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Sample records for estadio iiib tratado

  1. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing shows cancer in the cervix, the vagina, and ... that connect the kidneys to the bladder). The drawing shows the ureter on the right blocked by ...

  2. IIIB or not IIIB: a previously unanswered question.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Drazner, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    The term New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IIIB has been used increasingly in clinical medicine, including as an inclusion criteria for many clinical trials assessing left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Indeed, NYHA class IIIB is incorporated in the Food and Drug Administration's approved indication for the Heartmate II. However, on review of the medical literature, we found that there is no consensus definition of NYHA class IIIB. Until the ambiguity is resolved, we suggest that this designation not be used in clinical practice or by investigators leading clinical trials assessing therapies which convey substantial risk to patients and therefore require clarity in describing the enrolled patient population. With ongoing improvements in LVADs, this therapy will increasingly be considered in patients less sick than those who require inotropic support, providing urgency to establish a consensus system of classifying such patients who nevertheless fall within the spectrum of advanced heart failure. Herein we propose a modification of the standard NYHA classification system which can be used to fill this void. PMID:22555265

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) masquerading as a behavioural disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacqueline; Trehan, Aditi; Landis, Dennis; Toro, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) that manifest primarily as psychiatric and behavioural symptoms in childhood are often mistaken for idiopathic primary psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological basis of these symptoms may be overlooked until later in the disease course when neurological deficits become dominant; this results in a significant delay in establishing a proper diagnosis. To illustrate this, we describe two siblings who presented with behavioural issues and mild learning disabilities in childhood, and were consequently given multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In early adulthood, however, they manifested a rapid cognitive decline. Subsequent cranial MRI imaging revealed progressive brain iron accumulation in deep brain nuclei. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical investigation confirmed the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Their long diagnostic odyssey illustrates the importance of considering IEMs when assessing individuals with behavioural abnormalities and cognitive impairment. PMID:23661660

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) masquerading as a behavioural disorder.

    PubMed

    Brady, Jacqueline; Trehan, Aditi; Landis, Dennis; Toro, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) that manifest primarily as psychiatric and behavioural symptoms in childhood are often mistaken for idiopathic primary psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological basis of these symptoms may be overlooked until later in the disease course when neurological deficits become dominant; this results in a significant delay in establishing a proper diagnosis. To illustrate this, we describe two siblings who presented with behavioural issues and mild learning disabilities in childhood, and were consequently given multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In early adulthood, however, they manifested a rapid cognitive decline. Subsequent cranial MRI imaging revealed progressive brain iron accumulation in deep brain nuclei. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical investigation confirmed the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Their long diagnostic odyssey illustrates the importance of considering IEMs when assessing individuals with behavioural abnormalities and cognitive impairment. PMID:23661660

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  7. Dental Findings and Management in a Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB Patient.

    PubMed

    Mellara, Talitha de Siqueira; Azevedo, Danielle Torres; Faria, Gisele; Nelson Filho, Paulo; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme a-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Affected subjects present developmental delay, attention deficit disorder, uncontrollable hyperactivity, and aggressive behavior, followed by progressive dementia and death in late adolescence. The purpose of this paper is to report the dental findings and treatment in a child with MPS IIIB. His primary molars and permanent mandibular incisors presented obliterated pulp chambers and root canals, which may be a clinical manifestation of this disorder. PMID:23433622

  8. The neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, E.; King, K.; Ahmed, A.; Rudser, K.; Rumsey, R.; Yund, B.; Delaney, K.; Nestrasil, I.; Whitley, C.; Potegal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to describe the neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPS IIIB). Parents report that behavioral abnormalities are a major problem in MPS III posing serious challenges to parenting and quality-of-life for both patient and parent. Our previous research on MPS IIIA identified autistic symptoms, and a Klüver-Bucy-type syndrome as indicated by reduced startle and loss of fear associated with amygdala atrophy. We hypothesized that MPS IIIB would manifest similar attributes when assessed with the same neurobehavioral protocol. Methods Ten patients with MPS IIIB were compared with 9 MPS IIIA patients, all older than 6. 8 younger children with Hurler syndrome (1H) were chosen as a comparison group for the Risk Room procedure; MPS IH does not directly affect social/emotional function and these younger children were closer to the developmental level of the MPS IIIB group. To examine disease severity, cognitive ability was assessed. Four evaluations were used: the Risk Room procedure (to measure social-emotional characteristics, especially fear and startle responses), the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), the Sanfilippo Behavior Rating Scale (SBRS), and amygdala brain volumes calculated from manually-traced MRI images. Results The two groups are equivalent in severity and show severe cognitive impairment. On the ADOS, the MPS IIIB patients exhibited the same autistic features as IIIA. The IIIB means differed from MPS IH means on most measures. However, the IIIB group did not approach the Risk Room stranger, like the MPS IH group who kept their distance, but unlike the IIIA group who showed no fear of the stranger. On the SBRS, the MPS IIIB patients were described as more inattentive and more fearful, especially of new people than the MPS IIIA. Onsets of some disease characteristics appeared more closely spaced and slightly earlier in MPS IIIB than IIIA. Conclusions On most behavioral measures, MPS IIIB patients did

  9. Estudios ALCHEMIST para el cáncer de pulmón en estadio inicial

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST comprende tres estudios clínicos integrados de medicina de precisión diseñados para identificar a personas con cáncer de pulmón en estadio inicial cuyos tumores tienen ciertos cambios genéticos poco comunes.

  10. Efectos tardíos y el linfoma de Hodgkin en estadio inicial

    Cancer.gov

    Los pacientes con linfoma de Hodgkin en estadio inicial que recibieron varios fármacos de quimioterapia como único tratamiento, tenían más probabilidad de sobrevivir 12 años después que los pacientes que recibieron tratamiento que incluía radioterapia.

  11. Membrane-permeabilizing activities of Bacillus thuringiensis coleopteran-active toxin CryIIIB2 and CryIIIB2 domain I peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Von Tersch, M A; Slatin, S L; Kulesza, C A; English, L H

    1994-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxin CryIIIB2 exhibits activity against two agriculturally important pests, the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, and the Southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata. CryIIIB2 shows significant structural similarity to Colorado potato beetle-active toxin CryIIIA, whose crystal structure has been determined elsewhere [J. Li, J. Carrol, and D. J. Ellar, Nature (London) 353:815-821, 1991]. A clone limited to the putative 7-alpha-helical bundle domain I peptide of CryIIIB2 was constructed by PCR. The truncated protein was expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli. Domain I peptide was isolated and compared with native CryIIIB2 toxin in promoting ion efflux from synthetic phospholipid vesicles and formation of ion channels in black lipid membranes. The results showed that CryIIIB2 domain I peptide is sufficient for ion channel formation and promotes ion efflux. Both native CryIIIB2 toxin and domain I peptide were inefficient channel-forming proteins that produced noisy ion channels of various conductance states. In ion efflux assays, native toxin promoted greater ion efflux from synthetic vesicles than did the truncated peptide. Images PMID:7527203

  12. [Tolerance of riluzole in a phase IIIb clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Lacomblez, L; Dib, M; Doppler, V; Faudet, A; Robin, V; Salachas, F; Bensimon, G; Meininger, V

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of an early drug access programme launched in 1995, a multicentre open study was initiated in France in order to assess, inter alia, the safety of riluzole (50 mg twice a day) in a total of 2069 patients from 28 centres. This programme, a phase IIIb study with direct individual benefit, had two main objectives: to enable patients to receive riluzole therapy pending regulatory approval and commercial availability and to provide further data on the safety of riluzole in a broader ALS population. The most frequent adverse events related to riluzole treatment were: asthenia, nausea and elevation of serum transaminase levels. These observations, similar to data derived from previous pivotal clinical trials, confirm that riluzole has a satisfactory tolerability profile. PMID:12090150

  13. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Combined type IIIB with bilateral type I thyroplasty for pitch lowering with maintenance of vocal fold tension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Devine, Erin E.; Remacle, Marc; Ford, Charles N.; Wadium, Elizabeth; Jiang, Jack J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate type IIIB thyroplasty using the excised larynx bench apparatus and determine how altering vocal fold contour by performing bilateral medialization of the inferior vocal fold affects phonation. This procedure could be performed in patients for whom pitch lowering is desirable, such as female-to-male transsexuals or male patients with mutational falsetto in whom intensive voice therapy was insufficient. Methods Aerodynamic, acoustic, and high-speed videokymographic data were collected for nine larynges at three subglottal pressure inputs for each of three conditions: normal; type IIIB thyroplasty; and combined type IIIB with modified bilateral type I thyroplasty intended to create a more rectangular glottal configuration. Each larynx served as its own control. Results Phonation threshold flow (p=0.005), phonation threshold power (p=0.031), and airflow varied across conditions with highest values for type IIIB thyroplasty and lowest for the combined procedure. Fundamental frequency was significantly different (p<0.001), decreasing by approximately 100 Hz from control to type IIIB trials, and then by approximately 15 Hz from IIIB to combined procedure trials. Vibratory amplitudes and intrafold phase difference were highest for type IIIB trials. Conclusions Addition of bilateral inferior medialization to type IIIB thyroplasty provided some further decrease in frequency, but mostly served to increase tension, reduce airflow, and produce a vibratory pattern which more closely mirrored control trials. Exploration of this combined procedure in patients may be warranted if not completely satisfied with the results from type IIIB thyroplasty alone. PMID:24241252

  15. Calculation of atmospheric transmittance by IBM 3033 computer code LOWTRAN IIIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, M. S.

    1983-06-01

    LOWTRAN IIIB is a FORTRAN computer program for prediction of atmospheric optical transmittance, developed at the U.S. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL). The LOWTRAN IIIB was received in the modified form developed by naval weapons center China Lake for use on the UNIVAC 1110 computer, and has now been interfaced to the IBM 3033 computer. Due to complier storage limitation in the IBM computer, the atmospheric data are read into common storage at the beginning of the program. The two dimensional block data submodule has been replaced with a linear data array, and a new subroutine (array) written to reformat the data. The basic logic structure is unchanged. Comparisons of NPS LOWTRAN IIIB computations with direct optical extinctions measurement over Monterey Bay and at San Nicolas Island indicate that under these circumstances LOWTRAN IIIB underestimates the extinction due to aerosols while the computed molecular absorption is in substantial agreement with experiment. LOWTRAN IIIB is presently available as a method of predicting atmospheric transmittance at low resolutions at NPS and is suitable for incorporation in simulations and studies of electrooptic weapon/sensor systems performance.

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB may predominantly present with an attenuated clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Valstar, Marlies J.; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Olmer, Renske; Wevers, Ron A.; Verheijen, Frans W.; Poorthuis, Ben J.; Halley, Dicky J.

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB, Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme N-acetyl-α-D-glucosaminidase (NAGLU). Information on the natural course of MPS IIIB is scarce but much needed in view of emerging therapies. To improve knowledge on the natural course, data on all 52 MPS IIIB patients ever identified by enzymatic studies in the Netherlands were gathered. Clinical data on 44 patients could be retrieved. Only a small number (n = 9; 21%) presented with a classical MPS III phenotype; all other patients showed a much more attenuated course of the disease characterized by a significantly slower regression of intellectual and motor abilities. The majority of patients lived well into adulthood. First signs of the disease, usually mild developmental delay, were observed at a median age of 4 years. Subsequently, patients showed a slowing and eventually a stagnation of development. Patients with the attenuated phenotype had a stable intellectual disability for many years. Molecular analysis was performed in 24 index patients. The missense changes p.R643C, p.S612G, p.E634K, and p.L497V were exclusively found in patients with the attenuated phenotype. MPS IIIB comprises a remarkably wide spectrum of disease severity, and an unselected cohort including all Dutch patients showed a large proportion (79%) with an attenuated phenotype. MPS IIIB must be considered in patients with a developmental delay, even in the absence of a progressive decline in intellectual abilities. A key feature, necessitating metabolic studies, is the coexistence of behavioral problems. PMID:20852935

  17. SIMILARITIES BETWEEN PROTEIN IIIA AND PROTEIN IIIB, TWO PROMINENT SYNAPTIC VESICLE-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOPROTEINS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein IIIa (Mr 74,000) and protein IIIb (Mr 55,000) are two major phosphoproteins found in mammalian brain. It was previously shown in intact nerve cells that the phosphorylation state of these two proteins could be increased by electrical stimulation, by depolarizing agents in...

  18. Isolated Limb Perfusion With Melphalan in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV Melanoma or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-22

    Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Eccrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Skin Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  19. Selected Findings from Phase III-B. BTES. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Supplement. Preliminary Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Charles W.; And Others

    This series of six papers concerning the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES) starts with Teaching Behaviors, Academic Learning Time and Student Achievement: An Overview of Phase III-B of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study by the project director, Charles Fisher. As an introduction, it describes a model of classroom instruction based on…

  20. Interaction of sugarbeet host resistance and Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 IIIB strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rhizoctonia root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani can cause serious economic losses in sugarbeet fields. Preliminary evidence suggests there could be interactions between different strains and resistance sources. Thus, field studies were conducted to determine if nine R. solani AG-2-2 IIIB str...

  1. GCP II inhibition rescues neurons from gp120IIIB-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Bodner, Amos; Ghadge, Ghanashyam; Roos, Raymond P; Slusher, Barbara S

    2009-09-01

    Excessive glutamate neurotransmission has been implicated in neuronal injury in many disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia. Gp120IIIB is a strain of a HIV glycoprotein with specificity for the CXCR4 receptor that induces neuronal apoptosis in in vitro models of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-induced neurodegeneration. Since the catabolism of the neuropeptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) by glutamate carboxypeptidase (GCP) II increases cellular glutamate, an event associated with excitotoxicity, we hypothesized that inhibition of GCP II may prevent gp120IIIB-induced cell death. Furthermore, through GCP II inhibition, increased NAAG may be neuroprotective via its agonist effects at the mGlu(3) receptor. To ascertain the therapeutic potential of GCP II inhibitors, embryonic day 17 hippocampal cultures were exposed to gp120IIIB in the presence of a potent and highly selective GCP II inhibitor, 2-(phosphonomethyl)-pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). 2-PMPA was found to abrogate gp120IIIB-induced toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, 2-PMPA was neuroprotective when applied up to 2 h after the application of gp120IIIB. The abrogation of apoptosis by 2-PMPA was reversed with administration of mGlu(3) receptor antagonists and with antibodies to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Further, consistent with the localization of GCP II, 2-PMPA failed to provide neuroprotection in the absence of glia. GCP II activity and its inhibition by 2-PMPA were confirmed in the hippocampal cultures using radiolabeled NAAG and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Taken together, these data suggest that GCP II is involved in mediating gp120-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons and GCP II inhibitors may have potential in the treatment of neuronal injury related to AIDS. PMID:19995130

  2. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  3. Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I, IIIA and IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Holley, Rebecca J.; Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Badrinath, Soumya; Liao, Aiyin; Langford-Smith, Alex; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Jones, Simon A.; Wraith, J. Ed; Wynn, Rob F.; Merry, Catherine L. R.; Bigger, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharide diseases (MPS) are caused by deficiency of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degrading enzymes, leading to GAG accumulation. Neurodegenerative MPS diseases exhibit cognitive decline, behavioural problems and shortened lifespan. We have characterised neuropathological changes in mouse models of MPSI, IIIA and IIIB to provide a better understanding of these events. Wild-type (WT), MPSI, IIIA and IIIB mouse brains were analysed at 4 and 9 months of age. Quantitative immunohistochemistry showed significantly increased lysosomal compartment, GM2 ganglioside storage, neuroinflammation, decreased and mislocalised synaptic vesicle associated membrane protein, (VAMP2), and decreased post-synaptic protein, Homer-1, in layers II/III-VI of the primary motor, somatosensory and parietal cortex. Total heparan sulphate (HS), was significantly elevated, and abnormally N-, 6-O and 2-O sulphated compared to WT, potentially altering HS-dependent cellular functions. Neuroinflammation was confirmed by significantly increased MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-1α, using cytometric bead arrays. An overall genotype effect was seen in all parameters tested except for synaptophysin staining, neuronal cell number and cortical thickness which were not significantly different from WT. MPSIIIA and IIIB showed significantly more pronounced pathology than MPSI in lysosomal storage, astrocytosis, microgliosis and the percentage of 2-O sulphation of HS. We also observed significant time progression of all genotypes from 4–9 months in lysosomal storage, astrocytosis, microgliosis and synaptic disorganisation but not GM2 gangliosidosis. Individual genotype*time differences were disparate, with significant progression from 4 to 9 months only seen for MPSIIIB with lysosomal storage, MPSI with astrocytocis and MPSIIIA with microgliosis as well as neuronal loss. Transmission electron microscopy of MPS brains revealed dystrophic axons, axonal storage, and extensive lipid and lysosomal storage. These data lend

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-03-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  6. The Murine Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB Develops Cardiopathies over Time Leading to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Valeria; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Paciello, Orlando; Avallone, Luigi; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Iacobellis, Francesca; Di Napoli, Daniele; Magliulo, Fabio; Perrino, Cinzia; Trimarco, Bruno; Esposito, Giovanni; Di Natale, Paola; Pavone, Luigi Michele

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a lysosomal disease due to the deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) required for heparan sulfate (HS) degradation. The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological disorders. Very little is known on the cardiac dysfunctions in MPS IIIB. In this study, we used the murine model of MPS IIIB (NAGLU knockout mice, NAGLU-/-) in order to investigate the cardiac involvement in the disease. Echocardiographic analysis showed a marked increase in left ventricular (LV) mass, reduced cardiac function and valvular defects in NAGLU-/- mice as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significant increase in aortic and mitral annulus dimension with a progressive elongation and thickening of anterior mitral valve leaflet. A severe mitral regurgitation with reduction in mitral inflow E-wave-to-A-wave ratio was observed in 32-week-old NAGLU-/- mice. Compared to WT mice, NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significantly lower survival with increased mortality observed in particular after 25 weeks of age. Histopathological analysis revealed a significant increase of myocardial fiber vacuolization, accumulation of HS in the myocardial vacuoles, recruitment of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition within the myocardium, and an increase of LV fibrosis in NAGLU-/- mice compared to WT mice. Biochemical analysis of heart samples from affected mice showed increased expression levels of cardiac failure hallmarks such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, connexin43, α-smooth muscle actin, α-actinin, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, and myosin heavy polypeptide 7. Furthermore, heart samples from NAGLU-/- mice showed enhanced expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2), and the autophagic markers Beclin1 and LC3 isoform II (LC3-II). Overall, our findings demonstrate that NAGLU-/- mice develop heart disease, valvular abnormalities and cardiac

  7. Electrophysiological and Histological Characterization of Rod-Cone Retinal Degeneration and Microglia Activation in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Lotfi, Parisa; Simons, David L.; Sardiello, Marco; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome Type B or Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB) is a neurodegenerative autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which patients suffer severe vision loss from associated retinopathy. Here we sought to study the underlying retinal functional and morphological changes associated with MPS IIIB disease progression using the established model of MPS IIIB, the B6.129S6-Naglu(tm1Efn)/J mouse line. Electroretinogram (ERG) was recorded from MPS IIIB and wild-type (WT) mice at the age of 28 and 46 weeks, and retinal tissues were subsequently collected for immunohistochemistry analysis. At the 28th week, rod a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly diminished in MPS IIIB compared to WT mice. The cone a- and b-waves of MPS IIIB mice were not significantly different from those of the control at the 28th week but were significantly diminished at the 46th week, when MPS IIIB mice showed a major loss of rods and rod bipolar cells in both central and peripheral regions and a minor loss of cones in the periphery. Activation of microglia and neovascularization were also detected in the MPS IIIB retina. The new findings that cones and rod bipolar cells also undergo degeneration, and that retinal microglia are activated, will inform future development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26607664

  8. Electrophysiological and Histological Characterization of Rod-Cone Retinal Degeneration and Microglia Activation in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB.

    PubMed

    Tse, Dennis Y; Lotfi, Parisa; Simons, David L; Sardiello, Marco; Wu, Samuel M

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome Type B or Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB) is a neurodegenerative autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which patients suffer severe vision loss from associated retinopathy. Here we sought to study the underlying retinal functional and morphological changes associated with MPS IIIB disease progression using the established model of MPS IIIB, the B6.129S6-Naglu(tm1Efn)/J mouse line. Electroretinogram (ERG) was recorded from MPS IIIB and wild-type (WT) mice at the age of 28 and 46 weeks, and retinal tissues were subsequently collected for immunohistochemistry analysis. At the 28th week, rod a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly diminished in MPS IIIB compared to WT mice. The cone a- and b-waves of MPS IIIB mice were not significantly different from those of the control at the 28th week but were significantly diminished at the 46 th week, when MPS IIIB mice showed a major loss of rods and rod bipolar cells in both central and peripheral regions and a minor loss of cones in the periphery. Activation of microglia and neovascularization were also detected in the MPS IIIB retina. The new findings that cones and rod bipolar cells also undergo degeneration, and that retinal microglia are activated, will inform future development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26607664

  9. Epilepsy and electrophysiological findings in polish twins with glycogenosis type IIIb.

    PubMed

    Kroczka, Sławomir; Biedroń, Agnieszka; Kaciński, Marek

    2014-07-01

    Glycogen storage diseases are rare genetic disorders, mostly autosomal recessively inherited. Abnormal accumulation is because of the lack of one of the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism. Neurological manifestation of the diseases involves muscle weakness and hypoglycemia-induced seizures. In this article, we present a history of twin sisters with unusual coincidence of glycogenosis type IIIb and epilepsy. Hypoglycemic background of seizures and organic changes of the central nervous system were excluded. Since the introduction of antiepileptic treatment, the patients have been seizure-free; however, paroxysmal electroencephalographic (EEG) changes have persisted. A high-protein and low-carbohydrate diet has protected them against hypoglycemia. PMID:24357677

  10. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Chronic DeBakey IIIb Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, G. Chad; Ganapathi, Asvin M.; Keenan, Jeffrey E.; Englum, Brian R.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Schechter, Matthew A.; Wang, Hanghang; McCann, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for chronic DeBakey IIIb dissection with associated descending aneurysm remains controversial. This study examines long-term results of TEVAR for this disorder including examination of anatomic features associated with TEVAR outcomes. Methods Between July 2005 and January 2013, 32 patients underwent TEVAR for chronic (>30 days) DeBakey IIIb dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta at a single institution and constituted the study cohort. Results The mean interval from dissection to TEVAR was 32 ± 44 months (range, 1 to 146 months). There were no 30-day or in-hospital deaths, strokes, or paraplegia. During a 54-month median follow-up, there were no aortic-related deaths. Significant thoracic aneurysm sac regression (>1 cm) in the intervened segment was observed in 89%. Thoracic remodeling was not correlated with the number of visceral vessels arising from the true lumen or the number or size of residual distal fenestrations; failure of thoracic remodeling was associated with fenestrations distal to the endograft(s) in the descending thoracic aorta, most often stent graft-induced new entry tears. Complete resolution of the thoracic and abdominal false lumen after TEVAR was observed in 15.6% (n = 5). All patients in this group had all visceral vessels arising from the true lumen and fewer than three residual distal fenestrations. Conclusions Thoracic endovascular aortic repair is effective for chronic DeBakey IIIb dissection with associated descending aneurysm, with excellent 30-day and long-term outcomes and significant aortic remodeling in the vast majority of patients. Thoracic remodeling does not appear dependent on distal anatomic characteristics of the true and false lumens, although care should be taken to cover all thoracic fenestrations and avoid creation of stent graft-induced new entry tears to ensure clinical success. Complete aortic remodeling was observed only in the setting of all

  11. 77 FR 39388 - Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions; Confirmation of Effective Date and Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... confirms the effective date of the direct final rule published on February 16, 2012 (77 FR 9163), and..., entitled ``Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions'' (77 FR 9163). The direct final rule..._policies/ or 3. Access the Government Printing Office's Web page at...

  12. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Metabolome profiling to understand the defense response to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn AG 2-2 IIIB, is an important disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular processes that mediate sugar beet resistance to R. solani are largely unknown and identifying the metabolites associated with R. solani infection ma...

  14. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  15. RNA-activated DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Michael A; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bailey, Scott

    2016-02-15

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) system is an RNA-guided immune system that protects prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. This system represents an inheritable and adaptable immune system that is mediated by multisubunit effector complexes. In the Type III-B system, the Cmr effector complex has been found to cleave ssRNA in vitro. However, in vivo, it has been implicated in transcription-dependent DNA targeting. We show here that the Cmr complex from Thermotoga maritima can cleave an ssRNA target that is complementary to the CRISPR RNA. We also show that binding of a complementary ssRNA target activates an ssDNA-specific nuclease activity in the histidine-aspartate (HD) domain of the Cmr2 subunit of the complex. These data suggest a mechanism for transcription-coupled DNA targeting by the Cmr complex and provide a unifying mechanism for all Type III systems. PMID:26848046

  16. A Qualitative Study of Recovery from Type III-B and III-C Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa S.; Aravind, Maya S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction following type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and/or outcomes. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes. PMID:20948418

  17. Delivery of an enzyme-IGFII fusion protein to the mouse brain is therapeutic for mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shih-hsin; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Le, Steven Q.; Vincelette, Jon; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; Bullens, Sherry; Wendt, Daniel J.; Christianson, Terri M.; Tiger, Pascale M. N.; Brown, Jillian R.; Lawrence, Roger; Yip, Bryan K.; Holtzinger, John; Bagri, Anil; Crippen-Harmon, Danielle; Vondrak, Kristen N.; Chen, Zhi; Hague, Chuck M.; Woloszynek, Josh C.; Cheung, Diana S.; Webster, Katherine A.; Adintori, Evan G.; Lo, Melanie J.; Wong, Wesley; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.; LeBowitz, Jonathan H.; Crawford, Brett E.; Bunting, Stuart; Dickson, Patricia I.; Neufeld, Elizabeth F.

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB, Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by profound intellectual disability, dementia, and a lifespan of about two decades. The cause is mutation in the gene encoding α–N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), deficiency of NAGLU, and accumulation of heparan sulfate. Impediments to enzyme replacement therapy are the absence of mannose 6-phosphate on recombinant human NAGLU and the blood–brain barrier. To overcome the first impediment, a fusion protein of recombinant NAGLU and a fragment of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) was prepared for endocytosis by the mannose 6-phosphate/IGFII receptor. To bypass the blood–brain barrier, the fusion protein (“enzyme”) in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (“vehicle”) was administered intracerebroventricularly to the brain of adult MPS IIIB mice, four times over 2 wk. The brains were analyzed 1–28 d later and compared with brains of MPS IIIB mice that received vehicle alone or control (heterozygous) mice that received vehicle. There was marked uptake of the administered enzyme in many parts of the brain, where it persisted with a half-life of approximately 10 d. Heparan sulfate, and especially disease-specific heparan sulfate, was reduced to control level. A number of secondary accumulations in neurons [β-hexosaminidase, LAMP1(lysosome-associated membrane protein 1), SCMAS (subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase), glypican 5, β-amyloid, P-tau] were reduced almost to control level. CD68, a microglial protein, was reduced halfway. A large amount of enzyme also appeared in liver cells, where it reduced heparan sulfate and β-hexosaminidase accumulation to control levels. These results suggest the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IIIB. PMID:25267636

  18. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Role for Surgical Resection in the Multi-Disciplinary Treatment of Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Matthew J.; Patel, Aalok P.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Robinson, Cliff G.; Colditz, Graham A.; Waqar, Saiama; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Patterson, G. Alexander; Broderick, Stephen; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of multi-modality therapy in stage IIIB NSCLC remains inadequately studied. Although chemoradiation is currently the mainstay of treatment, randomized trials evaluating surgery are lacking and resection is offered selectively. Methods Data of clinical stage IIIB NSCLC patients (T4N2 or any N3) undergoing definitive multimodality therapy were obtained from the National Cancer Database (NCDB). Multivariable Cox regression models were fitted to evaluate variables influencing overall survival (OS). Results From 1998-2010, 7,459 clinical stage IIIB NSCLC patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation (CR group), while 1,714 patients underwent chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in any sequence (CRS group). CRS patients were more likely to be younger, Caucasian, and have slightly smaller tumors (all p < 0.01). There was no difference in Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) between the groups (p = 0.5). In the CRS group, 79% of patients received neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 3%. Factors associated with improved OS in multivariate analysis included younger age, female gender, decreased CCI, smaller tumor size, and surgical resection (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.52-0.63). Among patients treated with surgery, incomplete resection was associated with decreased OS (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.20-1.92). Median OS was longer in CRS patients (25.9 months vs. 16.3 months, p<0.001). Propensity matched analysis on 631 patient-pairs treated with CRS vs. CR confirmed these findings (median OS = 28.9 vs. 17.2 months, p<0.001). Conclusions Surgical resection as a part of multimodality therapy may be associated with improved overall survival in highly selected patients with stage IIIB NSCLC. Multidisciplinary evaluation of these patients is critical. PMID:25912748

  20. Effectiveness of composition based on oxidized dextran in the treatment of grade IIIB skin burns.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Karpov, M A; Troitskii, A V; Arkhipov, S A; Neshchadim, D V

    2015-03-01

    Grade IIIB skin burns were treated with a composition based on oxidized dextran with a molecular weight of 40 kDa (oxidation of 7% glucose residues). On day 32 after burn infliction and from the start of the treatment, the area of skin defect in rats was 30% less than in the group without treatment and by 2.3 times less than in rats treated with panthenol. In rats treated with dextran-based composition or panthenol, the eschar was absent on day 21 after the start of the treatment; by day 32, we found cells of surface epithelium, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands above the scar tissue that were absent in untreated animals; in rats treated with the composition, their number was higher by 2.5 times than in animals treated with panthenol. Treatment with the composition increased volume density (by 2.5 times) and numerical density (by more than 3 times) of blood vessels in the wound and reduced signs of inflammation and fibroplastic activity of fibroblasts in comparison with the corresponding parameters in untreated animals or animals treated with panthenol. PMID:25778648

  1. Crystal structure of a transcription factor IIIB core interface ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Juo, Z Sean; Kassavetis, George A; Wang, Jimin; Geiduschek, E Peter; Sigler, Paul B

    2003-04-01

    Transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB), consisting of the TATA-binding protein (TBP), TFIIB-related factor (Brf1) and Bdp1, is a central component in basal and regulated transcription by RNA polymerase III. TFIIIB recruits its polymerase to the promoter and subsequently has an essential role in the formation of the open initiation complex. The amino-terminal half of Brf1 shares a high degree of sequence similarity with the polymerase II general transcription factor TFIIB, but it is the carboxy-terminal half of Brf1 that contributes most of its binding affinity with TBP. The principal anchoring region is located between residues 435 and 545 of yeast Brf1, comprising its homology domain II. The same region also provides the primary interface for assembling Bdp1 into the TFIIIB complex. We report here a 2.95 A resolution crystal structure of the ternary complex containing Brf1 homology domain II, the conserved region of TBP and 19 base pairs of U6 promoter DNA. The structure reveals the core interface for assembly of TFIIIB and demonstrates how the loosely packed Brf1 domain achieves remarkable binding specificity with the convex and lateral surfaces of TBP. PMID:12660736

  2. Saprolegnia species in Norwegian salmon hatcheries: field survey identifies S. diclina sub-clade IIIB as the dominating taxon.

    PubMed

    Thoen, E; Vrålstad, T; Rolén, E; Kristensen, R; Evensen, Ø; Skaar, I

    2015-06-01

    Saprolegnia isolates within the recognized clades encompassing the taxa S. parasitica and S. diclina act as opportunist and aggressive pathogens to both fish and their eggs. They are responsible for significant economic losses in aquaculture, particularly in salmonid hatcheries. However, the identity, distribution and pathogenic significance of involved species often remain unexplored. In this study, 89 Saprolegnia isolates were recovered from water, eggs and salmon tissue samples that originated from salmon (Salmo salar) hatcheries along the coast of Norway. The cultures were characterized morphologically and molecularly in order to provide an overview of the species composition of Saprolegnia spp. present in Norwegian salmon hatcheries. We demonstrate that S. diclina clearly dominated and contributed to 79% of the recovered isolates. Parsimony analyses of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region split these isolates into 2 strongly supported sub-clades, S. diclina sub-clade IIIA and IIIB, where sub-clade IIIB accounted for 66% of all isolates. A minor portion of the isolates constituted other taxa that were either conspecific or showed strong affinity to S. parasitica, S. ferax, S. hypogyna and Scoliolegnia asterophora. The unique sub-clade IIIB of S. diclina was most prevalent in water and salmon eggs, while S. parasitica isolates were more frequently isolated from post hatching stages. The study demonstrated that morphological criteria in many cases were insufficient for species delimitation due to lack of sexual structures or incoherent morphological expression of such features within the tested replicates. PMID:26036826

  3. The expression of keratinocyte growth factor receptor (FGFR2-IIIb) correlates with the high proliferative rate of HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nikoletta; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kopasz, Norbert; Szeg, Csilla; Pivarcsi, Andor; Koreck, Andrea; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos; Széll, Márta

    2006-08-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR = FGFR2-IIIb) is a tyrosine kinase receptor expressed by keratinocytes, which mediates the effects of fibroblast growth factors (FGF). There are contradictory data in the literature regarding the role of FGFR2-IIIb during the proliferation/differentiation programme of keratinocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether overexpression of FGFR2-IIIb may have a role in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation. We analysed the expression of FGFR2-IIIb in an in vitro HaCaT model system representing different stages of proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses demonstrated a correlation between FGFR2-IIIb mRNA and protein expression and the proportion of cells in S/G2/M phase in synchronized HaCaT keratinocytes and thus with proliferation activity (r = 0.96). After treatment with the antipsoriatic drug, dithranol, FGFR2-IIIb is downregulated dose dependently both at mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, when the rate of proliferation is decreased by the lack of cell attachment to the culturing surface, FGFR2-IIIb mRNA (P = 0.0315) and protein expressions were also reduced (P = 0.0242), while a differentiation marker, keratin 10, mRNA (P = 0.0003) and protein levels (P = 0.001) were increased (r = -0.92). Based on our results we conclude that FGFR2-IIIb expression in HaCaT keratinocytes corresponds with the proliferative activation of the cells and is not related to the differentiation programme. PMID:16842598

  4. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB. PMID:25524704

  5. Robot-assisted laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for stage IIIb mixed germ cell testicular cancer after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Dong Soo; Chang, Sung-Goo; Jeon, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, especially when performed with the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical), has shown excellent cosmetic results with similar oncologic outcomes to those of open surgery. In this study, we present a case of robot-assisted retroperitoneal lymph node dissection performed in an 18-year-old man who was diagnosed with a stage IIIb mixed germ cell tumor and who was initially treated with radical orchiectomy, followed by chemotherapy. This case shows that robot-assisted retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is technically feasible, safe, and cosmetically favorable, even when performed on patients with high-stage disease or after chemotherapy. PMID:26175874

  6. Insulin-like growth factor II peptide fusion enables uptake and lysosomal delivery of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase to mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shih-hsin; Troitskaya, Larisa A.; Sinow, Carolyn S.; Haitz, Karyn; Todd, Amanda K.; Di Stefano, Ariana; Le, Steven Q.; Dickson, Patricia I.; Tippin, Brigette L.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo B syndrome) has been hindered by inadequate mannose 6-phosphorylation and cellular uptake of recombinantly produced human α-N-acetyl-glucosamindase (rhNAGLU). We expressed and characterized a modified, recombinant human NAGLU fused to the receptor binding motif of insulin-like growth factor-II (rhNAGLU-IGF-II) to enhance its ability to enter cells using the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, which is also the receptor for IGF-II (at a different binding site). RhNAGLU-IGF-II was stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, secreted and purified to apparent homogeneity. The Km and pH optimum of the fusion enzyme was similar to those reported for rhNAGLU. Both intracellular uptake and confocal microscopy suggested MPS IIIB fibroblasts readily take up the fusion enzyme via receptor-mediated endocytosis that was significantly inhibited (p<0.001) by monomeric IGF-II peptide. Glycosaminoglycan storage was reduced by 60% (p<0.001) to near background levels in MPS IIIB cells after treatment with rhNAGLU-IGF-II, with half-maximal correction at concentrations of 3–12 pM. Similar cellular uptake mechanism via the IGF-II receptor was also demonstrated in two different brain tumor-derived cell lines. Fusion of NAGLU to IGF-II enhanced its cellular uptake while maintaining enzymatic activity, supporting its potential as a therapeutic candidate for MPS IIIB. PMID:24266751

  7. Effect of Sugar Beet Variety and Nonhost Plant on Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB Soil Inoculum Potential Measured in Soil DNA Extracts.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Sascha; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Märländer, Bernward; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A direct soil DNA extraction method from soil samples (250 g) was applied for detection of the soilborne sugar-beet-infecting pathogen Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG) 2-2IIIB using a newly developed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay that showed specificity to AG2-2IIIB when tested against various R. solani AG. The assay showed a good relation between cycle threshold and amount of AG2-2IIIB sclerotia detected in three spiked field soils and was also able to detect the pathogen in naturally infested field soil samples. A field trial was conducted to quantify R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil inoculum potential (IP) before and after growing a susceptible and a resistant sugar beet variety as well as after subsequent growth of an expected nonhost winter rye. Plants of the susceptible sugar beet variety displayed a higher disease severity. A more than sixfold increase of the R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil IP was observed in contrast to the resistant variety that resulted in a constant IP. Growing winter rye significantly reduced soil IP to the initial level at sowing. Further research is required to better understand the interaction between disease occurrence and soil IP as well as the environmental influence on IP development. PMID:27143412

  8. Genetic relationships among Italian and Mexican maize-rhizosphere Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) populations belonging to Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A close association between maize roots and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteria has been observed in different locations globally. In this study we investigated by MultiLocus Restriction Typing (MLRT) the genetic diversity and relationships among Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 populations associated with roots of maize plants cultivated in geographically distant countries (Italy and Mexico), in order to provide new insights into their population structure, evolution and ecology. Results The 31 B. cenocepacia IIIB and 65 BCC6 isolates gave rise to 29 and 39 different restriction types (RTs), respectively. Two pairs of isolates of B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6, recovered from both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres, were found to share the same RT. The eBURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types) analysis of MLRT data grouped all the B. cenocepacia IIIB isolates into four clonal complexes, with the RT-4-complex including the 42% of them, while the majority of the BCC6 isolates (94%) were grouped into the RT-104-complex. These two main clonal complexes included RTs shared by both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres and a clear relationship between grouping and maize variety was also found. Grouping established by eBURST correlated well with the assessment using unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). The standardized index of association values obtained in both B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 suggests an epidemic population structure in which occasional clones emerge and spread. Conclusions Taken together our data demonstrate a wide dispersal of certain B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 isolates in Mexican and Italian maize rhizospheres. Despite the clear relationship found between the geographic origin of isolates and grouping, identical RTs and closely related isolates were observed in geographically distant regions. Ecological factors and selective pressure may preferably promote some genotypes within each local microbial

  9. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  10. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2006-04-04

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  11. Correction of Neurological Disease of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB in Adult Mice by rAAV9 Trans-Blood–Brain Barrier Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; DiRosario, Julianne; Killedar, Smruti; Zaraspe, Kimberly; McCarty, Douglas M

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge in developing therapies for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is to achieve efficient central nervous system (CNS) delivery across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we used the novel ability of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) to cross the BBB from the vasculature to achieve long-term global CNS, and widespread somatic restoration of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. A single intravenous (IV) injection of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU, without extraneous treatment to disrupt the BBB, restored NAGLU activity to normal or above normal levels in adult MPS IIIB mice, leading to the correction of lysosomal storage pathology in the CNS and periphery, and correction of astrocytosis and neurodegeneration. The IV delivered rAAV9 vector also transduced abundant neurons in the myenteric and submucosal plexus, suggesting peripheral nervous system (PNS) targeting. While CNS entry did not depend on osmotic disruption of the BBB, it was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with an IV infusion of mannitol. Most important, we demonstrate that a single systemic rAAV9-NAGLU gene delivery provides long-term (>18 months) neurological benefits in MPS IIIB mice, resulting in significant improvement in behavioral performance, and extension of survival. These data suggest promising clinical potential using the trans-BBB neurotropic rAAV9 vector for treating MPS IIIB and other neurogenetic diseases. PMID:21386820

  12. Bond-stretching and bond-bending force constant of binary tetrahedral (A IIIB V and A IIB VI) semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this Letter we present the two expressions relating the bond-stretching force constant ( α in N/m) and bond-bending force constant ( β in N/m) for the A IIIB V and A IIB VI semiconductors with the product of ionic charges ( ZZ) and nearest neighbor distance d (Å). Interatomic force constants of these compounds exhibit a linear relationship when plotted on a log-log scale against the nearest neighbor distance d (Å), but fall on different straight lines according to the ionic charge product of the compounds. A fairly good agreement has been found between the observed and calculated values of the α and β for binary tetrahedral semiconductors.

  13. Draft genome sequence of the sugar beet pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB strain BBA69670.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Andersson, Louise; Rupp, Oliver; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Varrelmann, Mark; Dixelius, Christina; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-03-20

    Rhizoctonia solani is a widespread plant pathogenic fungus featuring a broad host range including several economically important crops. Accordingly, genome analyses of R. solani isolates are important to uncover their pathogenic potential. Draft genome sequences for four R. solani isolates representing three of the 14 R. solani anastomosis groups (AGs) are available. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence for an R. solani AG2-2IIIB isolate that is pathogenic on sugar beet. The fungal genome was assembled in 2065 scaffolds consisting of 5826 contigs amounting to a size of about 52 Mb which is larger than any other R. solani isolate known today. Genes potentially encoding cellulolytic, lignolytic and pectinolytic enzymes were identified. PMID:26851388

  14. Pathological and biochemical studies of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (Sanfilippo syndrome type B) in juvenile emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Giger, U; Wang, P; Pizarro, M; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIB was diagnosed in 14 juvenile emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae), ages 3 weeks to 6 months, based on pathological and biochemical analyses. The animals had a history of neurological signs or sudden death; one of the birds with neurological signs and 3 others experienced acute hemoabdomen. Histopathologically, neuronal swelling and vacuolation in the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord (80%-92%); retina (100%); autonomic ganglia of the intestine (71%); gizzard (50%); adrenal gland (27%); and ear (50%) were noted in affected but not healthy emus. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were also observed in the pancreas, liver, intestine, adrenal glands, and kidneys. The intracytoplasmic inclusions were periodic acid-Schiff and Luxol Fast Blue positive, consistent with a storage disease. Foamy macrophages infiltrated the liver, intestine, tunica media of the aorta, and spleen. By transmission electron microscopy, typical lamellated cytoplasmic bodies were detected in neurons of the brain and retina, while electron-dense bodies consistent with glycosaminoglycan inclusions were observed in hepatocytes and/or hepatic macrophages. The livers of the 2 affected emus studied contained large amounts of heparan sulfate, which is suggestive of MPS type III. Compared with normal controls, hepatic and serum α-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity was very low (<8% of control), while other enzyme activities were normal to increased in the 2 affected emus studied. Moreover, affected emus were homozygous for a 2-bp deletion in the NAGLU gene. This study characterizes the pathology of MPS type IIIB in emus, which is one of the rare inborn errors in birds, showing the homology of this condition to Sanfilippo syndrome in humans. PMID:24723233

  15. [The effect of piperazine analogs of aryloxyaminopropanol (IIIq and IIIb) on the occurrence of reperfusion dysrhythmias in an in vivo experiment on rats].

    PubMed

    Jadronová, O; Kuzelová, M; Seginko, J; Celková, H; Svec, P

    1996-11-01

    The present experimental study reports the beneficial effects of newly synthetized substances IIIq and IIIb in vivo. These aryloxyaminopropanol drugs have been shown to antagonize the contraction caused by calcium comparable to verapamil and flunarizine in the model of the isolated guinea pig terminal ileum. Effects of substances on both the incidence of arrhythmias during ischemia and the reperfusion period and mortality were investigated in the rat model ischemia-reperfusion injury. We can conclude that compound IIIq in a dose of 10(-6) mol/kg is effective in reducing the incidence of reperfusion-induced arrhythmias. Substance IIIb (10(-6) mol/kg) administered before ischemia was not able to suppress arrhythmias in the rat model of myocardial infarction and reperfusion. PMID:8998610

  16. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  17. Definitive radiotherapy with concurrent oncothermia for stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia enhances the susceptibility of tumors to radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Oncothermia, also known as electro-hyperthermia, is a new treatment modality developed to overcome the problems of traditional hyperthermia by selectively delivering energy to the malignant tissues. The present study reports the outcome of combined oncothermia and RT in a 75-year-old patient with stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to the advanced age and the performance status of the patient, the combination of systemic chemotherapy and RT was deemed infeasible; therefore, the patient instead decided to undergo oncothermia concurrently with definitive RT. The RT was administered at a dose of 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions using a three-dimensional conformal plan technique. Oncothermia was started concomitantly with RT and was performed for 60 min per session, two sessions per week, for a total of 12 sessions. No severe toxicities developed, with the exception of mild odynophagia, which resolved soon after the treatments. Follow-up computed tomography showed complete tumor response, and the patient was alive with no evidence of the disease 18 months after the completion of the treatment. In conclusion, the present case report suggests that oncothermia combined with RT, with the former possessing radiosensitizing potential and no additional toxicities, may be a promising alternative for advanced-age and/or frail patients with locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:26622391

  18. A Gustilo type IIIB open forearm fracture treated by negative pressure wound therapy and locking compression plates: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naohide; Mae, Takao; Hotokezaka, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kosuke; Matsushita, Akinobu; Miake, Go; Kuchiishi, Rintaro; Noguchi, Yasuo

    2011-10-01

    A 91-year-old female sustained injuries to her left forearm while walking across a crosswalk. X-rays showed left radial shaft and ulna shaft fractures, and the injury was a type IIIB open fracture. On the day of admission, irrigation and debridement of the open wound, and temporary fixation of the radius and ulna using an external fixator and a Kirschner wire were peformed. Six days after the surgery, we used negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using the V.A.C.ATS system for the open wound. Thirteen days after the first surgery, definitive fixation was performed by using locking compression plates, and full thickness skin grafting was undertaken for the open wound. NPWT is a treatment that accelerates the wound healing process through the delivery of continuous subatmospheric pressure within a closed environment. In our case, we could reduce the healing period of the soft tissue and could convert to the definitive fixation in a timely fashion. NPWT is thought to be a useful adjunct in the management of the soft tissues of open fractures. PMID:22171501

  19. Structure and activity of the RNA-targeting Type III-B CRISPR-Cas complex of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yifan; Taylor, David W.; van Duijn, Esther; Barendregt, Arjan; Vlot, Marnix; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Sakamoto, Keiko; Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Schaap, Peter J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Heck, Albert J.R.; Yonekura, Koji; van der Oost, John; Shinkai, Akeo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CRISPR-Cas system is a prokaryotic host defense system against genetic elements. The Type III-B CRISPR-Cas system of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the TtCmr complex, is composed of six different protein subunits (Cmr1-6) and one crRNA with a stoichiometry of Cmr112131445361:crRNA1. The TtCmr complex co-purifies with crRNA species of 40 and 46 nt, originating from a distinct subset of CRISPR loci and spacers. The TtCmr complex cleaves the target RNA at multiple sites with 6 nt intervals via a 5’ ruler mechanism. Electron microscopy revealed that the structure of TtCmr resembles a ‘sea worm’ and is composed of a Cmr2-3 heterodimer ‘tail’, a helical backbone of Cmr4 subunits capped by Cmr5 subunits, and a curled ‘head’ containing Cmr1 and Cmr6. Despite having a backbone of only four Cmr4 subunits and being both longer and narrower, the overall architecture of TtCmr resembles that of Type I Cascade complexes. PMID:24119403

  20. Definitive extended field intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin chemosensitization in the treatment of IB2-IIIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangyu; He, Fangfang; Fu, Chunli; Zhang, Youzhong; Yang, Qiuan; Wang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the toxicity of delivering extended field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) and concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods Forty-five patients who underwent EF-IMRT and concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IB2 to IIIB cervical cancer were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical target volume included all areas of gross and potentially microscopic disease and regional lymph node regions. All patients underwent high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The acute and late toxicity were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring criteria, respectively. Results The median follow-up was 28 months (range, 5 to 62 months). Forty-two patients had a complete response, and three had a persistent disease. Of those 42 patients, 15 patients (35.7%) had recurrence. The regions of recurrence were in-field in 2 patients and out-field in 13 patients. Acute grade ≥3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary and hematologic toxicity occurred in 3, 1, and 9 patients, respectively. Three patients (6.7%) suffered from late grade 3 toxicities. Seven patients experienced ovarian transposition, 5 of those patients (71%) maintained ovarian function. Thirty-eight patients (84.4%) were alive at the last follow-up. Conclusion Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy with EF-IMRT was safe. The acute and late toxicities are acceptable. EF-IMRT provides an opportunity to preserve endocrine function for patients with ovarian transposition. PMID:24459576

  1. Mutation Scanning of D1705 and D1709 in the RNAse IIIb Domain of MicroRNA Processing Enzyme Dicer in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G; Skrygan, Marina; Sand, Daniel; Gambichler, Thilo; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Hessam, Schapoor

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) there have been performed several studies showing perturbations in the expression of miRNAs and the miRNA expression machinery in cutaneous melanoma. Dicer, a pivotal cytosolic enzyme of miRNA maturation has shown to be affected by both somatic and germline mutations in a variety of cancers. Recent studies have shown that recurrent somatic mutations of Dicer frequently affect the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain, therefore called hot spot mutations. The present study investigates metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of the Dicer RNase IIIb domain in cutaneous melanomas and melanoma metastasis by Sanger sequencing. All investigated samples showed wildtype sequence and no single mutation was detected. The miRNA processing enzyme Dicer of melanoma and melanoma metastasis does not appear to be affected by mutation in the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain. PMID:26683837

  2. FGFR2IIIb-MAPK Activity Is Required for Epithelial Cell Fate Decision in the Lower Müllerian Duct.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Jumpei; Rocchi, Altea; Serna, Vanida A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Graff, Jonathan M; Kurita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell fate of lower Müllerian duct epithelium (MDE), to become uterine or vaginal epithelium, is determined by the absence or presence of ΔNp63 expression, respectively. Previously, we showed that SMAD4 and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) were independently required for MDE to express ΔNp63. Here, we report that vaginal mesenchyme directs vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE through paracrine activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-MAPK pathway. In the developing reproductive tract, FGF7 and FGF10 were enriched in vaginal mesenchyme, whereas FGF receptor 2IIIb was expressed in epithelia of both the uterus and vagina. When Fgfr2 was inactivated, vaginal MDE underwent uterine cell fate, and this differentiation defect was corrected by activation of MEK-ERK pathway. In vitro, FGF10 in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A (ActA) was sufficient to induce ΔNp63 in MDE, and ActA was essential for induction of RUNX1 through SMAD-independent pathways. Accordingly, inhibition of type 1 receptors for activin in neonatal mice induced uterine differentiation in vaginal epithelium by down-regulating RUNX1, whereas conditional deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 had no effect on vaginal epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE is induced by FGF7/10-MAPK, bone morphogenetic protein 4-SMAD, and ActA-RUNX1 pathway activities, and the disruption in any one of these pathways results in conversion from vaginal to uterine epithelial cell fate. PMID:27164167

  3. The role of transcription initiation factor IIIB subunits in promoter opening probed by photochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Kassavetis, George A; Han, Shulin; Naji, Souad; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2003-05-16

    The core transcription initiation factor (TF) IIIB recruits its conjugate RNA polymerase (pol) III to the promoter and also plays an essential role in promoter opening. TFIIIB assembled with certain deletion mutants of its Brf1 and Bdp1 subunits is competent in pol III recruitment, but the resulting preinitiation complex does not open the promoter. Whether Brf1 and Bdp1 participate in opening the promoter by direct DNA interaction (as sigma subunits of bacterial RNA polymerases do) or indirectly by their action on pol III has been approached by site-specific photochemical protein-DNA cross-linking of TFIIIB-pol III-U6 RNA gene promoter complexes. Brf1, Bdp1, and several pol III subunits can be cross-linked to the nontranscribed strand of the U6 promoter at base pair -9/-8 and +2/+3 (relative to the transcriptional start as +1), respectively the upstream and downstream ends of the DNA segment that opens up into the transcription bubble. Cross-linking of Bdp1 and Brf1 is detected at 0 degrees C in closed preinitiation complexes and at 30 degrees C in complexes that are partly open, but also it is detected in mutant TFIIIB-pol III-DNA complexes that are unable to open the promoter. In contrast, promoter opening-defective TFIIIB mutants generate significant changes of cross-linking of polymerase subunits. The weight of this evidence argues in favor of an indirect mode of action of TFIIIB in promoter opening. PMID:12637540

  4. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Aaron S; Duncan, F Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J; Bremer, William G; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M; McBride, Kim L; McCarty, Douglas M; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1 × 10(14) vg/kg and 2 × 10(14) vg/kg (n = 30/group, M:F = 1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2 × 10(14) vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2 × 10(14) vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  5. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carcinoma of the cervix - Stages IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IVA: results of a randomized study by the radiation therapy oncology group

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Plenk,H.P.; Hanley, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    A total of 65 patients with Stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB or IVA carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive conventional radiation therapy in air or hyperbaric oxygen therapy with radiation at optimal schedules. Seven patients could not be evaluated. Of the 19 patients treated in oxygen, 14 (73%) were living or had died without evidence of disease. Of the 29 patients treated with radiation alone 15 (52%) were alive or had died without evidence of tumor. Two of 29 patients treated in air and 5 of 19 patients treated in oxygen were dead of complications or intercurrent disease. No significant difference in survival could be demonstrated.

  7. Increased number of negative lymph nodes is associated with improved cancer specific survival in pathological IIIB and IIIC rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Zhuo, Changhua; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Dawei; Liang, Lei; Cai, Sanjun

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative radiation significantly decreases the number of retrieved lymph nodes (LNs) in rectal cancer, but little is known with respect to the prognostic significance of negative LN (NLN) counts under these circumstances. In this study, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-registered ypIII stage rectal cancer patients, and patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FDSCC) were combined and analyzed. The results showed that the survival rate of patients with n (cutoff) or more NLNs increased gradually when n ranged from two to nine. After n reached 10 or greater, survival rates were approximately equivalent. Furthermore, the optimal cutoff value of 10 was validated as an independent prognostic factor in stage ypIIIB and ypIIIC patients by both univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.001); the number of NLNs could also stratify the prognosis of ypN(+) patients in more detail. Patients in the FDSCC set validated these findings and confirmed that NLN count was not decreased in the good tumor regression group relative to the poor tumor regression group. These results suggest that NLN count is an independent prognostic factor for ypIIIB and ypIIIC rectal cancer patients, and, together with the number of positive LNs, this will provide better prognostic information than the number of positive LNs alone. PMID:25514596

  8. Impact of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Timing on Brain Relapse Rates in Patients With Stage IIIB Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Two Different Chemoradiotherapy Regimens

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Yuksel, Oznur; Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pehlivan, Berrin

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the influence of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) timing on brain relapse rates in patients treated with two different chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimens for Stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 134 patients, with Stage IIIB NSCLC in recursive partitioning analysis Group 1, was treated with PCI (30 Gy at 2 Gy/fr) following one of two CRT regimens. Regimen 1 (n = 58) consisted of three cycles of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT (C-CRT). Regimen 2 (n = 76) consisted of immediate C-CRT during thoracic radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 27.6 months (range, 7.2-40.4), 65 patients were alive. Median, progression-free, and brain metastasis-free survival (BMFS) times for the whole study cohort were 23.4, 15.4, and 23.0 months, respectively. Median survival time and the 3-year survival rate for regimens 1 and 2 were 19.3 vs. 26.1 months (p = 0.001) and 14.4% vs. 34.4% (p < .001), respectively. Median time from the initiation of primary treatment to PCI was 123.2 (range, 97-161) and 63.4 (range, 55-74) days for regimens 1 and 2, respectively (p < 0.001). Overall, 11 (8.2%) patients developed brain metastasis (BM) during the follow-up period: 8 (13.8%) in regimen 1 and 3 (3.9%) in regimen 2 (p = 0.03). Only 3 (2.2%) patients developed BM at the site of first failure, and for 2 of them, it was also the sole site of recurrence. Median BMFS for regimens 1 and 2 were 17.4 (13.5-21.3) vs. 26.0 (22.9-29.1 months), respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that in Stage IIIB NSCLC patients treated with PCI, lower BM incidence and longer survival rates result from immediate C-CRT rather than ITC-first regimens. This indicates the benefit of earlier PCI use without delay because of induction protocols.

  9. Bioactive saponins and glycosides. XII. Horse chestnut. (2): Structures of escins IIIb, IV, V, and VI and isoescins Ia, Ib, and V, acylated polyhydroxyoleanene triterpene oligoglycosides, from the seeds of horse chestnut tree (Aesculus hippocastanum L., Hippocastanaceae).

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Murakami, T; Yamahara, J; Matsuda, H

    1998-11-01

    New acylated polyhydroxyoleanene triterpene oligoglycosides, escins IIIb, IV, V, and VI and isoescins Ia, Ib, and V, were isolated from the seeds of horse chestnut tree (Aesculus hippocastanum L.). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. PMID:9845957

  10. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  11. Feasibility and Safety of Systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU Delivery for Treating Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB: Toxicology, Biodistribution, and Immunological Assessments in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Murrey, Darren A.; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Meadows, Aaron S.; Ware, Tierra A.; Campbell, Katie J.; Bremer, William G.; Walker, Christopher M.; Goodchild, Laurie; Bolon, Brad; La Perle, Krista; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal recessive defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In anticipation of a clinical gene therapy treatment for MPS IIIB in humans, we tested the rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU vector administration to cynomolgus monkeys (n=8) at 1E13 vg/kg or 2E13 vg/kg via intravenous injection. No adverse events or detectable toxicity occurred over a 6-month period. Gene delivery resulted in persistent global central nervous system and broad somatic transduction, with NAGLU activity detected at 2.9–12-fold above endogenous levels in somatic tissues and 1.3–3-fold above endogenous levels in the brain. Secreted rNAGLU was detected in serum. Low levels of preexisting anti-AAV9 antibodies (Abs) did not diminish vector transduction. Importantly, high-level preexisting anti-AAV9 Abs lead to reduced transduction in liver and other somatic tissues, but had no detectable impact on transgene expression in the brain. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay showed Ab responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in treated animals. Serum anti-hNAGLU Abs, but not anti-AAV9 Abs, correlated with the loss of circulating rNAGLU enzyme. However, serum Abs did not affect tissue rNAGLU activity levels. Weekly or monthly peripheral blood interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays detected a CD4+ T-cell (Th-1) response to rNAGLU only at 4 weeks postinjection in one treated subject, without observable correlation to tissue transduction levels. The treatment did not result in detectable CTL responses to either AAV9 or rNAGLU. Our data demonstrate an effective and safe profile for systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector delivery in nonhuman primates, supporting its clinical potential in humans. PMID:24720466

  12. Outcomes of anterolateral thigh-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with bone grafting in gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Chung, Duke Whan; Han, Chung Soo

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the utility and the clinical outcomes of anterolateral thigh (ALT)-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with plating and bone grafting in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures. A total of 21 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean follow-up period was 18 months and the mean age was 46.7 years. There were 18 men and three women. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 11.6 days. The mean size of flaps used was 15.3 × 8.2 cm. The mean size of bone defects was 2.26 cm. Segmental bone defects were observed in 5 five cases, for which bone transport or vascularized fibular graft were performed. When flaps were successful and the fracture sites did not have any evidence of infection, internal fixation with plates and bone grafting were performed. Flaps survived in 20 cases. In the 20 cases with successful flaps, two cases developed osteomyelitis, but the 20 cases achieved solid bone union at a mean of 8.6 months after the injury, salvaging the lower extremity in 100% of the cases. At the last follow-up, 9 nine cases were measured excellent or good; 6, fair; and 6, poor in the functional assessment based on the method developed by Puno et al. ALT- free flaps to cover soft tissue defects in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures are considered as useful option for the treatment of composite defects. In addition, conversion to internal fixation and bone grafting can be an alternative method in order to reduce the risk of complications and inconvenience of external fixators. PMID:22434519

  13. Interactions of disulfide-deficient selenocysteine analogs of μ-conotoxin BuIIIB with the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.3.

    PubMed

    Green, Brad R; Zhang, Min-Min; Chhabra, Sandeep; Robinson, Samuel D; Wilson, Michael J; Redding, Addison; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-07-01

    Inhibitors of the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.3 (NaV 1.3) are of interest as pharmacological tools for the study of neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury and have potential therapeutic applications. The recently described μ-conotoxin BuIIIB (μ-BuIIIB) from Conus bullatus was shown to block NaV 1.3 with submicromolar potency (Kd = 0.2 μm), making it one of the most potent peptidic inhibitors of this subtype described to date. However, oxidative folding of μ-BuIIIB results in numerous folding isoforms, making it difficult to obtain sufficient quantities of the active form of the peptide for detailed structure-activity studies. In the present study, we report the synthesis and characterization of μ-BuIIIB analogs incorporating a disulfide-deficient, diselenide-containing scaffold designed to simplify synthesis and facilitate structure-activity studies directed at identifying amino acid residues involved in NaV 1.3 blockade. Our results indicate that, similar to other μ-conotoxins, the C-terminal residues (Trp16, Arg18 and His20) are most crucial for NaV 1 blockade. At the N-terminus, replacement of Glu3 by Ala resulted in an analog with an increased potency for NaV 1.3 (Kd = 0.07 μm), implicating this position as a potential site for modification for increased potency and/or selectivity. Further examination of this position showed that increased negative charge, through γ-carboxyglutamate replacement, decreased potency (Kd = 0.33 μm), whereas replacement with positively-charged 2,4-diamonobutyric acid increased potency (Kd = 0.036 μm). These results provide a foundation for the design and synthesis of μ-BuIIIB-based analogs with increased potency against NaV 1.3. PMID:24814369

  14. Temporal order of RNase IIIb and loss-of-function mutations during development determines phenotype in DICER1 syndrome: a unique variant of the two-hit tumor suppression model

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, Mark; Field, Amanda; Yang, Jiandong; Williams, Gretchen; Doros, Leslie; Rossi, Christopher; Schultz, Kris Ann; Rosenberg, Avi; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Turner, Joyce; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Stewart, Douglas; Yu, Weiying; Harris, Anne; Schoettler, Peter; Goodfellow, Paul; Dehner, Louis; Messinger, Yoav; Hill, D. Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is the most frequent pediatric lung tumor and often the first indication of a pleiotropic cancer predisposition,  DICER1 syndrome, comprising a range of other individually rare, benign and malignant tumors of childhood and early adulthood. The genetics of  DICER1-associated tumorigenesis are unusual in that tumors typically bear neomorphic missense mutations at one of five specific “hotspot” codons within the RNase IIIb domain of  DICER 1, combined with complete loss of function (LOF) in the other allele. We analyzed a cohort of 124 PPB children for predisposing  DICER1 mutations and sought correlations with clinical phenotypes. Over 70% have inherited or  de novo germline LOF mutations, most of which truncate the  DICER1 open reading frame. We identified a minority of patients who have no germline mutation, but are instead mosaic for predisposing  DICER1 mutations. Mosaicism for RNase IIIb domain hotspot mutations defines a special category of  DICER1 syndrome patients, clinically distinguished from those with germline or mosaic LOF mutations by earlier onsets and numerous discrete foci of neoplastic disease involving multiple syndromic organ sites. A final category of patients lack predisposing germline or mosaic mutations and have disease limited to a single PPB tumor bearing tumor-specific RNase IIIb and LOF mutations. We propose that acquisition of a neomorphic RNase IIIb domain mutation is the rate limiting event in  DICER1-associated  tumorigenesis, and that distinct clinical phenotypes associated with mutational categories reflect the temporal order in which LOF and RNase IIIb domain mutations are acquired during development. PMID:26925222

  15. Pilot study of a specific dietary supplement in tumor-bearing mice and in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, A S; Yeh, H C; Wang, L H; Huang, Y P; Maeda, H; Pivazyan, A; Hsu, C; Lewis, E R; Bruckner, H W; Fasy, T M

    2001-01-01

    Previously, a specific dietary supplement, selected vegetables (SV), was found to be associated with prolonged survival of stage III and IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. In this study, several anticancer components in SV were measured; the anticancer activity of SV was assessed using a lung tumor model, line 1 in BALB/c mice. SV was also used in conjunction with conventional therapies by stage IIIB and IV NSCLC patients whose survival and clinical responses were evaluated. A daily portion (283 g) of SV was found to contain 63 mg of inositol hexaphosphate, 4.4 mg of daidzein, 2.6 mg of genistein, and 16 mg of coumestrol. Mouse food containing 5% SV (wt/wt) was associated with a 53-74% inhibition of tumor growth rate. Fourteen of the 18 patients who ingested SV daily for 2-46 months were included in the analyses; none showed evidence of toxicity. The first lead case remained tumor free for > 133 months; the second case showed complete regression of multiple brain lesions after using SV and radiotherapy. The median survival time of the remaining 12 patients was 33.5 months, and one-year survival was > 70%. The median survival time of the 16 "intent-to-treat" patients (including ineligible patients) was 20 months, and one-year survival was 55%. The Karnofsky performance status of eligible patients was 55 +/- 13 at entry but improved to 92 +/- 9 after use of SV for five months or longer (p < 0.01). Five patients had stable lesions for 30, 30, 20, 12, and 2 months; two of them, whose primary tumor was resected, used SV alone and demonstrated an objective response of their metastatic tumors. In addition to the two lead cases, eight patients had no new metastases after using SV. Three patients had complete regression of brain metastases after using radiotherapy and SV. In this study, daily ingestion of SV was associated with objective responses, prolonged survival, and attenuation of the normal pattern of progression of stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. A large

  16. Hemobilia secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: an unusual complication of bile leakage in a patient with a history of a resected IIIb Klatskin tumor.

    PubMed

    Siablis, Dimitrios; Papathanassiou, Zafiria G; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Christeas, Nikolaos; Vagianos, Constantine

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with a 16-year history of a double bilo-enteric anastomosis due to resected hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Type IIIb Klatskin tumor). The patient presented with cholangitis secondary to benign anastomotic stenosis which resulted in a large intrahepatic biloma. In order to restore the patency of the anastomosis and overcome cholangitis, several attempts took place, including endobiliary stenting, balloon-assisted biloplasty and transhepatic billiary drainage. Anastomotic patency was achieved, complicated, however, by persistent upper gastro-intestinal bleeding, presented as hemobilia. A biloma-induced pseudoaneurysm of the left hepatic artery was diagnosed. This had ruptured into the biliary tract, and presented the actual cause of the hemobilia. Selective embolism of the pseudoaneurysm resulted in control of the hemorrhage, and was successfully combined with transhepatic dilatation of the anastomosis and percutaneous drainage of the biloma. The patient was ultimately cured and seems to be in excellent condition, 5 mo after treatment. PMID:16127759

  17. Reconfiguring the connectivity of a multiprotein complex: fusions of yeast TATA-binding protein with Brf1, and the function of transcription factor IIIB.

    PubMed

    Kassavetis, George A; Soragni, Elisabetta; Driscoll, Robert; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2005-10-25

    Transcription factor (TF) IIIB, the central transcription initiation factor of RNA polymerase III (pol III), is composed of three subunits, Bdp1, Brf1 and TATA-binding protein (TBP), all essential for normal function in vivo and in vitro. Brf1 is a modular protein: Its N-proximal half is related to TFIIB and binds similarly to the C-terminal stirrup of TBP; its C-proximal one-third provides most of the affinity for TBP by binding along the entire length of the convex surface and N-terminal lateral face of TBP. A structure-informed triple fusion protein, with TBP core placed between the N- and C-proximal domains of Brf1, has been constructed. The Brf1-TBP triple fusion protein effectively replaces both Brf1 and TBP in TFIIIC-dependent and -independent transcription in vitro, and forms extremely stable TFIIIB-DNA complexes that are indistinguishable from wild-type TFIIIB-DNA complexes by chemical nuclease footprinting. Unlike Brf1 and TBP, the triple fusion protein is able to recruit pol III for TATA box-directed transcription of linear and supercoiled DNA in the absence of Bdp1. The Brf1-TBP triple fusion protein also effectively replaces Brf1 function in vivo as the intact protein, creating a TBP paralogue in yeast that is privatized for pol III transcription. PMID:16227432

  18. Performance of the new 2011 ACR/EULAR remission criteria with tocilizumab using the phase IIIb study TAMARA as an example and their comparison with traditional remission criteria

    PubMed Central

    Iking-Konert, Christof; Aringer, Martin; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Mosch, Thomas; Tuerk, Stefan; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd R

    2011-01-01

    Background Remission is the established goal in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. Although originally defined by a disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) <2.6, more stringent criteria may imply the absence of disease activity. The 2011 ACR/EULAR remission criteria provide the newest and most stringent definition of remission. Objectives To evaluate post hoc the remission by ACR/EULAR criteria and compare the criteria with the conventional DAS28 in TAMARA, an open-label phase IIIb tocilizumab (TCZ) trial including patients with active RA receiving inadequate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor treatment. Results 286 patients were enrolled, 99.7% of patients were receiving a conventional DMARD and 41.6% had TNFα inhibitor pretreatment. Baseline mean DAS28 of 6.0 ± 1.0 fell to 2.6 ± 1.5 at week 24. DAS28 <2.6 was achieved by 47.6% at week 24. Remission rates with the new ACR/EULAR Boolean-based criteria for clinical studies were 15.0% after 12 weeks and 20.3% after 24 weeks. Of note, 13.5% of patients with previous TNFα blocker inadequate response still achieved remission according to the new ACR/EULAR criteria after 24 weeks. Clinical Disease Activity Index and Simplified Disease Activity Index remission rates were 24.1% and 25.2%, respectively. Conclusions Under the definition of the new stringent 2011 ACR/EULAR remission criteria, patients with active RA despite DMARD treatment and even after inadequate response to TNFα inhibitors, receiving TCZ showed significant rates of remission. Similar remission rates were achieved, when clinical practice criteria, not inclusive of acute phase reactants, were used. PMID:21875873

  19. Mid-Infrared (MIR) and Near-Infrared (NIR) Detection of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB on Barley-Based Artificial Inoculum.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; Calderón, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much must be present to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities found naturally in soil and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We investigated the usefulness of Fourier transform mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic properties in identifying the artificial colonization of barley grains with R. solani AG 2-2 IIIB and in detecting R. solani populations in plant tissues and inoculants. The objectives of this study were to compare the ability of traditional plating assays to NIR and MIR spectroscopies to identify R. solani in different-size fractions of colonized ground barley (used as an artificial inoculum) and to differentiate colonized from non-inoculated barley. We found that NIR and MIR spectroscopies were sensitive in resolving different barley particle sizes, with particles that were <0.25 and 0.25-0.5 mm having different spectral properties than coarser particles. Moreover, we found that barley colonized with R. solani had different MIR spectral properties than the non-inoculated samples for the larger fractions (0.5-1.0, 1.0-2.0, and >2.0 mm) of the ground barley. This colonization was confirmed using traditional plating assays. Comparisons with the spectra from pure fungal cultures and non-inoculated barley suggest that the MIR spectrum of colonized barley is different because of the consumption of C substrates by the fungus rather than because of the presence of fungal bands in the spectra of the colonized samples. We found that MIR was better than NIR spectroscopy in differentiating the colonized from the control samples. PMID:26449805

  20. Benefits of switching from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops: a meta-analysis of two Phase IIIb clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, Hannu; Egorov, Evgeniy; Kaarniranta, Kai; Astakhov, Yuri; Ropo, Auli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glaucoma patients frequently exhibit ocular surface side effects during treatment with prostaglandin eye drops. The present work investigated whether glaucoma patients suffering from signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease while using preserved latanoprost eye drops benefited from switching to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops. Patients and methods The analysis was based on 339 glaucoma patients enrolled in two Phase IIIb trials. The patients were required to have two symptoms, or one sign and one symptom of ocular surface disease at baseline, and at least 6 months preceding treatment with latanoprost eye drops preserved with benzalkonium chloride. All eligible patients were switched from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost for a total of 12 weeks. Ocular symptoms and ocular signs were evaluated at baseline and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after commencing treatment with tafluprost. Intraocular pressure (IOP), drop discomfort, and treatment preference were evaluated to investigate the clinical efficacy and patient-related outcomes. Results After 12 weeks of treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, the incidences of irritation/burning/stinging, foreign body sensation, tearing, itching, and dry eye sensation had diminished to one-third of those reported for preserved latanoprost at baseline. The incidences of blepharitis and corneal/conjunctival fluorescein staining had in turn decreased to one-half of those reported for preserved latanoprost. Severity of conjunctival hyperemia was halved during treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, and there was significant improvement in tear break-up time and tear production. A further reduction in IOP (~1 mmHg) was seen with preservative-free tafluprost compared with preserved latanoprost. Drop discomfort was alleviated during preservative-free tafluprost treatment, and an outstanding majority of patients (72%) preferred preservative-free tafluprost over preserved latanoprost

  1. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Latif, Naeem

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  2. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  3. Classification of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutation Status Using Serum Proteomic Profiling Predicts Tumor Response in Patients with Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Tang, Chuanhao; Xu, Bin; Wang, Weixia; Li, Jianjie; Li, Xiaoyan; Qin, Haifeng; Gao, Hongjun; He, Kun; Song, Santai; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in tumors predict tumor response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, obtaining tumor tissue for mutation analysis is challenging. Here, we aimed to detect serum peptides/proteins associated with EGFR gene mutation status, and test whether a classification algorithm based on serum proteomic profiling could be developed to analyze EGFR gene mutation status to aid therapeutic decision-making. Patients and Methods Serum collected from 223 stage IIIB or IV NSCLC patients with known EGFR gene mutation status in their tumors prior to therapy was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ClinProTools software. Differences in serum peptides/proteins between patients with EGFR gene TKI-sensitive mutations and wild-type EGFR genes were detected in a training group of 100 patients; based on this analysis, a serum proteomic classification algorithm was developed to classify EGFR gene mutation status and tested in an independent validation group of 123 patients. The correlation between EGFR gene mutation status, as identified with the serum proteomic classifier and response to EGFR-TKIs was analyzed. Results Nine peptide/protein peaks were significantly different between NSCLC patients with EGFR gene TKI-sensitive mutations and wild-type EGFR genes in the training group. A genetic algorithm model consisting of five peptides/proteins (m/z 4092.4, 4585.05, 1365.1, 4643.49 and 4438.43) was developed from the training group to separate patients with EGFR gene TKI-sensitive mutations and wild-type EGFR genes. The classifier exhibited a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 77.5% in the validation group. In the 81 patients from the validation group treated with EGFR-TKIs, 28 (59.6%) of 47 patients whose matched samples were labeled as “mutant” by the classifier and 3 (8.8%) of 34 patients

  4. Nonresected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Stages I Through IIIB: Accelerated, Twice-Daily, High-Dose Radiotherapy-A Prospective Phase I/II Trial With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Kranzinger, Manfred; Merz, Florian; Nairz, Olaf; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to investigate the tolerability of accelerated, twice-daily, high-dose radiotherapy. The secondary endpoints were survival and locoregional tumor control. Methods and Materials: Thirty consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven non-small-cell lung cancer were enrolled. Tumor Stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was found in 7, 3, 12, and 8 patients, respectively. We applied a median of 84.6 Gy (range, 75.6-90.0 Gy) to the primary tumors, 63.0 Gy (range, 59.4-72.0 Gy) to lymph nodes, and 45 Gy to nodes electively (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved sites). Fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily, with an interval of 11 hours, were given, resulting in a median treatment time of 35 days. In the majority of patients the conformal target-splitting technique was used. In 19 patients (63%) two cycles of induction chemotherapy were given. The median follow-up time of survivors is 72 months (range, 62-74 months). Results: We found Grade 1, 2 and 3 acute esophageal toxicity in 11 patients (37%), 2 patients (7%), and 2 patients (7%), respectively. Grade 2 acute pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients (7%). No late toxicity greater than Grade 1 was observed. The actual overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years are 63% and 23%, respectively; the median overall survival, 27.7 months. In 9 patients a local failure occurred, 7 of them presenting initially with an atelectasis without availability of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging at that time. In 4 patients recurrence occurred regionally. Conclusions: This Phase I/II trial with long-term follow-up shows low toxicity with promising results for survival and locoregional tumor control.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Reduces the Dose to Normal Tissue Compared With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or Passive Scattering Proton Therapy and Enables Individualized Radical Radiotherapy for Extensive Stage IIIB Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Virtual Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Pan Xiaoning; Xiaoqiang, Li; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose volume histograms of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with those of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) for the treatment of stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the possibility of individualized radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose volume histograms designed to deliver IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, PSPT at 74 Gy, and IMPT at the same doses were compared and the use of individualized radical radiotherapy was assessed in patients with extensive stage IIIB NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach). These patients were selected based on their extensive disease and were considered to have no or borderline tolerance to IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, based on the dose to normal tissue volume constraints (lung volume receiving 20 Gy [V20] of <35%, total mean lung dose <20 Gy; spinal cord dose, <45 Gy). The possibility of increasing the total tumor dose with IMPT for each patient without exceeding the dose volume constraints (maximum tolerated dose [MTD]) was also investigated. Results: Compared with IMRT, IMPT spared more lung, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus, even with dose escalation from 63 Gy to 83.5 Gy, with a mean MTD of 74 Gy. Compared with PSPT, IMPT allowed further dose escalation from 74 Gy to a mean MTD of 84.4 Gy (range, 79.4-88.4 Gy) while all parameters of normal tissue sparing were kept at lower or similar levels. In addition, IMPT prevented lower-dose target coverage in patients with complicated tumor anatomies. Conclusions: IMPT reduces the dose to normal tissue and allows individualized radical radiotherapy for extensive stage IIIB NSCLC.

  6. Changes in hormone and lipid levels in male patients with focal seizures when switched from carbamazepine to lacosamide as adjunctive treatment to levetiracetam: A small phase IIIb, prospective, multicenter, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Elger, Christian E; Rademacher, Michael; Brandt, Christian; Elmoufti, Sami; Dedeken, Peter; Eckhardt, Klaus; Tennigkeit, Frank; De Backer, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Treatment with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as carbamazepine (CBZ) can lead to changes in reproductive, endocrine, and lipid parameters, resulting in clinical symptoms for some patients. Previous studies indicate that these changes can be reversed by switching to a nonenzyme-inducing AED. Lacosamide is a newer-generation AED, not known to induce or strongly inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes. In this phase IIIb, prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm trial (NCT01375374), the serum concentrations of CYP-related reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, and lipids were assessed in otherwise healthy male patients with focal seizures (N=11), before and after a switch from CBZ (600-1200mg/day at baseline) to lacosamide (target dose: 400mg/day by the end of titration) as adjunctive treatment to the nonenzyme-inducing AED levetiracetam (LEV, stable dosage of >1000mg/day throughout). Cross titration took place over 4weeks, followed by an 8-week maintenance period. Serum measurements were conducted at baseline and at the end of maintenance. The median serum sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentration was towards the higher end of the normal range at baseline and decreased following the switch (61.7 to 47.5nmol/L, N=10, p=0.027 by Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Free androgen index (100×testosterone/SHBG) and free thyroxine serum concentration increased (25.4 to 36.4 and 13.0 to 14.9pmol/L, respectively, both N=10 and p=0.002). At baseline, the median progesterone serum concentration was below the normal range (0.7nmol/L), whereas median cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein concentrations were above the normal range (5.5 and 3.6mmol/L, respectively). By the end of maintenance, all measured parameters were within the normal range. The safety and tolerability profile of lacosamide was consistent with that observed in previous studies. Furthermore, antiseizure efficacy appeared to be maintained, suggesting that deinduction of CYP enzymes

  7. (Alkylamino) piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizine analogs are potent, broad-spectrum nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of drug-resistant isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and select for drug-resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB with reduced replication phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Slade, D E; Kopta, L A; Poppe, S M; Poel, T J; Newport, S W; Rank, K B; Biles, C; Morge, R A; Dueweke, T J; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L; Thomas, R C; Sharma, S K; Tarpley, W G

    1996-01-01

    The (alkylamino)piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizines (AAP-BHAPs) are a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific inhibitors which were identified by targeted screening of recombinant reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes carrying key nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-conferring mutations and NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1. Phenotypic profiling of the two most potent AAP-BHAPs, U-95133 and U-104489, against in vitro-selected drug-resistant HIV-1 variants carrying the NNRTI resistance-conferring mutation (Tyr->Cys) at position 181 of the HIV-1 RT revealed submicromolar 90% inhibitory concentration estimates for these compounds. Moreover, U-104489 demonstrated potent activity against BHA-P-resistant HIV-1MF harboring the Pro-236->Leu RT substitution and significantly suppressed the replication of clinical isolates of HIV-1 resistant to both delavirdine (BHAP U-90152T) and zidovudine. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of AAP-BHAPresistant HIV-1IIIB variants revealed that high-level resistance to the AAP-BHAPs was mediated by a Gly-190->Glu substitution in RT, which had a deleterious effect on the integrity and enzymatic activity of virion-associated RT heterodimers, as well as the replication capacity of these resistant viruses. PMID:8648704

  8. PointBreak: A Randomized Phase III Study of Pemetrexed Plus Carboplatin and Bevacizumab Followed by Maintenance Pemetrexed and Bevacizumab Versus Paclitaxel Plus Carboplatin and Bevacizumab Followed by Maintenance Bevacizumab in Patients With Stage IIIB or IV Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti D.; Socinski, Mark A.; Garon, Edward B.; Reynolds, Craig H.; Spigel, David R.; Olsen, Mark R.; Hermann, Robert C.; Jotte, Robert M.; Beck, Thaddeus; Richards, Donald A.; Guba, Susan C.; Liu, Jingyi; Frimodt-Moller, Bente; John, William J.; Obasaju, Coleman K.; Pennella, Eduardo J.; Bonomi, Philip; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose PointBreak (A Study of Pemetrexed, Carboplatin and Bevacizumab in Patients With Nonsquamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer) compared the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed (Pem) plus carboplatin (C) plus bevacizumab (Bev) followed by pemetrexed plus bevacizumab (PemCBev) with paclitaxel (Pac) plus carboplatin (C) plus bevacizumab (Bev) followed by bevacizumab (PacCBev) in patients with advanced nonsquamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated stage IIIB or IV nonsquamous NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 1 were randomly assigned to receive pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 or paclitaxel 200 mg/m2 combined with carboplatin area under the curve 6 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks for up to four cycles. Eligible patients received maintenance until disease progression: pemetrexed plus bevacizumab (for the PemCBev group) or bevacizumab (for the PacCBev group). The primary end point of this superiority study was overall survival (OS). Results Patients were randomly assigned to PemCBev (n = 472) or PacCBev (n = 467). For PemCBev versus PacCBev, OS hazard ratio (HR) was 1.00 (median OS, 12.6 v 13.4 months; P = .949); progression-free survival (PFS) HR was 0.83 (median PFS, 6.0 v 5.6 months; P = .012); overall response rate was 34.1% versus 33.0%; and disease control rate was 65.9% versus 69.8%. Significantly more study drug–related grade 3 or 4 anemia (14.5% v 2.7%), thrombocytopenia (23.3% v 5.6%), and fatigue (10.9% v 5.0%) occurred with PemCBev; significantly more grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (40.6% v 25.8%), febrile neutropenia (4.1% v 1.4%), sensory neuropathy (4.1% v 0%), and alopecia (grade 1 or 2; 36.8% v 6.6%) occurred with PacCBev. Conclusion OS did not improve with the PemCBev regimen compared with the PacCBev regimen, although PFS was significantly improved with PemCBev. Toxicity profiles differed; both regimens demonstrated tolerability. PMID:24145346

  9. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  10. 77 FR 9163 - Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... Regulatory Policies and Procedures of the Department of Transportation (DOT) (44 FR 1134) provide that to the... aircraft certification and operational approval documentation no longer uses these definitions. Under...

  11. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Provo, James L.

    2015-07-15

    A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner—A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters, Spring 2014), p. 50–51] describes various methods for producing oxides, nitrides, carbides, and some compounds, but hydrides were not mentioned. A study was performed in the mid-1970s at the General Electric Company Neutron Devices Department in Largo, FL, by the author to study preparation of thin film hydrides using reactive evaporation and to determine their unique characteristics and properties. Films were produced of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and the rare earth praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), gadolinium (Gd), dysprosium (Dy), and erbium (Er) hydrides by hot crucible filament and electron beam evaporation in atmospheres of deuterium and tritium gases. All-metal vacuum systems were used and those used with tritium were dedicated for this processing. Thin film test samples 1000 nm thick were prepared on 1.27 cm diameter molybdenum disk substrates for each occluder (i.e., an element that can react with hydrogen to form a hydride) material. Loading characteristics as determined by gas-to-metal atomic ratios, oxidation characteristics as determined by argon–sputter Auger analysis, film structure as determined by scanning electron microscope analysis, and film stress properties as determined by a double resonator technique were used to define properties of interest. Results showed hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratios varied from 1.5 to 2.0 with near maximum loading for all but Pr and Nd occluders which correlated with the oxidation levels observed, with all occluder oxidation levels being variable due to vacuum system internal processing conditions and the materials used. Surface oxide levels varied from ∼80 Å to over 1000 Å. For most films studied, results showed that a maximum loading ratio of near 2.0 and a minimum surface oxide level of ∼80 Å could be obtained with a bulk film oxygen level of ∼0.54 oxygen as determined by microprobe analysis when an evaporation rate of ∼0.313 mg/cm{sup 2} min was used in an atmosphere of D{sub 2} or T{sub 2} gas at a system deposition pressure of 1 × 10{sup −3 }Torr (1.33 × 10{sup −1 }Pa) in an evaporation time of ∼2 min. Platelet type (i.e., a film microstructure showing an overlay of flat plates with large grain sizes) film structures were observed for most films with some film mechanical properties determined (i.e., grain size and Vickers μ-hardness), and reduced stress levels were seen with initial normalized differential (tensile) stress levels being (1.0–4.0) × 10{sup 8 }dyne/cm{sup 2} for tritium loaded samples and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9 }dyne/cm{sup 2} for deuterium loaded samples. Also, stress aging characteristics were determined for some hydride films prepared in a radioactive tritium gas atmosphere. Tritium loading, however, had the undesirable characteristic of having to dispose of the internal processing system fixtures, which can be minimized, but the reactive evaporation technique produced desirable thin films.

  12. Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process, Phase IIIB (Progress)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt E. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    From June 1998 through September 1999, direct process residue (DPR, a waste byproduct) hydrogenolysis has been studied at a large pilot plant within Dow Corning's Carrollton, KY, facility. The system reacts filtered DPR with chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and pressure. The process routinely demonstrates DPR conversions from 59% to 89% on a monthly basis. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. An expansion of the current unit's capacity is planned to be on-line by the end of CY2000. Furthermore, a larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning's Barry, Wales, site.

  13. Mutational analysis of the transcription factor IIIB-DNA target of Ty3 retroelement integration.

    PubMed

    Yieh, Lynn; Hatzis, Heather; Kassavetis, George; Sandmeyer, Suzanne B

    2002-07-19

    The Ty3 retrovirus-like element inserts preferentially at the transcription initiation sites of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III. The requirements for transcription factor (TF) IIIC and TFIIIB in Ty3 integration into the two initiation sites of the U6 gene carried on pU6LboxB were previously examined. Ty3 integrates at low but detectable frequencies in the presence of TFIIIB subunits Brf1 and TATA-binding protein. Integration increases in the presence of the third subunit, Bdp1. TFIIIC is not essential, but the presence of TFIIIC specifies an orientation of TFIIIB for transcriptional initiation and directs integration to the U6 gene-proximal initiation site. In the current study, recombinant wild type TATA-binding protein, wild type and mutant Brf1, and Bdp1 proteins and highly purified TFIIIC were used to investigate the roles of specific protein domains in Ty3 integration. The amino-terminal half of Brf1, which contains a TFIIB-like repeat, contributed more strongly than the carboxyl-terminal half of Brf1 to Ty3 targeting. Each half of Bdp1 split at amino acid 352 enhanced integration. In the presence of TFIIIB and TFIIIC, the pattern of integration extended downstream by several base pairs compared with the pattern observed in vitro in the absence of TFIIIC and in vivo, suggesting that TFIIIC may not be present on genes targeted by Ty3 in vivo. Mutations in Bdp1 that affect its interaction with TFIIIC resulted in TFIIIC-independent patterns of Ty3 integration. Brf1 zinc ribbon and Bdp1 internal deletion mutants that are competent for polymerase III recruitment but defective in promoter opening were competent for Ty3 integration irrespective of the state of DNA supercoiling. These results extend the similarities between the TFIIIB domains required for transcription and Ty3 integration and also reveal requirements that are specific to transcription. PMID:11994300

  14. Multiple dermoid sinuses of type Vb and IIIb on the head of a Saint Bernard dog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dermoid sinus, a congenital malformation of neural tube development, has been reported in humans and several animal species including dogs. It is typically found in the dorsal midline and commonly occurs in the Rhodesian Ridgeback breed. A case of multiple dermoid sinuses in the fronto-occipital region is described. An 11-month-old, intact female Saint Bernard dog was presented with a 2 day history of discharge from a large irregular subcutaneous mass in the fronto-occipital region. The dog was otherwise healthy. The dog had two circular skin lesions (approximately 4 × 4 and 4 × 2 cm diameter) surrounded by multiple irregular elevated masses. The masses had multiple small openings on the skin surface with tufts of hair protruding from the apertures. The masses were surgically removed, and the diagnosis of multiple dermoid sinuses was confirmed by histological examination. Histopathological examination showed multiple, variably sized, spherical to tubular cysts expanding the dermis and subcutis. Cysts were filled with hair shafts and lamellar keratin and were lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. Sebaceous and apocrine gland adnexal structures were also observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple dermoid sinuses of two different types in the head of a Saint Bernard dog. PMID:24006855

  15. The Interaction of Man with His Environment. Science III and IIIB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Carl H.

    The two student notebooks in this set provide the basic course outline and assignments for the third year of a four year senior high school unified science program. This course is the less technical of the two third-year courses offered in the program. The first of the three major units in this course, Structure and Dynamics of the Biosphere, is…

  16. Transcription factor IIIB generates extended DNA interactions in RNA polymerase III transcription complexes on tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kassavetis, G A; Riggs, D L; Negri, R; Nguyen, L H; Geiduschek, E P

    1989-01-01

    Transcription complexes that assemble on tRNA genes in a crude Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell extract extend over the entire transcription unit and approximately 40 base pairs of contiguous 5'-flanking DNA. We show here that the interaction with 5'-flanking DNA is due to a protein that copurifies with transcription factor TFIIIB through several steps of purification and shares characteristic properties that are normally ascribed to TFIIIB: dependence on prior binding of TFIIIC and great stability once the TFIIIC-TFIIIB-DNA complex is formed. SUP4 gene (tRNATyr) DNA that was cut within the 5'-flanking sequence (either 31 or 28 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site) was no longer able to stably incorporate TFIIIB into a transcription complex. The TFIIIB-dependent 5'-flanking DNA protein interaction was predominantly not sequence specific. The extension of the transcription complex into this DNA segment does suggest two possible explanations for highly diverse effects of flanking-sequence substitutions on tRNA gene transcription: either (i) proteins that are capable of binding to these upstream DNA segments are also potentially capable of stimulating or interfering with the incorporation of TFIIIB into transcription complexes or (ii) 5'-flanking sequence influences the rate of assembly of TFIIIB into stable transcription complexes. Images PMID:2668737

  17. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-05-01

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3, and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local, semi-local, and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations, the deviation is 3.06, 0.94, and 1.23 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviations in DMC, local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations are 0.017(1), 0.07, 0.05, and 0.04 Å, respectively. DMC is a highly accurate method, outperforming the DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.

  18. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  19. Field Coordination: Phase III-B, Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note II-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, W. Pearl; Rice, Carol F.

    The activities included in the field coordination and data collection phase of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study are described. A history of the recruitment, selection, and training of field personnel, a description of coordination efforts with teachers and school districts, a discussion of the various aspects of scheduling, and the…

  20. Fc Gamma Receptor IIIB (FcγRIIIB) Polymorphisms Are Associated with Clinical Malaria in Ghanaian Children

    PubMed Central

    Adu, Bright; Dodoo, Daniel; Adukpo, Selorme; Hedley, Paula L.; Arthur, Fareed K. N.; Gerds, Thomas A.; Larsen, Severin O.; Christiansen, Michael; Theisen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills nearly a million people annually. Over 90% of these deaths occur in children under five years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. A neutrophil mediated mechanism, the antibody dependent respiratory burst (ADRB), was recently shown to correlate with protection from clinical malaria. Human neutrophils constitutively express Fc gamma receptor-FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB by which they interact with immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG)-subclass antibodies. Polymorphisms in exon 4 of FCGR2A and exon 3 of FCGR3B genes encoding FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB respectively have been described to alter the affinities of both receptors for IgG. Here, associations between specific polymorphisms, encoding FcγRIIA p.H166R and FcγRIIIB-NA1/NA2/SH variants with clinical malaria were investigated in a longitudinal malaria cohort study. FcγRIIA-p.166H/R was genotyped by gene specific polymerase chain reaction followed by allele specific restriction enzyme digestion. FCGR3B-exon 3 was sequenced in 585 children, aged 1 to 12 years living in a malaria endemic region of Ghana. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found no association between FcγRIIA-166H/R polymorphism and clinical malaria. The A-allele of FCGR3B-c.233C>A (rs5030738) was significantly associated with protection from clinical malaria under two out of three genetic models (additive: p = 0.0061; recessive: p = 0.097; dominant: p = 0.0076) of inheritance. The FcγRIIIB-SH allotype (CTGAAA) containing the 233A-allele (in bold) was associated with protection from malaria (p = 0.049). The FcγRIIIB-NA2*03 allotype (CTGCGA), a variant of the classical FcγRIIIB-NA2 (CTGCAA) was associated with susceptibility to clinical malaria (p = 0.0092). The present study is the first to report an association between a variant of FcγRIIIB-NA2 and susceptibility to clinical malaria and provides justification for further functional characterization of variants of the classical FcγRIIIB allotypes. This would be crucial to the improvement of neutrophil mediated functional assays such as the ADRB assay aimed at assessing the functionality of antibodies induced by candidate malaria vaccines. PMID:23049979

  1. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Santana, Juan A; Krogel, Jaron T; Kent, Paul R C; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2016-05-01

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3, and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local, semi-local, and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations, the deviation is 3.06, 0.94, and 1.23 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviations in DMC, local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations are 0.017(1), 0.07, 0.05, and 0.04 Å, respectively. DMC is a highly accurate method, outperforming the DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides. PMID:27155647

  2. 77 FR 40478 - Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions; Confirmation of Effective Date and Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... 16, 2012 (77 FR 9163), and responds to the comments received on that direct final rule. In that... authorization. DATES: The direct final rule published on February 16, 2012 (77 FR 9163), and delayed on April 13, 2012 (77 FR 22186), became effective on June 12, 2012. ADDRESSES: For information on where to...

  3. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Housing. Module III-B-1: Low-Income Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennings, Patricia

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on low income housing is the first in a set of three modules on housing in economically depressed areas. (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see CE 019 901-967.) Following…

  4. Mid-infared (MidIR) and near-infared (NIR) dection of rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB on barley based artificial inoculum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much is needed to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities natually found in soil, and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We invest...

  5. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-B: Calculation Procedures for Step-Feed Process Responses and Addendum No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the third in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals with the calculation procedures associated with a step-feed process. Illustrations and examples are included to…

  6. Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    From July 1994 through May 1998, direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis has been studied in the laboratory, at a small Pilot Plant, and finally at a larger Pilot Plant within Dow Corning`s Carrollton, Kentucky plant. The system reacts filtered DPR with monomer at high temperature and pressure. The process demonstrates DPR conversion up to 86%. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. A larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning`s Barry, Wales site.

  7. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  8. Mid-infared and near-infared detection of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2IIIB on barley based artifical inoculum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much is needed to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities natually found in soil, and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We invest...

  9. Novel mutation detection of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, FGFR2IIIa, FGFR2IIIb, FGFR2IIIc, FGFR3, FGFR4 gene for craniosynostosis: A prospective study in Asian Indian patient

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Malhotra, Arun; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Dwivedi, Sadananda; Das, Sambhunath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniosynostosis (CS) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition classically combining craniosynostosis and non-syndromic craniosynostosis with digital anomalies of the hands and feet. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous mutations in the third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgIII) of FGFR2, whilst a larger number of cases can be attributed to mutations outside this region of the protein. Aims: To find out the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4 gene in craniosynostosis syndrome. Settings and Design: A hospital based prospective study. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of clinical records of patients registered in CS clinic from December 2007 to January 2015 was done in patients between 4 months to 13 years of age. We have performed genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome. Results: We report for the first time the clinical and genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome caused by a heterozygous missense mutation, Thr 392 Thr and ser 311 try, located in the IgII domain of FGFR2. FGFR 3 and 4 gene basis syndrome was eponymously named. Genetic analysis demonstrated that 51/56 families to be unrelated. In FGFR3 gene 10/TM location of 1172 the nucleotide changes C>A, Ala 391 Glu 19/56 and Exon-19, 5q35.2 at conserved linker region the changes occurred pro 246 Arg in 25/56 families. Conclusions: Independent genetic origins, but phenotypic similarities in the 51 families add to the evidence supporting the theory of selfish spermatogonial selective advantage for this rare gain-of-function FGFR2 mutation. PMID:26557159

  10. MRI assessment of early response to certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIIb study applying MRI at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, M; Jacobsson, L T H; Schaufelberger, C; Hansen, M Sejer; Bijlsma, J W J; Dudek, A; Rell-Bakalarska, M; Staelens, F; Haake, R; Sundman-Engberg, B; Bliddal, H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the first time point of an MRI-verified response to certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Forty-one patients with active RA despite disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy were randomised 2:1 to CZP (CZP loading dose 400 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 0–4; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 6–16) or placebo→CZP (placebo at weeks 0–2; CZP loading dose at weeks 2–6; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 8–16). Contrast-enhanced MRI of one hand and wrist was acquired at baseline (week 0) and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16. All six time points were read simultaneously, blinded to time, using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI scoring system. Primary outcome was change in synovitis score in the CZP group; secondary outcomes were change in bone oedema (osteitis) and erosion scores and clinical outcome measures. Results Forty patients were treated (27 CZP, 13 placebo→CZP), and 36 (24 CZP, 12 placebo→CZP) completed week 16. In the CZP group, there were significant reductions from baseline synovitis (Hodges–Lehmann estimate of median change, −1.5, p=0.049) and osteitis scores (−2.5, p=0.031) at week 16. Numerical, but statistically insignificant, MRI inflammation reductions were observed at weeks 1–2 in the CZP group. No significant change was seen in bone erosion score. Improvements across all clinical outcomes were seen in the CZP group. Conclusions CZP reduced MRI synovitis and osteitis scores at week 16, despite small sample size and the technical challenge of reading six time points simultaneously. This study provides essential information on optimal MRI timing for subsequent trials. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01235598. PMID:25512675

  11. Epacadostat and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-12

    Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  12. Axitinib in Treating Patients With Melanoma That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IIIA Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  13. Ropidoxuridine in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Bile Duct Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. 40 CFR 52.73 - Approval of plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meeting the requirements of Clean Air Act sections 169A and 169B, and Federal Regulations 40 CFR 51.308 to... Strategies (Section III.B.5), Modeling and Projections (Section III.B.6), Contingency Plan (Section III.B.7...), Modeling and Projections (Section III.C.6), and Air Quality Conformity Procedures (Section III.C.10);...

  16. PET Imaging of Ovarian Carcinoma With 18F-FSPG

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Altamirano, Karolina; Mendoza-Hernández, Alma Nubia; Carcoba-Tenorio, Carolina; García-García, José Antonio; Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos: la terapia con antioxidantes durante la quimioterapia y radioterapia en pacientes con cáncer cervicouterino es controvertida. Mientras existe evidencia que sugiere que el uso de antioxidantes disminuye los efectos secundarios propios del tratamiento contra el cáncer, hay datos que sugieren que los antioxidantes incrementan el riesgo de recurrencia de cáncer por la afectación de la terapia de los tratamientos. Métodos: se dirigió un estudio clínico controlado en pacientes con cáncer cervicouterino que fueron suplementados con una mezcla de antioxidantes o placebo, con seguimiento por 4 años posteriores al término de su tratamiento antineoplásico para evaluar el efecto de los antioxidantes en la recurrencia. Tomamos datos de niveles de hemoglobina y albúmina. Se analizaron las diferencias entre grupos con la prueba de Chi-cuadrado, la sobrevida se calculó con un análisis multivariado por medio de regresión de COX. Resultados: se dio seguimiento a 103 pacientes con cáncer cervicouterino en etapa clínica IIB y IIIB de los cuales 48% fueron tratados con suplementación de antioxidantes y el 52% con placebo, originalmente y de estos se dio seguimiento a 88 pacientes durante 4 años. El 23,9% de los pacientes tratados presentaron recurrencia por cáncer mientras que el 76,1% no la presentó. El 21,6% de los pacientes presentaron metástasis, el 8% de los pacientes perteneció al grupo de antioxidantes y el 15,9% al grupo placebo (p > 0,05). Implicaciones para los pacientes supervivientes: la suplementación con antioxidantes aparentemente no interfiere con la recurrencia por cáncer, sin embargo no hay evidencia suficiente para probarlo. Posiblemente una dosis distinta sea la clave para un mejor efecto, pero serán necesarios futuros estudios que prueben efectos sobre otro tipo de dosis. Conclusiones: la suplementación con antioxidantes durante el tratamiento de pacientes con cáncer cervicouterino no tiene efectos en la

  20. Phase I Study of Intravenous Triapine (IND # 68338) in Combination With Pelvic Radiation Therapy With or Without Weekly Intravenous Cisplatin Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical, Vaginal, or Pelvic Gynecologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  1. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  2. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  3. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  4. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Talazoparib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Mesothelioma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  7. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  8. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  9. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. Dabrafenib Alone and in Combination With Trametinib Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally or Regionally Advanced Melanoma That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-29

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IIB Melanoma (Locally Advanced); Stage IIC Melanoma (Locally Advanced); Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma (Limited, Resectable)

  11. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Docetaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  12. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  13. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  14. Standard-dose versus high-dose conformal radiotherapy with concurrent and consolidation carboplatin plus paclitaxel with or without cetuximab for patients with stage IIIA or IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (RTOG 0617): a randomised, two-by-two factorial phase 3 study

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jeffrey D; Paulus, Rebecca; Komaki, Ritsuko; Masters, Gregory; Blumenschein, George; Schild, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hu, Chen; Forster, Kenneth; Magliocco, Anthony; Kavadi, Vivek; Garces, Yolanda I; Narayan, Samir; Iyengar, Puneeth; Robinson, Cliff; Wynn, Raymond B; Koprowski, Christopher; Meng, Joanne; Beitler, Jonathan; Gaur, Rakesh; Curran, Walter; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to compare overall survival after standard-dose versus high-dose conformal radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and the addition of cetuximab to concurrent chemoradiation for patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods In this open-label randomised, two-by-two factorial phase 3 study in 185 institutions in the USA and Canada, we enrolled patients (aged ≥ 18 years) with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer, a Zubrod performance status of 0–1, adequate pulmonary function, and no evidence of supraclavicular or contralateral hilar adenopathy. We randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) patients to receive either 60 Gy (standard dose), 74 Gy (high dose), 60 Gy plus cetuximab, or 74 Gy plus cetuximab. All patients also received concurrent chemotherapy with 45 mg/m2 paclitaxel and carboplatin once a week (AUC 2); 2 weeks after chemoradiation, two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy separated by 3 weeks were given consisting of paclitaxel (200 mg/m2) and carboplatin (AUC 6). Randomisation was done with permuted block randomisation methods, stratified by radiotherapy technique, Zubrod performance status, use of PET during staging, and histology; treatment group assignments were not masked. Radiation dose was prescribed to the planning target volume and was given in 2 Gy daily fractions with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. The use of four-dimensional CT and image-guided radiation therapy were encouraged but not necessary. For patients assigned to receive cetuximab, 400 mg/m2 cetuximab was given on day 1 followed by weekly doses of 250 mg/m2, and was continued through consolidation therapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival. All analyses were done by modified intention-to-treat. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00533949. Findings Between Nov 27, 2007, and Nov 22, 2011, 166 patients were randomly assigned to receive standard-dose chemoradiotherapy, 121 to high-dose chemoradiotherapy, 147 to standard-dose chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab, and 110 to high-dose chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab. Median follow-up for the radiotherapy comparison was 22·9 months (IQR 27·5–33·3). Median overall survival was 28·7 months (95% CI 24·1–36·9) for patients who received standard-dose radiotherapy and 20·3 months (17·7–25·0) for those who received high-dose radiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR] 1·38, 95% CI 1·09–1·76; p=0·004). Median follow-up for the cetuximab comparison was 21·3 months (IQR 23·5–29·8). Median overall survival in patients who received cetuximab was 25·0 months (95% CI 20·2–30·5) compared with 24·0 months (19·8–28·6) in those who did not (HR 1·07, 95% CI 0·84–1·35; p=0·29). Both the radiation-dose and cetuximab results crossed protocol-specified futility boundaries. We recorded no statistical differences in grade 3 or worse toxic effects between radiotherapy groups. By contrast, the use of cetuximab was associated with a higher rate of grade 3 or worse toxic effects (205 [86%] of 237 vs 160 [70%] of 228 patients; p<0·0001). There were more treatment-related deaths in the high-dose chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab groups (radiotherapy comparison: eight vs three patients; cetuximab comparison: ten vs five patients). There were no differences in severe pulmonary events between treatment groups. Severe oesophagitis was more common in patients who received high-dose chemoradiotherapy than in those who received standard-dose treatment (43 [21%] of 207 patients vs 16 [7%] of 217 patients; p<0·0001). Interpretation 74 Gy radiation given in 2 Gy fractions with concurrent chemotherapy was not better than 60 Gy plus concurrent chemotherapy for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer, and might be potentially harmful. Addition of cetuximab to concurrent chemoradiation and consolidation treatment provided no benefit in overall survival for these patients. Funding National Cancer Institute and Bristol-Myers Squibb. PMID:25601342

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS SYSTEMS ANALYSIS MODEL (GSAM) VOLUME I - SUMMARY REPORT VOLUME II - USER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIA - RP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIB - SRPM PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIC - E&P PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIID - D&I PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-02-01

    This report summarizes work completed on DOE Contract DE-AC21-92MC28138, Development of a Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The products developed under this project directly support the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in carrying out its natural gas R&D mission. The objective of this research effort has been to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas market. GSAM has been developed to explicitly evaluate components of the natural gas system, including the entire in-place gas resource base, exploration and development technologies, extraction technology and performance parameters, transportation and storage factors, and end-use demand issues. The system has been fully tested and calibrated and has been used for multiple natural gas metrics analyses at NETL in which metric associated with NETL natural gas upstream R&D technologies and strategies under the direction of NETL has been evaluated. NETL's Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced natural gas. GSAM provides the capability to assess potential and on-going R&D projects using a full fuel cycle, cost-benefit approach. This method yields realistic, market-based assessments of benefits and costs of alternative or related technology advances. GSAM is capable of estimating both technical and commercial successes, quantifying the potential benefits to the market, as well as to other related research. GSAM, therefore, represents an integration of research activities and a method for planning and prioritizing efforts to maximize benefits and minimize costs. Without an analytical tool like GSAM, NETL natural gas upstream R&D activities cannot be appropriately ranked or focused on the most important aspects of natural gas extraction efforts or utilization considerations.

  16. Genetic Analysis-Guided Dosing of FOLFIRABAX in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Cholangiocarcinoma; Gallbladder Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Gastrointestinal Neoplasm; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ampulla of Vater Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  17. C-Met Inhibitor AMG 337, Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-13

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  1. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adenomatous Polyp; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIC-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-20

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Small Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IIC Melanoma; Stage IIIA Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  6. Telomere Length in Predicting Toxicity in Older Patients With Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  7. Type-specific neutralization of the human immunodeficiency virus with antibodies to env-encoded synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Palker, T J; Clark, M E; Langlois, A J; Matthews, T J; Weinhold, K J; Randall, R R; Bolognesi, D P; Haynes, B F

    1988-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (SP-10-IIIB) with an amino acid sequence [Cys-Thr-Arg-Pro-Asn-Asn-Asn-Thr-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Arg-Ile-Gln-Arg-Gly-Pro -Pro-Gly-(Tyr); amino acids 303-321] from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) HTLV-IIIB envelope glycoprotein gp120 was coupled to tetanus toxoid and used to raise goat antibodies to HIV gp120. Goat anti-SP-10-IIIB serum bound to the surface of HTLV-IIIB-infected CEM T cells but not to the surface of HTLV-IIIRF-infected or uninfected CEM T cells. Anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies also selectively bound to gp120 from lysates of HTLV-IIIB cells in immunoblot assays. Twenty-one percent of sera (28 of 175) from patients seropositive for HIV contained antibodies that reacted with SP-10-IIIB in RIA. Human anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies affinity purified from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient serum bound to HTLV-IIIB-infected cells and immunoprecipitated gp120. Goat antibodies to SP-10-IIIB neutralized HTLV-IIIB (80% neutralization titer of 1/600), inhibited HTLV-IIIB-induced syncytium formation, but did not neutralize HIV isolates HTLV-IIIRF or HTLV-IIIMN or inhibit syncytium formation with these isolates. Also, goat antiserum to an homologous synthetic peptide [SP-10-IIIRF(A), (Cys)-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Thr-Lys-Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr] from gp120 of HIV isolate HTLV-IIIRF inhibited syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIRF, but did not inhibit syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIB or by HTLV-IIIMN. Thus, the amino acid sequences of SP-10-IIIB and SP-10-IIIRF(A) define homologous regions of gp120 that are important in type-specific virus neutralization. The identification of these type-specific neutralizing epitopes should facilitate the design of a polyvalent, synthetic vaccine for AIDS. Images PMID:2450351

  8. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Male Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  9. Amyloidosis, Synucleinopathy, and Prion Encephalopathy in a Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disease: The CNS-Biomarker Potential of Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Murrey, Darren; Ware, Tierra; Meadows, Aaron; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a devastating neuropathic lysosomal storage disease with complex pathology. This study identifies molecular signatures in peripheral blood that may be relevant to MPS IIIB pathogenesis using a mouse model. Genome-wide gene expression microarrays on pooled RNAs showed dysregulation of 2,802 transcripts in blood from MPS IIIB mice, reflecting pathological complexity of MPS IIIB, encompassing virtually all previously reported and as yet unexplored disease aspects. Importantly, many of the dysregulated genes are reported to be tissue-specific. Further analyses of multiple genes linked to major pathways of neurodegeneration demonstrated a strong brain-blood correlation in amyloidosis and synucleinopathy in MPS IIIB. We also detected prion protein (Prnp) deposition in the CNS and Prnp dysregulation in the blood in MPS IIIB mice, suggesting the involvement of Prnp aggregation in neuropathology. Systemic delivery of trans-BBB-neurotropic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector mediated not only efficient restoration of functional α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and clearance of lysosomal storage pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery, but also the correction of impaired neurodegenerative molecular pathways in the brain and blood. Our data suggest that molecular changes in blood may reflect pathological status in the CNS and provide a useful tool for identifying potential CNS-specific biomarkers for MPS IIIB and possibly other neurological diseases. PMID:24278249

  10. Evaluation of a head-to-head study of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine: evaluation of Dittmann RW, Cardo E, Nagy P, et al. Efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a head-to-head, randomised, double-blind, Phase IIIb study. CNS Drugs 2013;27:1081-1092. doi: 10.1007/s40263-013-0104-8 ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01106430.

    PubMed

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Rothermel, Boris; Poustka, Luise

    2014-09-01

    Here, we evaluate a report of a head-to-head study of the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and the non-stimulant atomoxetine hydrochloride (ATX) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). An inadequate response to previous methylphenidate (MPH) treatment was a notable inclusion criterion. The primary efficacy outcome of a more rapid clinical response to LDX than to ATX was predictable from the known properties of the two drugs. However, secondary efficacy outcomes indicated that LDX was significantly more effective than ATX in relieving investigator-rated symptoms of ADHD, with an effect size of 0.56. Safety and tolerability profiles were consistent with the known properties of LDX and ATX. Despite some issues with the study design, the conclusion that LDX is more effective than ATX over the short term appears robust. In addition, the magnitude of improvement with both treatments indicated that previous MPH treatment is not a factor affecting the potential for patients to benefit from LDX or ATX. The results may help to inform clinical practice in Europe, where LDX is approved for treating children and adolescents with ADHD and a previous inadequate response to MPH, and in other regions where generic MPH formulations are typically the first-line therapeutic option. PMID:25085429

  11. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  12. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-17

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  13. Veliparib and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Cancer That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Breast Carcinoma; Colon Carcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Lung Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm; Ovarian Carcinoma; Pancreatic Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  14. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. TORC1/2 Inhibitor MLN0128 and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma or Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Glioblastoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  1. Zoledronic Acid in Aromatase Inhibitor Induced Musculoskeletal Symptoms

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-12

    Ductal Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Transarterial Chemoembolization in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Child-Pugh Class A; Child-Pugh Class B; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  3. Irinotecan Hydrochloride With or Without Alvocidib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Cancer of the Gastroesophageal Junction or Stomach

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  5. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Stage IIB Melanoma; Stage IIC Melanoma; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  8. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  9. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. Programs To Support You During Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Depression; Fatigue; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  11. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-20

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  13. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  15. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  16. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Intravital Microscopy for Identifying Tumor Vessels in Patients With Stage IA-IV Melanoma That is Being Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  18. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  20. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. Physical Activity Behavioral Intervention in Obese Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  2. Paclitaxel and Intraperitoneal Carboplatin Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Uterine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-10

    Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  3. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  6. Hormone Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Women Who Have Undergone Surgery for Node-Negative Breast Cancer (The TAILORx Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  7. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab With or Without Estrogen Deprivation in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Positive Operable or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Ph 1 Study in Subjects With Tumors Requiring Arginine to Assess ADI-PEG 20 With Pemetrexed and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Pleural Mesothelioma Malignant Advanced; Peritoneal Mesothelioma Malignant Advanced; Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma Stage IIIB/IV (NSCLC); Metastatic Uveal Melanoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC); Glioma; Sarcomatoid Cancers

  10. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Weekly Doses of Cilengitide and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  14. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  16. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Platinum Based Chemotherapy or Observation in Treating Patients With Residual Triple-Negative Basal-Like Breast Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. 77 FR 74923 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Estuaries, Coastal Waters, and South Florida...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters (75 FR 4173) that are addressed in this proposal... detail in Sections III.B and III.C. \\7\\ This area includes waters offshore of Apalachicola Bay,...

  20. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Genomic Sequencing in Determining Treatment in Patients With Metastatic Cancer or Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic Neoplasm; Recurrent Neoplasm; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  2. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  4. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Phase I: At-Home Support for Rural Women Using Group Video Calling

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-15

    Depression; Post-traumatic Stress Disorder; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  7. Phase II Study of Everolimus Beyond Progression

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Megestrol Acetate or Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Treating Patients With Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-09

    Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  9. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. Veliparib and Atezolizumab Either Alone or in Combination in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  11. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  15. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  16. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-29

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Atezolizumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Stage II-III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-29

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  20. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  2. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Veliparib in Combination With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Booster Vaccination in Preventing Disease Recurrence in Previously Vaccinated Patients With Melanoma That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-23

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  7. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b in Treating Patients With Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  9. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Carboplatin+Nab-paclitaxel, Plus Trastuzumab (HER2+) or Bevacizumab (HER2-) in the Neoadjuvant Setting

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-03

    Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization epitope with conserved architecture elicits early type-specific antibodies in experimentally infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Goudsmit, J; Debouck, C; Meloen, R H; Smit, L; Bakker, M; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C

    1988-01-01

    Chimpanzees are susceptible to infection by divergent strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), none of which cause clinical or immunological abnormalities. Chimpanzees were inoculated with one of four strains of HIV-1: human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type IIIB, lymphadenopathy virus (LAV) type 1, HTLV type IIIRF, or an isolate from the brain of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Within 6 months after inoculation with the closely related strains HTLV-IIIB or LAV-1, six chimpanzees developed serum antibodies to the C-terminal half (amino acids 288-467) of the HTLV-IIIB external envelope glycoprotein gp120. Sera from five of those chimpanzees had HTLV-IIIB cell-fusion-inhibiting antibody titers greater than or equal to 20 at that time, indicating that they neutralized the infecting strain of HIV-1 in vitro. No antibodies to the carboxyl terminus of HTLV-IIIB gp120 were observed in sera of chimpanzees inoculated with HTLV-IIIRF or with the brain-tissue strain, and those sera did not neutralize HTLV-IIIB. A rabbit immunized with the C-terminal portion of gp120 acquired neutralizing antibodies that bound to four domains of the HTLV-IIIB external envelope as analyzed by reactivity to 536 overlapping nonapeptides of gp120. One of these domains in the variable region V3, with the amino acid sequence IRIQRGPGRAFVTIG (amino acids 307-321), bound to all chimpanzee sera that neutralized HTLV-IIIB but not to the serum of the HTLV-IIIRF-inoculated chimpanzee that did not neutralize HTLV-IIIB. The HTLV-IIIRF sequence at the same location, ITKGPGRVIYA, was recognized by the serum of the HTLV-IIIRF-inoculated chimpanzee but not by any sera of the HTLV-IIIB-inoculated or LAV-1-inoculated chimpanzees. The HTLV-IIIB residues RIQR and AFV and the HTLV-IIIRF residues lysine and VIYA, flanking a highly conserved beta-turn (GPGR), appear to be critical for antibody binding and subsequent type-specific virus neutralization. This neutralization epitope

  15. Joint Leveling for Advanced Kienbock’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Van Steyn, Marlo O.; Gyuricza, Cassie; Adams, Amelia; Weiland, Andrew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The use of joint leveling procedures to treat Kienbock’s disease has been limited by the degree of disease advancement. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of wrists with more advanced Kienbock’s disease (stage IIIB) to wrists with less advanced disease (stage II/IIIA) following radius shortening osteotomy. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 31 adult wrists (30 patients, mean age 39 years), treated by radius shortening osteotomy between two institutions for either stage IIIB (n=14) or stage II/IIIA (n=17) disease. Evaluation was carried out at a mean of 74 months (IIIB, 77 months; II/IIIA, 72 months). Radiographic assessment determined disease progression. Clinical outcomes were determined by validated patient-based and objective measures. RESULTS Patient-based outcome ratings of wrists treated for stage IIIB were similar to those with stage II/IIIA [QuickDASH (15 vs 12:p=.63), MMWS (84 vs 87:p=.59), VAS pain (1.2 vs 1.7:p=.45), VAS function (2.6 vs 2.1:p=.59)]. The average flexion/extension arc was 102° for wrists with stage IIIB and 106° for wrists with stage II/IIIA Kienbock’s (p=.70). Grip strength was 77% of the opposite side for stage IIIB wrists versus 85% for stage II/IIIA (p=.25). Postoperative carpal height ratio and radioscaphoid angle were worse (p<.05) for wrists treated for stage IIIB (0.46:65°) than stage II/IIIA (0.53:53°) disease. Radiographic disease progression occurred in 7 wrists (6 stage II/IIIA: 1 stage IIIB). The one stage IIIB wrist that progressed underwent wrist arthrodesis. CONCLUSIONS In this limited series, clinical outcomes of radius shortening using validated, patient-based assessment instruments and objective measures failed to demonstrate predicted “clinically relevant” differences between stage II/IIIA and IIIB Kienbock’s. Provided the high percentage successful clinical outcomes in this case series of 14 stage IIIB wrists, we believe that static carpal malalignment

  16. A New Look at Type-III Bursts and Their Use as Coronal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun Beltran, Samuel D.; Cutchin, S.; White, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present meter-wave solar radio spectra of the highest spectro-temporal resolution achieved to date. The observations, obtained with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), show unprecedented detail of solar emissions across a wide bandwidth during a Type-III/IIIb storm. Our flux calibration demonstrates that the LWA1 can detect Type-III bursts much weaker than 1 SFU, much lower than previous observations, and that the distribution of fluxes in these bursts varies with frequency. The high sensitivity and low noise in the data provide strong constraints to models of this type of plasma emission, providing evidence against the idea that Type-IIIb striae are generated from electrons trapped in Langmuir-wave sidebands. The continuous generation of electron beams in the corona revealed by the high density Type-III storm is evidence for ubiquitous magnetic reconnection in the lower corona. Such an abundance of reconnection events not only contributes to the total coronal energy budget, but also provides an engine by which to form the populations of seed particles responsible for proton-rich solar energetic-particle events. An active region (AR) with such levels of reconnection and the accompanying Type-III/IIIb storms is proposed here to be associated with an increase of SEP production if a CME erupts. The data's constraints on existing theories of Type-IIIb production are used to make an association of the observed Type-IIIb storm to specific electron-beam paths with increased inhomogeneities in density, temperature, and/or turbulence. This scenario ties in the observed timing of Type-III and -IIIb storms, constrained theories of Type-III and -IIIb emission, and the ability of the emitting AR to produce a strong SEP event. The result requires but a single observable to cement these ideas, the statistical correlation of Type-III/IIIb activity with SEP-productive AR.

  17. Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Cisplatin and Pemetrexed

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Advanced Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma; Thymoma

  18. Liposomal Irinotecan and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. CDX-1401 and Poly-ICLC Vaccine Therapy With or Without CDX-301in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Iris Melanoma; Medium/Large Size Posterior Uveal Melanoma; Mucosal Melanoma; Ocular Melanoma With Extraocular Extension; Small Size Posterior Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  20. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. Programs to Support You During Chemotherapy (Pro-You)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Depressive Symptoms; Fatigue; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  2. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. A Phase I, Pharmacological, and Biological Study of OSI-774 in Combination With FOLFOX 4 (5-FU, Leucovorin, and Oxaliplatin) and Bevacizumab (Avastin) in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. CPI-613 and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Irinotecan Compared With Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  6. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  7. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Estudio muestra reducción de mortalidad en hombres con cáncer de próstata de grado intermedio

    Cancer.gov

    Terapia hormonal por corto tiempo administrada en combinación con radioterapia a hombres con cáncer de próstata en estadio inicial aumentó sus posibilidades de vivir más en comparación con tratamiento de radioterapia sola, según un estudio clínico patroci

  9. Los NIH anuncian el lanzamiento de los estudios ALCHEMIST

    Cancer.gov

    Los Estudios sobre la Secuenciación e Identificación de Marcadores para el Mejoramiento de la Terapia Adjuvante para el Cáncer de Pulmón, ALCHEMIST, identificarán a pacientes con cáncer de pulmón en estadio inicial cuyos tumores tienen cambios genéticos.

  10. Algunas mujeres con cáncer de seno pueden abstenerse de quimioterapia

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de resultados del estudio TAILORx indica que mujeres con cáncer de seno receptor de hormonas en estadio inicial tienen un riesgo bajo de recurrencia según una prueba de expresión de 21 genes.