were still with high cytotoxicity and activity in vitro and with safety in vivo, but without proliferation. Further, the irradiated NKG cells exhibited strong cytotoxicity against human primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and against human ovarian cancer in a mouse xenograft model. The adoptive transfer of NKG cells significantly inhibited the ovarian tumor growth, decreased the mortality rate and prolonged the survival, even in cases of advanced diseases. A number of NKG cells were detected in the ovarian tumor tissues during cell therapy. In use of the new human NK cell line, NKG would a promising cellular candidate for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer. PMID:21669033

  3. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in primary human breast cancer and breast cancer cell lines: New findings and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of structural and functional related endopeptidases. They play a crucial role in tumor invasion and building of metastatic formations because of their ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins. Under physiological conditions their activity is precisely regulated in order to prevent tissue disruption. This physiological balance seems to be disrupted in cancer making tumor cells capable of invading the tissue. In breast cancer different expression levels of several MMPs have been found. Methods To fill the gap in our knowledge about MMP expression in breast cancer, we analyzed the expression of all known human MMPs in a panel of twenty-five tissue samples (five normal breast tissues, ten grade 2 (G2) and ten grade 3 (G3) breast cancer tissues). As we found different expression levels for several MMPs in normal breast and breast cancer tissue as well as depending on tumor grade, we additionally analyzed the expression of MMPs in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, BT 20, ZR 75/1) commonly used in research. The results could thus be used as model for further studies on human breast cancer. Expression analysis was performed on mRNA and protein level using semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Results In summary, we identified several MMPs (MMP-1, -2, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, -13, -15, -19, -23, -24, -27 and -28) with a stronger expression in breast cancer tissue compared to normal breast tissue. Of those, expression of MMP-8, -10, -12 and -27 is related to tumor grade since it is higher in analyzed G3 compared to G2 tissue samples. In contrast, MMP-7 and MMP-27 mRNA showed a weaker expression in tumor samples compared to healthy tissue. In addition, we demonstrated that the four breast cancer cell lines examined, are constitutively expressing a wide variety of MMPs. Of those, MDA-MB-468 showed the strongest mRNA and protein expression for most of

  4. Sensitivity of proliferating human breast epithelial cells to hypotonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstone, S.E.; Stanyon, R.; Lan, S.

    1982-12-01

    An assay for colony-forming cells of breast epithelia derived from normal and malignant surgical specimens is described using an IMR 90 fibroblast feeder layer. Their radiosensitivity (DO: 120-172) is consistent with the proliferative origin of the colonies. Distilled water inhibits proliferation of a proportion of the colony-forming cells after a 1-minute exposure. Continued detection of colonies after 10 minutes of exposure indicates that it is an inefficient way of completely eradicating proliferating epithelial cells of normal and malignant origin.

  5. Trends in the enantiomeric composition of polychlorinated biphenyl atropisomers in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Nakano, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    For the precise estimation of the risk to human health caused by persistent organic pollutants (POPs), it is important to discuss enantiomer fraction value (EF value) because it is reported that behaviors such as stability and toxicity of enantiomers are quite different in human body. Among POPs, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) is known as one of the most persistent compounds in human breast milk samples. The main exposure source of PCB for human body is mostly from food especially in seafood. The contamination of fish and shellfish has been a serious problem for the Japanese, who consume a large amount of fish in their diet. PCBs have 19 congeners which are chlorine-substituted in 3- or 4- ortho positions are known to have enantiomers. In this study, we analyzed PCB 183 (2,2',3,4,4',5',6-hepta CB) in human breast milk and fish samples enantioselectively and revealed the time trends of the EF value. Though EF value of PCB 183 in fish samples sustained close to racemate (EF = 0.5) from 1982 to 2012, that in breast milk increased over time. This fact indicates that (+)-PCB-183 has greater bioaccumulation potential than (-)-PCB-183 in human body; therefore, the toxicity of (+)-PCB-183 should be emphasized. PMID:26081770

  6. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  7. Enhanced chemosensitization in multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cells by inhibition of IL-6 and IL-8 production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Yang, Wei-Min; Chen, Li-Pai; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Jun-Jiang; Huang, Ruo-Chun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance remains a major hurdle to successful cancer treatment. Many mechanisms such as overexpression of multidrug-resistance related proteins, increased drug metabolism, decreased apoptosis, and impairment of signal transduction pathway can contribute multidrug resistance (MDR). Recent studies strongly suggest a close link between cytokines and drug resistance. To identify new targets involved in drug resistance, we established a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/R and examined the cytokine profile using cytokine antibody array technology. Among 120 cytokines/chemokines screened, IL-6, IL-8, and 13 other proteins were found to be markedly increased in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cell line as compared to sensitive MCF-7/S cell line, while 7 proteins were specifically reduced in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and IL-8 partially reversed the drug resistance of MCF-7/R to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, while a neutralizing antibody against MCP-1 had no significant effect. Inhibition of endogenous IL-6 or IL-8 by siRNA technology significantly enhanced drug sensitivity of MCF-7/R cells. Furthermore, overexpression of IL-6 or IL-8 expression by transfection increased the ADM resistance in MCF-7/S cells. Our data suggest that increased expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 may contribute to MDR in human breast cancer cells. PMID:22923236

  8. Oridonin phosphate-induced autophagy effectively enhances cell apoptosis of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Wang, Ying; Wang, Suihai; Gao, Yanjun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Lu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    together, the compound of oridonin phosphate simultaneously induced cell apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells. Inhibition oridonin phosphate-induced cell autophagy suppressed the progression of cell apoptosis, which revealed that oridonin phosphate-induced autophagy participated in up-regulation of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. It would provide some new clues for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:25491140

  9. The triterpenoid cucurbitacin B augments the antiproliferative activity of chemotherapy in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aribi, Ahmed; Gery, Sigal; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Thoennissen, Nils H; Thoennissen, Gabriela B; Alvarez, Rocio; Ho, Quoc; Lee, Kunik; Doan, Ngan B; Chan, Kin T; Toh, Melvin; Said, Jonathan W; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2013-06-15

    Despite recent advances in therapy, breast cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancy in women. Chemotherapy plays a major role in breast cancer management, and combining chemotherapeutic agents with nonchemotherapeutic agents is of considerable clinical interest. Cucurbitacins are triterpenes compounds found in plants of the Cucurbitaceae family, reported to have anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we have shown antiproliferative activity of cucurbitacin B (CuB) in breast cancer, and we hypothesized that combining CuB with chemotherapeutic agents can augment their antitumor effect. Here, we show that a combination of CuB with either docetaxel (DOC) or gemcitabine (GEM) synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro. This antiproliferative effect was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis rates. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of human breast cancer orthotopic xenografts in immunodeficient mice with CuB at either low (0.5 mg/kg) or high (1 mg/kg) doses in combination with either DOC (20 mg/kg) or GEM (12.5mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor volume as compared with monotherapy of each drug. Importantly, no significant toxicity was noted with low-dose CuB in combination with either DOC or GEM. In conclusion, combination of CuB at a relatively low concentration with either of the chemotherapeutic agents, DOC or GEM, shows prominent antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells without increased toxicity. This promising combination should be examined in therapeutic trials of breast cancer. PMID:23165325

  10. The triterpenoid Cucurbitacin B augments the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapy in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aribi, Ahmed; Gery, Sigal; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Thoennissen, Nils H.; Thoennissen, Gabriela B.; Alvarez, Rocio; Ho, Quoc; Lee, Kunik; Doan, Ngan B.; Chan, Kin T.; Toh, Melvin; Said, Jonathan W.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in therapy, breast cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancy in women. Chemotherapy plays a major role in breast cancer management, and combining chemotherapeutic agents with non-chemotherapeutic agents is of considerable clinical interest. Cucurbitacins are triterpenes compounds found in plants of the Cucurbitaceae family, reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflamatory activities. Previously, we have shown antiproliferative activity of cucurbitacin B (CuB) in breast cancer, and we hypothesized that combining CuB with chemotherapeutic agents can augment their anti-tumor effect. Here, we show that a combination of CuB with either docetaxel (DOC) or gemcitabine (GEM) synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro. This antiproliferative effect was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis rates. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of human breast cancer orthotopic xenografts in immunodeficient mice with CuB at either low (0.5 mg/kg) or high (1 mg/kg) doses in combination with either DOC (20 mg/kg) or GEM (12.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor volume as compared to monotherapy of each drug. Importantly, no significant toxicity was noted with low dose CuB in combination with either DOC or GEM. In conclusion, combination of CuB at a relatively low concentration with either of the chemotherapeutic agents, DOC or GEM, shows prominent antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells without increased toxicity. This promising combination should be examined in therapeutic trials of breast cancer. PMID:23165325