Science.gov

Sample records for estuarine sediment communities

  1. Organic Matter Loading Modifies the Microbial Community Responsible for Nitrogen Loss in Estuarine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine sediments, as locations of substantial fixed nitrogen loss, are very important to the nitrogen budget and to the primary productivity of the oceans. Coastal sediment systems are also highly dynamic and subject to periodic natural and anthropogenic organic substrate additions. The response to organic matter by the microbial community involved in nitrogen loss processes was evaluated using mesocosms of Chesapeake Bay sediments. Over the course of a 50-day incubation, rates of anammox and denitrification were measured weekly using (15)N tracer incubations, and samples were collected for genetic analysis. Rates of both nitrogen loss processes and gene abundances associated with them corresponded loosely, probably because heterogeneities in sediments obscured a clear relationship. The rates of denitrification were stimulated more, and the fraction of nitrogen loss attributed to anammox slightly reduced, by the higher organic matter addition. Furthermore, the large organic matter pulse drove a significant and rapid shift in the denitrifier community composition as determined using a nirS microarray, indicating that the diversity of these organisms plays an essential role in responding to anthropogenic inputs. We also suggest that the proportion of nitrogen loss due to anammox in these coastal estuarine sediments may be underestimated due to temporal dynamics as well as from methodological artifacts related to conventional sediment slurry incubation approaches. PMID:26520832

  2. High Levels of Sediment Contamination Have Little Influence on Estuarine Beach Fish Communities

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Andrew C.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Taylor, Matthew D.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2011-01-01

    While contaminants are predicted to have measurable impacts on fish assemblages, studies have rarely assessed this potential in the context of natural variability in physico-chemical conditions within and between estuaries. We investigated links between the distribution of sediment contamination (metals and PAHs), physico-chemical variables (pH, salinity, temperature, turbidity) and beach fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Fish communities were sampled using a beach seine within the inner and outer zones of six estuaries that were either heavily modified or relatively unmodified by urbanization and industrial activity. All sampling was replicated over two years with two periods sampled each year. Shannon diversity, biomass and abundance were all significantly higher in the inner zone of estuaries while fish were larger on average in the outer zone. Strong differences in community composition were also detected between the inner and outer zones. Few differences were detected between fish assemblages in heavily modified versus relatively unmodified estuaries despite high concentrations of sediment contaminants in the inner zones of modified estuaries that exceeded recognized sediment quality guidelines. Trends in species distributions, community composition, abundance, Shannon diversity, and average fish weight were strongly correlated to physico-chemical variables and showed a weaker relationship to sediment metal contamination. Sediment PAH concentrations were not significantly related to the fish assemblage. These findings suggest that variation in some physico-chemical factors (salinity, temperature, pH) or variables that co-vary with these factors (e.g., wave activity or grain size) have a much greater influence on this fish assemblage than anthropogenic stressors such as contamination. PMID:22039470

  3. Archaeal community diversity and abundance changes along a natural salinity gradient in estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Gordon; O'Sullivan, Louise A.; Meng, Yiyu; Williams, Angharad S.; Sass, Andrea M.; Watkins, Andrew J.; Parkes, R. John; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Archaea are widespread in marine sediments, but their occurrence and relationship with natural salinity gradients in estuarine sediments is not well understood. This study investigated the abundance and diversity of Archaea in sediments at three sites [Brightlingsea (BR), Alresford (AR) and Hythe (HY)] along the Colne Estuary, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes, DNA hybridization, Archaea 16S rRNA and mcrA gene phylogenetic analyses. Total archaeal 16S rRNA abundance in sediments were higher in the low-salinity brackish sediments from HY (2–8 × 107 16S rRNA gene copies cm−3) than the high-salinity marine sites from BR and AR (2 × 104–2 × 107 and 4 × 106–2 × 107 16S rRNA gene copies cm−3, respectively), although as a proportion of the total prokaryotes Archaea were higher at BR than at AR or HY. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the ‘Bathyarchaeota’ (MCG), Thaumarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota were the dominant groups of Archaea. The composition of Thaumarchaeota varied with salinity, as only ‘marine’ group I.1a was present in marine sediments (BR). Methanogen 16S rRNA genes from low-salinity sediments at HY were dominated by acetotrophic Methanosaeta and putatively hydrogentrophic Methanomicrobiales, whereas the marine site (BR) was dominated by mcrA genes belonging to methylotrophic Methanococcoides, versatile Methanosarcina and methanotrophic ANME-2a. Overall, the results indicate that salinity and associated factors play a role in controlling diversity and distribution of Archaea in estuarine sediments. PMID:25764553

  4. PHYTOASSESSMENT OF ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most sediment quality assessments and quality guidelines are based on the laboratory response of single animal species and benthic animal community composition. The role of plants in this hazard assessment process is poorly understood despite the fact that plant-dominated habitat...

  5. Response of estuarine benthic communities to zinc contamination: Tests using formulated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Watzin, M.C.; Roscigno, P.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of historic industrial sources, zinc contamination in Mobile Bay is of widespread concern. Using formulated sediment and a newly developed field technique, the authors examined the effects of a series of concentrations of zinc on the benthic invertebrate community at two sites. A formulated sediment that matches field sediment in grain size distribution and organic matter content was mixed from 11 components and used as the test substrate. Clean sediments and sediments dosed with zinc at concentrations from 250--5,000 mg/kg were exposed in the field on holding racks anchored on the bottom of the bay. The abundance and diversity of benthic invertebrate recruits were used as indicators of sediment quality. The authors found significant differences in both the abundances and species composition of recruits between clean controls and the zinc contaminated sediments. All taxa did not respond similarly to changing zinc concentrations, and effects on some groups were more apparent at lower concentrations. Several families of polychaete worms, harpacticoid copepods, and ostracods appeared to be most sensitive to the zinc. Under certain conditions, some taxa were attracted to zinc contaminated sediments. Taken together, the results suggest that zinc contamination can profoundly affect the nature of the benthic community recruiting into such sediments.

  6. Effects of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene on estuarine macrobenthic communities exposed via water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Tagatz, M.E.; Plaia, G.R.; Deans, C.H.

    1985-12-01

    Macrobenthic animal communities that colonized sand-filled aquaria were exposed to 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB), a recent replacement for polycholorinated biphenyls in the electrical industry. In one test, communities established by planktonic larvae entrained in continuously supplied unfiltered seawater for 50 days were exposed to waterborne TCB for 6 days; in the second test, the toxicant was added to the sediment before 8 weeks of colonization. Concentrations that affected community structure were usually two orders of magnitude lower for waterborne TCB than for sediment-bound TCB, but the same types of organisms were affected by each route of exposure. The lowest TCB concentrations (measured) that affected average numbers of individuals exposed via the water were 0.04 mg/liter for mollusks, 0.4 mg/liter for arthropods, and 4 mg/liter for annelids. Average number of species was significantly lower than the control at 4 mg/liter. For TCB exposures via the sediment, the lowest concentrations (nominal) that affected average numbers of individuals were 100 micrograms/g for mollusks and echinoderms, and 1000 micrograms/g for arthropods and annelids. Average number of species in experimental aquaria was significantly lower than the control at greater than or equal to 100 micrograms/g. TCB persisted in sediments, but some leached into water throughout the 8-week exposure via sediment.

  7. Effects of sedimentary sulfide on community structure, population dynamics, and colonization depth of macrozoobenthos in organic-rich estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Gen; Uehara, Tadayasu; Kikuchi, Eisuke

    2016-08-15

    An annual field survey and in situ recolonization experiment revealed the effects of sedimentary sulfide (H2S) on macrozoobenthos in a eutrophic brackish lagoon. Species diversity was much lower throughout the year in muddy opportunist-dominant sulfidic areas. Mass mortality occurred during warmer months under elevated H2S levels. An enclosure experiment demonstrated that sedimentary H2S modified community composition, size structure, and colonization depth of macrozoobenthos. Species-specific responses to each sediment type (sand, sulfidic mud, and mud with H2S removed) resulted in changes in the established community structure. Dominant polychaetes (Hediste spp., Pseudopolydora spp., and Capitella teleta) occurred predominantly in a thin surface layer in the presence of H2S. On the other hand, organic-rich mud facilitated settlement of polychaete larvae if it does not contain H2S. These results demonstrate that sediment characteristics, including H2S level and organic content, were key structuring factors for the macrozoobenthic assemblage in organically polluted estuarine sediments. PMID:27234365

  8. THE EFFECTS OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS ON REPRESENTATIVE ESTUARINE SPECIES AND DEVELOPING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES. CHAPTER 21

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay techniques developed to examine acute and sublethal effects of dredged sediments on marine life are described. Results are reported for laboratory tests conducted to determine sublethal and acute effects of Kepone-sorbed sediment and dredged spoil material from the James...

  9. TOXICITY OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TO FIELD-AND LABORATORY-COLONIZED ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities that colonized uncontaminated and creosote-contaminated sand during 8 weeks were compared to assess effects of marine-grade creosote on community structure. Aquaria were colonized in the laboratory by planktonic larvae entrained in continuously sup...

  10. EFFECTS OF 1,2,4-TRICHLOROBENZENE ON ESTUARINE MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES EXPOSED VIA WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities that colonized sand-filled aquaria were exposed to 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB), a recent replacement for polychlorinated biphenyls in the electrical industry. In one test, communities established by planktonic larvae entrained in continuously supp...

  11. Measuring the acute toxicity of estuarine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, T.H.; Swartz, R.C.; Lanberson, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Estuarine sediments frequently are repositories and sources of anthropogenic contaminants. Toxicity is one method of assessing the environmental quality of sediments, yet because of the extreme range of salinities that characterize estuaries few infaunal organisms have both the physiological tolerance and sensitivity to chemical contaminants to serve in estuarine sediment toxicity tests. The study describes research on the estuarine burrowing amphipod, Eohaustorius estuarius Bosworth, 1973, whose survival was >95% in control sediments across a 2 to 28% salinity range over 10-d periods. E. estuarius also was acutely sensitive to low sediment concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, fluoranthene (LC50 approximately = 10.6 mg/kg), and its sensitivity to fluoranthene was not affected by salinity. E. estuarius was almost as sensitive as Rhepoxynius abronius to fluoranthene and to field-collected sediments from Puget Sound urban and industrial bays. E. estuarius was also more tolerant of very fine, uncontaminated sediments than R. abronius. Furthermore, E. estuarius was more sensitive to sediments spiked with fluoranthene than the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. E. estuarius, and possibly other estuarine haustoriid species, appears to be an excellent candidate for testing the acute toxicity if estuarine and marine sediments.

  12. Sediment diatom species and community response to nitrogen addition in Oregon (USA) estuarine tidal wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment microalgae play an important role in nutrient cycling and are important primary producers in the food web in Pacific Northwest estuaries. This study examines the effects of nitrogen addition to benthic microalgae in tidal wetlands of Yaquina Bay estuary on the Oregon c...

  13. Quantitative determination of microbial activity and community nutritional status in estuarine sediments: evidence for a disturbance artifact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, R. H.; Pollard, P. C.; Moriarty, D. J.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    In estuarine sediments with a high degree of vertical heterogeneity in reduced substrate and terminal electron acceptor concentrations, the method of exposure of the microbiota to labeled substrates can introduce a "disturbance artifact" into measures of metabolic activity. The detection of this artifact is based on quantitative measurement of the relative rates of incorporation of [14C]acetate into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and endogenous storage lipid, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Previous studies have shown that PLFA synthesis measures cellular growth and that PHA synthesis measures carbon accumulation (unbalanced growth). The "disturbance artifact" of exposure to [14C]acetate was demonstrated by comparing injection of a core with the usual or pore-water replacement or slurry techniques. Only injection of labeled substrate allowed detection of preassay disturbance of the sediment with a garden rake. The raking increased PLFA synthesis with little effect to differences in concentration or distribution of [14C]acetate in the 10-min incubation. Bioturbation induced by sand dollar feeding in estuarine sediment could be detected in an increased PLFA/PHA ratio which was due to decreased PHA synthesis if the addition of labeled substrate was by the injection technique. Addition of labeled precursors to sediment by slurry or pore-water replacement induces greater disturbance artifacts than injection techniques.

  14. Sediment measurement in estuarine and coastal areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of uses of estuarine and coastal areas is given. Problems associated with these uses are discussed, and data needs for intelligent management of these valuable areas are outlined. Suspended sediment measurements are seen to be one of the greatest needs. To help understand the complexity of the problem, a brief discussion of sediment mechanics is given, including sediment sources, characteristics, and transport. The impact of sediment mechanics on its direct measurement (sampling and analysis) is indicated, along with recommendations for directly obtaining representative data. Indirect measurement of suspended sediment by remote sensors is discussed both theoretically and in the light of some recent experiences. The need for an integrated, multidisciplinary program to solve the problem of quantitatively measuring suspended sediment with remote sensors is stressed, and several important considerations of such a program and benefits to be derived therefrom are briefly addressed.

  15. Contribution of intra-estuarine tributaries to estuarine sediment budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, M.; Deloffre, J.; Lafite, R.; Le Hir, P.; Oberle, K.; Petit, F.

    2012-04-01

    sediment dynamics is significantly affected by pluri-annual variability. This timescale has to be taken into account in order to study hydro-sedimentary behaviour in estuarine environments in particular considering the development of long-term estuarine observatories.

  16. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on the communities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in estuarine marsh sediments

    PubMed Central

    Zeleke, Jemaneh; Sheng, Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gong; Huang, Ming-Yao; Xia, Fei; Wu, Ji-Hua; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2013-01-01

    The effect of plant invasion on the microorganisms of soil sediments is very important for estuary ecology. The community structures of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as a function of Spartina alterniflora invasion in Phragmites australis-vegetated sediments of the Dongtan wetland in the Yangtze River estuary, China, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) and dissimilatory sulfite-reductase (dsrB) genes. Sediment samples were collected from two replicate locations, and each location included three sampling stands each covered by monocultures of P. australis, S. alterniflora and both plants (transition stands), respectively. qPCR analysis revealed higher copy numbers of mcrA genes in sediments from S. alterniflora stands than P. australis stands (5- and 7.5-fold more in the spring and summer, respectively), which is consistent with the higher methane flux rates measured in the S. alterniflora stands (up to 8.01 ± 5.61 mg m−2 h−1). Similar trends were observed for SRB, and they were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the methanogens. Diversity indices indicated a lower diversity of methanogens in the S. alterniflora stands than the P. australis stands. In contrast, insignificant variations were observed in the diversity of SRB with the invasion. Although Methanomicrobiales and Methanococcales, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated in the salt marsh, Methanomicrobiales displayed a slight increase with the invasion and growth of S. alterniflora, whereas the later responded differently. Methanosarcina, the metabolically diverse methanogens, did not vary with the invasion of, but Methanosaeta, the exclusive acetate utilizers, appeared to increase with S. alterniflora invasion. In SRB, sequences closely related to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae dominated in the salt marsh, although they displayed minimal changes with the S

  17. Benthic infaunal community structuring in an acidified tropical estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that increasing ocean acidification (OA) should have strong direct and indirect influences on marine invertebrates. While most theory and application for OA is based on relatively physically-stable oceanic ecological systems, less is known about the effects of acidification on nearshore and estuarine systems. Here, we investigated the structuring of a benthic infaunal community in a tropical estuarine system, along a steep salinity and pH gradient, arising largely from acid-sulphate groundwater inflows (Sungai Brunei Estuary, Borneo, July 2011- June 2012). Results Preliminary data indicate that sediment pore-water salinity (range: 8.07 - 29.6 psu) declined towards the mainland in correspondence with the above-sediment estuarine water salinity (range: 3.58 – 31.2 psu), whereas the pore-water pH (range: 6.47- 7.72) was generally lower and less variable than the estuarine water pH (range: 5.78- 8.3), along the estuary. Of the thirty six species (taxa) recorded, the polychaetes Neanthes sp., Onuphis conchylega, Nereididae sp. and the amphipod Corophiidae sp., were numerically dominant. Calcified microcrustaceans (e.g., Cyclopoida sp. and Corophiidae sp.) were abundant at all stations and there was no clear distinction in distribution pattern along the estuarine between calcified and non-calcified groups. Species richness increased seawards, though abundance (density) showed no distinct directional trend. Diversity indices were generally positively correlated (Spearman’s rank correlation) with salinity and pH (p <0.05) and negatively with clay and organic matter, except for evenness values (p >0.05). Three faunistic assemblages were distinguished: (1) nereid-cyclopoid-sabellid, (2) corophiid-capitellid and (3) onuphid- nereid-capitellid. These respectively associated with lower salinity/pH and a muddy bottom, low salinity/pH and a sandy bottom, and high salinity/pH and a sandy bottom. However, CCA suggested that species distribution

  18. Impact of silver nanoparticles on benthic prokaryotes in heavy metal-contaminated estuarine sediments in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, B; Bhattacharya, B D; Ray Chaudhuri, S; Sarkar, S K

    2015-10-15

    Little knowledge is available about the potential impact of commercial silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on estuarine microbial communities. The Hugli river estuary, India, is susceptible to heavy metals pollution through boat traffic, and there is the potential for Ag-NP exposure via effluent discharged from ongoing municipal and industrial activities located in close proximity. This study investigated the effects of commercial Ag-NPs on native microbial communities in estuarine sediments collected from five stations, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique. An increase in the number of bacteria in consortium in sediments was observed following exposure to Ag-NPs. In general microbial communities may be resistant in estuarine systems to the antimicrobial effects of commercial Ag-NPs, but key microorganisms, such as Pelobacter propionicus, disappeared following exposure to Ag-NPs. In conclusion, the T-RFLP analysis indicated that Ag-NPs have the potential to shape estuarine sediment bacterial community structure. PMID:26231062

  19. EFFECTS OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL ON DEVELOPMENT OF ESTUARINE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pentachlorophenol affected the composition of communities of estuarine organisms developed in sand from planktonic larvae in estuarine water that flowed through ten control aquaria and ten aquaria per exposure concentration averaging 7, 76, or 622 micrograms/liter. Annelids, arth...

  20. Generation of an estuarine sediment plume by a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Li, Yun

    2013-02-01

    Tropical Storm Lee (2011) caused a record flood in the Susquehanna River which discharged about 6.7 million tons of suspended sediments into the Bay, an amount equal to the input of 6 average years. The flood-carried sediment produced a large sediment plume that covered one half of Chesapeake Bay with the maximum suspended sediment concentration exceeding 2500 mg L-1. Three stages were identified in the development of the sediment plume, corresponding to three dominant forcing mechanisms, i.e., river flow, estuarine circulation, and sediment settling. Most of the flood-carried sediments were deposited in the Bay within 20 days. Sands were dumped in the Susquehanna Flats with a maximum thickness of 10 cm, while fine-grained sediments were dusted over a wide area in the upper Bay with a maximum thickness of 4 cm. Long-term simulation of the post-storm period showed that a majority of the flood sediments were redistributed to accumulate in the estuarine turbidity maximum region due to flood-ebb asymmetry in tidal suspension and advection by estuarine circulation and tidal flows while the rest were transported seaward and deposited in the mid-Bay. It is estimated that the flood delivered 9 months of particulate nitrogen and over 1 year of particulate phosphorus supplies to the estuary. This catastrophic event may change the geological history and exacerbate water-quality decline in the American largest estuary.

  1. Role of Phragmites australis (common reed) for heavy metals phytoremediation of estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Cicero-Fernández, Diego; Peña-Fernández, Manuel; Expósito-Camargo, Jose A; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Phragmites australis to take up heavy metals (Co, Ni, Mo, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Hg) and other trace elements (As, Se, Ba), from estuarine sediments was investigated using a pilot plant experimental approach. Bioaccumulation (BCF) and translocation factors (TF) were calculated in vegetative and senescence periods for two populations of P. australis, from contaminated (MIC) and non-contaminated (GAL) estuarine sediments, respectively, both growing in estuarine contaminated sediment (RIA) from ría del Carmen y Boo, Santander Bay, Spain. The highest BCF values were obtained for Ni (0.43), Ba (0.43) Mo (0.36), Cr (0.35), and Cd (0.31) for plants collected from site GAL following the senescence period. The highest BCF values recorded for plants collected from MIC following the senescence period were for Mo (0.22) and Cu (0.22). Following senescence, plants collected from GAL and MIC presented TF>1 for Ni, Mo, Se, and Zn, and in addition plants collected from MIC presented TF>1 for Ba, Cr, and Mn. A substantial increase of Micedo's rhizosphere, six times higher than Galizano's rhizosphere, suggested adaptation to contaminated sediment. The evaluated communities of P. australis demonstrated their suitability for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated estuarine sediments. PMID:26375048

  2. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  3. Methylmercury production in estuarine sediments: role of organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Schartup, Amina T.; Mason, Robert P.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Hollweg, Terill A.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2013-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) affects wildlife and human health mainly through marine fish consumption. In marine systems, MeHg is formed from inorganic mercury (HgII) species primarily in sediments then accumulates and biomagnifies in the food web. Most of the fish consumed in the US are from estuarine and marine systems highlighting the importance of understanding MeHg formation in these productive regions. Sediment organic matter has been shown to limit mercury methylation in estuarine ecosystems, as a result it is often described as the primary control over MeHg production. In this paper, we explore the role of organic matter by looking at the effects of its changing sediment concentrations on the methylation rates across multiple estuaries. We measured sedimentary MeHg production at eleven estuarine sites that were selected for their contrasting biogeochemical characteristics, mercury (Hg) content, and location in the Northeastern US (ME, NH, CT, NY, and NJ). Sedimentary total Hg concentrations ranged across five orders of magnitude, increasing in concentration from the pristine, sandy sediments of Wells (ME), to industrially contaminated areas like Portsmouth (NH) and Hackensack (NJ). We find that methylation rates are the highest at locations with high Hg content (relative to carbon), and that organic matter does not hinder mercury methylation in estuaries. PMID:23194318

  4. Hydrodynamic Forcing Mobilizes Cu in Low-Permeability Estuarine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minwei; Wang, Ning; Gaillard, Jean-François; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-01

    Overlying hydrodynamics play critical roles in controlling surface-porewater exchanges in permeable sediments, but these effects have rarely been characterized in low-permeability sediments. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effects of varied hydrodynamic conditions on the efflux of metals from low-permeability estuarine sediments. Two Cu-contaminated sediments obtained from the Piscataqua River were subject to controlled levels of hydrodynamic shear in Gust mesocosms, including episodic sediment resuspension. Overlying water and porewater samples were collected over the course of experiments and analyzed for metal concentrations. The two sediments had similar permeability (∼10(-15) m(2)), but different particle size distributions. Hydrodynamic forcing enhanced the mobilization and efflux of Cu from the coarser-grained sediments, but not the finer-grained sediments. Sediment resuspension caused additional transitory perturbations in Cu concentrations in the water column. Particulate metal concentrations increased significantly during resuspension, but then rapidly decreased to preresuspension levels following cessation of sediment transport. Overall, these results show that the mobility and efflux of metals are likely to be influenced by overlying hydrodynamics even in low-permeability sediments, and these effects are mediated by sediment heterogeneity and resuspension. PMID:27054802

  5. Impact of frontal systems on estuarine sediment and pollutant dynamics.

    PubMed

    Duck, R W; Wewetzer, S F

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, a brief description of frontal systems, their modes of occurrence and impact on the estuarine environment, is presented. Previous studies of estuarine fronts have largely focused on the water surface and within the water column. New observations in the Tay Estuary, Scotland have shown that the presence of fronts within the water column may be marked, not only by surface foam bands, but also by abrupt (i.e. non-gradational) changes in the underlying bedform morphology and/or sediment facies, as detected using side-scan sonar. This preliminary evidence suggests that fronts may exert a control, not only on the surface and intra-water column sediment and pollutant partitioning, but also on the distribution and persistence of bedload transport pathways. PMID:11258822

  6. EFFECT OF BARITE (BASO4) ON DEVELOPMENT OF ESTUARINE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Barite (BaSO4), the primary component of oil drilling muds, affected the composition of estuarine communities developed from planktonic larvae in aquaria containing sand and flowing estuarine water. Aquaria contained: sand only; a mixture (by volume) of 1 part barite and 10 parts...

  7. VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE CDOM CAUSED BY PARTITIONING ONTO RIVER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The optical properties and geochemical cycling of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are altered by its sorption to freshwater and estuarine sediments. Measured partition coefficients (Kp) of Satilla River (Georgia) and Cape Fear River estuary (North Carolina) CDOM ran...

  8. RECOLONIZATION OF SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED MICROALGAE AND EFFECTS OF ESTUARINE INFAUNA ON MICROALGAL PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to determine the rate of recolonization of sediment-associated microalgae and effects of infauna on microalgal biomass and production. Estuarine sediment was defaunated and transplanted to the field and the laboratory. Recolonization of sediment by flor...

  9. Sediment transport in a surface-advected estuarine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. Y.; Leonardi, N.; Li, J. F.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2016-03-01

    The interplay between suspended-sediment transport and plume hydrodynamics in a surface-advected estuarine plume is studied using a three-dimensional numerical model. Our analysis focuses on the formation of a sediment-rich alongshore current and on the effect of sediments on the structure of the recirculating freshwater bulge. We introduce the ratio Y between the traveling time of sediment along the bulge edge and the settling timescale. When Y <1, suspended sediments enter the alongshore coastal current. When Y >1 the sediments are deposited within the bulge. We find that a critical range of settling velocities exist above which no transport in the costal current is allowed. Critical settling-velocity values increase with river discharge. Therefore, low magnitude and long-lasting floods promote sediment sorting in the continental shelf. We further find that, for a given flood duration, intermediate flood magnitudes at the limit between subcritical and supercritical flow maximize the alongshore sediment transport. Similarly, for a fixed input of water and sediments, intermediate discharge durations maximize alongshore sediment transport.

  10. Temporal variability of denitrification in estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. S.; Rees, A. P.; Owens, N. J. P.

    1991-07-01

    Sediment denitrification rates and fluxes of nitrous oxide, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium were determined at two intertidal sites in the Tamar estuary (S.W. England). High sediment nitrate uptake rates were recorded throughout the year, whereas the nitrite and ammonium fluxes were positive (from sediment to water column), with the former resulting from nitrification. Nitrous oxide flux was also positive, being largely attributable to denitrification with some contribution from nitrification or nitrification-denitrification coupling. No relationship was apparent between denitrification rate and nitrate concentration in the overlying water, invalidating the notion that denitrification automatically regulates nitrate during periods of elevated ambient concentration. However, denitrification exhibited a strong covariance with the degree of sediment bioturbation ( Nereis diversicolor), which was considered to be attributable to increased transport and supply of nitrate via Nereis burrows. Denitrification accounted for 8·5% of the annual total nitrate loading to the Tamar estuary, although a maximum of 100% was observed in summer when the phytoplankton nutrient requirement would also be highest.

  11. Comparative analysis of chemical and microbial profiles in estuarine sediments sampled from Kanto and Tohoku regions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Taiga; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Estuarine environments accumulate large quantities of organic matter from land masses adjoining the sea, and this is consumed as part of the detritus cycle. These environments are rich in biodiversity, and their ecosystem services greatly benefit humans. However, the estuarine environments have complicated aqueous ecosystems, thus the comprehensive evaluation of biotic interactions and stability is difficult using conventional hypothesis-driven approaches. In this study, we describe the advancement of an evaluation strategy for characterizing and visualizing the interactions and relationships among the microorganisms and chemicals in sediment ecosystems of estuarine environments by a combination of organic matter and elemental profiling as well as microbial profiling. We also report our findings from a comparative analysis of estuarine and coastal environmental samples collected from the Kanto and Tsunami-affected Tohoku regions in Japan. The microbial-gated correlation deployed from the coefficient of microbiota from the correlation matrix and network analysis was able to visualize and summarize the different relationships among the microbial communities, sediment organic matter, and element profiles based on geographical differences in Kanto and Tohoku regions. We demonstrated remarkable estuarine eutrophication in the Kanto region based on abundant sediment polypeptide signals and water nitrogen ions catabolized by microbiota. Therefore, we propose that this data-driven approach is a powerful method for analyzing, visualizing, and evaluating complex metabolic dynamics and networks in sediment microbial ecosystems and can be applied to other environmental ecosystems, such as deep sea sediments and agronomic and forest soils. PMID:24889864

  12. RESPONSES OF EXPERIMENTAL ESTUARINE COMMUNITIES TO CONTINUOUS CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of continuous chlorination (as NaOCl) on estuarine benthic organisms were investigated with plankton-derived experimental communities. Twelve consecutive studies were conducted, each of which consisted of approximately 60 days colonization periods from flowing estuari...

  13. Pepsin-Digestibility of Contaminated Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A.; Henon, D. N.; Dale, J. L. L.

    2001-11-01

    A standard method for the in vitro digestion of animal protein feeds (2% pepsin in 0·075 N HCl) has been applied to contaminated sediments in order to evaluate a ' bioavailable ' or ' gut-soluble ' fraction of carbon, nitrogen and mineral and trace metals. For most sediment samples, considerably more nitrogen was digested than carbon because of enzymatic digestion of proteinaceous material, and the sequence of metal ' gut-solubility ' was: Cu, Zn>Mn>Fe≫Al. The principal mechanism of metal release appears to be hydrochloric acid digestion of inorganic hydrogenous host phases (e.g. amorphous Fe and Mn oxides), although release of Cu via surface complexation with pepsin molecules may also be significant, and the amount of metal digested enzymatically is restricted to a small and unquantifiable fraction associated with proteinaceous material. Dilute HCl alone does not, however, afford a suitable surrogate for assessing a gut-soluble fraction of metal because enzymatic and acid digestions exhibit synergistic effects, including possible re-adsorption of pepsin-metal complexes under acidic conditions, and exposure and acid attack of otherwise inaccessible hydrogenous material following enzymatic digestion of organic matter.

  14. Trace metals in estuarine sediments from the southwestern Spanish coast.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, F

    2001-06-01

    The impact of river-transported metal pollution and industrial wastes on the metal distribution (Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb) in estuarine sediments was studied in the southwestern Spanish estuaries. Intertidal and subtidal surface sediments of the Tinto-Odiel Estuary are very highly polluted by heavy metals, with geoaccumulation indices up to 4 in the three sedimentary environments studied (channel, channel border and salt marsh). The single exception is the Punta Umbria channel, very protected from the point sources by salt marsh deposits and hydraulic processes. In the remaining two estuaries, pollution (Pb, Cu) was only significant near the harbour situated in the Piedras river mouth, whereas very low values were found in the Guadiana Estuary. In these last rivers, the enrichment factor increases from the channel to the salt marsh sediments. PMID:11468926

  15. Changes in metal contamination levels in estuarine sediments around India--an assessment.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Nagender Nath, B

    2014-01-15

    This review is the first attempt to comprehend the changes in metal contamination levels in surface estuarine sediments with changing time around India. Contamination factor, geoaccumulation index, pollution load index, effects range low and effects range median analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the estuarine sediments (by using the available literature data). This study suggests that estuarine sediments from the east coast of India were comparatively less contaminated by metals than the west coast. Sediments from those estuaries were found to be more contaminated by metals on which major cities are located. An improvement in estuarine sediment quality (in terms of metal contamination) over time around India was noticed. This study provides managers and decision-makers of environmental protection agency with a better scientific understanding for decision-making in controlling metal pollution in estuarine sediments around India. PMID:24211100

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of acetylene by estuarine sediments and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Acetylene disappeared from the gas phase of anaerobically incubated estuarine sediment slurries, and loss was accompanied by increased levels of carbon dioxide. Acetylene loss was inhibited by chloramphenicol, air, and autoclaving. Addition of 14C2H2 to slurries resulted in the formation of 14CO2 and the transient appearance of 14C-soluble intermediates, of which acetate was a major component. Acetylene oxidation stimulated sulfate reduction; however, sulfate reduction was not required for the loss of C2H2 to occur. Enrichment cultures were obtained which grew anaerobically at the expense of C2H2.

  17. RELEVANCE OF ROOTED VASCULAR PLANTS AS INDICATORS OF ESTUARINE SEDIMENT QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity assessments and numerical quality assessment guidelines for estuarine sediments are rarely based on information for aquatic plants. The effect of this lack of information on contaminated sediment evaluations is largely unknown. For this reason, the toxicities of whole se...

  18. Turing Patterns in Estuarine Sediments by Microbiological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The use of Turing mechanisms and lattice Lotka-Volterra model (LLV), also by means of the non-extensive statistical mechanics, can mathematically describe well the phenomena of clustering and their associated boundaries with fractal dimensionality, which occurs in various natural situations, among them, biogeochemical processes via microorganisms in estuarine and marine sediments on the planet Earth. The author did an experimental analysis in field work which took into account the spatial and temporal behavior of Turing patterns, in the form of microbial activity within estuarine subsurface sediments. We show we can find the characteristics of clustering and fractallity which are present in the dynamical LLV model and Turing patterns mechanisms, and the non-extensive statistical mechanics could be used to find the q-entropy (Sq), and other non-equilibrium statistical parameters of the studied estuarine (Caraís lagoon) subsurface biogeochemical system. In this paper, the author suggests that such kinds of subsurface ecological systems are of interest to Astrobiology because if we find Turing-type clustered geomorphological patterns, below meter scale, on the near subsurface and inside rocks at the surface of planet Mars, and also find non-equilibrium statistical parameters (temperature, [F], [C], [S], etc.), displaying Turing-type mechanism, in the aquatic environments of the internal seas of planets Jupiter's moon Europa and the internal global ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus, that could mean that possible hypothetical biogeochemical activities are present in such places. This could be a bio-indicator tool. And with further studies we could find the q-entropy Sq to establish better defined statistical mechanical parameters for such environments and to refine models for their evolution, as we do on planet Earth.

  19. Partitioning of Cd in geochemical fractions of anaerobic estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, Joseph H.; Alden, Raymond W.

    1992-05-01

    Distribution of Cd in geochemical fractions of anaerobic estuarine sediments was determined before and after treatment of the sediments with added Cd. Portions of three sediment types (sandy, silty, and clayey) were treated with 5 and 10 mg kg -1 Cd as CdCl 2 and each type had an untreated control. Sediments were sampled at the start and at the conclusion of a 14 day laboratory bioaccumulation study. Each set was promptly extracted using a sequential technique for exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulphide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. In the non-treated sediments, approximately 64% of the naturally occurring Cd was in the acid extractable phase with most of the balance in the organicsulphide phase (OSP). There was a similar amount of Cd in the acid extractable phase of all treatments of all sediments. For the treated sediments, the majority of the Cd was found in the OSP and ranged from 56% to 85% for all treatments and sediments. At the end of the experiment, a greater and more consistent level of Cd was present in the OSP (from 76% to 92%). These results show an initially rapid conversion of most of the added soluble Cd to the OSP with conversion of up to 92% of applied Cd to this phase within 14 days. The bulk of the OSP Cd is postulated to occur as sulphides which are an important reservoir of sediment Cd. Addition of Cd had no effect on the geochemical distribution of native Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, or Zn.

  20. Longshore sediment transport rates on a microtidal estuarine beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, K.F.; Jackson, N.L.; Allen, J.R.; Sherman, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Longshore sediment transport rates were estimated on a microtidal estuarine beach in Great South Bay, N.Y., during two dyed sand tracer experiments using a temporal sampling method. Mean onshore wind speeds of 5.8 and 9.9 m/s resulted in root-mean-square wave heights of 0.07 and 0.08 m and wave angles of 3.0 and 10.1, causing transport rates of 0.468 and 0.972 m3/h. Rates were 3.1 to 6.5 times greater than predicted by existing equations using standard coefficients. Greater rates are attributed to the concentration of sediment transport in the energetic swash zone under plunging breakers.

  1. Rate of mercury loss from contaminated estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Jahnke, R.A.; Peterson, M.L.; Carpenter, R.

    1980-01-01

    The concentration of mercury in contaminated estuarine sediments of Bellingham Bay, Washington was found to decrease with a half-time of about 1.3 yr after the primary anthropogenic source of mercury was removed. In situ measurements of the mercury flux from sediments, in both dissolved and volatile forms, could not account for this decrease. This result suggests that the removal of mercury is associated with sediment particles transported out of the study area. This decrease was modeled using a steady-state mixing model. Mercury concentrations in anoxic interstitial waters reached 3.5 ??g/l, 126 times higher than observed in the overlying seawater. Mercury fluxes from these sediments ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 ?? 10-5 ng/cm2/sec, all in a soluble form. In general, higher Hg fluxes were associated with low oxygen or reducing conditions in the overlying seawater. In contrast, no flux was measurable from oxidizing interstitial water having mercury concentrations of 0.01-0.06 ??/l. ?? 1980.

  2. Development of formulated reference sediments for freshwater and estuarine sediment testing

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-07-01

    Sediments collected at various field locations may have chemical and physical constituents that influence test results and may contain organisms that cannot be readily removed. Thus, reference sediments are needed that can be formulated to match diverse freshwater and estuarine sediments encountered in comprehensive testing programs. This research evaluated formulated reference sediments in terms of (a) their ability to match field-collected sediments both chemically and physically; (b) their suitability as habitant (survival and reproduction) for typical invertebrate toxicity testing species (Hyalella azteca Saussure, Chironomus tentans Fabricius, and Daphnia magna Straus) during chronic exposures; and (c) their suitability as a substrate for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard, and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque in 14-d whole-sediment exposures. Formulated reference sediments were prepared to match naturally occurring sediments with respect to particle-size distribution, organic matter, organic carbon, pH, solids, CEC, but not redox potential. After preparation, a conditioning period of at least 7 d was required for pH stabilization of formulated reference sediments. In culture experiments, formulated reference sediments was suitable for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Daphnia magna survival and reproduction for 56,40, and 28 d, respectively. Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas survival was [>=] 88% in 14-d exposures to formulated reference sediment. Formulated reference sediments may reduce some unexplained physical, chemical, or biological toxicity'' of field-collected sediments (e.g., organic matter) that may influence toxicity testing results.

  3. Linking DNRA community structure and activity in a shallow lagoonal estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bongkeun; Lisa, Jessica A.; Tobias, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and denitrification are two nitrate respiration pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Diversity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria have been extensively examined in various ecosystems. However, studies on DNRA bacterial diversity are limited, and the linkage between the structure and activity of DNRA communities has yet to be discovered. We examined the composition, diversity, abundance, and activities of DNRA communities at five sites along a salinity gradient in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA, a shallow temporal/lagoonal estuarine system. Sediment slurry incubation experiments with 15N-nitrate were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates, while the abundance of DNRA communities was calculated using quantitative PCR of nrfA genes encoding cytochrome C nitrite reductase, commonly found in DNRA bacteria. A pyrosequencing method targeting nrfA genes was developed using an Ion Torrent sequencer to examine the diversity and composition of DNRA communities within the estuarine sediment community. We found higher levels of nrfA gene abundance and DNRA activities in sediments with higher percent organic content. Pyrosequencing analysis of nrfA genes revealed spatial variation of DNRA communities along the salinity gradient of the New River Estuary. Percent abundance of dominant populations was found to have significant influence on overall activities of DNRA communities. Abundance of dominant DNRA bacteria and organic carbon availability are important regulators of DNRA activities in the eutrophic New River Estuary. PMID:25232351

  4. AN EVALUATION OF ELECTRODE INSERTION TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eh measurements by electrodes are commonly used to characterize redox status of sediments in freshwater, marine and estuarine studies, due to the relative ease and rapidity of data collection. In our studies of fine-grained estuarine seabeds, we observed that Eh values measured i...

  5. Integrated quality assessment of sediments from harbour areas in Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buruaem, Lucas Moreira; de Castro, Ítalo Braga; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio; Taniguchi, Satie; Fillmann, Gilberto; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Varella Petti, Mônica Angélica; Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo de Souza; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Maranho, Luciane Alves; Davanso, Marcela Bergo; Nonato, Edmundo Ferraz; Cesar, Augusto; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia Veras; Abessa, Denis Moledo de Souza

    2013-09-01

    Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System is a highly populated coastal zone in Brazil and where it is located the major port of Latin America. Historically, port activities, industrial and domestic effluents discharges have constituted the main sources of contaminants to estuarine system. This study aimed to assess the recent status of sediment quality from 5 zones of Port of Santos by applying a lines-of-evidence approach through integrating results of: (1) acute toxicity of whole sediment and chronic toxicity of liquid phases; (2) grain size, organic matter, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzenes and butyltins; (3) benthic community descriptors. Results revealed a gradient of increasing contamination for metals and organic compounds, alongside with their geochemical carriers. Sediment liquid phases were more toxic compared to whole sediment. Low number of species and individuals indicated the impoverishment of benthic community. The use of site-specific sediment quality guidelines was more appropriate to predict sediment toxicity. The integration of results through Sediment Quality Triad approach and principal component analysis allowed observing the effects of natural stressors and dredging on sediment quality and benthic distribution. Even with recent governmental efforts to control, pollution is still relevant in Port of Santos and a threat to local ecosystems.

  6. Toward Understanding the Dynamics of Microbial Communities in an Estuarine System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Yang, Jiangke; Chan, Colin; Song, Xingyu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Community assembly theories such as species sorting theory provide a framework for understanding the structures and dynamics of local communities. The effect of theoretical mechanisms can vary with the scales of observation and effects of specific environmental factors. Based on 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing, different structures and temporal succession patterns were discovered between the surface sediments and bottom water microbial communities in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE). The microbial communities in the surface sediment samples were more diverse than those in the bottom water samples, and several genera were specific for the water or sediment communities. Moreover, water temperature was identified as the main variable driving community dynamics and the microbial communities in the sediment showed a greater temporal change. We speculate that nutrient-based species sorting and bacterial plasticity to the temperature contribute to the variations observed between sediment and water communities in the PRE. This study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the microbial community structures in a highly dynamic estuarine system and sheds light on the applicability of ecological theoretical mechanisms. PMID:24732211

  7. EFFECTS OF SEVIN ON DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL ESTUARINE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The composition of animal communities developing from planktonic larvae in aquariums containing sand and flowing estuarine water was altered in the presence of the carbamate insecticide Sevin (carbaryl). Treatments were control and concentrations of Sevin that averaged 1.1, 11.1,...

  8. RESPONSES OF DEVELOPING ESTUARINE MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES TO DRILLING MUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of drilling mud, used in oil drilling operations, on development of estuarine macrobenthic communities from settling planktonic larvae were assessed by comparing numbers and species of animals that grew in uncontaminated and contaminated aquaria for 8 weeks. Aquaria c...

  9. RESPONSES OF ESTUARINE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES TO SEDIMENT BURIAL: THE IMPORTANCE OF MOBILITY AND ADAPTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine benthic organisms are frequently subjected to disturbance events caused by hydrodynamic processes that disrupt and move the sediment in which the animals reside, however the mechanisms by which physical disturbance processes affect infaunal and epifaunal populations and...

  10. Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

  11. PREDICTING ESTUARINE SEDIMENT METAL CONCENTRATIONS AND INFERRED ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS: AN INFORMATION THEORETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Empirically derived values associating sediment metal concentrations with degraded ecological conditions provide important information to assess estuarine condition. However, resources limit the number, magnitude, and frequency of monitoring programs to gather these data. As su...

  12. Influence of sediment organic carbon on estuarine benthic species of the US West Coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) is often used as an indicator of nutrient enrichment in estuarine environments. However, the determination of biologically relevant TOC criteria to indicate sediment quality is complicated by the relationship between TOC and grain size. Both variables...

  13. Evaluation of the contamination of platinum in estuarine and coastal sediments (Tagus Estuary and Prodelta, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Cobelo-García, Antonio; Neira, Patricia; Mil-Homens, Mario; Caetano, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    Platinum contamination in estuarine and coastal sediments has been evaluated in three cores collected from the Tagus Estuary and Prodelta shelf sediments. Elevated concentrations, up to 25-fold enrichment compared to background values, were found in the upper layers of the estuarine sediments. The degree of Pt enrichment in the estuarine sediments varied depending on the proximity to vehicular traffic sources, with a maximum concentration of 9.5 ng g(-1). A considerable decrease of Pt concentrations with depth indicated the absence of significant contamination before the introduction of catalytic converters in automobiles. Platinum distribution in the Tagus Prodelta shelf sediment core showed no surface enrichment; instead a sub-surface maximum at the base of the mixed layer suggested the possibility of post-depositional mobility, thereby blurring the traffic-borne contamination signature in coastal sediments. PMID:21256526

  14. Importance of allochthonous material in benthic macrofaunal community functioning in estuarine salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Koetsu; Hoshino, Yukihiro; Kanou, Kouki; Okazaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Satoko; Kohno, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Allochthonous input provides important food and spatial resources for estuarine benthic fauna. While it is known that autochthonous materials are important for fauna occupying small marshes, here, we present the significance of allochthonous materials for benthic fauna inhabiting a large salt marsh. To assess the effects of allochthonous input on benthic macrofaunal communities in estuarine salt marshes, we determined the source of substrate sediments and food resource utilisation patterns of benthic invertebrates in 2 temperate estuaries (the Tama River and the Obitsu River estuarine outlets into Tokyo Bay) by using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. In the Tama River estuary, which has small patches of marsh vegetation upstream of the river mouth, there was an input of sedimentary organic matter from autochthonous sources (i.e. common reed and microphytobenthos). In the Obitsu River estuary salt marsh, which is situated immediately upstream of the river mouth and is well connected to the sea, sediment consists of allochthonous sources (i.e. imported phytoplankton), along with microphytobenthos. Isotope analysis indicated that most benthic invertebrates in the Tama River estuary depend on benthic microalgae (autochthonous) as a food resource, whereas the macrofauna in the Obitsu River estuary are supported by drift macroalgae (allochthonous), in addition to microphytobenthos or phytoplankton. Our results indicated that allochthonous material provides a food resource and potential habitat for benthic macrofauna in extensive salt marshes that have a strong connection to the sea but is not substantial in smaller marshes with limited connectivity to coastal water.

  15. Partitioning of trace elements in contaminated estuarine sediments: the role of environmental settings.

    PubMed

    Shaike, Mohmmad M; Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin F

    2014-12-01

    Estuarine sedimentary environments safeguard aquatic ecosystem health by attenuating and transforming catchment-derived contaminants. Currently these environments are under severe stress from trace element contamination due to urbanization. Sediments of Sydney estuary (Australia) are highly elevated in a range of metals due to a long period of intense urbanization and industrialization, which has had a considerable influence on coastal ecosystem health and functioning. A three-stage sequential procedure following Bureau Communautaire de Référence (Community Bureau of Reference-BCR) technique was applied to sediments collected from Sydney estuary to determine their quality, elemental partitioning and ecosystem risk in three human-impacted environmental settings (i.e., mangrove-dominated, stormwater-dominated and industrial-dominated sites) and a control site in this coastal ecosystem. In all three environmental settings, Pb and Zn concentrations exceeded Australian Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines-High (ISQG-High) values and were mostly associated with the reducible and acid soluble fractions, respectively. Copper and Cr also exceeded ISQG-High values (especially in the industrial-dominated site), however the majority of these metals were associated with the oxidizable fraction. Arsenic and Ni concentrations were mostly below ISQG-High values (except one of the stormwater-dominated sites) and were associated with the residual fraction. These results suggest that the most easily mobilized metal was Zn followed by Pb and these metals together presented a risk to estuarine ecosystems in the three selected environmental settings. However, these metals are not always the most abundant in tissue of mangroves, oysters or prawns suggesting other mechanisms are important in a complex uptake process. PMID:25265026

  16. USE OF THE AMPHIPOD CRUSTACEAN HYALELLA AZTECA IN FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hyalella azteca (Saussure), which are currently used in toxicity tests with freshwater sediments, were tested to determine their suitability for tests with estuarine sediments. eproduction was good after 24 d at and below 12.5 g/L (ppt) salinity in water only. C50 values (50% red...

  17. MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN SURFACE SEDIMENTS: A COMPARISON OF TWO ESTUARINE CONTINUUMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial diversity in estuarine sediments of the Altamaha and Savannah Rivers in Georgia were compared temporally and spatially using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Surface sediment samples collected along a salinity gradient were also analyzed for ATP, TOC, and C ...

  18. Fate of Triclosan and Evidence for Reductive Dechlorination of Triclocarban in Estuarine Sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biocides triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are wastewater contaminants whose occurrence and fate in estuarine sediments remain unexplored. We examined contaminant profiles in 137Cs/7Be-dated sediment cores taken near wastewater treatment plants in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CB), Maryland...

  19. PARTITIONING OF NO. 2 FUEL OIL IN CONTROLLED ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS, SEDIMENTS AND SUSPENDED PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the transport and incorporation of water-borne oil to sediments, no. 2 fuel oil was added as a dispersion in semiweekly doses to three controlled estuarine ecosystems. Samples of suspended particulate matter and sediments were analyzed by gas chromatography for sat...

  20. Macro and micro scale interactions between cohesive sediment tracers and natural estuarine mud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; Manning, A. J.; Droppo, I. G.; Leppard, G. G.; Benson, T.

    2009-04-01

    Improving the understanding of dispersion patterns of the fine sediment fraction (< 63 micron) and associated contaminants is fundamental to the sustainable management of estuarine and marine environments. In order to develop sediment transport models and predict sediment dispersion, accurate and reliable field techniques for the measurement of sediment transport are required. Although this is relatively simple for the sand sized fraction, measuring transport pathways for the < 63 micron sediment fraction has been more problematic. There has been considerable effort within the scientific community to develop a tracer for the fine/cohesive sediment fraction. This has included the use of synthetic tracer particles and the labelling of natural clays (e.g. Mahler et al. 1998, Yin et al. 1999, Krezoski 1985; Spencer et al. 2007). Synthetic tracers have included polymer-based fluorescent tracers, with the same size, density and surface charge characteristics as the flocculated clay and silt fraction. A fundamental assumption of tracer technology is that the tracer has the same physical properties as the natural sediment it is intended to mimic. For sand-sized material matching particle size, shape and density has been easy to achieve. However, the < 63 micron sediment fraction is cohesive and in order to satisfy this assumption cohesive sediment tracers must be incorporated into and transported via floc aggregates (Black et al. 2006). This work focuses on the use of a labelled natural clay; a Ho-montmorillonite (see Spencer et al. 2007). The aim of the research was to determine whether this tracer interacted with and was transported via floc aggregates in saline environments and would therefore be a suitable cohesive sediment tracer in estuaries. Our objectives were to examine the physical characteristics, internal structure and settling dynamics of flocculated tracer and to determine the extent to which the tracer interacted with natural estuarine muds under laboratory

  1. Effects of leached mirex on experimental communities of estuarine animals.

    PubMed

    Tagatz, M E; Borthwick, P W; Ivey, J M; Knight, J

    1976-01-01

    Experimental communities of various estuarine animals in outdoor tanks were exposed to a continuous flow of water containing mirex for 10 weeks. The mirex was leached from fire ant bait (0.3% active ingredient) by fresh water which was then mixed with salt water to yield exposure concentrations averaging 0.038 mug/L. The experiment simulated runoff from treated land into estuarine areas. Mortality of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes vulgaris), pin, shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), common mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii), and striped hermit crabs (Clibanarius vittatus) was significantly high in tanks containing the toxicant. Mortality of ribbed mussels (Modiolus demissus) and American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) was significantly lower in treated tanks, probably because numbers of both species of crabs, which ate the bivalves, were reduced. Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were least affected by mirex. Almost all deaths occurred after 10 or more days of exposure. All exposed animals accumulated mirex, with maximum concentrations ranging from 5,500X (pink shrimp) to 73,700X (soft tissues of oysters) above the concentration in the water. Sand substratum contained mirex up to 1,500X that in the water. The study demonstrated that mirex can be leached from bait by fresh water and concentrated by and affect survival of members in an experimental estuarine community. PMID:999334

  2. Stability and change in estuarine biofilm bacterial community diversity.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph A; Nocker, Andreas; Lepo, Joe E; Snyder, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    Biofouling communities contribute significantly to aquatic ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical cycling. Our knowledge of the distribution, composition, and activities of these microbially dominated communities is limited compared to other components of estuarine ecosystems. This study investigated the temporal stability and change of the dominant phylogenetic groups of the domain Bacteria in estuarine biofilm communities. Glass slides were deployed monthly over 1 year for 7-day incubations during peak tidal periods in East Sabine Bay, Fla. Community profiling was achieved by using 16S rRNA genes and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes in combination with ribotyping, cloning, and sequencing to evaluate diversity and to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacterial community profiles from biofilms grown near the benthos showed distinct periods of constancy within winter and summer sampling periods. Similar periods of stability were also seen in T-RFLP patterns from floating biofilms. Alternating dominance of phylogenetic groups between seasons appeared to be associated with seasonal changes in temperature, nutrient availability, and light. The community structure appeared to be stable during these periods despite changes in salinity and in dissolved oxygen. PMID:16957182

  3. Significance of antifouling paint flakes to the distribution of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) in estuarine sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-03-01

    Recently published literature indicated that dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-containing antifouling paint flakes were heterogeneously distributed within estuarine sediments. However, the significance of antifouling paint flakes in the fate and transport of DDT compounds and other organic pollutants in estuarine sediment is yet to be adequately addressed. To fill this knowledge gap, estuarine sediment and paint flakes from cabin and boat surfaces were collected from a fishery base in Guangdong Province of South China and analyzed for DDT compounds. Coarse fractioned samples collected from the vicinity of boat maintenance facilities contained appreciable amounts of colorful particles, which were identified as paint flakes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest concentrations of DDXs (sum of DDTs and its metabolites) occurred in the heavy-density (>1.7 g cm(-3)) fraction of coarse-size (200-2000 μm) sediments from near the boat maintenance facilities, suggesting the importance of paint flakes in the distribution pattern of "hot spots" in estuarine sediment. Moreover, the desorption rates of DDT compounds from paint flakes and the heavy-density fraction of coarse-size sediment were both extremely slow. Apparently, unevenly distributed paint flakes in sediment can artificially inflate the sorption capacity of heavy-density sediment for DDT compounds, and therefore can substantially change the environmental fate and behavior of hydrophobic organic chemicals in estuarine sediment. Finally, commonly used source diagnostic indices of DDT compounds were mostly grain-size and density dependent in sediment, as a result of the occurrence of paint flakes, which may strongly compromise the outcome of any source diagnostics efforts. PMID:26741562

  4. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  5. Phosphorus distribution in the estuarine sediments of the Daliao river, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; He, Mengchang; Lin, Chunye; Men, Bin; Liu, Ruimin; Quan, Xiangchun; Yang, Zhifeng

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the phosphorus distribution in the estuarine sediments of the Daliao river, intensively affected by municipal effluent and agricultural activity for about 50 years. Surface sediment samples were taken at 35 sites in the estuarine area and phosphorus species and contents of total P, Al, Fe, and Ca in the sediments were measured. Results showed that the content of total P in the sediments ranged from 230 to 841 mg kg -1, with an average of 549 mg kg -1. Ca-bound P, residual P, Al-bound P, reductant-soluble P, Fe-bound P, and soluble and loosely bound P were averagely 44.5, 21.6, 13.6, 11.7, 8.9 and 0.2% of total P, respectively. With the gradual increase of total P content, Al-bound P, reductant-soluble P, and Fe-bound P generally increased, while the rest species of P did not. This might indicate that anthropogenic P is bound to Al and Fe oxides. Regression analysis showed that Al-bound P and sum of Fe-bound P and reductant-soluble P were correlated to the contents of total Al and Fe, respectively. On the other hand, Ca-bound P was not correlated to the content of total Ca in the sediment, probably suggesting that Ca-P was mainly from authigenic marine origin. Whereas the content of total P in the estuarine sediments of the Daliao river was within the range of total P content for Chinese and worldwide river estuaries as well as coastal sediments, non-calcium apatite phosphorus content in the estuarine sediments of the Daliao river was relatively higher, indicating higher release risk and bioavailability of P in the sediment. On the other hand, the molar ratio of total Fe to total P was 16-34 in the estuarine sediments of the Daliao river, suggesting that iron oxides/hydroxides in the sediments might be able to sequester more phosphorus. Therefore, the accumulation or release of P in/from the estuarine sediments might be dependent on the external loading of P and the estuarine eutrophication may be sustained by the

  6. Effects of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on an estuarine microbial community.

    PubMed

    Novais, Adriana; Souza, Allan T; Ilarri, Martina; Pascoal, Cláudia; Sousa, Ronaldo

    2016-10-01

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) is well recognized for its invasive behavior and high ecological and economic impacts, being classified as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe. In this study, we performed a manipulative experiment under natural conditions to assess the effects of C. fluminea on sediments biochemistry and on the structure of an estuarine microbial (fungi and bacteria) community. We placed 5 treatments (control, rock, closed, live and open) for 2months in the Minho estuary (NW Iberian Peninsula). No differences were detected between treatments regarding the values of carbon (C), nitrite (NO2(-)), ammonium (NH4(+)), phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca) in the sediments; however, potassium (K) had higher values in the open treatment. Furthermore, we found that the presence of live C. fluminea stimulated fungal biomass (but not diversity) and bacterial diversity. Bioturbation activities by C. fluminea are possibly the main mechanism explaining these results; however, other factors such as the presence of other macroinvertebrate species and/or production of feces and pseudofeces by C. fluminea cannot be excluded. To our knowledge, this is the first manipulative experiment under natural conditions that clearly shows the effects of C. fluminea on an estuarine microbial community. Given the widespread distribution of this IAS and the paucity of quantitative assessments of invasive bivalves' effects on microbial communities, it will be important that future studies further investigate these processes. PMID:27265734

  7. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED FRACTIONATION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN AN ESTUARINE SEDIMENT USING THE NEW MUTAGENIC BIOASSAY, MUTATOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of organic compounds was performed on an organic solvent extract of a contaminated estuarine sediment from Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut, using the new mutagenic bioassay, Mutatox-. hemical fractionation methods of the sediment extract included si...

  8. The Abundance and Activity of Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Populations in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estuaries are productive ecosystems that ameliorate nutrient and metal contaminants from surficial water supplies. At the intersection of terrestrial and aquatic environments, estuarine sediments host major microbially-mediated geochemical transformations. These include denitrification (the conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide and/or dinitrogen) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Denitrification has historically been seen as the predominant nitrate attenuation process and functions as an effective sink for nitrate. DNRA has previously been believed to be a minor nitrate reduction process and transforms nitrate within the ecosystem to ammonium, a more biologically available N species. Recent studies have compared the two processes in coastal environments and determined fluctuating environmental conditions may suppress denitrification, supporting an increased role for DNRA in the N cycle. Nitrate availability and salinity are factors thought to influence the membership of the microbial communities present, and the nitrate reduction process that predominates. The aim of this study is to investigate how nitrate concentration and salinity alter the transcript abundances of N cycling functional gene markers for denitrification (nirK, nirS) and DNRA (nrfA) in estuarine sediments at the mouth of the hypernutrified Old Salinas River, CA. Short-term whole core incubations amended with artificial freshwater/artificial seawater (2 psu, 35 psu) and with varying NO3- concentrations (200mM, 2000mM) were conducted to assess the activity as well as the abundance of the nitrate-reducing microbial populations present. Gene expression of nirK, nirS, and nrfA at the conclusion of the incubations was quantified using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). High abundances of nirK, nirS, and nrfA under particular conditions coupled with the resulting geochemical data ultimately provides insight onto how the aforementioned factors

  9. BENTHIC COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO SEDIMENT AMENDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The amendments apatite, organoclay, acetate, chitin, and geotextile reactive mats containing apatite and apatite + organoclay are currently under examination for remediation of contaminated sediments. The objective of this research is to evaluate toxicity to several estuarine an...

  10. Benthic ciliate and meiofaunal communities in two contrasting habitats of an intertidal estuarine wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongfen; Xu, Kuidong; Warren, Alan; Lei, Yanli; Dai, Renhai

    2012-05-01

    Annual variations in benthic meiofaunal and ciliated protozoan communities were investigated using monthly samplings from June 2006 to May 2007 in two habitats characterized by different vegetal coverage in an estuarine intertidal wetland of Qingdao Jiaozhou Bay, China. The sediment composition was stable at each site: sediments densely covered with seagrass (Suaeda glauca) in the lower estuarine site (Station S) were finer, with higher content of organic matter, phaeopigments and water than sediments at the upper estuarine site (Station S-P) which was unvegetated other than for patches of S. glauca and common reed (Phragmites australis). Chlorophyll a exhibited a similar distribution in the two habitats. A total of 14 meiofaunal groups, and 249 species of ciliates belonging to 37 genera, 28 families and 16 orders, were isolated from the two sites. Univariate and multivariate measures of the communities were significantly different between the two habitats. There were higher abundances of ciliates and meiofauna, and a greater diversity of ciliates, at Station S than Station S-P (223 vs. 61 species). Herbivorous ciliates were numerically predominant in ciliate communities at both sites. The representative ciliates at Station S-P belonged to the Cyrtophorida and appeared to be a reduced subset of the assemblage at Station S, which was characterized by members of the Prostomatida, Cyrtophorida, Hypotrichida and Scuticociliatida. More than 96% of the total meiofauna were nematodes, accounting for 93% of the differences in the abundance compositions of the meiofaunal communities between habitats. The average individual weights of nematodes were nearly 3 times greater at Station S than Station S-P, indicating a distinctive species composition at each site. Temperature, salinity and food availability were key factors that regulated the ciliate and meiofaunal community structure. Nematodes were the dominant group in terms of the combined abundance, biomass and benthic

  11. The effect of biological and physical disturbances on the transport of arsenic from contaminated estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Gerhardt F.; Sanders, James G.; Osman, Richard W.

    1987-12-01

    From the distribution of dissolved and solid arsenic species in a contaminated estuarine sediment and measured rates of flux of the various arsenic species we propose an empirical model for the cycling of arsenic between sediments and water column. The chemical form of arsenic in the sediment was largely determined by the redox state of the sediment. Arsenite was the dominant dissolved and solid species in the deeper reduced sediment, and arsenate was dominant in the oxidized surface layer. Arsenite in the interstitial water diffused toward the surface layer, where it was mostly oxidized to arsenate prior to leaving the sediments. Some arsenate adsorbed to the surface sediments and produced a surface layer enriched in arsenic. Small concentrations of methyl and dimethyl arsenic were produced in the sediments, and these also diffused into the overlying water. Nereis succinea, a burrowing polychaete, affected distribution and flux of arsenic from the sediments by its production of irrigated burrows. These burrows increased both the effective surface area of the sediment and the diffusion of arsenic by a factor of five. When the relative effects of the activities of Nereis succinea and physical resuspension are compared, results indicate that although physical resuspension can produce large pulses of materials from contaminated sediments, continuous biological activity is likely to be more important in the mobilization of contaminants from sediments in many estuarine environments.

  12. Comparison of four chronic sediment toxicity tests using selected marine/estuarine tests species

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, I.; Fleming, R.

    1995-12-31

    Several draft standard guidelines exist for acute marine/estuarine sediment bioassays which measure lethality over a 4 to 14 day exposure period. Although these are very useful tools for certain applications, such tests may not be useful for discriminating between sediments with the low levels of contaminants most likely to be found in UK estuaries. For this application, chronic sediment bioassays are required which allow the measurement of both lethal and sublethal effects (growth, development and reproduction). Some chronic bioassays are currently being developed for estuarine sediments by workers in Europe, America and Canada. The objectives of the study presented here were to compare four bioassays, currently in development, in terms of their sensitivity to sediment-bound lindane and to differences in particle size. The test species selected for the study were Corophium volutator, Arenicola marina, Macoma Balthica and Neanthes arenaceodentata. Three sediment types were used: high, medium and low percentage of fine material, These were achieved using mixtures of silica sand and a fine, natural, estuarine sediment, and spiked with lindane using a spiking protocol developed at WRc. The results of the study will be presented.

  13. Fish community responses to green tides in shallow estuarine and coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Luherne, E.; Réveillac, E.; Ponsero, A.; Sturbois, A.; Ballu, S.; Perdriau, M.; Le Pape, O.

    2016-06-01

    All over the world, numerous bays and estuarine systems that are known to shelter essential fish habitats are experiencing proliferations of green macroalgae known as green tides. Although the processes that enhance green tides in response to nutrient enrichment are well known, their consequences for ecological communities -especially for ichthyofauna- remain poorly studied. To estimate these consequences, this analysis focused on the two types of shallow systems that are experiencing green tides: sandy beaches and estuarine mudflats. In these two systems, macroalgae proliferation and fish community were surveyed along seasonal cycles at control and impacted sites that shared similar physico-chemical parameters and sediment structure. To analyse the consequences of green tides on the fish community, a Before-After Control-Impact approach was used. This approach reveals no difference between fish communities at the control and impacted sites before the macroalgal bloom. Then, it underlines an influence of green tides on the fish community, and this influence varies according to the composition, density and duration of the macroalgal bloom. Indeed, when intertidal systems experienced short proliferation and/or weak density, green tides did not seem to impact the fish community. However, when green macroalgae proliferated in large quantities and/or when the proliferation lasted for long periods, the fish community was significantly affected. These modifications in the fish community led to a significant decrease in fish species diversity and density until fish disappeared from impacted sites at high proliferations. Furthermore, the response of fish species to green tides differed according to their functional guilds. Negative consequences for benthic and marine juvenile fish species were beginning at low proliferations, whereas for pelagic fish species they occurred only at high proliferations. Thus, green tides significantly affect fish habitat suitability because

  14. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: I. Biochemical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Filipe O; Lima, Gláucia; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    We report on biomarker responses conducted as part of a multi-level assessment of the chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments to the amphipod Gammarus locusta. A companion article accounts for organism and population-level effects. Five moderately contaminated sediments from two Portuguese estuaries, Sado and Tagus, were assessed. Three of them were muddy and two were sandy sediments. The objective was to assess sediments that were not acutely toxic. Three of the sediments met this criterion, the other two were diluted (50% and 75%) with clean sediment until acute toxicity was absent. Following 28-d exposures, the amphipods were analysed for whole-body metal bioaccumulation, metallothionein induction (MT), DNA strand breakage (SB) and lipid peroxidation (LP). Two of the muddy sediments did not cause chronic toxicity. These findings were consistent with responses at organism and population levels that showed higher growth rates and improvement of reproductive traits for amphipods exposed to these two sediments. Two other sediments, one muddy and one sandy, exhibited pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting SB, MT induction (in muddy sediment), survival and reproduction. Potential toxicants involved in these effects were identified. The last sandy sediment exhibited some loss of DNA integrity, however growth was also enhanced. Present results, together with the organism/population-level data, and also benthic communities information, were analysed under a weight-of-evidence approach. By providing evidence of exposure (or lack of it) to contaminants in sediments, the biomarkers here applied assisted in distinguishing toxicants' impacts in test organisms from the confounding influence of other geochemical features of the sediments. PMID:15649528

  15. Trace element release from estuarine sediments of South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, M. P.; Ghuman, G. S.; Emeh, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical partitioning of four trace metals in estuarine sediments collected from eight sites in South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center, in terms of four different categories was accomplished using four different extraction techniques. The concentrations of the four trace metals, Zn, Mn, Cd, and Cu, released in interstitial water extract, 1 N ammonium acetate extract, conc. HCl extract and fusion extract of sediments as well as their concentrations in water samples collected from the same location were determined using flame atomic absorption technique. From the analytical results the percentages of total amount of each metal distributed among four different categories, interstitial water phase, acetate extractable, acid extractable and detrital crystalline material, were determined. Our results suggest that analytical partitioning of trace metals in estuarine sediments may be used to study the mechanism of incorporation of trace metals with sediments from natural waters. A correlation between the seasonal variation in the concentration of acetate extractable trace metals in the sediment and similar variation in their concentration in water was observed. A mechanism for the release of trace metals from estuarine sediments to natural water is also suggested.

  16. Shifts in the community structure and activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria along an estuarine salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanling; Jiang, Xiaofen; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Gao, Juan; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a major microbial pathway for nitrogen (N) removal in estuarine and coastal environments. However, understanding of anammox bacterial dynamics and associations with anammox activity remains scarce along estuarine salinity gradient. In this study, the diversity, abundance, and activity of anammox bacteria, and their potential contributions to total N2 production in the sediments along the salinity gradient (0.1-33.8) of the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone, were studied using 16S rRNA gene clone library, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, and isotope-tracing technique. Phylogenetic analysis showed a significant change in anammox bacterial community structure along the salinity gradient (P < 0.01), with the dominant genus shifting from Brocadia in the freshwater region to Scalindua in the open ocean. Anammox bacterial abundance ranged from 3.67 × 105 to 8.22 × 107 copies 16S rRNA gene g-1 and related significantly with salinity (P < 0.05). The anammox activity varied between 0.08 and 6.46 nmol N g-1 h-1 and related closely with anammox bacterial abundance (P < 0.01). Contributions of anammox activity to total N loss were highly variable along the salinity gradient, ranging from 5 to 77% and were significantly negatively correlated with salinity (P < 0.01). Sediment organic matter was also recognized as an important factor in controlling the relative role of anammox to total N2 production in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone. Overall, our data demonstrated a biogeographical distribution of anammox bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity along the estuarine salinity gradient and suggested that salinity is a major environmental control on anammox process in the estuarine and coastal ecosystems.

  17. The role of "pump action" in coastal and estuarine sediment resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the sediment into sea carried by rivers deposited near the estuary,forming the subaqueous delta. However,previous researches has shown that sediment into sea carried by many rivers all over the world always forms a large scale of distribution along the estuarine coastal areas that thousands of kilometers away from the estuary. Resuspension of estuarine and coastal sediment plays an important role in the sediment long distance transport into sea. At present, it is widely recognized that sediment resuspension is caused by the wave and current scouring action on the surface of the seabed. This paper explored the process and mechanism of seabed sediment resuspension through flume simulation experiments; developed a conclusion that sediment resuspension is not only from the seabed surface, there is still a considerable part of sediments coming from the internal seabed through seepage "pump action";The proportion of the latter part in sediment resuspension is related to wave height, this experiment concluded that 5、10、15cm wave heights respectively accounted for 30.5%,43.8%,47.9%;The "pump action" is induced by the accumulation of excess pore water pressure inside the soil bed under the action of wave loading.

  18. ORIGINS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to determine the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, the PAH assemblages from the sediments and from possible origin materials were analyzed by gas chromatographic and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric ...

  19. Seawater-induced mobilization of trace metals from mackinawite-rich estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa N L; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A; Slavich, Peter G

    2013-02-01

    Benthic sediments in coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) drains can contain high concentrations (~1-5%) of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) as nano-particulate mackinawite. These sediments can sequester substantial quantities of trace metals. Because of their low elevation and the connectivity of drains to estuarine channels, these benthic sediments are vulnerable to rapid increases in ionic strength from seawater incursion by floodgate opening, floodgate failure, storm surge and seasonal migration of the estuarine salt wedge. This study examines the effect of increasing seawater concentration on trace metal mobilization from mackinawite-rich drain sediments (210-550 μmol g⁻¹ AVS) collected along an estuarine salinity gradient. Linear combination fitting of S K-edge XANES indicated mackinawite comprised 88-96% of sediment-bound S. Anoxic sediment suspensions were conducted with seawater concentrations ranging from 0% to 100%. We found that mobilization of some metals increased markedly with increasing ionic strength (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni) whereas Al mobilization decreased. The largest proportion of metals mobilized from the labile metal pool, operationally defined as Σexchangeable + acid-extractable + organically-bound metals, occurred in sediments from relatively fresh upstream sites (up to 39% mobilized) compared to sediments sourced from brackish downstream sites (0-11% mobilized). The extent of relative trace metal desorption generally followed the sequence Mn > Ni ≈ Cu > Zn > Fe > Al. Trace metal mobilization from these mackinawite-rich sediments was attributed primarily to desorption of weakly-bound metals via competitive exchange with marine-derived cations and enhanced complexation with Cl⁻ and dissolved organic ligands. These results have important implications for trace metal mobilization from these sediments at near-neutral pH under current predicted sea-level rise and climate change scenarios. PMID:23199454

  20. Bioaccumulation kinetics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from estuarine sediments to the marine polychaete, Nereis virens.

    PubMed

    Klosterhaus, Susan L; Dreis, Erin; Baker, Joel E

    2011-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame-retardant chemicals that have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Polybrominated diphenyl ether no-uptake rates from estuarine or marine sediments to deposit-feeding organisms have not yet been reported. In the present study, the marine polychaete worm Nereis virens was exposed to field-contaminated and spiked sediments containing the penta- and deca-BDE commercial mixtures in a 28-d experiment to characterize the relative bioavailability of PBDE congeners from estuarine sediments. A time series sampling regimen was conducted to estimate uptake rate constants. In both field-collected and laboratory-spiked sediment exposures, worms selectively accumulated congeners in the penta-BDE mixture over BDE 209 and other components of the deca-BDE mixture, supporting the prevalence of these congeners in higher trophic level species. Brominated diphenyl ether 209 was not bioavailable to N. virens from field sediment and was only minimally detected in worms exposed to spiked sediments in which bioavailability was maximized. Chemical hydrophobicity was not a good predictor of bioavailability for congeners in the penta-BDE mixture. Direct comparison of bioavailability from the spiked and field sediments for the predominant congeners in the penta-BDE mixture was confounded by the considerable difference in exposure concentration between treatments. Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for N. virens after 28 d of exposure to the field sediment were lower than the BSAFs for Nereis succinea collected from the field site, indicating that 28-d bioaccumulation tests using N. virens may underestimate the in situ concentration of PBDEs in deposit-feeding species. The bioavailability of PBDEs to N. virens indicates that these chemicals can be remobilized from estuarine sediments and transferred to aquatic food webs. PMID:21337608

  1. Salinity tolerance of Daphnia magna and potential use for estuarine sediment toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Schuytema, G S; Nebeker, A V; Stutzman, T W

    1997-08-01

    Daphnia magna Straus, a common organism used for freshwater sediment toxicity tests, was evaluated to determine its tolerance to salinity and suitability for tests with estuarine water and sediments. Daphnids were exposed for 2 to 21 days to salinity in a variety of water-only tests, in tests with freshwater sediment overlain by salt water, and in tests with estuarine sediments overlain by freshwater. Daphnid age, test length, and temperature seemed to have little effect upon the range of LC50, NOAEL, and LOAEL values. LC50s for all tests ranged from 5.10 to 7.81 g/L, with a mean of 6.6 g/L salinity (measured conductivity 10.0 mS/cm) [corrected]. The mean NOAEL and LOAEL values based on production of young were 4.6 and 6.9 g/L salinity (measured conductivity 7.1 and 10.5 mS/cm) [corrected], respectively. The results indicate that D. magna will survive and reproduce well in water with salinities below 4 g/L and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this organism in monitoring sediment toxicity from both freshwater and estuarine wetland sites. PMID:9294248

  2. Use of sediment risk and ecological/conservation value for strategic management of estuarine environments: Sydney estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Birch, Gavin F; Hutson, Philip

    2009-10-01

    Sediment mantling the floor of Sydney estuary contains a wide range of chemicals at highly elevated concentrations over extensive areas. Appropriate sediment management decisions are urgently required to prevent further degradation of sediment quality and to minimize resulting adverse ecological effects. The objective of the present work was to provide a systematic, estuary-wide assessment of sediment risk and ecological/conservation value throughout the harbor to guide sediment management decisions. Sediment risk is the likelihood of sediment chemistry causing adverse biological effects to bottom-dwelling animals and was conducted using national sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for single contaminants and the mean SQG quotient approach to assess chemical mixtures. Sediment risk was negligible at the mouth of the estuary, but increased strongly landwards. The ecological/conservation value assessment was conducted to identify sites that warrant different levels of protection and was conducted using the value of ecological communities and priority waterway use. Consideration of these two parameters combined enabled the estuary to be prioritized for management attention. The prioritization and identification of appropriate management strategies were determined through the use of management matrices also based on sediment risk and ecological/conservation value. A computer package is being developed to provide managers with information on sediment risk, ecological/conservation value, the urgency and the type of management intervention required for any location in Sydney estuary, in real-time. This approach to estuarine management is unique and will greatly improve effective management of Sydney estuary, and other harbors in urgent need of management action and protection. PMID:19705195

  3. Use of Sediment Risk and Ecological/Conservation Value for Strategic Management of Estuarine Environments: Sydney Estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Gavin F.; Hutson, Philip

    2009-10-01

    Sediment mantling the floor of Sydney estuary contains a wide range of chemicals at highly elevated concentrations over extensive areas. Appropriate sediment management decisions are urgently required to prevent further degradation of sediment quality and to minimize resulting adverse ecological effects. The objective of the present work was to provide a systematic, estuary-wide assessment of sediment risk and ecological/conservation value throughout the harbor to guide sediment management decisions. Sediment risk is the likelihood of sediment chemistry causing adverse biological effects to bottom-dwelling animals and was conducted using national sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for single contaminants and the mean SQG quotient approach to assess chemical mixtures. Sediment risk was negligible at the mouth of the estuary, but increased strongly landwards. The ecological/conservation value assessment was conducted to identify sites that warrant different levels of protection and was conducted using the value of ecological communities and priority waterway use. Consideration of these two parameters combined enabled the estuary to be prioritized for management attention. The prioritization and identification of appropriate management strategies were determined through the use of management matrices also based on sediment risk and ecological/conservation value. A computer package is being developed to provide managers with information on sediment risk, ecological/conservation value, the urgency and the type of management intervention required for any location in Sydney estuary, in real-time. This approach to estuarine management is unique and will greatly improve effective management of Sydney estuary, and other harbors in urgent need of management action and protection.

  4. Decadal-timescale estuarine geomorphic change under future scenarios of climate and sediment supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Future estuarine geomorphic change, in response to climate change, sea-level rise, and watershed sediment supply, may govern ecological function, navigation, and water quality. We estimated geomorphic changes in Suisun Bay, CA, under four scenarios using a tidal-timescale hydrodynamic/sediment transport model. Computational expense and data needs were reduced using the morphological hydrograph concept and the morphological acceleration factor. The four scenarios included (1) present-day conditions; (2) sea-level rise and freshwater flow changes of 2030; (3) sea-level rise and decreased watershed sediment supply of 2030; and (4) sea-level rise, freshwater flow changes, and decreased watershed sediment supply of 2030. Sea-level rise increased water levels thereby reducing wave-induced bottom shear stress and sediment redistribution during the wind-wave season. Decreased watershed sediment supply reduced net deposition within the estuary, while minor changes in freshwater flow timing and magnitude induced the smallest overall effect. In all future scenarios, net deposition in the entire estuary and in the shallowest areas did not keep pace with sea-level rise, suggesting that intertidal and wetland areas may struggle to maintain elevation. Tidal-timescale simulations using future conditions were also used to infer changes in optical depth: though sea-level rise acts to decrease mean light irradiance, decreased suspended-sediment concentrations increase irradiance, yielding small changes in optical depth. The modeling results also assisted with the development of a dimensionless estuarine geomorphic number representing the ratio of potential sediment import forces to sediment export forces; we found the number to be linearly related to relative geomorphic change in Suisun Bay. The methods implemented here are widely applicable to evaluating future scenarios of estuarine change over decadal timescales. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  5. EFFECTS OF A LIGNOSULFONATE-TYPE DRILLING MUD ON DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL ESTUARINE MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drilling mud, as used in exploratory drilling for oil offshore, affected the composition of estuarine communities that developed from planktonic larvae in aquaria containing sand and flowing estuarine water. Aquaria contained: sand only; a mixture (by volume) of 1 part mud and 10...

  6. Modelling of cohesive sediment dynamics in tidal estuarine systems: Case study of Tagus estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, G.; Pinto, L.; Ascione, I.; Mateus, M.; Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P.; Neves, R.

    2014-12-01

    Cohesive sediment dynamics in estuarine systems is a major issue in water quality and engineering problems. Numerical models can help to assess the complex dynamics of cohesive sediments, integrating the information collected in monitoring studies. Following a numerical approach we investigated the main factors that influence the cohesive sediment dynamics in an estuarine system composed of large mudflats (Tagus estuary, Portugal). After a spin up period of the bottom layer and considering the combined effect of waves and currents on the bottom shear stress, the dynamics of cohesive sediment during the fortnightly and daily erosion-sedimentation cycle was properly reproduced by the model. The results of cohesive suspended sediments were validated with data from sixteen monitoring stations located along the estuary and turbidity data measured by two multiparametric probes. The hydrodynamics were previously validated by harmonic analysis and with ADCP data. Although tidal currents are the major cause of cohesive sediment erosion, the results suggest that wind waves also play an important role. The simulated sediment mass involved in the fortnightly tidal cycle was in the same order of magnitude of the annual load from the rivers, as observed in previous studies based on field data.

  7. Distribution and partitioning of heavy metals in estuarine sediment cores and implications for the use of sediment quality standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; MacLeod, C. L.

    Total metal concentrations in surface sediments and historically contaminated sediments were determined in sediment cores collected from three estuaries (Thames, Medway and Blackwater) in south-east England. The partitioning behaviour of metals in these sediments was also determined using a sequential extraction scheme. These data were then compared with sediment quality values (SQVs) to determine the potential ecotoxicological risk to sediment dwelling organisms. When total metal concentrations in surface sediments are examined, no risk to biota in any of the estuaries is indicated. However, when historically contaminated sediments at depth are also considered, risks to biota are apparent and are greatest for the Thames, followed by the Medway and then the Blackwater. This suggests that regulatory authorities should examine vertical metal profiles, particularly in estuaries that are experiencing low sediment accumulation rates where historically contaminated sediments are in the shallow sub-surface zone and where erosion or dredging activities may take place. When metal partitioning characteristics are also considered, the risk to biota is comparable for the Medway and the Blackwater with the potentially bioavailable fraction presenting no ecotoxicological risk. Conversely, over 70% of metals are labile in the Thames Estuary sediments and toxic effects are probable. This suggests that the application of SQVs using total sediment metal concentrations may over- or under-estimate the risk to biota in geochemically dissimilar estuarine sediments.

  8. Method 440.0 Determination of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sediments and Particulatesof Estuarine/Coastal Waters Using Elemental Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental analysis is used to determine particulate carbon (PC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) in estuarine and coastal waters and sediment. The method measures the total carbon and nitrogen irrespective of source (inorganic or organic).

  9. A two-class population balance equation yielding bimodal flocculation of marine or estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Joon; Toorman, Erik; Molz, Fred J; Wang, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Bimodal flocculation of marine and estuarine sediments describes the aggregation and breakage process in which dense microflocs and floppy macroflocs change their relative mass fraction and develop a bimodal floc size distribution. To simulate bimodal flocculation of such sediments, a Two-Class Population Balance Equation (TCPBE), which includes both size-fixed microflocs and size-varying macroflocs, was developed. The new TCPBE was tested by a model-data fitting analysis with experimental data from 1-D column tests, in comparison with the simple Single-Class PBE (SCPBE) and the elaborate Multi-Class PBE (MCPBE). Results showed that the TCPBE was the simplest model that is capable of simulating the major aspects of the bimodal flocculation of marine and estuarine sediments. Therefore, the TCPBE can be implemented in a large-scale multi-dimensional flocculation model with least computational cost and used as a prototypic model for researchers to investigate complicated cohesive sediment transport in marine and estuarine environments. Incorporating additional biological and physicochemical aspects into the TCPBE flocculation process is straight-forward also. PMID:21239034

  10. Structure and diversity of functional guilds in the microbial nitrogen cycle of estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.; Francis, C. A.; Taroncher-Oldenburg, G.; Cornwell, J.

    2002-12-01

    Denitrification is a major flux of nitrogen in Chesapeake Bay, an estuary with a long residence time and high organic and inorganic nutrient inputs from the large surrounding watershed. The estuarine system spans a complex gradient of salinity and many correlated chemical constituents, from its upper bay and river freshwater end members to its nearly full strength seawater lower Bay. Denitrification rates in sediments, computed from net nitrogen fluxes in simulated in situ core incubations, show distinct reproducible patterns along the Bay. Highest rates are observed in sediments from the low salinity, high nitrate upper stations in the Bay and Choptank River. Lower rates occur in the low nitrate, oxygen depleted mid bay sediments and in the metabolically less active south Bay sediments. Gene sequences for nitrite reductase, the key enzyme in denitrification, show very high diversity in Bay and River sediments. On the basis of clone library sequences alone, however, there are distinct clades and patterns indicating highest diversity in the upper Bay and River sediments and lower diversity in the lower Bay sediments. Using a DNA microarray containing many individual nitrite reductase sequences, we investigated the population structure of denitrification genes along the estuarine gradient. Evaluation of gene expression patterns, in addition to presence/absence or abundance of individual genes, will allow a direct assessment of the links between diversity and biogeochemical transformation rates for particular functional guilds. The rate of denitrification and its regulation by environmental variables may be reflected in patterns of guild composition and activity.

  11. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  12. Iron monosulfide accumulation and pyrite formation in eutrophic estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraal, Peter; Burton, Edward D.; Bush, Richard T.

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) cycling in sediments from the eutrophic Peel-Harvey Estuary in Western Australia, which is subject to localized accumulation of strongly reducing, organic- and sulfide-rich sediments. Sedimentary iron was mostly present in highly reactive form (on average 73% of total Fe) and showed extensive sulfidization even in surface sediments, despite being overlain by a well-mixed oxygenated water column. This indicates that, under eutrophic marine conditions, Fe sulfidization may be driven by reductive processes in the sediment without requiring oxygen depletion in the overlying waters. Strong enrichments in iron monosulfide (FeS > 300 μmol g-1) were observed in fine-grained sediment intervals up to 45 cm depth. This metastable Fe sulfide is commonly restricted to thin subsurface sediment intervals, below which pyrite (FeS2) dominates. Our findings suggest inhibition of the dissolution-precipitation processes that replace FeS with FeS2 in sediments. Rates of pyrite formation based on the FeS2 profiles were much lower than those predicted by applying commonly used kinetic equations for pyrite formation. Dissolved H2S was present at millimolar levels throughout the investigated sediment profiles. This may indicate that (i) pyrite formation via reaction between dissolved Fe (including Fe clusters) and H2S was limited by low availability of dissolved Fe or (ii) reaction kinetics of pyrite formation via the H2S pathway may be relatively slow in natural reducing sediments. We propose that rapid burial of the FeS under anoxic conditions in these organic-rich reducing sediments minimizes the potential for pyrite formation, possibly by preventing dissolution of FeS or by limiting the availability of oxidized sulfur species that are required for pyrite formation via the polysulfide pathway.

  13. Microbial composition affects the functioning of estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Heather E; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2013-01-01

    Although microorganisms largely drive many ecosystem processes, the relationship between microbial composition and their functioning remains unclear. To tease apart the effects of composition and the environment directly, microbial composition must be manipulated and maintained, ideally in a natural ecosystem. In this study, we aimed to test whether variability in microbial composition affects functional processes in a field setting, by reciprocally transplanting riverbed sediments between low- and high-salinity locations along the Nonesuch River (Maine, USA). We placed the sediments into microbial ‘cages' to prevent the migration of microorganisms, while allowing the sediments to experience the abiotic conditions of the surroundings. We performed two experiments, short- (1 week) and long-term (7 weeks) reciprocal transplants, after which we assayed a variety of functional processes in the cages. In both experiments, we examined the composition of bacteria generally (targeting the 16S rDNA gene) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) specifically (targeting the dsrAB gene) using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In the short-term experiment, sediment processes (CO2 production, CH4 flux, nitrification and enzyme activities) depended on both the sediment's origin (reflecting differences in microbial composition between salt and freshwater sediments) and the surrounding environment. In the long-term experiment, general bacterial composition (but not SRB composition) shifted in response to their new environment, and this composition was significantly correlated with sediment functioning. Further, sediment origin had a diminished effect, relative to the short-term experiment, on sediment processes. Overall, this study provides direct evidence that microbial composition directly affects functional processes in these sediments. PMID:23235294

  14. Sublethal effects of the antibiotic tylosin on estuarine benthic microalgal communities.

    PubMed

    Pinckney, James L; Hagenbuch, Isaac M; Long, Richard A; Lovell, Charles R

    2013-03-15

    Pharmaceuticals are common chemical contaminants in estuaries receiving effluent from wastewater and sewage treatment facilities. The purpose of this research was to examine benthic microalgal (BMA) community responses to sublethal exposures to tylosin, a common and environmentally persistent antibiotic. Bioassays, using concentrations of 0.011-218 μmol tylosin l(-1), were performed on intertidal muddy sediments from North Inlet Estuary, SC. Exposure to tylosin resulted in a reduction in total BMA biomass and primary productivity. Furthermore, exposure seemed to retard diatom growth while having a minimal effect on cyanobacteria biomass. Estuarine systems receiving chronic inputs of trace concentrations of tylosin, as well as other antibiotics, may experience significant reductions in BMA biomass and primary productivity. Given the well-documented role of BMA in the trophodynamics of estuaries, these impacts will likely be manifested in higher trophic levels with possible impairments of the structure and function of these sensitive systems. PMID:23398744

  15. The impact of channel deepening and dredging on estuarine sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Maren, D. S.; van Kessel, T.; Cronin, K.; Sittoni, L.

    2015-03-01

    Many estuaries worldwide are becoming more urbanised with heavier traffic in the waterways, requiring continuous channel deepening and larger ports, and increasing suspended sediment concentration (SSC). An example of a heavily impacted estuary where SSC levels are rising is the Ems Estuary, located between the Netherlands and Germany. In order to provide larger and larger ships access to three ports and a shipyard, the tidal channels in the Ems Estuary have been substantially deepened by dredging over the past decades. This has led to tidal amplification and hyper concentrated sediment conditions in the upstream tidal river. In the middle and outer reaches of the Ems Estuary, the tidal amplification is limited, and mechanisms responsible for increasing SSC are poorly understood. Most likely, channel and port deepening lead to larger SSC levels because of resulting enhanced siltation rates and therefore an increase in maintenance dredging. Additionally, channel deepening may increase up-estuary suspended sediment transport due to enhanced salinity-induced estuarine circulation. The effect of channel deepening and port construction on SSC levels is investigated using a numerical model of suspended sediment transport forced by tides, waves and salinity. The model satisfactorily reproduces observed water levels, velocity, sediment concentration and port deposition in the estuary, and therefore is subsequently applied to test the impact of channel deepening, historical dredging strategy and port construction on SSCs in the Estuary. These model scenarios suggest that: (1) channel deepening appears to be a main factor for enhancing the transport of sediments up-estuary, due to increased salinity-driven estuarine circulation; (2) sediment extraction strategies from the ports have a large impact on estuarine SSC; and (3) maintenance dredging and disposal influences the spatial distribution of SSC but has a limited effect on average SSC levels.

  16. Partitioning of Heavy Metals In Estuarine Sediments Cores and Implications For The Use of Sediment Quality Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K.; MacLeod, C.

    Total metal concentrations and partitioning behaviour of metal contaminants in sedi- ment cores collected from three estuaries (Thames, Medway and Blackwater) in south east England were examined with respect to sediment quality guidelines (SQGs). Metal data from surface sediments were compared with historically contaminated sed- iments at depth to determine whether vertical contaminant profiles should be consid- ered when applying sediment quality guidelines. Initial investigations, based on total metal concentrations in surface sediments indicate that there is no risk to biota in any of the estuaries studied. However, in the Medway and Thames estuaries, which have received past industrial inputs, consideration of sediments at depth is also im- portant. Comparison of sediments at depth with SQGs suggests that local authorities should examine vertical metal profiles, particularly in estuaries that are experiencing low sediment accumulation rates, erosion or dredging activities. Total metal data indi- cate that the risk to biota is greatest in the Thames followed by the Medway and then the Blackwater. However, metal partitioning data indicate that the risk to biota is com- parable for the Medway and the Blackwater with the potentially bioavailable fraction presenting no risk to biota. Conversely, over 70% of metals are labile in the Thames Estuary sediments and toxic effects are probable. This suggests that the application of sediment quality guidelines using total sediment metal concentrations may over or under estimate the risk to biota in geochemically dissimilar estuarine sediments.

  17. Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Steven P. Ferraro, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR Background/Questions/Methods The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification, and the Her...

  18. Lipid biomarkers and organic matter carbon isotopes in estuarine sediments as proxies for evaluating seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Weiming; Zhang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Coastal wetlands and estuarine sediments are characteristics of tide-dominated environments and retain a record of seawater intrusion and possibly sea-level changes. A variety of methods including the C/N ratio and δ13C of bulk organic matter in the sediment have been employed in estuarine studies, but they are generally non-specific indicators. Here we report using lipid biomarkers to evaluate the extent of seawater intrusion based on an estuary in eastern China, Xinyanggang. Along the river from the estuary mouth upstream to the freshwater head, the vegetation shifts quickly from salt-tolerant Spartina (C4) to the less tolerant reed Phragmites (C3), both of which have distinguished δ13C values and biomarker distribution. The δ13C values of particulate organic matter (POM) and surface sediment decreased from the estuary mouth upstream, indicating the reduced contributions from Spartina and marine phytoplankton to the POM and surface sediment and increased inputs from Phragmites. The C32/C30 alkanol and cholesterol/sitosterol ratio decreased in the surface sediments, faithfully recording the variations in the contributions from Spartina and Phragmites. The combination of biomarker distribution and organic matter δ13C in the sediments can be used as indicators for sea water intrusion into the estuary/river.

  19. Methanogenesis and sulfate reduction: Competitive and noncompetitive substrates in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Polcin, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    Sulfate ions did not inhibit methanogenesis in estuarine sediments supplemented with methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine. However, sulfate greatly retarded methanogenesis when hydrogen or acetate was the substrate. Sulfate reduction was stimulated by acetate, hydrogen, and acetate plus hydrogen, but not by methanol or trimethylamine. These results indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria will outcompete methanogens for hydrogen, acetate, or both, but will not compete with methanogens for compounds like methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine, thereby allowing methanogenesis and sulfate reduction to operate simultaneously within anoxic, sulfate-containing sediments.

  20. Growth and decline of shoreline industry in Sydney estuary (Australia) and influence on adjacent estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Lean, J; Gunns, T

    2015-06-01

    Sydney estuary (Australia), like many urbanised waterways, is degraded due to an extended history of anthropogenic activity. Two major sources of contamination to this estuary are discharge by former shoreline industries and historic and contemporary catchment stormwater. The objectives of the present study were to document changes in shoreline land use from European settlement to the present day and determine the influence of this trend on the metal content of adjacent estuarine sediments. Temporal analysis of land use for seven time horizons between 1788 and 2010 showed rapid expansion of industry along much of the Sydney estuary foreshore soon after European settlement due to the benefits of easy and inexpensive access and readily available water for cooling and power. Shoreline industry attained maximum development in 1978 (32-km length) and declined rapidly to the present-day (9-km length) through redevelopment of industrial sites into medium- to high-density, high-value residential housing. Cores taken adjacent to 11 long-term industrial sites showed that past industrial practices contributed significantly to contamination of estuarine sediment. Subsurface metal concentrations were up to 35 times that of present-day surface sediment and over 100 times greater than natural background concentrations. Sedimentation rates for areas adjacent to shoreline industry were between 0.6 and 2.5 cm/year, and relaxation times were estimated at 50 to 100 years. Natural relaxation and non-disturbance of sediments may be the best management practice in most locations. PMID:25937494

  1. RESPONSES OF ESTUARINE MACROFAUNA COLONIZING SEDIMENTS CONTAMINATED WITH FENVALERATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities that colonized uncontaminated and fenvalerate-contaminated sand (0.1, 1 and 10 micrograms/g, nominal) during 8 weeks in an estuary were compared to assess effects of fenvalerate on community structure. As much as 27% of initial concentrations of th...

  2. Iron ore pollution in Mandovi and Zuari estuarine sediments and its fate after mining ban.

    PubMed

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Suja, S; Sudheesh, V; Srivastava, Shubh; Rao, V Purnachandra

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore was mined from the banded iron formations of Goa, India, and transported through the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries for six decades until the ban on mining from September 2012. Here we focus on the environmental magnetic properties of sediments from the catchment area, upstream and downstream of these estuaries, and adjacent shelf during peak mining time. Magnetic susceptibility (χ lf) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) values of sediments were highest in upstream (catchment area and estuaries), decreased gradually towards downstream (catchment area and estuaries), and were lowest on the adjacent shelf. The χ lf values of the Mandovi estuary were two to fourfold higher than those in the Zuari. The sediments of these two estuaries after the mining ban showed enrichment of older magnetite and sharp decrease in the SIRM values. Although the input of ore material has been reduced after mining ban, more flushing of estuarine sediments is required for healthier environment. PMID:26271913

  3. Effects of sevin on development of experimental estuarine communities.

    PubMed

    Tagatz, M E; Ivey, J M; Lehman, H K; Oglesby, J L

    1979-07-01

    The composition of animal communities developing from planktonic larvae in aquariums. A marked increase in the abundance of the annelid Polydora ligni in aquariums containing sand and flowing estuarine water was altered in the presence of the carbamate insecticide Sevin (carbaryl). Treatments were control and concentrations of Sevin that averaged 1.1, 11.1, and 103 micrograms/l; each treatment was replicated 8 times. Animals that colonized aquarium sand were collected in a 1-mm mesh sieve after 10 wk of exposure. Mollusks' arthropods, annelids, and nemerteans were the numerically dominant phyla. The average number of species per aquarium was significantly less (alpha = 0.05) in aquariums containing 11.1 or 103 micrograms/l than in those containing 1.1 micrograms/l or in control aquariums. The abundant clam Ensis minor grew significantly less in length at the higher concentrations of Sevin. The amphipod Corophium acherusicum was particularly affected; significantly fewer were found at all concentrations than in the control aquariums containing 103 micrograms/l corresponded to a marked decrease in the number of other annelids and to a significant absence of nemerteans. PMID:114668

  4. Interlaboratory comparison of standardized sediment toxicity test methods using estuarine and marine amphipods

    SciTech Connect

    Schlekat, C.E.; Scott, J.; Armitage, T.M.; Swartz, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    USEPA`s Office of Science and Technology has developed standardized sediment toxicity test methods that use four estuarine and marine amphipod species. An interlaboratory comparison was conducted to evaluate the precision of these methods. This comparison included three species, Ampelisca abdita, Eohaustorius estuarius, and Leptocheirus plumulosus. A similar study with the fourth species, Rhepoxynius abronius, has already been conducted. A matrix of ten participating laboratories, including both government and contract laboratories, ensure that each species was tested by at least six laboratories. Each species was exposed for 10 d under static, non-renewal conditions to four sediment treatments using standardized, species-specific test protocols. Sediment treatments were selected for each species to include one negative control sediment and three contaminated sediments. Highly contaminated sediment from Black Rock Harbor, CT, was diluted with species-specific, non-contaminated control sediment, creating test sediments that ranged in relative contamination from low to high. Each laboratory also conducted 4-d water-only reference toxicant tests with Cd. Independent suppliers distributed amphipods to each laboratory. Results of sediment exposures were analyzed to evaluate (1) the magnitude of variability for each treatment among laboratories, (2) differences in mean survival for each species among laboratories, and (3) differences in rank survival for each species among laboratories.

  5. Relationships Between Environmental Factors, Bacterial Indicators, and the Occurrence of Enteric Viruses in Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    LaBelle, Raymond L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Melnick, Joseph L.; Cech, Irina; Bogdan, Gregory F.

    1980-01-01

    Current standards for evaluation of the public health safety of recreational and shellfish-harvesting waters are based upon bacteriological analysis, but do not include an evaluation of the number of viruses. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of enteric viruses in estuarine sediments and to find a relationship, if any, between the presence of viruses in seawater or sediment or both and various biological and physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Viruses were found in greater numbers in sediment than in overlying seawater on a volume basis. Several types of enteroviruses were isolated: coxsackievirus types A16, B1, and B5, echovirus type 1, and poliovirus type 2. On several occasions, viruses were isolated from sediments when overlying seawaters met bacteriological water quality standards for recreational use. Statistical analysis of the relationship between viruses in seawater or in sediment and other variables measured yielded only one significant association: the number of viruses in sediment was found to be positively correlated with the number of fecal coliforms in sediment. No other physical, chemical, or biological characteristic of seawater or sediment that was measured showed statistically significant association with viral numbers. No correlation was found between bacterial indicators and virus in the overlying waters. The data indicated that evaluation of the presence of bacteria and viruses in sediment may provide additional insight into long-term water quality conditions and that indicator bacteria in water are not reflective of the concentration of enteric viruses in marine waters. PMID:6247974

  6. Method for recovery of enteric viruses from estuarine sediments with chaotropic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wait, D A; Sobsey, M D

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the ability of chaotropes, low-molecular-weight ionic compounds which enhance the solubilization of hydrophobic compounds in water, to improve the recovery of enteric viruses from highly organic estuarine sediments. Chaotropic agents alone were poor eluents of polioviruses from sediment but were effective when combined with 3% beef extract. Chaotropes of lower potency, NaNO3, NaCl, and KCl, were more efficient eluents than the stronger chaotropes, guanidium hydrochloride or sodium trichloroacetate. The most effective eluent was 2 M NaNO3 in 3% beef extract at pH 5.5, which eluted 71% of sediment-associated polioviruses. Efficient concentration of the sodium nitrate-beef extract eluate by organic flocculation required the addition of the antichaotrope (NH4)2SO4 to a 2 M concentration and Cat-Floc T (Calgon, Pittsburgh, Pa.) a cationic polyelectrolyte, to a 0.01% concentration. Dialysis of the final concentrate was necessary to reduce salts to nontoxic levels before assay in cell cultures. Trials with highly organic estuarine sediment seeded with high or low numbers of poliovirus 1, echovirus 1, or rotavirus SA-11 demonstrated the superiority of this method over two other methods currently in use. PMID:6312884

  7. Trace element contamination in the estuarine sediments along Tuticorin coast--Gulf of Mannar, southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Magesh, N S; Chandrasekar, N; Krishna Kumar, S; Glory, M

    2013-08-15

    Sediment samples were collected from Kallar, Korampallam creek and Punnakayal estuaries of Tuticorin coast for assessing the level of contamination by trace elements in these estuarine sediments. The trace element concentration, calcium carbonate, organic carbon and mercury level were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer, Titrimetric method and SnCl2 reduction method. The results reveals that the enrichment factor, metal pollution index and geo-accumulation index of these estuarine sediments were predominantly polluted by Cd, As, Zn, Hg and Pb. The factor analysis revealed the source of trace element accumulation in the estuarine sediments particularly Mn and Fe are from riverine inputs and As and Hg from untreated industrial effluents. Among the selected estuaries, Korampallam creek was found to be highly contaminated by trace elements due to the discharge of effluents from thermal power plant, Tuticorin alkali chemicals, copper smelting, Petrochemical industries and shipping activities. PMID:23790446

  8. Associations between dioxins/furans and dioxin-like PCBs in estuarine sediment and blue crab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebens, J.; Mohrherr, C.J.; Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Snyder, R.A.; Rao, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationships between the quantity, toxicity, and compositional profile of dioxin/furan compounds (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in estuarine sediment and in the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Sediment and blue crab samples were collected in three small urban estuaries that are in relatively close proximity to each other. Results show that differences between PCDD/F and DL-PCB mass concentrations and total toxic equivalents (TEQ) toxicity in sediments of the three estuaries are reflected in those of the blue crab. TEQs are higher in the hepatopancreas of the crabs than in the sediment, but the concentration factor is inversely proportional to the TEQ in the sediments. Congener profiles in the crabs are systematically different from those in the sediments, and the difference is more pronounced for PCDD/Fs than for DL-PCBs, possibly due to differences in metabolization rates. Compared with sediment profiles, more lesser-chlorinated PCDD/Fs that have higher TEFs accumulate in crab hepatopancreas. This selective bioaccumulation of PCDD/Fs results in a TEQ augmentation in crab hepatopancreas compared with sediments. The bioaccumulation in the blue crab is also selective for PCDD/Fs over DL-PCBs. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Modelling-based assessment of suspended sediment dynamics in a hypertidal estuarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoudry, Laurent O.; Ramirez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro J.; Brown, Jennifer M.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of suspended sediment transport in a hypertidal estuarine channel which displays a vertically sheared exchange flow. We apply a three-dimensional process-based model coupling hydrodynamics, turbulence and sediment transport to the Dee Estuary, in the north-west region of the UK. The numerical model is used to reproduce observations of suspended sediment and to assess physical processes responsible for the observed suspended sediment concentration patterns. The study period focuses on a calm period during which wave-current interactions can reasonably be neglected. Good agreement between model and observations has been obtained. A series of numerical experiments aim to isolate specific processes and confirm that the suspended sediment dynamics result primarily from advection of a longitudinal gradient in concentration during our study period, combined with resuspension and vertical exchange processes. Horizontal advection of sediment presents a strong semi-diurnal variability, while vertical exchange processes (including time-varying settling as a proxy for flocculation) exhibit a quarter-diurnal variability. Sediment input from the river is found to have very little importance, and spatial gradients in suspended concentration are generated by spatial heterogeneity in bed sediment characteristics and spatial variations in turbulence and bed shear stress.

  10. Mediated distribution pattern of organic compounds in estuarine sediment by anthropogenic debris.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-09-15

    Natural organic matter and grain size are considered as important parameters dictating the transport and fate of organic compounds in sediment. However, increasing evidence suggested that manufactured debris may alter the underlying mechanisms for biogeochemical cycling of organic compounds. To examine this assumption, estuarine sediment and embedded debris were collected from a fishery base in Guangdong Province of South China and analyzed for organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs), phthalates (PAEs), organotin compounds (OTs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs). Coarse-size debris (>200μm) were heterogeneously distributed in sediment, and most abundant near the boat maintenance facilities, aquaculture zone and shipping channel. The median concentrations of OPFRs, OTs, PAEs and DDTs in debris were 11, 0.2, 11 and 3.9μgg(-1) dry sample weight(-1), respectively, 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than those in bulk sediment (19, 60, 240 and 570ngg(-1) dry sample weight(-1), respectively). Furthermore, OPFRs, OTs and PAEs were mostly (>99%) enriched in coarse-size (63-2000μm) sediment, and there was no significant correlation (p>0.05) between the concentrations of OPFRs, OTs and PAEs in bulk and size-fractioned sediment samples and total organic carbon or grain size, similar to the distribution pattern of DDTs reported previously. When distinct debris were removed from the light-density (<1.7gcm(-3)) fraction of coarse-size (200-2000μm) sediment, the concentration levels of OPFRs, OTs, PAEs and DDTs declined by 84%, 59%, 55% and 7%, respectively. Obviously, debris irregularly distributed in sediment can alter the sediment sorption capacity for OPFRs, OTs and PAEs, and thus may undermine the significance of organic matter and grain size to the distribution of organic chemicals in sediment. Finally, commonly used procedures for preparing sediment samples and screening of debris may disturb the grain size distribution or underestimate the abundance of

  11. Large-scale spatial patterns in estuaries: estuarine macrobenthic communities in the Schelde estuary, NW Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P. M. J.; Meire, P.; Craeymeersch, J.; Verbeek, H.; Heip, C. H. R.

    2003-05-01

    Few macrobenthic studies have dealt simultaneously with the two major gradients in estuarine benthic habitats: the salinity gradient along the estuary (longitudinal) and the gradients from high intertidal to deep subtidal sites (vertical gradient). In this broad-scale study, a large data set (3112 samples) of the Schelde estuary allowed a thorough analysis of these gradients, and to relate macrobenthic species distributions and community structure to salinity, depth, current velocities and sediment characteristics. Univariate analyses clearly revealed distinct gradients in diversity, abundance, and biomass along the vertical and longitudinal gradients. In general, highest diversity and biomass were observed in the intertidal, polyhaline zone and decreased with decreasing salinity. Abundance did not show clear trends and varied between spring and autumn. In all regions, very low values for all measures were observed in the subtidal depth strata. Abundance in all regions was dominated by both surface deposit feeders and sub-surface deposit feeders. In contrast, the biomass of the different feeding guilds showed clear gradients in the intertidal zone. Suspension feeders dominated in the polyhaline zone and showed a significant decrease with decreasing salinity. Surface deposit feeders and sub-surface deposit feeders showed significantly higher biomass values in the polyhaline zone as compared with the mesohaline zone. Omnivores showed an opposite trend. Multivariate analyses showed a strong relationship between the macrobenthic assemblages and the predominant environmental gradients in the Schelde estuary. The most important environmental factor was depth, which reflected also the hydrodynamic conditions (current velocities). A second gradient was related to salinity and confirms the observations from the univariate analyses. Additionally, sediment characteristics (mud content) explained a significant part of the macrobenthic community structure not yet explained by

  12. Calibration of an estuarine sediment transport model to sediment fluxes as an intermediate step for simulation of geomorphic evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling geomorphic evolution in estuaries is necessary to model the fate of legacy contaminants in the bed sediment and the effect of climate change, watershed alterations, sea level rise, construction projects, and restoration efforts. Coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport models used for this purpose typically are calibrated to water level, currents, and/or suspended-sediment concentrations. However, small errors in these tidal-timescale models can accumulate to cause major errors in geomorphic evolution, which may not be obvious. Here we present an intermediate step towards simulating decadal-timescale geomorphic change: calibration to estimated sediment fluxes (mass/time) at two cross-sections within an estuary. Accurate representation of sediment fluxes gives confidence in representation of sediment supply to and from the estuary during those periods. Several years of sediment flux data are available for the landward and seaward boundaries of Suisun Bay, California, the landward-most embayment of San Francisco Bay. Sediment flux observations suggest that episodic freshwater flows export sediment from Suisun Bay, while gravitational circulation during the dry season imports sediment from seaward sources. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS), a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic/sediment transport model, was adapted for Suisun Bay, for the purposes of hindcasting 19th and 20th century bathymetric change, and simulating geomorphic response to sea level rise and climatic variability in the 21st century. The sediment transport parameters were calibrated using the sediment flux data from 1997 (a relatively wet year) and 2004 (a relatively dry year). The remaining years of data (1998, 2002, 2003) were used for validation. The model represents the inter-annual and annual sediment flux variability, while net sediment import/export is accurately modeled for three of the five years. The use of sediment flux data for calibrating an estuarine geomorphic

  13. The role of two sediment-dwelling invertebrates on the mercury transfer from sediments to the estuarine trophic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, J. P.; Nunes, M.; Dolbeth, M.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A. C.; Pardal, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    The annual total and organic mercury bioaccumulation pattern of Scrobicularia plana and Hediste diversicolor was assessed to evaluate the potential mercury transfer from contaminated sediments to estuarine food webs. S. plana was found to accumulate more total and organic mercury than H. diversicolor, up to 0.79 mg kg -1 and 0.15 mg kg -1 (wet weight) respectively, with a maximum annual uptake of 0.21 mg kg -1 y -1, while for methylmercury the annual accumulation was similar between species and never exceeded 0.045 mg kg -1 y -1. The higher organic mercury fraction in H. diversicolor is related to the omnivorous diet of this species. Both species increase methylmercury exposure by burrowing activities and uptake in anoxic, methylmercury rich sediment layers. Integration with the annual biological production of each species revealed mercury incorporation rates that reached 28 μg m -2 y -1, and to extract as much as 11.5 g Hg y -1 (of which 95% associated with S. plana) in the 0.4 km 2 of the most contaminated area, that can be transferred to higher trophic levels. S. plana is therefore an essential vector in the mercury biomagnification processes, through uptake from contaminated sediments and, by predation, to transfer it to economically important and exploited estuarine species.

  14. Evaluation of ADCP backscatter inversion to suspended sediment concentration in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G. H.; Park, H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), designed for measuring velocity profile, is now widely used for the estimation of suspended sediment concentration from acoustic backscatter intensity, but its application to estuarine environments has not been vigorously tested. In this study, we examined the inversion capability of two ADCPs with 600 and 1200 kHz at three Korean estuaries: macrotidal Han river estuary (HRE), microtidal Nakdong river estuary (NRE), and anthropogenically altered macrotidal Yeongsan river estuary (YRE). In particular, we examined the relative importance of the sound attenuations due to water (aw) and sediment (as) in response to sediment characteristics (size and concentration) as well as changing salinity and temperature. The inverted concentration was compared with reference concentrations obtained either water samples or Optical Backscatter Sensors. In NRE and YRE, where suspended sediment concentrations were smaller than 0.2 kg/m3, the acoustic inversion performed poorly only with as (R2 = 0.05 and 0.39 for NRE and YRE, respectively), but well with aw (R2 = 0.70 and 0.64 for NRE and YRE, respectively). Thus, it is important to accurately constrain aw in low-concentration estuarine environments. However, we did not find that the varying aw performed considerably better than the constant aw. On the other hand, the acoustic inversion was poorest at HRE regardless of aw and as (R2 = 0.58 and mean relative error =45%). The large discrepancy appears to result from the poorly constrained, spatially and temporally varying sediment characteristics (grain size, density and concentration) due to non-local sediment transport at macrotidal HRE.

  15. Evaluation of ADCP backscatter inversion to suspended sediment concentration in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Guan-hong; Park, Hyo-Bong

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), designed for measuring velocity profile, is now widely used for the estimation of suspended sediment concentration from acoustic backscatter strength, but its application to estuarine environments has still room for improvement. In this study, we examinedthe inversion capability of two ADCPs with 600 and 1200 kHz at three Korean estuaries: macrotidalHan river estuary (HRE), microtidalNakdong river estuary (NRE), and anthropogenically altered macrotidalYeongsan river estuary (YRE). In particular, we examined the relative importance of the sound attenuations due to water (αw) and sediment (αs) in response to sediment characteristics (size and concentration) as well as changing salinity and temperature. The inverted concentration was compared with reference concentrations obtained either water samples or Optical Backscatter Sensors. In NRE and YRE, where suspended sediment concentrations were smaller than 0.2 g/l, the acoustic inversion performed poorly only with αs (r = 0.20and 0.38for NRE and YRE, respectively), but well with αw (r = 0.66and 0.42 for NREand YRE, respectively). Thus, it is important to accurately constrain αw in low-concentration estuarine environments. However, we did not find that the varying αw performed considerably better than the constant αw. On the other hand, the acoustic inversion was poorest at HRE regardless of αw and αs (r = 0.71 and mean relative error =45%). The large discrepancy appears to result from the poorly constrained, spatially and temporally varying sediment characteristics (grain size, density and concentration) due to non-local sediment transport at macrotidal HRE.

  16. Mercury Stable Isotopic Composition of Monomethylmercury in Estuarine Sediments and Pure Cultures of Mercury Methylating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, S.; Johnson, M. W.; Barkay, T.; Blum, J. D.; Reinfelder, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tracking monomethylmercury (MeHg) from its source in soils and sediments through various environmental compartments and transformations is critical to understanding its accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Advances in the field of mercury (Hg) stable isotopes have allowed for the tracking of discrete Hg sources and the examination of photochemical and bacterial transformations. Despite analytical advances, measuring the Hg stable isotopic signature of MeHg in environmental samples or laboratory experiments remains challenging due to difficulties in the quantitative separation of MeHg from complex matrices with high concentrations of inorganic Hg. To address these challenges, we have developed a MeHg isolation method for sediments and bacterial cultures which involves separation by gas chromatography. The MeHg eluting from the GC is passed through a pyrolysis column and purged onto a gold amalgam trap which is then desorbed into a final oxidizing solution. A MeHg reference standard carried through our separation process retained its isotopic composition within 0.02 ‰ for δ202Hg, and for native estuarine sediments, MeHg recoveries were 80% to 100%. For sediment samples from the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers (New Jersey, USA), δ202Hg values for MeHg varied from -1.2 to +0.58 ‰ (relative to SRM 3133) and for individual samples were significantly different from that of total Hg (-0.38 ± 0.06 ‰). No mass independent fractionation was observed in MeHg or total Hg from these sediments. Pure cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens, grown under fermentative conditions showed preferential enrichment of lighter isotopes (lower δ202Hg) during Hg methylation. The Hg stable isotope signatures of MeHg in sediments and laboratory methylation experiments will be discussed in the context of the formation and degradation of MeHg in the environment and the bioaccumulation of MeHg in estuarine food webs.

  17. Evaluation of ADCP backscatter inversion to suspended sediment concentration in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo-Bong; Lee, Guan-hong

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), designed for measuring velocity profiles, are widely used for the estimation of suspended sediment concentration from acoustic backscatter strength, but its application to estuarine environments requires further refinement. In this study, we examined the inversion capability of two ADCPs with 600 and 1200 kHz in three Korean estuaries: the supra-macrotidal Han River Estuary (HRE), microtidal Nakdong River Estuary (NRE), and anthropogenically altered macrotidal Yeongsan River Estuary (YRE). In particular, we examined the relative importance of the sound attenuations due to water (αw) and sediment (αs) in response to sediment characteristics (size and concentration) as well as changing salinity and temperature. The inverted concentration was compared with reference concentrations obtained either from water samples or Optical Backscatter Sensors. In NRE and YRE, where suspended sediment concentrations were less than 0.2 g/l, the acoustic inversion performed poorly only with αs (r = 0.20 and 0.38 for NRE and YRE, respectively), but well with αw (r = 0.66 and 0.42 for NRE and YRE, respectively). Thus, it is important to accurately constrain αw in low-concentration estuarine environments. However, we did not find that the varying αw performed considerably better than the constant αw. On the other hand, the acoustic inversion was poorest at HRE regardless of αw and αs (r = 0.71 and mean relative error = 45%). The large discrepancy appears to result from the poorly constrained, spatially and temporally varying sediment characteristics (grain size, density and concentration) due to non-local sediment transport in the macrotidal HRE.

  18. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation in Salem Sound, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, E. R.; Hubeny, J. B.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.; Warren, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Salem Sound watershed (MA) historically has been a region of significant industrial activity. Two specific point sources for pollution in the region are the South Essex Sewerage District (SESD) wastewater treatment facility, and the Salem Harbor Power Station, a coal-burning power plant. This study tests the hypothesis that human impact on Salem Sound is preserved in the sediment record. A sediment core was taken near the location of the SESD outfall. This core was analyzed for content of organic matter via loss on ignition (LOI), as well as magnetic susceptibility. An age model was constructed using 137Cs and 210Pb. Below 31 cm (mid-nineteenth century), the core contains mean background values of 2.7% LOI and values increase above this depth. At 21cm, a rapid increase in organic matter concentration from 6.6% to 11.8% is observed. This depth corresponds to ~1905 which is contemporaneous with construction of the outfall pipe discharging raw wastewater. At a depth of 7 cm (mid 1970s), LOI values decrease from 11.7% to 9.3%. This shift is likely attributed to SESD beginning primary treatment in 1977. LOI values continue to drop at 2cm (late 1990s), from 7.8% to 6.3%, and remain at 6.1% to the modern surface, likely a result of SESD upgrading to secondary treatment in 1998. Magnetic susceptibility also shows variability down core that is likely attributed to human impact. At a depth of approximately 20cm susceptibility values start increasing from 4.2 SI units until they reach a peak at 15cm (8.8 SI units). This increase can be attributed to the industrial revolution and increased industrial activity in the area. A decrease in susceptibility is observed at 15cm to 11cm (5.6 SI units) that may be attributed to the Great Depression and less fossil fuels being burned due to the economic situation. At approximately 10cm and 8.0 SI units, an increasing trend is first observed. This trend continues up to the modern surface where it eventually reaches 19.9 SI units. This

  19. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  20. Sediment composition influences spatial variation in the abundance of human pathogen indicator bacteria within an estuarine environment.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tracy L; Clements, Katie; Baas, Jaco H; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; Malham, Shelagh K; McDonald, James E

    2014-01-01

    Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) contamination within the water column, but fails to consider the abundance of FIB in sediments, which under certain hydrodynamic conditions can become resuspended. Sediments can enhance the survival of FIB in estuarine environments, but the influence of sediment composition on the ecology and abundance of FIB is poorly understood. To determine the relationship between sediment composition (grain size and organic matter) and the abundance of pathogen indicator bacteria (PIB), sediments were collected from four transverse transects of the Conwy estuary, UK. The abundance of culturable Escherichia coli, total coliforms, enterococci, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Vibrio spp. in sediments was determined in relation to sediment grain size, organic matter content, salinity, depth and temperature. Sediments that contained higher proportions of silt and/or clay and associated organic matter content showed significant positive correlations with the abundance of PIB. Furthermore, the abundance of each bacterial group was positively correlated with the presence of all other groups enumerated. Campylobacter spp. were not isolated from estuarine sediments. Comparisons of the number of culturable E. coli, total coliforms and Vibrio spp. in sediments and the water column revealed that their abundance was 281, 433 and 58-fold greater in sediments (colony forming units (CFU)/100g) when compared with the water column (CFU/100ml), respectively. These data provide important insights into sediment compositions that promote the abundance of PIB in estuarine environments, with important implications for the modelling and prediction of public health risk based on sediment resuspension and transport. PMID:25397595

  1. Sediment Composition Influences Spatial Variation in the Abundance of Human Pathogen Indicator Bacteria within an Estuarine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Tracy L.; Clements, Katie; Baas, Jaco H.; Jago, Colin F.; Jones, Davey L.; Malham, Shelagh K.; McDonald, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) contamination within the water column, but fails to consider the abundance of FIB in sediments, which under certain hydrodynamic conditions can become resuspended. Sediments can enhance the survival of FIB in estuarine environments, but the influence of sediment composition on the ecology and abundance of FIB is poorly understood. To determine the relationship between sediment composition (grain size and organic matter) and the abundance of pathogen indicator bacteria (PIB), sediments were collected from four transverse transects of the Conwy estuary, UK. The abundance of culturable Escherichia coli, total coliforms, enterococci, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Vibrio spp. in sediments was determined in relation to sediment grain size, organic matter content, salinity, depth and temperature. Sediments that contained higher proportions of silt and/or clay and associated organic matter content showed significant positive correlations with the abundance of PIB. Furthermore, the abundance of each bacterial group was positively correlated with the presence of all other groups enumerated. Campylobacter spp. were not isolated from estuarine sediments. Comparisons of the number of culturable E. coli, total coliforms and Vibrio spp. in sediments and the water column revealed that their abundance was 281, 433 and 58-fold greater in sediments (colony forming units (CFU)/100g) when compared with the water column (CFU/100ml), respectively. These data provide important insights into sediment compositions that promote the abundance of PIB in estuarine environments, with important implications for the modelling and prediction of public health risk based on sediment resuspension and transport. PMID:25397595

  2. Bioaccessibility and mobilisation of copper and zinc in estuarine sediment contaminated by antifouling paint particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David E.; Turner, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Clean estuarine sediment amended with antifouling paint particles has been digested in biologically relevant reagents in order to evaluate the bioaccessibilities of Cu and Zn to deposit feeders in coastal environments where boat maintenance is important. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in the estuarine sediment of about 20 and 70 μg g -1, respectively, increased to about 930 and 330 μg g -1, respectively, on addition of 1.3% of a composite of fractionated paint particles collected from a boat repair facility. Seawater containing the vertebrate bile salt, sodium taurocholate, representative of surfactants in the digestive environment of deposit feeders, mobilised significantly greater quantities of metal (up to about 2 μg g -1 of both Cu and Zn) than seawater alone, presumably through complexation and exchange reactions. Seawater solutions of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), a surrogate for proteinaceous material and amino acids encountered in the digestive tract, mobilised even greater quantities of metal (up to about 80 and 40 μg g -1 of Cu and Zn, respectively) via strong complexation, although addition of taurocholate reduced this capacity through interactions between the two reagents. Overall, and through feeding, burrowing and bioirrigation, infaunal invertebrates are predicted to greatly accelerate the rate of mobilisation and local dispersal of metals in sediment contaminated by antifouling paint particles.

  3. Maps showing textural characteristics of benthic sediments in the Corpus Christi Bay estuarine system, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Stelting, Charles E.; McGowen, Joseph H.

    1981-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay is a heavily used estuary on the south Texas coast in the northwest Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1).  The Bay is stressed by diverse activities which could substantially affect its ecosystem.  Such activities include shipping, resource production (oil, gas, and construction aggregate), commercial and sport fishing, and recreation.  Shipping activities alone have had a substantial impact on the bay.  For example, the past maintenance of navigation channels has required extensive dredging and spoil disposal within the estuarine system.  Numerous subaqueous spoil disposal sites and subaerial spoil banks are present throughout the bay (fig. 1), and the selection of future spoil disposal sites is becoming a critical local problem.  As activities in the bay increase, the need for effective environmental management becomes increasingly important, and effective management necessitates a good understanding of the bay's physical characteristics.  The objective of this study is to provide detailed information about the textural composition of bottom sediments within the estuarine system, information which could be used in making environmental-management decisions.  Visual descriptions of bottom sediments in Corpus Christi Bay and adjacent areas have been presented by McGowen and Morton (1979).  Additionally, a study of the textures of sediments on the Inner Continental Shelf adjacent to the bay has been presented by Shideler and Berryhill (1977).

  4. Long-Term Survival of Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Estuarine Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, A. S.; Layton, A.; Culligan, P. J.; Kenna, T. C.; Mailloux, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Fecal contamination of marine and freshwater environments can negatively impact water quality, leading to contaminated drinking water as well as the closure of recreational beaches and waterways. Fecal contamination is routinely assessed using fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and even though the potential for their long-term survival or proliferation in sediments exist, information linking deposition of FIB with sediment age is scarce. We evaluate sediments as a reservoir for culturable FIB, by examining dated sediments from the lower Hudson River estuary for Escherichia coli (E. coli), enterococcus, and Bacteroides. Sediment cores were collected from in the vicinity of the George Washington (GWB) and Tappan Zee (TZB) Bridges NY. Sediment deposition ages were constrained using gamma emitting radionuclides and pollution chronology. Culturable E. coli and enterococcus were quantified using a culture-based most probable number method (ColilertTM, Idexx Laboratories). Molecular based methods were used to quantify E. coli and Bacteroides. In the GWB core, viable enterococcus or E. coli were consistently detected in sediment younger than the 1960s with maximum concentrations of 39 and 171 cells/g, respectively. In the TZB core, only enterococcus was sporadically detected in sediment younger than 1950 with a maximum concentration of 79 cells/g. Molecular Bacteroides and E. coli were detected in all core samples with a geometric mean of 4.2x104 and 1.2x105 copies/g, respectively. Results indicate that fecal bacteria can survive within estuarine sediments for decades, suggesting that sediments could be a significant and persistent source of bacterial pollution.

  5. Sorption of cadmium to bacterial extracellular polymeric sediment coatings under estuarine conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlekat, C.E.; Decho, A.W.; Chandler, G.T.

    1998-09-01

    Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are ubiquitous features in aquatic environments. Produced by surface-adherent bacteria and microalgae, EPS are often present as coatings on surfaces of sediment particles and exhibit high affinities for divalent cationic metals. Thus, EPS sediment coatings may participate in the fate of potentially toxic metals. The authors coated particulate silica with EPS produced by NISC1, a bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments, in order to measure the metal binding characteristics of these coatings. They used the radioisotope {sup 109}Cd to measure effects of salinity, Cd concentration, and pH on Cd sorption to EPS-coated (EPS-silica) silica and to noncoated silica (NC-silica). Also, Cd sorption by NISC1 EPS coatings was compared to coatings of polymers formed by the bacterium, Alteromonas atlantica and the alga, Macrocystis porifera. Under all circumstances, EPS coatings increased the affinity of silica for Cd. Extracellular polymeric substance-particulate aggregates rapidly sorbed up to 90% of Cd from aqueous solution. Extracellular polymeric substance sediment coatings exhibited a maximum log distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of 6.5 at 2.5%. Sorption of Cd to NC-silica was affected by salinity and metal concentration, whereas sorption of Cd to EPS-silica was only affected by salinity under high metal concentrations. Changes in pH had a dramatic effect on Cd sorption, with the proportion of free Cd to sorbed Cd changing from approximately 90% at pH 5 to 5% at pH 9. Desorption of Cd from EPS-silica was enhanced with increasing salinity. These experiments suggest that EPS coatings actively participate in binding dissolved overlying and pore-water metals in estuarine sediments.

  6. Contamination of estuarine water, biota, and sediment by halogenated organic compounds: A field study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Chiou, C.T.; Brinton, T.I.; Barber, L.B., II; Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in the vicinity of an industrial outfall in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, have shown that water, bottom and suspended sediment, and four different species of biota are contaminated with halogenated organic compounds (HOC) including haloarenes. A "salting-out" effect in the estuary moderately enhanced the partitioning tendency of the contaminants into biota and sediments. Contaminant concentrations in water, suspended sediments, and biota were found to be far below the values predicted on the basis of the assumption of phase equilibria with respect to concentrations in bottom sediment. Relative concentration factors of HOC between biota (catfish) and bottom sediment increased with increasing octanol/estuarine water partition coefficients (Kow*), maximizing at log Kow* of about 5, although these ratios were considerably less than equilibrium values. In contrast, contaminant concentrations in water, biota, and suspended sediments were much closer to equilibrium values. Bioconcentration factors of HOC determined on the basis of lipid content for four different biotic species correlated reasonably well with equilibrium triolein/water partition coefficients (Ktw).

  7. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Vudamala, Krushna; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-02-01

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal-sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn-Teller effect, and water exchange rate (k-w) on metal distribution in different binding phases of estuarine sediments. It was found that Cu had highest affinity for organic binding phases in the studied sediments followed by Ni and Pb. However, Pb showed strong association with Fe/Mn oxide phases followed by Ni and Cu. Faster k-w of Cu (II) (1 × 10(9) s(-1)) increased the rate of complex formation of Cu(2+) ion with ligand in the organic phases. The Cu-ligand (from organic phase) complexes gained extra stability by the Jahn-Teller effect. The combined effects of these two phenomena and high ionic potential increased the association of Cu with the organic phases of the sediments than Ni and Pb. The smaller ionic radii of Ni(2+) (0.72 Å) than Pb(2+) (1.20 Å) increase the stability of Ni-ligand complexes in the organic phase of the sediments. High LFSE of Ni(II) (compared with Pb(2+) ions) also make Ni-organic complexes increasingly stable than Pb. High k-w (7 × 10(9) s(-1)) of Pb did not help it to associate with organic phases in the sediments. The high concentration of Pb in the Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phase was probably due to co-precipitation of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+). High surface area or site availability for Pb(2+) ion on Fe oxyhydroxide phase was probably responsible for the high concentration of Pb in Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase. Increasing concentrations of Cu in organic phases with the increasing Cu loading suggest that enough binding sites were available for Cu in the organic binding phases of the sediments. This study also describes the influence of nature of sedimentary organic carbon (terrestrial and marine derived OC) in controlling these metal distribution and speciation in marine sediment. PMID:26490921

  8. Comparisons of 210Pb and pollen methods for determining rates of estuarine sediment accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brush, G.S.; Martin, E.A.; DeFries, R.S.; Rice, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparisons of sedimentation rates obtained by 210Pb and pollen analyses of 1-m cores collected throughout the Potomac Estuary show good agreement in the majority of cores that can be analyzed by both methods. Most of the discrepancy between the methods can be explained by the analytical precision of the 210Pb method and by the exactness with which time horizons can be identified and dated for the pollen method. X-radiographs of the cores and the distinctness of the pollen horizons preclude significant displacement by reworking and/or mixing of sediments. Differences between the methods are greatest where uncertainties exist in assigning a rate by one or both methods (i.e., 210Pb trends and/or "possible" horizon assignments). Both methods show the same relative rates, with greater sediment accumulation more common in the upper and middle estuary and less toward the mouth. The results indicate that geochronologic studies of estuarine sediments should be preceded by careful observation of sedimentary structures, preferably by X-radiography, to evaluate the extent of mixing of the sediments. Time horizons, whether paleontologic or isotopic, are generally blurred where mixing has occurred, precluding precise identification. Whenever possible, two methods should be used for dating sediments because a rate, albeit erroneous, can be obtained isotopically in sediments that are mixed; accurate sedimentation rates are also difficult to determine where the time boundary is a zone rather than a horizon, where the historical record does not provide a precise date for the pollen horizon, or where scouring has removed some of the sediment above a dated pollen horizon. ?? 1982.

  9. Arsenic fractionation in estuarine sediments: Does coastal eutrophication influence As behavior?

    PubMed

    Sá, Fabian; Sanders, Christian J; Patchineelam, Sambasiva Rao; Machado, Eunice da Costa; Lombardi, Ana Teresa

    2015-07-15

    The Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (PEC) includes the naturally oligotrophic (NO) Mel Island which is surrounded by sea grasses, a naturally eutrophic (NE) Benito Inlet adjacent to mangrove wetlands and the highly impacted eutrophic (IE) Paranaguá Bay, home of one of Brazil's largest ports. The results from this study indicate that reactive As and pyrite increase with sediment depth near Paranaguá port in the IE region. At the NE region, near a mangrove fringe, the reactive As, Fe, Mn and pyrite remained relatively high along the sediment column while near the sea grasses at NO the As contents were low. The degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) and the degree of pyritization (DOP) was highest at the IE site, slightly increasing with depth. These baseline results indicate that influence of trophic conditions and presence of marine vegetation may be directly related to As behavior in coastal systems. PMID:25931175

  10. Recovery and validation of historical sediment quality data from coastal and estuarine areas: An integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental parameters has been compiled for Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay. This work illustrates methodologies for rescuing and validating sediment data from heterogeneous historical sources. It greatly expands spatial and temporal data coverage of estuarine and coastal sediments. The database contains about 3500 samples containing inorganic chemical, organic, texture and other environmental data dating from 1955 to 1994. Cooperation with local and federal agencies as well as universities was essential in locating and screening documents for the database. More than 80% of references utilized came from sources with limited distribution (gray literature). Task sharing was facilitated by a comprehensive and clearly defined data dictionary for sediments. It also served as a data entry template and flat file format for data processing and as a basis for interpretation and graphical illustration. Standard QA/QC protocols are usually inapplicable to historical sediment data. In this work outliers and data quality problems were identified by batch screening techniques that also provide visualizations of data relationships and geochemical affinities. No data were excluded, but qualifying comments warn users of problem data. For Boston Harbor, the proportion of irreparable or seriously questioned data was remarkably small (<5%), although concentration values for metals and organic contaminants spanned 3 orders of magnitude for many elements or compounds. Data from the historical database provide alternatives to dated cores for measuring changes in surficial sediment contamination level with time. The data indicate that spatial inhomogeneity in harbor environments can be large with respect to sediment-hosted contaminants. Boston Inner Harbor surficial sediments showed decreases in concentrations of Cu, Hg, and Zn of 40 to 60% over a 17-year period.A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental

  11. Sediment quality in the Douro river estuary based on trace metal contents, macrobenthic community and elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT).

    PubMed

    Mucha, Ana P; Bordalo, Adriano A; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sediment quality in the mesotidal Douro River estuarine environment, in order to identify areas where sediment contamination could cause ecosystem degradation. Samples were obtained in five locations and sediment characterised for grain size, total organic matter, total-recoverable metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd, Zn and Mn), as well as acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). In situ effects were evaluated by examining the macrobenthic community structure. An elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT) was used to estimate the amount of metals and nutrients that could be exchanged with the water column through resuspension, and its positive or negative effects on the growth of the micro-alga Emiliania huxleyi in a 10 day test. Anthropogenic metal contamination was identified at the north bank of the Douro estuary, with deleterious effects on the macrobenthic community, namely decrease in number of species and diversity. This contamination could possibly also be toxic for water column organisms, in case of resuspension, as shown by the ESTT. Sediments from the salt marsh at the south bank showed an impoverished macrobenthic community and elutriate toxicity, which appeared to be due to anaerobic conditions. This study clearly shows the usefulness of the ESST approach to assess the biological effect of resuspension of estuarine sediments. PMID:15237288

  12. Foraminiferal Distributions, Sedimentation Rates and Patterns in the Albemarle Estuarine System, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, D. J.; Corbett, D. R.; Culver, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The modern distribution of benthic foraminifera of the Albemarle Estuarine System (AES) has been characterized by studying 50 strategically chosen sites to provide a model for paleoenvironmental interpretations of short sediment cores (15-75 cm). Water bodies studied within the AES include Albemarle Sound, Currituck Sound, Roanoke Sound, Croatan Sound, northern Pamlico Sound, North River, Pasquotank River, Alligator River, as well as Oregon Inlet and the adjacent foreshore and shoreface of the Atlantic Ocean. Sedimentation rates in the study area have been addressed using 210Pb and 137Cs dating methods. Five foraminiferal assemblages are present: an inner estuary biofacies characterized by two dominant genera, Ammobaculites and Ammotium, with moderate percentages of Miliammina fusca and minor percentages of Ammoastuta salsa; an outer estuary biofacies characterized again by Ammobaculites and Ammotium, but with lower percentages of Miliammina fusca; a marsh shoreline biofacies characterized by a mixed assemblage dominated by Ammobaculites and Ammotium with minor to moderate percentages of adjacent marsh foraminifera; a marsh biofacies characterized by varying abundances of Ammoastuta inepta, Arenoparella mexicana, Haplophragmoides wilberti, Jadammina macrescens, Miliammina earlandi, Miliammina fusca, Tiphotrocha comprimata, Trochammina inflata, as well as the genera Ammobaculites and Ammotium; and a marine (normal salinity) biofacies characterized mainly by Elphidium excavatum and minor percentages of other elphidiids. Sedimentation rates were studied from 28 short cores taken along transects in all the major water bodies. Rates were as high as 0.45 cm/yr at the head of Albemarle Sound and as little as 0.05 cm/yr 60 km away in the eastern part of the Albemarle. The embayed tributaries exhibited sedimentation rates on the order of 0.25 cm/yr. Limited information on sedimentation rates was provided by cores in eastern sounds, which had only a few centimeters of recent

  13. Metal pollution of estuarine sediments caused by leaching of acid sulphate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmyr, Linda; Åström, Mats; Peltola, Pasi

    2008-01-01

    This study tracks changes in metal distribution in estuarine sediments as a result of leakage from acid sulphate (AS) soil landscapes in the Boreal Zone (Finland). The main objective was to identify the impact of these nasty soils on sediment geochemistry in a biologically sensitive and shallow brackish-water estuary. In order to do this four sediment cores were sampled in a profile extending seawards from the mouth of the Vörå River, which is one of the most heavily AS soil-impacted rivers in Finland and Europe. Two of the cores were rather deep (2.5 m and 4.0 m) and the others were shallow (0.4 m and 0.8 m). The results showed that an appreciable amount of aluminium (Al), cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) were elevated in the surface and sub-surface of the sampled bottom sediments compared to the deeper sediment background levels. These metals are all known to be abundantly leached from the AS soils. At the site approximately 4 km away from the river mouth, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Mn, Ni and Zn were elevated 5-100 times as compared to the background levels and showed an intriguing cyclic pattern, most likely reflecting seasonal leaching dynamics in the AS soil landscapes. In contrast, metals that are not abundantly leached from AS soils, i.e. chromium (Cr), iron (Fe) and vanadium (V) had consistently low concentrations throughout all sediment cores. The elevated metal concentrations in the top layers of the sediments in the estuary are alarming. The continuous land uplift of the region combined with the episodic rapid declines in pH may result in short and long term extensive release of metals. This, in turn, may have significant effects on the trace-metal contents in the Gulf of Bothnia and the entire Baltic Sea.

  14. Trophic structure of macrobenthic communities on the Portuguese coast. A review of lagoonal, estuarine and rocky littoral habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaventura, Diana; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Teles-Ferreira, Carla

    1999-07-01

    This work is based on a compilation and treatment of data obtained on several studies regarding the macrobenthos trophic structure, carried out in different habitats of the Portuguese coast: a lagoon, rocky subtidal shores and estuarine eelgrass beds. Macrobenthic organisms were assigned to four distinct trophic groups (filter feeders, detritivores, herbivores and carnivores). Detritivores were the dominant trophic group in soft-bottom communities. Filter feeders dominated in subtidal rocky shores while eelgrass communities were equally represented by detritivores and herbivores. Current intensity and sediment deposition are discussed as factors affecting the observed distribution. Nevertheless, different sampling methods used in these studies and the lack of information on feeding habits of some species can also influence the results obtained.

  15. Incidence of adverse biological effects within ranges of chemical concentrations in marine and estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Edward R.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Smith, Sherri L.; Calder, Fred D.

    1995-01-01

    Matching biological and chemical data were compiled from numerous modeling, laboratory, and field studies performed in marine and estuarine sediments. Using these data, two guideline values (an effects range-low and an effects range-median) were determined for nine trace metals, total PCBs, two pesticides, 13 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and three classes of PAHs. The two values defined concentration ranges that were: (1) rarely, (2) occasionally, or (3) frequently associated with adverse effects. The values generally agreed within a factor of 3 or less with those developed with the same methods applied to other data and to those developed with other effects-based methods. The incidence of adverse effects was quantified within each of the three concentration ranges as the number of cases in which effects were observed divided by the total number of observations. The incidence of effects increased markedly with increasing concentrations of all of the individual PAHs, the three classes of PAHs, and most of the trace metals. Relatively poor relationships were observed between the incidence of effects and the concentrations of mercury, nickel, total PCB, total DDT and p,p'-DDE. Based upon this evaluation, the approach provided reliable guidelines for use in sediment quality assessments. This method is being used as a basis for developing National sediment quality guidelines for Canada and informal, sediment quality guidelines for Florida.

  16. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints after 10 d of exposure. Both Ag NP types were characterized in parallel to the toxicity studies and found to be polydispersed and overlapping in size. Burrowing activity decreased (marginally) with increasing Ag concentration and depended on the form of Ag added to sediment. All worms accumulated Ag regardless of the form in which it was added to the sediment, and worm size (expressed as dry weight) was found to significantly affect bioaccumulation such that smaller worms accumulated more Ag per body weight than larger worms. Lysosomal membrane permeability (neutral red retention time, NRRT) and DNA damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms. No significant difference in toxicity was observed between the two Ag NP treatments which was attributed to their overlap in particle size. PMID:25179147

  17. Microbial communities within saltmarsh sediments: Composition, abundance and pollution constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Ana; Magalhães, Catarina; Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of the saltmarsh plant Halimione portucaloides and the level of sediment metal contamination on the distribution of microbial communities were investigated in two Portuguese estuarine systems with different degrees of metal contamination: the Cavado (41.5 N; 8.7 W) and Sado estuaries. In the Sado, two saltmarshes were studied: Lisnave (38.4 N; 8.7 W) and Comporta (38.4 N; 8.8 W). A PCR rDNA-DGGE approach and direct microscopic counts of DAPI-stained cells were applied to study the biodiversity and abundance of prokaryotic communities. Sediment characteristics and metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni and Zn) were also evaluated to identify possible environmental pollution constraints on spatial and temporal microbial dynamics. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that the Lisnave saltmarsh microbial community was usually associated with a higher degree of metal contamination, especially the metal Pb. In clear contrast, the Cavado estuary microbial assemblage composition was associated with low metal concentrations but higher organic matter content. The Comporta saltmarsh bacterial community clustered in a separate branch, and was associated with higher levels of different metals, such as Ni, Cr and Zn. Additionally, the microbial community structure of the Lisnave and Cavado showed a seasonal pattern. Moreover, microbial abundance correlated negatively with metal concentrations, being higher at the Cavado estuarine site and with general higher counts in the rhizosediment. These findings suggest that increased metal concentrations negatively affect the abundance of prokaryotic cells and that saltmarsh plants may have a pivotal role in shaping the microbial community structure.

  18. Fish community-based measures of estuarine ecological quality and pressure-impact relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Vanessa F.; Vasconcelos, Rita P.; Gamito, Rita; Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Gonçalves, Catarina I.; Costa, José L.; Costa, Maria J.; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2013-12-01

    Community-based responses of fish fauna to anthropogenic pressures have been extensively used to assess the ecological quality of estuarine ecosystems. Several methodologies have been developed recently combining metrics reflecting community structure and function. A fish community facing significant environmental disturbances will be characterized by a simplified structure, with lower diversity and complexity. However, estuaries are naturally dynamic ecosystems exposed to numerous human pressures, making it difficult to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic-induced changes to the biological community. In the present work, the variability of several fish metrics was assessed in relation to different pressures in estuarine sites. The response of a multimetric index (Estuarine Fish Assessment Index) was also analysed. Overall, fish metrics and the multimetric index signalled anthropogenic stress, particularly environmental chemical pollution. The fish assemblage associated with this type of pressure was characterized by lower species diversity, lower number of functional guilds, lower abundance of marine migrants and of piscivorous individuals, and higher abundance of estuarine resident species. A decreased ecological quality status, based on the EFAI, was also determined for sites associated with this pressure group. Ultimately, the definition of each pressure groups favoured a stressor-specific analysis, evidencing pressure patterns and accounting for multiple factors in a highly dynamic environment.

  19. FIELD VALIDATION OF MULTI-SPECIES LABORATORY TEST SYSTEMS FOR ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of the project was to determine the validity of using multispecies laboratory systems to evaluate the response of estuarine benthic communities to an introduced stress. In a 5-year period, experiments in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, and the York River, Virginia,...

  20. Shifts in the metabolic function of a benthic estuarine microbial community following a single pulse exposure to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Echavarri-Bravo, Virginia; Paterson, Lynn; Aspray, Thomas J; Porter, Joanne S; Winson, Michael K; Thornton, Barry; Hartl, Mark G J

    2015-06-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a biocidal agent and their potential accumulation in sediments may threaten non-target natural environmental bacterial communities. In this study a microcosm approach was established to investigate the effects of well characterized OECD AgNPs (NM-300) on the function of the bacterial community inhabiting marine estuarine sediments (salinity 31‰). The results showed that a single pulse of NM-300 AgNPs (1 mg L(-1)) that led to sediment concentrations below 6 mg Ag kg(-1) dry weight inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant carbon substrates. As a result, the functional diversity changed, but recovered after 120 h under the experimental conditions. This microcosm study suggests that AgNPs under environmentally relevant experimental conditions can negatively affect bacterial function and provides an insight into the understanding of the bacterial community response and resilience to AgNPs exposure, important for informing relevant regulatory measures. PMID:25779207

  1. Metal partitioning and availability in estuarine surface sediments: Changes promoted by feeding activity of Scrobicularia plana and Liza ramada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Reis, Givaldo; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Costa, José Lino; Caçador, Isabel; Almeida, Pedro Raposo de

    2015-12-01

    Several works have evidenced in the past the importance and influence of plants and terrestrial invertebrates in metal availability in soils and sediments through changes in metal speciation. In contrast, the impact of estuarine invertebrates and fishes in this process has been poorly explored. The partition of metals in estuarine surface sediments was studied in a controlled environment according to four operationally defined fractions. Sediments were analyzed before and after the passage through the gut of two detritivorous species. Scrobicularia plana feeds on the bottom and suspended sediment particles through the inhalant siphon. Liza ramada is an interface feeder, filtering the superficial layer of the sediment and suspended particles in the water column. Cd, Cu and Ni bound to carbonates increased in the pellets of S. plana, compared with the ingested sediment, as did exchangeable Zn. Similarly, Cd and Zn bound to carbonates have also increased in the pellets of L. ramada; on the contrary, a decrease of Ni was observable in the pellets of this fish. The outcome of the controlled experiments pointed to a potential increase in some metals' availability in the estuarine environment, as a result of the more mobile metal forms in the excreted fecal pellets. This draws the attention to a relevant impact of the trophic activity of both species, alongside with the potential enhancement brought to it by the bioturbation promoted by them, in the role that the estuary itself has as a contaminants' buffer.

  2. Fate of Triclosan and Evidence for Reductive Dechlorination of Triclocarban in Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd R.; Heidler, Jochen; Chillrud, Steven N.; DeLaquil, Amelia; Ritchie, Jerry C.; Mihalic, Jana N.; Bopp, Richard; Halden, Rolf U.

    2008-01-01

    The biocides triclosan and triclocarban are wastewater contaminants whose occurrence and fate in estuarine sediments remain unexplored. We examined contaminant profiles in 137Cs/7Be-dated sediment cores taken near wastewater treatment plants in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CB), Maryland and Jamaica Bay (JB), New York. In JB, biocide occurrences tracked the time course of biocide usage and wastewater treatment strategies employed, first appearing in the 1950s (triclocarban) and 1960s (triclosan), and peaking in the late 1960s and 1970s (24 ± 0.54 and 0.8 ± 0.4 29 mg/kg dry weight, respectively). In CB, where time of sediment accumulation was not as well constrained by 137Cs depth profiles, triclocarban was only measurable in 137Cs bearing sediments, peaking at 3.6 ± 0.6 mg/kg midway through the core and exceeding 1 mg/kg in recent deposits. In contrast, triclosan concentrations were low or not detectable in the CB core. Analysis of CB sediment by tandem mass spectrometry produced the first evidence for complete sequential dechlorination of triclocarban to the transformation products dichloro-, monochloro-, and unsubstituted carbanilide which were detected at maxima of 15.5 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 2.4, and 0.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg, respectively. Concentrations of all carbanilide congeners combined were correlated with heavy metals (R2 > 0.64, P<0.01), thereby identifying wastewater as the principal pathway of contamination. Environmental persistence over the past 40 years was observed for triclosan and triclocarban in JB, and for triclocarban and its diphenylurea backbone in CB sediments. PMID:18605588

  3. Elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl substances in estuarine sediments of Charleston, SC.

    PubMed

    White, Natasha D; Balthis, Len; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; De Silva, Amila O; Wu, Qian; French, Katherine M; Daugomah, James; Spencer, Christine; Fair, Patricia A

    2015-07-15

    Urban areas are sources of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the environment, although little is known about specific point sources and distribution of PFASs. Sentinel species, like bottlenose dolphins, are important indicators of environmental perturbations. The high PFAS levels found in dolphins inhabiting Charleston, South Carolina prompted investigation of these chemicals in this area. This study provides further evidence on the extent of contamination and potential sources of PFASs. In this study, concentrations of 11 PFASs measured in estuarine sediments collected in 2012 from the Charleston Harbor and the Ashley and Cooper Rivers (n=36) in South Carolina revealed higher levels than those reported in any other U.S. urban areas. Detectable levels were found in all sample locations with mean total PFAS concentrations of 3.79ngg(-1) (range 0.22 to 19.2ngg(-1) d.w.). Dominant compounds were perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (mean 1.52ngg(-1); range 0.09-7.37ngg(-1) d.w.), followed by perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) (mean 0.83ngg(-1); range 0.06-4.76ngg(-1) d.w.) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (mean 0.42ngg(-1); range 0.02-2.52ngg(-1) d.w.). PFOS levels in sediments at 19 of 36 sites (representing 52% of the study area) exceeded the published global median PFOS sediment concentration of 0.54ngg(-1). PMID:25828416

  4. Restoring sediment to compensate for human-induced erosion of an estuarine shore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Karl F.; Jackson, Nancy L.; Farrell, Eugene J.; Rafferty, Patricia; Tengwall, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Shoreline erosion is often exacerbated by reduction of sediment inputs because of interference with sediment transport by human structures. We evaluate use of sediment dredged from a navigation channel to establish a feeder beach adjacent to a bulkhead as a solution for addressing erosion of landforms and habitats on sandy estuarine shores. The objectives are to determine how beach volume, position and shape within and downdrift of the fill area change and whether the volumes supplied by dredging match sediment losses caused by human actions. The fill was placed along a 75 m length of shoreline adjacent to a marina in Great South Bay at Fire Island, New York, USA. Changes in beach shape and volume were determined from topographic surveys conducted before and after fill and at half year intervals for 18 months. The quantity of fill was 1747 m3. Maximum shoreline advance due to fill emplacement was 20.7 m. The maximum volume placed at any transect was 28.6 m3 m- 1 of shoreline length. Erosion of the fill occurred rapidly, with landward migration of a conspicuous scarp. The edge of the upland 18 months after the fill was placed was up to 4.6 m farther landward than prior to the fill. Movement of sediment alongshore downdrift of the fill occurred as wave-like pulses, extending the active foreshore bayward, causing accretion of the inner low tide terrace, burying saltmarsh peat outcrops on the foreshore and creating a higher and wider overwash platform over portions of the saltmarshes. Landforms downdrift of the fill area underwent successive stages including erosion (pre-nourishment), accretion, stability (with throughput of sediment) and then erosion. Beach nourishment compensates for human-induced sediment losses. The volume of sediment added from maintenance dredging can slow the rate of erosion but may not prevent long-term shoreline retreat. Restoration and maintenance of coastal landforms and habitats to specific target states at a given location is difficult

  5. Effects of Bottom-up and Top-down Controls and Climate Change on Estuarine Macrophyte Communities and the Ecosystem Services they Provide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrophytes provide important estuarine benthic habitats and support a significant portion of estuarine productivity. The composition and characteristics of these benthic communities are regulated bottom-up by resource availability and from the top-down by herbivory and predation...

  6. Influence of the sea rush Juncus maritimus on metal concentration and speciation in estuarine sediment colonized by the plant.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana P; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2004-06-01

    Metal accumulation by Juncus maritimus and the role of this plant on the physical and chemical composition of sediments, from the Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were investigated. The contents of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined (by atomic absorption spectrophotometry) in sediments, rhizosediments (those among plant roots and rhizomes), and different plant tissues (roots, rhizomes, leaves, and stems). Metal fractionation in sediments through sequential extraction was carried out and used for interpretation of sediment/J. maritimus interactions. Two estuarine sites with different characteristics were studied: site I displayed sandy sediment with lower organic matter and metals more weakly bound to it than site II sediment, which was muddy. At both sites, higher metal contents were observed in rhizosediments than in the surrounding sediment, but metals were more weakly bound to rhizosediment. Therefore, J. maritimus markedly influenced the sediments among its roots and rhizomes, changing metal distribution and speciation. Different patterns of both metal uptake and metal distribution among J. maritimus tissues were observed at the two sites. Plant bioaccumulation was only observed for Cd, Cu, and Zn, being similar for Cd atthe two sites and significantly higher for Cu and Zn (9 and 4 times higher, respectively) at site I. In conclusion, J. maritimus was shown to have potential for phytoextraction (or phytostabilization) of Cd, Cu, and Zn in estuarine environment. However, an eventual application of J. maritimus for this purpose will require a periodic removal of the plants together with their own rhizosediment. PMID:15224743

  7. Speciation of metals and their distribution in tropical estuarine mudflat sediments, southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria C; Nayak, G N

    2015-12-01

    Two sediment cores collected from a mudflat sedimentary environment of Swarna estuary (S3) and Gurpur estuary (MF6), representing the middle estuarine region, Karnataka, India, were investigated to understand bioavailability of metals and their toxicity. The subsamples were analyzed for sand, silt, clay, organic carbon and total metal concentration of Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Cobalt (Co) and Chromium (Cr) at 2 cm intervals. Sediments (average) are relatively coarser in Gurpur estuary whereas silt, clay, organic carbon along with the studied metals (except Mn and Cu) is noted to be higher in the Swarna estuary. Significant correlations were observed of Al, Fe with finer sediments and most of the trace metals in both the cores indicating a mainly lithogenic source. Further, metal speciation analysis carried out for Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co and Cr on selected samples of both the cores indicated that Fe was largely associated with the residual fraction with 93 ± 0.5% in Gurpur and 84 ± 6% in Swarna estuary. The concentration of studied metals in the residual fraction in the sediments of Gurpur estuary was in the order Mn(90 ± 5%)>Cr(85 ± 1%)>Ni(72 ± 5%)>Zn(69 ± 3%)>Cu(57 ± 5%)>Co(55 ± 2%) and; Cr(80 ± 7%)>Mn(77 ± 10%)>Ni(76 ± 7%)>Zn(67 ± 10%)>Cu(67 ± 10%)>Co(50 ± 7%) in Swarna estuary. When the total (bulk) metals were compared with the Sediment Quality Values (SQV) following Screening Quick Reference Table (SQUIRT), Co values of both the cores fell above Apparent Effect Threshold (AET) values. When the sum of the average bioavailable fractions in sediments was considered, Co values exceeded the AET in core S3 (Swarna estuary). When the variations are viewed with depth, bioavailability of Mn, Ni, Cu and Co in Gurpur estuary indicated anthropogenic addition in recent years whereas in Swarna estuary most of the studied metals showed diagenetic remobilization and diffusion to the water column from surface

  8. Prokaryotic Community in Lacustrine Sediments of Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Lentini, Valeria; Rochera, Carlos; Camacho, Antonio; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana

    2016-02-01

    . Ilumatobacter (Actinobacteria), Gp16 (Acidobacteria), and Gemmatimonas (Gemmatimonadetes) were recovered as dominant genera in both inland and coastal lakes, but not in the estuarine sample, indicating that they may be useful markers of Antarctic lakes. The proximity to the sea, the different lake depths and the external or internal origin of the nutrient sources shape the bacterial communities composition in lacustrine sediments of Byers Peninsula. PMID:26337826

  9. The utility of acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals concentrations as an indicator of metal bioavailability and toxicity in estuarine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K.; Windom, H.; Weisberg, S.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program, surficial sediment samples (upper 2 cm) were collected from over 1,000 estuarine sites along the Mid-Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines from 1990--1994. In addition, sediment samples from approximately 30 sites within the New York/New Jersey Harbor complex were collected in 1993. Acid volatile sulfide concentrations (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), sediment toxicity bioassays, and benthic community compositions were determined for each of these sites. The present effort examined the hypotheses that: (1) the ratio of AVS to SEM is an indicator of metal availability and sediment toxicity and (2) that correction of other sources of mortality (organic contamination, narcosis, hypoxia, etc.) further strengthens this ratio relationship. Examination of highly metal contaminated sites in the New York/New Jersey harbor area, selected metal contaminated regions in the Mid-Atlantic and Gulf estuaries, as well as reference regions (uncontaminated zones) did not support these hypotheses. In fact, significant/or benthic community composition shifts that could not be attributed to other sources were observed in regions characterized by the alternate hypothesis. Normalized metal concentrations based on available aluminum appeared to be more closely related indicator of observed toxicity of benthic community attributes than AVS ratios.

  10. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVean, Lissa J.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements were collected on a shallow estuarine mudflat in northern San Francisco Bay to examine the physical processes controlling waves, turbulence, sediment resuspension, and their interactions. Tides alone forced weak to moderate currents of 10-30 cm s-1 in depths of 0-3 m, and maintained a background suspension of 30-50 mg L-1 of fine sediment. In the presence of wind waves, bottom orbital velocities spanned 20-30 cm s-1, suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC) at 15 and 30 cm above the bed (cmab) increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and vertical gradients in SSC were strong enough to produce turbulence-limiting stratification, with gradient Richardson numbers exceeding 0.25. Simultaneously, turbulent stresses (decomposed from wave motions) increased by an order of magnitude. The apparent contradiction of energetic turbulence in the presence of strong stratification was reconciled by considering the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget: in general, dissipation and buoyancy flux were balanced by local shear production, and each of these terms increased during wave events. The classic wave-current boundary layer model represented the observations qualitatively, but not quantitatively since the velocity profile could not be approximated as logarithmic. Rather, the mean shear was elevated by the Stokes drift return flow and wind-generated surface stress, which diffused sediment upward and limited stratification. Our findings highlight a pathway for waves to supply energy to both the production and destruction of turbulence, and demonstrate that in such shallow depths, TKE and SSC can be elevated over more of the water column than predicted by traditional models.

  11. The structure of the benthic macrofaunal assemblages and sediments characteristics of the Paraguaçu estuarine system, NE, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Francisco; Hatje, Vanessa; Figueiredo, Maria Betânia; Magalhães, Wagner Ferreira; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira; Emídio, Elissandro Soares

    2008-07-01

    The structure of the benthic macrofaunal assemblages of the estuarine portion of Paraguaçu River, NE, Brazil, and its relationship with surface sediment characteristics (trace metals, PAHs, nutrients and grain size) and physical variables were investigated at ten stations on two contrasting occasions, summer (dry season) and winter (rainy season). A total of 1258 individuals (632 in winter and 626 in summer) and 62 taxa representing polychaetes, crustaceans, bivalves, echinoderms, bryozoans, sponges, cnidarians and cephalochordates were collected. Benthic assemblages in the upper estuary were unlike those in the lower estuary and a clear substitution of benthic taxa along the estuary was observed. Macrofaunal invertebrates in the low salinity region, composed of coarse sediments, were dominated by tellinids, venerids (bivalves), cirolanids (isopods), cyclopoids (copepods), and nereidids (polychaetes). While the high salinity region, composed of fine sediments, were dominated by nuculids (bivalves), cirratulids (polychaetes), and by amphiurids (ophiuroids). The Paraguaçu estuarine system is not severely affected by anthropogenic activities. In the great majority of the study sites, concentrations of trace metals and PAHs in the sediments were near background values. Nutrients values were also low. We formulated new models of taxon distribution and suggested detailed studies on the effects of salinity variation and studies using functional approaches to better understand the processes causing the spatial patterns in tropical estuarine benthic assemblages.

  12. Natural attenuation and biosurfactant-stimulated bioremediation of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Débora M; Chagas-Spinelli, Alessandra C O; Gavazza, Sávia; Florencio, Lourdinha; Kato, Mario T

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the bioremediation, by natural attenuation (NA) and by natural attenuation stimulated (SNA) using a rhamnolipid biosurfactant, of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil. Sediment samples (30 cm) were put into 35 cm glass columns, and the concentrations of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency were monitored for 111 days. Naphthalene percolated through the columns more than the other PAHs, and, in general, the concentrations of the lower molecular weight PAHs, consisting of two and three aromatic rings, changed during the first 45 days of treatment, whereas the concentrations of the higher molecular weight PAHs, consisting of four, five, and six rings, were more stable. The higher molecular weight PAHs became more available after 45 days, in the deeper parts of the columns (20-30 cm). Evidence of degradation was observed only for some compounds, such as pyrene, with a total removal efficiency of 82 and 78 % in the NA and SNA treatments, respectively, but without significant difference. In the case of total PAH removal, the efficiencies were significantly different of 82 and 67 %, respectively. PMID:23821292

  13. Primary effects of extracellular enzyme activity and microbial community on carbon and nitrogen mineralization in estuarine and tidal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Li, Ye; Li, Shuwen

    2015-03-01

    Estuarine and tidal wetlands with high primary productivity and biological activity play a crucial role in coastal nutrient dynamics. Here, to better reveal the effects of extracellular enzymes and microbial community on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization, the incubation experiments with different C and N addition patterns to the tidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary (China) were conducted. The results suggested a significant increase in cumulative CO2 effluxes in the C and CN treatment experiments, while no significant difference in cumulative CO2 effluxes between the N treatment and control (CK) experiments was observed. In addition, the nutrient addition patterns had a great influence on dissolve organic C and N levels, but a small effect on microbial biomass C and N. Microbial community composition and microbial activity were found to be positively correlated with organic C (OC) and the molar ratio of C to N (C/N). Partial correlation analysis, controlling for C/N, supported direct effects of OC on the activity of carbon-cycling extracellular enzymes (cellulase and polyphenol oxidase), while C/N exhibited negatively correlations with urease and Gram-positive bacteria to Gram-negative bacteria (G+/G-). Strong relationships were found between CO2 efflux and mineral nitrogen with the activity of specific enzymes (sucrase, cellulase, and polyphenol oxidase) and abundances of Gram-negative bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and fungi, suggesting the significant influences of microbial community and enzyme activity on C and N mineralization in the estuarine and tidal wetlands. Furthermore, this study could highlight the need to explore effects of nutrient supply on microbial communities and enzyme activity changes associated with the C and N mineralization in these wetlands induced by the climate change. PMID:25381491

  14. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  15. Depositional variability of estuarine intertidal sediments and implications for metal distribution: An example from Moreton Bay (Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Guia; Gasparon, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the patterns of depositional variability, sediment geochemistry and metal distribution in intertidal areas of Moreton Bay, southeast Queensland, Australia. Recent concern over increasing human impact on the bay has generated the need to obtain evidence on how the disturbance of the depositional setting might affect the natural estuarine environment. Sediment stratigraphy, major, and trace element analyses of sediment cores show that the sedimentation pattern is unique to each intertidal site. Disturbed 210Pb and 137Cs activity profiles of some of the cores indicate that sediment reworking occurs across the intertidal flats up to a depth of at least 80 cm. With some notable exceptions, an accurate geochronology of the surface sediments could not be established due to low 210Pb activities and sediment mixing. Thus, an increase in Pb, Zn and Cu towards the surface sediments observed at various sites is attributed to both anthropogenic contribution following the rapid urban development in the last century and to post-depositional diagenetic processes, bioturbation and sediment re-suspension induced by tides, storms or floods. Sediment cores are representative only of the local sedimentation and may not always allow extensive correlation to larger areas. Vertical profiles of heavy metals reflect the different depositional environment controlled by the complex hydrodynamics of the bay. Local hydrologic, physical, and tidal conditions might induce metals redistribution at different scales. This information is of critical importance in view of sediment remobilization caused by future development such as dredging, intertidal areas reclamation or excavation of new navigational channels.

  16. Reactive iron and manganese in estuarine sediments of the Baltic Sea: Impacts of flocculation and redox shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Asmala, Eero; Hietanen, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) play important roles in sedimentary carbon cycling in both freshwater and marine systems. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe and Mn oxides is known to be a major pathway of suboxic organic matter remineralization in surface sediments, while recent studies have shown that Fe and Mn oxides may be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane deeper in the sediment column (e.g., Egger et al., 2015). Estuaries are transitional environments, characterized by gradients of salinity and redox conditions which impact on the mobility of Fe and Mn. In turn, the distribution of Fe and Mn in estuarine sediments, and the role of the two metals in carbon cycling, is expected to be spatially heterogeneous. However, few studies have attempted to describe the sedimentary distribution of Fe and Mn in the context of processes occurring in the estuarine water column. In particular, salinity-driven flocculation and redox shuttling are two key processes whose relative impacts on sedimentary Fe and Mn have not been clearly demonstrated. In this study we investigated the coupled water column and sedimentary cycling of Fe and Mn along a 60km non-tidal estuarine transect in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. We show that riverine Fe entering the estuary as colloidal oxides associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) is quickly flocculated and sedimented within 5 km of the river mouth, despite the shallow lateral salinity gradient. Sediments within this range are enriched in Fe (up to twice the regional average), principally in the form of crystalline Fe oxides as determined by sequential extractions. The high crystallinity implies relative maturity of the oxide mineralogy, likely due to sustained oxic conditions and long residence time in the river catchment. Despite the reducing conditions below the sediment-water interface, Fe is largely retained in the sediments close to the river mouth. In contrast, sedimentary Mn concentrations are highest in a deep silled

  17. Metal release from contaminated estuarine sediment under pH changes in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Martín-Torre, M Camino; Payán, M Cruz; Verbinnen, Bram; Coz, Alberto; Ruiz, Gema; Vandecasteele, Carlo; Viguri, Javier R

    2015-04-01

    The contaminant release from estuarine sediment due to pH changes was investigated using a modified CEN/TS 14429 pH-dependence leaching test. The test is performed in the range of pH values of 0-14 using deionised water and seawater as leaching solutions. The experimental conditions mimic different circumstances of the marine environment due to the global acidification, carbon dioxide (CO2) leakages from carbon capture and sequestration technologies, and accidental chemical spills in seawater. Leaching test results using seawater as leaching solution show a better neutralisation capacity giving slightly lower metal leaching concentrations than when using deionised water. The contaminated sediment shows a low base-neutralisation capacity (BNCpH 12 = -0.44 eq/kg for deionised water and BNCpH 12 = -1.38 eq/kg for seawater) but a high acid-neutralisation capacity when using deionised water (ANCpH 4 = 3.58 eq/kg) and seawater (ANCpH 4 = 3.97 eq/kg). Experimental results are modelled with the Visual MINTEQ geochemical software to predict metal release from sediment using both leaching liquids. Surface adsorption to iron- and aluminium-(hydr)oxides was applied for all studied elements. The consideration of the metal-organic matter binding through the NICA-Donnan model and Stockholm Humic Model for lead and copper, respectively, improves the former metal release prediction. Modelled curves can be useful for the environmental impact assessment of seawater acidification due to its match with the experimental values. PMID:25680769

  18. Seagrass sediments reveal the long-term deterioration of an estuarine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul; Masque, Pere; Inostroza, Karina; Bongiovanni, James; Duarte, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The study of a Posidonia australis sediment archive has provided a record of ecosystem dynamics and processes over the last 600 years in Oyster Harbour (SW Australia). Ecosystem shifts are a widespread phenomenon in coastal areas, and this study identifies baseline conditions and the time-course of ecological change (cycles, trends, resilience and thresholds of ecosystem change) under environmental stress in seagrass-dominated ecosystem. The shifts in the concentrations of chemical elements, carbonates, sediments <0.125 mm and stable carbon isotope signatures (δ(13) C) of the organic matter were detected between 1850s and 1920s, whereas the shift detected in P concentration occurred several decades later (1960s). The first degradation phase (1850s-1950s) follows the onset of European settlement in Australia and was characterized by a strong increase in sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained particles, driven primarily by enhanced run-off due to land clearance and agriculture in the catchment. About 80% of total seagrass area at Oyster Harbour was lost during the second phase of environmental degradation (1960s until present). The sharp increase in P concentration and the increasing contribution of algae and terrestrial inputs into the sedimentary organic matter pool around 1960s provides compelling evidence of the documented eutrophication of the estuary and the subsequent loss of seagrass meadows. The results presented demonstrate the power of seagrass sedimentary archives to reconstruct the trajectories of anthropogenic pressures on estuarine ecosystem and the associated regime shifts, which can be used to improve the capacity of scientists and environmental managers to understand, predict and better manage ecological change in these ecosystems. PMID:26818637

  19. Estuarine sedimentation, sediment character, and foraminiferal distribution in central San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, John L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Central San Francisco Bay is the deepest subembayment in the San Francisco Bay estuary and hence has the largest water volume of any of the subembayments. It also has the strongest tidal currents and the coarsest sediment within the estuary. Tidal currents are strongest over the west-central part of central bay and, correspondingly, this area is dominated by sand-size sediment. Much of the area east of a line from Angel Island to Alcatraz Island is characterized by muddy sand to sandy mud, and the area to the west of this line is sandy. The sand-size sediment over west-central bay furthermore is molded by the energetic tidal currents into bedforms of varying sizes and wavelengths. Bedforms typically occur in water depths of 15-25 m. High resolution bathymetry (multibeam) from 1997 and 2008 allow for subdivision of the west-central bayfloor into four basic types based on morphologic expression: featureless, sand waves, disrupted/man-altered, and bedrock knobs. Featureless and sand-wave morphologies dominate the bayfloor of west-central bay. Disrupted bayfloor has a direct association with areas that are undergoing alteration due to human activities, such as sand-mining lease areas, dredging, and disposal of dredge spoils. Change detection analysis, comparing the 1997 and 2008 multibeam data sets, shows that significant change has occurred in west-central bay during the roughly 10 years between surveys. The surveyed area lost about 5.45 million m3 of sediment during the decade. Sand-mining lease areas within west-central bay lost 6.77 million m3 as the bayfloor deepened. Nonlease areas gained 1.32 million m3 of sediment as the bayfloor shallowed slightly outside of sand-mining lease areas. Furthermore, bedform asymmetry did not change significantly, but some bedforms did migrate some tens of meters. Gravity cores show that the area east of Angel and Alcatraz Islands is floored by clayey silts or silty sand whereas the area to the west of the islands is floored

  20. Tropical Estuarine Macrobenthic Communities Are Structured by Turnover Rather than Nestedness.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Carlinda Raílly; Hepp, Luiz Ubiratan; Patrício, Joana; Molozzi, Joseline

    2016-01-01

    Turnover (i.e., species substitution) and nestedness (i.e., subsets of species from more diverse locations), the two main mechanisms used to explain the beta diversity of biological communities, have different implications for biodiversity conservation. To better understand how these mechanisms contribute to beta diversity, we tested the following hypotheses: (i) greater dissimilarity in community composition occurs between estuarine zones than other hierarchical level studied; (ii) beta diversity in these communities develops by turnover in estuaries with a lower degree of anthropogenic impact, but by nestedness in estuaries with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact; and (iii) the structuring mechanism is independent of season. We studied two tropical estuaries (dry and wet seasons) that vary in terms of land-use of the drainage basins. Subtidal benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled along the estuarine gradient in each of the two estuaries. The additive partitioning approach to species diversity was used to determine the hierarchical scale with the greatest dissimilarity in community composition. General beta diversity was measured using the Sorensen dissimilarity index, partitioning the turnover and nestedness components. The greatest dissimilarity in the composition of the communities occurred between the zones along the estuarine gradient in both seasons (dry = 58.6%; wet = 46.3%). In the estuary with a lower degree of anthropogenic influence, benthic macroinvertebrate diversity was generated by turnover regardless of the season. In the estuary with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact, beta diversity was structured by turnover during the dry season and a combination of both mechanisms during the wet season. We conclude that turnover is the principal mechanism responsible for beta diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate communities in tropical estuaries. PMID:27584726

  1. Using gamma ray spectrometry for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment in Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Murakami, Y.; Ishiya, T.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    To seek the geological tracers of environmental radionuclide for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment, the gamma ray spectrometry was conducted for the soil and sediment samples collected from subcatchments, rivers, estuaries and coast in Mukawa and Sarugawa river watersheds and Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Gamma ray spectrometry was conducted to determine the activities of environmental radionuclides associated with each soil and sediment samples using HP Ge well-type detector. Gamma ray spectrometry could determine 15 environmental radionuclides, including U-series, Th-series, cesium-137 and potassium-40. Lead-210 excess was also determined by subtracting the activities of Pb-214 from that of Pb-210. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to assess the ability of each tracer property to discriminate between surface soil samples from the categories divided by subcatchment, geological era and period, suggesting that more than 11 tracer properties were available. Subsequently, the stepwise discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify which combination of tracer properties provides the best composite fingerprint for differentiating source materials on the basis of subcatchment and geology source groups. This analysis suggested that the composite fingerprints of Pb-212, Ac-228 and K-40 can classify the geology into 6 groups based on rock type. Using these tracer properties, the contribution of rock to estuarine and coastal sediment can be evaluated with the multivariate sediment mixing model.

  2. Assessing environmental drivers of microbial communities in estuarine soils of the Aconcagua River in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Ding, Guo-Chun; Cárdenas, Franco; Smalla, Kornelia; Seeger, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Aconcagua River basin (Central Chile) harbors diverse economic activities such as agriculture, mining and a crude oil refinery. The aim of this study was to assess environmental drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils, which may be influenced by anthropogenic activities taking place upstream and by natural processes such as tides and flood runoffs. Physicochemical parameters were measured in floodplain soils along the estuary. Bacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Fungi were studied by DGGE fingerprinting of 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal ITS-1 amplified from community DNA. Correlations between environment and communities were assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. Mainly hydrocarbons, pH and the composed variable copper/arsenic/calcium but in less extent nitrogen and organic matter/phosphorous/magnesium correlated with community structures at different taxonomic levels. Aromatic hydrocarbons degradation potential by bacterial community was studied. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases genes were detected only at upstream sites. Naphthalene dioxygenase ndo genes were heterogeneously distributed along estuary, and related to Pseudomonas, Delftia, Comamonas and Ralstonia. IncP-1 plasmids were mainly present at downstream sites, whereas IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids showed a heterogeneous distribution. This study strongly suggests that pH, copper, arsenic and hydrocarbons are main drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils. PMID:26362923

  3. Use of porewater extracts to identify the cause of toxicity in marine and estuarine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.

    1994-12-31

    Amphipod toxicity tests in the evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal has come under increased scrutiny by the regulated community in the Port of NY/NJ. In recent large-scale assessments of sediment quality in the harbor, the vast majority of locations were deemed highly contaminated when tested with Ampelisca abdita. Toxicity tests, by themselves, do not provide data regarding the cause of toxicity of these sediments. The enormous potential costs associated with most proposed alternatives to ocean disposal of dredged sediments has prompted the investigation of the causative agents of toxicity in sediments of the NY/NJ Harbor. Sediment from five locations in the harbor, selected in consultation with local regulatory agencies to represent diverse potential contamination scenarios, was collected and tested for toxicity to the amphipods Ampelisca abdita, Leptocheirus plumulosus, Eohaustorius estuadus, Rhepoxynius abronius, and the mysid shrimp, Mysidopsis bahia, using 10-day static bioassays. Porewater from each of the five sediments was extracted under centrifugation and used in water-only toxicity tests with A. abdita, L. plumulosus, R. abronius, E. estuadus, M. bahia, M. beryllina, and Microtox. A Phase 1 Toxicity Identification Evaluation of the three most toxic porewater samples was conducted using several of the species tested. Results from the preliminary investigations and the ongoing TIE`s will be presented. Species selection, porewater toxicity test procedures, and Phase 1, 2, and 3 paradigms will be discussed.

  4. Cumulative influences of a small city and former mining activities on the sediment quality of a subtropical estuarine protected area.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Ana Carolina Feitosa; Davanso, Marcela Bergo; Araujo, Giuliana Seraphim; Buruaem, Lucas M; Santaella, Sandra Tédde; de Morais, Rodofley Davino; Abessa, Denis M S

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the sediment quality in the estuarine protected area known as Cananéia-Iguape-Peruíbe (CIP-PA), located on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The study was designed considering possible negative effects induced by the city of Cananéia on the sediment quality of surrounding areas. This evaluation was performed using chemical and ecotoxicological analyses. Sediments were predominantly sandy, with low CaCO3 contents. Amounts of organic matter varied, but higher contents occurred closer to the city, as well as did Fe and Total Recoverable Oils and Greases (TROGs) concentrations. Contamination by Cd and Cu was revealed in some samples, while concentrations of Zn were considered low. Chronic toxicity was detected in all tested sediments and acute toxicity occurred only in sediments collected near the city. The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed an association among Cd, Cu, Fe, TROG, fines, organic matter, CaCO3, and chronic toxicity, whereas acute toxicity was found to be associated with Zn and mud. However, because Zn levels were low, acute toxicity was likely due to a contaminant that was not measured. Results show that there is a broad area within the CIP-PA that is under the influence of mining activities (chronic toxicity, moderate contamination by metals), whereas poorer conditions occur closer to Cananéia (acute toxicity); thus, the urban area seems to constitute a relevant source of contaminants for the estuarine complex. These results show that contamination is already capable of producing risks for the local aquatic biota, which suggests that the CIP-PA effectiveness in protecting estuarine biota may be threatened. PMID:25037965

  5. Influence of a burrowing, metal-tolerant polychaete on benthic metabolism, denitrification and nitrogen regeneration in contaminated estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Banks, Joanne L; Ross, D Jeff; Keough, Michael J; Macleod, Catriona K; Keane, John; Eyre, Bradley D

    2013-03-15

    We investigated the effects of the burrowing cirratulid polychaete Cirriformia filigera (Delle Chiaje, 1828) on benthic respiration and nitrogen regeneration in metal-contaminated estuarine sediments using laboratory mesocosms. C. filigera is a dominant component of assemblages in the most severely contaminated sediments within the Derwent estuary, southern Australia. In the presence of C. filigera sediment O2 consumption doubled, with approximately 55% of this increase due to their respiration and the remaining 45% attributable to oxidation reactions and increased microbial respiration associated with burrow walls. Combined NO3 and NO2 fluxes were unaffected. The addition of labile organic matter did not affect benthic fluxes, in the presence or absence of C. filigera, presumably due to the short timeframe of the experiment and naturally enriched test sediments. The results suggest that a combination of tolerance and burrowing activity enables this species to provide an ecosystem service in the removal of N from contaminated sites. PMID:23398743

  6. Multi-element study of sediments from the river Khai River - Nha Trang Bay estuarine system, South China Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukina, Sofia; Lobus, Nikolai; Peresypkin, Valery; Baturin, Gleb; Smurov, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    Major (Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, Ca, Na, K), minor (Mn) and trace (Cr, Ni, Cd, V, Zn, Cu, Pb, Sb, Bi, Sn, Ag, Li, Co, As, Zr, Mo, Hg) elements along with nutrients (TOC, TS, TP) and TIC were first determined in ten surface sediment samples from the Khai River - Nha Trang Bay estuarine system, South China Sea. According to the sediment quality guidelines and reference background values, most of the element contents that were studied were below the threshold levels, while the content of Ag exceeded significantly the hazardous levels in the most of the samples along the river - sea transect. The local anthropogenic and/or environmental sources of Ag within the region need special study. Aluminum and lithium normalization indicated some specific features in the abundance and distribution of the elements along the salinity gradient. The mean grain size of the sediments decreased from the river part to the bay part of the transect. Sedimentary TOC was relatively low (1-2 %) and showed independent distribution along the river - sea transect in relation to the other elements that were studied. Ca, Ba and Sr distribution showed some sporadic enrichment and were largely controlled by the TIC content in sediments. Sedimentary TP, Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Na, K, Li, Co, Cs, Zn and V varied within the narrow range and tended to increase seaward. These elements are most likely controlled by the accumulation of their fine grained aluminosilicate host minerals and materials at sites determined by hydrodynamic conditions, i. e., in the sea floor depression. TS, As, Sn, Bi, U, Cd and Mo were relatively low in the sediments studied and tended to decrease seaward with the slight elevation in the intermediate part of the transect. These elements can be scavenged by and/or co-precipitated with the dissolved and particulate materials of the river discharge and further deposited on the river - sea geochemical barrier in the course of estuarine sedimentation. The distribution of Ni, Cr, Zr Cu, Pb, Sb, Hg and

  7. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. ...

  8. Multiproxy evidence of Holocene climate variability from estuarine sediments, eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Thunell, R.; Dwyer, G.S.; Saenger, C.; Mann, M.E.; Vann, C.; Seal, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    We reconstructed paleoclimate patterns from oxygen and carbon isotope records from the fossil estuarine benthic foraminifera Elphidium and Mg/ Ca ratios from the ostracode Loxoconcha from sediment cores from Chesapeake Bay to examine the Holocene evolution of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)-type climate variability. Precipitation-driven river discharge and regional temperature variability are the primary influences on Chesapeake Bay salinity and water temperature, respectively. We first calibrated modern ??18 Owater to salinity and applied this relationship to calculate trends in paleosalinity from the ??18 Oforam, correcting for changes in water temperature estimated from ostracode Mg /Ca ratios. The results indicate a much drier early Holocene in which mean paleosalinity was ???28 ppt in the northern bay, falling ???25% to ???20 ppt during the late Holocene. Early Holocene Mg/Ca-derived temperatures varied in a relatively narrow range of 13?? to 16??C with a mean temperature of 14.2??C and excursions above 16??C; the late Holocene was on average cooler (mean temperature of 12.8??C). In addition to the large contrast between early and late Holocene regional climate conditions, multidecadal (20-40 years) salinity and temperature variability is an inherent part of the region's climate during both the early and late Holocene, including the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age. These patterns are similar to those observed during the twentieth century caused by NAO-related processes. Comparison of the midlatitude Chesapeake Bay salinity record with tropical climate records of Intertropical Convergence Zone fluctuations inferred from the Cariaco Basin titanium record suggests an anticorrelation between precipitation in the two regions at both millennial and centennial timescales. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Isotopic distribution of carbon from sewage sludge and eutrophication in the sediments and food web of estuarine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Gearing, P.J.; Gearing, J.N.; Maughan, J.T.; Oviatt, C.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Stable isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C) from samples of water, sediments, and biota traced the behavior of organic carbon for 3 summer months in estuarine mesocosms (three controls, three with added sewage sludge, three with added inorganic nutrients). Isotope ratios proved to be a useful quantitative tracer for sewage carbon as well as for the fresh phytoplanktonic carbon produced during nutrient fertilization. Sewage sludge sedimented within hours of its addition, and approximately 50% remained in sediments after 99 days. The sludge was not inert, but was biologically oxidized at rates similar to those of phytoplankton carbon. Its residence time in the water column was too short for uptake by zooplankton, but it was readily assimilated by some benthic organisms. Fresh phytoplanktonic carbon from nutrient-induced blooms was isotopically heavy and thus distinguishable from old primary production (fixed before the experiment). It flowed through the pelagic and benthic food webs more extensively and more uniformly than did sludge carbon.

  10. RESPONSE OF GHOST SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS) BIOTURBATION TO ORGANIC MATTER ENRICHMENT OF ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Populations of burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia p;ugettensis) are the dominant invertebrate fauna on Pacific estuarine tide flats, occupying >80% of intertidal area in some estuaries. Burrowing shrimp are renowned for their bioturbation of intertidal sedi...

  11. Survival of Desulfotomaculum spores from estuarine sediments after serial autoclaving and high-temperature exposure

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Louise A; Roussel, Erwan G; Weightman, Andrew J; Webster, Gordon; Hubert, Casey RJ; Bell, Emma; Head, Ian; Sass, Henrik; Parkes, R John

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spores are widespread in marine sediments, including those of thermophilic, sulphate-reducing bacteria, which have a high minimum growth temperature making it unlikely that they grow in situ. These Desulfotomaculum spp. are thought to be from hot environments and are distributed by ocean currents. Their cells and spores upper temperature limit for survival is unknown, as is whether they can survive repeated high-temperature exposure that might occur in hydrothermal systems. This was investigated by incubating estuarine sediments significantly above (40–80 °C) maximum in situ temperatures (∼23 °C), and with and without prior triple autoclaving. Sulphate reduction occurred at 40–60 °C and at 60 °C was unaffected by autoclaving. Desulfotomaculum sp. C1A60 was isolated and was most closely related to the thermophilic D. kuznetsoviiT (∼96% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). Cultures of Desulfotomaculum sp. C1A60, D. kuznetsoviiTand D. geothermicum B2T survived triple autoclaving while other related Desulfotomaculum spp. did not, although they did survive pasteurisation. Desulfotomaculum sp. C1A60 and D. kuznetsovii cultures also survived more extreme autoclaving (C1A60, 130 °C for 15 min; D. kuznetsovii, 135 °C for 15 min, maximum of 154 °C reached) and high-temperature conditions in an oil bath (C1A60, 130° for 30 min, D. kuznetsovii 140 °C for 15 min). Desulfotomaculum sp. C1A60 with either spores or predominantly vegetative cells demonstrated that surviving triple autoclaving was due to spores. Spores also had very high culturability compared with vegetative cells (∼30 × higher). Combined extreme temperature survival and high culturability of some thermophilic Desulfotomaculum spp. make them very effective colonisers of hot environments, which is consistent with their presence in subsurface geothermal waters and petroleum reservoirs. PMID:25325382

  12. Vertical geochemical distribution of some contaminants in estuarine sediments from the Jaboatão River, Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marta; Neumann, Virgínio; Castro, Maria Teresa; Lima, Enjôlras; Lima, Edmilson; Silva, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Sediment core samples with length ranging from 50 cm was collected in the Jaboatão river estuary and analyzed to ( As, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni and Zn) level concentrations using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The studied area is located in the northeastern coast of Pernambuco State and is comprised of a densely urbanized region, the largest industrial complex of the state, with a predominance of fertilizer plants. These elements have a consistent vertical evolution compatible with the increase of the pelitic-organic material. There is an increase from bottom to top of the core but this may not represent a real increase in the input, but rather a concentration associated to the fine particle fraction and organic matter that increases to the top of the core profile. These conditions of clay predominance in estuarine sediments on the top indicate a decrease of the energy condition in the system and not necessarily an increase in the supply of contaminating metals. The majority of the chemical species, the concentration did not reach toxicity levels, when considering the values (ERL and ERM) established by USEPA (1998). The only exception is Cr, which has already surpassed the ERM value, and suggests that this increase is related to industrial contribution. Chromium concentration reached preliminary alert levels according to international environmental agencies, whereas the other species analyzed do not show toxicity. Key-words: environmental geochemistry, estuarine sediments

  13. Estuarine bed-sediment-quality data collected in New Jersey and New York after Hurricane Sandy, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.; Loftin, Keith A.; Benzel, William M.; Jones, Daniel K.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Jenkins, Darkus E.; Bowers, Luke; Boehlke, Adam; Foreman, William T.; Deetz, Anna C.; Carper, Lisa G.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-sediment samples were collected from June to October 2013 from 167 estuarine sites extending from Cape May, New Jersey, to the New York Harbor and the eastern end of Long Island. Each sampling location and study region was characterized by using geographic information to identify potential contaminant sources. Characterizations included land cover, locations and types of businesses (industrial, financial, and others), spills (sewage, chemical, and others), bulk storage facilities, effluent discharges within 2 kilometers of the sampling point, and discharges within inundated and non-inundated regions near the sampling location. Samples were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon, metals and trace elements, semivolatile organic compounds, wastewater compounds, hormones, and sediment toxicity. Samples were also screened using x-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In addition, bioassays for endocrine disruptors and protein phosphatase 2A inhibition were conducted. The study was designed to provide the data needed to understand the extent and sources of contamination resulting from Hurricane Sandy, to compare the chemistry and toxicity of estuarine bed sediments before and after the storm, and to evaluate the usefulness of rapid screening and bioassay approaches in disaster settings.

  14. Effects of sulfamethazine on denitrification and the associated N2O release in estuarine and coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lijun; Yin, Guoyu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junliang; Zheng, Yanling; Gao, Juan; Zong, Haibo; Yang, Yi; Gao, Lei; Tong, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway of nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) production in estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and plays a significant role in counteracting aquatic eutrophication induced by excessive nitrogen loads. Estuarine and coastal environments also suffer from increasing antibiotic contamination because of the growing production and usage of antibiotics. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were conducted to determine the influence of sulfamethazine (SMT, a sulphonamide antibiotic) on denitrification and the associated N2O production. Genes important for denitrification and antibiotic resistance were quantified to investigate the microbial physiological mechanisms underlying SMT's effects on denitrification. SMT was observed to significantly inhibit denitrification rates, but increasing concentrations of SMT enhanced N2O release rates. The negative exponential relationships between denitrifying gene abundances and SMT concentrations showed that SMT reduced denitrification rates by restricting the growth of denitrifying bacteria, although the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene was detected during the incubation period. These results imply that the wide occurrence of residual antibiotics in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may influence eutrophication control, greenhouse effects, and atmospheric ozone depletion by inhibiting denitrification and stimulating the release of N2O. PMID:25525860

  15. Sudden Clearing of Estuarine Waters upon Crossing the Threshold from Transport to Supply Regulation of Sediment Transport as an Erodible Sediment Pool is Depleted: San Francisco Bay, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity of suspended sediment in an estuary is regulated either by transport, where energy or time needed to suspend sediment is limiting, or by supply, where the quantity of erodible sediment is limiting. This paper presents a hypothesis that suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in estuaries can suddenly decrease when the threshold from transport to supply regulation is crossed as an erodible sediment pool is depleted. This study was motivated by a statistically significant 36% step decrease in SSC in San Francisco Bay from water years 1991-1998 to 1999-2007. A quantitative conceptual model of an estuary with an erodible sediment pool and transport or supply regulation of sediment transport is developed. Model results confirm that, if the regulation threshold was crossed in 1999, SSC would decrease rapidly after water year 1999 as observed. Estuaries with a similar history of a depositional sediment pulse followed by erosion may experience sudden clearing. ?? 2011 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation (outside the USA).

  16. Separating natural and contaminant related gradients in estuarine macrobenthic community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rakocinski, C.; Heard, R.; Walker, W.; Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Summers, J.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using whole-community macrobenthic responses to assess pollution impacts in estuaries presents a difficult challenge due to dynamic natural conditions that may impose their own physical limitations on the biota. For example, the recognition of bioindicator taxa becomes confounded when correlations exist between gradients in natural environmental variables, such as salinity, and gradients in contaminants, such as trace metals. The authors used partial Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) to separate natural and contaminant related gradients in macrobenthic community structure across 319 EMAP sites dispersed throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. Residual variation in macrobenthic community structure was examined with respect to gradients in contaminant levels to identify responses by positive and negative bioindicator taxa. Gradients in concentrations of trace metals do not coincide completely with those in other chemical contaminants, and responses by characteristic bioindicator taxa reveal information regarding effects of specific contaminants. Several indigenous taxa serve as good negative bioindicators, whereas other opportunistic taxa serve as positive bioindicators of estuarine contamination.

  17. Measuring hypoxia induced metal release from highly contaminated estuarine sediments during a 40 day laboratory incubation experiment.

    PubMed

    Banks, Joanne L; Ross, D Jeff; Keough, Michael J; Eyre, Bradley D; Macleod, Catriona K

    2012-03-15

    Nutrient inputs to estuarine and coastal waters worldwide are increasing and this in turn is increasing the prevalence of eutrophication and hypoxic and anoxic episodes in these systems. Many urbanised estuaries are also subject to high levels of anthropogenic metal contamination. Environmental O(2) levels may influence whether sediments act as sinks or sources of metals. In this study we investigated the effect of an extended O(2) depletion event (40 days) on fluxes of trace metals (and the metalloid As) across the sediment-water interface in sediments from a highly metal contaminated estuary in S.E. Tasmania, Australia. We collected sediments from three sites that spanned a range of contamination and measured total metal concentration in the overlying water using sealed core incubations. Manganese and iron, which are known to regulate the release of other divalent cations from sub-oxic sediments, were released from sediments at all sites as hypoxia developed. In contrast, the release of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc was comparatively low, most likely due to inherent stability of these elements within the sediments, perhaps as a result of their refractory origin, their association with fine-grained sediments or their being bound in stable sulphide complexes. Metal release was not sustained due to the powerful effect of metal-sulphide precipitation of dissolved metals back into sediments. The limited mobilisation of sediment bound metals during hypoxia is encouraging, nevertheless the results highlight particular problems for management in areas where hypoxia might occur, such as the release of metals exacerbating already high loads or resulting in localised toxicity. PMID:22321900

  18. Metabolism of Reduced Methylated Sulfur Compounds in Anaerobic Sediments and by a Pure Culture of an Estuarine Methanogen †

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Ronald P.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Catena, Anthony; Miller, Laurence G.; Capone, Douglas G.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), or methane thiol (MSH) to a diversity of anoxic aquatic sediments (e.g., fresh water, estuarine, alkaline/hypersaline) stimulated methane production. The yield of methane recovered from DMS was often 52 to 63%, although high concentrations of DMS (as well as MSH and DMDS) inhibited methanogenesis in some types of sediments. Production of methane from these reduced methylated sulfur compounds was blocked by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Sulfate did not influence the metabolism of millimolar levels of DMS, DMDS, or MSH added to sediments. However, when DMS was added at ∼2-μM levels as [14C]DMS, metabolism by sediments resulted in a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of only 0.06. Addition of molybdate increased the ratio to 1.8, while 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid decreased it to 0, but did not block 14CO2 production. These results indicate the methanogens and sulfate reducers compete for DMS when it is present at low concentrations; however, at high concentrations, DMS is a “noncompetitive” substrate for methanogens. Metabolism of DMS by sediments resulted in the appearance of MSH as a transient intermediate. A pure culture of an obligately methylotrophic estuarine methanogen was isolated which was capable of growth on DMS. Metabolism of DMS by the culture also resulted in the transient appearance of MSH, but the organism could grow on neither MSH nor DMDS. The culture metabolized [14C]-DMS to yield a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of ∼2.8. Reduced methylated sulfur compounds represent a new class of substrates for methanogens and may be potential precursors of methane in a variety of aquatic habitats. PMID:16347202

  19. Metabolism of reduced methylated sulfur compounds in anaerobic sediments and by a pure culture of an estuarine methanogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiene, R.P.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Catena, Anthony; Miller, Laurence G.; Capone, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), or methane thiol (MSH) to a diversity of anoxic aquatic sediments (e.g., fresh water, estuarine, alkaline/hypersaline) stimulated methane production. The yield of methane recovered from DMS was often 52 to 63%, although high concentrations of DMS (as well as MSH and DMDS) inhibited methanogenesis in some types of sediments. Production of methane from these reduced methylated sulfur compounds was blocked by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Sulfate did not influence the metabolism of millimolar levels of DMS, DMDS, or MSH added to sediments. However, when DMS was added at ∼2-μM levels as [14C]DMS, metabolism by sediments resulted in a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of only 0.06. Addition of molybdate increased the ratio to 1.8, while 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid decreased it to 0, but did not block 14CO2 production. These results indicate the methanogens and sulfate reducers compete for DMS when it is present at low concentrations; however, at high concentrations, DMS is a “noncompetitive” substrate for methanogens. Metabolism of DMS by sediments resulted in the appearance of MSH as a transient intermediate. A pure culture of an obligately methylotrophic estuarine methanogen was isolated which was capable of growth on DMS. Metabolism of DMS by the culture also resulted in the transient appearance of MSH, but the organism could grow on neither MSH nor DMDS. The culture metabolized [14C]-DMS to yield a 14CH4/14CO2 ratio of ∼2.8. Reduced methylated sulfur compounds represent a new class of substrates for methanogens and may be potential precursors of methane in a variety of aquatic habitats.

  20. Stratified active archaeal communities in the sediments of Jiulong River estuary, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianqian; Wang, Fengping; Chen, Zhiwei; Yin, Xijie; Xiao, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Here the composition of total and active archaeal communities in a sediment core of Jiulong River estuary at Fujian Province, Southern China was reported. Profiles of CH4 and SO2−4 concentrations from the sediment core indicated the existence of a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) in which sulfate reduction-coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs. Accordingly, three sediment layers (16–18.5 cm, 71–73.5 cm, and 161–163.5 cm) from the 1.2 m sediment core were sectioned and named top, middle and bottom, respectively. Total DNA and RNA of each layer were extracted and used for clone libraries and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, the reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products of 16S rRNA and methyl CoM reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that archaeal communities of the three layers were dominated by the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG) whose ecological functions were still unknown. The MCG could be further divided into seven subgroups, named MCG-A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. MCG-A and MCG-G were the most active groups in the estuarine sediments. Known anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANMEs) were only found as minor components in these estuarine archaeal communities. This study, together with the studies of deep subsurface sediments, would be a very good start point to target and compare the specific active archaeal groups and their roles in the dark, deep subsurface sediment environments. PMID:22969752

  1. Size-selective toxicity effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on estuarine phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Kline, Allison; Pinckney, James L

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on natural estuarine phytoplankton communities. Bioassays were used in experimental treatments with final concentrations of 5 to 1000 μg tylosin l(-1). Maximum percent inhibition ranged from 57 to 85% at concentrations of 200-400 μg tylosin l(-1). Half maximum inhibition concentrations of tylosin were ca. 5x lower for small phytoplankton (<20 μm) relative to larger phytoplankton (>20 μm) and suggests that small phytoplankton are more sensitive to tylosin exposure. Sublethal effects occurred at concentrations as low as 5 μg tylosin l(-1). Environmental concentrations of tylosin (e.g., 0.2-3 μg l(-1)) may have a significant sublethal effect that alters the size structure and composition of phytoplankton communities. The results of this study highlight the potential importance of cell size on toxicity responses of estuarine phytoplankton. PMID:27376985

  2. Aeration effects on the partitioning of a PCB to anoxic estuarine sediment pore water dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, J.A.; Gabelich, C.J.; Lin, C.H.; Suffet, I.H.

    1999-05-01

    Pore water dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the distribution, mobility, and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in sediment environments. The effect of aeration on the partitioning of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TeCB) to anoxic pore water DOM from three estuarine sites was investigated. Pore water DOM was fractionated into molecular size and polarity fractions by ultrafiltration and XAD-8 resin chromatography. Total organic carbon analysis was utilized to determine shifts in molecular size and polarity distributions. Changes in functional groups and aromaticity were evaluated for whole and fractionated pore waters by specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA{sub 254}). The solubility enhancement method was used to determine the partitioning of TeCB to whole and fractionated pore water DOM. At two sites, the overall TeCB-DOM distribution coefficient decreased by an order of magnitude after aeration. The higher molecular size and all polarity fractions exhibited a decrease in partitioning behavior upon aeration. The aromaticity and TeCB-DOM distribution coefficient of the lowest molecular size fraction decreased upon aeration. The highest and lowest molecular size fractions contributed the most to overall partitioning. The observed aeration effects in anoxic estuarine sediment pore waters differed significantly from those previously reported in freshwater systems.

  3. Speciation and Fate of Trace Metals in Estuarine Sediments Under Reduced and Oxidized Conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S A; Day, P A; Esser, B; Randall, S

    2002-10-18

    We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ) or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc) as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm) from a 60-year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975) as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60-year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxy)hydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted ZnS were

  4. Trace element concentrations in surface estuarine and marine sediments along the Mississippi Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Warren, Crystal; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan S; Weston, James; Willett, Kristine L

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes are relatively frequent ecological disturbances that may cause potentially long-term impacts to the coastal environment. Hurricane Katrina hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 2005, and caused a storm surge with the potential to change the trace element content of coastal surface sediments. In this study, surface estuarine and marine sediments were collected monthly following the storm from ten sites along the Mississippi Gulf Coast (Mobile Bay, Grand Bay Bayous Heron and Cumbest, Pascagoula, Ocean Springs, Biloxi Gulf, Back Biloxi Bay, Gulfport Gulf, Gulfport Courthouse Rd, and Gulfport Marina). Concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to evaluate their temporal and spatial variations in the year following Hurricane Katrina. Sediments were characterized by pH, particle size distribution and total carbon and nitrogen content. Trace element contents of the sediments were determined in both <2 mm and <63 μm grain size fractions. Results revealed no significant temporal and spatial variability in trace element concentrations, in either size fraction. Potential ecological risk of the sediments was assessed by using NOAA SQuiRTs' guideline values; most concentrations remained below probable adverse effects guidelines to marine organisms suggesting that trace elements redistributed by Hurricane Katrina would not cause an adverse impact on resident organisms. Instead, the concentrations of trace elements were site-dependent, with specific contaminants relating to the use of the area prior to Hurricane Katrina. PMID:21494829

  5. PAHs in surface sediments from coastal and estuarine areas of the northern Bohai and Yellow Seas, China.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wentao; Wang, Tieyu; Khim, Jong Seong; Luo, Wei; Hu, Wenyou; Naile, Jonathan E; Giesy, John P; Lu, Yonglong

    2012-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations and their risks in surface sediments (n = 35) collected from coastal and estuarine areas of the northern Bohai and Yellow Seas, China, were investigated in 2008. Total concentrations of PAHs ranged from 52.3 to 1,870.6 ng/g dry weight. The greatest concentrations were observed in the Dou River of Tangshan where waste water from small factories is discharged into the river without treatment. At other locations, municipal sewage was the primary contributor of PAHs. Regional differences in concentrations of PAHs in sediments are related to human activities. Concentrations of PAHs were significantly correlated with concentrations of organic carbon in sediments. The patterns of relative concentrations and types of PAHs observed and knowledge of the potential sources, as well as the results of a principal component analysis, are consistent with the primary sources of PAHs in sediments of the northern Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea, being derived from the high-temperature pyrolytic processes such as combustion of fossil fuel. While concentrations of PAHs at most locations did not exceed the effects range median stated by the numerical effect-based sediment quality guidelines of the United States, concentrations of PAHs at some locations were similar to or greater than the effects range low. PMID:22203243

  6. Exudation of organic acids by a marsh plant and implications on trace metal availability in the rhizosphere of estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work was to identify a variety of low molecular weight organic acids exuded by the sea rush Juncus maritimus collected at two locations with different sediment characteristics (sandy and muddy) and to examine whether specific differences in physico-chemical sediment characteristics influenced plant exudation. Just after collection, plant roots were rinsed and put in contact with deionised water for 2 h. In the obtained solution the organic acids, exuded by the plants, were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Juncus maritimus was shown to be capable of releasing malonate and oxalate. Sediments and rhizosediments (sediment in contact with the plant roots and rhizomes, corresponding to the area of higher belowground biomass) from the areas where the plants had been collected were characterised in terms of physical and chemical composition, including acid volatile sulphide and total-recoverable metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cd). It was found that the extent of exudation varied markedly between sites. The identified organic acids were used as extractants of metals from sediments and rhizosediments and the results were compared with those provided by a very commonly used sequential extraction approach, which was carried out in parallel. This work demonstrates that J. maritimus can release organic compounds that can act as complexing agents of trace metal and therefore organic exudates should be accounted for when dealing with estuarine environment quality.

  7. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquanscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. S...

  8. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran residues in estuarine and coastal North Sea sediments: Sources and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Evers, E.H.G.; Klamer, H.J.C.; Laane, R.W.P.M. . Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management); Govers, H.A.J. . Dept. of Environmental and Toxicological Chemistry)

    1993-09-01

    Sediments from two depositional zones of the North Sea (the Wadden Sea and Oyster Grounds) and from the estuaries of the rivers Rhine, Meuse, Scheldt, Ems, and Humber were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) using a congener-specific procedure. A simple grain-size correction procedure was utilized for the comparison of PCDF and PCDD concentrations in sediments from different origin. PCDFs were more widely encountered than PCDDs in all sediments, except for the Ems-Dollard and the Humber estuary. The highest concentrations were found in the outflow sediments of the rivers Rhine and Humber. Concentrations up to 2,980 ng/kg PCDFs, principally 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF and OCDF, and up to 1,760 ng/kg PCDDs, principally OCDD, were determined in the River Rhine sediments. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the compositional changes of Rhine sediments. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the compositional changes of PCDD and PCDF profiles in the sediments. Two-dimensional projections based on sample scores from the principal component models showed a marked influence of the River Rhine on the presence of these compounds in the western Wadden Sea and the Oyster Grounds. Based on a chemometric evaluation of chromatographic profiles of these coastal, estuarine and related freshwater sediments, the authors have deduced that these compounds originate from industrial operation discharges, related to the production of chloroaliphatic compounds and the chloralkali compounds and the chloralkali industry along the River Rhine. The atmospheric deposition of combustion-generated PCDDs and PCDFs appeared significant only for remote marine environments.

  9. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Pedro M.; Neuparth, Teresa S.; Caeiro, Sandra; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Angel DelValls, T.

    2011-01-15

    Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with sediment

  10. Nematode communities in contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Peter; Höss, Sebastian; Claus, Evelyn; Pelzer, Jürgen; Traunspurger, Walter

    2007-03-01

    Nematode communities of eight sites from three river catchments were investigated in terms of the genera composition, feeding types, and life-history strategists. The sampling sites showed a gradient of anthropogenic contamination with heavy metals and organic pollutants being important factors in differentiating the sites. Nematode community structure was related to sediment pollution and the hydro-morphological structure of the sampling sites. Heavily contaminated sites were characterized by communities with high relative abundances of omnivorous and predacious nematodes (Tobrilus, c-p 3; Mononchus, c-p 4), while sites with low to medium contamination were dominated by bacterivorous nematodes (Monhystera, Daptonema; c-p 2) or suction feeders (Dorylaimus, c-p 4). The relatively high Maturity Index values in the heavily polluted sites were surprising. Nematodes turned out to be a suitable organism group for monitoring sediment quality, with generic composition being the most accurate indicator for assessing differences in nematode community structure. PMID:16905227

  11. Method for enumeration of 5-cyano-2,3-ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC)-active cells and cell-specific CTC activity of benthic bacteria in riverine, estuarine and coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Proctor, L M; Souza, A C

    2001-01-01

    Bacteria are the most abundant and active organisms in marine sediments and are critical for nutrient cycling and as a food source to many benthic and pelagic organisms. Bacteria are found both as free-living cells and as particle-associated cells, which can make investigations of these communities difficult. We found that common procedures for extracting bacteria from sediments leave the bacteria clay particle-associated and the clay particles clump, which reduce the reproducibility of direct counts. We optimized a sonication/surfactant method that produces a homogeneous suspension of bacterial cells against a uniform background of clay particles, which results in reproducible samples for epifluorescence microscopy. We developed a method to estimate CTC-positive cells and cell-specific CTC content in intact cores of surficial sediment communities from riverine, estuarine and coastal sites. Benthic bacterial abundances averaged 4.9x10(8) cells/g dry wt sediments in Apalachicola River, Florida sediments, 4.9-13.8x10(9) cells/g dry wt sediments in a variety of Apalachicola Bay sediments and 3.6x10(8) cells/g dry weight in shallow, anoxic Gulf of Mexico sediments. Percent CTC-positive cells ranged from low values of 9-10% CTC-positive cells in Apalachicola River and Apalachicola Bay sediments to high values of 25% CTC-positive cells in anoxic Gulf of Mexico sediments. After correction for abiotic CTC reduction and chlorophyll interference, estimates of cell-specific CTC reduction ranged from 0.15 to 0.55 fmol CTC(red)/active cell in the Apalachicola Bay sediments to 1.6 to 3.8 fmol CTC(red)/active cell in anoxic Gulf of Mexico sediments. PMID:11118655

  12. N 2O accumulation in estuarine and coastal sediments: The influence of H 2S on dissimilatory nitrate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senga, Yukiko; Mochida, Kazuo; Fukumori, Ryouko; Okamoto, Norihisa; Seike, Yasushi

    2006-03-01

    The effects of H 2S on the production and accumulation of N 2O in surface sediments of the coastal lagoons of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi were studied using sediment suspensions and isolated strains of halophilic N 2O producers. Denitrification and N 2O accumulation were determined by anaerobic incubations with and without C 2H 2, respectively. Denitrifying activities in the sediment suspensions of both lakes decreased markedly at an H 2S concentration of 3 mg S l -1, whereas N 2O accumulations in the sediment suspensions of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi were highest at 75-100 mg S l -1 and 15-50 mg S l -1 H 2S, respectively. In addition, H 2S had marked inhibiting (about 30 h) and retarding effects on N 2O reduction in the suspensions of both lakes. Two strains of halophilic N 2O producers were isolated from the sediment of Lake Shinji ( Aeromonas sp. and Vibrio sp.). N 2O accumulation rates by Aeromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. were accelerated at 1-5 mg S l -1 and 1-10 mg S l -1 H 2S, respectively. Patterns of inorganic nitrogen compounds after the incubations revealed the accumulation of NH 4+ and NO 2-, with concomitant N 2O, were accelerated by H 2S. These results indicate that H 2S plays a key role in regulation of N 2O accumulation in the eutrophic estuarine or coastal sediments. Furthermore, the accumulation of N 2O in the sediments of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi is predicted to derive through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) not only denitrification in the presence of H 2S.

  13. An integrative assessment to determine the genotoxic hazard of estuarine sediments: combining cell and whole-organism responses

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro M.; Pinto, Miguel; Vicente, Ana M.; Gonçalves, Cátia; Rodrigo, Ana P.; Louro, Henriqueta; Costa, Maria H.; Caeiro, Sandra; Silva, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the Comet assay in environmental monitoring remains challenging in face of the complexity of environmental stressors, e.g., when dealing with estuarine sediments, that hampers the drawing of cause-effect relationships. Although the in vitro Comet assay may circumvent confounding factors, its application in environmental risk assessment (ERA) still needs validation. As such, the present work aims at integrating genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage induced by sediment-bound toxicants in HepG2 cells with oxidative stress-related effects observed in three species collected from an impacted estuary. Distinct patterns were observed in cells exposed to crude mixtures of sediment contaminants from the urban/industrial area comparatively to the ones from the rural/riverine area of the estuary, with respect to oxidative DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage. The extracts obtained with the most polar solvent and the crude extracts caused the most significant oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells, as measured by the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified Comet assay. This observation suggests that metals and unknown toxicants more hydrophilic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may be important causative agents, especially in samples from the rural part of the estuary, where oxidative DNA damage was the most significant. Clams, sole, and cuttlefish responded differentially to environmental agents triggering oxidative stress, albeit yielding results accordant with the oxidative DNA damage observed in HepG2 cells. Overall, the integration of in vivo biomarker responses and Comet assay data in HepG2 cells yielded a comparable pattern, indicating that the in vitro FPG-modified Comet assay may be an effective and complementary line-of-evidence in ERA even in particularly challenging, natural, scenarios such as estuarine environments. PMID:25540652

  14. Assessment of benthic flux of dissolved organic carbon in wetland and estuarine sediments using the eddy-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swett, M. P.; Amirbahman, A.; Boss, E.

    2009-12-01

    Wetland and estuarine sediments release significant amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) due to high levels of microbial activity, particularly sulfate reduction. Changes in climate and hydrologic conditions have a potential to alter DOC release from these systems as well. This is a concern, as high levels of DOC can lead to mobilization of toxic metals and organics in natural waters. In addition, source waters high in DOC produce undesirable disinfection byproducts in water treatment. Various in situ methods, such as peepers and sediment core centrifugation, exist to quantify vertical benthic fluxes of DOC and other dissolved species from the sediment-water interface (SWI). These techniques, however, are intrusive and involve disturbance of the sediment environment. Eddy-correlation allows for real-time, non-intrusive, in situ flux measurement of important analytes, such as O2 and DOC. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is used to obtain three-dimensional fluid velocity measurements. The eddy-correlation technique employs the mathematical separation of fluid velocity into mean velocity and fluctuating velocity components, with the latter representing turbulent eddy velocity. DOC concentrations are measured using a colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorometer, and instantaneous vertical flux is determined from the correlated data. This study assesses DOC flux at three project sites: a beaver pond in the Lower Penobscot Watershed, Maine; a mudflat in Penobscot River, Maine; and a mudflat in Great Bay, New Hampshire. Eddy flux values are compared with results obtained using peepers and centrifugation, as well as vertical profiling.

  15. Evaluation of Reduced Sediment Volume Procedures for Acute Toxicity Tests Using the Estuarine Amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume of sediment required to perform a sediment toxicity bioassay is a major driver of the overall cost associated with that bioassay. Sediment volume affects bioassay cost due to sediment collection, transportation, storage, and disposal costs as well as labor costs assoc...

  16. Ecology of estuarine channels of the Pacific Northwest coast: a community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Simenstad, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    This report on the estuarine channel habitats of the Pacific Northwest is one of a series of community profiles that synthesize useful information about specific natural coastal habitats. This profile will assist environmental scientists and biologists and coastal planners and managers who are interested in the open-water channels of coastal estuaries from the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington, south to Cape Mendocino, California. The profile describes the geomorphological, hydrological, chemical, and biological components and natural processes of the channels, their energy interchange, and interactions among adjacent habitats. In combination these habitat components and their interactions dictate the ecological structures and functions of the channels. The subject materials of the various chapters are integrated and summarized in the last chapter, and considerations for habitat management are identified. 523 references, 31 figures, 13 tables.

  17. Multi Length Scale Imaging of Flocculated Estuarine Sediments; Insights into their Complex 3D Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Droppo, Ian; Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Suspended estuarine sediments form flocs that are compositionally complex, fragile and irregularly shaped. The fate and transport of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is determined by the size, shape, density, porosity and stability of these flocs and prediction of SPM transport requires accurate measurements of these three-dimensional (3D) physical properties. However, the multi-scaled nature of flocs in addition to their fragility makes their characterisation in 3D problematic. Correlative microscopy is a strategy involving the spatial registration of information collected at different scales using several imaging modalities. Previously, conventional optical microscopy (COM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled 2-dimensional (2D) floc characterisation at the gross (> 1 µm) and sub-micron scales respectively. Whilst this has proven insightful there remains a critical spatial and dimensional gap preventing the accurate measurement of geometric properties and an understanding of how structures at different scales are related. Within life sciences volumetric imaging techniques such as 3D micro-computed tomography (3D µCT) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy [FIB-SEM (or FIB-tomography)] have been combined to characterise materials at the centimetre to micron scale. Combining these techniques with TEM enables an advanced correlative study, allowing material properties across multiple spatial and dimensional scales to be visualised. The aims of this study are; 1) to formulate an advanced correlative imaging strategy combining 3D µCT, FIB-tomography and TEM; 2) to acquire 3D datasets; 3) to produce a model allowing their co-visualisation; 4) to interpret 3D floc structure. To reduce the chance of structural alterations during analysis samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before being embedding in Durcupan resin. Intermediate steps were implemented to improve contrast and remove pore water, achieved by the

  18. Can Human-made Saltpans Represent an Alternative Habitat for Shorebirds? Implications for a Predictable Loss of Estuarine Sediment Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Maria P.; Lecoq, Miguel; Moniz, Filipe; Rabaça, João E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine areas worldwide are under intense pressure due to human activities such as upstream dam building. Shorebirds strongly depend on estuarine intertidal flats during migration and wintering periods and so are particularly vulnerable to such impacts, whose magnitude will depend on the availability of alternative feeding habitats. In this study we analyze if man-made saltpans can represent an alternative habitat for wintering and migrating shorebirds in the Guadiana estuary, a wetland that is already experiencing environmental changes due to the building of the Alqueva reservoir, the largest in Western Europe. We compared the use of mudflats and saltpans as feeding areas by several shorebird species before the construction of the dam. A dataset with 26 years of counts data was also analyzed in order to detect any long-term trend in shorebirds abundance. We concluded that saltpans, in particular the fully mechanized, can be used as an alternative habitat by larger species during winter and southward migration, thus playing a major role in minimizing the possible effects of sediment loss due to dam building. In contrast, smaller species were particularly dependent on mudflats to feed. A significant change in population trends, from positive to negative, was detected for two species. Although we still have no evidence that this is directly linked to dam building, this result and documented changes that limit primary productivity justifies the implementation of a long-term monitoring scheme of shorebird populations in this estuary. We also reinforce the need to manage the saltpans as key habitats for shorebirds.

  19. Variability of metal contents in the sea rush Juncus maritimus-estuarine sediment system through one year of plant's life.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana P; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2006-05-01

    Metal accumulation by Juncus maritimus and the effect this plant might have on the physico-chemical composition of sediments, from Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were investigated through one year of plant's life. The contents of Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined (by atomic absorption spectrophotometry) in sediments, rhizosediments (those among plant roots and rhizomes) and different tissues of J. maritimus. Two estuarine sites with different characteristics were studied, one a sandy sediment with relatively low organic matter content, the other a muddy site. The role of the plant seemed to be markedly dependent on the sediment composition. At the sandy site, significant variations throughout the year (a decrease from winter to summer and an increase in autumn) either in rhizosediment and sediment or in J. maritimus roots were only observed in Cd and Cu levels. These variations were the same in both compartments, probably caused by tidal water movements and the activity of the plant. At the muddy site, variations throughout the year were observed for all studied elements but Pb. Changes in the Cd and Zn contents of roots were opposite to those in the rhizosediment (uptake of Cd and Zn by J. maritimus roots in summer may have caused a decrease in rhizosediment levels). Fe and Mn showed similar patterns of variation in both roots and rhizosediment (contents significantly increasing in summer). Higher contents of Fe and Mn in roots in summer could be related to changes in mass, higher availability of the elements, or accumulation at the surface of the root in (hydr)oxides forms. For the remaining elements no significant correlations between rhizosediment and roots variations were observed, indicating that their uptake and release by roots were not based on single exchanges with the sediment. J. maritimus showed capacity to accumulate Cu, Zn and particularly Cd, thus appearing to be useful for the phytostabilization of these metals. PMID

  20. Effects of thiamphenicol on nitrate reduction and N2O release in estuarine and coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoyu; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate overload is an important driver of water pollution in most estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and thus nitrate reduction processes have attracted considerable attention. Antibiotics contamination is also an emerging environmental problem in estuarine and coastal regions as a result of growing production and usage of antibiotics. However, the effects of antibiotics on nitrate reduction remain unclear in these aquatic ecosystems. In this study, continuous-flow experiments were conducted to examine the effects of thiamphenicol (TAP, a common chloramphenicol antibiotic) on nitrate reduction and greenhouse gas N2O release. Functional genes involved in nitrogen transformation were also quantified to explore the microbial mechanisms of the TAP influence. Production of N2 were observed to be inhibited by TAP treatment, which implied the inhibition effect of TAP on nitrate reduction processes. As intermediate products of nitrogen transformation processes, nitrite and N2O were observed to accumulate during the incubation. Different TAP inhibition effects on related functional genes may be the microbial mechanism for the changes of nutrient fluxes, N2 fluxes and N2O release rates. These results indicate that the antibiotics residues in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may contribute to nitrate retention and N2O release, which could be a major factor responsible for eutrophication and greenhouse effects. PMID:27105162

  1. Suspended sediment concentration mapping based on the MODIS satellite imagery in the East China inland, estuarine, and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianping; Sokoletsky, Leonid; Wei, Xiaodao; Shen, Fang

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the retrieval accuracy for the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from in situ and satellite remote sensing measurements in turbid East China estuarine and coastal waters. For this aim, three important tasks are formulated and solved: 1) an estimation of remote-sensing reflectance spectra R rs(λ) after atmospheric correction; 2) an estimation of R rs(λ) from the radiometric signals above the air-water surface; and 3) an estimation of SSC from R rs(λ). Six different models for radiometric R rs(λ) determination and 28 models for SSC versus R rs(λ) are analyzed based on the field observations made in the Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent coastal area. The SSC images based on the above-mentioned analysis are generated for the area.

  2. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. PMID:16002194

  3. Cadmium dynamics in estuarine sediments: Effects of salinity and lugworm bioturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, A.D.; Banta, G.T.; Andersen, O.

    2000-02-01

    The authors investigated the effects of lugworm bioturbation on the fate of Cd added either to a thin layer at the sediment surface or homogeneously mixed throughout the sediment. In both situations, the Cd release to the overlying water was highest when lugworms were not present, most likely because bioturbation transported Cd-contaminated sediment away from the sediment surface. Also, irrigation transported water-borne Cd back into the sediment. When Cd was added to the sediment surface, a Cd peak emerged at the feeding depth of the worm within 1 d because of the transport of water-borne Cd down into the sediment by lugworm irrigation. In addition, the conveyor-belt feeding mode of the worm caused both burial of Cd by fecal casts and a gradual spreading of the Cd distribution within the sediment column. When Cd was added to the entire sediment column, bioturbation caused a net transport of Cd upwards, resulting in the surface layers having higher Cd concentrations than the deeper layers, indicating a net release of Cd from deeper sediments. The distribution of Cd in lugworms depended on the Cd exposure situation and suggested that worms were exposed mainly to water-borne Cd when Cd was added to the top of the sediment, whereas worms were exposed mainly by ingesting Cd-labeled sediment when Cd was mixed homogeneously throughout the sediment.

  4. Heavy metals in estuarine surface sediments of the Hai River Basin, variation characteristics, chemical speciation and ecological risk.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pei; Zhang, Hong; Shan, Baoqing; Lv, Shucong; Tang, Wenzhong

    2016-04-01

    The Hai River Basin (HRB) is considered to be one of the most polluted areas in China due to the high regional population density and rapid economic development. The estuaries of the HRB, which receive pollutants from terrestrial rivers, may subsequently suffer potential pollution and result in ecological risk of heavy metals. Six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were measured in estuarine surface sediments from 10 estuaries of the HRB to investigate their variation characteristics and ecological risks. The spatial difference of Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn in sediments was higher than that of the rest two elements. The Yongdingxin Estuary (YDX) and Ziyaxin Estuary (ZYX) in the Northern Hai River System (NHRS) were the most severe in terms of heavy metal contamination. According to the Risk Assessment Code (RAC) classification, Cd associated with the exchangeable and carbonate fraction (the average of 21.3 %) indicated medium risk to high risk. More than 50 % of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn on average were associated with the residual fraction. Based on the sum of the first three fractions (exchangeable and carbonate + reducible + oxidizable), the mobility order of these heavy metals was Cd >Pb > Zn ≈ Cu > Ni > Cr. Compared to the background values of cinnamon soil, the potential ecological risk index (RI) values ranged from 25.6 to 168, with an average of 91.2, indicating a low ecological risk in estuarine sites of the HRB. Cd and Pb were the dominant contributors to the toxic-response factor (45.8 and 25.5 %, respectively). The results give insight into the different control measures pertaining to heavy metal pollution and risk for both relatively clean estuaries and urban seriously polluted areas, respectively, for the formation of protect strategies of aquatic environment in the HRB. PMID:26758307

  5. Estuarine fish communities respond to climate variability over both river and ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Feyrer, Frederick; Cloern, James E; Brown, Larry R; Fish, Maxfield A; Hieb, Kathryn A; Baxter, Randall D

    2015-10-01

    Estuaries are dynamic environments at the land-sea interface that are strongly affected by interannual climate variability. Ocean-atmosphere processes propagate into estuaries from the sea, and atmospheric processes over land propagate into estuaries from watersheds. We examined the effects of these two separate climate-driven processes on pelagic and demersal fish community structure along the salinity gradient in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA. A 33-year data set (1980-2012) on pelagic and demersal fishes spanning the freshwater to marine regions of the estuary suggested the existence of five estuarine salinity fish guilds: limnetic (salinity = 0-1), oligohaline (salinity = 1-12), mesohaline (salinity = 6-19), polyhaline (salinity = 19-28), and euhaline (salinity = 29-32). Climatic effects propagating from the adjacent Pacific Ocean, indexed by the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the euhaline and polyhaline guilds. Climatic effects propagating over land, indexed as freshwater outflow from the watershed (OUT), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the oligohaline, mesohaline, polyhaline, and euhaline guilds. The effects of OUT propagated further down the estuary salinity gradient than the effects of NPGO that propagated up the estuary salinity gradient, exemplifying the role of variable freshwater outflow as an important driver of biotic communities in river-dominated estuaries. These results illustrate how unique sources of climate variability interact to drive biotic communities and, therefore, that climate change is likely to be an important driver in shaping the future trajectory of biotic communities in estuaries and other transitional habitats. PMID:25966973

  6. RELEASE AND PHASE PARTITIONING OF METALS FROM ANOXIC ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS DURING PERIODS OF SIMULATED RESUSPENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periodically, marine sediments are subjected to physical processes which resuspend them into the water column, releasing previously sequestered metals. The role of resuspension energy and duration on release and subsequent redistribution of sediment bound metals was measured expe...

  7. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems. PMID:24933166

  8. Extractable organohalogens (EOX) in sediment and biota collected at an estuarine marsh near a former chloralkali facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, K.; Giesy, J.P.; Kawano, Masahide; Kashima, Yuji; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    1999-04-01

    Extractable, organically bound chlorine (EOCl), which is determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA), has been used as a measure of pollution by chlorinated organics. In this study, the concentrations and distribution of extractable organohalogens (EOX = EOCl + EOBr + EOl) were measured in sediment, blue crab, fishes, birds, and terrapin collected at an estuarine marsh and a nearby creek contaminated by the disposal of wastes from a former chloralkali facility. The concentrations of the organohalogens were in the order of EOCl {much_gt} EOBr > EOl. The sediment EOCl concentration was comparable to those reported for sediments at sites that have been contaminated by the disposal of bleached kraft pulp mill effluents. The concentrations of EOCl measured in the tissues of blue crab, fishes, and birds were higher than any values previously reported. The absolute concentrations of EOCl coupled with its elevated proportions relative to the concentrations of EOBr or EOl in biota suggest that wastes from the chloralkali processes are a potential source of chlorinated organics present in the environment.

  9. Comparison of the basin-scale effect of dredging operations and natural estuarine processes on suspended sediment concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) data from San Pablo Bay, California, were analyzed to compare the basin-scale effect of dredging and disposal of dredged material (dredging operations) and natural estuarine processes. The analysis used twelve 3-wk to 5-wk periods of mid-depth and near-bottom SSC data collected at Point San Pablo every 15 min from 1993-1998. Point San Pablo is within a tidal excursion of a dredged-material disposal site. The SSC data were compared to dredging volume, Julian day, and hydrodynamic and meteorological variables that could affect SSC. Kendall's ??, Spearman's ??, and weighted (by the fraction of valid data in each period) Spearman's ??w correlation coefficients of the variables indicated which variables were significantly correlated with SSC. Wind-wave resuspension had the greatest effect on SSC. Median water-surface elevation was the primary factor affecting mid-depth SSC. Greater depths inhibit wind-wave resuspension of bottom sediment and indicate greater influence of less turbid water from down estuary. Seasonal variability in the supply of erodible sediment is the primary factor affecting near-bottom SSC. Natural physical processes in San Pablo Bay are more areally extensive, of equal or longer duration, and as frequent as dredging operations (when occurring), and they affect SSC at the tidal time scale. Natural processes control SSC at Point San Pablo even when dredging operations are occurring.

  10. Effects of sediment bioturbation by the estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator on fluoranthene resuspension and transfer into the mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarelli, S.; Straalen, N.M. van; Klap, V.A.; Wezel, A.P. van

    1999-02-01

    To better understand the effects of bioturbation on partitioning and availability of sediment-bound contaminants to infaunal amphipods and mussels, experiments were carried out with fluoranthene-spiked sediment. Treatments included different densities of the estuarine amphipod, Corophium volutator. Total suspended solids (TSS), particulate organic carbon/particulate organic matter (POC/POM) in overlying water, fluoranthene concentrations in sediment, pore water, overlying water, amphipods, and mussels were measured. Bioturbation significantly increased TSS and POC/POM concentrations in overlying water, and this effect became greater at higher animal density and longer exposure time. Mean total aqueous fluoranthene concentrations increased from 2.40 to 4.1 and 5.45 {micro}g/L in the control, low-density, and high-density treatments, respectively, after 10 d of exposure. The particle-bound fraction of fluoranthene in the overlying water from the high-density treatment was two times higher than that from the low-density treatment. Bioturbation did not affect the partitioning of fluoranthene over suspended solids and water, nor did it affect the concentrations in sediment and pore water. This was illustrated by the constancy of sediment-interstitial water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub oc(iw)}), sediment-overlying water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub oc(ow)}), and normalized POC-water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub poc}). Uptake of fluoranthene by filter-feeding mussels (Mytilus edulis) increased linearly with the density of bioturbating amphipods and with exposure time. The difference in concentrations of fluoranthene in mussels between the lowest and highest density of amphipods was more than factor of two. Their results showed that bioturbation significantly increases TSS concentration in the overlying water and consequently the total aqueous concentration of sediment-bound contaminants, which are subsequently accumulated by filter-feeders. The

  11. Evaluation of reduced sediment volume procedures for acute toxicity tests using the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Kennedy, Alan J; Farrar, J Daniel; Mount, David R; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-01

    The volume of sediment required to perform a sediment toxicity bioassay is a major driver of the overall cost associated with that bioassay. Sediment volume affects bioassay cost because of sediment collection, transportation, storage, and disposal costs as well as labor costs associated with organism recovery at the conclusion of the exposure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate reduced sediment volume versions of the standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) 10-d acute Leptocheirus plumulosus method that uses a beaker size of 1,000 ml and 20 organisms. The test design used evaluated the effects of beaker size (250 and 100 ml) and associated sediment volume (75 and 30 ml, respectively) as well as organism loading density (10 and 20 organisms) on test endpoint responsiveness relative to the standard 10-d test method. These comparisons were completed with three different types of contaminated sediments: a field-collected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment, a lead-spiked control sediment, and a control sediment spiked with mineral oil. Assessment criteria included test endpoint sensitivity, endpoint consistency, statistical power, water quality, and logistical assessments. Results indicate that the current U.S. EPA method is preferable to the reduced sediment volume methods we assessed, but that a 250-ml beaker/10 organism experimental design is of comparable utility and may be advantageous when reduced sediment volumes are desirable because of high contaminant (spiking studies) or sediment disposal costs. In addition, the results of the current study provide toxicity reference values for PAHs, lead, and an oil surrogate for petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:20890914

  12. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe. PMID:15649529

  13. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition in estuarine and oceanic environments assessed using a functional gene microarray.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bess B; Eveillard, Damien; Kirshtein, Julie D; Nelson, Joshua D; Voytek, Mary A; Jackson, George A

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between environmental factors and functional gene diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated across a transect from the freshwater portions of the Chesapeake Bay and Choptank River out into the Sargasso Sea. Oligonucleotide probes (70-bp) designed to represent the diversity of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes from Chesapeake Bay clone libraries and cultivated AOB were used to construct a glass slide microarray. Hybridization patterns among the probes in 14 samples along the transect showed clear variations in amoA community composition. Probes representing uncultivated members of the Nitrosospira-like AOB dominated the probe signal, especially in the more marine samples. Of the cultivated species, only Nitrosospira briensis was detected at appreciable levels. Discrimination analysis of hybridization signals detected two guilds. Guild 1 was dominated by the marine Nitrosospira-like probe signal, and Guild 2's largest contribution was from upper bay (freshwater) sediment probes. Principal components analysis showed that Guild 1 was positively correlated with salinity, temperature and chlorophyll a concentration, while Guild 2 was positively correlated with concentrations of oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate nitrogen and carbon, suggesting that different amoA sequences represent organisms that occupy different ecological niches within the estuarine/marine environment. The trend from most diversity of AOB in the upper estuary towards dominance of a single type in the polyhaline region of the Bay is consistent with the declining importance of AOB with increasing salinity, and with the idea that AO-Archaea are the more important ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. PMID:17803777

  14. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition in estuarine and oceanic environments assessed using a functional gene microarray

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, B.B.; Eveillard, D.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Nelson, J.D.; Voytek, M.A.; Jackson, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between environmental factors and functional gene diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated across a transect from the freshwater portions of the Chesapeake Bay and Choptank River out into the Sargasso Sea. Oligonucleotide probes (70-bp) designed to represent the diversity of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes from Chesapeake Bay clone libraries and cultivated AOB were used to construct a glass slide microarray. Hybridization patterns among the probes in 14 samples along the transect showed clear variations in amoA community composition. Probes representing uncultivated members of the Nitrosospira-like AOB dominated the probe signal, especially in the more marine samples. Of the cultivated species, only Nitrosospira briensis was detected at appreciable levels. Discrimination analysis of hybridization signals detected two guilds. Guild 1 was dominated by the marine Nitrosospira-like probe signal, and Guild 2???s largest contribution was from upper bay (freshwater) sediment probes. Principal components analysis showed that Guild 1 was positively correlated with salinity, temperature and chlorophyll a concentration, while Guild 2 was positively correlated with concentrations of oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate nitrogen and carbon, suggesting that different amoA sequences represent organisms that occupy different ecological niches within the estuarine/marine environment. The trend from most diversity of AOB in the upper estuary towards dominance of a single type in the polyhaline region of the Bay is consistent with the declining importance of AOB with increasing salinity, and with the idea that AO-Archaea are the more important ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  15. Geochemical characterization of mangrove sediments of the Zuari estuarine system, West coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha-D'Mello, Cheryl A.; Nayak, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    The grain size, clay mineralogy and geochemistry were studied in the sediment cores collected from the mangrove environments of the Zuari estuary to understand sources and factors affecting accumulation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of metals. Finer sediments, organic matter and metals were higher in the middle estuary and canal sediments while coarser sediments with fewer metal concentrations were seen in the lower estuary. Kaolinite, smectite, illite and traces of chlorite constituted the clay mineral assemblage and had a minor influence on metal distributions. In the study area, the hydrodynamic conditions changed from lower estuary towards the upstream regions owing to mixing of riverine and sea water that led to finer sediment deposition in the middle estuary. The variations in metal abundance were attributed to a difference in hydrodynamic conditions regulated by the tide, freshwater flow and geomorphology of the Zuari estuary. The results revealed that the estuary received material from natural weathering of rocks as well as from anthropogenic sources such as mining and industrial/domestic discharges. Enrichment factor and Geo-accumulation index showed that Fe, Mn and Cr were enriched in the mangrove sediments whereas fractionation of metals revealed that concentrations of bioavailable Mn pose a considerable risk to biota. Increased accumulation of Fe and Mn in the upper middle estuary and canal sediments, trap trace metals that may considerably affect sediment quality and dredging of these sediments can cause re-suspension and mobilize metals from loosely bound sedimentary forms to the water column.

  16. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  17. Matrix solid phase dispersion-assisted BCR sequential extraction method for metal partitioning in surface estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, Marta; Barciela-Alonso, María Carmen; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2011-01-15

    The BCR (the Community Bureau of Reference) of the European Union sequential extraction scheme for metal partitioning in estuarine sediments has been accelerated by using a matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) approach. The MSPD assisted BCR procedure consists of passing the extractants proposed by conventional BCR protocol (0.11 M acetic acid, 0.1M hydroxylammonium chloride and 8.8M hydrogen peroxide plus 1M ammonium acetate) through the dispersed sample packaged inside a disposable syringe. Different silica-, magnesium- and aluminium-based materials were tested as dispersing agents and sea sand was found to offer the best performances. Variables for assisting the three stages of the BCR protocol were optimized, and accurate results were obtained when assisting the first and the third stages (exchangeable and oxidizable fractions, respectively). However, lack of accuracy was observed when assisting the second step (reducible fraction) and this result agrees with most of the assisted BCR procedures for which extracting the reducible fraction is the most troublesome stage. The organic matter oxidation (third stage) was successfully assisted by passing hydrogen peroxide at 50°C through the dispersed sample inside de syringe just before passing ammonium acetate. Therefore, the time-consuming and unsafe conventional organic matter oxidation processes, commonly performed even for microwave/ultrasounds assisted BCR procedures, are totally avoided. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used as a selective detector. The target elements were Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn (first stage), Cd, Co and Ni (second stage), and Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn (third stage). Repeatability of the method (n=7) was good, and RSDs values of 9, 10, 10, 8, 8, 3 and 8% was obtained for Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn, respectively (first stage); 10, 9 and 9% for Cd, Co and Ni, respectively (second stage); and 6, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9% Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn, respectively (third

  18. Biochemical and behavioral responses in the estuarine polychaete Perinereis gualpensis (Nereididae) after in situ exposure to polluted sediments.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Jaramillo, Mauricio; da Rocha, Alessandra Martins; Chiang, Gustavo; Buchwalter, David; Monserrat, José M; Barra, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    In situ translocation experiments are advantageous relative to traditional laboratory experiments, particularly for understanding the bioavailability of trace metals like mercury (Hg). Individuals of the polychaete Perinereis gualpensis were translocated from a reference site (Raqui estuary, Chile) to an estuarine site with significant sediment Hg concentrations (Lenga estuary: 1.78-9.89 mg/kg). Individuals were exposed in polluted and non-polluted sediments for 21 days and sampled every 7 days with cages deployed at three different depths. Tissue Hg concentrations were measured in conjunction with oxidative stress responses. Translocated polychaetes rapidly accumulated Hg. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities measured from posterior body regions were 2-fold higher than control activities after 21 days of exposure. Other antioxidant measures were idiosyncratic. Distinct burrowing behavior differences were observed; control polychaetes exhibited more homogenous vertical distributions, whereas in Lenga, worms tended to remain in upper layers. These studies demonstrate that under natural conditions, Hg is highly bioavailable to polychaetes affecting both biochemical and behavioral responses after relatively short-term exposure. PMID:23273620

  19. Chemical versus Enzymatic Digestion of Contaminated Estuarine Sediment: Relative Importance of Iron and Manganese Oxides in Controlling Trace Metal Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A.; Olsen, Y. S.

    2000-12-01

    Chemical and enzymatic reagents have been employed to determine available concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in contaminated estuarine sediment. Gastric and intestinal enzymes (pepsin, pH 2, and trypsin, pH 7·6, respectively) removed significantly more metal than was water-soluble or exchangeable (by seawater or ammonium acetate), while gastro-intestinal fluid of the demersal teleost, Pleuronectes platessa L. (plaice), employed to operationally define a bioavailable fraction of contaminants, generally solubilized more metal than the model enzymes. Manganese was considerably more available than Fe under these conditions and it is suggested that the principal mechanism of contaminant release is via surface complexation and reductive solubilization of Mn oxides, a process which is enhanced under conditions of low pH. Of the chemical reagents tested, acetic acid best represents the fraction of Mn (as well as Cu and Zn) which is available under gastro-intestinal conditions, suggesting that the reducing tendency of acetate is similar to that of the ligands encountered in the natural digestive environment. Although the precise enzymatic and non-enzymatic composition of plaice gastro-intestinal fluid may be different to that encountered in more representative, filter-feeding or burrowing organisms, a general implication of this study is that contaminants associated with Mn oxides are significantly more bioavailable than those associated with Fe oxides, and that contaminant bioavailability may be largely dictated by the oxidic composition of contaminated sediment.

  20. Development of whole sediment bioassay using the marine/estuarine polychaetes Polydora cornuta Bosc 1802 and Boccardia proboscidea Hartman 1940

    SciTech Connect

    Pocklington, P.; Doe, K.; Huybers, A.; Wade, S.; Lee, D.

    1995-12-31

    The growing need by Environment Canada for a battery of marine toxicity tests has prompted the development of chronic, sublethal, sediment bioassay tests using marine or estuarine annelids (polychaetes). Initially several species of polychaetes found in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic waters were assessed and a few of these were selected for testing survival and sensitivity under laboratory conditions and sensitivity to reference toxicants using field collected specimens. From these experiments, the authors identified several promising species and attempts were made to culture them. To date they have been successful in culturing one species from the Atlantic coast--Polydora cornuta and one species from the Pacific Coast--Boccardia proboscidea. They have been able to generate sufficient numbers of same-age larvae, raise them under controlled conditions to juveniles/young adults, and, subject them to a variety of Non-Contaminant Effects Trials (NCETs) and Contaminant Effects Trials (CETs). In the NCETs the authors determined the effect of food type and food ration, temperature, salinity, grain size, length of test condition. They found them to be moderately robust in terms of variable environmental parameters. In the CETs they found this species to be sensitive to sediments considered by Environment Canada to be toxic. They also determined the animal`s sensitivity to a reference toxicant CdCl{sub 2} (96 hr LC50).

  1. Reduction of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria: Experiments with cell suspensions and estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, J.P.; Oremland, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Washed cell suspension of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. aestuarii were capable of reducing nanomolar levels of selenate to selenide as well as sulfate to sulfide. Reduction of these species was inhibited by 1 mM selenate or tungstate. The addition of 1 mM sulfate decreased the reduction of selenate and enhanced the reduction of sulfate. Increasing concentrations of sulfate inhibited rates of selenate reduction but enhanced sulfate reduction rates. Cell suspensions kept in 1 mM selenate were incapable of reducing either selenate or sulfate when the selenate/sulfate ratio was ???0.02, indicating that irreversible inhibition occurs at high selenate concentrations. Anoxic estuarine sediments having an active flora of sulfate-respiring bacteria were capable of a small amount of selenate reduction when ambient sulfate concentrations were low (<4 mM). These results indicate that sulfate is an inhibitor of the reduction of trace qunatitites of selenate. Therefore, direct reduction of traces of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria in natural environments is constrained by the ambient concentration of sulfate ions. The significance of this observation with regard to the role sediments play in sequestering selenium is discussed

  2. Estuarine and coastal water dynamics controlling sediment movement and plume development in Long Island Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, F. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As the Connecticut River flows into Long Island Sound, large plumes develop during the mixing of ocean and estuarine waters. Plumes were delineated for July 28, October 8, October 27, and December 2, 1972, by analyzing ERTS-1 imagery with the SRI Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC). Because the chemical and physical composition of the plume and ocean water were not too different, the ESIAC was utilized to expand the scenes and subject the transparencies to varying combinations of viewing techniques to identify and delineate the plumes. Best results were obtained when band 5 transparencies were used. Indications are, when the scene being analyzed is predominantly in the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the negative transparencies. When the analysis is being done above the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the positive transparencies.

  3. Regional assessment of marine and estuarine sediment toxicity in Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Darrin; Bay, Steven; Jacobe, Matthew; Barton, Carlita; Sakamoto, Ken; Young, Diana; Ritter, Kerry; Schiff, Ken

    2013-02-01

    Sediment toxicity was investigated at 222 stations in the Southern California Bight (SCB) during 2008. This represented the first time that assessment methods established by California's new Sediment Quality Objectives program were employed in a survey of this scale. The goal was to determine the extent and magnitude of sediment toxicity in the SCB, how toxicity compared among specific environments, and whether toxicity has changed over the last decade. Two toxicity tests were used: the 10-day amphipod whole sediment survival test with Eohaustorius estuarius and a 48-h embryo development test with the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed at the sediment-water interface. Less than 1 % of the area of the SCB was found to be toxic to the amphipod test. No toxicity was found in offshore stations, but 14 % of embayment areas were toxic to the amphipods. The mussel test identified 13 % of the embayment areas to be toxic. Estuary and marina locations had the greatest areal extent of toxicity for both tests. The two toxicity methods agreed that sediments were not toxic at over half of the stations tested. The mussel test showed a greater magnitude of response than the amphipod. Sediment toxicity was shown to have declined in both extent and magnitude from levels measured in 1998 and 2003. PMID:22638724

  4. Radiocarbon dating, chronologic framework, and changes in accumulation rates of holocene estuarine sediments from Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Baucom, P.C.; Bratton, J.F.; Cronin, T. M.; McGeehin, J.P.; Willard, D.; Zimmerman, A.R.; Vogt, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating Holocene sediments in estuaries commonly are difficult to sample and date. In Chesapeake Bay, we obtained sediment cores as much as 20 m in length and used numerous radiocarbon ages measured by accelarator mass spectrometry methods to provide the first detailed chronologies of Holocene sediment accumulation in the bay. Carbon in these sediments is a complex mixture of materials from a variety of sources. Analyses of different components of the sediments show that total organic carbon ages are largely unreliable, because much of the carbon (including coal) has been transported to the bay from upstream sources and is older than sediments in which it was deposited. Mollusk shells (clams, oysters) and foraminifera appear to give reliable results, although reworking and burrowing are potential problems. Analyses of museum specimens collected alive before atmospheric nuclear testing suggest that the standard reservoir correction for marine samples is appropriate for middle to lower Chesapeake Bay. The biogenic carbonate radiocarbon ages are compatible with 210 Pb and 137 Cs data and pollen stratigraphy from the same sites. Post-settlement changes in sediment transport and accumulation is an important environmental issue in many estuaries, including the Chesapeake. Our data show that large variations in sediment mass accumulation rates occur among sites. At shallow water sites, local factors seem to control changes in accumulation rates with time. Our two relatively deep-water sites in the axial channel of the bay have different long-term average accumulation rates, but the history of sediment accumulation at these sites appears to reflect overall conditions in the bay. Mass accumulation rates at the two deep-water sites rapidly increased by about fourfold coincident with widespread land clearance for agriculture in the Chesapeake watershed.

  5. Variation in numbers and behaviour of waders during the tidal cycle: implications for the use of estuarine sediment flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granadeiro, José P.; Dias, Maria P.; Martins, Ricardo C.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2006-05-01

    Estuarine sediment flats are essential feeding areas for waders, but their exploitation is constrained by the movements of tides. In this cyclic environment the exposure period of sediment flats decreases several fold from upper to lower flats, and the moving tidal waterline briefly creates particular conditions for waders and their prey. This study attempts to determine how the exposure period and the movement of the tide line influence the use of space and food resources by waders across the sediment flats. Wader counts and observations of feeding behaviour were carried out in all phases of the tidal cycle, in plots forming a transect from upper to lower flats, thus representing a gradient of exposure periods. Pecking, prey intake, and success rates varied little along the gradient. Some species actively followed the tide line while foraging, whereas others are evenly spread over the exposed flats. Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Avocet were 'tide followers', whereas Grey Plover, Redshank and Bar-tailed Godwit were 'non-followers'. Densities of 'followers' near the tide line were up to five times higher than elsewhere. Species differed markedly in the way they used space on the flats, but in general the rate of biomass acquisition (in grams of ash-free dry weight per time exposed) was much higher in lower flats. However, this preference was insufficient to counter the much longer exposure of the upper flats, so the total amount of biomass consumed on the latter was greater. Therefore, it was in these upper flats that waders fulfilled most of their energetic needs. Consequently, upper flats are of particular importance for the conservation of wader assemblages, but because they are usually closer to shore they tend to suffer the highest pressure from disturbance and land reclamation.

  6. Influence of the submersed plant, Potamogeton perfoliatus, on nitrogen cycling in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Kemp, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Using 15N isotope techniques P. perfoliatus is shown to have a significant influence on sediment N cycling by direct uptake of NH4+ and NO3- and by indirect mechanisms leading to enhanced nitrification and denitrification. -from Authors

  7. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T.

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  8. A comparison of two nitrification inhibitors used to measure nitrification rates in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrification rates were measured using intact sediment cores from South San Francisco Bay and two different nitrification inhibitors: acetylene and methyl fluoride. Sediment oxygen consumption and ammonium and nitrate fluxes were also measured in these cores. Four experiments were conducted in the spring, and one in the fall of 1993. There was no significant difference in nitrification rates measured using the two inhibitors, which suggests that methyl fluoride can be used as an effective inhibitor of nitrification. Nitrification was positively correlated with sediment oxygen consumption and numbers of macrofauna. This suggests that bioturbation by macrofauna is an important control of nitrification rates. Irrigation by the tube-dwelling polychaete, Asychis elongata, which dominates the benthic biomass at this location, appears particularly important. Ammonium fluxes out of the sediment were greatest about one week after the spring bloom, while nitrification peaked about one month later.

  9. Development of Reduced Sediment Volume Test Procedures for the Estuarine Amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sediment volume requirements of toxicity and bioaccumulation bioassays affect the cost of the assessment related to field collection, transportation, storage, disposal, and labor associated with organism recovery at bioassay termination. Our objective was to assess four redu...

  10. Deposition of zinc and cadmium by marine bacteria in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLerran, C.J.; Holmes, Charles W.

    1974-01-01

    Mixed cultures of marine bacteria isolated from the sediments of Corpus Christi Harbor were examined for their ability to assimilate or precipitate radioactive zinc and cadmium from solution. Test data indicate that during summer, when bacterial activity is at a maximum, the bacteria and their metabolic byproducts play a significant role in the removal of zinc and cadmium from seawater and their subsequent deposition in marine sediments.

  11. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  12. Estuarine Sediment Deposition during Wetland Restoration: A GIS and Remote Sensing Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Michelle; Kuss, Amber; Kentron, Tyler; Remar, Alex; Choksi, Vivek; Skiles, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of the industrial salt flats in the San Francisco Bay, California is an ongoing wetland rehabilitation project. Remote sensing maps of suspended sediment concentration, and other GIS predictor variables were used to model sediment deposition within these recently restored ponds. Suspended sediment concentrations were calibrated to reflectance values from Landsat TM 5 and ASTER using three statistical techniques -- linear regression, multivariate regression, and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), to map suspended sediment concentrations. Multivariate and ANN regressions using ASTER proved to be the most accurate methods, yielding r2 values of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. Predictor variables such as sediment grain size and tidal frequency were used in the Marsh Sedimentation (MARSED) model for predicting deposition rates for three years. MARSED results for a fully restored pond show a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 66.8 mm (<1) between modeled and field observations. This model was further applied to a pond breached in November 2010 and indicated that the recently breached pond will reach equilibrium levels after 60 months of tidal inundation.

  13. Vertical Distribution of Denitrification in an Estuarine Sediment: Integrating Sediment Flowthrough Reactor Experiments and Microprofiling via Reactive Transport Modeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Laverman, Anniet M.; Meile, Christof; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Wieringa, Elze B. A.

    2007-01-01

    Denitrifying activity in a sediment from the freshwater part of a polluted estuary in northwest Europe was quantified using two independent approaches. High-resolution N2O microprofiles were recorded in sediment cores to which acetylene was added to the overlying water and injected laterally into the sediment. The vertical distribution of the rate of denitrification supported by nitrate uptake from the overlying water was then derived from the time series N2O concentration profiles. The rates obtained for the core incubations were compared to the rates predicted by a forward reactive transport model, which included rate expression for denitrification calibrated with potential rate measurements obtained in flowthrough reactors containing undisturbed, 1-cm-thick sediment slices. The two approaches yielded comparable rate profiles, with a near-surface, 2- to 3-mm narrow zone of denitrification and maximum in situ rates on the order of 200 to 300 nmol cm−3 h−1. The maximum in situ rates were about twofold lower than the maximum potential rate for the 0- to 1-cm depth interval of the sediment, indicating that in situ denitrification was nitrate limited. The experimentally and model-derived rates of denitrification implied that there was nitrate uptake by the sediment at a rate that was on the order of 50 (± 10) nmol cm−2 h−1, which agreed well with direct nitrate flux measurements for core incubations. Reactive transport model calculations showed that benthic uptake of nitrate at the site is particularly sensitive to the nitrate concentration in the overlying water and the maximum potential rate of denitrification in the sediment. PMID:17071796

  14. SPECIES-ABUNDANCE-BIOMASS RESPONSES BY ESTUARINE MACROBENTHOS TO SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic community responses can be measured through concerted changes in univariate metrics, including species richness, total abundance, and total biomass. The classic model of pollution effects on marine macroinvertebrate communities recognizes that species/abundance/bioma...

  15. Preliminary evidence for the organisation of a bacterial community by zooplanktivores at the top of an estuarine planktonic food web.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, R J; Matcher, G F; Vink, T J F; Froneman, P W

    2015-02-01

    As part of a larger investigation, the effect of apex predation on estuarine bacterial community structure, through trophic cascading, was investigated using experimental in situ mesocosms. Through either the removal (filtration) or addition of specific size classes of planktonic groups, four different trophic scenarios were established using estuarine water and its associated plankton. One such treatment represented a "natural" scenario in which stable apex predatory pressure was qualified. Water samples were collected over time from each of the treatments for bacterial community evaluation. These samples were assessed through pyrosequencing of the variable regions 4 and 5 of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and analysed at the species operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level using a community procedure. The blue-green group dominated the samples, followed by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Samples were the most similar among treatments at the commencement of the experiment. While the bacterial communities sampled within each treatment changed over time, the deviation from initial appeared to be linked to the treatment trophic scenarios. The least temporal deviation-from-initial in bacterial community was found within the stable apex predatory pressure treatment. These findings are consistent with trophic cascade theory, whereby predators mediate interactions at multiple lower trophic levels with consequent repercussions for diversity. PMID:25301499

  16. Quantification of Sterol and Triterpenol Biomarkers in Sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape Estuarine-Lagoonal System (Brazil) by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bataglion, Giovana Anceski; Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Weber, Rolf Roland; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Sterols and triterpenols present in sedimentary cores from 12 stations along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system were investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Ten sterols and three triterpenols were identified and quantified, indicating both natural and anthropogenic sources. The relative distributions of sterol and triterpenol showed that the study area is submitted to organic matter (OM) from the Ribeira de Iguape River, seawater, surrounding vegetation, and plankton production. The contribution of these sources depends on the region of the estuarine-lagoonal system and the depth of sediment. Regarding anthropogenic sources, only the samples submitted to freshwater flow from the Ribeira de Iguape River presented concentration of coprostanol higher than the threshold value and diagnostic ratios, coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol, that indicate moderate contamination by domestic sewage in that area of the estuarine-lagoonal system. Therefore, the approach used herein identified the OM sources and its transport along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system (Brazil), which is a complex of lagoonal channels located in a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve. PMID:27087811

  17. Quantification of Sterol and Triterpenol Biomarkers in Sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape Estuarine-Lagoonal System (Brazil) by UHPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Bataglion, Giovana Anceski; Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Weber, Rolf Roland; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Sterols and triterpenols present in sedimentary cores from 12 stations along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system were investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Ten sterols and three triterpenols were identified and quantified, indicating both natural and anthropogenic sources. The relative distributions of sterol and triterpenol showed that the study area is submitted to organic matter (OM) from the Ribeira de Iguape River, seawater, surrounding vegetation, and plankton production. The contribution of these sources depends on the region of the estuarine-lagoonal system and the depth of sediment. Regarding anthropogenic sources, only the samples submitted to freshwater flow from the Ribeira de Iguape River presented concentration of coprostanol higher than the threshold value and diagnostic ratios, coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol, that indicate moderate contamination by domestic sewage in that area of the estuarine-lagoonal system. Therefore, the approach used herein identified the OM sources and its transport along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system (Brazil), which is a complex of lagoonal channels located in a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve. PMID:27087811

  18. Mercury enrichments in core sediments in Hugli-Matla-Bidyadhari estuarine complex, north-eastern part of the Bay of Bengal and their ecotoxicological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, M.; Canário, J.; Sarkar, S. K.; Branco, V.; Bhattacharya, A. K.; Satpathy, K. K.

    2009-05-01

    Mercury concentrations (HgT) in fine-grained fraction (<63 μm) of core sediments of the Hugli-Matla-Bidyadhari estuarine complex, India were analyzed. Results revealed a wide range of spatial variations (<4-93 ng g-1 dry weight) with a definite enhancement level at the lower stretch of the estuarine complex infested with mangrove plants, which might act as a sink to HgT. An elevated concentration of Hg was encountered in surface/subsurface layer of the core in majority of the cases resulting from physical, biogenic and postdepositional diagenetic processes that remobilized and resuspended the metal from deeper sediments. A strong positive correlation was observed between the Hg and clay fraction content of the sediments, while the correlations of Hg with Al, Fe and Mn were poor. Based on the index of geoaccumulation ( I geo) and effects range-low (ER-L) value, it is considered that the sediments are less polluted and thus there is less chance of ecotoxicological risk to organisms living in sediments.

  19. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacVean, Lissa J.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2014-01-01

    stress, which diffused sediment upward and limited stratification. Our findings highlight a pathway for waves to supply energy to both the production and destruction of turbulence, and demonstrate that in such shallow depths, TKE and SSC can be elevated over more of the water column than predicted by traditional models.

  20. USE OF ULVA LACTUTA TO IDENTIFY AMMONIA TOXICITY IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity identification evaluation(TIE) methods are being developed for use with whole sediments. Although a phase I TIE method has been developed to characterize ammonia toxicity in aqueous samples using the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca, the relationship between amphipod and my...

  1. Model-based interpretation of sediment concentration and vertical flux measurements in a shallow estuarine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Andreas; Lacy, Jessica R.; Gladding, Steve; Holleman, Rusty; Stacey, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model describing tidally varying vertical mixing and settling was used to interpret sediment concentrations and vertical fluxes observed in the shoals of South San Francisco Bay by two acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) at elevations of 0.36 m and 0.72 m above bed. Measured sediment concentrations changed by up to 100 g m−3 over the semidiurnal tidal cycle. These dynamics were dominated by local resuspension and settling. Multiple particle class models suggested the existence of a class with fast settling velocities (ws of 9.0 × 10−4 m s−1 in spring and 5.8 × 10−4 m s−1 in fall) and a slowly settling particle fraction (ws of <1 × 10−7 m s−1 in spring and 1.4 × 10−5 m s−1 in fall). Modeled concentrations of slowly settling particles at 0.36 m were as high as 20 g m−3 during fall and varied with the spring-neap cycle while fine sediment concentrations in spring were constant around 5 g m−3. Analysis of in situ water column floc size distributions suggested that floc properties in the lower part of the water column were most likely governed by particle-size distribution on the bed and not by coagulation, validating our multiple particle size approach. A comparison of different sediment bed models with respect to model performance, sensitivity, and identifiability suggested that the use of a sediment erosion model linear in bottom shear stress τb (E = M (τb − τc)) was the most appropriate choice to describe the field observations when the critical shear stress τc and the proportionality factor M were kept constant.

  2. Rapid toxicity assessment of sediments from estuarine ecosystems: A new tandem in vitro testing approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Long, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Microtox?? and Mutatox?? were used to evaluate the acute toxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, of organic sediment extracts from Pensacola Bay and St. Andrew Bay, two estuaries that cover about 273 and 127 km2, respectively, along the Gulf coast of Florida, USA. The sensitivity and selectivity of these two bioluminescent toxicity assays were demonstrated in validation studies with over 50 pesticides, genotoxins, and industrial pollutants, both as single compounds and in complex mixtures. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of insecticides, petroleum products, and polychlorinated biphenyls determined by Microtox all tended to group around the mean EC50 value of 1.2 (0.8) mg/L. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sensitivity of Mutatox was in general similar to that reported in the Ames test. Surficial sediment samples were collected, extracted with dichloromethane, evaporated and concentrated under nitrogen, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, assayed for acute toxicity and genotoxicity, and compared with reference sediments. Samples with low EC50 values, and determined to be genotoxic, were detected in Massalina Bayou, Watson Bayou, East Bay, and St. Andrew Bay-East in St. Andrew Bay as well as Bayou Grande, Bayou Chico, and Bayou Texar in Pensacola Bay. An overview of these data sets analyzed by Spearman rank correlation showed a significant correlation between acute toxicity and genotoxicity (p < 0.05). Microtox and Mutatox in tandem was a sensitive, cost-effective, and rapid (<24 h) screening tool that identified troublesome areas of pollution and assessed the potential sediment toxicity of lipophilic contaminants in aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Nitrogen reduction pathways in estuarine sediments: Influences of organic carbon and sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Patrick; Tobias, Craig; Cady, David

    2015-10-01

    Potential rates of sediment denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were mapped across the entire Niantic River Estuary, CT, USA, at 100-200 m scale resolution consisting of 60 stations. On the estuary scale, denitrification accounted for ~ 90% of the nitrogen reduction, followed by DNRA and anammox. However, the relative importance of these reactions to each other was not evenly distributed through the estuary. A Nitrogen Retention Index (NIRI) was calculated from the rate data (DNRA/(denitrification + anammox)) as a metric to assess the relative amounts of reactive nitrogen being recycled versus retained in the sediments following reduction. The distribution of rates and accompanying sediment geochemical analytes suggested variable controls on specific reactions, and on the NIRI, depending on position in the estuary and that these controls were linked to organic carbon abundance, organic carbon source, and pore water sulfide concentration. The relationship between NIRI and organic carbon abundance was dependent on organic carbon source. Sulfide proved the single best predictor of NIRI, accounting for 44% of its observed variance throughout the whole estuary. We suggest that as a single metric, sulfide may have utility as a proxy for gauging the distribution of denitrification, anammox, and DNRA.

  4. Transfer of chemical elements from a contaminated estuarine sediment to river water. A leaching assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Manuela; Peres, Sara; Magalhães, M. Clara F.

    2014-05-01

    Wastes of a former Portuguese steel industry were deposited during 40 years on the left bank of the Coina River, which flows into the estuary of the Tagus River near Lisbon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of the chemical elements from the contaminated sediment to the river water. A leaching experiment (four replicates) was performed using 1.6 kg/replicate of sediment from a landfill located in the Coina River bank, forming a lagoon subject to tidal influence. River water coming from this lagoon was collected during low tide. This water (200 mL) was added to the moist sediment, contained in cylindrical reactors, and was collected after 24 h of percolation. The leaching experiments were conducted for 77 days being leachates collected at time zero, after 28, 49 and 77 days with the sediment always moist. The sediment was characterized for: pH, electric conductivity (EC), total organic carbon (TOC), extractable phosphorus and potassium, mineral nitrogen, iron from iron oxides (crystalline and non-crystalline) and manganese oxides. Multi-elemental analysis was also made by ICP-INAA. Leachates and river water were analysed for pH, EC, hydrogencarbonate and sulfatetot by titrations, chloride by potentiometry, and multi-elemental composition by ICP-MS. The sediment presented pH=7.2, EC=18.5 dS/m, TOC=147.8 g/kg, high concentrations of extractable phosphorous (62.8 mg/kg) and potassium (1236.8 mg/kg), mineral nitrogen=11.3 mg/kg. The non-crystalline fraction of iron oxides corresponds to 99% (167.5 g Fe/kg) of the total iron oxides, and manganese from manganese oxides was low (52.7 mg/kg). Sediment is considered contaminated. It contained high concentrations (g/kg) of Zn (2.9), Pb (0.9), Cr (0.59), Cu (0.16), As (0.07), Cd (0.005), and Hg (0.001), which are above Canadian values for marine sediments quality guidelines for protection of aquatic life. River water had: pH=8.2, EC=28.6 dS/m, csulfate=1.23 g/L, and [Cl-]=251.6 mg/L. The concentrations of Cd (0

  5. Environmental availability of potentially toxic elements in estuarine sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape coastal system, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tramonte, Keila Modesto; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; de Lima Ferreira, Paulo Alves; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Batista, Miriam Fernanda; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch

    2016-02-15

    The Cananéia-Iguape system is located in a Southeastern Brazilian coastal region, acknowledged by UNESCO as Biosphere Reserve of the Atlantic Rainforest. This system underwent important environmental changes due to the opening of the artificial channel of Valo Grande and by past intensive Pb ore mining activities. In view of this scenario, this study evaluated Cu, Pb and Zn availability in sediments from Cananéia-Iguape system, based on the content associated with the main components of the sediments. Moreover, in order to assess local contamination, the metals' contents were compared to Canadian quality guidelines, the past levels of metals preceding the mining activities and background sediment values. Concerning Cu and Zn in a state of chemical remobilization, both elements would possibly present no harm to the local communities. However, Pb available content exceeded the comparison values in various sampling sites, suggesting the need of monitoring regarding its bioavailability. PMID:26707887

  6. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  7. Mangrove succession enriches the sediment microbial community in South China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Zhao, Qian; Li, Jing; Jian, Shuguang; Ren, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Sediment microorganisms help create and maintain mangrove ecosystems. Although the changes in vegetation during mangrove forest succession have been well studied, the changes in the sediment microbial community during mangrove succession are poorly understood. To investigate the changes in the sediment microbial community during succession of mangroves at Zhanjiang, South China, we used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and the following chronosequence from primary to climax community: unvegetated shoal; Avicennia marina community; Aegiceras corniculatum community; and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza + Rhizophora stylosa community. The PLFA concentrations of all sediment microbial groups (total microorganisms, fungi, gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and actinomycetes) increased significantly with each stage of mangrove succession. Microbial PLFA concentrations in the sediment were significantly lower in the wet season than in the dry season. Regression and ordination analyses indicated that the changes in the microbial community with mangrove succession were mainly associated with properties of the aboveground vegetation (mainly plant height) and the sediment (mainly sediment organic matter and total nitrogen). The changes in the sediment microbial community can probably be explained by increases in nutrients and microhabitat heterogeneity during mangrove succession. PMID:27265262

  8. Mangrove succession enriches the sediment microbial community in South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Zhao, Qian; Li, Jing; Jian, Shuguang; Ren, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Sediment microorganisms help create and maintain mangrove ecosystems. Although the changes in vegetation during mangrove forest succession have been well studied, the changes in the sediment microbial community during mangrove succession are poorly understood. To investigate the changes in the sediment microbial community during succession of mangroves at Zhanjiang, South China, we used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and the following chronosequence from primary to climax community: unvegetated shoal; Avicennia marina community; Aegiceras corniculatum community; and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza + Rhizophora stylosa community. The PLFA concentrations of all sediment microbial groups (total microorganisms, fungi, gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and actinomycetes) increased significantly with each stage of mangrove succession. Microbial PLFA concentrations in the sediment were significantly lower in the wet season than in the dry season. Regression and ordination analyses indicated that the changes in the microbial community with mangrove succession were mainly associated with properties of the aboveground vegetation (mainly plant height) and the sediment (mainly sediment organic matter and total nitrogen). The changes in the sediment microbial community can probably be explained by increases in nutrients and microhabitat heterogeneity during mangrove succession. PMID:27265262

  9. Meiobenthic communities of seagrass beds ( Zostera capricorni) and unvegetated sediments along the coast of New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Gustavo; Hutchings, Pat; Gallucci, Fabiane

    2011-01-01

    Seagrass beds have higher biomass, abundance, diversity and productivity of benthic organisms than unvegetated sediments. However, to date most studies have analysed only the macrofaunal component and ignored the abundant meiofauna present in seagrass meadows. This study was designed to test if meiobenthic communities, especially the free-living nematodes, differed between seagrass beds and unvegetated sediments. Sediment samples from beds of the eelgrass Zostera capricorni and nearby unvegetated sediments were collected in three estuaries along the coast of New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that sediments below the seagrass were finer, with a higher content of organic material and were less oxygenated than sediments without seagrass. Univariate measures of the fauna (i.e. abundance, diversity and taxa richness of total meiofauna and nematode assemblages) did not differ between vegetated and unvegetated sediments. However multivariate analysis of meiofaunal higher taxa showed significant differences between the two habitats, largely due to the presence and absence of certain taxa. Amphipods, tanaidacea, ostracods, hydrozoans and isopods occurred mainly in unvegetated sediments, while kinorhyncs, polychaetes, gastrotrichs and turbellarians were more abundant in vegetated sediments. Regarding the nematode assemblages, 32.4% of the species were restricted to Z. capricorni and 25% only occurred in unvegetated sediments, this suggests that each habitat is characterized by a particular suite of species. Epistrate feeding nematodes were more abundant in seagrass beds, and it is suggested that they graze on the microphytobenthos which accumulates underneath the seagrass. Most of the genera that characterized these estuarine unvegetated sediments are also commonly found on exposed sandy beaches. This may be explained by the fact that Australian estuaries have very little input of freshwater and experience marine conditions for most of the year. This study

  10. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  11. Community Dynamics and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Prokaryotes in Intertidal Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanling; Newell, Silvia; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junliang; Zhao, Hui; You, Lili; Cheng, Xunliang

    2014-01-01

    Diversity, abundance, and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase α subunit (amoA) in the intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. Generally, AOB had a lower diversity of amoA genes than did AOA in this study. Clone library analysis revealed great spatial variations in both AOB and AOA communities along the estuary. The UniFrac distance matrix showed that all the AOB communities and 6 out of 7 AOA communities in the Yangtze Estuary were statistically indistinguishable between summer and winter. The studied AOB and AOA community structures were observed to correlate with environmental parameters, of which salinity, pH, ammonium, total phosphorus, and organic carbon had significant correlations with the composition and distribution of both communities. Also, the AOA communities were significantly correlated with sediment clay content. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) results indicated that the abundance of AOB amoA genes was greater than that of AOA amoA genes in 10 of the 14 samples analyzed in this study. Potential nitrification rates were significantly greater in summer than in winter and had a significant negative correlation with salinity. In addition, potential nitrification rates were correlated strongly only with archaeal amoA gene abundance and not with bacterial amoA gene abundance. However, no significant differences were observed between rates measured with and without ampicillin (AOB inhibitor). These results implied that archaea might play a more important role in mediating the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite in the Yangtze estuarine sediments. PMID:24185847

  12. Community dynamics and activity of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in intertidal sediments of the Yangtze estuary.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Newell, Silvia; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junliang; Zhao, Hui; You, Lili; Cheng, Xunliang

    2014-01-01

    Diversity, abundance, and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase α subunit (amoA) in the intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. Generally, AOB had a lower diversity of amoA genes than did AOA in this study. Clone library analysis revealed great spatial variations in both AOB and AOA communities along the estuary. The UniFrac distance matrix showed that all the AOB communities and 6 out of 7 AOA communities in the Yangtze Estuary were statistically indistinguishable between summer and winter. The studied AOB and AOA community structures were observed to correlate with environmental parameters, of which salinity, pH, ammonium, total phosphorus, and organic carbon had significant correlations with the composition and distribution of both communities. Also, the AOA communities were significantly correlated with sediment clay content. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) results indicated that the abundance of AOB amoA genes was greater than that of AOA amoA genes in 10 of the 14 samples analyzed in this study. Potential nitrification rates were significantly greater in summer than in winter and had a significant negative correlation with salinity. In addition, potential nitrification rates were correlated strongly only with archaeal amoA gene abundance and not with bacterial amoA gene abundance. However, no significant differences were observed between rates measured with and without ampicillin (AOB inhibitor). These results implied that archaea might play a more important role in mediating the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite in the Yangtze estuarine sediments. PMID:24185847

  13. Microbial Communities in Sediments of Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria: Elucidation of Community Structure and Potential Impacts of Contamination by Municipal and Industrial Wastes.

    PubMed

    Obi, Chioma C; Adebusoye, Sunday A; Ugoji, Esther O; Ilori, Mathew O; Amund, Olukayode O; Hickey, William J

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine sediments are significant repositories of anthropogenic contaminants, and thus knowledge of the impacts of pollution upon microbial communities in these environments is important to understand potential effects on estuaries as a whole. The Lagos lagoon (Nigeria) is one of Africa's largest estuarine ecosystems, and is impacted by hydrocarbon pollutants and other industrial and municipal wastes. The goal of this study was to elucidate microbial community structure in Lagos lagoon sediments to identify groups that may be adversely affected by pollution, and those that may serve as degraders of environmental contaminants, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sediment samples were collected from sites that ranged in types and levels of anthropogenic impacts. The sediments were characterized for a range of physicochemical properties, and microbial community structure was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Microbial diversity (species richness and evenness) in the Apapa and Eledu sediments was reduced compared to that of the Ofin site, and communities of both of the former two were dominated by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) assigned to the family Helicobacteraceae (Epsilonproteobacteria). In the Ofin community, Epsilonproteobacteria were minor constituents, while the major groups were Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, which were all minor in the Apapa and Eledu sediments. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD), a broad indicator of contamination, was identified by multivariate analyses as strongly correlated with variation in alpha diversity. Environmental variables that explained beta diversity patterns included SOD, as well as levels of naphthalene, acenaphthylene, cobalt, cadmium, total organic matter, or nitrate. Of 582 OTU identified, abundance of 167 was significantly correlated (false discovery rate q≤ 0.05) to environmental variables. The largest group of OTU correlated with PAH levels were PAH

  14. Microbial Communities in Sediments of Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria: Elucidation of Community Structure and Potential Impacts of Contamination by Municipal and Industrial Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Chioma C.; Adebusoye, Sunday A.; Ugoji, Esther O.; Ilori, Mathew O.; Amund, Olukayode O.; Hickey, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine sediments are significant repositories of anthropogenic contaminants, and thus knowledge of the impacts of pollution upon microbial communities in these environments is important to understand potential effects on estuaries as a whole. The Lagos lagoon (Nigeria) is one of Africa’s largest estuarine ecosystems, and is impacted by hydrocarbon pollutants and other industrial and municipal wastes. The goal of this study was to elucidate microbial community structure in Lagos lagoon sediments to identify groups that may be adversely affected by pollution, and those that may serve as degraders of environmental contaminants, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sediment samples were collected from sites that ranged in types and levels of anthropogenic impacts. The sediments were characterized for a range of physicochemical properties, and microbial community structure was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Microbial diversity (species richness and evenness) in the Apapa and Eledu sediments was reduced compared to that of the Ofin site, and communities of both of the former two were dominated by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) assigned to the family Helicobacteraceae (Epsilonproteobacteria). In the Ofin community, Epsilonproteobacteria were minor constituents, while the major groups were Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, which were all minor in the Apapa and Eledu sediments. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD), a broad indicator of contamination, was identified by multivariate analyses as strongly correlated with variation in alpha diversity. Environmental variables that explained beta diversity patterns included SOD, as well as levels of naphthalene, acenaphthylene, cobalt, cadmium, total organic matter, or nitrate. Of 582 OTU identified, abundance of 167 was significantly correlated (false discovery rate q≤ 0.05) to environmental variables. The largest group of OTU correlated with PAH levels were PAH

  15. An association of benthic foraminifera and gypsum in Holocene sediments of estuarine Chesapeake Bay, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cann, J.; Cronin, T.

    2004-01-01

    Two cores of Holocene sediments recovered from the Cape Charles Channel of Chesapeake Bay yielded radiocarbon ages of about 6.8 to 5.8 ka for the lower intervals. Fossil foraminifera preserved in these lower sediments are dominated by species of Elphidium, which make up about 90% of the assemblage throughout, and probably signify deposition in hypersaline waters. Buccella frigida and Ammonia beccarii are the only other species commonly present. Hypersalinity of bottom waters seems to have been maintained by water-density stratification in a basin-like section of the channel. In core PTXT-4-P-1 transition to modern Chesapeake conditions, in which numbers of Ammonia beccarii exceed those of Elphidium, commenced about 400 years ago. In core PTXT-3-P-2 hypersalinity is further signified by the presence of abundant euhedral crystals of gypsum in association with the fossil Elphidium. This occurrence of gypsum is not attributed to palaeoclimatic aridity, but rather to inflow of groundwater from adjacent gypsiferous Miocene strata. The study shows that in palaeoclimatic investigations the significance of the presence of gypsum should be evaluated with caution - it does not necessarily signify an evaporative regime.

  16. Enrichment Factors (EF) on Superficial Sediments of Santos Estuarine System, Southeasthern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. S. M.; Salaroli, A. B.; Mahiques, M.; Figueira, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Baixada Santista, located at southeastern Brazilian coast, hosts the largest harbor of South America, it is also the third most heavily populated region in São Paulo state. Many industries and domestic sewage have been contaminating the environment with heavy metals and arsenic since industrial revolution. This has been a major concern worldwide due to its toxicity and persistence. Levels of metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Mn, Sc, V) and As were determinated on 180 samples of surface sediments, by acid digestion and quantified by ICP-OES to assess enrichment factors in order to know the anthropogenic contribution of the investigated elements. The levels of metals indicated absence of contamination, but a higher enrichment of As (approximately 9.5) near Bertioga city. Ni and Cr had values between 0.5 - 2.0, Cu and Zn between 0.6 - 4.0 and 0.9 - 7.5 for Pb. Despite As, all others metals showed higher enrichment in Santos - São Vicente Estuary, especially near Cubatão. The analysis of the enrichment factor of As indicate that these values could be due to natural processes of weathering and sedimentation, meanwhile the other metals could be from antropogenic sources, since thoses values were found near industrial area.

  17. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team.

    PubMed

    Deusdado, Pedro; Guedes, Magno; Silva, André; Marques, Francisco; Pinto, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Lourenço, André; Mendonça, Ricardo; Santana, Pedro; Corisco, José; Almeida, Susana Marta; Portugal, Luís; Caldeira, Raquel; Barata, José; Flores, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus' estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional) human-based sampling. PMID:27618060

  18. The Impact of Salinity on the Diversity of Microbial Sediment Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, C.; Cardarelli, E.; Lee, J. A.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle is a global process, largely mediated by microorganisms, that exchanges nitrogen between its biologically available forms (NH4+, NO3-) and its inert (N2) form. This cycle enables the biological uptake of nitrogen for the formation of DNA, amino acids, and other biological compounds critical to life. Several processes are responsible for facilitating the cycling of nitrogen through eight different oxidation states. Two nitrogen removal processes include anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), in which N2 is produced directly from ammonia and nitrite, and denitrification, the sequential oxidation of NO3 to N2. Together, these two processes play a large role in determining the biological availability of nitrogen in estuarine ecosystems. To better understand how microbial communities conducting these processes change under varying environmental conditions, a manipulation experiment was developed to simulate an environmental site salinity shift. Sediment cores were collected from north San Francisco Bay in the Carquinez Strait, a site of seasonally varying salinity. These cores from the Carquinez Strait were incubated in two treatments: one with local brackish water and one with freshwater from Suisun Bay. Using Sanger sequencing, we examined shifts in the microbial communities containing the functional genes hzsA (anammox) and nirS (denitrification). Geochemical characteristics such as NO3- and NH4+ concentrations in the water and the C:N ratio of the sediment were measured to determine subsequent changes these communities had on the sediment chemistry. This study provides insight into how changes in salinity affect microbial sediment community composition in San Francisco Bay.

  19. RESPONSES OF MACROBENTHOS COLONIZING ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS CONTAMINATED WITH DRILLING MUD CONTAINING DIESEL OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boxes filled with clean sand or clean sand with a 2-cm overlay of mixtures of sand with barite or drilling mud were placed in Santa Rosa Sound, Florida to determine the effects of a used lime drilling-mud on field-colonized macrobenthic communities. Effect of the drilling mud on ...

  20. Environmental Conditions Outweigh Geographical Contiguity in Determining the Similarity of nifH-Harboring Microbial Communities in Sediments of Two Disconnected Marginal Seas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Dang, Hongyue; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    Ecological evidence suggests that heterotrophic diazotrophs fueled by organic carbon respiration in sediments play an important role in marine nitrogen fixation. However, fundamental knowledge about the identities, abundance, diversity, biogeography, and controlling environmental factors of nitrogen-fixing communities in open ocean sediments is still elusive. Surprisingly, little is known also about nitrogen-fixing communities in sediments of the more research-accessible marginal seas. Here we report on an investigation of the environmental geochemistry and putative diazotrophic microbiota in the sediments of Bohai Sea, an eutrophic marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean. Diverse and abundant nifH gene sequences were identified and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were found to be the dominant putative nitrogen-fixing microbes. Community statistical analyses suggested bottom water temperature, bottom water chlorophyll a content (or the covarying turbidity) and sediment porewater Eh (or the covarying pH) as the most significant environmental factors controlling the structure and spatial distribution of the putative diazotrophic communities, while sediment Hg content, sulfide content, and porewater [Formula: see text]-Si content were identified as the key environmental factors correlated positively with the nifH gene abundance in Bohai Sea sediments. Comparative analyses between the Bohai Sea and the northern South China Sea (nSCS) identified a significant composition difference of the putative diazotrophic communities in sediments between the shallow-water (estuarine and nearshore) and deep-water (offshore and deep-sea) environments, and sediment porewater dissolved oxygen content, water depth and in situ temperature as the key environmental factors tentatively controlling the species composition, community structure, and spatial distribution of the marginal sea sediment nifH-harboring microbiota. This confirms the ecophysiological specialization and niche

  1. MODIS-based retrieval of suspended sediment concentration and diffuse attenuation coefficient in Chinese estuarine and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoletsky, Leonid; Yang, Xianping; Shen, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Radiative transfer modelling in atmosphere, water, and on the air-water surface was used to create an algorithm and computer code for satellite monitoring Chinese estuarine and coastal waters. The atmospheric part of the algorithm is based on the Reference Evaluation of Solar Transmittance (REST) model for calculation of optical properties of the atmosphere from the top of the atmosphere to the target; for modelling optical properties from target towards satellite's sensor, an optical reciprocity principle has been used. An algorithm uses estimates derived from three different sources: 1) the MODIS-based software; 2) radiative transfer equations, and 3) well-known empirical relationships between measured parameters and optical depths and transmittances for such atmospheric components as molecules, aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, precipitable water vapor and uniformly mixed gases. Using this model allowed us to derive a reliable relationship relating an important parameter, the diffuse-to-global solar incoming irradiance ratio, to the aerosol optical thickness, solar zenith angle and wavelength. The surface and underwater parts of the algorithm contained theoretical and semi-empirical relationships between inherent (such as absorption, scattering and backscattering coefficients) and apparent (remote-sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation coefficient, Kd) optical properties, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measured in the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent coastal area. The first false colour maps of SSC and Kd demonstrated a well accordance with the multi-year field observations in the region, and suggest promise for use of this algorithm for the regular monitoring of Chinese and worldwide natural waters.

  2. Net methylation of mercury in estuarine sediment microcosms amended with dissolved, nanoparticulate, and microparticulate mercuric sulfides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Kim, Bojeong; Deshusses, Marc A; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2014-08-19

    The production of methylmercury (MeHg) by anaerobic microorganisms depends in part on the speciation and bioavailability of inorganic mercury to these organisms. Our previous work with pure cultures of methylating bacteria has demonstrated that the methylation potential of mercury decreased during the aging of mercuric sulfides (from dissolved to nanoparticulate and microcrystalline HgS). The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between mercury sulfide speciation and methylation potential in experiments that more closely simulate the complexity of sediment settings. The study involved sediment slurry microcosms that represented a spectrum of salinities in an estuary and were each amended with different forms of mercuric sulfides: dissolved Hg and sulfide, nanoparticulate HgS (3-4 nm in diameter), and microparticulate HgS (>500 nm). The results indicated that net MeHg production was influenced by both the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (roughly represented by the rate of sulfate loss) and the bioavailability of mercury. In the presence of abundant sulfate and carbon sources (supporting relatively high microbial activity), net MeHg production in the slurries amended with dissolved Hg was greater than in slurries amended with nano-HgS, similar to previous experiments with pure bacterial cultures. In microcosms with minimal microbial activity (indicated by low rates of sulfate loss), the addition of either dissolved Hg or nano-HgS resulted in similar amounts of net MeHg production. For all slurries receiving micro-HgS, MeHg production did not exceed abiotic controls. In slurries amended with dissolved and nano-HgS, mercury was mainly partitioned to bulk-scale mineral particles and colloids, indicating that Hg bioavailability was not simply related to dissolved Hg concentration or speciation. Overall, the results suggest that models for mercury methylation potential in the environment will need to balance the relative contributions of

  3. Sediment Bacterial Communities Reflect the History of a Sea Basin

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Christina; Sinkko, Hanna; Rantanen, Matias; Paulin, Lars; Kotilainen, Aarno

    2013-01-01

    How entire microbial communities are structured across stratified sediments from the historical standpoint is unknown. The Baltic Sea is an ideal research object for historical reconstruction, since it has experienced many fresh- and brackish water periods and is depleted of dissolved oxygen, which increases the sediment's preservation potential. We investigated the bacterial communities, chemical elements (e.g. Cr, Pb Na, P, Sr and U) and sediment composition in a stratified sediment core dated by radiocarbon and spanning 8000 years of Baltic Sea history, using up-to-date multivariate statistics. The communities were analysed by 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The communities of the deep Early Litorina and surface Late Litorina Sea laminae were separated from the communities of the middle Litorina Sea laminae, which were associated with elevated concentrations of U and Sr trace elements, palaeo-oxygen and palaeosalinity proxies. Thus, the Litorina Sea laminae were characterized by past oxygen deficiency and salinity increase. The communities of the laminae, bioturbated and homogeneous sediments were differentiated, based on the same historical sea phases, with correct classifications of 90%. Palaeosalinity was one of the major parameters that separated the bacterial communities of the stratified sediments. A discontinuous spatial structure with a surprising increase in community heterogeneity was detected in Litorina Sea sediments from 388 to 422 cm deep, which suggests that a salinity maximum occurred in the central Gulf of Finland app. 6200–6600 years ago. The community heterogeneity decreased from the surface down to 306 cm, which reflected downcore mineralization. The plateau of the decrease was in the app. 2000-year-old sediment layers. Bacterial community data may be used as an additional tool in ocean-drilling projects, in which it is important to detect mineralization plateaus both to determine historically comparable

  4. Fitting response models of benthic community structure to abiotic variables in a polluted estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Oreja, José Antonio; Saiz-Salinas, José Ignacio

    1999-07-01

    Models of the macrozoobenthic community responses to abiotic variables measured in the polluted Bilbao estuary were obtained by multiple linear regression analyses. Total, Oligochaeta and Nematoda abundance and biomass were considered as dependent variables. Intertidal level, dissolved oxygen at the bottom of the water column (DOXB) and organic content of the sediment were selected by the analyses as the three principal explanatory variables. Goodness-of-fit of the models was high ( overlinex=71.3% ). Total abundance and biomass increased as a linear function of DOXB. The principal outcome of the vast sewage scheme currently in progress in the study area is an important contributor of increasing DOXB levels. The models exposed in this paper will serve as a tool to evaluate the expected changes in the near future.

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of contaminants within estuarine sediments and native Olympia oysters: A contrast between a developed and an undeveloped estuary.

    PubMed

    Granek, Elise F; Conn, Kathleen E; Nilsen, Elena B; Pillsbury, Lori; Strecker, Angela L; Rumrill, Steve S; Fish, William

    2016-07-01

    Chemical contaminants can be introduced into estuarine and marine ecosystems from a variety of sources including wastewater, agriculture and forestry practices, point and non-point discharges, runoff from industrial, municipal, and urban lands, accidental spills, and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of potential sources contributes to the likelihood of contaminated marine waters and sediments and increases the probability of uptake by marine organisms. Despite widespread recognition of direct and indirect pathways for contaminant deposition and organismal exposure in coastal systems, spatial and temporal variability in contaminant composition, deposition, and uptake patterns are still poorly known. We investigated these patterns for a suite of persistent legacy contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and chemicals of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals within two Oregon coastal estuaries (Coos and Netarts Bays). In the more urbanized Coos Bay, native Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida) tissue had approximately twice the number of PCB congeners at over seven times the total concentration, yet fewer PBDEs at one-tenth the concentration as compared to the more rural Netarts Bay. Different pharmaceutical suites were detected during each sampling season. Variability in contaminant types and concentrations across seasons and between species and media (organisms versus sediment) indicates the limitation of using indicator species and/or sampling annually to determine contaminant loads at a site or for specific species. The results indicate the prevalence of legacy contaminants and CECs in relatively undeveloped coastal environments highlighting the need to improve policy and management actions to reduce contaminant releases into estuarine and marine waters and to deal with legacy compounds that remain long after prohibition of use. Our results point to the need for better understanding of the ecological and

  6. Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov., a chitinolytic strain isolated from estuarine lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lopamudra; Mishra, Samir Ranjan; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Das, Surajit; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattanaik, Ajit Kumar; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-09-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain RC1832T was isolated from the sediment of a fish dumping yard at Balugaon near Chilika Lake. The strain is halotolerant (15 % NaCl, w/v), alkali-tolerant (pH 7-10) and hydrolyzes chitin, starch, gelatin, cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, Tween 80, tributyrin, lecithin and casein. Apart from showing typical genus-specific morphological and chemotaxonomic features, the comparision and analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence clearly revealed that the strain RC1832T represented a member of the genus Streptomyces. It exhibited the highest sequence similarities with the strains Streptomyces fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T (99.78 %), Streptomyces nanhaiensis DSM 41926T (99.07 %), Streptomyces radiopugnans R97T(98.71 %), Streptomyces atacamensis DSM 42065T (98.65 %) and Streptomyces barkulensis DSM 42082T (98.25 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain RC 1832T with the closest phylogenetic neighbours S. fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T and S. nanhaiensis DSM 41926T were 20±2 % and 21±2 %, respectively. Thus, based on a range of phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain RC1832T was suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RC1832T (=JCM 30611=KCTC 29696). PMID:27220564

  7. Distribution of typical denitrifying functional genes and diversity of the nirS-encoding bacterial community related to environmental characteristics of river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Chen, C.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, R.; Yang, X.

    2011-05-01

    Denitrification in river sediments leads to nitrate removal from the aquatic system; therefore, it is necessary to understand functional diversity of denitrifier communities in the system. Sediment samples (0-25 cm depth) were collected from three typical locations along the Pearl River. The real-time PCR approach was used to measure the abundance of nitrate (narG), nitrite (nirS, nirK and nrfA), and nitrous oxide (nosZ) reductase genes from the sediment samples. Assemblages of nirS, nirK and nosZ indicated that complete denitrification occurred in sediment cores, with the greatest number of gene copies from 5-15 cm depth. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction appeared to be important below 15 cm depth, based on increasing gene copies of narG and nrfA with sediment depth. There was a close match (78-94 %) between the nirS sequences recovered from Pearl River sediment and those detected in estuarine and marine sediments as well as active sludge, suggesting that domestic sewage inputs and irregular tides. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the spatial distribution of denitrifying bacteria was highly correlated with dissolved inorganic N (DIN: NH4+, NO2sediment. We conclude that changes in DIN within the sediment profile influences the distribution of denitrifying genes and the nirS-encoding denitrifier community in the river sediment. Our results also reveal a variety of novel denitrifying bacteria in the river sediment.

  8. Microbial community transitions across the deep sediment-basement interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonté, J.; Lever, M. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of microbial abundance and geochemistry in deep marine sediments indicate a stimulation of microbial activity near the sediment-basement interface; yet, the extent to which microbial communities in bottom sediments and underlying crustal habitats interact is unclear. We conducted tag pyrosequencing on DNA extracted from a spectrum of deep sediment-basement samples to try to identify patterns in microbial community shifts across sediment-basement interfaces, focusing on samples from the subsurface of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank (IODP Expedition 327). Our results demonstrate that sediment and the basaltic crust harbor microbial communities that are phylogenetically connected, but the eveness is characteristic of the environment. We will discuss the microbial community transitions that occur horizontally along fluid flow pathways and vertically across the sediment basement interface, as well as the possible implications regarding the controls of microbial community composition along deep sediment-basement interfaces in hydrothermal systems. We will also highlight efforts to overcome sample contamination in crustal subsurface samples.

  9. A molecular-based approach for examining responses of eukaryotes in microcosms to contaminant-spiked estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Chariton, Anthony A; Ho, Kay T; Proestou, Dina; Bik, Holly; Simpson, Stuart L; Portis, Lisa M; Cantwell, Mark G; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Burgess, Robert M; Pelletier, Marguerite M; Perron, Monique; Gunsch, Claudia; Matthews, Robin A

    2014-02-01

    Ecotoxicological information for most contaminants is limited to a small number of taxa, and these are generally restricted to comparatively hardy organisms that are readily extractable from test media and easily identifiable. Advances in DNA sequencing can now provide a comprehensive view of benthic invertebrate diversity. The authors applied 454 pyrosequencing to examine the responses of benthic communities in microcosms exposed to sediments with elevated concentrations of triclosan, the endpoint being eukaryl communities that have successfully vertically migrated through the manipulated sediments. The biological communities associated with the 3 treatments (control triclosan, low triclosan [14 mg/kg], and high triclosan [180 mg/kg]) clustered into 3 groups: control/low (n = 6 controls and 4 low), moderate (n = 2 low), and high (n = 5 high). One sample was discarded as an outlier. The most pronounced change as a response to triclosan was the loss of number of metazoan operational taxonomic units (OTUs), indicative of the control/low and moderate groups, with this being most evident in the range of taxa associated with the classes Chromadorea and Bivalvia and the phylum Kinorhyncha. The authors also describe a range of other taxa that aided discrimination between the groups; compare findings with traditionally obtained meio- and macrofaunal communities obtained from the same experiment; and illustrate some of the advantages and limitations associated with both the molecular and traditional approaches. The described approach illustrates the capacity for amplicon sequencing to provide ecologically relevant information that can be used to strengthen an understanding of how sedimentary communities respond to a range of environmental stressors. PMID:24399368

  10. Tidal fluxes of nutrients and suspended sediments at the North Inlet Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. R.; Kjerfve, B.

    2006-12-01

    Beginning June of 1993 suites of 13 water samples have been collected at Oyster Landing, North Inlet (SC), every 20 days covering two consecutive tidal cycles at 2.07 h intervals. In order to ascertain whether this large (and still growing) water chemistry data set can be used to determine tidal fluxes of nutrients and sediments, we coupled measured concentrations to estimates of instantaneous tidal discharge based on a basin water storage curve and hindcast tides. The mean advective fluxes of all constituents, including salt, showed statistically significant exports. This result, however, is largely due to an ebb bias in the sampling protocol, which resulted in 52% of the samples being collected on ebb tide versus a theoretical percentage of 48%. When this bias was corrected by reducing the mean discharge (-610 l s -1) to a value (-125 l s -1) that produced a balance between the mean advective and dispersive salt fluxes, the advective fluxes of the other constituents were reduced to values that are not significantly different from zero. In addition to a statistically significant dispersive influx of salt, significant dispersive exports were found for DON, NH 4, DOP, PO 4 and DOC. All particulate constituents (PN, PP, ISS and OSS) yielded dispersive fluxes that were not significantly different from zero. Annual material budgets for the Oyster Landing basin based on the dispersive fluxes of all constituents (except salt) are generally similar in magnitude and direction to those measured by [Dame, R.F., Spurrier, J.D., Williams, T.M., Kjerfve, B., Zingmark, R.G., Wolaver, T.G., Chrzanowski, T.H., McKeller, H.N., Vernberg, F.J., 1991. Annual material processing by a salt marsh-estuarine basin in South Carolina, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series 72, 153-166.] in the nearby and ecologically similar Bly Creek basin, indicating that the dispersive fluxes determined in this study are realistic. We offer suggestions for improving the reliability and usefulness of future

  11. Remote Sensing of Salinity Profiles and Multi-sensor Profiler for Marine Estuarine Flow, Water Properties and Sediment Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. B.

    2012-12-01

    Observing the numerous characteristics of flow and water properties in marine estuaries requires many sensors and systems. As a component of CMOP (Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction), an NSF Science and Technology Center, two innovative new instruments were developed and operated in the marine estuary of the Columbia River. One determines the vertical profile of electrical conductivity (σ), which in the Columbia River can be converted to salinity. The goal of the Sigma Profiler is to provide a robust sensor for determining the salinity profile from the riverbed in a region of vessel traffic, fishing, debris and strong currents. The Sigma Profiler uses characteristics of deliberately emitted EM currents. Because the spatial attenuation of EM signals is proportional to the square root of signal frequency, the transmission of signals of many frequencies can determine the vertical structure of σ. Six frequencies between 270 Hz and 27.7 kHz are used. SP performance is determined with simultaneous CTD casts and the CMOP autonomous profiler at Saturn01. The observations are useful for comparison with numerical models simulations. The second instrument is a combination of many sensors on a tow body that is winched vertically. The sensors on the Winched Profiler include SonTek ADV, CTD, μσ, μT, dual shear probes, Wet Labs Triplet, LISST-100X, O2, acoustic altimeter, motion package, and magnetic compass. The various sensors on the Winched Profiler can be used to determine vertical eddy fluxes of salinity, mixing characteristics, dissipation rates of kinetic energy, internal waves, estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs), terms in turbulent KE energy balance, BBL structure, turbidity, suspended sediment characteristic and transport and evaluate various turbulence closure schemes. The Winched Profiler has a real time display of 25 panels of sensor outputs and diagnostics. Results from the Sigma Profiler and Winched Profiler, which were operated extensively in May 2012

  12. Hydrodynamic and suspended sediment patterns in the estuarine turbidity zone of a mesotidal estuary from cross-sectional ADCP measurements and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorndt, Anna Christina; Grünler, Steffen; Schiller, Ulrike; Kösters, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Carefully assessing impacts of human interventions on hydrodynamics, salinity and sediment transport in estuaries has become increasingly important due to the high ecological importance of these systems. Quantifying these changes is commonly done by numerical modeling. However, model results highly rely on the applied model formulations and model parameters. Therefore, validation of the results with measurements is necessary. In case of suspended particulate matter, the use of stationary point measurements is limited due to the high spatial variability of sediments in the water column. This study focusses on modeling the estuarine turbidity maximum of the Weser estuary (Germany), which is a mesotidal and well- to partially mixed estuary. The estuarine turbidity maximum evolves due to known physical effects such as the gravitational circulation, tidal velocity and tidal mixing asymmetries as well as vertical and lateral advection. Those effects also contribute to high lateral and vertical variations which may in nature superposed with secondary currents by local bathymetric features. To increase the understanding of the high spatial and temporal variability of the suspended particulate matter and to validate numerical simulations, 13-hour measurements of three cross-profiles within the estuarine turbidity maximum were carried out in three consecutive years (2009 - 2011). Those consisted of continuous measurements of two vessel-mounted acoustic doppler current profiler, one of which was tilted by 20°. Also, a movable unit (with conductivity, temperature and depth probes, a laser in-situ scattering transmitter and an optical backscatter sensor) was used, also taking a water sample for calibration every 30 minutes. The employed hydrodynamical modeling tool based on the 3D shallow water equations is UnTRIM, described by Casulli and Zanolli (2002), together with the SediMorph module for calculation of transport of suspended and bed load. The model domain has a size of

  13. Resilience and adjustments of surface sediment bacterial communities in an enclosed shallow coastal lagoon, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Vani; Archambault, Philippe; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-05-01

    Bacteria regulate global biogeochemical cycles and much of this activity occurs in shallow coastal sediments; however, little is known of the seasonality or how changes in environmental conditions influence the active sediment bacterial communities. Havre-aux-Maisons (Magdalen Islands, Canada), a relatively pristine enclosed shallow coastal lagoon, is of particular biological interest since it has no inflowing rivers and provides an opportunity to investigate non-estuarine shallow marine sediments. Potentially active taxa in surface sediments were identified over a 15-month period using high-throughput rRNA amplicon sequencing. Sediment bacterial communities were diverse at the species level, with high Beta diversity. Throughout most of the sampling period, communities consisted of taxa that were closely related to each other, suggesting that specific environmental conditions at a given time point favored taxa with similar ecological traits. However, bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes were remarkably similar over time with a predominantly sulfur cycling community composed of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria persisting over much of the sampling period, despite the oxygenated water column. This community was disrupted after a storm and less common phyla became relatively more abundant. Following this disruption, a high proportion of benthic Cyanobacteria colonized the sediment before the reestablishment of the sulfur-cycle-dominated community. PMID:25873467

  14. Evaluation of the organic matter sources using the δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes in sediments from Brazilian estuarine systems by GC/C/IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maioli, Otávio Luiz Gusso; de Oliveira, Cristiane Rossi; Dal Sasso, Marco Aurélio; Madureira, Luiz Augusto dos Santos; Azevedo, Débora de Almeida; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2012-12-01

    The δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes (from C16 to C34) was measured from surface sediments of five Brazilian estuarine systems affected by different organic matter sources, such as harbor area, industries, urban centers and sugar cane crops, in order to determine the origins of the organic matter. The aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The levels of n-alkanes in the studied areas ranged from 0.34 to 18.14 μg kg-1, being relatively low in comparison to high polluted environments. The Carbon Preference Index (CPI) calculated in the C23-C34 range indicates that n-alkanes are mainly inherited from cuticular waxes of higher plants. The δ13C composition of all n-alkanes detected in the sediment samples ranged from -39.6 to -18.3‰ showing different sources for the studied estuarine systems. Through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) it was possible to verify the petrogenic influence in the n-alkane sources, especially in the Paraíba do Sul sediment samples. Differences up to 15‰ of the δ13C values between n-alkanes of odd and even carbon number (C26 and C27) also indicated mixture of petrogenic and biogenic sources in Paraíba do Sul River. High (less negative) δ13C n-alkane values of odd carbon number were obtained from two sampling sites located close to an ethanol plant, indicating residues discharge of sugar cane (C4 plant). Influence of C3 plants that are the main components of dense ombrophile forest was observed in the Itajaí-Açu sediments by the decrease of δ13C (about 10‰ compared to the Paraíba do Sul River δ13C).

  15. Spatio-temporal distribution of major and trace metals in estuarine sediments of Dhamra, Bay of Bengal, India--its environmental significance.

    PubMed

    Satapathy, D R; Panda, C R

    2015-01-01

    The research depicts the spatial and temporal variation of major and trace metals in marine sediments at various monitoring stations of Dhamra estuary, Bay of Bengal, Odisha. The concentration and distribution of selected metals in surface sediments of the estuary were studied in order to assess the spatial extent of anthropogenic inputs viz., mining activities and to estimate the effects of seasonal variations on geochemical processes in this particular tropical estuarine system. Surface sediments reflect the presence of trace and major metals in parts per million, and the concentrations vary in the range of Cu (0.083 to 127.2), Ni (17.35 to 122.8), Co (1.2 to 31.58), Pb (0.8 to 95.86), Zn (12.1 to 415), Cd (0 to 11) and Cr (35.21 to 5,890), Fe (7,490 and 169,100), Mn (20 to 69,188), Ca (10 to 10,520), Mg (990 to 28,750), Na (300 to 51,700), and K (1,100 to 30,010). The comparison of spatial distribution of metal contents using GIS in marine sediments indicates that there is a substantial anthropogenic input in the Dhamra estuary. The enrichment of Cr is ascribed to the sedimentation of Brahmani River, passing through the mining region and discharging Cr pollutant to the sea. Similarly, the sources of Cd are attributable to corrosion-resistant paints used by a large number of trawlers. Contamination factor has been calculated for various metals to assess the degree of pollution. As per Hakanson's classification, Cr indicates very high contamination with considerable contamination of Cd, whereas moderate contamination of Pb, Zn, and Mn are observed in marine sediments. Pollution load index also indicate that there is deterioration of site quality in premonsoon season, which almost attains the baseline level in post monsoon and perfection in monsoon season (Tomlinson et al. (Helgolander Wissenschaftliche Meeresuntersuchungen, 33, 566-572, 1980)). The geoaccumulation index shows that the metal concentrations in sediments can be considered as background levels except

  16. Speciation and fate of trace metals in estuarine sediments under reduced and oxidized conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susan; O'Day, Peggy A; Esser, Brad; Randall, Simon

    2002-01-01

    We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ) or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc) as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm) from a 60 year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975) as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60 year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxy)hydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted ZnS were

  17. 137Cs and excess 210Pb deposition patterns in estuarine and marine sediment in the central region of the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon, north-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, John; Brunskill, Gregg; Zagorskis, Irena

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of 137Cs and 210Pb(xs) in 51 estuarine and marine sediment cores collected between the Upstart Bay and Rockingham Bay in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon, north-eastern Australia. Historical records of 210Pb(xs) and 137Cs atmospheric deposition and present day terrestrial inventories in north-eastern Australia are presented. 210Pb(xs) and 137Cs fluxes measured on suspended sediments in the Burdekin River are considered to be a source of recent inputs of these nuclides to the nearshore region of this part of the Great Barrier Reef. Direct correlations between sediment nuclide inventories, maximum detectable depths, and sediment mass accumulation rates (MARs), calculated using both 137Cs and 210Pb(xs), are explored. In relation to inventories of 210Pb(xs), 60% of atmospheric fallout 137Cs appears to be missing from the sediments. The reasons for these differences in two tracers, primarily of atmospheric origin, are discussed in terms of the geochemical properties of these two nuclides. Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that the 137Cs distribution in these cores can be a useful independent tracer which provides confirmation of MARs calculated from the decay of 210Pb(xs). PMID:15245842

  18. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments. PMID:26849913

  19. Microbial communities in streambed sediments recovering from desiccation.

    PubMed

    Marxsen, Jürgen; Zoppini, Annamaria; Wilczek, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    Climate change affects running waters not only by increasing temperatures but also by increasing discharge variability as more frequent and severe floods and more frequent and longer droughts occur, especially in upper reaches. Mediterranean streams are known to experience droughts, but Central European headwaters are also beginning to be affected. The development of bacterial communities (abundance, composition) and the recovery of microbial functions (bacterial production, extracellular enzyme activity) were explored after rewetting desiccated streambed sediments via a sediment core perfusion technique. The bacterial community composition changed only slightly in the sediments from the Central European stream Breitenbach (Germany), but distinctly in the Mediterranean Mulargia River (Sardinia, Italy) during 4 days of experimental rewetting. Breitenbach sediments probably enabled survival of bacterial communities more similar to indigenous streambed communities, because they were less dry. High activity of enzymes involved in polymer degradation at the beginning of rewetting in both sediments indicated the persistence of extracellular enzymes during drought. After 4 days, nearly all microbial activities reached a level similar to unaffected sediments for the Breitenbach, but not for Mulargia. Here, much more intense drying resulted in a more distinct change and reduction of the microbial community, responsible for slower recovery of structure and functions. PMID:20041952

  20. Comparison of methods for the removal of organic carbon and extraction of chromium, iron and manganese from an estuarine sediment standard and sediment from the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Hatcher, S.A.; Demas, C.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) estuarine sediment 1646 from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and surface sediment collected at two sites in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, were used to evaluate the dilute hydrochloric acid extraction of Cr, Fe and Mn from air-dried and freeze-dried samples that had been treated by one of three methods to remove organic carbon. The three methods for the oxidation and removal of organic carbon were: (1) 30% hydrogen peroxide; (2) 30% hydrogen peroxide plus 0.25 mM pyrophosphate; and (3) plasma oxidation (low-temperature ashing). There was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the percent of organic carbon removed by the three methods. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the concentration of Cr, Fe and Mn that was extracted, regardless of the extraction technique that was used. Hydrogen peroxide plus pyrophosphate removed the most organic carbon from sediment collected at the site in the Calcasieu River that was upstream from industrial outfalls. Plasma oxidation removed the most organic carbon from the sediment collected at a site in the Calcasieu River close to industrial outfalls and from the NBS estuarine sediment sample. Plasma oxidation merits further study as a treatment for removal of organic carbon. Operational parameters can be chosen to limit the plasma oxidation of pyrite which, unlike other Fe species, will not be dissolved by dilute hydrochloric acid. Preservation of pyrite allows the positive identification of Fe present as pyrite in sediments. ?? 1992.

  1. Disturbance of intertidal soft-sediment benthic communities by cockle hand raking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. J.; Broad, G.; Hall, S. J.

    2001-05-01

    Recent awareness of the ecosystem effects of fishing activities on the marine environment means that there is a pressing need to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of those activities that may have negative effects on non-target species and habitats. The cockle, Cerastoderma edule (L.) is the target of a commercial and artisanal fishery that occurs in intertidal and estuarine habitats across Northern Europe. Cockles are harvested either mechanically using tractor dredges or suction dredges or by large numbers of individual fishers using hand rakes. This study examined the effects of hand raking on the non-target species and under-sized cockles associated with intertidal cockle beds and the effects of size of the patch of sediment disturbed on subsequent recolonisation. Hand raking led to an initial three-fold increase in the damage rate of under-sized cockles compared with control plots. The communities in both small and large raked plots showed community changes relative to control plots 14 days after the initial disturbance. The small raked plots had recovered 56 days after the initial disturbance whereas the large raked plots remained in an altered state. Samples collected over a year later indicated that small-scale variations in habitat heterogeneity had been altered and suggest that while effects of hand raking may be significant within a year, they are unlikely to persist beyond this time-scale unless there are larger long-lived species present within the community.

  2. Microbial community composition in sediments resists perturbation by nutrient enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jennifer L; Ward, Bess B; Morrison, Hilary G; Hobbie, John E; Valiela, Ivan; Deegan, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2011-01-01

    Functional redundancy in bacterial communities is expected to allow microbial assemblages to survive perturbation by allowing continuity in function despite compositional changes in communities. Recent evidence suggests, however, that microbial communities change both composition and function as a result of disturbance. We present evidence for a third response: resistance. We examined microbial community response to perturbation caused by nutrient enrichment in salt marsh sediments using deep pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional gene microarrays targeting the nirS gene. Composition of the microbial community, as demonstrated by both genes, was unaffected by significant variations in external nutrient supply in our sampling locations, despite demonstrable and diverse nutrient-induced changes in many aspects of marsh ecology. The lack of response to external forcing demonstrates a remarkable uncoupling between microbial composition and ecosystem-level biogeochemical processes and suggests that sediment microbial communities are able to resist some forms of perturbation. PMID:21412346

  3. EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS ON FIELD- AND LABORATORY-DEVELOPED ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities, developed in sand-filled aquaria in the laboratory and in the field, were exposed to various concentrations of the insecticide, chlorpyrifos, and effects on community structure assessed. Laboratory communities were continuously exposed to the toxi...

  4. Methodology to assess the mobility of trace elements between water and contaminated estuarine sediments as a function of the site physico-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Gredilla, Ainara; de Diego, Alberto; Arana, Gorka; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This work presents an innovative methodology to have a rapid diagnosis about the mobility of selected trace elements of known toxicity and biological risk (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn and Zn) present in contaminated sediments. The novel strategy presented in this work uses, therefore, the own estuarine water in contact with sediments as the extracting agent to perform the mobility tests, simulating the real situation of the estuary. This water suffers from different physico-chemical conditions (low and high tides) and gives consequently, rather better information than the one obtained by the routine sequential extraction procedures. The final step of this methodology was the use of spatial modelling by kriging method and multivariate chemometric analysis, both for a better interpretation of the results. To achieve this goal, sediment and water samples were strategically collected at eight different points (four in tributary rivers, one in a closed dock, two in the main channel and another one in the mouth) along the Nerbioi-Ibaizabal River estuary (Metropolitan Bilbao, Basque Country) approximately every three months (summer, autumn, winter and spring) during a whole year. Physico-chemical changes, such as pH, carbonate content and organic matter of the sediments, together with variations in water salinity appear to be responsible for metal mobility from the sediment to the water layer. The influence of these variables was higher in the sites located close to the sea. Moreover, the mobility of trace elements was even higher at high tide in sediments with lower metal content. PMID:24378927

  5. Human and environmental impacts on river sediment microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Sean M; Jones, Edwin; Bearquiver, Angelita; Blackwolf, Frederick; Roundstone, Wayne; Scott, Nicole; Hooker, Jeff; Madsen, Robert; Coleman, Maureen L; Gilbert, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    Sediment microbial communities are responsible for a majority of the metabolic activity in river and stream ecosystems. Understanding the dynamics in community structure and function across freshwater environments will help us to predict how these ecosystems will change in response to human land-use practices. Here we present a spatiotemporal study of sediments in the Tongue River (Montana, USA), comprising six sites along 134 km of river sampled in both spring and fall for two years. Sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons and shotgun metagenomes revealed that these sediments are the richest (∼ 65,000 microbial 'species' identified) and most novel (93% of OTUs do not match known microbial diversity) ecosystems analyzed by the Earth Microbiome Project to date, and display more functional diversity than was detected in a recent review of global soil metagenomes. Community structure and functional potential have been significantly altered by anthropogenic drivers, including increased pathogenicity and antibiotic metabolism markers near towns and metabolic signatures of coal and coalbed methane extraction byproducts. The core (OTUs shared across all samples) and the overall microbial community exhibited highly similar structure, and phylogeny was weakly coupled with functional potential. Together, these results suggest that microbial community structure is shaped by environmental drivers and niche filtering, though stochastic assembly processes likely play a role as well. These results indicate that sediment microbial communities are highly complex and sensitive to changes in land use practices. PMID:24841417

  6. Human and Environmental Impacts on River Sediment Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Sean M.; Jones, Edwin; Bearquiver, Angelita; Blackwolf, Frederick; Roundstone, Wayne; Scott, Nicole; Hooker, Jeff; Madsen, Robert; Coleman, Maureen L.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment microbial communities are responsible for a majority of the metabolic activity in river and stream ecosystems. Understanding the dynamics in community structure and function across freshwater environments will help us to predict how these ecosystems will change in response to human land-use practices. Here we present a spatiotemporal study of sediments in the Tongue River (Montana, USA), comprising six sites along 134 km of river sampled in both spring and fall for two years. Sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons and shotgun metagenomes revealed that these sediments are the richest (∼65,000 microbial ‘species’ identified) and most novel (93% of OTUs do not match known microbial diversity) ecosystems analyzed by the Earth Microbiome Project to date, and display more functional diversity than was detected in a recent review of global soil metagenomes. Community structure and functional potential have been significantly altered by anthropogenic drivers, including increased pathogenicity and antibiotic metabolism markers near towns and metabolic signatures of coal and coalbed methane extraction byproducts. The core (OTUs shared across all samples) and the overall microbial community exhibited highly similar structure, and phylogeny was weakly coupled with functional potential. Together, these results suggest that microbial community structure is shaped by environmental drivers and niche filtering, though stochastic assembly processes likely play a role as well. These results indicate that sediment microbial communities are highly complex and sensitive to changes in land use practices. PMID:24841417

  7. Sediment bacterial communities associated with anaerobic biodegradation of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Zhao; He, Tao; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are ubiquitous in aquatic environments. Biodegradation is a major way to clean up the BPA pollution in sediments. However, information on the effective BPA biodegradation in anaerobic sediments is still lacking. The present study investigated the biodegradation potential of BPA in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. After 120-day incubation, a high removal of BPA (93 or 89%) was found in sediment microcosms (amended with 50 mg kg(-1) BPA) under these two anaerobic conditions. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Actinobacteria were the major bacterial groups in BPA-degrading sediments. The shift in bacterial community structure could occur with BPA biodegradation. PMID:25501890

  8. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria community in surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhen, Yu; Mi, Tiezhu; He, Hui; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which obtain energy from dissimilatory sulfate reduction, play a vital role in the carbon and sulfur cycles. The dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr), catalyzing the last step in the sulfate reduction pathway, has been found in all known SRB that have been tested so far. In this study, the diversity of SRB was investigated in the surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit gene ( dsrB). Based on dsrB clone libraries constructed in this study, diversified SRB were found, represented by 173 unique OTUs. Certain cloned sequences were associated with Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and a large fraction (60%) of novel sequences that have deeply branched groups in the dsrB tree, indicating that novel SRB inhabit the surface sediments. In addition, correlations of the SRB assemblages with environmental factors were analyzed by the linear model-based redundancy analysis (RDA). The result revealed that temperature, salinity and the content of TOC were most closely correlated with the SRB communities. More information on SRB community was obtained by applying the utility of UniFrac to published dsrB gene sequences from this study and other 9 different kinds of marine environments. The results demonstrated that there were highly similar SRB genotypes in the marine and estuarine sediments, and that geographic positions and environmental factors influenced the SRB community distribution.

  9. EFFECTS OF FENVALERATE ON FIELD- AND LABORATORY-DEVELOPED ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities developed in laboratory and in field aquaria during 8 weeks were exposed to various concentrations of the pyrethroid insecticide, fenvalerate. Laboratory communities, developed from planktonic larvae in unfiltered seawater, were continuously expose...

  10. Ban on commercial fishing in the estuarine waters of New South Wales, Australia: Community consultation and social impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Momtaz, Salim Gladstone, William

    2008-02-15

    In its effort to resolve the conflict between commercial and recreational fishers the New South Wales (NSW) government (NSW Fisheries) banned commercial fishing in the estuarine waters. The NSW Fisheries conducted a number of studies and held meetings with the affected communities including commercial fishers prior to the implementation of the ban. To investigate how community consultation played a role in the decision-making process especially as perceived by the commercial fishers and to determine actual social impacts of the ban on commercial fishers, in-depth interviews were conducted with the commercial fishers. This research reveals that despite the NSW Fisheries' consultations with commercial fishers prior to the closure, the latter were confused about various vital aspects of the decision. It further reveals that, the commercial fishers faced a number of significant changes as a result of this decision. We argue that a better decision-making process and outcome would have been possible through a meaningful consultation with the commercial fishers and a social impact assessment.

  11. STORAGE DURATION AND TEMPERATURE AND THE ACUTE TOXICITIES OF ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS TO MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA AND LEPTOCHEIRUS PLUMULOSUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many statutory needs for sediment quality assessment exist (U.S. EPA 1996). A variety of sediment toxicity tests have been used to support the development of sediment quality guidelines and to determine the benthic impacts of dredging activities and point and non-point source tox...

  12. STORAGE DURATION AND TEMPERATURE AND THE ACUTE TOXICITIES OF ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS TO MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA AND LEPTOCHEIRUS PLUMULOSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many statutory needs for sediment quality assessment exist (U.S. EPA 1996). A variety of sediment toxicity tests have been used to support the development of sediment quality guidelines and to determine the benthic impacts of dredging activities and point and non-point source tox...

  13. An Evaluation of Partial Digestion Protocols for the Extraction and Measurement of Trace Metals of Environmental Concern in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, S. J.; Krahforst, C.; Sherman, L.; Kehm, K.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a broad study of the fate and transport of trace metals in estuarine sediments (Krahforst et al., 2013), the efficacy of commonly-used partial digestion protocols, including ISO 11466 (treatment with aqua regia), EPA 3050B (nitric acid followed by H2O2) and a modified rock digestion method ('RD' method- H2O2 followed by nitric), were evaluated for two NIST SRM materials, marine sediment 2702 and estuarine sediment 1646a. Unlike so-called total sediment digestions, the methods studied in this work do not employ hydrofluoric acid and are thought to leave silicates substantially or wholly intact. These methods can in principle compliment studies based on total digestions by providing information about trace metals in phases that are potentially more labile in the marine environment. Samples were digested in ~150 mg aliquots. Application of ISO 11466 and EPA 3050B followed published protocols except that digestions were carried out in trace-metal clean 15 mL capped Teflon vessels in an Al block digester and, at the end of the procedure, the supernatant was decanted from undigested material following repeated centrifugation in 2% nitric acid. Digested solutions were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Sn and Pb content by ICPMS. All elements were analyzed in collision reaction cell mode to minimize isobaric interferences, except Cd and Ag, which were analyzed in standard mode. Instrument performance was monitored in-run by analyzing the SRM 1643e and several quality-check standards. Two repeated digestions of SRM 2702 and SRM 1646a using EPA 3050B produced identical yields, within the standard deviation of repeated analyses (0 - 5%), for all analyzed elements except Cu, which varied by 30% for SRM 2702. The same was true for ISO 11466, although the standard deviation of repeated analyses for this digestion series tended to be larger (< ~15%). The RD method, which consists of pre-treatment with H2O2 followed by repeated treatments with

  14. Interactions of Cd and Cu in anaerobic estuarine sediments. 2: Bioavailability, body burdens and respiration effects as related to geochemical partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, J.H.; Alden, R.W. III

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between Cd and Cu distribution in sediment geochemical fractions and their bioavailability was studied. A fine-sandy textured estuarine sediment was treated with all combinations of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg Cd and 0, 12, and 25 mg/kg Cu using the chloride salts of each metal. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) were exposed to the treated sediments in aquaria with 20 ppt artificial seawater for 14 d. Sediments were sequentially extracted before and after organism exposure to determine the exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulfide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. Low mortalities were observed for all organism types and none were attributable to any of the treatments. The Cd and Cu concentrations in the easily reducible and organic-sulfide phases were found to be significantly related to the bioavailability of these metals. The most highly significant relationship was established between Cd in the easily reducible phase and body burden of Cd in the blue mussel. Notable interactions were found between Cd and Cu in some of the geochemical phases, body burdens, and respiration rates. Metal uptake, respiration, and interactions were highly dependent on the test species. A significant correlation was found between increased body burden and depressed respiration for Cd but not for Cu. Multiple regression models are used to describe these relationships. It appears that the interactive responses in the organisms are driven primarily by the sediment geochemical effects and mediated by individual organism processes. These results underscore the necessity of multicomponent (multielement) studies in assessing the fate and effects of toxic elements in the environment.

  15. Pond sediment magnetite grains show a distinctive microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, H-K; Sonkaria, S; Khare, V; Dong, K; Lee, H-T; Ahn, S-H; Kim, H-K; Kang, H-J; Lee, S-H; Jung, S P; Adams, J M

    2015-07-01

    Formation of magnetite in anaerobic sediments is thought to be enhanced by the activities of iron-reducing bacteria. Geobacter has been implicated as playing a major role, as in culture its cells are often associated with extracellular magnetite grains. We studied the bacterial community associated with magnetite grains in sediment of a freshwater pond in South Korea. Magnetite was isolated from the sediment using a magnet. The magnetite-depleted fraction of sediment was also taken for comparison. DNA was extracted from each set of samples, followed by PCR for 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and HiSeq sequencing. The bacterial communities of the magnetite-enriched and magnetite-depleted fractions were significantly different. The enrichment of three abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) suggests that they may either be dependent upon the magnetite grain environment or may be playing a role in magnetite formation. The most abundant OTU in magnetite-enriched fractions was Geobacter, bolstering the case that this genus is important in magnetite formation in natural systems. Other major OTUs strongly associated with the magnetite-enriched fraction, rather than the magnetite-depleted fraction, include a Sulfuricella and a novel member of the Betaproteobacteria. The existence of distinct bacterial communities associated with particular mineral grain types may also be an example of niche separation and coexistence in sediments and soils, which cannot usually be detected due to difficulties in separating and concentrating minerals. PMID:25592636

  16. Iron cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Delwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2014-05-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of iron is a key early diagenetic process. However, limited information exists about the diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to iron cycling in marine sediments. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial community diversity in sediments showing ongoing dissimilatory iron reduction using 454-pyrosequencing as a first step in characterizing microorganisms potentially involved in iron reduction. For this purpose, two 35 cm cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak (SK) and the Bothnian Bay (BB) from the North-Sea Baltic Sea and the northern Baltic Sea respectively. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulphide levels were below detection in both sediments. No significant depletion of SO42- occurred at both sites, further supported by stable S and O isotope analyses of dissolved sulfate at SK site. Only very minor net sulfate reduction is suggested here from the trend in sulphur isotope signatures, in agreement with previously reported gross microbial sulphate rate measurements (Canfield et al., 1993;GCA). Based on these biogeochemical constraints, Fe reduction in the studied sediments is therefore dominated by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction, while cryptic Fe-S-cycling can be largely excluded. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate Proteobacteria as the dominating microbial group in these sediments. Potential iron and manganese reducing bacteria included Geobacteraceae, Pelobacteraceae, Shewanellaceae, and Oceanospirillales. Additionally, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were present. Also, Fe-oxidizers were present and their occurrence correlated in depth with a Fe-oxide-rich layer, most likely a former buried Fe-oxidation front. Gene sequences point to the presence of Mariprofundus in SK sediments and

  17. The Role of Heterotrophic Microbial Communities in Estuarine C Budgets and the Biogeochemical C Cycle with Implications for Global Warming: Research Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O Roger

    2016-05-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive and economically important marine ecosystems at the land-ocean interface and contribute significantly to exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Estuarine microbial communities are major links in the biogeochemical C cycle and flow of C in food webs from primary producers to higher consumers. Considerable attention has been given to bacteria and autotrophic eukaryotes in estuarine ecosystems, but less research has been devoted to the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes. Current research is reviewed here on the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes in C biogeochemistry and ecology of estuaries, with particular attention to C budgets, trophodynamics, and the metabolic fate of C in microbial communities. Some attention is given to the importance of these processes in climate change and global warming, especially in relation to sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 , while also documenting the current paucity of research on the role of eukaryotic microbes that contribute to this larger question of C biogeochemistry and the environment. Some recommendations are made for future directions of research and opportunities of applying newer technologies and analytical approaches to a more refined analysis of the role of C in estuarine microbial community processes and the biogeochemical C cycle. PMID:26507684

  18. Patterns of species diversity in estuarine benthic communities along teh US west coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries in the Pacific North West (PNW) were recently classified by whether the estuary is river- or ocean-dominated, the extent of intertidal to subtidal environments, and spatial salinity patterns. We examine whether these characteristics predict patterns of soft-sediment, m...

  19. Distribution of typical denitrifying functional genes and diversity of the nirS-encoding bacterial community related to environmental characteristics of river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Chen, C.; Yang, X.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, R.

    2011-10-01

    Denitrification in river sediments leads to nitrate removal from the aquatic system; therefore, it is necessary to understand functional diversity of denitrifier communities in the system. Sediment samples (0-25 cm depth) were collected from three typical locations along the Pearl River. The real-time PCR approach was used to measure the abundance of nitrate (narG), nitrite (nirS, nirK and nrfA), and nitrous oxide (nosZ) reductase genes from the sediment samples. Assemblages of nirS, nirK and nosZ indicated that complete denitrification occurred in sediment cores, with the greatest number of gene copies from 5-15 cm depth. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction appeared to be important below 15 cm depth, based on increasing gene copies of narG and nrfA with sediment depth. There was a close match (78-94 %) between the nirS sequences recovered from the Pearl River sediment and those detected in estuarine and marine sediments as well as active sludge, suggesting that the nitrogen source in the Pearl River sediment was affected by domestic sewage inputs and irregular tides. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the spatial distribution of denitrifying bacteria was highly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (including NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) concentrations in sediment. It was concluded that the difference in dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations along the sediment profile influenced the distribution of denitrifying genes and the nirS-encoding denitrifier community in the river sediment. In addition, a variety of novel denitrifying bacteria were revealed in the river sediment.

  20. Estuarine Food for Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M�ller-Solger, A. B.; M�ller-Navarra, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in animal and human nutrition has shown the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as the n-3 LC-PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These LC-PUFA are needed for healthy development and functioning of the nervous and vascular systems. De novo synthesis or elongation to LC-PUFA in animals is inefficient at best; thus sufficient amounts of these PUFA must be supplied by food sources. Algae, especially diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes, are the quantitatively most important producers of EPA and DHA. These types of algae often dominate estuarine producer communities. The upper San Francisco Estuary is no exception, and we found its LC-PUFA-rich phytoplankton biomass, but not the quantitatively prevalent terrestrial plant detritus, to be highly predictive of zooplankton (Daphnia) growth. In contrast, in freshwater lakes dominated by relatively LC-PUFA-poor phytoplankton, EPA, not total phytoplankton biomass, best predicted Daphnia growth. The commonly high abundance of LC-PUFA-rich algae in estuaries may help explain the high trophic efficiencies in these systems and resulting high consumer production. Moreover, LC-PUFA-rich estuarine food resources may also provide essential nutrition and associated health and evolutionary benefits to land-dwelling consumers of such foods, including humans. Ensuring LC-PUFA-rich, uncontaminated estuarine production is thus an important goal for estuarine restoration and a convincing argument for estuarine conservation.

  1. Phytoplankton Diversity and Community Composition along the Estuarine Gradient of a Temperate Macrotidal Ecosystem: Combined Morphological and Molecular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Pauline; Jouenne, Fabien; Friedl, Thomas; Deton-Cabanillas, Anne-Flore; Le Roy, Bertrand; Véron, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Microscopical and molecular analyses were used to investigate the diversity and spatial community structure of spring phytoplankton all along the estuarine gradient in a macrotidal ecosystem, the Baie des Veys (eastern English Channel). Taxa distribution at high tide in the water column appeared to be mainly driven by the tidal force which superimposed on the natural salinity gradient, resulting in a two-layer flow within the channel. Lowest taxa richness and abundance were found in the bay where Teleaulax-like cryptophytes dominated. A shift in species composition occurred towards the mouth of the river, with the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis dramatically accumulating in the bottom waters of the upstream brackish reach. Small thalassiosiroid diatoms dominated the upper layer river community, where taxa richness was higher. Through the construction of partial 18S rDNA clone libraries, the microeukaryotic diversity was further explored for three samples selected along the surface salinity gradient (freshwater - brackish - marine). Clone libraries revealed a high diversity among heterotrophic and/or small-sized protists which were undetected by microscopy. Among them, a rich variety of Chrysophyceae and other lineages (e.g. novel marine stramenopiles) are reported here for the first time in this transition area. However, conventional microscopy remains more efficient in revealing the high diversity of phototrophic taxa, low in abundances but morphologically distinct, that is overlooked by the molecular approach. The differences between microscopical and molecular analyses and their limitations are discussed here, pointing out the complementarities of both approaches, for a thorough phytoplankton community description. PMID:24718653

  2. Zooplankton community structure during a transition from dry to wet state in a shallow, subtropical estuarine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2015-12-01

    Lake St Lucia is among the most important shallow ecosystems globally and Africa's largest estuarine lake. It has long been regarded as a resilient system, oscillating through periods of hypersalinity and freshwater conditions, depending on the prevailing climate. The alteration of the system's catchment involving the diversion of the Mfolozi River away from Lake St Lucia, however, challenged the resilience of the system, particularly during the most recent drought (2002-2011), sacrificing much of its biodiversity. This study reports on the transition of the St Lucia zooplankton community from a dry hypersaline state to a new wet phase. Sampling was undertaken during routine quarterly surveys at five representative stations along the lake system from February 2011 to November 2013. A total of 54 taxa were recorded during the study period. The zooplankton community was numerically dominated by the calanoid copepods Acartiella natalensis and Pseudodiaptomus stuhlmanni and the cyclopoid copepod Oithona brevicornis. While the mysid Mesopodopsis africana was still present in the system during the wet phase, it was not found in the swarming densities that were recorded during the previous dry phase, possibly due to increased predation pressure, competition with other taxa and or the reconnection with the Mfolozi River via a beach spillway. The increase in zooplankton species richness recorded during the present study shows that the system has undergone a transition to wet state, with the zooplankton community structure reflecting that recorded during the past. It is likely, though, that only a full restoration of natural mouth functioning will result in further diversity increases.

  3. Stable isotopes and mercury in a model estuarine fish: multibasin comparisons with water quality, community structure, and available prey base.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas H; Paperno, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Stable-isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and mercury in a model predator, and associated prey community assessments were used to make inferences regarding food web relationships and how these relationships are influenced by habitat variability and anthropogenic factors. Although interconnected, the three major basins of the Indian River Lagoon system on the Atlantic coast of Florida comprise noticeably different available habitat types with spatially distinct faunal communities and available prey for spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, a model predatory fish species. Water quality, degree of urbanization, human population density, and levels of nitrogen enrichment clearly differ between these representative estuarine basins. The differences can influence feeding ecology and therefore result in different mercury concentrations and different stable-isotope signatures of spotted seatrout between basins. Mercury concentrations in spotted seatrout were greatest in Mosquito Lagoon (ML) and least in the Indian River Lagoon proper (IRL), although concentrations were low for all basins. Spotted seatrout from IRL were carbon-depleted and nitrogen-enriched compared with those from the other basins; this suggests either that the fish's primary source of carbon in IRL is an algae- or phytoplankton-based food web or that the pathway through the food web is shorter there. The δ(15)N values of IRL spotted seatrout were greater than those in the Banana River Lagoon or ML, suggesting slightly different trophic positioning of fish in these basins. The greater δ(15)N values in IRL spotted seatrout may also reflect the greater human population density and resultant anthropogenic inputs (e.g., observed higher total nitrogen levels) in IRL compared with the other more pristine basins examined. Understanding species' responses to broad-scale habitat heterogeneity in estuaries and knowing basin-specific differences in stable isotopes, mercury, prey communities, and comprehensive

  4. Sudden clearing of estuarine waters upon crossing the threshold from transport to supply regulation of sediment transport as an erodible sediment pool is depleted: San Francisco Bay, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity of suspended sediment in an estuary is regulated either by transport, where energy or time needed to suspend sediment is limiting, or by supply, where the quantity of erodible sediment is limiting. This paper presents a hypothesis that suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in estuaries can suddenly decrease when the threshold from transport to supply regulation is crossed as an erodible sediment pool is depleted. This study was motivated by a statistically significant 36% step decrease in SSC in San Francisco Bay from water years 1991–1998 to 1999–2007. A quantitative conceptual model of an estuary with an erodible sediment pool and transport or supply regulation of sediment transport is developed. Model results confirm that, if the regulation threshold was crossed in 1999, SSC would decrease rapidly after water year 1999 as observed. Estuaries with a similar history of a depositional sediment pulse followed by erosion may experience sudden clearing.

  5. Changes in northern Gulf of Mexico sediment bacterial and archaeal communities exposed to hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical changes in marine sediments during coastal water hypoxia are well described, but less is known about underlying changes in microbial communities. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) hypoxic zone sediments were characterized by py...

  6. Comparison of sediment grain size characteristics on nourished and un-nourished estuarine beaches and impacts on horseshoe crab habitat, Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, N.L.; Smith, D.R.; Nordstrom, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nourished and un-nourished estuarine beaches have conspicuous differences in sediment size and sorting that could affect their value as habitat for horseshoe crabs. Comparisons are made of beach profiles and sediment samples gathered at 0.15 m and 0.30 m depths on the backshore, at spring tide elevation, neap tide elevation, and the lower foreshore on 5 un-nourished and 3 nourished beaches in Delaware Bay, where tidal range is <2.0 m. The backshore is at least 0.5 m higher on the recently nourished beaches than on a nearby un-nourished beach reworked by storm waves. Nourishing these beaches to elevations higher than natural overwash heights will restrict natural evolution of the upper beach. Sediments at spring tide elevation on un-nourished sites average 0.72 mm in diameter at 0.15 m depth and 0.67 mm at 0.30 m depth.The similarity in size implies a relatively deep active layer in the zone of maximum cut and fill associated with cyclic profile change during low frequency, high magnitude storms. Sedimentary changes at neap tide elevation may be influenced more by depth of activation by waves than by cycles of deposition and erosion. Sediment at 0.15 m depth at spring and neap locations on the foreshore of nourished beaches is finer (0.51 mm) and better sorted (0.82 phi) than at 0.30 m depth (0.91 mm, 1.38 phi), implying that waves have not reworked the deeper sediments. Differences in sediment characteristics at depth may persist on eroding nourished beaches, where unreworked fill is close to the surface. Sediment texture influences horseshoe crab egg viability and development. Lower rates of water movement through the foreshore and greater thickness of the capillary fringe on nourished sites suggests that greater moisture retention will occur where horseshoe crabs bury eggs and may provide more favorable conditions for egg development, but the depth of these conditions will not be great on a recently nourished beach

  7. Stratified Communities of Active Archaea in Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Ketil B.; Teske, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Archaeal 16S rRNA was extracted from samples of deep marine subsurface sediments from Peru Margin site 1227, Ocean Drilling Program leg 201. The amounts of archaeal 16S rRNA in each extract were quantified by serial dilution and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The results indicated a 1,000-fold variation in rRNA content with depth in the sediment, with the highest concentrations found near the sediment surface and in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). The phylogenetic composition of the active archaeal population revealed by cloning and sequencing of RT-PCR products changed with depth. Several phylotypes affiliated with marine benthic group B (MBGB) dominated clone libraries from the upper part of the SMTZ and were detected only in this layer. Members of the miscellaneous crenarchaeotal group (MCG) dominated clone libraries from the other layers. These results demonstrate that archaeal communities change in activity and community composition over short distances in geochemically distinct zones of deep subseafloor sediments and that these changes are traceable in the rRNA pool. It was shown for the first time that members of both the MCG and MBGB Archaea are more active in the SMTZ than in layers above and below. This indicates that they benefit either directly or indirectly from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. They also appear to be ecophysiologically flexible, as they have been retrieved from a wide range of marine sediments of various geochemical properties. PMID:16820449

  8. Microbial Communities from Methane Hydrate-Bearing Deep Marine Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, David William; Fujita, Yoshiko; Delwiche, Mark Edmond; Blackwelder, David Bradley; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Uchida, T.

    2002-08-01

    Microbial communities in cores obtained from methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments (down to more than 300 m below the seafloor) in the forearc basin of the Nankai Trough near Japan were characterized with cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. Acridine orange direct count data indicated that cell numbers generally decreased with sediment depth. Lipid biomarker analyses indicated the presence of viable biomass at concentrations greater than previously reported for terrestrial subsurface environments at similar depths. Archaeal lipids were more abundant than bacterial lipids. Methane was produced from both acetate and hydrogen in enrichments inoculated with sediment from all depths evaluated, at both 10 and 35°C. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes amplified from the sediments indicated that archaeal clones could be discretely grouped within the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota domains. The bacterial clones exhibited greater overall diversity than the archaeal clones, with sequences related to the Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and green nonsulfur groups. The majority of the bacterial clones were either members of a novel lineage or most closely related to uncultured clones. The results of these analyses suggest that the microbial community in this environment is distinct from those in previously characterized methane hydrate-bearing sediments.

  9. Diversity of active microbial communities subjected to long-term exposure to chemical contaminants along a 40-year-old sediment core.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Assia; Petit, Fabienne; Fournier, Matthieu; Cécillon, Sébastien; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick; Berthe, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    In estuarine ecosystems, metallic and organic contaminants are mainly associated with fine grain sediments which settle on mudflats. Over time, the layers of sediment accumulate and are then transformed by diagenetic processes mainly controlled by microbial activity, recording the history of the estuary's chemical contamination. In an environment of this specific type, we investigated the evolution of the chemical contamination and the structure of both total and active microbial communities, based on PhyloChip analysis of a 4.6-m core corresponding to a 40-year sedimentary record. While the archaeal abundance remained constant along the core, a decrease by one order of magnitude in the bacterial abundance was observed with depth. Both total and active microbial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes in all sediment samples. Among Proteobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria dominated both total (from 37 to 60 %) and metabolically active (from 19.7 to 34.6 %) communities, including the Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, Caulobacterales, and Sphingomonadales orders. Co-inertia analysis revealed a relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, zinc and some polychlorobiphenyls concentrations, and the structure of total and active microbial communities in the oldest and most contaminated sediments (from 1970 to 1975), suggesting that long-term exposure to chemicals shaped the structure of the microbial community. PMID:25934230

  10. Environmental Conditions Outweigh Geographical Contiguity in Determining the Similarity of nifH-Harboring Microbial Communities in Sediments of Two Disconnected Marginal Seas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haixia; Dang, Hongyue; Klotz, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological evidence suggests that heterotrophic diazotrophs fueled by organic carbon respiration in sediments play an important role in marine nitrogen fixation. However, fundamental knowledge about the identities, abundance, diversity, biogeography, and controlling environmental factors of nitrogen-fixing communities in open ocean sediments is still elusive. Surprisingly, little is known also about nitrogen-fixing communities in sediments of the more research-accessible marginal seas. Here we report on an investigation of the environmental geochemistry and putative diazotrophic microbiota in the sediments of Bohai Sea, an eutrophic marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean. Diverse and abundant nifH gene sequences were identified and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were found to be the dominant putative nitrogen-fixing microbes. Community statistical analyses suggested bottom water temperature, bottom water chlorophyll a content (or the covarying turbidity) and sediment porewater Eh (or the covarying pH) as the most significant environmental factors controlling the structure and spatial distribution of the putative diazotrophic communities, while sediment Hg content, sulfide content, and porewater SiO32−-Si content were identified as the key environmental factors correlated positively with the nifH gene abundance in Bohai Sea sediments. Comparative analyses between the Bohai Sea and the northern South China Sea (nSCS) identified a significant composition difference of the putative diazotrophic communities in sediments between the shallow-water (estuarine and nearshore) and deep-water (offshore and deep-sea) environments, and sediment porewater dissolved oxygen content, water depth and in situ temperature as the key environmental factors tentatively controlling the species composition, community structure, and spatial distribution of the marginal sea sediment nifH-harboring microbiota. This confirms the ecophysiological specialization and niche differentiation

  11. Stream invertebrate community functional responses to deposited sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rabeni, C.F.; Doisy, K.E.; Zweig, L.D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated functional responses of benthic invertebrates to deposited sediment in four Missouri USA streams. In each stream, invertebrates were sampled along continuums of deposited sediment (particles <2 mm in size) from 0 to 100% surface cover in reaches of fairly homogeneous substrate composition, current velocity, and water depths. Correlations, graphical representations, and the cumulative response curves of feeding and habit groups provided strong empirical support for distinct community functional changes due to deposited sediment. Feeding groups were more sensitive to deposited sediment than habit groups. Densities of all the feeding groups decreased significantly with increasing deposited sediment, while relative densities of gatherers increased significantly. Taxa richness also decreased significantly for all the feeding groups except for the shredders. Increases in deposited sediment were related to significant density decreases for only the clingers and sprawlers in the habit group, resulting in significant increases in the relative densities of both burrowers and climbers. Clingers, sprawlers, and swimmers also showed significant decreases in taxa richness. ?? Eawag, 2005.

  12. Heavy metals in sediments as evidence for recent pollution and quasi-estuarine processes: an example from Lake Druzno, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylmann, Wojciech; Gołębiewski, Roman; Woźniak, Piotr Paweł; Czarnecka, Karolina

    2007-09-01

    This article presents the results of a geochemical investigation of sediments from Lake Druzno (northern Poland), a reservoir fed by freshwater from the catchment, with periodic input of brackish water from Vistula Lagoon. This study analyzed the spatial variation in heavy metal content in surface sediments as well as the temporal changes in metal content in two sediment cores dated using the 210Pb method. In the surface sediments, the highest metal concentrations were recorded in the northern part of the lake, with lower concentrations in the central and southern parts. Absolute values of metal concentrations in the cores were low, but normalization with respect to Al showed an increase during the second half of the 20th century. Mean enrichment factors (EF) in sediments from the second half of the 20th century ranged from insignificant (1-1.2) for Fe to (1.55-3.3) for Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn. The sediments deposited before 1950 had lower EF values (>1.5) and had low variability. Results from both the surface sediments and the cores indicate that the main source of lake pollution is brackish water intrusion from the Vistula Lagoon via the contaminated River Elbląg.

  13. Effects of estuarine sediment contamination on feeding and on key physiological functions of the polychaete Hediste diversicolor: Laboratory and in situ assays.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Lima, Inês; Ribeiro, Rui; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2006-06-15

    This study aimed at integrating postexposure feeding and some biochemical parameters in the responses of the estuarine polychaeta, Hediste diversicolor, to controlled laboratory exposure conditions and to in situ exposures scenario of sediment contamination. Since H. diversicolor feeding may be considered as a major rate-limiting step in the processing of detritus in European estuaries, a reduction in feeding activity may have implications not only at the individual and population level of the species but also in detritus processing and in organic matter decomposition rates at the ecosystem level. The biochemical parameters were chosen as indicators of four key physiological functions: neurotransmission, metabolic condition, detoxification processes and antioxidant defences. The Mira and Sado estuaries, located in the Southwest coast of Portugal and classified as undisturbed and impacted, respectively, were selected as sites for this study. A significant depression in H. diversicolor postexposure feeding (from 30 to 70%) was consistently detected in all impacted sediments, supporting the sensitivity and responsiveness of feeding as a sublethal toxicity endpoint. Alongside with a reduced energy intake, an increased rate of organisms' anaerobic metabolism, as evidenced by an enhancement of lactate dehydrogenase activity (up to 1.5-fold), suggested a rapid need of additional energy to ameliorate chemical stress. Moreover, oxidative stress was shown to be an important mechanism of toxicity of the impacted sediments in H. diversicolor, as evidenced by a marked reduction in the glutathione redox status (up to 6.5-fold) and an increase in lipid peroxides levels (up to 2.3-fold) in organisms exposed to the most impacted sediments. Results of the in situ assay, conducted to assess the ecological relevance of sediment laboratory toxicity estimates and their application to make valid field extrapolations, revealed a lack of agreement in the response of catalase in organisms

  14. Effect of physical sediments reworking on hydrocarbon degradation and bacterial community structure in marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Duran, Robert; Bonin, Patricia; Jezequel, Ronan; Dubosc, Karine; Gassie, Claire; Terrisse, Fanny; Abella, Justine; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cecile; Michotey, Valérie; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether the physical reworking of sediments by harrowing would be suitable for favouring the hydrocarbon degradation in coastal marine sediments. Mudflat sediments were maintained in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to those prevailing in natural environments with tidal cycles. Sediments were contaminated with Ural blend crude oil, and in half of them, harrowing treatment was applied in order to mimic physical reworking of surface sediments. Hydrocarbon distribution within the sediment and its removal was followed during 286 days. The harrowing treatment allowed hydrocarbon compounds to penetrate the first 6 cm of the sediments, and biodegradation indexes (such as n-C18/phytane) indicated that biodegradation started 90 days before that observed in untreated control mesocosms. However, the harrowing treatment had a severe impact on benthic organisms reducing drastically the macrofaunal abundance and diversity. In the harrowing-treated mesocosms, the bacterial abundance, determined by 16S rRNA gene Q-PCR, was slightly increased; and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct and specific bacterial community structure. Co-occurrence network and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) based on T-RFLP data indicated the main correlations between bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as well as the associations between OTUs and hydrocarbon compound contents further supported by clustered correlation (ClusCor) analysis. The analyses highlighted the OTUs constituting the network structural bases involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Negative correlations indicated the possible shifts in bacterial communities that occurred during the ecological succession. PMID:25847440

  15. Modeling the fate of p,p'-DDT in water and sediment of two typical estuarine bays in South China: Importance of fishing vessels' inputs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Xianming; Bao, Lian-Jun; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-05-01

    Antifouling paint applied to fishing vessels is the primary source of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) to the coastal marine environments of China. With the aim to provide science-based support of potential regulations on DDT use in antifouling paint, we utilized a fugacity-based model to evaluate the fate and impact of p,p'-DDT, the dominant component of DDT mixture, in Daya Bay and Hailing Bay, two typical estuarine bays in South China. The emissions of p,p'-DDT from fishing vessels to the aquatic environments of Hailing Bay and Daya Bay were estimated as 9.3 and 7.7 kg yr(-1), respectively. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the temporal variability of p,p'-DDT was well described by the model if fishing vessels were considered as the only direct source, i.e., fishing vessels should be the dominant source of p,p'-DDT in coastal bay areas of China. Estimated hazard quotients indicated that sediment in Hailing Bay posed high risk to the aquatic system, and it would take at least 21 years to reduce the hazards to a safe level. Moreover, p,p'-DDT tends to migrate from water to sediment in the entire Hailing Bay and Daya Bay. On the other hand, our previous research indicated that p,p'-DDT was more likely to migrate from sediment to water in the maricultured zones located in shallow waters of these two bays, where fishing vessels frequently remain. These findings suggest that relocating mariculture zones to deeper waters would reduce the likelihood of farmed fish contamination by p,p'-DDT. PMID:27016888

  16. Dietary assimilation of cadmium associated with bacterial exopolymer sediment coatings by the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus: Effects of Cd concentration and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Decho, Alan W.; Chandler, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular substances (also known as exopolysaccharides, or EPS) may serve as vectors for trophic transfer of metals in benthic systems because these ubiquitous sediment coatings can sorb high concentrations of toxic metals, and because many benthic invertebrates assimilate EPS sediment coatings upon ingestion. We conducted 3 sets of experiments to determine the assimilative bioavailability of EPS-associated Cd to the benthic amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus as a function of Cd concentration and salinity. Bioavailability was measured as L. plumulosus Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) from EPS-coated silica (EPS-Si) and from uncoated silica (NC-Si) using modified pulse-chase methods with the gamma-emitting radioisotope 109Cd. Cd AE was significantly greater from NC-Si than from EPS-Si at 7.5???, but not at 2.5 or 25???. Overall, Cd AE from EPS-Si was between 15.1 and 21.5%. Because EPS-Si sorbed more Cd than NC-Si, EPS coatings magnified the amount of Cd amphipods accumulated at each salinity by up to a factor of 10. Salinity did not directly affect Cd AE from EPS-Si, but because Cd-EPS partitioning increased with decreasing salinity, amphipods accumulated more Cd from EPS at the lowest Cd-EPS incubation salinity (2.5 ???) than at higher salinities (7.5 and 25 ???). Finally, Cd concentration in EPS exhibited an inverse relationship with Cd AE at 2.5 ???, but not at 25 ???. Specifically, Cd AE was 12 times greater at 1 compared with 10 ??g Cd ??g-1 EPS. Together, these results show that estuarine benthos can accumulate Cd from EPS sediment coatings, but that the degree to which this phenomenon occurs is dependent upon seawater salinity and Cd concentration in EPS.

  17. Influence of waves and horseshoe crab spawning on beach morphology and sediment grain-size characteristics on a sandy estuarine beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, N.L.; Nordstrom, K.F.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of wave action and horseshoe crab spawning on the topography and grain-size characteristics on the foreshore of an estuarine sand beach in Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA were evaluated using data collected over six consecutive high tides. Data were gathered inside and outside a 25 m long exclosure constructed to create a control area free of disturbance by crabs. The density of crabs in the swash zone outside the exclosure was 8??1 organisms m-2. The maximum depth of sediment activation on the upper foreshore where spawning occurred was 0??103 m during periods characterized by low significant wave heights: < 0??08 m. This depth is greater than the depth of activation by waves alone during moderate significant wave heights of 0??16 - 0??18 m but less than the maximum depth (0??127 m) recorded when spawning occurred during periods of moderate wave heights. Spawning, combined with moderate wave heights, creates a concave upper foreshore that is similar to the type of profile change that occurs during storms, thus lowering the wave-energy threshold for morphological response. Spawning during low wave heights increases the mean grain size and sorting of surface sediments caused by the addition of gravel to the swash. Sedimentological differences are most pronounced on the upper foreshore, and data from this location may be most useful when using grain-size characteristics to interpret the effect of spawning in the sedimentary record. Depths of sediment reworking by horseshoe crabs can be greater than those by subsequent storm waves, so evidence of spawning can be preserved on non-eroding beaches. Greater depth of activation by horseshoe crab spawning than by waves alone, even during moderate-energy conditions, reveals the importance of crab burrowing in releasing eggs to the water column and making them available for shore birds. ?? 2005 International Association of Sedimentologists.

  18. Use of a Novel Sediment Exposure to Determine the Effects of Triclosan on Estuarine Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a relatively new, commonly used antimicrobial compound found in many personal care products. Triclosan is toxic to marine organisms at the ug/l level, can photo-degrade to a dioxin, accumulate in humans, and has been found t...

  19. PCO2 effects on species composition and growth of an estuarine phytoplankton community

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ocean and coastal waters are undergoing changes in carbonate chemistry, including pH, in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and the microbial degradation of organic matter associated with nutrient enrichment. The effects of this change on plankton communities ha...

  20. TOXICITY OF DRILLING-MUD BIOCIDES TO DEVELOPING ESTUARINE MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of various biocides, as used in drilling muds for exploratory drilling for oil offshore, were determined by comparing macrobenthic communities that developed from planktonic larvae in treated and untreated aquaria. Surflo(R)-B33 and Aldacide(R) were tested simultaneou...

  1. Relationship between N : P : Si ratio and phytoplankton community composition in a tropical estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. K.; Bhadury, P.

    2015-02-01

    The present work aims at understanding the importance of Brzezinski-Redfield ratio (modified Redfield ratio) as a determinant of natural phytoplankton community composition in a mangrove ecosystem. Even though this ecoregion has been reported to be mostly eutrophic, localised and anthropogenic influences often result in habitat variability especially with regard to nutrient concentrations at different parts of this ecosystem. Phytoplankton, an important sentinel in aquatic ecosystems may respond differently to such alterations in habitat thereby bringing about significant changes in the community composition. Results show that even though habitat variability does exist at our study area and varied on a spatial and temporal scale, the nutrient concentrations were intricately balanced that never became limited and complemented well with the concept of modified Redfield ratio. However, an integrative approach to study phytoplankton community involving microscopy and rbcL clone library and sequencing approach revealed that it was the functional traits of individual phytoplankton taxa that determined the phytoplankton community composition rather than the nutrient concentrations of the study area. Hence we conclude that the recent concept of functional traits and elemental stoichiometry does not remain restricted to controlled environment of experimental studies only but occur in natural mangrove habitat.

  2. Residues in fish, wildlife, and estuaries. Indicator species near top of food chain chosen for assessment of pesticide base levels in fish and wildlife--clams, oysters, and sediment in estuarine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.E.; Carver, T.C.; Dustman, E.H.

    1967-01-01

    Federal efforts to determine pesticide levels in fish and wildlife are being carried out by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, U. S. Department of the Interior. Monitoring estuarine pesticide levels in clams, oysters, and sediments is a joint endeavor of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, U. S. Department of the Interior, and the Water Supply and Sea Resources Program of the National Center for Urban and Industrial Health, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

  3. Validating the use of embryonic fish otoliths as recorders of sublethal exposure to copper in estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Barbee, Nicole C; Greig, Alan; Swearer, Stephen E

    2013-07-01

    In this study we explore the use of fish otoliths ('earbones') as a tool for detecting exposure to heavy metals in sediments. Because otoliths are metabolically inert and incorporate chemical impurities during growth, they can potentially provide a more permanent record of pollutant exposure history in aquatic environments than soft tissues. To validate this technique we cultured embryos of a native Australian fish, the common Galaxias (Galaxias maculatus), in the laboratory on sediments spiked with copper in a concentration gradient. Our aims were to test whether exposure to copper contaminated sediments is recorded in the otoliths of embryos and determine over what range in concentrations we can detect differences in exposure. We found elevated copper levels in otoliths of embryos exposed to high copper concentrations in sediments, suggesting that otoliths can be used as a tool to track a history of exposure to elevated copper levels in the environment. PMID:23628888

  4. An assessment of mercury in estuarine sediment and tissue in Southern New Jersey using public domain data.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kara; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Pamela A; Barringer, Julia L; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-06-15

    Mercury (Hg) is considered a contaminant of global concern for coastal environments due to its toxicity, widespread occurrence in sediment, and bioaccumulation in tissue. Coastal New Jersey, USA, is characterized by shallow bays and wetlands that provide critical habitat for wildlife but share space with expanding urban landscapes. This study was designed as an assessment of the magnitude and distribution of Hg in coastal New Jersey sediments and critical species using publicly available data to highlight potential data gaps. Mercury concentrations in estuary sediments can exceed 2μg/g and correlate with concentrations of other metals. Based on existing data, the concentrations of Hg in mussels in southern New Jersey are comparable to those observed in other urbanized Atlantic Coast estuaries. Lack of methylmercury data for sediments, other media, and tissues are data gaps needing to be filled for a clearer understanding of the impacts of Hg inputs to the ecosystem. PMID:27158049

  5. An assessment of mercury in estuarine sediment and tissue in Southern New Jersey using public domain data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Kara; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Pamela A.; Barringer, Julia; Smalling, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is considered a contaminant of global concern for coastal environments due to its toxicity, widespread occurrence in sediment, and bioaccumulation in tissue. Coastal New Jersey, USA, is characterized by shallow bays and wetlands that provide critical habitat for wildlife but share space with expanding urban landscapes. This study was designed as an assessment of the magnitude and distribution of Hg in coastal New Jersey sediments and critical species using publicly available data to highlight potential data gaps. Mercury concentrations in estuary sediments can exceed 2 μg/g and correlate with concentrations of other metals. Based on existing data, the concentrations of Hg in mussels in southern New Jersey are comparable to those observed in other urbanized Atlantic Coast estuaries. Lack of methylmercury data for sediments, other media, and tissues are data gaps needing to be filled for a clearer understanding of the impacts of Hg inputs to the ecosystem.

  6. Heavy metal contamination from historic mining in upland soil and estuarine sediments of Egypt Bay, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osher, L. J.; Leclerc, L.; Wiersma, G. B.; Hess, C. T.; Guiseppe, V. E.

    2006-10-01

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in sediments of Egypt Bay in Hancock County, Maine, are elevated above background levels. The source of the contamination is Cu mining that occurred in the uplands adjacent to Egypt Stream between 1877 and 1885. Egypt Stream is a tributary to Egypt Bay. Egypt Bay is part of the Taunton Bay estuary system. The Hagan Mine was one of the mines extracting metals from the sulfide deposits in Downeast Maine north of Penobscot Bay. Metal concentrations were determined using ICP-AES after sample digestion with nitric acid. Soil collected from the coarse textured mine tailings pile contained elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, but the majority of the surface soils at the Hagan Mine site were not contaminated. Estuary sediments from the surface to 100 cm depth were collected in four locations within Egypt Bay. Below 40 cm, metal concentrations in sediments were similar to those in uncontaminated upland soils. Metal concentrations in the estuary sediments between the surface and 26 cm were above background levels. According to 210Pb dating, the sediment at 26-34 cm depth was likely to have been deposited at the time the historic mines were in operation. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sediment from the 32-34 cm depth interval are similar to concentrations in the upland soil sample from the mine tailings pile. Elevated Pb concentrations in sediments from the surface to 24 cm are from atmospheric Pb deposition from anthropogenic sources. Sediment in the top 10 cm of the estuary has been mixed both by the polychaete worm Nereis virens and by those harvesting the worms for sale as fish bait.

  7. Microbial community composition and diversity in Caspian Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Robeson, Michael S; Castro, Hector F; Fortney, Julian L; Techtmann, Stephen M; Joyner, Dominique C; Paradis, Charles J; Pfiffner, Susan M; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-01-01

    The Caspian Sea is heavily polluted due to industrial and agricultural effluents as well as extraction of oil and gas reserves. Microbial communities can influence the fate of contaminants and nutrients. However, insight into the microbial ecology of the Caspian Sea significantly lags behind other marine systems. Here we describe microbial biomass, diversity and composition in sediments collected from three sampling stations in the Caspian Sea. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed the presence of a number of known bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs suggesting that organic carbon is a primary factor shaping microbial communities. Surface sediments collected from bottom waters with low oxygen levels were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria while surface sediments collected from bottom waters under hypoxic conditions were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, specifically sulfate-reducing bacteria. Thaumarchaeota was dominant across all surface sediments indicating that nitrogen cycling in this system is strongly influenced by ammonia-oxidizing archaea. This study provides a baseline assessment that may serve as a point of reference as this system changes or as the efficacy of new remediation efforts are implemented. PMID:25764536

  8. Microbial community composition and diversity in Caspian Sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Robeson, Michael S.; Castro, Hector F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Techtmann, Stephen M.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Paradis, Charles J.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    The Caspian Sea is heavily polluted due to industrial and agricultural effluents as well as extraction of oil and gas reserves. Microbial communities can influence the fate of contaminants and nutrients. However, insight into the microbial ecology of the Caspian Sea significantly lags behind other marine systems. Here we describe microbial biomass, diversity and composition in sediments collected from three sampling stations in the Caspian Sea. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed the presence of a number of known bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs suggesting that organic carbon is a primary factor shaping microbial communities. Surface sediments collected from bottom waters with low oxygen levels were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria while surface sediments collected from bottom waters under hypoxic conditions were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, specifically sulfate-reducing bacteria. Thaumarchaeota was dominant across all surface sediments indicating that nitrogen cycling in this system is strongly influenced by ammonia-oxidizing archaea. This study provides a baseline assessment that may serve as a point of reference as this system changes or as the efficacy of new remediation efforts are implemented. PMID:25764536

  9. Remediation of Estuarine Barrages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Lamping, J.; Wright, J.

    2003-04-01

    Estuarine barrages have become a popular component of urban regeneration in the UK. However, a range of problems have been identified with the construction and operation of barrages, including: excess sediment build up; low oxygen conditions and eutrophication. This project has examined 3 strategies for the remediation of estuarine barrages: use of aerators; flushing of the impoundment by lock management; and use of boom/skirt technologies. The results show that: flushing of the barrage is ineffective; and that boom/skirt technologies could be successful in stratified impoundments. Aerators were shown to give significant increases in dissolved oxygen levels and field studies were able to delimit times when aeration would be effective. The study has shown that most problems experienced by the barrage are the result of inputs to the barrage rather than caused by the internal processes of the barrage itself and as such esturies must be managed as part of the catchment as a whole.

  10. The influence of wind and tidal forcing on sediment resuspension and transport in a large, shallow estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clunies, G.; Mulligan, R. P.; Mallinson, D. J.; Walsh, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Eastern North Carolina is characterized by a large system of interconnected estuaries, including Pamlico Sound, that are bordered on the east side by 260 km of barrier islands punctuated by several tidal inlets. The sound is characterized by a mean water depth of 5 m and muddy to sandy sediments. Wind forcing primarily controls the hydrodynamics of the sound, except near inlets where tides are more influential. The quantity and size of tidal inlets has a large effect on salinity levels, circulation, and bathymetry within the sound. The Delft3D model, validated using field observations at two sites, was used to estimate the contributions of wind and tidal forcing to flow velocities, bed shear stresses and sediment resuspension and sediment transport. Results are presented to determine the ability of the numerical model to accurately simulate the morphological changes in Pamlico Sound in response to major storm events. Previous storm events have caused significant barrier overstepping causing extensive damage to barrier island infrastructure and forcing the surrounding system to shift to a new dynamic equilibrium when left unaltered. Model results allow us to further enhance our understanding of the interdependent hydrodynamic and sediment processes in the system. In combination with sediment cores and geophysical surveys, this work will aid in reconstructing the evolution of the morphology of Pamlico Sound over the Holocene and estimate the sedimentary response to major storm events that shaped the basin.

  11. Usefulness of sediment toxicity tests with estuarine plants and animals to indicate municipal and industrial effluent impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Weber, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The environmental impact of municipal and industrial effluents has been predicted from results from single species toxicity tests. The goal of these tests is to ensure that water quality criteria and the designated use of the waterbody is not impacted. Recently, the focus of some effluent toxicity evaluation has centered on determining the effluent impact on the sediment in the receiving water. This study evaluated the toxicities of several sediment samples collected above and below six outfalls to the Pensacola Bay system. Toxicities were determined using three macrophytic plants and four animal species. The sediments, with few exceptions, exhibited a low level of toxicity. The mysid shrimp was more sensitive than Ampelisca, Leptocheirus and the sheepshead minnow. The sensitivities of the plants, Echinochloa crusgalli, Scirpus robustus and Sesbania macrocarpa, were comparable to those of the animal species. The toxicity of time sediment, when compared to that of the effluent, determined using standard single species of plants and animals was less. Overall, the sediment toxicity tests were useful in providing insight on the impact of effluents. However, the application and usefulness of this assessment tool is highly dependent upon a variety of factors, including the geomorphological characteristics of the receiving waters.

  12. Biogeochemical Control on the Flux of Trace Elements from Estuarine Sediments: Water Column Oxygen Concentrations and Benthic Infauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Gerhardt F.; Sanders, James G.; Osman, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Trace element (arsenic, copper and manganese) fluxes between sediment and water were examined for approximately 2 months in replicated sediment/water microcosms. Treatments consisted of three oxygen levels in the water column (saturated, 10% saturation and anaerobic) and three different organism treatments (control, Macoma balthicaand Nereis succinea). Both arsenic and manganese were released from the sediment in the anoxic treatment, while copper was lost from the water. With the water column either saturated or at 10% oxygen saturation, both arsenic and manganese fluxes were negligible. In contrast, copper fluxes out of the sediment increased with increasing oxygen concentrations. The effect of organisms on the trace element fluxes were greatest immediately after their introduction to the microcosms, and declined substantially thereafter. Nereiscaused a substantial initial increase in manganese fluxes, but caused a negative flux (out of the water column) for arsenic. Macomahad a much smaller effect on flux than Nereis. Neither organism had a substantial effect on copper fluxes. Porewater profiles gave good predictions of arsenic and manganese fluxes in the anoxic treatment, but not in the 10% or saturated-oxygen treatments. Porewater profiles underestimated copper fluxes in the oxygenated treatments somewhat, and predicted copper flux in the opposite direction in the anoxic treatment. These results suggest that the annual cycle of anoxia in systems like Chesapeake Bay, and the resulting annual cycle of organism death and recruitment, can significantly alter the cycling of trace elements between the sediment and water column.

  13. The dynamics of the yeast community of the Tagus river estuary: testing the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marco A; Almeida, João M F; Martins, Inês M; da Silva, A Jorge; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2010-10-01

    Yeasts are common inhabitants of different types of aquatic habitats, including marine and estuarine waters and rivers. Although numerous studies have surveyed yeast occurrence in these habitats, the identification of autochthonous populations has been problematic because several yeast species seem to be very versatile and therefore mere presence is not sufficient to establish an ecological association. In the present study we investigated the dynamics of the yeast community in the Tagus river estuary (Portugal) by combining a microbiological study involving isolation, quantification, and molecular identification of dominant yeast populations with the analysis of hydrological and hydrographical data. We set out to test the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeast populations in a transect of the Tagus estuary and we postulate four possible sources: open sea, terrestrial, gastrointestinal and the estuary itself in the case of populations that have become resident. Candida parapsilosis and Pichia guilliermondii were correlated with Escherichia coli, which indicated an intestinal origin. Other cream-colored yeasts like Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides had similar dynamics, but no association with E. coli and quite distinct ecological preferences. They might represent a group of resident estuarine populations whose primary origin is diverse and can include marine, terrestrial, and gastrointestinal habitats. Another major yeast population was represented by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The cosmopolitan nature of that species and its moderate association with E. coli point to terrestrial sources as primary habitats. PMID:20422287

  14. An assessment of human influences on sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the estuarine and coastal sediments of China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyong; Liu, Jinqing; Zhang, Daolai; Yin, Ping; Li, Yanxia; Li, Xianguo

    2015-08-15

    Sediments collected from the coastal area of China, embracing west coast of Bohai Sea, south coast of Shandong Peninsula, and the Changjiang estuary (listed in order of decreasing north latitude), were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). ∑PAH (Sixteen US EPA priority PAHs) were 2.7-350.9ng/g. Petroleum residue was the major contributor of PAHs in the coastal sediments of China due to oil leakage from ships and offshore oil fields. The contribution of vehicular emissions in coast of North China was significantly lower than that in the Changjiang Estuary, and the reverse was true for coal combustion. PAH concentrations in the sediment core of the Changjiang estuary steadily increased upward and the variation was primarily due to economic development and severe floods. The impact on PAHs by vehicular emissions (37.2%) and petrogenic sources (45.8%) overwhelmed combustion sources (17.0%). PMID:26073798

  15. Growth responses of an estuarine fish exposed to mixed trace elements in sediments over a full life cycle.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher L

    2003-02-01

    Hatchling Cyprinodon variegatus were raised in the presence or absence of sediments contaminated with mixed trace elements to examine lethal and sublethal bioenergetic effects (metabolic rate, lipid storage, growth, reproduction) over a full life cycle (>1 year). Contaminated sediments were derived from a site receiving coal combustion residues (CCR) and were elevated in numerous trace elements including Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Se, and V. Exposures were conducted at two levels of salinity (5 and 36 ppt) to examine the potential interaction of this variable with contaminants. Salinity had no effect on responses measured. Over the course of the study, fish exposed to contaminated sediment accumulated several CCR-related trace elements, including As, Cd, Se, and V. There were no differences in fish survival for contaminated sediment treatments and uncontaminated sediment treatments, nor were there differences in metabolic expenditures. However, growth, male condition factor, and storage lipid content in females were reduced due to contaminant exposure. No significant effects on fecundity or the proportion of females that were gravid at the end of the study were observed, yet females raised under control conditions produced 12% larger eggs than did females raised on contaminated sediments. During the presumably most-sensitive early life stages, individuals were not noticeably affected by contaminants, but rather the effects of exposure became apparent later in life. Because many species inhabit contaminated areas for long periods of time, often encompassing the entire life cycle, exposures focused only on specific life stages may substantially underestimate the overall responses elicited by individuals. PMID:12550102

  16. Spatio-temporal distribution, source, and genotoxic potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in estuarine and riverine sediments from southern India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prasun; Ohura, Takeshi; Guruge, Keerthi S; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko; Akiba, Masato; Munuswamy, Natesan

    2016-08-01

    In order to categorize the distribution, source, and effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aquatic systems of southern India, chemical and toxicological analyses were performed on surface and core sediments, collected from Adyar river, Cooum river, Ennore estuary, and Pulicat lake near Chennai city. The total PAH concentration in surface sediment ranged from 13 to 31,425ng/g with a mean value of 4320ng/g; the concentration was markedly higher in Cooum river compared to that at other sites. The historical PAH dissemination in core samples in the Cooum river, Ennore estuary, and Pulicat lake ranged from 30 to 31,425ng/g, from 8.6 to 910ng/g, and from 62 to 546ng/g, respectively. Surface sediments were predominantly contaminated with low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs. Historical profiles suggest that PAH contamination in the area is now greater than it had been in the past. PAH accumulation in Pulicat lake was distinct from that at other locations where high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs were predominant. DNA damage in HepG2 cells treated with sediment extracts from different locations showed a good correlation with their respective total PAH levels. Statistical analysis revealed that 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs may synergistically contribute to the genotoxic potency compared to others in sediments. The study also showed that a majority of PAHs in the study area indicated a petrogenic origin. Based on the enrichment and toxicological assessment of PAHs in sediments, Cooum river was shown to suffer the highest biological impairment among the studied water bodies. PMID:27092974

  17. The influence of salinity on the abundance, transcriptional activity, and diversity of AOA and AOB in an estuarine sediment: a microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Tian, Jinping; Wen, Donghui

    2015-11-01

    Estuarine sediment-seawater microcosms were established to evaluate the influence of salinity on the population, transcriptional activity, and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). AOA was found to show the most abundant and the highest transcriptional activity under moderate salinity; on the other hand, AOB abundance was not sensitive to salinity variation but showed the highest transcriptional activity in the low-salinity microcosms. AOA exhibited more advantages than AOB on growth and ammonia-oxidizing activity under moderate- and high-salinity environments. The highest richness and diversity of active AOA were found under salinity of 15 psu. All the active AOA detected under the salinities studied were clustered into Nitrosopumilus maritimus linage, with the composition shifted from N. maritimus C12 cluster, N. maritimus like 1.1 cluster, N. maritimus SCM1 cluster, and N. maritimus like 1.2 cluster to N. maritimus C12 and N. maritimus A10 clusters when salinity was increased from 5 to 30 psu. PMID:26219499

  18. Coastal Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the species diversity of benthic communities in U.S. estuarine waters during the period 1997–2000. Benthic organisms — animals that inhabit the bottom substrate of a water body — play an important role in maintaining sediment and water qual...

  19. MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN SEDIMENT, WATER AND BIOTA COLLECTED FROM NEAR-COASTAL AREAS IMPACTED BY COMMON ESTUARINE STRESSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury concentrations in non-commercial organisms indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico are not well characterized particularly when compared to potential sources. In response to this need, mercury levels were determined in sediment, water and various biota in reference and non-refer...

  20. A new protocol to detect light elements in estuarine sediments by X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDS).

    PubMed

    Miguens, Flavio Costa; de Oliveira, Martha Lima; Marins, Rozane Valente; de Lacerda, Luiz Drude

    2010-01-01

    The analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to determine the presence and distribution of atomic elements in mineralogy. However, the detection of light elements such as carbon is difficult to obtain with standard energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and usual proceedings for SEM. This study proposes a new protocol to detect calcium carbonate by SEM/EDS using sediments from the Jaguaribe River estuary, NE Brazil, as a model. Handmade gold mounting discs (Au stubs) were used as sample support and samples were adhered with inexpensive glue (Loctite Super_Bonder) or directly disposed on the Au stubs. CaCO(3) and NaCl for chemical analysis were used as control and counterproof to the carbon adhesive tape. Control salts EDS analyses indicate that the method was efficient to detect light elements. Sediments obtained from different depths in the core sampled at the Jaguaribe River estuary consist of particles and aggregates with diverse morphology that covers a wide range of particle or aggregate size. Morphology and dimensions were similar for all core depths. Analysis of samples disposed on gold mounting disc without glue showed that sediment bulk particles usually presented small particles adhering on the surface. Clay minerals were predominant but silica was also often identified. Calcium was a trace element in a small number of sediment bulk particles. Biological and non-biological calcium carbonates, including nanoparticles, were identified in all core depths. X-ray emitted from Au stub did not interfere in the CaCO(3) EDS analysis. Calcium carbonate particles from sediments were identified using this novel approach. PMID:20388618

  1. Influence of Trypaea australiensis population density on benthic metabolism and nitrogen dynamics in sandy estuarine sediment: A mesocosm simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Mark A.; Welsh, David T.; Dunn, Ryan J. K.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    Laboratory mesocosm incubations were undertaken to investigate the influence of natural densities of the thalassinidean shrimp, Trypaea australiensis (marine yabby) on sediment oxygen demand (SOD), inorganic nutrient fluxes, and the N-cycle processes of nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Mesocosms (~ 0.1 m 2 × 55 cm deep) of sieved, natural T. australiensis inhabited sands were continually flushed with fresh seawater and pre-incubated for two weeks prior to being assigned to one of three treatments; control (no additions), low yabby density (40 T. australiensis m - 2 ) or high yabby density (80 T. australiensis m - 2 ). Thereafter, SOD and sediment-water column inorganic nutrient fluxes were determined periodically over a 38 day period. On the final day rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were also determined using the 15N-isotope pairing technique. Yabbies consistently and significantly ( p < 0.001) stimulated SOD over the entire 38 day incubation period (mean values: 4.92, 9.21 and 14.9 mmol m - 2 day - 1 for control, low and high density treatments, respectively). The increased organic matter mineralisation rates greatly enhanced nitrogen regeneration rates in the sediment and fuelled significantly higher effluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen with NH 4+ and total DIN effluxes in the low and high density treatments respectively, being 617 and 1534%, and 269 and 565% higher than those in the controls, despite sediment bioavailable (porewater + exchangeable) NH 4+ pools being approximately 2 and 4-fold lower in the low and high density yabby treatment sediments compared to the controls, measured at the end of the 37 day experiment. Mass balance calculations based on the final day nutrient flux and nitrate reduction rate data demonstrated that yabbies stimulated benthic nitrification rates by 31 and 46% in the low and high density treatments. However, somewhat

  2. Biogeochemical study of water and bottom sediments from the Khai river - Nha Trang Bay estuarine system, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, Natalia; Lobys, Nikolay; Drozdova, Anastasia; Peresypkin, Valery

    2014-05-01

    The present study was carried out in Nha Trang Bay (Southern Vietnam, the South China Sea). The samples of water, suspended matter and bottom sediments were collected in summer 2010-2012 in section from the estuary of the Khai River to the marine part of the bay. The samples were analyzed in the stationary lab of IO RAS, Moscow, by TOC-V-CPH, GC/MS and pirolysis methods. We report here the novel data on sources, transformation and burial of OM coming from the Khai river waters. The investigation is focused on ontent and distribution of suspended matter (SM) in the estuary, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulated organic carbon (POC); molecular and group composition of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, steranes, hopanes) and mercury content in water, SM and bottom sediments. It was found that concentration of POC and SM decrease in the Nha Trang Bay waters from estuary to the open part of the bay. However, major changes in the concentration of SM and POC belong to the zone of salinity gradient.DOC behavior is more stable throughout the study area. Organic-geochemical indicators estimation allowed recognition of genesis and transformation degree of organic matter in the study area. The estuary is characterized by mixed genesis of SM with a predominance of allochthonous organic matter whereas outlying parts of the Nha Trang bay are characterized by autochthonous OM. Composition of OM in sediments reflects regularities identified above, despite of the interannual and seasonal variability in the study area. The investigation reveals a predominance of terrestrial organic matter in the silt sediments of the estuary, transported by the Khai river. Distribution of OM in sediments of marine part of the bay is mosaic, with a predominance of planktonogenic, bacterial or terrestrial input at their complex combination. Local anthropogenic pollution as well as an impact of industrial city effluents are found in river- and seaport areas. According to obtained data sedimentation rate

  3. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-01-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164 178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87–80 °C) and Site B (79 °C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (p̂=36.1%), Aeropyrum (p̂=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (p̂=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (p̂=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (p̂=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon ‘Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82 °C (p̂=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23235293

  4. Molecular Detection of Candidatus Scalindua pacifica and Environmental Responses of Sediment Anammox Bacterial Community in the Bohai Sea, China

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hongyue; Zhou, Haixia; Zhang, Zhinan; Yu, Zishan; Hua, Er; Liu, Xiaoshou; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2013-01-01

    The Bohai Sea is a large semi-enclosed shallow water basin, which receives extensive river discharges of various terrestrial and anthropogenic materials such as sediments, nutrients and contaminants. How these terrigenous inputs may influence the diversity, community structure, biogeographical distribution, abundance and ecophysiology of the sediment anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria was unknown. To answer this question, an investigation employing both 16S rRNA and hzo gene biomarkers was carried out. Ca. Scalindua bacteria were predominant in the surface sediments of the Bohai Sea, while non-Scalindua anammox bacteria were also detected in the Yellow River estuary and inner part of Liaodong Bay that received strong riverine and anthropogenic impacts. A novel 16S rRNA gene sequence clade was identified, putatively representing an anammox bacterial new candidate species tentatively named “Ca. Scalindua pacifica”. Several groups of environmental factors, usually with distinct physicochemical or biogeochemical natures, including general marine and estuarine physicochemical properties, availability of anammox substrates (inorganic N compounds), alternative reductants and oxidants, environmental variations caused by river discharges and associated contaminants such as heavy metals, were identified to likely play important roles in influencing the ecology and biogeochemical functioning of the sediment anammox bacteria. In addition to inorganic N compounds that might play a key role in shaping the anammox microbiota, organic carbon, organic nitrogen, sulfate, sulfide and metals all showed the potentials to participate in the anammox process, releasing the strict dependence of the anammox bacteria upon the direct availability of inorganic N nutrients that might be limiting in certain areas of the Bohai Sea. The importance of inorganic N nutrients and certain other environmental factors to the sediment anammox microbiota suggests that these bacteria were

  5. A Study of the Impact of a Pipeline Construction on Estuarine Benthic Invertebrate Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, L. J.; Davenport, J.; Kelly, T. C.

    2002-08-01

    The effects of a pipeline construction on benthic invertebrates were investigated using a Before/After impact protocol at Clonakilty Bay, West Cork, Ireland. Benthic invertebrates were sampled once before the excavation and at one, two, three and six months after the completion of the work. Analysis was designed to compare natural variation over time within control sites with the variation that occurred in the disturbed site from before to after construction. Invertebrate samples were dominated by Hediste diversicolor, Scrobicularia plana and Tubifex spp. An impact was obvious in the construction site in that no live invertebrates were found at one month after disturbance, but there followed a gradual recolonization by Hediste diversicolor. Scrobicularia plana failed to recolonize the impacted area during the study. At six months after the disturbance there was no significant difference in the mean number of total individuals (of all species) per core sample amongst all study sites, but the apparent ' recovery ' in the impacted area was due to two taxa only, namely Hediste diversicolor and Tubifex spp. The process of recovery of the benthic community within the impacted area is thus dependent on the species within the surrounding area. Their respective life cycle characteristics and mobilities will have been major factors in determining recovery.

  6. Sea to sky: impacts of residual salmon-derived nutrients on estuarine breeding bird communities

    PubMed Central

    Field, Rachel D.; Reynolds, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) returning to streams around the North Pacific Rim provide a nutrient subsidy to these ecosystems. While many species of animals feed directly on salmon carcasses each autumn, salmon-derived nutrients can also be stored in coastal habitats throughout the year. The effects of this storage legacy on vertebrates in other seasons are not well understood, especially in estuaries, which can receive a large portion of post-spawning salmon nutrients. We examine the effects of residual salmon-derived nutrients, forest habitats and landscape features on summer breeding birds in estuary forests. We compared models containing environmental variables and combined chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon biomass to test predictions concerning bird density and diversity. We discovered that total bird, insectivore, golden-crowned kinglet and Pacific wren densities and Shannon's diversity in the summer were strongly predicted by salmon biomass in the autumn. For most metrics, this relationship approaches an asymptote beyond 40 000 kg of salmon biomass. Foliage height diversity, watershed catchment area and estuary area were also important predictors of avian communities. Our study suggests that the legacy of salmon nutrients influences breeding bird density and diversity in estuaries that vary across a wide gradient of spawning salmon biomass. PMID:21325324

  7. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    PubMed

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions--with tidal cycles and natural seawater--was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g⁻¹ wet sediment), the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled) showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition) revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by Gammaproteobacteria

  8. Identifying the sources and processes of mercury in subtropical estuarine and ocean sediments using Hg isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Runsheng; Feng, Xinbin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Junjun; Wang, Wenxiong; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    The concentrations and isotopic compositions of mercury (Hg) in surface sediments of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the South China Sea (SCS) were analyzed. The data revealed significant differences between the total Hg (THg) in fine-grained sediments collected from the PRE (8-251 μg kg(-1)) and those collected from the SCS (12-83 μg kg(-1)). Large spatial variations in Hg isotopic compositions were observed in the SCS (δ(202)Hg, from -2.82 to -2.10‰; Δ(199)Hg, from +0.21 to +0.45‰) and PRE (δ(202)Hg, from -2.80 to -0.68‰; Δ(199)Hg, from -0.15 to +0.16‰). The large positive Δ(199)Hg in the SCS indicated that a fraction of Hg has undergone Hg(2+) photoreduction processes prior to incorporation into the sediments. The relatively negative Δ(199)Hg values in the PRE indicated that photoreduction of Hg is not the primary route for the removal of Hg from the water column. The riverine input of fine particles played an important role in transporting Hg to the PRE sediments. In the deep ocean bed of the SCS, source-related signatures of Hg isotopes may have been altered by natural geochemical processes (e.g., Hg(2+) photoreduction and preferential adsorption processes). Using Hg isotope compositions, we estimate that river deliveries of Hg from industrial and urban sources and natural soils could be the main inputs of Hg to the PRE. However, the use of Hg isotopes as tracers in source attribution could be limited because of the isotope fractionation by natural processes in the SCS. PMID:25565343

  9. Influence of benthic macroinvertebrates on the erodability of estuarine cohesive sediments: Density- and biomass-specific responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Erik; Neto, João Magalhães; Lundkvist, Morten; Frederiksen, Lars; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Valdemarsen, Thomas; Flindt, Mogens Rene

    2013-12-01

    The impact of three dominating benthic invertebrates on sediment stability and erosion conditions of cohesive sediments in the Mondego Estuary, Portugal, was examined in laboratory annular flume experiments. The purpose was to test how the life habits and body size of the three involved species (Hydrobia ulvae, Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana) in terms of density or biomass influence sediment erosion. All three species decreased the free-stream erosion threshold (uc) and increased erosion rate (E), since their feeding activities diminished the surface stabilizing effect of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microphytobenthos. S. plana had the highest and H. ulvae the lowest impact when related to density (factor of 29 for uc and factor of 19 for E), while H. ulvae was more important than S. plana when related to biomass (factor of 4 for uc and factor of 6 for E). N. diversicolor had intermediate density-specific (4-6 times higher than H. ulvae) and lowest biomass-specific (2-3 times lower than S. plana) effects on erosion. It appears that faunal erosion impacts preferably should be reported in biomass units for comparative purposes because individual behavioural effects of a small-bodied species like H. ulvae functionally can be relatively more important than those of a 100 times heavier S. plana individual. This is clearly evidenced from the strongly diminished response in suspended Chlorophyll-a content in the presence of the former than the latter species, which is caused by an efficient microphytobenthos grazing by H. ulvae. It is also important to emphasize that the total faunal impact on erosion threshold in a certain area is dictated by combination of contributions from individual species. The total outcome is unpredictable and controlled by synergistic and antagonistic species-specific effects, species interactions as well as environmental and sediment conditions.

  10. Characterization of the environmental quality of sediments from two estuarine systems based on different in-vitro bioassays.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Denise; Pujol, Silvia; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Tauler, Romà; Bebianno, Maria João; Porte, Cinta

    2014-05-01

    This study characterizes the environmental quality of sediments from the Arade and Guadiana estuaries using different in-vitro bioassays: a) fish hepatoma cell line (PLHC-1) to determine cytotoxicity and presence of CYP1A and oxidative stress inducing agents; b) gonad subcellular fractions from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to detect compounds that are likely to act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with the synthesis of androgens (CYP17, CYP11β) and estrogens (CYP19). Approximately 60% of extracts from the Arade estuary were cytotoxic when tested at 60 mg eQsed/mL, while only one sample from Guadiana showed cytotoxicity. Sediments from Arade collected close to harbours and waste water effluents were enriched with CYP1A inducing agents, while those from the upper Guadiana induced oxidative stress in PLHC-1 cells. On the other hand, several extracts from both estuaries were able to significantly inhibit CYP17, CYP11β and CYP19 activities in gonad subcellular fractions of sea bass, which indicates the presence of endocrine disrupters, particularly in several sites from the Arade estuary. Overall, the study highlights the usefulness of in-vitro bioassays to identify those sediments that could pose risk to aquatic organisms and that require further action to improve their environmental quality. PMID:24140013

  11. Geostatistical assessment and validation of uncertainty for three-dimensional dioxin data from sediments in an estuarine river.

    PubMed

    Barabás, N; Goovaerts, P; Adriaens, P

    2001-08-15

    Contaminated sediment management is an urgent environmental and regulatory issue worldwide. Because remediation is expensive, sound quantitative assessments of uncertainty aboutthe spatial distribution of contaminants are critical, butthey are hampered bythe physical complexity of sediment environments. This paper describes the use of geostatistical modeling approaches to quantify uncertainty of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin concentrations in Passaic River (New Jersey) sediments and to incorporate this information in decision-making processes, such as delineation of contaminated areas and additional sampling needs. First, coordinate transformation and analysis of three-dimensional semivariograms were used to describe and modelthe directional variability accounting forthe meandering course of the river. Then, indicator kriging was employed to provide models of local uncertainty at unsampled locations without requiring a prior transform (e.g. log-normal) of concentrations. Cross-validation results show that the use of probability thresholds leads to more efficient delineation of contaminated areas than a classification based on the exceedence of regulatory thresholds by concentration estimates. Depending on whether additional sampling aims at reducing prediction errors or misclassification rates, the variance of local probability distributions or a measure of the expected closeness to the regulatory threshold can be used to locate candidate locations. PMID:11529567

  12. Accumulation and partitioning of seven trace metals in mangroves and sediment cores from three estuarine wetlands of Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhang, Gan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-06-15

    Trace metals in mangrove tissues (leaf, branch, root and fruit) of nine species and sediments of ten cores collected in 2008 from Dongzhai Harbor, Sanya Bay and Yalong Bay, Hainan Island, were analyzed. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg and As in surface sediments were 14.8, 24.1, 57.9, 0.17, 29.6, 0.08 and 9.7 μg g(-1), whereas those in mangrove tissues were 2.8, 1.4, 8.7, 0.03, 1.1, 0.03, and 0.2 μg g(-1), respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Hainan were at low- to median-levels, which is consistent with the fact that Hainan Island is still in low exploitation and its mangroves suffer little impact from human activities. Metal concentrations among different tissues of mangroves were different. In general, Zn and Cu were enriched in fruit, Hg was enriched in leaf, Pb, Cd and Cr were enriched in branch, and As was enriched in root. The cycle of trace metals in mangrove species were estimated. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) followed the sequence of Hg (0.43)>Cu (0.27)>Cd (0.22)>Zn (0.17)>Pb (0.07)>Cr (0.06)>As (0.02). PMID:21501926

  13. Bioturbating shrimp alter the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in coastal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Laverock, Bonnie; Smith, Cindy J; Tait, Karen; Osborn, A Mark; Widdicombe, Steve; Gilbert, Jack A

    2010-12-01

    Bioturbation is a key process in coastal sediments, influencing microbially driven cycling of nutrients as well as the physical characteristics of the sediment. However, little is known about the distribution, diversity and function of the microbial communities that inhabit the burrows of infaunal macroorganisms. In this study, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to investigate variation in the structure of bacterial communities in sediment bioturbated by the burrowing shrimp Upogebia deltaura or Callianassa subterranea. Analyses of 229 sediment samples revealed significant differences between bacterial communities inhabiting shrimp burrows and those inhabiting ambient surface and subsurface sediments. Bacterial communities in burrows from both shrimp species were more similar to those in surface-ambient than subsurface-ambient sediment (R=0.258, P<0.001). The presence of shrimp was also associated with changes in bacterial community structure in surrounding surface sediment, when compared with sediments uninhabited by shrimp. Bacterial community structure varied with burrow depth, and also between individual burrows, suggesting that the shrimp's burrow construction, irrigation and maintenance behaviour affect the distribution of bacteria within shrimp burrows. Subsequent sequence analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from surface sediments revealed differences in the relative abundance of bacterial taxa between shrimp-inhabited and uninhabited sediments; shrimp-inhabited sediment contained a higher proportion of proteobacterial sequences, including in particular a twofold increase in Gammaproteobacteria. Chao1 and ACE diversity estimates showed that taxon richness within surface bacterial communities in shrimp-inhabited sediment was at least threefold higher than that in uninhabited sediment. This study shows that bioturbation can result in significant structural and compositional changes in sediment bacterial communities, increasing

  14. An experimental study on dredge spoil of estuarine sediments in the bay of seine (France): A morphosedimentary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmin, Stella; Lesueur, Patrick; Dauvin, Jean Claude; Samson, Sandrine; Tournier, Patrice; Gallicher Lavanne, Albert; Dubrulle-Brunaud, Carole; Thouroude, Coralie

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the consequences of dredging on estuarine morphology and its sedimentary dynamics are common, but the impacts of dumping dredge spoil in coastal open settings are rarely found in scientific literature. An experimental study was conducted over the period 2012-2013 to monitor the physical impacts of dredged material dumped at two adjacent sites (one million cubic metres at each) on the inner shelf of the Bay of Seine in France (eastern part of the English Channel, La Manche). As recently reinforced in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), knowledge on the location and intensity of human impacts (e.g. on marine ecosystems) is critical for effective marine management and conservation. So, two methods of disposition were tested to evaluate the impacts of dumping on the environment and thus propose recommendations for future dumping. The strategy is based on a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) approach, in which the spatio-temporal variability was studied by analysing the morphological and sedimentological characteristics over a period of 28 months, from November 2011 to April 2014, also including recovery of the seafloor after cessation of the dumping activities. The first experimental dumping operation (MASED) was carried out regularly for 8 months at a single point and generating a conical deposit of 5 m in height, while the second dumping (MABIO) lasted for 12 months involving four steps in the dumping process. In the second case, a wider area was covered, leading to the formation of a smaller deposit of 2 m in height. The dumped deposits consisted of muddy fine sand, whereas the inner shelf seafloor in this area is covered with fine to medium sand. As a result, muddy fine sand accumulated at or near the two dumping sites, with a maximum mud (i.e. particles<63 μm or>4 Φ) content of 50% compared to<5% before dumping operations. Videos obtained from a LVB200 Seabotix ROV, highlighted the heterogeneity of the sea floor around the dumping areas

  15. Urban rivers as conveyors of hydrocarbons to sediments of estuarine areas: source characterization, flow rates and mass accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mauad, Cristiane R; Wagener, Angela de L R; Massone, Carlos G; Aniceto, Mayara da S; Lazzari, Letícia; Carreira, Renato S; Farias, Cássia de O

    2015-02-15

    Aliphatic (n-C12-n-C40, unresolved complex mixture, resolved peaks) and aromatic hydrocarbons (46 PAH) were investigated in suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled over eleven months in six of the major rivers and two channels of the Guanabara Bay Basin. PAH flow rates of the most contaminated rivers, the contribution to the PAH sediment load of the receiving bay, and the main sources of hydrocarbons were determined. PAH (38) ranged from 28 ng L(-1) to 11,514 ng L(-1). Hydrocarbon typology and statistical evaluation demonstrated contribution of distinct sources in different regions and allowed quantification of these contributions. Total flow rate for the five major rivers amounts to 3 t year(-1) and responds for 30% of the total PAH annual input into the northern area of the Guanabara Bay. For the first time PAH mass deposited in the bay sediments has been estimated and shall serve as base for decision making and source abatement. PMID:25434473

  16. Quaternary ammonium compounds in urban estuarine sediment environments--a class of contaminants in need of increased attention?

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Brownawell, Bruce J

    2010-10-01

    The distributions of wastewater-derived quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) were determined in surficial sediments (n = 47) collected from the urbanized lower Hudson River basin. The most abundant class of QACs were dialkyldimethylammonium compounds (DADMACs, with C8 to C18 carbon chain lengths; median ΣDADMAC = 26 μg/g), followed by benzylalkyldimethylammonium compounds (BAC, C12-C18; 1.5 μg/g), and alkyltrimethylammonium compounds (ATMAC, primarily C16 and C18; 0.52 μg/g). The concentrations of total QACs are higher than those of other conventional organic contaminants determined on the same samples (e.g., median ΣPAH level of 2.1 μg/g). Comparatively high concentrations, correlations with sewage derived contaminants, and the relatively constant compositions of QACs observed over large areas suggest that many sediment-sorbed QACs can be relatively persistent in receiving waters. Unusually large concentration-dependent sorption is considered as a mechanism that likely affects persistence of these intrinsically biodegradable chemicals under field conditions. There has been comparatively little field-based research on these classes of cationic surfactants; given the levels of QACs observed here, it is suggested that further investigation is warranted. PMID:20804121

  17. Influence of organic carbon on estuarine benthic infauna of the US west coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) is often used as an indicator of eutrophication in estuarine environments. However, the determination of biologically relevant sediment TOC criteria to indicate estuarine condition is complicated by the relationship between TOC and grain size. Both va...

  18. Influence of organic carbon on estuarine benthic infauna of the US west coast - March 3, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) is often used as an indicator of eutrophication in estuarine environments. However, the determination of biologically relevant sediment TOC criteria to indicate estuarine condition is complicated by the relationship between TOC and grain size. Both va...

  19. Carbohydrate secretion by phototrophic communities in tidal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winder, B.; Staats, N.; Stal, L. J.; Paterson, D. M.

    1999-09-01

    Two different benthic phototrophic communities on tidal flats were investigated for their carbohydrate content and distribution. Carbohydrates were analysed as two operationally defined fractions, related to the difficulty of extraction from the sediment matrix. Water-soluble (colloidal) and EDTA-extractable (capsular) carbohydrates were measured in a cyanobacterial mat and a diatom biofilm. The chlorophyll-specific carbohydrate content of the two communities was very different. The diatom biofilm contained up to 100 times more colloidal carbohydrate than the cyanobacterial mat. The concentrations of colloidal carbohydrates in the diatom biofilm correlated with biomass (chlorophyll-a), but this was not the case with the carbohydrate in the EDTA extract. It is proposed that the capsular carbohydrates were probably recalcitrant to mineralisation and therefore accumulated in the sediment. Neither colloidal nor EDTA-extractable carbohydrate in the cyanobacterial mat correlated with chlorophyll-a. This was probably an artefact caused by the fact that approximately 50% of the chlorophyll-a in the mat was attributed to diatoms. The characteristics of extracellular polysaccharides were investigated in laboratory cultures of the dominant organisms. Extracellular polysaccharides of the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes and of the diatom Navicula menisculus did not contain uronic acids. However, carboxylated sugars were found in large quantities in the capsular polysaccharides of the cyanobacterium and were present in equal ratios in the extracellular and capsular carbohydrate of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. Both in laboratory model systems of diatom biofilms and in situ, enhanced colloidal carbohydrate production was observed in the light. No light-dependent increase in carbohydrate concentration was found for the cyanobacterial mat. The cyanobacteria formed a mat in which the filamentous organisms entangled sand grains and attached firmly to the substratum

  20. Variations of summer phytoplankton community related to environmental factors in a macro-tidal estuarine embayment, Hangzhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yu, Jun; Jiang, Zhibing; Wang, Qin; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    To explore the distribution and composition of phytoplankton community and their responses to environmental changes, summer net-collected phytoplankton and physicochemical parameters in the Hangzhou Bay during 2004-2010 were investigated. A total of four phyla and 84 species were identified, including 67 diatom and 12 dinoflagellate species. The dominant species constantly consisted of the diatoms, although the dominance of dinoflagellate and cyanobacteria increased recently. Due to great spatio-temporal variations in environmental factors (salinity, suspended solids, and nutrient concentration), significant heterogeneities in community compositions among different years and subregions (inner and middle sections, and bay mouth) were found based on the analyses of multidimensional scaling and similarity. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that salinity and Si/N were the main variables associated with algal assemblage. Compared with the historical data since the 1980s, eutrophication (N, P, and N/P increased with decreasing Si/N) was exacerbated drastically. Moreover, climatic forcing and human activities resulted in a series of physical alterations, including sediment retention, temperature increase, and salinity decrease as well as reduction in water exchanges. All these changes induced obvious increases in cell density and Chl- a while decreases in species diversity and diatom-dinoflagellate ratio as well as the shifting of dominant species. Therefore, the long-term phytoplankton variations were closely related to anthropogenic and climatic perturbations in the Hangzhou Bay.

  1. Microbial Community Composition in the Marine Sediments of Jeju Island: Next-Generation Sequencing Surveys.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heebok; Koh, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Hongik; Chae, Jong-Chan; Park, Soo-Je

    2016-05-28

    Marine sediments are a microbial biosphere with an unknown physiology, and the sediments harbor numerous distinct phylogenetic lineages of Bacteria and Archaea that are at present uncultured. In this study, the structure of the archaeal and bacterial communities was investigated in the surface and subsurface sediments of Jeju Island using a next-generation sequencing method. The microbial communities in the surface sediments were distinct from those in the subsurface sediments; the relative abundance of sequences for Thaumarchaeota, Actinobacteria, Bacteroides, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were higher in the surface than subsurface sediments, whereas the sequences for Euryarchaeota, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Deltaproteobacteria were relatively more abundant in the subsurface than surface sediments. This study presents detailed characterization of the spatial distribution of benthic microbial communities of Jeju Island and provides fundamental information on the potential interactions mediated by microorganisms with the different biogeochemical cycles in coastal sediments. PMID:26869600

  2. Sediment Enzyme Activities and Microbial Community Diversity in an Oligotrophic Drinking Water Reservoir, Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin; Liu, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water reservoir plays a vital role in the security of urban water supply, yet little is known about microbial community diversity harbored in the sediment of this oligotrophic freshwater environmental ecosystem. In the present study, integrating community level physiological profiles (CLPPs), nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone sequence technologies, we examined the sediment urease and protease activities, bacterial community functional diversity, genetic diversity of bacterial and fungal communities in sediments from six sampling sites of Zhou cun drinking water reservoir, eastern China. The results showed that sediment urease activity was markedly distinct along the sites, ranged from 2.48 to 11.81 mg NH3-N/(g·24h). The highest average well color development (AWCD) was found in site C, indicating the highest metabolic activity of heterotrophic bacterial community. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed tremendous differences in the functional (metabolic) diversity patterns of the sediment bacterial communities from different sites. Meanwhile, DGGE fingerprints also indicated spatial changes of genetic diversity of sediment bacterial and fungal communities. The sequence BLAST analysis of all the sediment samples found that Comamonas sp. was the dominant bacterial species harbored in site A. Alternaria alternate, Allomyces macrogynus and Rhizophydium sp. were most commonly detected fungal species in sediments of the Zhou cun drinking water reservoir. The results from this work provide new insights about the heterogeneity of sediment microbial community metabolic activity and genetic diversity in the oligotrophic drinking water reservoir. PMID:24205265

  3. DIBUTYLPHTHALATE DEGRADATION IN ESTUARINE AND FRESHWATER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic degradation of di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) in water and sediment/water systems from six different sites was investigated under laboratory conditions. Water and underlying sediment were collected from freshwater and estuarine sites in Florida, Mississippi, and Lou...

  4. Biochemical, physiological and behavioural markers in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana as tools for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality.

    PubMed

    Boldina-Cosqueric, Inna; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Métais, Isabelle; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Moutel, Benjamin; Berthet, Brigitte

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to link the responses at different levels of biological organisation of the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana differentially exposed to anthropogenic pressure. Clams were collected in April 2008 from three estuaries along a pollution gradient (Goyen < Loire < Seine). Biomarkers of defence (metallothionein concentration and glutathione-S-transferase activity) were activated in the Loire and the Seine. Biomarkers of damage revealed neurotoxicity (decreased AChE activity) and impairment of digestive enzyme activities (cellulase or amylase) in these estuaries. The highest lactate dehydrogenase activity was registered in the Loire estuary, in parallel with enhanced levels of vanadium (a metal present in petroleum), likely as a consequence of a small oil spill that occurred one month before the sampling collection. Physiological biomarkers (energy reserves as glycogen, lipids and proteins, condition and gonado-somatic indices) showed a few intersite differences. However, the median size was significantly lower in clams exposed to direct (chemicals) or indirect (available food) effects in the most contaminated site. Burrowing behaviour was disturbed in clams from both of the Loire and Seine estuaries, a response probably due to physiological impairment rather than to avoidance of contaminated sediment. The activation of defence mechanisms towards metals (metallothionein) and other classes of contaminants (the biotransformation enzyme glutathione-S-transferase) do not ensure a total protection since a number of impairments were observed at the infra-organismal (AChE and digestive enzyme activities) and individual (burrowing behaviour) levels in relation to the degree of anthropogenic pressure. However, even in the most contaminated estuary (Seine), historical records do not show a consistent decrease of S. plana populations. PMID:20797788

  5. Microbial diversity and community respiration in freshwater sediments influenced by artificial light at night.

    PubMed

    Hölker, Franz; Wurzbacher, Christian; Weißenborn, Carsten; Monaghan, Michael T; Holzhauer, Stephanie I J; Premke, Katrin

    2015-05-01

    An increasing proportion of the Earth's surface is illuminated at night. In aquatic ecosystems, artificial light at night (ALAN) may influence microbial communities living in the sediments. These communities are highly diverse and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. We combined field and laboratory experiments using sediments from an agricultural drainage system to examine how ALAN affects communities and alters carbon mineralization. Two identical light infrastructures were installed parallel to a drainage ditch before the start of the experiment. DNA metabarcoding indicated that both sediment communities were similar. After one was lit for five months (July-December 2012) we observed an increase in photoautotroph abundance (diatoms, Cyanobacteria) in ALAN-exposed sediments. In laboratory incubations mimicking summer and winter (six weeks each), communities in sediments that were exposed to ALAN for 1 year (July 2012-June 2013) showed less overall seasonal change compared with ALAN-naive sediments. Nocturnal community respiration was reduced in ALAN-exposed sediments. In long-term exposed summer-sediments, we observed a shift from negative to positive net ecosystem production. Our results indicate ALAN may alter sediment microbial communities over time, with implications for ecosystem-level functions. It may thus have the potential to transform inland waters to nocturnal carbon sinks. PMID:25780242

  6. Microbial diversity and community respiration in freshwater sediments influenced by artificial light at night

    PubMed Central

    Hölker, Franz; Wurzbacher, Christian; Weißenborn, Carsten; Monaghan, Michael T.; Holzhauer, Stephanie I. J.; Premke, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of the Earth's surface is illuminated at night. In aquatic ecosystems, artificial light at night (ALAN) may influence microbial communities living in the sediments. These communities are highly diverse and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. We combined field and laboratory experiments using sediments from an agricultural drainage system to examine how ALAN affects communities and alters carbon mineralization. Two identical light infrastructures were installed parallel to a drainage ditch before the start of the experiment. DNA metabarcoding indicated that both sediment communities were similar. After one was lit for five months (July–December 2012) we observed an increase in photoautotroph abundance (diatoms, Cyanobacteria) in ALAN-exposed sediments. In laboratory incubations mimicking summer and winter (six weeks each), communities in sediments that were exposed to ALAN for 1 year (July 2012–June 2013) showed less overall seasonal change compared with ALAN-naive sediments. Nocturnal community respiration was reduced in ALAN-exposed sediments. In long-term exposed summer-sediments, we observed a shift from negative to positive net ecosystem production. Our results indicate ALAN may alter sediment microbial communities over time, with implications for ecosystem-level functions. It may thus have the potential to transform inland waters to nocturnal carbon sinks. PMID:25780242

  7. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment. PMID:24475066

  8. Linking Geology and Microbiology: Inactive Pockmarks Affect Sediment Microbial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, Thomas H. A.; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment. PMID:24475066

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Anaerobic Bacterial Communities Associated with Roots of Submerged Macrophytes Growing in Marine or Brackish Water Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment microbial communities are important for seagrass growth and carbon cycling, however relatively few studies have addressed the composition of prokaryotic communities in seagrass bed sediments. Selective media were used enumerate culturable anaerobic bacteria associated ...

  10. Assessing estuarine quality: A cost-effective in situ assay with amphipods.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Haro, Monica; Acevedo, Pelayo; Pais-Costa, Antónia Juliana; Taggart, Mark A; Martins, Irene; Ribeiro, Rui; Marques, João Carlos

    2016-05-01

    In situ assays based on feeding depression can be powerful ecotoxicological tools that can link physiological organism-level responses to population and/or community-level effects. Amphipods are traditional target species for toxicity tests due to their high sensitivity to contaminants, availability in the field and ease of handling. However, cost-effective in situ assays based on feeding depression are not yet available for amphipods that inhabit estuarine ecosystems. The aim of this work was to assess a short-term in situ assay based on postexposure feeding rates on easily quantifiable food items with an estuarine amphipod. Experiments were carried out under laboratory conditions using juvenile Echinogammarus marinus as the target individual. When 60 Artemia franciscana nauplii (as prey) were provided per individual for a period of 30 min in dark conditions, feeding rates could be easily quantified. As an endpoint, postexposure feeding inhibition in E. marinus was more sensitive to cadmium contamination than mortality. Assay calibration under field conditions demonstrated the relevance of sediment particle size in explaining individual feeding rates in uncontaminated water bodies. An evaluation of the 48-h in situ bioassay based on postexposure feeding rates indicated that it is able to discriminate between unpolluted and polluted estuarine sites. Using the harmonized protocol described here, the in situ postexposure feeding assay with E. marinus was found to be a potentially useful, cost-effective tool for assessing estuarine sediment and water quality. PMID:26874320

  11. Assessing sediments from Upper Mississippi River navigational pools using a benthic invertebrate community evaluation and the sediment quality triad approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Canfield, T.J.; Brunson, E.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate samples were collected from 23 pools in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) and from one station in the Saint Croix River (SCR) as part of a study to assess the effects of the extensive flooding of 1993 on sediment contamination in the UMR system. Sediment contaminants of concern included both organic and inorganic compounds. Oligochaetes and chironomids constituted over 80% of the total abundance in samples from 14 of 23 pools in the UMR and SCR samples. Fingernail clams comprised a large portion of the community in three of 23 UMR pools and exceeded abundances of 1,000/m2 in five of 23 pools. Total abundance ranged from 250/m2 in samples from pool 1 to 22,389/m2 in samples from pool 19. Abundance values are comparable with levels previously reported in the literature for the UMR. Overall frequency of chironomid mouthpart deformities was 3% (range 0-13%), which is comparable to reported incidence of deformities in uncontaminated sediments previously evaluated. Sediment contamination was generally low in the UMR pools and the SCR site. Correlations between benthic measures and sediment chemistry and other abiotic parameters exhibited few significant or strong correlations. The sediment quality triad (Triad) approach was used to evaluate data from laboratory toxicity tests, sediment chemistry, and benthic community analyses; it showed that 88% of the samples were not scored as impacted based on sediment toxicity, chemistry, and benthic measures. Benthic invertebrate distributions and community structure within the UMR in the samples evaluated in the present study were most likely controlled by factors independent of contaminant concentrations in the sediments.

  12. VARIABILITY IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF LIPID BIOMARKERS AND THEIR MOLECULAR ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION IN ALTAMAHA ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE RELATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC MATTER FROM VARIOUS SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estuarine mixing zone is an effective trap for particulate and dissolved organic matter From many sources, and thus greatly affects transport and deposition of organic matter between the land and ocean. This study examined sedimentary distributions of various fatty acids and ...

  13. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    PubMed

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  14. ASSESSMENT OF RISK REDUCTION STRATEGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL NONPOINT SOURCE PESTICIDE RUNOFF IN ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agricultural nonpoint source (NPS) runoff may result in significant discharges of pesticides, suspended sediments, and fertilizers into estuarine habitats adjacent to agricultural areas or downstream from agricultural watersheds. Exposure of estuarine fin fish and shellfish to to...

  15. APPLICATION OF 3D COMPUTER-AIDED TOMOGRAPHY TO THE QUANTIFICATION OF MARINE SEDIMENT COMMUNITIES IN POLLUTION GRADIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) has been demonstrated to be a cost efficient tool for the qualitative and quantitative study of estuarine benthic communities along pollution gradients.
    Now we have advanced this technology to successfully visualize and discriminate three dimen...

  16. Polychaete burrows harbour distinct microbial communities in oil-contaminated coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joe D; Cunliffe, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the bioturbating polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor can affect the composition of bacterial communities in oil-contaminated sediments, but have not considered diversity specifically within bioturbator burrows or the impact on microbial eukaryotes. We tested the hypothesis that H. diversicolor burrows harbour different eukaryotic and bacterial communities compared with un-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbation stimulates oil degradation. Oil-contaminated sediment was incubated with or without H. diversicolor for 30 days, after which sediment un-affected by H. diversicolor and burrow DNA/RNA samples were analysed using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and high-throughput sequencing. Fungi dominated both burrow and un-bioturbated sediment sequence libraries; however, there was significant enrichment of bacterivorous protists and nematodes in the burrows. There were also significant differences between the bacterial communities in burrows compared with un-bioturbated sediment. Increased activity and relative abundance of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the burrows coincided with the significant reduction in hydrocarbon concentration in the bioturbated sediment. This study represents the first detailed assessment of the effect of bioturbation on total microbial communities in oil-contaminated sediments. In addition, it further shows that bioturbation is a significant factor in determining microbial diversity within polluted sediments and plays an important role in stimulating bioremediation. PMID:25858418

  17. Presence of oxygen and aerobic communities from sea floor to basement in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, Steven; Inagaki, Fumio; Zarikian, Carlos Alvarez; Abrams, Lewis J.; Dubois, Nathalie; Engelhardt, Tim; Evans, Helen; Ferdelman, Timothy; Gribsholt, Britta; Harris, Robert N.; Hoppie, Bryce W.; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kallmeyer, Jens; Kim, Jinwook; Lynch, Jill E.; McKinley, Claire C.; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Morono, Yuki; Murray, Richard W.; Pockalny, Robert; Sauvage, Justine; Shimono, Takaya; Shiraishi, Fumito; Smith, David C.; Smith-Duque, Christopher E.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Steinsbu, Bjorn Olav; Suzuki, Yohey; Szpak, Michal; Toffin, Laurent; Uramoto, Goichiro; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; Zhang, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2015-04-01

    The depth of oxygen penetration into marine sediments differs considerably from one region to another. In areas with high rates of microbial respiration, O2 penetrates only millimetres to centimetres into the sediments, but active anaerobic microbial communities are present in sediments hundreds of metres or more below the sea floor. In areas with low sedimentary respiration, O2 penetrates much deeper but the depth to which microbial communities persist was previously unknown. The sediments underlying the South Pacific Gyre exhibit extremely low areal rates of respiration. Here we show that, in this region, microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence to depths of at least 75 metres below sea floor. Based on the Redfield stoichiometry of dissolved O2 and nitrate, we suggest that net aerobic respiration in these sediments is coupled to oxidation of marine organic matter. We identify a relationship of O2 penetration depth to sedimentation rate and sediment thickness. Extrapolating this relationship, we suggest that oxygen and aerobic communities may occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global sea floor. Subduction of the sediment and basalt from these regions is a source of oxidized material to the mantle.

  18. Sequencing Insights into Microbial Communities in the Water and Sediments of Fenghe River, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sidan; Sun, Yujiao; Zhao, Xuan; Wang, Lei; Ding, Aizhong; Zhao, Xiaohui

    2016-07-01

    The connection between microbial community structure and spatial variation and pollution in river waters has been widely investigated. However, water and sediments together have rarely been explored. In this study, Illumina high-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze microbes in 24 water and sediment samples from natural to anthropogenic sources and from headstream to downstream areas. These data were used to assess variability in microbial community structure and diversity along in the Fenghe River, China. The relationship between bacterial diversity and environmental parameters was statistically analyzed. An average of 1682 operational taxonomic units was obtained. Microbial diversity increased from the headstream to downstream and tended to be greater in sediment compared with water. The water samples near the headstream endured relatively low Shannon and Chao1 indices. These diversity indices and the number of observed species in the water and sediment samples increase downstream. The parameters also differ in the two river tributaries. Community structures shift based on the extent of nitrogen pollution variation in the sediment and water samples. The four most dominant genera in the water community were Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Comamonadaceae, and Pseudomonas. In the sediments, the most dominant genera were Stramenopiles, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Comamonadaceae. The number of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the headstream water slightly differed from that in the sediment but varied considerably in the downstream sediments. Statistical analysis showed that community variation is correlated with changes in ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen. This study identified different microbial community structures in river water and sediments. Overall this study emphasized the need to elucidate spatial variations in bacterial diversity in water and sediments associated with physicochemical gradients and to show the effects of such

  19. The contribution of chemical fluxes across the sediment-water interface to carbon cycling in estuarine regions: A case study at the Rhône River mouth (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassmann, Jens; Eitel, Eryn; Bombled, Bruno; Lansard, Bruno; Taillefert, Martial; Rabouille, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Despite their small surface compared to the global oceans, continental shelf regions play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Whereas shelf regions are seen as a sink for atmospheric CO2, estuarine regions are seen as a source. These regions are caracterized by the export of allochthonous terrigenous organic matter (OM) and the production of autochthonous marine organic carbon. An important fraction of this OM is mineralized in the sediments close to the river mouth. As a result, high exchange fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), oxygen and nutriments cross the sediment-water interface (SWI) and cause acidification of the bottom waters. Potentially, primary production in the water column is enhanced by these fluxes. Therefore, OM mineralisation in estuarine regions plays a key role in the carbon cycle as a direct producer of DIC and as a potential control factor for primary production. This work aims to quantify chemical fluxes through the SWI at the prodelta of the Rhone River (Mediterranen). In September 2015, a benthic chamber has been deployed at several stations in the prodelta to measure directly (in situ) fluxes of DIC, TA, ammonium and dissolved calcium at the SWI. At the same stations, in situ microprofiles of oxygen and pH have been recorded and sediment cores were taken for pore water extraction and analysis (DIC, TA, NH4+ and Ca2+). The results show a strong decrease of the fluxes in offshore direction indicating a strong variation of respiration rates in this direction. From pore water profiles, diffusive fluxes have been calculated and compared with the fluxes measured by the benthic chamber. This comparison enables us to include pore water profiles from previous investigations to calculate a carbon mass budget of this region.

  20. Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marta

    2013-04-01

    Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries Lima, Marta1; Menor, Eldemar2; Lima, Enjolras3; Neumann, Virginio4 1MFGTransportes, Brazil; 2Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil 3Servico Geologico do Brasil-CPRM, Brazil 4Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil Heavy metal (HM) concentrations in estuarine sediments of the Botafogo and Manguaba river, North-eastern Brazil were investigated on basis of samples from a bottom core drill performed 4km from the mouth of the rivers. Total sediments (TS) of the sliced profiles (62 cm, Botafogo river and 87 cm, Manguaba river ) were submitted to chemical analysis (51 elements), mineralogical analysis (XRD) and statistical study, followed by stoichiometric calculations. Geochronologic determinations of 210Pb allowed studying the evolution of the contamination level approximately 150 year-old interval in the Botafogo river. Mercury (Hg) and Arsenic (As) are emphasized because of a chlorine-soda industry that dumps its effluents about 15 km upstream of the estuary and extensive cultivation of sugarcane existent in this watershed. Hg background in pelitic total sediments (PTS) was certain established considering the Hg content (126 ppb) in sedimentary intervals previous to 1910. The production of chlorine-soda (since 1963) coincides with a drastic increase of the Hg concentrations and contemporary values around 6.000 ppb, without interruption in the pollutant process. The conclusions found that the Hg was the main indicator of anthropogenic contribution in the sediments of the Botafogo river. On the other hand, an increase in the Hg-As concentrations has been observed at the last decades due to an increase of the clay mineral fraction in TS of the Manguaga river. This scenario indicates that the accumulation of HM has been constant since the last decades, under a

  1. In-Well Sediment Incubators to Evaluate Microbial Community Stability and Dynamics following Bioimmobilization of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Gan, M.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Smithgall, A. N.; Pfiffner, S.; Freifeld, Barry M.; White, D. C.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-09-23

    An in-situ incubation device (ISI) was developed in order to investigate the stability and dynamics of sediment associated microbial communities to prevailing subsurface oxidizing or reducing conditions. Here we describe the use of these devices at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site. During the 7 month deployment oxidized Rifle aquifer background sediments (RABS) were deployed in previously biostimulated wells under iron reducing conditions, cell densities of known iron reducing bacteria including Geobacteraceae increased significantly showing the microbial community response to local subsurface conditions. PLFA profiles of RABS following in situ deployment were strikingly similar to those of adjacent sediment cores suggesting ISI results could be extrapolated to the native material of the test plots. Results for ISI deployed reduced sediments showed only slight changes in community composition and pointed toward the ability of the ISIs to monitor microbial community stability and response to subsurface conditions.

  2. Responses of Aromatic-Degrading Microbial Communities to Elevated Nitrate in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiying; He, Zhili; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-10-20

    A high number of aromatic compounds that have been released into aquatic ecosystems have accumulated in sediment because of their low solubility and high hydrophobicity, causing significant hazards to the environment and human health. Since nitrate is an essential nitrogen component and a more thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, nitrate-based bioremediation has been applied to aromatic-contaminated sediments. However, few studies have focused on the response of aromatic-degrading microbial communities to nitrate addition in anaerobic sediments. Here we hypothesized that high nitrate inputs would stimulate aromatic-degrading microbial communities and their associated degrading processes, thus increasing the bioremediation efficiency in aromatic compound-contaminated sediments. We analyzed the changes of key aromatic-degrading genes in the sediment samples from a field-scale site for in situ bioremediation of an aromatic-contaminated creek in the Pearl River Delta before and after nitrate injection using a functional gene array. Our results showed that the genes involved in the degradation of several kinds of aromatic compounds were significantly enriched after nitrate injection, especially those encoding enzymes for central catabolic pathways of aromatic compound degradation, and most of the enriched genes were derived from nitrate-reducing microorganisms, possibly accelerating bioremediation of aromatic-contaminated sediments. The sediment nitrate concentration was found to be the predominant factor shaping the aromatic-degrading microbial communities. This study provides new insights into our understanding of the influences of nitrate addition on aromatic-degrading microbial communities in sediments. PMID:26390227

  3. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments.

    PubMed

    Thureborn, Petter; Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  4. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  5. Spatial and Vertical Variability in Bacterial Community Structure in the Sediment of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Xie, W.; Chen, S.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean subsurface contains one of the largest pools of reactive carbon and nitrogen on earth, and thus serves as the largest realm for microbial life. However, the microbial communities that drive deep-subsurface geochemical processes are vastly unexplored. In this study, the bacterial community structure in the subsurface of the South China Sea were examined using sediment cores collected from shelf (water depth 667 m) to slope (water depth 3840 m). High-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the sediment samples resulted in a total of 270,000 sequences with each sample averaging about 10,000 sequences. In all sediment cores, the 16S rRNA gene copies of bacteria were highest in the surface sediment and decreased with the core depth. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In most of the sediment cores, Proteobacteria dominated surface sediment samples and decreased with depth. The community structure showed no significant difference among the stations at different water depths, which indicates that bacterial distribution in the sediment is not influenced by the water column above. However, stations along the transect from Pearl River canyon to the deep basin were grouped together by cluster analysis, which indicates that bacterial community structure at these stations may bear the same consequence of sedimentary processes of the deep South China Sea.

  6. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  7. EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINANTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENTS ON MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITY TROPHIC STRUCTURE IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic communities from estuaries throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico were studied to assess the influence of sediment contaminants and natural environmental factors on macrobenthic community trophic structure. Community trophic data were also used to evaluate whether re...

  8. The Influence of Intense Chemical Pollution on the Community Composition, Diversity and Abundance of Anammox Bacteria in the Jiaojiang Estuary (China)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Baolan; Shen, Lidong; Du, Ping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xiangyang; Zeng, Jiangning

    2012-01-01

    Continuous chemical pollution is one of the most serious environmental problems in the Jiaojiang Estuary of the East Sea (China). This chemical pollution has significantly changed the estuarine environmental conditions and may have profoundly influenced the distribution of anammox bacterial communities in this estuary. Here, we investigated the influence of chemical pollution on the community composition, diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria in Jiaojiang estuarine sediments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that the majority of anammox bacterial sequences retrieved from the estuarine intertidal sediments were associated with Kuenenia. In contrast, different anammox communities composed of Brocadia, Kuenenia, Scalindua and Jettenia were found in the estuarine subtidal sediments. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that the sediment nitrobenzene and organic content had significant impacts on the distribution of anammox communities in the intertidal sediments. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the diversity of anammox bacteria in the intertidal sediments was positively correlated with the organic content. In contrast, RDA results showed that the nitrobenzene content, NO3− concentration and salinity significantly influenced the distribution of anammox communities in the subtidal sediments. The diversity and relative abundance of anammox bacteria in the subtidal sediments were positively correlated with NO3− concentration. PMID:22470481

  9. Microbial communities of urban stormwater sediments: the phylogenetic structure of bacterial communities varies with porosity.

    PubMed

    Badin, Anne-Laure; Mustafa, Tarfa; Bertrand, Cédric; Monier, Armelle; Delolme, Cécile; Geremia, Roberto A; Bedell, Jean-Philippe

    2012-08-01

    This study focuses on the distribution of bacterial and fungal communities within the microstructure of a multi-contaminated sedimentary layer resulting from urban stormwater infiltration. Fractionation was performed on the basis of differential porosity and aggregate grain size, resulting in five fractions: leachable fitting macroporosity, < 10, 10-160, 160-1000 μm fitting aggregates, > 1000 μm. Amounts of both bacterial and fungal biomasses are greater in the < 10 μm and leachable fractions. The aggregates contain numerous bacteria but very low amounts of fungal biomass. Single-strand conformational polymorphism molecular profiles highlighted the differences between bacterial and fungal communities of the leachable fraction and those of the aggregates. Random Sanger sequencing of ssu clones revealed that these differences were mainly because of the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria and Firmicutes in the leachable fractions, while the aggregates contained more Cyanobacteria. The Cyanobacteria phylotypes in the aggregates were dominated by the sequences related to Microcoleus vaginatus while the leachable fractions presented the sequences of chloroplastic origin. Therefore, more than 50% of the phylotypes observed were related to Proteobacteria while 40% were related to Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Preferential distribution of clades in almost all the phyla or classes detected was observed. This study provides insight into the identities of dominant members of the bacterial communities of urban sediments. Microcoleus vaginatus appeared to predominate in pioneer soils. PMID:22404135

  10. The influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of a coastal phytoplankton community in a micro-tidal estuary: Yura River Estuary, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Fukuzaki, K.; Akiyama, S.; Ichimi, K.; Kasai, A.; Fukushima, K.; Ueno, M.; Yoshioka, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The western side of Wakasa Bay, Tango Sea, Japan receives most of its allochthonous nutrient input from the Yura River. The Yura Estuary is classified as micro-tidal with a spring tidal range of less than 0.5 m. In summer, generally, the river discharge is low and the sea level is high, so the salt wedge extends 20 km upstream. Then, phytoplankton blooms occur due to an influx of riverine nutrients in the estuary. In contrast, during spring, river discharge is high and the salt wedge is not formed. These seasonal differences in estuarine physical and biological conditions may affect the coastal zone. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of the coastal phytoplankton community in this micro-tidal estuary. For this objective, field surveys were conducted both in the coastal zone and the river side of this estuary. Four sampling stations with depths of 5, 10, 20 and 30 m were set in the coastal zone, and weekly surveys were conducted from December 2009 to June 2011. Six sampling stations were set between the mouth of the Yura River and 16 km upstream, and monthly surveys were conducted in summer (from June 2010 to August 2010) and spring (from February 2011 to April 2011). Vertical profiles of salinity, water temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured with a CTD profiler at each station. With water samples taken from the surface, middle, and bottom layers at each station, concentrations of chlorophyll a, pheophytin, and nutrients were analyzed. The nutrients flux from the upstream to the estuary correlated strongly with river discharge, not with nutrient concentrations. In summer, when estuarine water were stratified, marine phytoplankton (mainly diatoms) developed in the middle layer of the estuary while freshwater phytoplankton (mainly green algae) increased in the surface layer of the river mouth. Nitrate concentration in riverine water was estimated to decline 15% while the water flowed from the

  11. Assessment of sediment contaminants, toxicity, and benthic community structure in Massachusetts bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, J.

    1994-12-31

    Sediments samples were collected during July 1993 at 12 stations in Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays along the Massachusetts coastline. The stations consisted of foursites from shallow subtidal depths in each of three harbor systems: Wellfleet Harbor, Boston Harbor, and Salem/Beverly Harbors. Synoptic measurements were made of pollutant concentrations, sediment/porewater toxicity, and benthic community structure as a basis for examining potential linkages between sediment contamination and adverse impacts on living benthic resources of the Massachusetts Bay/Cape Cod Bay nearshore ecosystem. Results from this application of the Sediment Quality Triad approach will be presented.

  12. [Effects of Perfluoroalkyl Substances on the Microbial Community Structure in Surface Sediments of Typical River, China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-jun; Wang, Tie-yu; Peng, Xia-wei; Wang, Pei

    2015-07-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) contamination and the bacterial community composition, surface sediment samples were collected along the Xiaoqing River in Shandong Province in April and July 2014 (XQ1-XQ10), where many PFASs manufacturers were located. PFASs were quantified by HPLC/MS-MS, related environmental factors affecting the microbial community structure were measured, and the microbial community structure in surface sediments was measured by the second-generation sequencing technology Illumina MiSeq. The results not only revealed the degree of PFASs pollution in the sediments of Xiaoqing River, but also illustrated the relationship between PFASs pollution and the microbial community structure. Among the twelve kinds of PFASs detected in this study, PFOA was the predominant compound, and the highest PFOA concentrations were detected in the sample of XQ5 (April: 456. 2 ng. g-1; July: 748.7 ng . g-1) located at the downstream of Xiaoqing River with many fluoropolymer producing facilities. PFOA contamination was the main factor affecting the microbial community structure in April, accordingly community richness and evenness were significantly negatively correlated with PFOA levels. The abundance of Thiobacillus increased with the increasing PFOA concentration in the sediment PFOA. This suggested that Thiobacillus was sensitive to PFOA pollution and might be the potential indicator to reveal the degree of PFOA pollution in sediment. When the concentrations of PFOA were below 100 ng . g-1, no significant effects on the microbial community structure were observed. PMID:26489317

  13. ESTUARINE AND SCALAR PATTERNS OF INVASION IN THE SOFT-BOTTOM BENTHIC COMMUNITIES OF THE SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial patterns of nonindigenous species in seven subtidal soft-bottom communities in the San Francisco Estuary were quantified. Sixty nonindigenous species were found out of the 533 taxa enumerated (11%). Patterns of invasion across the communities were evaluated using a ...

  14. Phylogenetic Characterization of Phosphatase-Expressing Bacterial Communities in Baltic Sea Sediments.

    PubMed

    Steenbergh, Anne K; Bodelier, Paul L E; Hoogveld, Hans L; Slomp, Caroline P; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate release from sediments hampers the remediation of aquatic systems from a eutrophic state. Microbial phosphatases in sediments release phosphorus during organic matter degradation. Despite the important role of phosphatase-expressing bacteria, the identity of these bacteria in sediments is largely unknown. We herein presented a culture-independent method to phylogenetically characterize phosphatase-expressing bacteria in sediments. We labeled whole-cell extracts of Baltic Sea sediments with an artificial phosphatase substrate and sorted phosphatase-expressing cells with a flow cytometer. Their phylogenetic affiliation was determined by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. The phosphatase-expressing bacterial community coarsely reflected the whole-cell bacterial community, with a similar dominance of Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:25817584

  15. Identification of bacterial communities in sediments of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenbo; Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xinxin; Ma, Yantian; Mou, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria play a vital role in various biogeochemical processes in lacustrine sediment ecosystems. This study is among the first to investigate the spatial distribution patterns of bacterial community composition in the sediments of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake of China. Sediment samples were collected from the main basins and mouths of major rivers that discharge into the Poyang Lake in May 2011. Quantitative PCR assay and pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that the bacteria community abundance and compositions of Poyang Lake sediment varied largely among sampling sites. A total of 25 phyla and 68 bacterial orders were distinguished. Burkholderiales, Gallionellales (Beta-proteobacteria), Myxococcales, Desulfuromonadales (Delta-proteobacteria), Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes), Nitrospirales (Nitrospirae), Xanthomonadales (Gamma-proteobacteria) were identified as the major taxa and collectively accounted for over half of annotated sequences. Moreover, correlation analyses suggested that higher loads of total phosphorus and heavy metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) could enhance bacterial abundance in the sediment. PMID:27047727

  16. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  17. Sediment Microbial Community Structure and Mercury Methylation in Mercury-Polluted Clear Lake, California

    PubMed Central

    Macalady, J. L.; Mack, E. E.; Nelson, D. C.; Scow, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in sediment microbial community structure in a eutrophic lake polluted with inorganic mercury were identified using polar lipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Microbial community structure was strongly related to mercury methylation potential, sediment organic carbon content, and lake location. Pore water sulfate, total mercury concentrations, and organic matter C/N ratios showed no relationships with microbial community structure. Seasonal changes and changes potentially attributable to temperature regulation of bacterial membranes were detectable but were less important influences on sediment PLFA composition than were differences due to lake sampling location. Analysis of biomarker PLFAs characteristic of Desulfobacter and Desulfovibrio groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria suggests that Desulfobacter-like organisms are important mercury methylators in the sediments, especially in the Lower Arm of Clear Lake. PMID:10742230

  18. Scale-dependency of macroinvertebrate communities: responses to contaminated sediments within run-of-river dams.

    PubMed

    Colas, Fanny; Archaimbault, Virginie; Devin, Simon

    2011-03-01

    Due to their nutrient recycling function and their importance in food-webs, macroinvertebrates are essential for the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. These organisms also constitute an important component of biodiversity. Sediment evaluation and monitoring is an essential aspect of ecosystem monitoring since sediments represent an important component of aquatic habitats and are also a potential source of contamination. In this study, we focused on macroinvertebrate communities within run-of-river dams, that are prime areas for sediment and pollutant accumulation. Little is known about littoral macroinvertebrate communities within run-of-river dam or their response to sediment levels and pollution. We therefore aimed to evaluate the following aspects: the functional and structural composition of macroinvertebrate communities in run-of-river dams; the impact of pollutant accumulation on such communities, and the most efficient scales and tools needed for the biomonitoring of contaminated sediments in such environments. Two run-of-river dams located in the French alpine area were selected and three spatial scales were examined: transversal (banks and channel), transversal x longitudinal (banks/channel x tail/middle/dam) and patch scale (erosion, sedimentation and vegetation habitats). At the patch scale, we noted that the heterogeneity of littoral habitats provided many available niches that allow for the development of diversified macroinvertebrate communities. This implies highly variable responses to contamination. Once combined on a global 'banks' spatial scale, littoral habitats can highlight the effects of toxic disturbances. PMID:21272919

  19. Sediment prokaryote communities in different sites of eutrophic Lake Taihu and their interactions with environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Yang, Jin-Shui; Qu, Jiang-Hang; Li, Hai-Feng; Liu, Wei-Jie; Li, Bao-Zhen; Wang, En Tao; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the temporal variation of the sediment prokaryote communities and their relation with the rapid increase of algae population in Taihu, a shallow eutrophic freshwater Lake, water and surface sediments were sampled from seven sites in different stages of algal bloom. The physicochemical characterization revealed positive correlations among the nutrient (N, P) parameters in the water and sediments, as well as TN/TP ratio 30.79 in average in water and 0.13 in sediments, demonstrating that P content was the limit factor for bloom in Taihu and sediment was an important nutrient resource for the water body. T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed a diversity decrease of sediment prokaryotic communities along the bloom. The bacterial communities in sediments were more sensitive and shaped by the temporal changes, while archaea were more sensitive to the trophic level. The pyrosequencing data showed clear spatial and temporal changes in diversity of sediment bacteria. Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant group in all the samples, following by Delta-, Gama- and Alpha-proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi etc. At the genus level, Thiobacillus and Sulfuricurvum were the most dominant groups in the sediments, and the increase of Thiobacillus abundance in February might be used as bioindicator for the subsequent bloom. In addition, NO3 (-)-N was evidenced to be the main factor to regulate the bacterial community structure in the sediments. These results offered some novel and important data for the evaluation and predict the algal bloom in Taihu and can be reference for other shallow fresh water lakes. PMID:25772498

  20. Molecular characterization of Pseudo-nitzschia community structure and species ecology in a hydrographically complex estuarine system (Puget Sound, Washington, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katherine A.; Olson, Claire H.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Species within the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia coexist in coastal and estuarine waters globally and are difficult to distinguish by microscopy. Here, we describe a sensitive, high throughput PCR-based Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) approach to determine the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species within natural communities over space and time. The method was quantitatively validated using simplified mixtures of DNA or ITS1 standards from isolates of P. pungens, P. multiseries, and P. delicatissima. Relative abundance calculations based on ARISA profiles from these mixtures reflected input ratios, with minor deviations resulting from intraspecific variability. ARISA was used to identify and quantify at least eight species within Puget Sound and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington, USA: P. americana, P. australis/P. seriata, P. cuspidata, P. delicatissima, P. fraudulenta, P. fryxelliana, P. multiseries, and P. pungens; genotypes corresponding to P. pungens var. pungens and P. pungens var. cingulata were identified by environmental sequencing. The different species were significantly correlated with physical (temperature, salinity), biological (chlorophyll a fluorescence, oxygen), and/or chemical (ammonium, nutrient ratios) factors. The ability to determine shifts in the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species over spatial and temporal scales relevant to dispersion and selection facilitates dissection of the varied mechanisms driving vertical and horizontal species distribution patterns in hydrographically complex systems. PMID:27239082

  1. Analysis of the microbial community and geochemistry of a sediment core from Great Slave Lake, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jesmine; Woodward, John; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Christoffersen, Poul; Cummings, Stephen P

    2011-02-01

    Sediment cores taken from Great Slave Lake, Canada, were analysed to investigate their metabolically active microbial populations and geochemistry. The amplification of cDNA detected metabolically active bacterial (50 separate bands) and archaeal (49 separate band) communities. The bacterial communities were further resolved indicating active actinobacterial and γ-proteobacterial communities (36 and 43 individual bands respectively). Redundancy discriminate analysis and Monte Carlo permutation testing demonstrated the significant impact of geochemical parameters on microbial community structures. Geochemical analyses suggest that the upper 0.4 m represents soil weathering and erosion in the lake catchment. An increase in organic carbon in the lower core suggests either more primary productivity, indicating warmer climate conditions, associated with Holocene Climatic Optimum conditions pre 5,000 years BP or change from a reducing environment in the lower core to an oxidizing environment during more recent deposition. Drivers for bacterial, archaeal and actinobacterial community structures were sediment particle size, and its mineral composition. Depth also significantly affected γ- proteobacterial community structure. In contrast the organic carbon content did not significantly shape the microbial community structures within the sediment. This study indicates that geochemical parameters significantly contribute to microbial community structure in these sediments. PMID:20803250

  2. Influence of sediment characteristics on the composition of soft-sediment intertidal communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jessica R.; Sigel, Bryan J.; Taylor, Caz M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic infaunal communities are important components of coastal ecosystems. Understanding the relationships between the structure of these communities and characteristics of the habitat in which they live is becoming progressively more important as coastal systems face increasing stress from anthropogenic impacts and changes in climate. To examine how sediment characteristics and infaunal community composition were related along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, we sampled intertidal infaunal communities at seven sites covering common habitat types at a regional scale. Across 69 samples, the communities clustered into four distinct groups on the basis of faunal composition. Nearly 70% of the variation in the composition of the communities was explained by salinity, median grain size, and total organic content. Our results suggest that at a regional level coarse habitat characteristics are able to explain a large amount of the variation among sites in infaunal community structure. By examining the relationships between infaunal communities and their sedimentary habitats, we take a necessary first step that will allow the exploration of how changes in habitat and community composition influence higher trophic levels and ecosystem scale processes. PMID:26157603

  3. Bacterial Communities in Polluted Seabed Sediments: A Molecular Biology Assay in Leghorn Harbor

    PubMed Central

    Verni, Franco; Petroni, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Seabed sediments of commercial ports are often characterized by high pollution levels. Differences in number and distribution of bacteria in such areas can be related to distribution of pollutants in the port and to sediment conditions. In this study, the bacterial communities of five sites from Leghorn Harbor seabed were characterized, and the main bacterial groups were identified. T-RFLP was used for all samples; two 16S rRNA libraries and in silico digestion of clones were used to identify fingerprint profiles. Library data, phylogenetic analysis, and T-RFLP coupled with in silico digestion of the obtained sequences evidenced the dominance of Proteobacteria and the high percentage of Bacteroidetes in all sites. The approach highlighted similar bacterial communities between samples coming from the five sites, suggesting a modest differentiation among bacterial communities of different harbor seabed sediments and hence the capacity of bacterial communities to adapt to different levels and types of pollution. PMID:24227997

  4. Changes in northern Gulf of Mexico sediment bacterial and archaeal communities exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Devereux, R; Mosher, J J; Vishnivetskaya, T A; Brown, S D; Beddick, D L; Yates, D F; Palumbo, A V

    2015-09-01

    Biogeochemical changes in marine sediments during coastal water hypoxia are well described, but less is known about underlying changes in microbial communities. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) hypoxic zone sediments were characterized by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA V4-region gene fragments obtained by PCR amplification of community genomic DNA with bacterial- or archaeal-specific primers. Duplicate LCS sediment cores collected during hypoxia had higher concentrations of Fe(II), and dissolved inorganic carbon, phosphate, and ammonium than cores collected when overlying water oxygen concentrations were normal. Pyrosequencing yielded 158,686 bacterial and 225,591 archaeal sequences from 20 sediment samples, representing five 2-cm depth intervals in the duplicate cores. Bacterial communities grouped by sampling date and sediment depth in a neighbor-joining analysis using Chao-Jaccard shared species values. Redundancy analysis indicated that variance in bacterial communities was mainly associated with differences in sediment chemistry between oxic and hypoxic water column conditions. Gammaproteobacteria (26.5%) were most prominent among bacterial sequences, followed by Firmicutes (9.6%), and Alphaproteobacteria (5.6%). Crenarchaeotal, thaumarchaeotal, and euryarchaeotal lineages accounted for 57%, 27%, and 16% of archaeal sequences, respectively. In Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I, sequences were 96-99% identical to the Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 sequence, were highest in surficial sediments, and accounted for 31% of archaeal sequences when waters were normoxic vs. 13% of archaeal sequences when waters were hypoxic. Redundancy analysis showed Nitrosopumilus-related sequence abundance was correlated with high solid-phase Fe(III) concentrations, whereas most of the remaining archaeal clusters were not. In contrast, crenarchaeotal sequences were from phylogenetically diverse lineages, differed little in relative abundance between

  5. In Situ Microbial Community Succession on Mild Steel in Estuarine and Marine Environments: Exploring the Role of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Joyce M.; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a complex biogeochemical process involving interactions between microbes, metals, minerals, and their environment. We hypothesized that sediment-derived iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would colonize and become numerically abundant on steel surfaces incubated in coastal marine environments. To test this, steel coupons were incubated on sediments over 40 days, and samples were taken at regular intervals to examine microbial community succession. The experiments were conducted at two locations: (1) a brackish salt marsh stream and (2) a coastal marine bay. We analyzed DNA extracted from the MIC biofilms for bacterial diversity using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene, and two coupons from the coastal site were single cell sorted and screened for the SSU rRNA gene. We quantified communities of Zetaproteobacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and total bacteria and archaea using qPCR analyses. Zetaproteobacteria and SRB were identified in the sequencing data and qPCR analyses for samples collected throughout the incubations and were also present in adjacent sediments. At the brackish site, the diversity of Zetaproteobacteria was lower on the steel compared to sediments, consistent with the expected enrichment of FeOB on steel. Their numbers increased rapidly over the first 10 days. At the marine site, Zetaproteobacteria and other known FeOB were not detected in sediments; however, the numbers of Zetaproteobacteria increased dramatically within 10 days on the steel surface, although their diversity was nearly clonal. Iron oxyhydroxide stalk biosignatures were observed on the steel and in earlier enrichment culture studies; this is evidence that the Zetaproteobacteria identified in the qPCR, pyrosequencing, and single cell data were likely FeOB. In the brackish environment, members of freshwater FeOB were also present, but were absent in the fully marine site. This work indicates there is a

  6. In Situ Microbial Community Succession on Mild Steel in Estuarine and Marine Environments: Exploring the Role of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Joyce M; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a complex biogeochemical process involving interactions between microbes, metals, minerals, and their environment. We hypothesized that sediment-derived iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would colonize and become numerically abundant on steel surfaces incubated in coastal marine environments. To test this, steel coupons were incubated on sediments over 40 days, and samples were taken at regular intervals to examine microbial community succession. The experiments were conducted at two locations: (1) a brackish salt marsh stream and (2) a coastal marine bay. We analyzed DNA extracted from the MIC biofilms for bacterial diversity using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene, and two coupons from the coastal site were single cell sorted and screened for the SSU rRNA gene. We quantified communities of Zetaproteobacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and total bacteria and archaea using qPCR analyses. Zetaproteobacteria and SRB were identified in the sequencing data and qPCR analyses for samples collected throughout the incubations and were also present in adjacent sediments. At the brackish site, the diversity of Zetaproteobacteria was lower on the steel compared to sediments, consistent with the expected enrichment of FeOB on steel. Their numbers increased rapidly over the first 10 days. At the marine site, Zetaproteobacteria and other known FeOB were not detected in sediments; however, the numbers of Zetaproteobacteria increased dramatically within 10 days on the steel surface, although their diversity was nearly clonal. Iron oxyhydroxide stalk biosignatures were observed on the steel and in earlier enrichment culture studies; this is evidence that the Zetaproteobacteria identified in the qPCR, pyrosequencing, and single cell data were likely FeOB. In the brackish environment, members of freshwater FeOB were also present, but were absent in the fully marine site. This work indicates there is a

  7. Effects of benthic macrofauna bioturbation on the bacterial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Da-Yong; Liu, Peng; Yu, Zhong-Bo; Huang, Rui; Wu, Qinglong L

    2014-08-01

    Benthic macrofauna are considered to be an important part of the lacustrine ecosystem, and bioturbation may greatly affect the biogeochemical processes and microbial activities in sediments. In the present study, the bacterial community composition in sediments inhabited by 3 different types of benthic macrofauna (Corbicula fluminea, Chironomidae larvae, and tubificid worms) in the shallow and eutrophic Lake Taihu was studied to investigate the different effects of bioturbation on the composition of these communities. Microcosms were constructed, and culture-independent methods, including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis, were performed to evaluate the bacterial communities. Analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that differences in the bacterial community composition between the control and the macrofauna-inhabited sediments were not as great as expected, although the chemical properties of the sediments changed remarkably. Nevertheless, the dominant bacterial group in each type of macrofauna-inhabited sediment was different. Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial groups in sediments inhabited by C. fluminea, tubificid worms, and Chironomidae larvae, respectively. The data obtained in this study are helpful for understanding the effects of bioturbation in a shallow, eutrophic lake. PMID:25070418

  8. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction-modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. PMID:26403720

  9. Using in situ bacterial communities to monitor contaminants in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuwei; Wang, Jizhong; Wu, Yaketon; Ren, Chen; Song, Chao; Yang, Jianghua; Yu, Hongxia; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial communities in sediments of human-impacted rivers are exposed to multiple anthropogenic contaminants and eventually lead to biodiversity lost and ecological functions disable. Nanfei River of Anhui province has been contaminated by pollutants from industrial and/or agricultural sources. This study was conducted to investigate the structure of in situ sediment bacterial communities in Nanfei River and to examine the correlation between the different taxonomic components and contaminant concentrations. The bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi. Both the profiles of environmental predictors and the composition of microbial communities differed among agriculture, industrial and confluence regions. There were significant associations between bacterial community phylogenies and the measured contaminants in the sediments. Nutrients (TN and TP) and two metals (Cd and Zn) were negatively correlated with the essential "core" of the bacterial interaction network (Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria). Metals (Fe, Ni and Zn) and nutrients (TN and TP) had higher impact on bacterial community compositions than PAHs, OPs and PRTs according to the correlation and network analyses. Furthermore, several sensitive candidate genera were identified as potential bioindicators to monitor key contaminants by species contaminant correlation analysis. Overall, in situ bacterial communities could provide a useful tool for monitoring and assessing ecological stressors in freshwater sediments. PMID:26866572

  10. Seasonal and spatial variability of free-living bacterial community composition along an estuarine gradient (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Isabel S.; Alves, Artur; Tacão, Marta; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Correia, António

    2006-06-01

    We examined the dynamics of the free-living bacterial community in the Ria de Aveiro estuary (Portugal) using 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Samples were collected along the salinity gradient in April, July and October 2003 and January 2004. Analysis of DGGE profiles indicated that the compositional shifts within this community occurred between the brackish and freshwater sections. Those shifts were particularly evident in samples collected in April, October and January. Less pronounced changes were also detected along the salinity gradient in the marine and brackish sections. Seasonally driven changes in microbial community in this estuary also occur. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that salinity and temperature accounted for a significant amount of the variability in the bacterioplankton community composition (26%). Dominant phylotypes were identified either by direct sequencing or by cloning and sequencing DGGE bands. Analysis of DNA sequences revealed that the dominant bacterial groups changed from Bacteroidetes, Alpha-proteobacteria and Gamma-proteobacteria in the marine-brackish section to Bacteroidetes, Beta-proteobacteria, Delta-proteobacteria and Epsilon-proteobacteria in the freshwater section of the estuary.

  11. Analysis of quaternary ammonium compounds in estuarine sediments by LC-ToF-MS: very high positive mass defects of alkylamine ions provide powerful diagnostic tools for identification and structural elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolin; Brownawell, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and robust method of analysis for quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) in marine sediments is presented. Methods for extraction, sample purification, and HPLC-Time-of-Flight-MS analysis were optimized, providing solutions to problems associated with analysis of QACs, such as dialkyldimethylammonium (DADMAC) and benzalkonium (BAC) compounds experienced previously. Recognized in this study are the exceptionally high positive mass defects characteristic of alkylammonium or protonated alkylamine ions. No alternative and chemically-viable elemental formulas exist within 25.2 mDa when the number of double bond equivalents is low, effectively allowing facile discrimination of this compound class in complex mixtures. Accurate mass measurements of diagnostic collision induced dissociation fragment ions and heavy isotope peaks were obtained and also seen to be uniquely heavy compared to other elemental formulae. In the case of BACs, the ability to resolve masses of alkylamine fragment ions is greater than it is for molecular ions, opening up a wide range of potential applications. The power of utilizing a combination of approaches is illustrated with the identification of non-targeted DADMAC C8:C8 and C8:C10, two widely used biocides previously unreported in environmental samples. Concentrations of QACs in sewage-impacted estuarine sediments (up to 74 μg/g) were higher than concentrations of other organic contaminants measured in the same or nearby samples, suggesting further study is needed. PMID:19739657

  12. Microbial Communities in Sediments across the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana continental Shelf (LCS) is a dynamic system that receives discharges from two large rivers. It has a stratified water column that is mixed by winter storms, hypoxic bottom water from spring to fall, and a muddy seafloor with highly mixed surficial sediments. Spatia...

  13. Molecular Assessment of Bacterial Community Dynamics and Functional End Points during Sediment Bioaccumulation Tests.

    PubMed

    Diepens, Noël J; Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Koelmans, Albert A; Smidt, Hauke

    2015-11-17

    Whole sediment toxicity tests play an important role in environmental risk assessment of organic chemicals. It is not clear, however, to what extent changing microbial community composition and associated functions affect sediment test results. We assessed the development of bacterial communities in artificial sediment during a 28 day bioaccumulation test with polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorpyrifos, and four marine benthic invertebrates. DGGE and 454-pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes were used to characterize bacterial community composition. Abundance of total bacteria and selected genes encoding enzymes involved in important microbially mediated ecosystem functions were measured by qPCR. Community composition and diversity responded most to the time course of the experiment, whereas organic matter (OM) content showed a low but significant effect on community composition, biodiversity and two functional genes tested. Moreover, OM content had a higher influence on bacterial community composition than invertebrate species. Medium OM content led to the highest gene abundance and is preferred for standard testing. Our results also indicated that a pre-equilibration period is essential for growth and stabilization of the bacterial community. The observed changes in microbial community composition and functional gene abundance may imply actual changes in such functions during tests, with consequences for exposure and toxicity assessment. PMID:26466173

  14. Comparison of Sulphate-reducing Bacterial Communities in Japanese Fish Farm Sediments with Different Levels of Organic Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ryuji; Mori, Yumi; Sakami, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Fish farm sediments receive a large amount of organic matter from uneaten food and fecal material. This nutrient enrichment, or organic pollution, causes the accumulation of sulphide in the sediment from the action of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We investigated the effect of organic enrichment around coastal fish farms comparing the SRB community structure in these sediments. Sediment samples with different levels of organic pollution classified based upon the contents of acid-volatile sulphide and chemical oxygen demand were collected at three stations on the coast of western Japan. The SRB community composition was assessed using PCR amplification, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the dissimilatory sulphite reductase β-subunit gene (dsrB) fragments using directly extracted sediment DNA. Sequencing of the cloned PCR products of dsrB showed the existence of different SRB groups in the sediments. The majority of dsrB sequences were associated with the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae. Clones related to the phylum Firmicutes were also detected from all sediment samples. Statistical comparison of sequences revealed that community compositions of SRB from polluted sediments significantly differed from those of moderately polluted sediments and unpolluted sediments (LIBSHUFF, p<0.05), showing a different distribution of SRB in the fish farm sediments. There is evidence showing that the organic enrichment of sediments influences the composition of SRB communities in sediments at marine fish farms. PMID:22791053

  15. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B.; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P.; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool. PMID:26052322

  16. Environmental Factors Shape Sediment Anammox Bacterial Communities in Hypernutrified Jiaozhou Bay, China▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hongyue; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Lin; Guo, Lizhong; Chen, Pingping; Tang, Zuwang; Tian, Fang; Li, Shaozheng; Klotz, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is an important process in the marine nitrogen cycle. Because ongoing eutrophication of coastal bays contributes significantly to the formation of low-oxygen zones, monitoring of the anammox bacterial community offers a unique opportunity for assessment of anthropogenic perturbations in these environments. The current study used targeting of 16S rRNA and hzo genes to characterize the composition and structure of the anammox bacterial community in the sediments of the eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay, thereby unraveling their diversity, abundance, and distribution. Abundance and distribution of hzo genes revealed a greater taxonomic diversity in Jiaozhou Bay, including several novel clades of anammox bacteria. In contrast, the targeting of 16S rRNA genes verified the presence of only “Candidatus Scalindua,” albeit with a high microdiversity. The genus “Ca. Scalindua” comprised the apparent majority of active sediment anammox bacteria. Multivariate statistical analyses indicated a heterogeneous distribution of the anammox bacterial assemblages in Jiaozhou Bay. Of all environmental parameters investigated, sediment organic C/organic N (OrgC/OrgN), nitrite concentration, and sediment median grain size were found to impact the composition, structure, and distribution of the sediment anammox bacterial community. Analysis of Pearson correlations between environmental factors and abundance of 16S rRNA and hzo genes as determined by fluorescent real-time PCR suggests that the local nitrite concentration is the key regulator of the abundance of anammox bacteria in Jiaozhou Bay sediments. PMID:20833786

  17. Response of sediment microbial community structure in a freshwater reservoir to manipulations in oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Lee D; Little, John C; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2012-04-01

    Hypolimnetic oxygenation systems (HOx) are being increasingly used in freshwater reservoirs to elevate dissolved oxygen levels in the hypolimnion and suppress sediment-water fluxes of soluble metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) which are often microbially mediated. We assessed changes in sediment microbial community structure and corresponding biogeochemical cycling on a reservoir-wide scale as a function of HOx operations. Sediment microbial biomass as quantified by DNA concentration was increased in regions most influenced by the HOx. Following an initial decrease in biomass in the upper sediment while oxygen concentrations were low, biomass typically increased at all depths as the 4-month-long oxygenation season progressed. A distinct shift in microbial community structure was only observed at the end of the season in the upper sediment near the HOx. While this shift was correlated to HOx-enhanced oxygen availability, increased TOC levels and precipitation of Fe- and Mn-oxides, abiotic controls on Fe and Mn cycling, and/or the adaptability of many bacteria to variations in prevailing electron acceptors may explain the delayed response and the comparatively limited changes at other locations. While the sediment microbial community proved remarkably resistant to relatively short-term changes in HOx operations, HOx-induced variation in microbial structure, biomass, and activity was observed after a full season of oxygenation. PMID:22224595

  18. The inhabitants of the spring ice, under-ice water, and sediments of the white sea in the estuarine zone of the Severnaya Dvina River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, A. F.; Sapozhnikov, F. V.; Rat'kova, T. N.; Romanova, N. D.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Filippov, A. S.

    2011-04-01

    The data on the supra-ice snow, ice, under-ice water, and benthic algal flora obtained in 2007-2008 by sampling in the estuary of the Severnaya Dvina River are analyzed. The river ice and under-ice water in the estuarine zone and in the channel part of the Severnaya Dvina differed greatly in the algal flora's composition. The fresh water species never exceeded 8.6%, while the ice algae composed 90-96% of the total ice inhabitants' biomass. In the under-ice water, this value did not exceed 58-64%. The bacteria in the ice composed not more than 2.5-10% of the total biomass, while, in the under-ice water, 36-49%. The shares of ciliates (0.04%) and nematodes (0.005-1.6%) in the total biomass were negligible. In the estuarine zone, the ice was inhabited mainly by nematodes (78% of the total biomass), while, in the river, their share decreased to 9%. The contribution of bacteria was 15% in Dvina Bay and increased to 61% in the river. The importance of algae in the snow was minor: 7% of the total biomass in the marine zone and 30% in the river region. High species diversity of the algal flora in the sandy and sandy-silty littoral grounds was revealed. The values of the total biomass of the bottom algal flora (0.38 g C/m2) were only two to three times lower than the values revealed in similar habitats in the summer. The epipelithic forms (0.15 g C/m2) dominated, being represented by 46 species of algae (49%). The shares of epipsammonic (0.12 g C/m2) and planktonic (0.11 g C/m2) species were almost equal to each other: 25 and 22 species, respectively (27 and 24%).

  19. Remnants of marine bacterial communities can be retrieved from deep sediments in lakes of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Langenheder, Silke; Comte, Jérôme; Zha, Yinghua; Samad, Md Sainur; Sinclair, Lucas; Eiler, Alexander; Lindström, Eva S

    2016-08-01

    Some bacteria can be preserved over time in deep sediments where they persist either in dormant or slow-growing vegetative stages. Here, we hypothesized that such cells can be revived when exposed to environmental conditions similar to those before they were buried in the sediments. To test this hypothesis, we collected bacteria from sediment samples of different ages (140-8500 calibrated years before present, cal BP) from three lakes that differed in the timing of their physical isolation from the Baltic Sea following postglacial uplift. After these bacterial communities were grown in sterile water from the Baltic Sea, we determined the proportion of 16S rRNA sequence reads associated with marine habitats by extracting the environment descriptive terms of homologous sequences retrieved from public databases. We found that the proportion of reads associated with marine descriptive term was significantly higher in cultures inoculated with sediment layers formed under Baltic conditions and where salinities were expected to be similar to current levels. Moreover, a similar pattern was found in the original sediment layers. Our study, therefore, suggests that remnants of marine bacterial communities can be preserved in sediments over thousands of years and can be revived from deep sediments in lakes of marine origin. PMID:26929161

  20. The use of vintage surficial sediment data and sedimentary cores to determine past and future trends in estuarine metal contamination (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Chang, C-H; Lee, J-H; Churchill, L J

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the present investigation were to determine past trends in sediment contamination and possibly predict future trends. Multiple vintages of surficial sediment metal data, from a quasi-decadal 'Status and Trends' programme, were used to provide large-scale spatial information on current status and temporal change. This information was augmented by sediment cores, specifically located to verify surface sediment data and to determine trends at major points of stormwater discharge. The data obtained indicate that surficial sediment metal concentrations have declined, since about the early 1990s, in extensive parts of the upper and central estuaries and have increased slightly in the lower estuary, due mainly to a down-estuary shift in industry and urbanisation. Declining surficial sediment metal concentrations is due to a movement of industry out of the catchment, especially from foreshore areas and the introduction of regulation, which prevent pollutants being discharged directly to the estuary. The major present-day source of metals is stormwater, with minor inputs from the main estuary channel into embayments and runoff from previously contaminated mainland sites. Modelled relaxation rates are optimistic as high metal concentrations in stormwater will slow predicted rates. Stormwater remediation should be the main managerial focus for this estuary. Multiple vintages of surficial sediment metal data covering the past 30 years, supplemented by sedimentary core data, have allowed past and future contamination trends to be determined. This type of science-based information provides an important tool for strategic management of this iconic waterway. PMID:23570910

  1. Response of the methanogenic microbial communities in Amazonian oxbow lake sediments to desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ralf; Ji, Yang; Noll, Matthias; Klose, Melanie; Claus, Peter; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Methanogenic microbial communities in soil and sediment function only when the environment is inundated and anoxic. In contrast to submerged soils, desiccation of lake sediments happens only rarely. However, some predictions suggest that extreme events of drying will become more common in the Amazon region, and this will promote an increase in sediments drying and exposure. We asked whether and how such methanogenic communities can withstand desiccation stress. Therefore, we determined the rates and pathways of CH(4) production (analysis of CH(4) and δ(13) C of CH(4), CO(2) and acetate), the copy numbers of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA genes (quantitative PCR), and the community composition of Archaea and Bacteria (T-RFLP and pyrosequencing) in oxbow lake sediments of rivers in the Brazilian Amazon region. The rivers were of white water, black water and clear water type. The measurements were done with sediment in fresh state and after drying and rewetting. After desiccation and rewetting the composition of both, the archaeal and bacterial community changed. Since lake sediments from white water rivers exhibited only negligible methanogenic activity, probably because of relatively high iron and low organic matter content, they were not further analysed. The other sediments produced CH(4), with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis usually accounting for > 50% of total activity. After desiccation and rewetting, archaeal and bacterial gene copy numbers decreased. The bacterial community showed a remarkable increase of Clostridiales from about 10% to > 30% of all Bacteria, partially caused by proliferation of specific taxa as the numbers of OTU shared with fresh sediment decreased from about 9% to 3%. Among the Archaea, desiccation specifically enhanced the relative abundance of either Methanocellales (black water) and/or Methanosarcinaceae (clear water). Despite the changes in gene copy numbers and composition of the microbial community, rates of CH

  2. Metagenome of a microbial community inhabiting a metal-rich tropical stream sediment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patrícia S; Reis, Mariana P; Ávila, Marcelo P; Leite, Laura R; de Araújo, Flávio M G; Salim, Anna C M; Oliveira, Guilherme; Barbosa, Francisco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the metagenome and functional composition of a microbial community in a historically metal-contaminated tropical freshwater stream sediment. The sediment was collected from the Mina Stream located in the Iron Quadrangle (Brazil), one of the world's largest mining regions. Environmental DNA was extracted and was sequenced using SOLiD technology, and a total of 7.9 Gbp was produced. A taxonomic profile that was obtained by comparison to the Greengenes database revealed a complex microbial community with a dominance of Proteobacteria and Parvarcheota. Contigs were recruited by bacterial and archaeal genomes, especially Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and their presence implicated them in the process of N cycling in the Mina Stream sediment (MSS). Functional reconstruction revealed a large, diverse set of genes for ammonium assimilation and ammonification. These processes have been implicated in the maintenance of the N cycle and the health of the sediment. SEED subsystems functional annotation unveiled a high degree of diversity of metal resistance genes, suggesting that the prokaryotic community is adapted to metal contamination. Furthermore, a high metabolic diversity was detected in the MSS, suggesting that the historical arsenic contamination is no longer affecting the prokaryotic community. These results expand the current knowledge of the microbial taxonomic and functional composition of tropical metal-contaminated freshwater sediments. PMID:25742617

  3. Metagenome of a Microbial Community Inhabiting a Metal-Rich Tropical Stream Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Patrícia S.; Reis, Mariana P.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Leite, Laura R.; de Araújo, Flávio M. G.; Salim, Anna C. M.; Oliveira, Guilherme; Barbosa, Francisco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the metagenome and functional composition of a microbial community in a historically metal-contaminated tropical freshwater stream sediment. The sediment was collected from the Mina Stream located in the Iron Quadrangle (Brazil), one of the world’s largest mining regions. Environmental DNA was extracted and was sequenced using SOLiD technology, and a total of 7.9 Gbp was produced. A taxonomic profile that was obtained by comparison to the Greengenes database revealed a complex microbial community with a dominance of Proteobacteria and Parvarcheota. Contigs were recruited by bacterial and archaeal genomes, especially Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and their presence implicated them in the process of N cycling in the Mina Stream sediment (MSS). Functional reconstruction revealed a large, diverse set of genes for ammonium assimilation and ammonification. These processes have been implicated in the maintenance of the N cycle and the health of the sediment. SEED subsystems functional annotation unveiled a high degree of diversity of metal resistance genes, suggesting that the prokaryotic community is adapted to metal contamination. Furthermore, a high metabolic diversity was detected in the MSS, suggesting that the historical arsenic contamination is no longer affecting the prokaryotic community. These results expand the current knowledge of the microbial taxonomic and functional composition of tropical metal-contaminated freshwater sediments. PMID:25742617

  4. Diversity, community structure, and bioremediation potential of mercury-resistant marine bacteria of estuarine and coastal environments of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Dash, Hirak R; Das, Surajit

    2016-04-01

    Both point and non-point sources increase the pollution status of mercury and increase the population of mercury-resistant marine bacteria (MRMB). They can be targeted as the indicator organism to access marine mercury pollution, besides utilization in bioremediation. Thus, sediment and water samples were collected for 2 years (2010-2012) along Odisha coast of Bay of Bengal, India. Mercury content of the study sites varied from 0.47 to 0.99 ppb irrespective of the seasons of sampling. A strong positive correlation was observed between mercury content and MRMB population (P < 0.05) suggesting the utilization of these bacteria to assess the level of mercury pollution in the marine environment. Seventy-eight percent of the MRMB isolates were under the phylum Firmicutes, and 36 and 31% of them could resist mercury by mer operon-mediated volatilization and mercury biosorption, respectively. In addition, most of the isolates could resist a number of antibiotics and toxic metals. All the MRMB isolates possess the potential of growth and survival at cardinal pH (4-8), temperature (25-37 °C), and salinity (5-35 psu). Enterobacteria repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and repetitive element palindromic PCR (REP-PCR) produced fingerprints corroborating the results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis also revealed strain-level speciation and phylogenetic relationships. PMID:26686519

  5. Ecohydraulics and Estuarine Wetland Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saintilan, N.; Spencer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The hydraulics or water flow in wetlands is known to be a key factor influencing ecosystem development in estuarine wetland environments. The relationship is indirect, with the hydraulics of wetlands influencing a host of factors including soil salinity, waterlogging, sediment transport, sediment chemistry, vegetation dispersal and growth and nutrient availability and cycling. The relationship is also not one way, with the hydraulics of wetlands being influenced by plant and animal activity. Understanding these complex interactions is fundamental for the adequate management of estuarine wetlands. Listed as a Wetland of International Importance under the 1971 Ramsar Convention, the Hunter River estuary is regarded as the most significant site for migratory shorebirds in New South Wales, Australia. Over the past 20 years, the number of migratory shorebirds in the estuary has sharply declined from 8,000 to 4,000 approx. Alteration of bird habitat is believed to be one of the reasons for this alarming trend. In 2004 we started a three-year program to investigate the links between hydraulics, sediment, benthic invertebrates, vegetation and migratory shorebird habitat in the estuary. During the first year we have focused on a highly disturbed part of the Hunter estuary wetlands located on Ash Island. The area is one of the major roosting sites in the estuary and is characterized by a complex hydraulic regime due to a restricted tidal interchange with the Hunter River and the presence of infrastructure for the maintenance of power lines (i.e., roads, bridges, culverts). Salt marshes, mudflat and mangroves are the dominant vegetation types. The monitoring program includes measurements of water levels, salinity, discharge, velocity, turbulence, sediment transport and deposition, plant species and density, soil composition and benthic invertebrates coordinated with observations of bird habitat utilization on a number of locations throughout the wetland and for different flow

  6. Nucleic acid based quantitative microbial community analysis in different marine and terrestrial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, A.; Blazejak, A.; Köweker, G.

    2009-12-01

    Sub-seafloor sediments harbour over half of all prokaryotic cells on Earth. This immense cell number is calculated from numerous microscopic cell counts (AODC) in ODP sediment cores. Since AODC can not differentiate between living or dead cells, the population size of living microorganisms and the abundance of different prokaryotic groups are unknown. Recent molecular nucleic acid and biomarker analyses showed that a high proportion of the cells are alive and that the microbial communities of deep marine sediments harbour members of distinct, uncultured bacterial and archaeal lineages. The main objective of our project is the quantification of living prokaryotes in various sediments. Deep sediment samples from the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans (ODP Legs 201 and 207, IODP Exp. 307 and 308), sediments from the Indian Ocean (RV Sonne 189-2) and the Black Sea (RV Meteor 51/4) as well as terrestrial Chesapeake Bay Sediments (ICDP) were analyzed using Catalyzed Reporter Deposition - Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (CARD - FISH) and quantitative, real-time PCR (Q-PCR), targeting either the 16S rRNA gene or the functional genes dsrA, mcrA and aprA to quantify microorganisms of various phylogenetic or physiological groups (e.g. JS1 cluster and Chloroflexi). At all sediment sites, cell numbers decreased with depth, however, the abundance of particular microbial groups varied at different sites and depths. The results indicate that global estimates of the deep biosphere should be reconsidered.

  7. Bacterial community response to petroleum contamination and nutrient addition in sediments from a temperate salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2013-08-01

    Microbial communities play an important role in the biodegradation of organic pollutants in sediments, including hydrocarbons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of temperate salt marsh microbial communities to petroleum contamination, in terms of community structure, abundance and capacity to degrade hydrocarbons. Sediments un-colonized and colonized (rhizosediments) by Juncus maritimus, Phragmites australis and Triglochin striata were collected in a temperate estuary (Lima, NW Portugal), spiked with petroleum under variable nutritional conditions, and incubated for 15 days. Results showed that plant speciation emerged as the major factor for shaping the rhizosphere community structure, overriding the petroleum influence. Moreover, when exposed to petroleum contamination, the distinct salt marsh microbial communities responded similarly with (i) increased abundance, (ii) changes in structure, and (iii) decreased diversity. Communities, particularly those associated to J. maritimus and P. australis roots displayed a potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with degradation percentages between 15% and 41%, depending on sediment type and nutritional conditions. In conclusion, distinct salt marsh microbial communities responded similarly to petroleum contamination, but presented different pace, nutritional requirements, and potential for its biodegradation, which should be taken into account when developing bioremediation strategies. PMID:23707865

  8. The energy–diversity relationship of complex bacterial communities in Arctic deep-sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bienhold, Christina; Boetius, Antje; Ramette, Alban

    2012-01-01

    The availability of nutrients and energy is a main driver of biodiversity for plant and animal communities in terrestrial and marine ecosystems, but we are only beginning to understand whether and how energy–diversity relationships may be extended to complex natural bacterial communities. Here, we analyzed the link between phytodetritus input, diversity and activity of bacterial communities of the Siberian continental margin (37–3427 m water depth). Community structure and functions, such as enzymatic activity, oxygen consumption and carbon remineralization rates, were highly related to each other, and with energy availability. Bacterial richness substantially increased with increasing sediment pigment content, suggesting a positive energy–diversity relationship in oligotrophic regions. Richness leveled off, forming a plateau, when mesotrophic sites were included, suggesting that bacterial communities and other benthic fauna may be structured by similar mechanisms. Dominant bacterial taxa showed strong positive or negative relationships with phytodetritus input and allowed us to identify candidate bioindicator taxa. Contrasting responses of individual taxa to changes in phytodetritus input also suggest varying ecological strategies among bacterial groups along the energy gradient. Our results imply that environmental changes affecting primary productivity and particle export from the surface ocean will not only affect bacterial community structure but also bacterial functions in Arctic deep-sea sediment, and that sediment bacterial communities can record shifts in the whole ocean ecosystem functioning. PMID:22071347

  9. Search for Martian fossil communities: Science strategies, sediment sites, and sample handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Marais, David J.

    The strategy for locating and sampling possible fossilized Martian organisms benefits from our experience with fossil microbial ecosystems on Earth. Evidence of early life is typically preserved as stromatolites in carbonates and cherts, and as microfossils in cherts, carbonates and shales. Stromatolites, which are laminated flat or domal structures built by microbial communities, are very likely the oldest and most widespread relics of early life. These communities flourished in supratidal to subtidal coastal benthic environments, wherever sunlight was available and where incoming sediments were insufficient to bury the communities before they became established. A logical site for such communities on Mars might be those areas in an ancient lake bed which were furthest from sediment input, but were still sufficiently shallow to have received sunlight. Therefore, although some sites within Valles Marineris might have contained ponded water, the possibly abundant sediment inputs might have overwhelmed stromatolite-like communities. Localized depressions which acted as catchment basins for ancient branched valley systems might be superior sites. Perhaps such depressions received drainage which, because of the relatively modest water discharges implied for these streams, was relatively low in transported sediment. Multiple streams converging on a single basin might have been able to maintain a shallow water environment for extended periods of time.

  10. Search for Martian fossil communities: Science strategies, sediment sites, and sample handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The strategy for locating and sampling possible fossilized Martian organisms benefits from our experience with fossil microbial ecosystems on Earth. Evidence of early life is typically preserved as stromatolites in carbonates and cherts, and as microfossils in cherts, carbonates and shales. Stromatolites, which are laminated flat or domal structures built by microbial communities, are very likely the oldest and most widespread relics of early life. These communities flourished in supratidal to subtidal coastal benthic environments, wherever sunlight was available and where incoming sediments were insufficient to bury the communities before they became established. A logical site for such communities on Mars might be those areas in an ancient lake bed which were furthest from sediment input, but were still sufficiently shallow to have received sunlight. Therefore, although some sites within Valles Marineris might have contained ponded water, the possibly abundant sediment inputs might have overwhelmed stromatolite-like communities. Localized depressions which acted as catchment basins for ancient branched valley systems might be superior sites. Perhaps such depressions received drainage which, because of the relatively modest water discharges implied for these streams, was relatively low in transported sediment. Multiple streams converging on a single basin might have been able to maintain a shallow water environment for extended periods of time.

  11. The use of innovative screening-level techniques for the bioassessment of estuarine sediments at U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, R.J.; Thebeau, L.; Paul, J.

    1994-12-31

    The US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) is a primarily undeveloped installation on the upper Chesapeake bay in Maryland. The bush and Gunpowder Rivers are two sub-estuaries that run through the installation before emptying into the Chesapeake Bay. Past activities at EA APG include pilot-scale chemical agent manufacturing, munitions testing, smoke/incendiary manufacturing, domestic and rubble landfilling, and disposal of chemical warfare agents as well as other materials. It was determined that if contamination of the Gunpowder River exists from these previous activities on EA APG it was most likely to be found in the sediments. The initial phase was to conduct a sediment survey of the river to determine the spatial distribution of sediment types and the suitability of the benthos for the proposed methodologies. The second phase was to combine innovative screening-level investigative methodologies as well as sediment chemical and physical analyses into one survey of the benthos and sediments of the Gunpowder River. This phase used the Microtox luminescent bioassay and Daphnia magna IQ Toxicity Test, Surface and Profile Image (SPI) photography, analysis of sediment physical characteristics, and limited chemical analysis to identify locations that warrant a more focused investigation.

  12. Microbial Biogeography along an Estuarine Salinity Gradient: Combined Influences of Bacterial Growth and Residence Time

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Byron C.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Hobbie, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Shifts in bacterioplankton community composition along the salinity gradient of the Parker River estuary and Plum Island Sound, in northeastern Massachusetts, were related to residence time and bacterial community doubling time in spring, summer, and fall seasons. Bacterial community composition was characterized with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA. Average community doubling time was calculated from bacterial production ([14C]leucine incorporation) and bacterial abundance (direct counts). Freshwater and marine populations advected into the estuary represented a large fraction of the bacterioplankton community in all seasons. However, a unique estuarine community formed at intermediate salinities in summer and fall, when average doubling time was much shorter than water residence time, but not in spring, when doubling time was similar to residence time. Sequencing of DNA in DGGE bands demonstrated that most bands represented single phylotypes and that matching bands from different samples represented identical phylotypes. Most river and coastal ocean bacterioplankton were members of common freshwater and marine phylogenetic clusters within the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. Estuarine bacterioplankton also belonged to these phyla but were related to clones and isolates from several different environments, including marine water columns, freshwater sediments, and soil. PMID:15006771

  13. Bacterial and archaeal communities in sediments of the north Chinese marginal seas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiwen; Liu, Xiaoshou; Wang, Min; Qiao, Yanlu; Zheng, Yanfen; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities of the Chinese marginal seas have rarely been reported. Here, bacterial and archaeal community structures and abundance in the surface sediment of four sea areas including the Bohai Sea (BS), North Yellow Sea (NYS), South Yellow Sea (SYS), and the north East China Sea (NECS) were surveyed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. The results showed that microbial communities of the four geographic areas were distinct from each other at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, whereas the microbial communities of the BS, NYS, and SYS were more similar to each other than to the NECS at higher taxonomic levels. Across all samples, Bacteria were numerically dominant relative to Archaea, and among them, Gammaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota were predominant in the BS, NYS, and SYS, while Deltaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota were prevalent in the NECS. The most abundant bacterial genera were putative sulfur oxidizer and sulfate reducer, suggesting that sulfur cycle processes might prevail in these areas, and the high abundance of dsrB (10(7)-10(8) copies g(-1)) in all sites verified the dominance of sulfate reducer in the north Chinese marginal seas. The differences in sediment sources among the sampling areas were potential explanations for the observed microbial community variations. Furthermore, temperature and dissolved oxygen of bottom water were significant environmental factors in determining both bacterial and archaeal communities, whereas chlorophyll a in sediment was significant only in structuring archaeal community. This study presented an outline of benthic microbial communities and provided insights into understanding the biogeochemical cycles in sediments of the north Chinese marginal seas. PMID:25501892

  14. Patterns in bacterial and archaeal community structure and diversity in western Beaufort Sea sediments and waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, L. J.; Sikaroodi, M.; Coffin, R. B.; Gillevet, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    A culture-independent phylogenetic study of microbial communities in water samples and sediment cores recovered from the Beaufort Sea slope east of Point Barrow, Alaska was conducted. The goal of the work was to describe community composition in sediment and water samples and determine the influence of local environmental conditions on microbial populations. Archaeal and bacterial community composition was studied using length heterogeneity-polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) and multitag pyrosequencing (MTPS). Sediment samples were obtained from three piston cores on the slope (~1000m depth) arrayed along an east-west transect and one core from a depth of approximately 2000m. Discrete water samples were obtained using a CTD-rosette from three locations adjacent to piston core sites. Water sample were selected at three discrete depths within a vertically stratified (density) water column. The microbial community in near surface waters was distinct from the community observed in deeper stratified layers of the water column. Multidimensional scaling analysis (MDS) revealed that water samples from mid and deep stratified layers bore high similarity to communities in cores collected in close proximity. Overall, the highest diversity (bacteria and archaea) was observed in a core which had elevated methane concentration relative to other locations. Geochemical (e.g., bulk organic and inorganic carbon pools, nutrients, metabolites) and physical data (e.g. depth, water content) were used to reveal the abiotic factors structuring microbial communities. The analysis indicates that sediment water content (porosity) and inorganic carbon concentration are the most significant structuring elements on Beaufort shelf sedimentary microbial communities.

  15. Effect of organic carbon and metal accumulation on the bacterial communities in sulphidogenic sediments.

    PubMed

    Bueche, Matthieu; Junier, Pilar

    2016-06-01

    A unique geochemical setting in Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, has led to the accumulation of insoluble metal sulphides in the sedimentary record as the result of past airborne pollution. This offers an exceptional opportunity to study the effect of these metals on the bacterial communities in sediments, and in particular to investigate further the link between metal contamination and an increase in the populations of endospore-forming bacteria observed previously in other metal-contaminated sediments. A decrease in organic carbon and total bacterial counts was correlated with an increase in the numbers of endospores in the oldest sediment samples, showing the first environmental evidence of a decrease in nutrient availability as a trigger of sporulation. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the two dominant bacterial phyla throughout the sediment, the former in an area with high sulphidogenic activity, and the latter in the oldest samples. Even though the dominant Firmicutes taxa were stable along the sediment core and did not vary with changes in metal contamination, the prevalence of some molecular species like Clostridium sp. was positively correlated with metal sulphide concentration. However, this cannot be generalized to all endospore-forming species. Overall, the community composition supports the hypothesis of sporulation as the main mechanism explaining the dominance of endospore formers in the deepest part of the sediment core, while metal contamination in the form of insoluble metal sulphide deposits appears not to be linked with sporulation as a mechanism of metal tolerance in this sulphidogenic ecosystem. PMID:26780045

  16. Mapping benthic faunal communities in the shallow and deep sediments of Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama.

    PubMed

    Mair, James M; Cunningham, Sarah L; Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Guzman, Hector M; Arroyo, Maria Fernanda; Merino, Daisi; Vargas, Rita

    2009-08-01

    Las Perlas Archipelago (LPA) is located off the Pacific Coast of Panama and was designated as a marine protected area (MPA) in 2007. This baseline study of the shallow and deeper sedimentary habitats of the islands partly informed the MPA designation. Ninety-two grab stations and twenty trawl stations were sampled. Sediment grab sample results were interpolated to produce a map that showed the area to be dominated by mud (1246 km2, 40%) and sand/shell sediments (780 km2, 25%). A total of 201 taxa were recorded and over 5800 individual specimens were processed, revealing that the sediments hold varying community compositions, with annelids being the dominant group (73%) followed by crustaceans (14%). Relationships were evident between community, feeding guilds, and sediment types, which give an indication of communities that can be expected in similar sediments in other areas of the Tropical Eastern Pacific. A study of this scale and level of detail is rare for this biogeographic region and provides a valuable, comprehensive appreciation of the LPA's benthos. PMID:19081116

  17. Influence of copper oxide nanoparticle shape on bioaccumulation, cellular internalization and effects in the estuarine sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Thit, Amalie; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Købler, Carsten; Kennaway, Gabrielle; Selck, Henriette

    2015-10-01

    CuO nanoparticles (NPs) released into the aquatic environment will likely accumulate in the sediment. Here we synthesized and characterized CuO NPs with different shapes and thus sizes: spheres, rods and spindles. Nereis diversicolor were exposed for 10 days to control sediment or sediment spiked with CuO NPs or aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq, CuCl2) at 7, 70 and 140 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment. Cu from all Cu treatments accumulated in worms in a concentration-dependent manner. Only Cu-Aq decreased burrowing, suggesting that worms avoid Cu when added to sediment as Cu-Aq, but not CuO NPs. Transmission Electron Microscopy of gut sections indicated limited presence of CuO NP-like objects in the gut lumen, but evidence on whether accumulated Cu from CuO NP exposure was internalized as particles was not conclusive. Overall, bioavailability and avoidance was not influenced by particle shape or size, whereas Cu form (Cu-Aq vs particulate) and exposure concentration had significant impact. PMID:26149327

  18. Examining the impact of acetylene on N-fixation and the active sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Heiss, Elise M.; Rogener, Mary Kate; Newell, Silvia E.; LeCleir, Gary R.; Kortebein, Sarah M.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Here we examined the impact of a commonly employed method used to measure nitrogen fixation, the acetylene reduction assay (ARA), on a marine sediment community. Historically, the ARA technique has been broadly employed for its ease of use, in spite of numerous known artifacts. To gauge the severity of these effects in a natural environment, we employed high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to detect differences in acetylene-treated sediments vs. non-treated control sediments after a 7 h incubation. Within this short time period, significant differences were seen across all activity of microbes identified in the sediment, implying that the changes induced by acetylene occur quickly. The results have important implications for our understanding of marine nitrogen budgets. Moreover, because the ARA technique has been widely used in terrestrial and freshwater habitats, these results may be applicable to other ecosystems. PMID:26029177

  19. Visualising the 3D Structure of Fine-Grained Estuarine Sediments; Preliminary Interpretations of a Novel Dataset Obtained via Volume Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Spencer, Kate; Carr, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Accurate measurement of the physical characteristics of sediment are critical to determining sediment transport behaviour and the stability of settled deposits. The properties (e.g. particle size, density, and settling velocity) of coarse-grained sediments (> 63 μm φ) can be easily characterised, hence their behaviour is relatively simple to predict and model. However, due to their small size and tendency to interact with their surrounding medium, the characteristics of fine sediments (< 63 μm φ) and their behaviour during transportation, deposition and consolidation is poorly understood. Recent studies have used correlative microscopy, a multi-method technique combining scanning confocal laser microscopy (SCLM), conventional optical microscopy (COM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to characterise fine sediments at both the gross (> 1 μm) and sub-micron scale (Droppo et al., 1996). Whilst this technique has proven insightful, the measurement of geometric properties (e.g. the shape of primary particles and their spatial arrangement) can only be achieved by three-dimensional (3D) analysis and the scale of observation for e.g. TEM does not overlap with those techniques used to characterise sediments at larger scales (100s to 1000s microns) (e.g. video analysis). Volume electron microscopy [or focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)] provides 3D analysis at scales of 10s to 1000s microns and though widely used in cell biology, has not been used to observe sediment. FIB-SEM requires samples that are vacuum stable and a key challenge will be to capture fragile, hydrated sediment samples whilst preserving their structural integrity. The aims of this work are therefore: 1) to modify preparation techniques currently used in cell biology for the stabilization of sedimentary materials; 2) to acquire 3D datasets for both fragile suspended sediments (flocs) and consolidated bed sediments and 3) to interpret the 3D structure of these samples. In

  20. SEDIMENT TOXICITY, CONTAMINATION, AND MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES NEAR A LARGE SEWAGE OUTFALL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment Toxicity, contamination and macrobenthic community structure were examined in 1980 at seven stations along a pollution gradient from the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's sewage outfalls on the Palos Verdes shelf, CA, to control conditions in Santa Monica Bay. Sed...

  1. Spatial patterns of microbial community composition within Lake Erie sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lake Erie is a large freshwater ecosystem with three distinct basins that exhibit an east-west gradient of increasing productivity, as well as allochthonous inputs of nutrients and xenobiotics. To evaluate microbial community composition throughout this ecosystem, 435 16S rDNA environmental clones w...

  2. Biodiversity, Community Structural Shifts, and Biogeography of Prokaryotes within Antarctic Continental Shelf Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, John P.; McCuaig, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone library analysis was conducted to assess prokaryotic diversity and community structural changes within a surficial sediment core obtained from an Antarctic continental shelf area (depth, 761 m) within the Mertz Glacier Polynya (MGP) region. Libraries were created from three separate horizons of the core (0- to 0.4-cm, 1.5- to 2.5-cm, and 20- to 21-cm depth positions). The results indicated that at the oxic sediment surface (depth, 0 to 0.4 cm) the microbial community appeared to be dominated by a small subset of potentially r-strategist (fast-growing, opportunistic) species, resulting in a lower-than-expected species richness of 442 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). At a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 cm, the species richness (1,128 OTUs) was much higher, with the community dominated by numerous gamma and delta proteobacterial phylotypes. At a depth of 20 to 21 cm, a clear decline in species richness (541 OTUs) occurred, accompanied by a larger number of more phylogenetically divergent phylotypes and a decline in the predominance of Proteobacteria. Based on rRNA and clonal abundance as well as sequence comparisons, syntrophic cycling of oxidized and reduced sulfur compounds appeared to be the dominant process in surficial MGP sediment, as phylotype groups putatively linked to these processes made up a large proportion of clones