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Sample records for ethanol-induced hepatic damage

  1. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of Garcinia indica fruit rind in ethanol-induced hepatic damage in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ashar, Hardik; Srinath, Sudhamani

    2012-01-01

    The protective effects of aqueous extracts of the fruit rind of Garcinia indica (GIE) on ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity and the probable mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated in rats. Liver damage was induced in rats by administering ethanol (5 g/kg, 20% w/v p.o.) once daily for 21 days. GIE at 400 mg/kg and 800 mg/kg and the reference drug silymarin (200 mg/kg) were administered orally for 28 days to ethanol treated rats, this treatment beginning 7 days prior to the commencement of ethanol administration. Levels of marker enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)), triglyceride (sTG), albumin (Alb) and total protein (TP) were evaluated in serum. Antioxidant parameters (reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR)), hepatic triglycerides (hTG) and the lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined in liver. GIE and silymarin elicited significant hepatoprotective activity by attenuating the ethanol–elevated levels of AST, ALT, ALP, sTG, hTG and MDA and restored the ethanol-depleted levels of GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, Alb and TP. GIE 800 mg/kg demonstrated greater hepatoprotection than GIE 400 mg/kg. The present findings indicate that hepatoprotective effects of GIE in ethanol-induced oxidative damage may be due to an augmentation of the endogenous antioxidants and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in liver. PMID:23554565

  2. Gastroprotective Effect of Selenium on Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Shin-Hyung; Nam, Soo-Wan; Choi, Yung-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the gastroprotective effect of selenium against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The gastric mucosal lesions were produced by oral administration with various concentrations of ethanol for three days, and 80% ethanol treatment was determined to be the optimal condition for induction of gastric damage. To identify the protective effect of selenium on ethanol-induced gastric damage, various doses of selenium were given as pretreatment for three days, and then gastric damage was induced by 80% ethanol treatment. Selenium showed a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in a dose dependent manner. Specifically, 100 ?g/kg selenium showed the highest level of gastroprotection. In addition, selenium markedly attenuated ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation in gastric mucosa and increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Histological data showed that 100 ?g/kg selenium distinctly reduced the depth and severity of the ethanol induced gastric lesion. These results clearly demonstrate that selenium inhibits the formation of ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of enzymatic radical scavenging. PMID:22754328

  3. Gastroprotective effect of selenium on ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Shin-Hyung; Nam, Soo-Wan; Choi, Yung-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the gastroprotective effect of selenium against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The gastric mucosal lesions were produced by oral administration with various concentrations of ethanol for three days, and 80% ethanol treatment was determined to be the optimal condition for induction of gastric damage. To identify the protective effect of selenium on ethanol-induced gastric damage, various doses of selenium were given as pretreatment for three days, and then gastric damage was induced by 80% ethanol treatment. Selenium showed a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in a dose dependent manner. Specifically, 100 ?g/kg selenium showed the highest level of gastroprotection. In addition, selenium markedly attenuated ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation in gastric mucosa and increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Histological data showed that 100 ?g/kg selenium distinctly reduced the depth and severity of the ethanol induced gastric lesion. These results clearly demonstrate that selenium inhibits the formation of ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of enzymatic radical scavenging. PMID:22754328

  4. Ethanol-induced impairment of hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated rat liver perfusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Ogden, K.A.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that acute administration of ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in vivo. This ethanol-induced effect appears to be mediated by its reactive metabolite, acetaldehyde. Since hormonal influences and vascular changes can not be controlled in vivo during ethanol administration, they investigated the effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver model. Rat liver from fed animals was perfused with oxygenated KRB at 3 ml/min/g liver for 4 hrs. Since ethanol inhibits proteins synthesis in vitro, protein acceptor pool size was equalized in both ethanol and control perfused livers with 1 mM cycloheximide. /sup 3/H-glucosamine was used to label hepatic secretory glycoproteins in the perfusate. Colchicine, a known inhibitor of protein secretion, impaired the secretion of labeled glycoproteins with a concomitant retention of these export proteins in the liver; therefore, confirming the authors secretory model. Ethanol (50 mM) inhibited the appearance of glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins by 60% into the perfusate as compared to control livers. Pretreatment of animals with cyanamide (an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) further potentiated this effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver. These data suggest that ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated liver perfusion model, and this ethanol-induced impairment appears to be mediated by acetaldehyde.

  5. PPAR?/? modulates ethanol-induced hepatic effects by decreasing pyridoxal kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Koga, Takayuki; Khozoie, Combiz; Mak, Tytus D.; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Fornace, Albert J.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Because of the significant morbidity and lethality caused by alcoholic liver disease (ALD), there remains a need to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms that can be targeted to prevent and treat ALD. Towards this goal, minimally invasive biomarker discovery represents an outstanding approach for these purposes. The mechanisms underlying ALD include hepatic lipid accumulation. As the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?/? (PPAR?/?) has been shown to inhibit steatosis, the present study examined the role of PPAR?/? in ALD coupling metabolomic, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. Wild-type and Ppar?/?-null mice were fed either a control or 4% ethanol diet and examined after 4–7 months of treatment. Ethanol fed Ppar?/?-null mice exhibited steatosis after short-term treatment compared to controls, the latter effect appeared to be due to increased activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c). The wild-type and Ppar?/?-null mice fed the control diet showed clear differences in their urinary metabolomic profiles. In particular, metabolites associated with arginine and proline metabolism, and glycerolipid metabolism, were markedly different between genotypes suggesting a constitutive role for PPAR?/? in the metabolism of these amino acids. Interestingly, urinary excretion of taurine was present in ethanol-fed wild-type mice but markedly lower in similarly treated Ppar?/?-null mice. Evidence suggests that PPAR?/? modulates pyridoxal kinase activity by altering Km, consistent with the observed decreased in urinary taurine excretion. These data collectively suggest that PPAR?/? prevents ethanol-induced hepatic effects by inhibiting hepatic lipogenesis, modulation of amino acid metabolism, and altering pyridoxal kinase activity. PMID:23851158

  6. Hepatoprotective effects of pecan nut shells on ethanol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Müller, Liz Girardi; Pase, Camila Simonetti; Reckziegel, Patrícia; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Boufleur, Nardeli; Prado, Ana Cristina P; Fett, Roseane; Block, Jane Mara; Pavanato, Maria Amália; Bauermann, Liliane F; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Burger, Marilise Escobar

    2013-01-01

    The hepatoprotective activity of the aqueous extract of the shells of pecan nut was investigated against ethanol-induced liver damage. This by-product of the food industry is popularly used to treat toxicological diseases. We evaluated the phytochemical properties of pecan shell aqueous extract (AE) and its in vitro and ex vivo antioxidant activity. The AE was found to have a high content of total polyphenols (192.4±1.9 mg GAE/g), condensed tannins (58.4±2.2 mg CE/g), and antioxidant capacity, and it inhibited Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation (LP) in vitro. Rats chronically treated with ethanol (Et) had increased plasmatic transaminases (ALT, AST) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels (96%, 59.13% and 465.9%, respectively), which were effectively prevented (87; 41 and 383%) by the extract (1:40, w/v). In liver, ethanol consumption increased the LP (121%) and decreased such antioxidant defenses as glutathione (GSH) (33%) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (47%) levels, causing genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Treatment with pecan shell AE prevented the development of LP (43%), GSH and SOD depletion (33% and 109%, respectively) and ethanol-induced erythrocyte genotoxicity. Catalase activity in the liver was unchanged by ethanol but was increased by the extract (47% and 73% in AE and AE+Et, respectively). Therefore, pecan shells may be an economic agent to treat liver diseases related to ethanol consumption. PMID:21924598

  7. Curcumin attenuates ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis through modulating Nrf2/FXR signaling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Wenxuan; Wu, Xiafei; Lian, Naqi; Jin, Huanhuan; Chen, Qin; Chen, Lianyun; Shao, Jiangjuan; Wu, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common health problem worldwide, characterized by aberrant accumulation of lipid in hepatocytes. Inhibition of lipid accumulation has been well recognized as a promising strategy for ALD. Previous studies showed that curcumin has potential effect on ALD by regulating oxidative stress and ethanol metabolism. However, the effects of curcumin on lipid accumulation and its mechanism remain unclear. Recent researches have indicated that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) have excellent effects on reducing lipid deposition. This study demonstrated that curcumin alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury by ameliorating activities of serum marker enzymes and inflammation. Moreover, curcumin alleviated the symptom of hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis via modulating the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, fatty acid synthase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha as well as the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1. Additionally, curcumin induced the expression of Nrf2 and FXR in liver, strongly implying close relationship between inhibitory effect of curcumin on hepatic steatosis and the above two genes. The following in vitro experiments further verified the protective effects of curcumin against hepatotoxicity and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes induced by ethanol. Gain- or loss-of-function analyses revealed Nrf2 and FXR mediated the effect of curcumin on lipid deposition in hepatocytes, and curcumin modulated the expression of FXR mediated by Nrf2. Collectively, we drew a conclusion that curcumin attenuated ALD by modulating lipid deposition in hepatocytes via a Nrf2/FXR activation-dependent mechanism. The findings make curcumin a potential agent for ALD and broaden the horizon of the molecular mechanism involved. PMID:26305715

  8. Hepatoprotective effects of dieckol-rich phlorotannins from Ecklonia cava, a brown seaweed, against ethanol induced liver damage in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Ahn, Ginnae; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Seok-Chun; Ko, Ju-Young; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Yong-Tae; Jee, Youngheun; Park, Sun-Joo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Alcoholic liver disease, which is one of the most serious liver disorders, has been known to cause by ethanol intake. In the present study, in vivo hepatoprotective effects of dieckol-rich phlorotannins (DRP) from Ecklonia cava, a brown seaweed, on ethanol induced hepatic damage in BALB/c mice liver were investigated. After administration of 5 and 25mg/kg mouse of DRP and 4 g/kg mice ethanol, the body weights and survival rates were increased as compared to the control, which is ethanol-treated group without DRP. The glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels in the serum were lower than those of the control. DRP exhibited a reduction of the total cholesterol. The lower levels of SOD enzyme and a reduction of the formation of malondialdehyde were occurred in mice fed with 5 and 25mg/kg mouse of DRP. Finally the effect on improvement of fatty liver induced by ethanol was observed by taking out the liver immediately after dissecting the mouse. However, no significant difference was observed on hepatic histopathological changes. In conclusion, this study indicated that DRP could protect liver injury induced by ethanol in vivo. It suggested that DRP possesses the beneficial effect to human against ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:22504843

  9. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide in copper-complex mediated protection against ethanol-induced gastric damage.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Doria, D

    1997-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of oral administration of the copper(II) complex of amino acids, on gastric lesions induced by ethanol in rats and the possible mechanism(s) of protection. The copper(II) complex of L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine is reported as the most effective in reducing ulcer numbers as well as ulcer severity of the many amino acid complexes studied. We investigated the role of PGE2 and nitric oxide (NO) in the protection afforded by Cu(II)(L-Trp)(L-Phe) against ethanol-induced damage. The involvement of endogenous eicosanoids and NO was evaluated with the respective inhibitors of prostaglandin and NO synthesis, indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Ex vivo PGE2 accumulation in the rat gastric mucosa has also been determined. Pretreatment with indomethacin only partially counteracted the protective activity of Cu(II)(L-Trp)(L-Phe). L-NNA did not attenuate the protection by Cu(II)(L-Trp)(L-Phe), which was reduced but not prevented by indomethacin, suggesting that prostanoids contribute to the Cu(II)(L-Trp)(L-Phe) protective effect, together with some mechanism(s) other than NO synthesis. PMID:9441731

  10. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R. Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M.; Ridenhour, Suzanne E.; Shukla, Shivendra D.; Thyfault, John P.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide “metabolic protection” from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and ?-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  11. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and ?-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  12. Physicochemical properties, antioxidant activities and protective effect against acute ethanol-induced hepatic injury in mice of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) bran oil.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; He, Shujian; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xinmin; Cao, Lili; Jiang, Shaotong

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate physicochemical characterization of the oil extracted from foxtail millet bran (FMBO), and the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects against acute ethanol-induced hepatic injury in mice. GC-MS analysis revealed that unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) account for 83.76% of the total fatty acids; in particular, the linoleic acid (C18:2) is the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and the compounds of squalene and six phytosterols (or phytostanols) were identified in unsaponifiable matter of FMBO. The antioxidant activity examination of FMBO in vitro showed highly ferric-reducing antioxidant power and scavenging effects against DPPH· and HO· radicals. Furthermore, the protective effect of FMBO against acute hepatic injuries induced by ethanol was verified in mice. In this, intragastric administration with different dosages of FMBO in mice ahead of acute ethanol administration could observably antagonize the ethanol-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), and the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, respectively, along with enhanced hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels relative to the control. Hepatic histological changes were also observed and confirmed that FMBO is capable of attenuating ethanol-induced hepatic injury. PMID:24909671

  13. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Released from Tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) Dimer (CORM-2) in Gastroprotection against Experimental Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage.

    PubMed

    Magierowska, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Adamski, Juliusz; Surmiak, Marcin; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The physiological gaseous molecule, carbon monoxide (CO) becomes a subject of extensive investigation due to its vasoactive activity throughout the body but its role in gastroprotection has been little investigated. We determined the mechanism of CO released from its donor tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2) in protection of gastric mucosa against 75% ethanol-induced injury. Rats were pretreated with CORM-2 30 min prior to 75% ethanol with or without 1) non-selective (indomethacin) or selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) and COX-2 (celecoxib) inhibitors, 2) nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NNA, 3) ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, hemin, a heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inductor or zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1 activity. The CO content in gastric mucosa and carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level in blood was analyzed by gas chromatography. The gastric mucosal mRNA expression for HO-1, COX-1, COX-2, iNOS, IL-4, IL-1? was analyzed by real-time PCR while HO-1, HO-2 and Nrf2 protein expression was determined by Western Blot. Pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.5-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced lesions and raised gastric blood flow (GBF) but large dose of 100 mg/kg was ineffective. CORM-2 (5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg i.g.) significantly increased gastric mucosal CO content and whole blood COHb level. CORM-2-induced protection was reversed by indomethacin, SC-560 and significantly attenuated by celecoxib, ODQ and L-NNA. Hemin significantly reduced ethanol damage and raised GBF while ZnPPIX which exacerbated ethanol-induced injury inhibited CORM-2- and hemin-induced gastroprotection and the accompanying rise in GBF. CORM-2 significantly increased gastric mucosal HO-1 mRNA expression and decreased mRNA expression for iNOS, IL-1?, COX-1 and COX-2 but failed to affect HO-1 and Nrf2 protein expression decreased by ethanol. We conclude that CORM-2 released CO exerts gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesions involving an increase in gastric microcirculation mediated by sGC/cGMP, prostaglandins derived from COX-1, NO-NOS system and its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26460608

  14. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Released from Tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) Dimer (CORM-2) in Gastroprotection against Experimental Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage

    PubMed Central

    Magierowska, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Adamski, Juliusz; Surmiak, Marcin; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The physiological gaseous molecule, carbon monoxide (CO) becomes a subject of extensive investigation due to its vasoactive activity throughout the body but its role in gastroprotection has been little investigated. We determined the mechanism of CO released from its donor tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2) in protection of gastric mucosa against 75% ethanol-induced injury. Rats were pretreated with CORM-2 30 min prior to 75% ethanol with or without 1) non-selective (indomethacin) or selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) and COX-2 (celecoxib) inhibitors, 2) nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NNA, 3) ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, hemin, a heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inductor or zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1 activity. The CO content in gastric mucosa and carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level in blood was analyzed by gas chromatography. The gastric mucosal mRNA expression for HO-1, COX-1, COX-2, iNOS, IL-4, IL-1? was analyzed by real-time PCR while HO-1, HO-2 and Nrf2 protein expression was determined by Western Blot. Pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.5–10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced lesions and raised gastric blood flow (GBF) but large dose of 100 mg/kg was ineffective. CORM-2 (5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg i.g.) significantly increased gastric mucosal CO content and whole blood COHb level. CORM-2-induced protection was reversed by indomethacin, SC-560 and significantly attenuated by celecoxib, ODQ and L-NNA. Hemin significantly reduced ethanol damage and raised GBF while ZnPPIX which exacerbated ethanol-induced injury inhibited CORM-2- and hemin-induced gastroprotection and the accompanying rise in GBF. CORM-2 significantly increased gastric mucosal HO-1 mRNA expression and decreased mRNA expression for iNOS, IL-1?, COX-1 and COX-2 but failed to affect HO-1 and Nrf2 protein expression decreased by ethanol. We conclude that CORM-2 released CO exerts gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesions involving an increase in gastric microcirculation mediated by sGC/cGMP, prostaglandins derived from COX-1, NO-NOS system and its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26460608

  15. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide synthesis by PAG protects against ethanol-induced gastric damage in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina; Tapia-Alvarez, Gabriela Rubí; Navarrete, Andrés

    2010-03-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gaseous mediator involved in a multitude of physiological functions; however the role of H(2)S in the gut is far from being understood completely. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of d-l-propargylglycine (PAG), an inhibitor of H(2)S synthesis, on ethanol-induced gastric injury in rat and to examine the role of l-cysteine, exogenous H(2)S, prostaglandins, non-protein sulphydryls groups, nitric oxide and K(ATP) channels in the gastroprotective effect of PAG. Administration of PAG (3.12 to 75mg/kg i.p.) or l-cysteine (0.3 to 300mg/kg, p.o.) exhibited a dose-dependent protective effect after intragastric administration of 1ml of ethanol to induce gastric injury. The gastroprotective effect of PAG (25mg/kg i.p.) was maintained after post-treatment with l-cysteine (10mg/kg p.o.), while NaHS (8.4mg/kg p.o.) inhibited this effect. The levels of gastric hydrogen sulfide were increased after ethanol-induced gastric damage and they were reverted by PAG while prostaglandin E(2) levels in gastric tissue were decreased by ethanol and PAG did not revert to this effect. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10mg/kg i.p.) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, 10mg/kg s.c.) resulted in a reversion of the gastroprotective effect of PAG while N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 70mg/kg s.c.), glibenclamide (1mg/kg i.p.) or diazoxide (3mg/kg i.p.) did not induce any changes. These results suggest that ethanol-induced gastric injury is related with an increment of endogenous H(2)S levels, and therefore a decrement of H(2)S levels by PAG is a benefit to protect gastric injury caused by ethanol. PMID:20035745

  16. Protective effect of anacardic acids from cashew (Anacardium occidentale) on ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais, Talita C; Pinto, Natália B; Carvalho, Karine Maria M B; Rios, Jeison B; Ricardo, Nagila Maria P S; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2010-01-01

    Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids (AAs) have been shown to possess antioxidant, lipoxygenase inhibitory, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. Despite these known effects, hitherto there were no published reports on their likely gastroprotective effects. The present study was designed to verify whether AAs afford gastroprotection against the ethanol-induced gastric damage and to examine the underlying mechanism(s). Gastric damage was induced by intragastric administration of 0.2mL of ethanol (96%). Mice in groups were pretreated orally with AAs (10, 30 and 100mg/kg), misoprostol (50 microg/kg), or vehicle (2% Tween 80 in saline, 10mL/kg), 45min before ethanol administration. They were sacrificed 30min later, the stomachs excised, and the mucosal lesion area (mm(2)) measured by planimetry. Gastroprotection was assessed in relation to inhibition of gastric lesion area. To study the gastroprotective mechanism(s), its relations to capsaicin-sensitive fibers, endogenous prostaglandins, nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels were analysed. Treatments effects on ethanol-associated oxidative stress markers GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD, and total nitrate/nitrite levels as an index of NO were measured in gastric tissue. Besides, the effects of AAs on gastric secretory volume and total acidity were analysed in 4-h pylorus-ligated rat. AAs afforded a dose-related gastroprotection against the ethanol damage and further prevented the ethanol-induced changes in the levels of GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD and nitrate/nitrite. However, they failed to modify the gastric secretion or the total acidity. It was observed that the gastroprotection by AAs was greatly reduced in animals pretreated with capsazepine, indomethacin, l-NAME or glibenclamide. These results suggest that AAs afford gastroprotection principally through an antioxidant mechanism. Other complementary mechanisms include the activation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric afferents, stimulation of endogenous prostaglandins and nitric oxide, and opening of K(+)(ATP) channels. These combined effects are likely to be accompanied by an increase in gastric microcirculation. PMID:19853593

  17. Hepatoprotective activity of Peganum harmala against ethanol-induced liver damages in rats.

    PubMed

    Bourogaa, Ezzeddine; Jarraya, Raoudha Mezghani; Damak, Mohamed; Elfeki, Abdelfattah

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective effects of Peganum harmala seeds extract (CPH) against chronic ethanol treatment. Hepatotoxicity was induced in male Wistar rats by administrating ethanol 35% (4?g/kg/day) for 6 weeks. CPH was co-administered with ethanol, by intraperitonial (IP) injection, at a dose of 10?mg/kg bw/day. Control rats were injected by saline solution (NaCl 9‰). Chronic ethanol administration intensified lipid peroxidation monitored by an increase of TBARS level in liver. Ethanol treatment caused also a drastic alteration in antioxidant defence system; hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. A co-administration of CPH during ethanol treatment inhibited lipid peroxidation and improved antioxidants activities. However, treatment with P. harmala extract protects efficiently the hepatic function of alcoholic rats by the considerable decrease of aminotransferase contents in serum of ethanol-treated rats. PMID:25974007

  18. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Xing, Mingyou; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 ?mol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  19. Role of nitric oxide in prevention of ethanol-induced gastric damage by CuNSN a copper-chelating compound.

    PubMed

    Franco, L

    1995-01-01

    CuNSN a bis (2-benzimidazolyl)thiother complex with copper, has been shown to prevent the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by acetylsalicylic acid and ethanol. In the present study we have investigated the role of NO in CuNSN protection from ethanol-induced gastric damage. For this purpose we have used the inhibitor of NO biosynthesis, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) as well as L- or D-arginine. Gastric mucosal damage caused by ethanol was dose-dependently increased by i.v. administration of graded dose of L-NNA. The effect of L-NNA was completely antagonized by the administration of L-arginine while D-arginine did not cause a reduction in the damage. Treatment with CuNSN has shown a significant protection against the damage produced by ethanol. This protection was not reversed by L-NNA and was significant as compared to the corresponding control group. The combination of L-NNA plus L-arginine potentiates this protection. These results suggest that NO synthesis is not involved in the protection afforded by CuNSN. PMID:7545068

  20. Tacrolimus (FK506) prevents early stages of ethanol induced hepatic fibrosis by targeting LARP6 dependent mechanism of collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Zarko; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. Its effects on hepatic fibrosis have been controversial and attributed to immunosuppression. We show that in vitro FK506, inhibited synthesis of type I collagen polypeptides, without affecting expression of collagen mRNAs. In vivo, administration of FK506 at a dose of 4 mg/kg completely prevented development of alcohol/carbon tetrachloride induced liver fibrosis in rats. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was absent in the FK506 treated livers and expression of collagen ?2(I) mRNA was at normal levels. Collagen ?1(I) mRNA was increased in the FK506 treated livers, but this mRNA was not translated into ?1(I) polypeptide. No significant inflammation was associated with the fibrosis model used. FK506 binding protein 3 (FKBP3) is one of cellular proteins which binds FK506 with high affinity. We discovered that FKBP3 interacts with LARP6 and LARP6 is the major regulator of translation and stability of collagen mRNAs. In the presence of FK506 the interaction between FKBP3 and LARP6 is weakened and so is the pull down of collagen mRNAs with FKBP3. We postulate that FK506 inactivates FKBP3 and that lack of interaction of LARP6 and FKBP3 results in aberrant translation of collagen mRNAs and prevention of fibrosis. This is the first report of such activity of FK506 and may renew the interest in using this drug to alleviate hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23755290

  1. Tacrolimus (FK506) Prevents Early Stages of Ethanol Induced Hepatic Fibrosis by Targeting LARP6 Dependent Mechanism of Collagen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Zarko; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. Its effects on hepatic fibrosis have been controversial and attributed to immunosuppression. We show that in vitro FK506, inhibited synthesis of type I collagen polypeptides, without affecting expression of collagen mRNAs. In vivo, administration of FK506 at a dose of 4 mg/kg completely prevented development of alcohol/carbon tetrachloride induced liver fibrosis in rats. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was absent in the FK506 treated livers and expression of collagen ?2(I) mRNA was at normal levels. Collagen ?1(I) mRNA was increased in the FK506 treated livers, but this mRNA was not translated into ?1(I) polypeptide. No significant inflammation was associated with the fibrosis model used. FK506 binding protein 3 (FKBP3) is one of cellular proteins which binds FK506 with high affinity. We discovered that FKBP3 interacts with LARP6 and LARP6 is the major regulator of translation and stability of collagen mRNAs. In the presence of FK506 the interaction between FKBP3 and LARP6 is weakened and so is the pull down of collagen mRNAs with FKBP3. We postulate that FK506 inactivates FKBP3 and that lack of interaction of LARP6 and FKBP3 results in aberrant translation of collagen mRNAs and prevention of fibrosis. This is the first report of such activity of FK506 and may renew the interest in using this drug to alleviate hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23755290

  2. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... attacking the liver Infections from viruses (such as hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C), bacteria, or parasites ... the liver damage and any illnesses you have. Hepatitis A, for example, is most often short-term and ...

  3. Subcellular location of secretory proteins retained in the liver during the ethanol-induced inhibition of hepatic protein secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol administration inhibits the secretion of proteins by the liver, resulting in their hepatocellular retention. Experiments were designed in this study to determine the subcellular location of the retained secretory proteins. Ethanol was administered acutely to nonfasted rats by gastric intubation, whereas control animals received an isocaloric dose of glucose. Two hours after intubation, when maximum blood ethanol levels (45 mM) were observed, (/sup 3/H)leucine and (/sup 14/C)fucose were injected simultaneously into the dorsal vein of the penis. The labelling of secretory proteins was determined in the liver and plasma at various time periods after label injection. Ethanol treatment decreased the secretion of both leucine- and fucose-labeled proteins into the plasma. This inhibition of secretion was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the hepatic retention of both leucine- and fucose-labeled immunoprecipitable secretory proteins. At the time of maximum inhibition of secretion, leucine labeled secretory proteins located in the Golgi apparatus represented about 50% of the accumulated secretory proteins in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats, whereas the remainder was essentially equally divided among the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol. Because fucose is incorporated into secretory proteins almost exclusively in the Golgi complex, fucose-labeled proteins accumulated in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats mainly in the Golgi apparatus, with the remainder located in the cytosol. These results show that ethanol administration causes an impaired movement of secretory proteins along the secretory pathway, and that secretory proteins accumulate mainly, but not exclusively, in the Golgi apparatus.

  4. Ethanol-induced acute gastric injury in mast cell-deficient and congenic normal mice. Evidence that mast cells can augment the area of damage.

    PubMed Central

    Galli, S. J.; Wershil, B. K.; Bose, R.; Walker, P. A.; Szabo, S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used stereomicroscopy and planimetry to measure the area of glandular stomach mucosa acutely injured by oral ethanol in mast cell-deficient and congenic normal (+/+) mice, and examined the damaged areas in 1-mu sections. Ethanol caused degranulation and/or disruption of gastric mucosal mast cells, and, at certain concentrations of ethanol, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv or WCB6F1-Sl/Sld mice developed significantly less (43-90% less) acute gastric injury than either congenic +/+ mice or WBB6F1-W/Wv mice whose mast cells were restored by bone marrow transplantation from WBB6F1-+/+ mice. Nevertheless, ethanol produced detectable, and in some cases substantial, gastric injury even in the complete absence of mast cells. Thus, ethanol can produce some damage to the gastric mucosa independently of mast cells. But these data suggest that under certain circumstances mast cells can augment the area of acute gastric injury induced by ethanol. Images Figure 3 PMID:3605311

  5. Fatty acid ethyl esters and ethanol-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaphalia, B S; Ansari, G A

    2001-01-01

    Conjugation of xenobiotic alcohols with endogenous fatty acids is considered one of the mechanisms of their retention in the target organs. A number of fatty acid esters of alcohol's detected in the human tissues were found to be toxic in vivo and in vitro. Non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol resulting in the formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) appears to be one of the major pathways of ethanol disposition in the pancreas during chronic alcohol abuse, and could be associated with pancreatitis. In most cases, pancreatic damage occurs in alcoholics preceding the onset of clinical pancreatitis. Early markers of ethanol-induced pancreatitis could be important for early prevention of such injury. Although FAEEs have been implicated in the ethanol-induced pancreatitis, mechanism(s) of such injury is not well understood. Studies by others and by our own group have shown that plasma levels of FAEEs correlate well with plasma/blood alcohol concentration. FAEE synthase is known to catalyze the formation of FAEEs. The activity of FAEE synthase was found highest in the pancreas. Excessive synthesis of FAEEs during chronic alcohol abuse in the pancreas may be associated with pancreatic injury as supported by in vivo and cell culture studies. Human studies correlating plasma FAEE levels with that of markers of pancreatic injury could be important in developing markers of ethanol-induced toxicity. Although toxicity of exogenously administered FAEEs is shown in vivo and in vitro, the toxicity associated with endogenously formed FAEEs has not been studied. Therefore, studies regarding the role of endogenously formed FAEEs could be important in understanding the mechanism of ethanol-induced pancreatitis. PMID:11936865

  6. Specific Conditions for Resveratrol Neuroprotection against Ethanol-Induced Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Brigitte; Allibe, Nathalie; Cottet-Rousselle, Cécile; Lamarche, Frédéric; Nuiry, Laurence; Barret, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Aims. 3,5,4'-Trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, a natural polyphenolic compound present in wine and grapes and better known as resveratrol, has free radical scavenging properties and is a potent protector against oxidative stress induced by alcohol metabolism. Today, the mechanism by which ethanol exerts its toxicity is still not well understood, but it is generally considered that free radical generation plays an important role in the appearance of structural and functional alterations in cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective action of resveratrol against ethanol-induced brain cell injury. Methods. Primary cultures of rat astrocytes were exposed to ethanol, with or without a pretreatment with resveratrol. We examined the dose-dependent effects of this resveratrol pretreatment on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by ethanol. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the MTT reduction test. Genotoxicity was evidenced using single cell gel electrophoresis. In addition, DNA staining with fluorescent dyes allowed visualization of nuclear damage using confocal microscopy. Results. Cell pretreatment with low concentrations of trans-resveratrol (0.1-10??M) slowed down cell death and DNA damage induced by ethanol exposure, while higher concentrations (50-100??M) enhanced these same effects. No protection by cis-resveratrol was observed. Conclusion. Protection offered by trans-resveratrol against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity was only effective for low concentrations of this polyphenol. PMID:22778731

  7. Determination of hepatoprotective and antioxidant role of walnuts against ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Bati, Bedia; Celik, Ismail; Dogan, Abdulahad

    2015-03-01

    The aims of our study were the evaluation of the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant role of walnuts against ethanol-induced oxidative stress. The hepatoprotective and antioxidant role of the walnuts supplementation feed against ethanol-induced oxidative stress were evaluated by measuring liver damage serum marker enzymes; aspartate aminotransferase (AST); alanine aminotransferase (ALT); gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT); lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and antioxidant defense systems such as reduced glutathione, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and Malondialdehyde (MDA) content in various tissues of rats. Rats were divided into six experimental groups: I (control), II (20 % ethanol), III (10 % walnuts), IV (20 % ethanol + 10 % walnuts), V (5 % walnuts), and VI (20 % ethanol + 5 % walnuts). According to the results, the biochemical analysis showed a considerable increase in the serum aspartate AST, ALT, GGT, and LDH in the group II as compared to that of group I, whereas decreased in group IVas compared to that of group II. In addition, administration of walnuts supplementation restored the ethanol-induced imbalance between MDA and fluctuated antioxidant system toward close control group particularly in the tissues. The results indicated that walnuts could be as important as diet-derived antioxidants in preventing oxidative damage in the tissues by reducing the lipid oxidation or inhibiting the production of ethanol-induced free radicals in rats. PMID:25391888

  8. Protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weifeng Huang, Huimin; Niu, Xiaofeng Fan, Ting; Mu, Qingli; Li, Huani

    2013-10-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to gastric ulcer and the present work was aimed to examine the protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine (THC) in the model of ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Fasted mice treated with ethanol 75% (0.5 ml/100 g) were pre-treated with THC (10 or 20 mg/kg, ip), cimetidine (100 mg/kg, ip) or saline in different experimental sets for a period of 3 days, and animals were euthanized 4 h after ethanol ingestion. Gross and microscopic lesions, immunological and biochemical parameters were taken into consideration. The results showed that ethanol induced gastric damage, improving nitric oxide (NO) level, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-? and IL-6) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in the ethanol group. Pretreatment of THC at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg bodyweight significantly attenuated the gastric lesions as compared to the ethanol group. These results suggest that the gastroprotective activity of THC is attributed to reducing NO production and adjusting the pro-inflammatory cytokine, inhibited neutrophil accumulation and NF-?B expression. - Highlights: • THC decreased ethanol-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release. • THC inhibited the production of NO in serum and gastric tissue. • THC reduced NF-?B expression and MPO accumulation in ethanol-induced gastric tissue.

  9. The Role of NOX Enzymes in Ethanol-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Sulik, Kathleen K; Chen, Shao-yu

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in ethanol-induced apoptosis and teratogenesis. However, the major sources of ROS in ethanol-exposed embryos have remained undefined. This study was conducted to determine the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in mouse embryos. Analyses of mRNA expression indicated that ethanol treatment resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of NOX catalytic subunit Duox-1 in gestational day 9 (GD 9:0) mouse embryos. Ethanol exposure also resulted in significant increases in mRNA expression of NOX regulatory subunits, p22phox, p67phox, NOXA1 and NOXO1. In addition, a significant increase in NOX enzyme activity was found in the ethanol-exposed embryos as compared to controls. Co-treatment with the NOX inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), significantly prevented ethanol-induced increases in NOX enzyme activity, ROS generation and oxidative DNA damage in ethanol-exposed embryos. DPI treatment also resulted in a reduction in caspase-3 activation, decreased caspase-3 activity and diminished prevalence of apoptosis in ethanol-exposed embryos. These results support the hypothesis that NOX is a critical source of ROS in ethanol-exposed embryos and that it plays an important role in ethanol-induced oxidative stress and pathogenesis. PMID:20026259

  10. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  11. The role of cellular oxidases and catalytic iron in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, S.; Jayatilleke, E. Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1992-01-01

    Free radical generation and catalytic iron have been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury but the source of free radicals is a subject of controversy. The mechanism of ethanol-induced liver injury was investigated in isolated hepatocytes from a rodent model of iron loading in which free radical generation was measured by the determination of alkane production. Iron loading increased hepatic non-heme iron 3-fold, increased the prooxidant activity of cytosolic ultrafiltrates 2-fold and doubled ethanol-induced alkane production. The role of cellular oxidases as a source of ethanol induced free radicals was studied through the use of selective inhibitors. In both the presence and absence of iron loading, selective inhibition of xanthine oxidase with oxipurinol diminished ethanol-induced alkane production 0-40%, inhibition of aldehyde oxidase with menadione diminished alkane production 36-75%, while the inhibition of aldehyde and xanthine oxidase by feeding tungstate virtually abolished alkane production. Addition of acetaldehyde to hepatocytes generated alkanes at rates comparable to those achieved with ethanol indicating the importance of acetaldehyde metabolism in free radical generation.

  12. Mechanisms of Ethanol-induced Death of Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. The most deleterious effect of fetal alcohol exposure is inducing neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that is most susceptible to ethanol during development. Ethanol exposure causes a loss of both cerebellar Purkinje cells and granule cells. This review focuses on the toxic effect of ethanol on cerebellar granule cells (CGC) and the underlying mechanisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that ethanol induces apoptotic death of CGC. The vulnerability of CGC to ethanol-induced death diminishes over time as neurons mature. Several mechanisms for ethanol-induced apoptosis of CGC have been suggested. These include inhibition of NMDA receptors, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, disturbance of potassium channel currents, thiamine deficiency, and disruption of translational regulation. Cultures of CGC provide an excellent system to investigate cellular/molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and to evaluate interventional strategies. This review will also discuss the approaches leading to neuroprotection against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:20927663

  13. Liver Damage from Hepatitis C More Widespread Than Thought

    MedlinePLUS

    ... author Dr. Stuart Gordon, director of hepatology at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Hepatitis C is a viral ... implemented." SOURCES: Stuart Gordon, M.D., director, hepatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich.; Andrea Cox, M.D., Ph. ...

  14. Tumor induced hepatic myeloid derived suppressor cells can cause moderate liver damage.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Tobias; Medina-Echeverz, José; Kapanadze, Tamar; Kruhlak, Michael J; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous tumors induce the accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) not only in blood and spleens, but also in livers of these animals. Unexpectedly, we observed a moderate increase in serum transaminases in mice with EL4 subcutaneous tumors, which prompted us to study the relationship of hepatic MDSC accumulation and liver injury. MDSC were the predominant immune cell population expanding in livers of all subcutaneous tumor models investigated (RIL175, B16, EL4, CT26 and BNL), while liver injury was only observed in EL4 and B16 tumor-bearing mice. Elimination of hepatic MDSC in EL4 tumor-bearing mice using low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment reversed transaminase elevation and adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice caused transaminase elevation indicating a direct MDSC mediated effect. Surprisingly, hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice partially lost their damage-inducing potency when transferred into mice bearing non damage-inducing RIL175 tumors. Furthermore, MDSC expansion and MDSC-mediated liver injury further increased with growing tumor burden and was associated with different cytokines including GM-CSF, VEGF, interleukin-6, CCL2 and KC, depending on the tumor model used. In contrast to previous findings, which have implicated MDSC only in protection from T cell-mediated hepatitis, we show that tumor-induced hepatic MDSC themselves can cause moderate liver damage. PMID:25401795

  15. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5?mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200?mg/kg) was administered to rats 2?h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000?mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  16. Depletion of Kupffer cells modulates ethanol-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Corthals, Stacy M; Uwaifo, Anthony O; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2014-08-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are important in hepatic homeostasis and responses to xenobiotics. KCs are activated on interaction with endotoxin, releasing cytokines, and reactive oxygen species normally associated with increased gene expression, cellular growth, or hepatic injury. Ethanol-induced endotoxemia is one means of KC activation. We propose that KC depletion attenuates the effect of EtOH-induced endotoxemia to impact the hepatic growth response. Hepatic DNA synthesis was examined in KC competent (KC+) or KC-depleted (KC-) C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet in the presence or absence of polyphenol-60 antioxidant. KC depletion was assessed by F4/80 antigen, and DNA synthesis was assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) messenger RNA released was quantified by RT-PCR/electrophoresis. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting, and Nrf2 and CYP2E1protein were also assayed. Apoptosis and hepatic injury were examined by the Tunnel assay and hepatic transaminases in serum, respectively. Hepatic transaminases in serum (AST and ALT) were within normal range. Over 90% of KC was depleted by clodronate treatment. KC depletion decreased TNF-? mRNA release, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and hepatocyte DNA synthesis. KC depletion is associated with increased numbers of apoptotic cells bodies in KC- mice. Antioxidant treatment decreased DNA synthesis, Nrf2, and CYP2E1 protein expression in EtOH-consuming mice. Our data indicate that upon ethanol exposure, KC participates in hepatic DNA synthesis and growth responses. Collectively, these observations suggest that KC depletion attenuates the downstream effect of ethanol-induced endotoxemia by reduced cytokine and reactive oxygen species production with its concomitant effect on MAPK-signaling pathway on hepatocyte DNA synthesis. PMID:22996800

  17. Gynura procumbens Reverses Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis through MAPK/SREBP-1c-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Mu, Yun-Mei; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Mei-Tuo; Li, Yu-Sang; Zhang, Wei Kevin; Tang, He-Bin; Shang, Hong-Cai

    2015-09-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect and mechanism of action of Gynura procumbens on acute and chronic ethanol-induced liver injuries. Ethanol extract from G. procumbens stems (EEGS) attenuated acute ethanol-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels and hepatic lipid accumulation. Therefore, EEGS was successively extracted by petroleum, ethyl acetate, and n-butyl alcohol. The results showed that the n-butyl alcohol extract was the active fraction of EEGS, and hence it was further fractionated on a polyamide glass column. The 60% ethanol-eluted fraction that contained 13.6% chlorogenic acid was the most active fraction, and its effect was further evaluated using a chronic model. Both the n-butyl alcohol extract and the 60% ethanol-eluted fraction inhibited chronic ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation by modulating lipid metabolism-related regulators through MAPK/SREBP-1c-dependent and -independent signaling pathways and ameliorated liver steatosis. Our findings suggest that EEGS and one of its active ingredients, chlorogenic acid, may be developed as potential effective agents for ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:26345299

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol ... not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  19. Metadoxine prevents damage produced by ethanol and acetaldehyde in hepatocyte and hepatic stellate cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C; Bucio, L; Correa, A; Souza, V; Hernández, E; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Kershenobich, D

    2001-11-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to improve liver function tests in alcoholic patients. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on some parameters of cellular damage in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in culture treated with ethanol and acetaldehyde. HepG2 and CFSC-2G cells were treated with 50 mM ethanol or 175 microM acetaldehyde as initial concentration in the presence or absence of 10 microg ml(-1) of metadoxine. Twenty-four hours later reduced and oxidized glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, collagen secretion and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF- alpha secretion were determined. Our results suggest that metadoxine prevents glutathione depletion and the increase in lipid peroxidation damage caused by ethanol and acetaldehyde in HepG2 cells. In hepatic stellate cells, metadoxine prevents the increase in collagen and attenuated TNF- alpha secretion caused by acetaldehyde. Thus, metadoxine could be useful in preventing the damage produced in early stages of alcoholic liver disease as it prevents the redox imbalance of the hepatocytes and prevents TNF- alpha induction, one of the earliest events in hepatic damage. PMID:11712874

  20. A polymethoxy flavonoids-rich Citrus aurantium extract ameliorates ethanol-induced liver injury through modulation of AMPK and Nrf2-related signals in a binge drinking mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong-Keun; Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Jung, Woon-Ha; Lim, Jong-Hwan; Jung, Ju-Young; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-10-01

    Nobiletin and tangeretin are polymethoxy flavonoids (PMFs), found in rich quantities in the peel of citrus fruits. In the present study, we assessed the biological effect of the PMFs on liver damage using a mouse model of binge drinking. First, we extracted PMFs from the peels of Citrus aurantium to make Citrus aurantium extract (CAE). Male C57BL/6 mice were orally treated with silymarin and CAE (50, 100, and 200?mg/kg) for 3?days prior to ethanol (5?g/kg, total of 3 doses) oral gavage. Liver injury was observed in the ethanol alone group, as evidenced by increases in serum hepatic enzymes and histopathologic alteration, as well as by hepatic oxidative status disruption. CAE improved serum marker and hepatic structure and restored oxidative status by enhancing antioxidant enzyme levels and by reducing lipid peroxidation levels. In addition, CAE evidently suppressed inflammation and apoptosis in the livers of mice administered with ethanol, by 85% (tumor necrosis factor-?) and 44% compared to the control group, respectively. Furthermore, CAE activated lipid metabolism related signals and enhanced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) with several cytoprotective proteins including heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1, and ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that, CAE possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic activity against ethanol-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26178909

  1. Protective effects of pogostone from Pogostemonis Herba against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiming; Liao, Huijun; Liu, Yuhong; Zheng, Yifeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Su, Zuqing; Zhang, Xie; Lai, Zhengquan; Lai, Xiaoping; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Su, Ziren

    2015-01-01

    We examined the protective effect of pogostone (PO), a chemical constituent isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, on the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Administration of PO at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol ingestion effectively protected the stomach from ulceration. The gastric lesions were significantly ameliorated by all doses of PO as compared to the vehicle group. Pre-treatment with PO prevented the oxidative damage and the decrease of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content. In addition, PO pretreatment markedly increased the mucosa levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and decreased gastric malonaldehyde (MDA), relative to the vehicle group. In the mechanistic study, significant elevation of non-protein-sulfhydryl (NP-SH) was observed in the gastric mucosa pretreated by PO. Analysis of serum cytokines indicated that PO pretreatment obviously elevated the decrease of interleukin-10 (IL-10) level, while markedly mitigated the increment of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) secretions in ethanol-induced rats. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that PO could exert a gastro-protective effect against gastric ulceration, and the underlying mechanism might be associated with the stimulation of PGE2, improvement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status, as well as preservation of NP-SH. PMID:25481373

  2. On the mechanism underlying ethanol-induced mitochondrial dynamic disruption and autophagy response.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Saez-Atienzar, Sara; da Casa, Carmen; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Barcia, Jorge M; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Romero, Francisco J; Jordan, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2015-07-01

    We have explored the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced mitochondrial dynamics disruption and mitophagy. Ethanol increases mitochondrial fission in a concentration-dependent manner through Drp1 mitochondrial translocation and OPA1 proteolytic cleavage. ARPE-19 (a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line) cells challenged with ethanol showed mitochondrial potential disruptions mediated by alterations in mitochondrial complex IV protein level and increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In addition, ethanol activated the canonical autophagic pathway, as denoted by autophagosome formation and autophagy regulator elements including Beclin1, ATG5-ATG12 and P-S6 kinase. Likewise, autophagy inhibition dramatically increased mitochondrial fission and cell death, whereas autophagy stimulation rendered the opposite results, placing autophagy as a cytoprotective response aimed to remove damaged mitochondria. Interestingly, although ethanol induced mitochondrial Bax translocation, this episode was associated to cell death rather than mitochondrial fission or autophagy responses. Thus, Bax required 600 mM ethanol to migrate to mitochondria, a concentration that resulted in cell death. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking this protein respond to ethanol by undergoing mitochondrial fission and autophagy but not cytotoxicity. Finally, by using the specific mitochondrial-targeted scavenger MitoQ, we revealed mitochondria as the main source of reactive oxygen species that trigger autophagy activation. These findings suggest that cells respond to ethanol activating mitochondrial fission machinery by Drp1 and OPA1 rather than bax, in a manner that stimulates cytoprotective autophagy through mitochondrial ROS. PMID:25779081

  3. Ameliorating effects of preadolescent aniracetam treatment on prenatal ethanol-induced impairment in AMPA receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Wijayawardhane, Nayana; Shonesy, Brian C; Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Pandiella, Noemi; Vaglenova, Julia; Breese, Charles R; Dityatev, Alexander; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol-induced damage in the developing hippocampus may result in cognitive deficits such as those observed in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Cognitive deficits in FASD are partially mediated by alterations in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Recently, we reported that synaptic transmission mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is impaired following fetal ethanol exposure. This finding led us to develop a rational approach for the treatment of alcohol-related cognitive deficits using aniracetam, an allosteric AMPAR modulator. In the present study, 28 to 34-day-old rats exposed to ethanol in utero were treated with aniracetam, and subsequently exhibited persistent improvement in mEPSC amplitude, frequency, and decay time. Furthermore, these animals expressed positive changes in synaptic single channel properties, suggesting that aniracetam ameliorates prenatal ethanol-induced deficits through modifications at the single channel level. Specifically, single channel open probability, conductance, mean open and closed times, and the number and burst duration were positively affected. Our findings emphasize the utility of compounds which slow the rate of deactivation and desensitization of AMPARs such as aniracetam. PMID:17916430

  4. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  5. Oleuropein prevents ethanol-induced gastric ulcers via elevation of antioxidant enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Alirezaei, Masoud; Dezfoulian, Omid; Neamati, Shima; Rashidipour, Marzyeh; Tanideh, Nader; Kheradmand, Arash

    2012-12-01

    Purified oleuropein from olive leaf extract has been shown to have antioxidant effects in our recent studies. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant abilities of oleuropein in comparison with ranitidine in ethanol-induced gastric damages via evaluation of ulcer index inhibition, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation level. Fifty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven equal groups as follows: control group, ethanol group (absolute ethanol 1 ml/rat), oleuropein group (12 mg/kg), and oleuropein (6, 12, and 18 mg/kg) plus ethanol groups, as well as ranitidine (50 mg/kg) plus ethanol group. Pretreatment with oleuropein (12 and 18 mg/kg) significantly increased the ulcer index inhibition (percent), in comparison with oleuropein (6 mg/kg). Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was significantly lower in the ethanol group when compared with the other groups whereas, treatment of rats with oleuropein (12 mg/kg) significantly increased glutathione content in gastric tissue when compared with the other groups, and lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in the oleuropein- (12 and 18 mg/kg) and ranitidine-treated animals. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were both much higher in oleuropein-treated rats than the ethanol group, and although there was a moderate increase in SOD and CAT activities in ranitidine-treated rats, the differences were not significant. These findings suggest that oleuropein has beneficial antioxidant properties against ethanol-induced gastric damages in the rat. Therefore, it seems that a combination regimen including both antioxidant and antisecretory drugs may be beneficial in prevention of ethanol-mediated gastric mucosal damages. PMID:22581435

  6. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with ?-Tocopherol and ?-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe(-/-)mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by ?-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  7. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with ?-Tocopherol and ?-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe?/?mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by ?-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that ?-tocopherol and ?-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  8. ARGININOSUCCINATE SYNTHASE CONDITIONS THE RESPONSE TO ACUTE AND CHRONIC ETHANOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Morón-Concepción, Jose A.; Ward, Stephen C.; Ge, Xiaodong; de la Rosa, Laura Conde; Nieto, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) is the rate-limiting enzyme in both the urea and the l-citrulline/nitric oxide (NO·) cycles regulating protein catabolism, ammonia levels and NO· generation (1-2). Since a proteomics analysis identified ASS and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) as co-induced in rat hepatocytes by chronic ethanol consumption, which also occurred in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and in cirrhotic patients, we hypothesized that ASS could play a role in ethanol binge and chronic ethanol-induced liver damage. Methods To investigate the contribution of ASS to the pathophysiology of ALD, wild-type (WT) and Ass+/? mice (Ass?/? are lethal due to hyperammonemia) were exposed to an ethanol binge or to chronic ethanol drinking. Results Compared with WT, Ass+/? mice given an ethanol binge exhibited decreased steatosis, lower NOS2 induction and less 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein residues, indicating that reducing nitrosative stress via the l-citrulline/NO· pathway plays a significant role in preventing liver damage. However, chronic ethanol treated Ass+/? mice displayed enhanced liver injury compared with WT mice. This was due to hyperammonemia, lower phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK?) to total AMPK? ratio, decreased sirtuin (Sirt-1) and peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1? (Pgc1?) mRNAs, lower fatty acid ?-oxidation due to down-regulation of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-II (CPT-II), decreased antioxidant defense and elevated lipid peroxidation end-products in spite of comparable nitrosative stress but likely reduced NOS3. Conclusion Partial Ass ablation protects only in acute ethanol-induced liver injury by decreasing nitrosative stress but not in a more chronic scenario where oxidative stress and impaired fatty acid ?-oxidation are key events. PMID:22213272

  9. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200?mg/kg/d?bw) for 30?d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8?g/kg?bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-? and increased adiponectin, PPAR-?, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16?g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from a hepatitis A infection, that person has immunity to the virus, meaning he or she will ... from the disease and may develop a natural immunity to future hepatitis B infections. But some people ...

  11. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  12. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  13. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  14. Adolescent rats are resistant to the development of ethanol-induced chronic tolerance and ethanol-induced conditioned aversion.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Godoy, Juan Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of chronic tolerance to ethanol in adult and adolescent rats has yielded mixed results. Tolerance to some effects of ethanol has been reported in adolescents, yet other studies found adults to exhibit greater tolerance than adolescents or comparable expression of the phenomena at both ages. Another unanswered question is how chronic ethanol exposure affects subsequent ethanol-mediated motivational learning at these ages. The present study examined the development of chronic tolerance to ethanol's hypothermic and motor stimulating effects, and subsequent acquisition of ethanol-mediated odor conditioning, in adolescent and adult male Wistar rats given every-other-day intragastric administrations of ethanol. Adolescent and adult rats exhibited lack of tolerance to the hypothermic effects of ethanol during an induction phase; whereas adults, but not adolescents, exhibited a trend towards a reduction in hypothermia at a challenge phase (Experiment 1). Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor activation after the first ethanol administration. Adults, but not adolescents, exhibited conditioned odor aversion by ethanol. Subsequent experiments conducted only in adolescents (Experiment 2, Experiment 3 and Experiment 4) manipulated the context, length and predictability of ethanol administration. These manipulations did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced tolerance. This study indicated that, when moderate ethanol doses are given every-other day for a relatively short period, adolescents are less likely than adults to develop chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia. This resistance to tolerance development could limit long-term maintenance of ethanol intake. Adolescents, however, exhibited greater sensitivity than adults to the acute motor stimulating effects of ethanol and a blunted response to the aversive effects of ethanol. This pattern of response may put adolescents at risk for early initiation of ethanol intake. PMID:26388098

  15. Role of Nrf2 in preventing ethanol-induced oxidative stress and lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress and lipid accumulation play important roles in alcohol-induced liver injury. Previous reports showed that, in livers of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-activated mice, genes involved in antioxidant defense are induced, whereas genes involved in lipid biosynthesis are suppressed. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in ethanol-induced hepatic alterations, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation, were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg, po). Blood and liver samples were collected 6 h thereafter. Ethanol increased alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in serum of Nrf2-null and wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. After ethanol administration, mitochondrial glutathione concentrations decreased markedly in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicates that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. Ethanol increased serum triglycerides and hepatic free fatty acids in Nrf2-null mice, and these increases were blunted in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In addition, the basal mRNA and nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1(Srebp-1) were decreased with graded Nrf2 activation. Ethanol further induced Srebp-1 mRNA in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In conclusion, Nrf2 activation prevented alcohol-induced oxidative stress and accumulation of free fatty acids in liver by increasing genes involved in antioxidant defense and decreasing genes involved in lipogenesis. -- Highlights: ? Ethanol depleted mitochondrial GSH in Nrf2-null mice but not in Keap1-KD mice. ? Ethanol increased ROS in hepatocytes isolated from Nrf2-null and wild-type mice. ? Nrf2 blunted ethanol-induced increase of triglycerides and free fatty acids. ? The mRNA and nuclear protein of Srebp-1 were decreased with Nrf2 activation. ? The mRNA of Scd1 was increased in Nrf2-null mice after ethanol exposure.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of biherbal ethanolic extract against paracetamol-induced hepatic damage in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Krishna Chaitanya D.; Siva, Reddy Challa; Manohar, Reddy A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The combined hepatoprotective effect of Bi-herbal ethanolic extract (BHEE) was evaluated against paracetamol induced hepatic damage in albino rats. Materials and Methods: Liver function tests and biochemical parameters were estimated using standard kits. Livers were quickly removed and fixed in 10% formalin and subjected to histopathological studies. Results: Ethanolic extract from the leaves of Aerva lanata and leaves of Achyranthes aspera at a dose level of 200 mg/kg, 400mg/kg body weight was administered orally once for 3 days. Substantially elevated serum marker enzymes such as SGOT, SGPT, ALP, due to paracetamol treatment were restored towards normal. Biochemical parameters like total protein, total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea were also restored towards normal levels. In addition, BHEE significantly decreased the liver weight of paracetamol intoxicated rats. Silymarin at a dose level of 25 mg/kg used as a standard reference also exhibited significant hepatoprotective activity against paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity. Conclusion: The results of this study strongly indicate that BHEE has got a potent hepatoprotective action against paracetamol induced hepatic damage in rats. PMID:23326091

  17. The effects of daily supplementation of Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ping; Chen, Rui; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Wang, He

    2014-09-01

    Polysaccharides isolated from edible Dendrobium huoshanense have been shown to possess a hepatoprotection function for selenium- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of daily supplementation with an homogeneous polysaccharide (DHP) purified from D. huoshanense on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice and its potential mechanisms in liver protection by a proteomic approach. DHP was found to effectively depress the increased ratio of liver weight to body weight, reduce the elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, total bilirubin and low density lipoprotein, and alleviate hepatic steatosis in mice with ethanol-induced subacute liver injury. Hepatic proteomics analysis performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) revealed that cystathionine beta-synthase (Cbs) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Ldhd) were two key proteins regulated by daily DHP intervention, which may assist in correcting the abnormal hepatic methionine metabolism pathway and decreasing the level of hepatic methylglyoxal generated from disordered metabolic pathways caused by ethanol. Our data suggest that DHP can protect liver function from alcoholic injury with complicated molecular mechanisms involving regulation of Cbs and Ldhd. PMID:24933018

  18. Preventive Effect of the Korean Traditional Health Drink (Taemyeongcheong) on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Damage in ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ruo-Kun; Song, Jia-Le; Lim, Yaung-Iee; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Park, Kun-Young

    2015-03-01

    This study was to investigate the preventive effect of taemyeongcheong (TMC, a Korean traditional health drink) on acetaminophen (APAP, 800 mg/kg BW)-induced hepatic damage in ICR mice. TMC is prepared from Saururus chinensis, Taraxacum officinale, Zingiber officinale, Cirsium setidens, Salicornia herbacea, and Glycyrrhizae. A high dose of TMC (500 mg/kg BW) was found to decrease APAP-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase. TMC pretreatment also increased the hepatic levels of hepatic catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione, and reduced serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-6 in mice administered APAP (P<0.05). TMC (500 mg/kg BW) reduced hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS by 87%, 84%, 89%, 85%, and 88%, respectively, in mice treated with APAP (P<0.05). Furthermore, histological observations suggested TMC pretreatment dose-dependently prevented APAP-induced hepatocyte damage. These results suggest that TMC could be used as a functional health drink to prevent hepatic damage. PMID:25866750

  19. Preventive Effect of the Korean Traditional Health Drink (Taemyeongcheong) on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Damage in ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruo-Kun; Song, Jia-Le; Lim, Yaung-Iee; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Park, Kun-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the preventive effect of taemyeongcheong (TMC, a Korean traditional health drink) on acetaminophen (APAP, 800 mg/kg BW)-induced hepatic damage in ICR mice. TMC is prepared from Saururus chinensis, Taraxacum officinale, Zingiber officinale, Cirsium setidens, Salicornia herbacea, and Glycyrrhizae. A high dose of TMC (500 mg/kg BW) was found to decrease APAP-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase. TMC pretreatment also increased the hepatic levels of hepatic catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione, and reduced serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-6 in mice administered APAP (P<0.05). TMC (500 mg/kg BW) reduced hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS by 87%, 84%, 89%, 85%, and 88%, respectively, in mice treated with APAP (P<0.05). Furthermore, histological observations suggested TMC pretreatment dose-dependently prevented APAP-induced hepatocyte damage. These results suggest that TMC could be used as a functional health drink to prevent hepatic damage. PMID:25866750

  20. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (ENKO) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in ENKO mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings. PMID:25680861

  1. Muscular damage during telbivudine treatment in a chronic hepatitis B patient

    PubMed Central

    Caroleo, Benedetto; Galasso, Olimpio; Staltari, Orietta; Giofrè, Chiara; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Guadagnino, Vincenzo; Gallelli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Summary Muscle tissue damage might be related to metabolic and mechanical factors. Certain drugs have been associated with increased blood levels of creatin phospho kinase (CPK) and myoglobin that are biochemical markers of musculoskeletal damage. An increase of CPK plasma levels might suggest severe rhabdomyolysis with possible resulting renal failure. Telbivudine is an antiviral drug indicated for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in adult patients. An increase in CPK plasma levels has been recently described in some telbivudine-treated CHB patients without muscle-skeletal symptoms. In this paper we report a CHB patient that developed a severe increase of CPK plasma levels during telbivudine-treatment. Pharmacological evaluation, using the Naranjo probability scale, indicated a probable relationship between telbivudine and CPK increase, so telbivudine was discontinued and replaced with entecavir with a complete resolution of laboratory findings. In conclusion, telbivudine treatment can induce muscular damage in the absence of skeletal injury, therefore we suggest to closely monitor the muscular function of the patients treated with this drug in order to prevent possible major complications. PMID:23738248

  2. Sodium selenite/selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) protect cardiomyoblasts and zebrafish embryos against ethanol induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Jeyabharathi, Subhaschandrabose; Sundar, Krishnan; Muthukumaran, Azhaguchamy

    2015-10-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is the damage caused to the heart muscles due to high level of alcohol consumption resulting in enlargement and inflammation of the heart. Selenium is an important trace element that is beneficial to human health. Selenium protects the cells by preventing the formation of free radicals in the body. In the present study, protein mediated synthesis of SeNPs was investigated. Two different sizes of SeNPs were synthesized using BSA and keratin. The synthesized SeNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with elemental composition analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). This study demonstrates the in vitro and in vivo antioxidative effects of sodium selenite and SeNPs. Further selenium and SeNPs were evaluated for their ability to protect against 1% ethanol induced oxidative stress in H9C2 cell line. The selenium and SeNPs were found to reduce the 1% ethanol-induced oxidative damage through scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species. The selenium and SeNPs could also prevent pericardial edema induced ethanol treatment and reduced apoptosis and cell death in zebrafish embryos. The results indicate that selenium and SeNPs could potentially be used as an additive in alcoholic beverage industry to control the cardiomyopathy. PMID:26302921

  3. Red Mold Rice against Hepatic Inflammatory Damage in Zn-deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The protective effect of red mold rice (RMR) against liver injury in rats fed with a Zn-deficient diet for 12 weeks was investigated in this study. Rats were orally administered RMR (151 mg/kg body weight or 755 mg/kg body weight; 1 × dose or 5 × dose, respectively) with or without Zn once a day for 4 consecutive weeks. The severity of liver damage was evaluated by measuring the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in Zn-deficient rats. RMR significantly inhibited the elevation of serum ALT levels by Zn-deficient induction. Hepatic antioxidase activity was also significantly increased in the RMR + Zn group (RZ), thereby suppressing the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines in the liver of Zn-deficient rats. These findings suggested that RMR exerted hepatoprotective effects against Zn deficiency-induced liver inflammation. PMID:24716115

  4. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions ... which type. Treatment In most cases, no specific therapy is given for acute hepatitis. The child’s own ...

  5. Mitochondrial Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (MTDs) Are Released during Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion and Induce Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qianni; Wood, Caroline Ruth; Cimen, Sanem; Venkatachalam, Ananda Baskaran; Alwayn, Ian Patrick Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia / reperfusion injury (IRI) during the course of liver transplantation enhances the immunogenicity of allografts and thus impacts overall graft outcome. This sterile inflammatory insult is known to activate innate immunity and propagate organ damage through the recognition of damage-associate molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of mitochondrial DAMPs (MTDs) in the pathogenesis of hepatic IRI. Using in vitro models we observed that levels of MTDs were significantly higher in both transplantation-associated and warm IR, and that co-culture of MTDs with human and rat hepatocytes significantly increased cell death. MTDs were also released in an in vivo rat model of hepatic IRI and associated with increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-6, and IL-10) and increased liver injury compared to the sham group. Our results suggest that hepatic IR results in a significant increase of MTDs both in vitro and in vivo suggesting that MTDs may serve as a novel marker in hepatic IRI. Co-culture of MTDs with hepatocytes showed a decrease in cell viability in a concentration dependent manner, which indicates that MTDs is a toxic mediator participating in the pathogenesis of liver IR injury. PMID:26451593

  6. Hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol by rabbit ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-450 isozyme 3a.

    PubMed

    Koop, D R

    1986-04-01

    The hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol to 4-nitrocatechol was investigated using rabbit hepatic microsomes and six purified isozymes of cytochrome P-450. The microsomal activity was maximal at pH 6.8 and at 100 microM p-nitrophenol. At higher substrate concentrations inhibition was observed. At pH 6.8 and 100 microM p-nitrophenol, isozyme 3a exhibited the highest activity of the purified isozymes: 3.4-fold more active than isozyme 6, and 8-fold more active than isozymes 2 and 4. The isozyme 3a-catalyzed hydroxylation reaction was stimulated 2.4-fold by the addition of a 4:1 ratio of cytochrome b5/P-450. At optimal concentrations of cytochrome b5, isozyme 3a was 8- to 9-fold more active than isozymes 2 and 6 and 20-fold more active than isozyme 4. Under the same conditions, isozyme 3a-catalyzed butanol oxidation was inhibited 40%. Antibodies to isozyme 3a inhibited greater than 95% of the p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity of microsomes from untreated or from ethanol- or acetone-treated rabbits. The microsomal hydroxylase activity was linearly correlated with the microsomal concentration of isozyme 3a (correlation coefficient of 0.94) and had an intercept near zero. The results from reconstitution, antibody inhibition, and correlation experiments indicate that isozyme 3a is the principal catalyst of rabbit microsomal p-nitrophenol hydroxylation. The ability of the ethanol-inducible isozyme to catalyze catechol formation may be important in the ethanol-enhanced toxicity of aromatic compounds such as benzene. PMID:3702859

  7. Hepatoprotective Evaluation of Ganoderma lucidum Pharmacopuncture: In vivo Studies of Ethanol-induced Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sun-Hee; Cho, Sung-woo; Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jeon; Song, Chun-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Alcohol abuse is a public issue and one of the major causes of liver disease worldwide. This study was aimed at investigating the protective effect of Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) against hepatotoxicity induced by acute ethanol (EtOH) intoxication in rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: normal, control, normal saline pharmacopuncture (NP) and GLP groups. The control, NP and GLP groups received ethanol orally. The NP and the GLP groups were treated daily with injections of normal saline and Ganoderma lucidum extract, respectively. The control group received no treatment. The rats in all groups, except the normal group, were intoxicated for 6 hours by oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg BW). The same volume of distilled water was administered to the rats in the normal group. Two local acupoints were used: Qimen (LR14) and Taechung (LR3). A histopathological analysis was performed, and the liver function and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. Results: GLP treatment reduced the histological changes due to acute liver injury induced by EtOH and significantly reduced the increase in the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme; however, it had an insignificant effect in reducing the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme. It also significantly ameliorated the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the catalase (CAT) activities. Conclusion: The present study suggests that GLP treatment is effective in protecting against ethanol-induced acute hepatic injury in SD rats by modulating the activities of ethanol-metabolizing enzymes and by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:25780705

  8. Effect of intestinal microbiota alteration on hepatic damage in rats with acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yirui; Chen, Huazhong; Zhu, Biao; Qin, Nan; Chen, Yunbo; Li, Zhengfeng; Deng, Min; Jiang, Haiyin; Xu, Xiangfei; Yang, Jiezuan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-11-01

    The previous studies all focus on the effect of probiotics and antibiotics on infection after liver transplantation. Here, we focus on the effect of gut microbiota alteration caused by probiotics and antibiotics on hepatic damage after allograft liver transplantation. Brown-Norway rats received saline, probiotics, or antibiotics via daily gavage for 3 weeks. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was carried out after 1 week of gavage. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota, liver function and histopathology, serum and liver cytokines, and T cells in peripheral blood and Peyer's patch were evaluated. Distinct segregation of fecal bacterial diversity was observed in the probiotic group and antibiotic group when compared with the allograft group. As for diversity of intestinal mucosal microbiota and pathology of intestine at 2 weeks after OLT, antibiotics and probiotics had a significant effect on ileum and colon. The population of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the probiotic group was significantly greater than the antibiotic group and the allograft group. The liver injury was significantly reduced in the antibiotic group and the probiotic group compared with the allograft group. The CD4/CD8 and Treg cells in Peyer's patch were decreased in the antibiotic group. The intestinal Treg cell and serum and liver TGF-? were increased markedly while CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly decreased in the probiotic group. It suggested that probiotics mediate their beneficial effects through increase of Treg cells and TGF-? and deduction of CD4/CD8 in rats with acute rejection (AR) after OLT. PMID:25004996

  9. Hepatitis C, Innate Immunity and Alcohol: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; Ganesan, Murali; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C and alcohol are the most widespread causes of liver disease worldwide. Approximately 80% of patients with a history of hepatitis C and alcohol abuse develop chronic liver injury. Alcohol consumption in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients exacerbates liver disease leading to rapid progression of fibrosis, cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatocytes are the main sites of HCV-infection and ethanol metabolism, both of which generate oxidative stress. Oxidative stress levels affect HCV replication and innate immunity, resulting in a greater susceptibility for HCV-infection and virus spread in the alcoholic patients. In this review paper, we analyze the effects of ethanol metabolism and other factors on HCV replication. In addition, we illustrate the mechanisms of how HCV hijacks innate immunity and how ethanol exposure regulates this process. We also clarify the effects of HCV and ethanol metabolism on interferon signaling—a crucial point for activation of anti-viral genes to protect cells from virus—and the role that HCV- and ethanol-induced impairments play in adaptive immunity which is necessary for recognition of virally-infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, ethanol exposure potentiates the suppressive effects of HCV on innate immunity, which activates viral spread in the liver and finally, leads to impairments in adaptive immunity. The dysregulation of immune response results in impaired elimination of HCV-infected cells, viral persistence, progressive liver damage and establishment of chronic infection that worsens the outcomes of chronic hepatitis C in alcoholic patients. PMID:25664450

  10. Protective Role of Ficus carica Stem Extract against Hepatic Oxidative Damage Induced by Methanol in Male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Saoudi, Mongi; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant activity of Ficus carica stem extract (FE) in methanol-induced hepatotoxicity in male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into two batches: 16 control rats (C) drinking tap water and 16 treated rats drinking Ficus carica stem extract for six weeks. Then, each group was divided into two subgroups, and one of them was intraperitoneally injected (i.p.) daily methanol at a dose of 2.37?g/kg body weight i.p. for 30 days, for four weeks. The results showed that FE was found to contain large amounts of polyphenols and carotenoids. The treatment with methanol exhibited a significant increase of serum hepatic biochemical parameters (ALT, AST, ALP, and LDH) and hepatic lipid peroxidation. Hepatic antioxidant enzymes, namely, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px, were significantly decreased in methanol-treated animals. FE treatment prior to methanol intoxication has significant role in protecting animals from methanol-induced hepatic oxidative damage. PMID:22203864

  11. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  12. Neuroprotective effect of osmotin against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, M I; Ullah, I; Narasimhan, M L; Lee, H Y; Bressan, R A; Yoon, G H; Yun, D J; Kim, M O

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a neurological and developmental disorder caused by exposure of developing brain to ethanol. Administration of osmotin to rat pups reduced ethanol-induced apoptosis in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Osmotin, a plant protein, mitigated the ethanol-induced increases in cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3, and PARP-1. Osmotin and ethanol reduced ethanol neurotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro by reducing the protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, intracellular [Ca2+]cyt, and mitochondrial transmembrane potential collapse, and also upregulated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Osmotin is a homolog of adiponectin, and it controls energy metabolism via phosphorylation. Adiponectin can protect hippocampal neurons against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Abrogation of signaling via receptors AdipoR1 or AdipoR2, by transfection with siRNAs, reduced the ability of osmotin and adiponectin to protect neurons against ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. Metformin, an activator of AMPK (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase), increased whereas Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK pathway, reduced the ability of osmotin and adiponectin to protect against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Osmotin exerted its neuroprotection via Bcl-2 family proteins and activation of AMPK signaling pathway. Modulation of AMPK pathways by osmotin, adiponectin, and metformin hold promise as a preventive therapy for fetal alcohol syndrome. PMID:24675468

  13. Environmental enrichment blocks reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinjuan; Meng, Li; Huang, Keyu; Wang, Hua; Li, Dongliang

    2015-07-10

    This study aimed to explore the effect of environmental enrichment (EE) on the reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6J mice. To investigate the effect of training dose on the extinction and relapse of ethanol-induced CPP, doses of ethanol were applied and we found 0.8 g/kg and 1.6 g/kg training doses lead to significant CPP. In the reinstatement procedure, previously extinguished 1.6 g/kg ethanol CPP could be markedly reinstated by a priming injection of 0.8 g/kg. In contrast, priming with 0.4 g/kg of ethanol failed to reinstate the CPP induced by 0.8 g/kg. To investigate whether concomitant EE exposure could prevent the reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP, one half of the mice were housed in standard environment (SE) and the other half in EE during the extinction and reinstatement session in the second experiment. Our study showed that reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP was blocked by EE and the extinction rate was the same between SE and EE mice. These findings suggest that EE can block reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP in mice, and aiding in the identification of new therapeutic strategies for alcohol addiction. PMID:26003446

  14. Autophagy is involved in ethanol-induced cardia bifida during chick cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Guang; Gao, Lin-Rui; Lu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Cao, Liu; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-10-18

    Excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy has been acknowledged to increase the incidence of congenital disorders, especially the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanism involved in ethanol-induced cardiac malformation in prenatal fetus is still unknown. We demonstrated that ethanol exposure during gastrulation in the chick embryo increased the incidence of cardia bifida. Previously, we reported that autophagy was involved in heart tube formation. In this context, we demonstrated that ethanol exposure increased ATG7 and LC3 expression. mTOR was found to be inhibited by ethanol exposure. We activated autophagy using exogenous rapamycin (RAPA) and observed that it induced cardiac bifida and increased GATA5 expression. RAPA beads implantation experiments revealed that RAPA restricted ventricular myosin heavy chain (VMHC) expression. In vitro explant cultures of anterior primitive streak demonstrated that both ethanol and RAPA treatments could reduce cell differentiation and the spontaneous beating of cardiac precursor cells. In addition, the bead experiments showed that RAPA inhibited GATA5 expression during heart tube formation. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that BMP2 expression was increased while GATA4 expression was suppressed. In the embryos exposed to excess ethanol, BMP2, GATA4 and FGF8 expression was repressed. These genes are associated with cardiomyocyte differentiation, while heart tube fusion is associated with increased Wnt3a but reduced VEGF and Slit2 expression. Furthermore, the ethanol exposure also caused the production of excess ROS, which might damage the cardiac precursor cells of developing embryos. In sum, our results revealed that disrupting autophagy and excess ROS generation are responsible for inducing abnormal cardiogenesis in ethanol-treated chick embryos. PMID:26317250

  15. Effect and mechanism of evodiamine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice by suppressing Rho/NF-?B pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongyan; Gong, Shilin; Wang, Shumin; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-09-01

    Evodiamine (EVD), a major alkaloid compound extracted from the dry unripened fruit Evodia fructus (Evodia rutaecarpa Benth., Rutaceae), has various pharmacological effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-ulcerogenic potential of EVD and explore the underlying mechanism against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Administration of EVD at the doses of 20, 40mg/kg body weight prior to the ethanol ingestion could effectively protect the stomach from ulceration. The gastric lesion was significantly ameliorated in the EVD group compared with that in the model group. Pre-treatment with EVD prevented the oxidative damage and decreased the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). In addition, EVD pretreatment markedly increased the serum levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), decreased malonaldehyde (MDA) content in serum and activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in stomach tissues compared with those in the model group. In the mechanistic study, significant elevation of Rho, Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1), ROCK2, cytosolic and nucleic NF-?Bp65 expressions were observed in the gastric mucosa group, whereas EVD effectively suppressed the protein expressions of Rho, Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1), ROCK2, cytosolic and nucleic NF-?Bp65 in mice. Moreover, EVD showed protective activity on ethanol-induced GES-1 cells, while the therapeutic effects were not due to its cytotoxity. Taken together, these results strongly indicated that EVD exerted a gastro-protective effect against gastric ulceration. The underlying mechanism might be associated with the improvement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status through Rho/NF-?B pathway. PMID:26225926

  16. Gastroprotective effects of Corchorus olitorius leaf extract against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhagic lesions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Al Batran, Rami; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Jamil Al-Obaidi, Mazen M; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Fouad, Mustafa; Golbabapour, Shahram; Talaee, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background and AimCorchorus olitorius is a medicinal plant traditionally utilized as an antifertility, anti-convulsive, and purgative agent. This study aimed to evaluate the gastroprotective effect of an ethanolic extract of C.?olitorius against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in adult Sprague Dawley rats. MethodsThe rats were divided into seven groups according to their pretreatment: an untreated control group, an ulcer control group, a reference control group (20?mg/kg omeprazole), and four experimental groups (50, 100, 200, or 400?mg/kg of extract). Carboxymethyl cellulose was the vehicle for the agents. Prior to the induction of gastric ulcers with absolute ethanol, the rats in each group were pretreated orally. An hour later, the rats were sacrificed, and gastric tissues were collected to evaluate the ulcers and to measure enzymatic activity. The tissues were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical evaluations. ResultsCompared with the extensive mucosal damage in the ulcer control group, gross evaluation revealed a marked protection of the gastric mucosa in the experimental groups, with significantly preserved gastric wall mucus. In these groups, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased (P?ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhagic lesions in rats. PMID:23611708

  17. Cypermethrin has the potential to induce hepatic oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Zheng, Shanshan; Pu, Yue; Shu, Linjun; Sun, Liwei; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2011-01-01

    Cypermethrin (CYP), a widely used Type II pyrethroid pesticide, is one of the most common contaminants in the freshwater aquatic system. We studied the effects of CYP exposure on the induction of hepatic oxidative stress, DNA damage and the alteration of gene expression related to apoptosis in adult zebrafish. Hepatic mRNA levels for the genes encoding antioxidant proteins, such as Cu/Zn-Sod, Mn-Sod, Cat, and Gpx, were significantly upregulated when zebrafish were exposed to various concentrations of CYP for 4 or 8 days. In addition, the main genes related to fatty acid ?-oxidation and the mitochondrial genes related to respiration and ATP synthesis were also significantly upregulated after exposure to high concentrations (1 and 3 ?g L(-1)) of CYP for 4 or 8 days. Moreover, in a comet assay of zebrafish hepatocytes, tail DNA, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The significant induction (p<0.01) of all four parameters observed with CYP concentrations of 0.3 ?g L(-1) or higher suggests that heavy DNA damage was induced even at low levels. Furthermore, several apoptosis- related genes, such as p53, Apaf1 and Cas3, were significantly upregulated after CYP exposure, and Bcl2/Bax expression ratio decreased, especially in groups treated with 1 and 3 ?g L(-1) CYP for 8 days. Taken together, our results suggested that CYP has the potential to induce hepatic oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in zebrafish. This information will be helpful in fully understanding the mechanism of aquatic toxicology induced by CYP in fish. PMID:20965546

  18. Early maternal separation affects ethanol-induced conditioning in a nor-BNI insensitive manner, but does not alter ethanol-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Fabio, Ma Carolina; Spear, Norman E

    2012-01-01

    Early environmental stress significantly affects the development of offspring. This stress has been modeled in rats through the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which alters the functioning of the HPA axis and can enhance ethanol intake at adulthood. Infant rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing effects, which modulate ethanol seeking and intake. Little is known about the impact of MS on sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive and aversive effects during infancy. The present study assessed ethanol-induced conditioned place preference established through second-order conditioning (SOC), spontaneous or ethanol-induced locomotor activity and ethanol intake in preweanling rats that experienced normal animal facility rearing (AFR) or daily episodes of maternal separation (MS) during postnatal days 1-13 (PDs 1-13). Low-ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) induced appetitive conditioned place preference (via SOC) in control rats given conventional rearing but not in rats given maternal separation in early infancy, whereas 2.0 g/kg ethanol induced aversive conditioned place preference in the former but not the latter. The administration of a kappa antagonist at PD 1 or immediately before testing did not alter ethanol-induced reinforcement. High (i.e., 2.5 and 2.0 g/kg) but not low (i.e., 0.5 g/kg) ethanol dose induced reliable motor stimulation, which was independent of early maternal separation. Ethanol intake and blood alcohol levels during conditioning were unaffected by rearing conditions. Pups given early maternal separation had lower body weights than controls and showed an altered pattern of exploration when placed in an open field. These results indicate that, when assessed in infant rats, earlier maternal separation alters the balance between the appetitive and aversive motivational effects of ethanol but has no effect on the motor activating effects of the drug. PMID:22108648

  19. Suppression of intralysosomal proteolysis aggravates structural damage and functional impairment of liver lysosomes in rats with toxic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Korolenko, T.A.; Gavrilova, N.I.; Kurysheva, N.G.; Malygin, A.E.; Pupyshev, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of lowering protein catabolism in the lysosomes on structural and functional properties of the latter during liver damage. For comparison, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which is inert relative to intralysosomal proteolysis, and which also accumulates largely in lysosomes of the kupffer cells of the liver, was used. The uptake of labeled bovine serum albuman (C 14-BSA) by the liver is shown and the rate of intralysosomal proteolysis is given 24 hours after administration of suramin an CCl/sub 4/ to rats. It is suggested that it is risky to use drugs which inhibit intralysosomal proteolysis in the treatment of patients with acute hepatitis.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy can visualize zonal damage and decreased cellular metabolic activity in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Liu, Xin; Burczynski, Frank J.; Fletcher, Linda M.; Gobe, Glenda C.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a common occurrence in liver surgery. In orthotopic transplantation, the donor liver is exposed to periods of ischemia and when oxygenated blood is reintroduced to the liver, oxidative stress may develop and lead to graft failure. The aim of this project was to investigate whether noninvasive multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, without external markers, were useful in detecting early liver damage caused by I/R injury. Localized hepatic ischemia was induced in rats for 1 h followed by 4 h reperfusion. Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was conducted prior to ischemia and up to 4 h of reperfusion and compared to morphological and biochemical assessment of liver damage. Liver function was significantly impaired at 2 and 4 h of reperfusion. Multiphoton microscopy detected liver damage at 1 h of reperfusion, manifested by vacuolated cells and heterogeneous spread of damage over the liver. The damage was mainly localized in the midzonal region of the liver acinus. In addition, fluorescence lifetime imaging showed a decrease in cellular metabolic activity. Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy detected evidence of early I/R injury both structurally and functionally. This provides a simple noninvasive technique useful for following progressive liver injury without external markers.

  1. Curcuma aromatica Water Extract Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Gastritis via Enhancement of Antioxidant Status.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Jin, Seong Eun; Ha, Hyekyung

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma aromatica is an herbal medicine and traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases in Asia. We investigated the effects of C. aromatica water extract (CAW) in the stomach of rats with ethanol-induced gastritis. Gastritis was induced in rats by intragastric administration of 5?mL/kg body weight of absolute ethanol. The CAW groups were given 250 or 500?mg of extract/kg 2?h before administration of ethanol, respectively. To determine the antioxidant effects of CAW, we determined the level of lipid peroxidation, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), the activities of catalase, degree of inflammation, and mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced ethanol-induced inflammation and loss of epithelial cells and increased the mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced the increase in lipid peroxidation associated with ethanol-induced gastritis (250 and 500?mg/kg, p < 0.01, resp.) and increased mucosal GSH content (500?mg/kg, p < 0.01) and the activity of catalase (250 and 500?mg/kg, p < 0.01, resp.). CAW increased the production of prostaglandin E2. These findings suggest that CAW protects against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury by increasing antioxidant status. We suggest that CAW could be developed for the treatment of gastritis induced by alcohol. PMID:26483844

  2. Curcuma aromatica Water Extract Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Gastritis via Enhancement of Antioxidant Status

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Jin, Seong Eun; Ha, Hyekyung

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma aromatica is an herbal medicine and traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases in Asia. We investigated the effects of C. aromatica water extract (CAW) in the stomach of rats with ethanol-induced gastritis. Gastritis was induced in rats by intragastric administration of 5?mL/kg body weight of absolute ethanol. The CAW groups were given 250 or 500?mg of extract/kg 2?h before administration of ethanol, respectively. To determine the antioxidant effects of CAW, we determined the level of lipid peroxidation, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), the activities of catalase, degree of inflammation, and mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced ethanol-induced inflammation and loss of epithelial cells and increased the mucus production in the stomach. CAW reduced the increase in lipid peroxidation associated with ethanol-induced gastritis (250 and 500?mg/kg, p < 0.01, resp.) and increased mucosal GSH content (500?mg/kg, p < 0.01) and the activity of catalase (250 and 500?mg/kg, p < 0.01, resp.). CAW increased the production of prostaglandin E2. These findings suggest that CAW protects against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury by increasing antioxidant status. We suggest that CAW could be developed for the treatment of gastritis induced by alcohol. PMID:26483844

  3. ALTERED RA SIGNALING IN THE GENESIS OF ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered RA Signaling in the Genesis of Ethanol-Induced Limb Defects

    Johnson CS(1), Sulik KK(1,2) Hunter, ES III(3)
    (1) Dept of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-Chapel Hill (2) Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, UNC-CH (3) NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC

    Administr...

  4. Lithium blocks ethanol-induced modulation of protein kinases in the developing brain

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Saito, Mitsuo; Mao, Rui-Fen; Wang, Ray; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mariko

    2008-03-14

    Lithium has been shown to be neuroprotective against various insults including ethanol exposure. We previously reported that ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the postnatal day 7 (P7) mice is associated with decreases in phosphorylation levels of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and alteration in lipid profiles in the brain. Here, P7 mice were injected with ethanol and lithium, and the effects of lithium on ethanol-induced alterations in phosphorylation levels of protein kinases and lipid profiles in the brain were examined. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that lithium significantly blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation and reduction in phosphorylation levels of Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK. Further, lithium inhibited accumulation of cholesterol ester (ChE) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) triggered by ethanol in the brain. These results suggest that Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK are involved in ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and the neuroprotective effects of lithium by modulating both apoptotic and survival pathways.

  5. Zinc inhibits ethanol-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Plewka, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna

    2008-05-15

    Alcohol consumption produces a variety of metabolic alterations in liver cells, associated with ethanol oxidation and with nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol, among others apoptosis of hepatocytes. As zinc is known as a potent antioxidant and an inhibitor of cell apoptosis, the aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplementation could inhibit ethanol-induced HepG2 apoptosis, and whether this inhibition was connected with attenuation of oxidative stress and modulation of FasR/FasL system expression. The results indicated that zinc supplementation significantly inhibited ethanol-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis (measured by cytochrome c release from mitochondria and caspase-3 activation) by attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, increase in the cellular level of GSH, inhibition of ethanol-induced sFasR and FasL overexpression and caspase-8 activation. These results indicate that zinc can inhibit ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis by several independent mechanisms, among others by an indirect antioxidative effect and probably by inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation.

  6. Role of chemokines and their receptors in viral persistence and liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Larrubia, Juan R; Benito-Martínez, Selma; Calvino, Miryam; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo; Parra-Cid, Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines produced in the liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induce migration of activated T cells from the periphery to infected parenchyma. The milieu of chemokines secreted by infected hepatocytes is predominantly associated with the T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1) response. These chemokines consist of CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1?; MIP-1?), CCL4 (MIP-1?), CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted; RANTES), CXCL10 (interferon-??inducible protein-10; IP-10), CXCL11 (interferon-inducible T-cell ? chemoattractant; I-TAC), and CXCL9 (monokine induced by interferon ?; Mig) and they recruit T cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR3 chemokine receptors. Intrahepatic and peripheral blood levels of these chemokines are increased during chronic hepatitis C. The interaction between chemokines and their receptors is essential in recruiting HCV-specific T cells to control the infection. When the adaptive immune response fails in this task, non-specific T cells without the capacity to control the infection are also recruited to the liver, and these are ultimately responsible for the persistent hepatic damage. The modulation of chemokine receptor expression and chemokine secretion could be a viral escape mechanism to avoid specific T cell migration to the liver during the early phase of infection, and to maintain liver viability during the chronic phase, by impairing non-specific T cell migration. Some chemokines and their receptors correlate with liver damage, and CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCR3 levels have shown a clinical utility as predictors of treatment response outcome. The regulation of chemokines and their receptors could be a future potential therapeutic target to decrease liver inflammation and to increase specific T cell migration to the infected liver. PMID:19084927

  7. Resveratrol mitigate structural changes and hepatic stellate cell activation in N'-nitrosodimethylamine-induced liver fibrosis via restraining oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Areeba; Ahmad, Riaz

    2014-09-25

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol, found in skin of red grapes, peanuts and berries possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and lipid modulation properties. Here, we demonstrate in vivo antifibrotic activity of resveratrol in a mammalian model, wherein hepatic fibrosis was induced by N'-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) administration. Apart from being a potent hepatotoxin, NDMA is a known mutagen and carcinogen, as well. To induce hepatic fibrosis, rats were administered NDMA (i.p.) in 10mg/kgb.wt thrice/week for 21 days. Another group of animals received resveratrol supplement (10mg/kgb.wt) subsequent to NDMA administration and were sacrificed weekly. The changes in selected biomarkers were monitored to compare profibrotic effects of NDMA and antifibrotic activity of resveratrol. The selected biomarkers were: sera transaminases, ALP, bilirubin, liver glycogen, LPO, SOD, protein carbonyl content, ATPases (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+)/K(+)) and hydroxyproline/collagen content. Alterations in liver architecture were assessed by H&E, Masson's trichrome and reticulin staining of liver biopsies. Immuno-histochemistry and immunoblotting were employed to examine expression of ?-SMA. Our results demonstrate that during NDMA-induced liver fibrosis transaminases, ALP, bilirubin, hydroxyproline and liver collagen increases, while liver glycogen is depleted. The decline in SOD (>65%) and ATPases, which were concomitant with the elevation in MDA and protein carbonyls, strongly indicate oxidative damage. Fibrotic transformation of liver in NDMA-treated rats was verified by histopathology, immuno-histochemistry and immunoblotting data, with the higher expressivity of ?-SMA-positive HSCs being most established diagnostic immuno-histochemical marker of HSCs. Resveratrol-supplement refurbished liver architecture by significantly restoring levels of biomarkers of oxidative damage (MDA, SOD, protein carbonyls and membrane-bound ATPases). Therefore, we conclude that antifibrotic effect of resveratrol is due to restrained oxidative damage and down-regulation of ?-SMA, which inhibits HSC activation to obstruct liver fibrosis. PMID:25064540

  8. Tacrine, an oral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, induced hepatic oxidative damage, which was blocked by liquiritigenin through GSK3-beta inhibition.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan; Han, Nu Ri; Cho, Il Je; Ku, Sae Kwang; Kim, Sang Chan; Zhao, Rong Jie; Kim, Young Woo

    2015-01-01

    Although the cholinesterase inhibitor tacrine has been successfully used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, it is known to have hepatotoxic effects. Liquiritigenin (LQ), an active flavonoid in Glycyrrhizae radix, exerts protective effects against liver damage. This study investigated the toxic effect of tacrine on hepatocytes and the beneficial effect of LQ on tacrine intoxication in vivo and in vitro, and the underlying mechanism involved. In hepatocyte cell lines, tacrine induced cell death and oxidative stress, as indicated by decreases in cell viability and glutathione (GSH) contents, which were blocked by pretreatment with LQ. Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis revealed that LQ inhibited cellular H2O2 production and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by tacrine in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, LQ promoted inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK3?) and prevented decreases in GSK3? phosphorylation induced by tacrine. In rats treatment with tacrine at 30 mg/kg increased hepatic damage as assessed by blood biochemistry and histopathology. Administration of LQ (10 or 30 mg/kg/d, per os (p.o.)) or the hepatoprotective drug sylimarin (100 mg/kg/d) for 3 d inhibited elevations in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and histological changes induced by tacrine. These results show that LQ efficaciously protects the rat liver against tacrine-induced liver damage, and suggest that LQ is a therapeutic candidate for ameliorating the hepatotoxic effects of tacrine. PMID:25747977

  9. The protective effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles against hepatic oxidative damage induced by monocrotaline

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kamal A; Hassan, Mohamed S; Awad, El-Said T; Hashem, Khalid S

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to determine the ability of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles to protect against monocrotaline (MCT)-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model. Method Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats were arbitrarily assigned to four groups: control (received saline), CeO2 (given 0.0001 nmol/kg intraperitoneally [IP]), MCT (given 10 mg/kg body weight IP as a single dose), and MCT + CeO2 (received CeO2 both before and after MCT). Electron microscopic imaging of the rat livers was carried out, and hepatic total glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) enzymatic activities were quantified. Results Results showed a significant MCT-induced decrease in total hepatic GSH, GPX, GR, and GST normalized to control values with concurrent CeO2 administration. In addition, MCT produced significant increases in hepatic CAT and SOD activities, which also ameliorated with CeO2. Conclusions These results indicate that CeO2 acts as a putative novel and effective hepatoprotective agent against MCT-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:21289991

  10. Increased methylation demand exacerbates ethanol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kharbanda, Kusum K; Todero, Sandra L; Thomes, Paul G; Orlicky, David J; Osna, Natalia A; French, Samuel W; Tuma, Dean J

    2014-08-01

    We previously reported that chronic ethanol intake lowers hepatocellular S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio and significantly impairs many liver methylation reactions. One such reaction, catalyzed by guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT), is a major consumer of methyl groups and utilizes as much as 40% of the SAM-derived groups to convert guanidinoacetate (GAA) to creatine. The exposure to methyl-group consuming compounds has substantially increased over the past decade that puts additional stresses on the cellular methylation potential. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether increased ingestion of a methyl-group consumer (GAA) either alone or combined with ethanol intake, plays a role in the pathogenesis of liver injury. Adult male Wistar rats were pair-fed the Lieber DeCarli control or ethanol diet in the presence or absence of GAA for 2weeks. At the end of the feeding regimen, biochemical and histological analyses were conducted. We observed that 2 weeks of GAA- or ethanol-alone treatment increases hepatic triglyceride accumulation by 4.5 and 7-fold, respectively as compared with the pair-fed controls. However, supplementing GAA in the ethanol diet produced panlobular macro- and micro-vesicular steatosis, a marked decrease in the methylation potential and a 28-fold increased triglyceride accumulation. These GAA-supplemented ethanol diet-fed rats displayed inflammatory changes and significantly increased liver toxicity compared to the other groups. In conclusion, increased methylation demand superimposed on chronic ethanol consumption causes more pronounced liver injury. Thus, alcoholic patients should be cautioned for increased dietary intake of methyl-group consuming compounds even for a short period of time. PMID:24842317

  11. [Hepatoprotective properties of isoflavonoids from roots of Maackia amurensis on experimental carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage].

    PubMed

    Kushnerova, N F; Fedoreev, S A; Fomenko, S E; Sprygin, V G; Kulesh, N I; Mishchenko, N P; Veselova, M V; Momot, T V

    2014-01-01

    Hepatoprotective properties of ethanol extract from the roots of Maackia amurensis Ruper et Maxim have been studied on the model of toxic hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride damage. It is established that the extract contains daidzein, 7-O-gentobiosides of isoflavonoids genistein, formononetin, pseudobabtige-nin, and 5-O-methylgenistein, and 3-O-gentobiosides of pterocarpans (6aR, 11aR)-maakiain and (6aR, 11aR)-medicarpin. The administration of extract facilitates the restoration of antioxidant protection enzymes activity and reduced glutathione level, decreases the formation of toxic peroxidation products, produces normalizing impact on liver phospholipid pattern, and improves the erythrocyte tolerance to hemolytic agents. The action of isoflavonoids from Maackia amurensis in restoration of metabolic pathways of the liver and removal of toxic stress was more effective as compared to that of the reference hepatoprotector legalon. PMID:24791337

  12. Acetaminophen increases the risk of arsenic-mediated development of hepatic damage in rats by enhancing redox-signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Chhaya Rani; Khan, Saleem; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Prawez, Shahid; Kumar, Amit; Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated whether the commonly used analgesic-antipyretic drug acetaminophen can modify the arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress and also whether withdrawal of acetaminophen administration during the course of long-term arsenic exposure can increase susceptibility of liver to arsenic toxicity. Acetaminophen was co-administered orally to rats for 3 days following 28 days of arsenic pre-exposure (Phase-I) and thereafter, acetaminophen was withdrawn, but arsenic exposure was continued for another 28 days (Phase-II). Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depleted glutathione (GSH), and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Acetaminophen caused exacerbation of arsenic-mediated lipid peroxidation and ROS generation and further enhancement of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In Phase-I, acetaminophen caused further GSH depletion and reduction in SOD, catalase, GPx and GR activities, but in Phase-II, only GPx and GR activities were more affected. Arsenic did not alter basal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production, but decreased constitutive NOS (cNOS)-mediated NO release. Arsenic reduced expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS genes. Acetaminophen up-regulated eNOS and iNOS expression and NO production in Phase-I, but reversed these effects in Phase-II. Results reveal that acetaminophen increased the risk of arsenic-mediated hepatic oxidative damage. Withdrawal of acetaminophen administration also increased susceptibility of liver to hepatotoxicity. Both ROS and NO appeared to mediate lipid peroxidation in Phase-I, whereas only ROS appeared responsible for peroxidative damage in Phase-II. PMID:22120977

  13. Effects of catecholamine synthesis inhibition on ethanol-induced withdrawal symptoms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Blum, K.; Wallace, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    ?-Methyl-p-tyrosine, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, was studied to determine its effects against ethanol-induced withdrawal symptoms in mice. Signifilcant (P < 0.001) potentiation of the withdrawal convulsion score induced by ethanol vapour exposure for three days was observed in mice. The synergistic effect was not due to alteration of ethanol metabolism. These results indicate that reductions in catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) augment seizure activity induced by subchronic exposure to ethanol. PMID:4474904

  14. Hemidesmus indicus protects against ethanol-induced liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Nadana; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the most common diseases in modern society. A large number of studies are in progress aiming to identify natural substances that would be effective in reducing the severity of ALD. Although there are currently a number of drugs on the market, their long-term use can have numerous side effects. Hemidesmus indicus is an indigenous Ayurvedic medicinal plant used in soft drinks in India. In this study, we examined the effects of its ethanolic root extract on experimental liver damage in order to evaluate its hepatoprotective effects against hepatotoxicity induced in rats by ethanol at a dosage of 5 g/kg body weight for 60 days. The H. indicus root extract was given at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight for the last 30 days of the experiment. The animals were monitored for food intake and weight gain. The liver was analysed for the degree of lipid peroxidation using thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and antioxidant status using the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. The degree of liver damage was analysed using serum marker enzyme activities, the total protein, albumin, globulin, ceruloplasmin and liver glycogen contents, and the A/G ratio. The Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) of the liver tissues were recorded in the region of 4000-400 cm(-1). The ethanol-fed rats showed significantly elevated liver marker enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation levels and reduced antioxidant levels as compared to the control rats. Oral administration of H. indicus for the latter 30 days resulted in an increased food intake and weight gain, decreased TBARS levels, near normal levels of glutathione-dependent enzymes, increased total protein, albumin, globulin and liver glycogen contents, an increased A/G ratio, and decreased liver marker enzyme activities and ceruloplasmin levels. The relative intensity of the liver FT-IR bands for the experimental groups were found to be altered significantly (p < 0.05) compared to the control samples. For the group that had H. indicus co-administered with ethanol, the intensity of the bands was near normal. Moreover, the results of the FT-IR study correlated with our biochemical results. PMID:17952378

  15. Antioxidative Activity of Flavonoids from Abrus cantoniensis against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Song, Zi-Jing; Dai, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Su-Li; He, Xin; Guo, Chang-Run; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Wang, Jiao-Ying; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated the flavonoids from Abrus cantoniensis against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in mice. The flavonoids from A. cantoniensis were extracted with ethanol and purified by macroporous resin and polyamide. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay was used to measure the antioxidative activities in vitro. The ethanol-induced ulcer mouse model was used to evaluate the gastroprotective activities of the flavonoids from A. cantoniensis. In addition, a method was established to ensure accuracy for animal ulcer evaluation. The flavonoids from A. cantoniensis showed a strong free radical scavenging capacity with an IC50 of 43.83?µg/mL in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. At doses between 28.16-112.67?mg/kg, the flavonoids conspicuously reduced the ulcer index in ethanol-induced mice (p<0.001). Significant differences were found in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, and myeloperoxidase in the stomach tissues between the flavonoids from the A. cantoniensis groups and the ethanol control group. The gastroprotective effect of the flavonoids from A. cantoniensis could be due to its antioxidative activity of the defensive mechanism. The data revealed that the flavonoids from A. cantoniensis could be a potential therapeutic agent for gastric ulcer prevention and treatment. PMID:26039267

  16. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  17. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20?mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500?mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500?mg/kg). After 1?h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1?h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5?g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  18. Efficacy of sardinelle protein hydrolysate to alleviate ethanol-induced oxidative stress in the heart of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Zeineb; Kamoun, Alya Sellami; Bougatef, Ali; Chtourou, Yassine; Boudawara, Tahia; Nasri, Moncef; Zeghal, Najiba

    2012-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the protective effects of sardinelle proteins hydrolysate (SPH) obtained from heads and viscera against ethanol toxicity in the heart of adult rats. Twenty-four male rats of Wistar strain, weighing at the beginning of the experiment 250 to 300 g, were used in this study. They were divided into 4 groups: group (C) served as controls, group (Eth) received 30% ethanol solution at 3 g/kg body weight, group (SPH) received only 7.27 mg of SPH/kg body weight, and group (Eth-SPH) received ethanol and sardinelle proteins hydrolysate simultaneously. All treatments were made by gavage during 15 d. Treatment with ethanol revealed a significant elevation of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels in the heart and of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase activities in plasma. Nitric oxide levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase decreased. Nonenzymatic antioxidant such as reduced glutathione did not significantly change and ascorbic acid was decreased. SPH intake concomitantly with ethanol restored these parameters to near control values. These modifications confirmed histopathological aspects of the heart. The results revealed that SPH could provide protection of the myocardium against ethanol-induced oxidative damages in rats. This may be due to the high antioxidant potential of SPH. PMID:22780570

  19. Acute toxicity and gastroprotective role of M. pruriens in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A Hamid A; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  20. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage. PMID:23363576

  1. Cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibition prevents hepatic carcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine in alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qinyuan; Lian, Fuzhi; Chavez, Pollyanna R.G.; Chung, Jayong; Ling, Wenhua; Qin, Hua; Seitz, Helmut K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion increases hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole (CMZ), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, protects against alcohol-associated hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were fed either an ethanol liquid diet or a non-ethanol liquid diet, with or without CMZ for one and ten months. A single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 20 mg/kg) was given to initiate hepatic carcinogenesis. CYP2E1 expression, inflammatory proteins, cell proliferation, protein-bound 4-HNE, etheno-DNA adducts, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), retinoid concentrations, and hepatic carcinogenesis were examined. Ethanol feeding for 1 month with DEN resulted in significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 levels and increased nuclear accumulation of NF-?B protein and TNF-? expression, which were associated with increased cyclin D1 expression and p-GST positive altered hepatic foci. All of these changes induced by ethanol feeding were significantly inhibited by the one month CMZ treatment. At 10-months of treatment, hepatocellular adenomas were detected in ethanol-fed rats only, but neither in control rats nor in animals receiving ethanol and CMZ. The 8-OHdG formation was found to be significantly increased in ethanol fed animals and normalized with CMZ treatment. In addition, alcohol-reduced hepatic retinol and retinoic acid concentrations were restored by CMZ treatment to normal levels in the rats at 10 months of treatment. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of ethanol-induced CYP2E1 as a key pathogenic factor can counteract the tumor-promoting action of ethanol by decreasing TNF-? expression, NF-?B activation, and oxidative DNA damage as well as restoring normal hepatic levels of retinoic acid in DEN-treated rats. PMID:23543859

  2. CMZ Reversed Chronic Ethanol-Induced Disturbance of PPAR-? Possibly by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and PGC-1? Acetylation, and Activating the MAPK and GSK3? Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Cui-Li; Song, Fu-Yong; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) has been suggested to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic fatty liver (AFL), but the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. The current study was designed to evaluate whether CYP2E1 suppression by chlormethiazole (CMZ) could suppress AFL in mice, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods Mice were treated with or without CMZ (50 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and subjected to liquid diet with or without ethanol (5%, w/v) for 4 weeks. Biochemical parameters were measured using commercial kits. The protein and mRNA levels were detected by western blot and qPCR, respectively. Histopathology and immunohistochemical assay were performed with routine methods. Results CYP2E1 inhibition by CMZ completely blocked AFL in mice, shown as the decline of the hepatic and serum triglyceride levels, and the fewer fat droplets in the liver sections. Chronic ethanol exposure led to significant decrease of the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR-?), which was blocked by CMZ co-treatment. CMZ co-treatment suppressed ethanol-induced oxidative stress, overproduction of tumor necrosis ? (TNF-?), and decrease of protein levels of the PPAR-? co-activators including p300 and deacetylated PGC1-?. Furthermore, CMZ co-treatment led to the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and PI3K/Akt/GSK3? pathway. However, chronic ethanol-induced decline of acyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) protein levels was partially restored by CMZ, while the activation of autophagy appeared to be suppressed by CMZ. Conclusion These results suggested that CMZ suppressed chronic ethanol-induced oxidative stress, TNF-? overproduction, decline of p300 protein level and deacetylation of PGC1-?, and activated AMPK, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt/GSK3? pathway, which might contribute to the activation of PPAR-? and account for the protection of CMZ against AFL. PMID:24892905

  3. 1,2-DIBROMOETHANE CAUSES RAT HEPATIC DNA DAMAGE AT LOW DOSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two oral administrations of 1,2-dibromoethane to adult female rats at doses above 10 micromoles/kg (1.9 mg/kg) caused DNA damage as determined by the alkaline elution technique. Far greater doses (300 micromoles/kg, 56.4 mg/kg) of 1,2-dibromoethane were required to cause other he...

  4. Protective effect of dieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol caused damage in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Eun-A; Song, Choon Bok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Suck; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol-induced cell damage and apoptosis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Three phlorotannin compounds, namely phloroglucinol, eckol and dieckol, were successively isolated and identified from the extract. Dieckol showed the strongest protective effect against ethanol-induced cell apoptosis in Chang liver cells, with the lowest cytotoxicity. It was observed that dieckol reduced cell apoptosis through activation of Bcl-xL and PARP, and down-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in Western blot analyses. In the in vivo study, the protective effect of ethanol induced by dieckol was investigated in a zebrafish model. The dieckol treated group scavenged intracellural reactive oxygen species and prevented lipid peroxidation and ethanol induced cell death in the zebrafish embryo. In conclusion, dieckol isolated from E. cava might possess a potential protective effect against ethanol-induced liver diseases. PMID:24189014

  5. Protective effects of friedelin isolated from Azima tetracantha Lam. against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats and possible underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Antonisamy, Paulrayer; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Aravinthan, Adithan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Choi, Ki Choon; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the gastroprotective effects of friedelin isolated from the hexane extract of leaves of Azima tetracantha. Ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model was used to investigate the gastroprotective effects of friedelin. Antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, gastric vascular permeability, pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis level have been investigated. Ethanol caused severe gastric damage and friedelin pretreatment protected against its deleterious role. Antioxidant enzyme activities, anti-inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) and mucus weight have been increased significantly. However, the vascular permeability, pro-inflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3 and apoptosis level have significantly been decreased after friedelin ingestion. The present study has clearly demonstrated the anti-ulcer potential of friedelin, these findings suggested that friedelin could be a new useful natural gastroprotective tool against gastric ulcer. PMID:25617794

  6. Combination of Alcohol and Fructose Exacerbates Metabolic Imbalance in Terms of Hepatic Damage, Dyslipidemia, and Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, Frank Christian; Wilting, Jörg; Mihm, Sabine; Raddatz, Dirk; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Although both alcohol and fructose are particularly steatogenic, their long-term effect in the development of a metabolic syndrome has not been studied in vivo. Consumption of fructose generally leads to obesity, whereas ethanol can induce liver damage in the absence of overweight. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum for 28 days on five diets: chow (control), liquid Lieber-DeCarli (LDC) diet, LDC +30%J of ethanol (L-Et) or fructose (L-Fr), and LDC combined with 30%J ethanol and 30%J fructose (L-EF). Body weight (BW) and liver weight (LW) were measured. Blood and liver samples were harvested and subjected to biochemical tests, histopathological examinations, and RT-PCR. Alcohol-containing diets substantially reduced the food intake and BW (?3rd week), whereas fructose-fed animals had higher LW than controls (P<0.05). Additionally, leukocytes, plasma AST and leptin levels were the highest in the fructose-administered rats. Compared to the chow and LDC diets, the L-EF diet significantly elevated blood glucose, insulin, and total-cholesterol levels (also vs. the L-Et group). The albumin and Quick-test levels were the lowest, whereas ALT activity was the highest in the L-EF group. Moreover, the L-EF diet aggravated plasma triglyceride and reduced HDL-cholesterol levels more than 2.7-fold compared to the sum of the effects of the L-Et and L-Fr diets. The decreased hepatic insulin clearance in the L-EF group vs. control and LDC groups was reflected by a significantly decreased C-peptide:insulin ratio. All diets except the control caused hepatosteatosis, as evidenced by Nile red and H&E staining. Hepatic transcription of insulin receptor substrate-1/2 was mainly suppressed by the L-Fr and L-EF diets. The L-EF diet did not enhance the mitochondrial ?-oxidation of fatty acids (Cpt1? and Ppar-? expressions) compared to the L-Et or L-Fr diet. Together, our data provide evidence for the coaction of ethanol and fructose with a high-fat-diet on dyslipidemia and insulin resistance-accompanied liver damage. PMID:25101998

  7. Xanthohumol, a main prenylated chalcone from hops, reduces liver damage and modulates oxidative reaction and apoptosis in hepatitis C virus infected Tupaia belangeri.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingbo; Li, Na; Li, Fang; Zhu, Qianqian; Liu, Xi; Han, Qunying; Wang, Yawen; Chen, Yanping; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Pingping; Yang, Cuiling; Liu, Zhengwen

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Tupaia belangeri (Tupaia) represents an important model of HCV infection. Xanthohumol (XN), a major prenylated chalcone from hops, has various biological activities including hepatopreventive and anti-viral activities. In this study, Tupaias infected with HCV RNA positive serum were used to evaluate the effects of XN on liver damage, oxidative reaction, apoptosis and viral protein expression in liver tissues. The Tupaias inoculated with HCV positive serum had elevated serum aminotransferase levels and inflammation, especially hepatic steatosis, and HCV core protein expression in liver tissue. In the animals inoculated with HCV positive serum, XN significantly decreased aminotransferase levels, histological activity index, hepatic steatosis score and transforming growth factor ?1 expression in liver tissue compared with the animals without XN intervention. XN reduced HCV core protein expression in liver tissue compared with those without XN intervention but the difference was not significant. XN significantly decreased malondialdehyde, potentiated superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, reduced Bax expression, promoted Bcl-xL and inhibited caspase 3 activity in liver tissues compared with the animals without XN intervention. These results indicate that XN may effectively improve hepatic inflammation, steatosis and fibrosis induced by HCV in Tupaias primarily through inhibition of oxidative reaction and regulation of apoptosis and possible suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation. The anti-HCV potential of XN needs further investigation. PMID:23669332

  8. Fractalkine is a “find-me” signal released by neurons undergoing ethanol-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Jennifer D.; Chabanon-Hicks, Chloe N.; Han, Claudia Z.; Heffron, Daniel S.; Mandell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic neurons generated during normal brain development or secondary to pathologic insults are efficiently cleared from the central nervous system. Several soluble factors, including nucleotides, cytokines, and chemokines are released from injured neurons, signaling microglia to find and clear debris. One such chemokine that serves as a neuronal–microglial communication factor is fractalkine, with roles demonstrated in several models of adult neurological disorders. Lacking, however, are studies investigating roles for fractalkine in perinatal brain injury, an important clinical problem with no effective therapies. We used a well-characterized mouse model of ethanol-induced apoptosis to assess the role of fractalkine in neuronal–microglial signaling. Quantification of apoptotic debris in fractalkine-knockout (KO) and CX3CR1-KO mice following ethanol treatment revealed increased apoptotic bodies compared to wild type mice. Ethanol-induced injury led to release of soluble, extracellular fractalkine. The extracellular media harvested from apoptotic brains induces microglial migration in a fractalkine-dependent manner that is prevented by neutralization of fractalkine with a blocking antibody or by deficiency in the receptor, CX3CR1. This suggests fractalkine acts as a “find-me” signal, recruiting microglial processes toward apoptotic cells to promote their clearance. Next, we aimed to determine whether there are downstream alterations in cytokine gene expression due to fractalkine signaling. We examined mRNA expression in fractalkine-KO and CX3CR1-KO mice after alcohol-induced apoptosis and found differences in cytokine production in the brains of these KOs by 6 h after ethanol treatment. Collectively, this suggests that fractalkine acts as a “find me” signal released by apoptotic neurons, and subsequently plays a critical role in modulating both clearance and inflammatory cytokine gene expression after ethanol-induced apoptosis. PMID:25426022

  9. N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamine ameliorates ethanol-induced impairment of neural stem cell neurogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that prenatal exposure to ethanol interferes with embryonic and fetal development, and causes abnormal neurodevelopment. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid highly enriched in the brain, was shown to be essential for proper brain development and function. Recently, we found that N-docosahexenoyethanolamine (synaptamide), an endogenous metabolite of DHA, is a potent PKA-dependent neurogenic factor for neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that ethanol at pharmacologically relevant concentrations downregulates cAMP signaling in NSC and impairs neurogenic differentiation. In contrast, synaptamide reverses ethanol-impaired NSC neurogenic differentiation through counter-acting on the cAMP production system. NSC exposure to ethanol (25-50 mM) for 4 days dose-dependently decreased the number of Tuj-1 positive neurons and PKA/CREB phosphorylation with a concomitant reduction of cellular cAMP. Ethanol-induced cAMP reduction was accompanied by the inhibition of G-protein activation and expression of adenylyl cyclase (AC) 7 and AC8, as well as PDE4 upregulation. In contrast to ethanol, synaptamide increased cAMP production, GTP?S binding, and expression of AC7 and AC8 isoforms in a cAMP-dependent manner, offsetting the ethanol-induced impairment in neurogenic differentiation. These results indicate that synaptamide can reduce ethanol-induced impairment of neuronal differentiation by counter-affecting shared targets in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)/cAMP signaling. The synaptamide-mediated mechanism observed in this study may offer a possible avenue for ameliorating the adverse impact of fetal alcohol exposure on neurodevelopment. PMID:26586023

  10. Cytoprotective effects of NC-1300 and omeprazole on Hcl . ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Miyake, H; Awane, Y

    1986-09-01

    NC-1300 (10-100 mg/kg), given p.o. at 0.5, 6, 12 or 24 hr before HCl . ethanol, dose-dependently protected the rat gastric mucosa. This protection was observed even when the gastric contents had been removed before application of HCl . ethanol. NC-1300 (30 mg/kg), given i.p., was without effect on lesion formation in a dose which potently inhibited gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats. pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg/kg, s.c.) resulted in no reduction in the protection by NC-1300, excluding the possible participation of endogenous prostaglandins in the protective mechanism. N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment (10 mg/kg, s.c.) slightly reduced the protective activity of NC-1300, suggesting the partial participation of endogenous sulfhydryl compounds in the NC-1300 protection. NC-1300 sulfide and mercaptobenzimidazole (compounds obtained after mixing NC-1300 with acidic solution) also dose-dependently protected against HCl . ethanol-induced lesions when given p.o. at 0.5 hr before HCl . ethanol. The protection was significant but was considerably reduced in contrast to NC-1300 when the compounds were given 12 hr beforehand. NC-1300 sulfone had no effect on lesion formation. Omeprazole (10, 30 mg/kg), given p.o., also dose-dependently inhibited HCl . ethanol-induced lesions. However, the duration of protection was shorter than that seen with NC-1300, i.e., the effect disappeared 12 hr later. Thus, NC-1300 has a potent and long-lasting activity on HCl . ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. PMID:3795613

  11. Ameliorative efficacy of tetrahydrocurcumin against arsenic induced oxidative damage, dyslipidemia and hepatic mitochondrial toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, M; Miltonprabu, S

    2015-06-25

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known human carcinogen and a potent hepatotoxin. Environmental exposure to arsenic imposes a serious health hazard to humans and other animals worldwide. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), one of the major metabolites of curcumin, exhibits many of the same physiological and pharmacological activities as curcumin and in some systems may exert greater antioxidant activity than the curcumin. It has been reported that THC has antioxidant efficacy attributable to the presence of identical ?-diketone of 3rd and 5th substitution in heptane moiety. In the present study, rats were orally treated with arsenic alone (5 mg kg(-1) bw/day) with THC (80 mg kg(-1) bw/day) for 28 days. Hepatotoxicity was measured by the increased activities of serum hepatospecific enzymes, namely aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin along with increased elevation of lipid peroxidative markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. And also elevated levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids were observed in arsenic intoxicated rats. These effects of arsenic were coupled with enhanced mitochondrial swelling, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, Ca(2+)ATPase and a decrease in mitochondrial calcium content. The toxic effect of arsenic was also indicated by significantly decreased activities of enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase along with non-enzymatic antioxidant such as reduced glutathione. Administration of THC exhibited significant reversal of arsenic induced toxicity in hepatic tissue. All these changes were supported by the reduction of arsenic concentration and histopathological observations of the liver. These results suggest that THC has a protective effect over arsenic induced toxicity in rat. PMID:25869292

  12. Nelumbo nucifera leaves protect hydrogen peroxide-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant enzymes and HO-1/Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Lee, Da-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are widely found in plants. Here, the phenolic composition and hepatoprotective effect of the butanolic extract (BE) from Nelumbo nucifera leaves against H2O2-induced hepatic damage in cultured hepatocytes were investigated. BE showed high total phenol and flavonoid contents, and major phenolic compounds are quercetin, catechin, ferulic acid, rutin, and protocatechuic acid by HPLC analysis. BE effectively scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) cation radicals (IC50 values of 5.21 ?g mL(-1) for DPPH and 6.22 ?g mL(-1) for ABTS(+)) and showed strong reducing power. Pretreatment of BE prior to 650 ?M H2O2 exposure markedly increased cell viability and suppressed H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and AAPH-induced cell membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, BE up-regulated intracellular glutathione levels under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of BE was directly correlated with the increased expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) by 0.62-fold, catalase (CAT) by 0.42-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 2.4-fold. Pretreatment of BE also increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8.1-fold indicating that increased SOD-1, CAT, and HO-1 expressions are Nrf2-mediated. PMID:25962859

  13. Green tea extract (Camellia sinensis) fermented by Lactobacillus fermentum attenuates alcohol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2012-01-01

    Here, the impact of an extract derived from green tea (Camellia sinensis) and fermentation with Lactobacilli fermentum strain OCS19 was explored with acute alcohol-induced liver damage. The study employed the HepG2 hepatic cell line and an in vivo murine model of liver damage. L. fermentum-fermented green tea extract (FGTE) was found to possess pronounced alcohol metabolizing enzyme activity. It significantly enhanced the cell viability of HepG2 cells following of them exposure, to ethanol (p<0.05) as compared with an extract derived from Hovenia dulcis, a positive control that is known for its action as an alcohol antagonist. Our in vivo studies indicated that prior administration of FGTE to alcohol-exposed mice significantly prevented subsequent increases in blood alcohol concentration (p<0.05), in addition to the induction of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and triglycerides (p<0.05). Furthermore, the activity of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and its mRNA expression level both increased in the livers of mice treated with FGTE, similarly to the H. dulcis-treated group. Taken together, these results may suggest that green tea extract coupled with L. fermentum fermentation attenuates the risk of ethanol-induced liver damage. PMID:23221715

  14. Protective effect of Quercetin in the Regression of Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, A.; Indira, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the protective effects of quercetin on chronic ethanol-induced liver injury. Rats were treated with ethanol at a dose of 4 g/100 g/day for 90 days. After ethanol intoxication, levels of serum amino transferases were significantly elevated. Decreased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase was also observed on ethanol administration. Increased amounts of lipid peroxidation products viz. hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and malodialdehyde were observed on ethanol intoxication. Ethanol administration resulted in significant decrease in liver glutathione content. After 90 days, the control animals were divided into two groups, the control group and the control+quercetin group. Ethanol-treated group was divided into two groups, abstention group and quercetin-supplemented group. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and various biochemical parameters were analyzed. The changes in enzyme activities as well as levels of lipid peroxidation products were reversed to a certain extent by quercetin. Quercetin supplementation resulted in increase of glutathione content to a significant level compared to normal abstention group. Quercetin supplemented group showed a faster recovery than abstention group. This shows the protective effect of quercetin against chronic ethanol induced hepatotoxicity. Histopathological study is also in line with these results. PMID:20502571

  15. Conservation of the ethanol-induced locomotor stimulant response among arthropods.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation has been variously described as reflective of the disinhibitory, euphoric, or reinforcing effects of ethanol and is commonly used as an index of acute ethanol sensitivity in rodents. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster also shows a locomotor stimulant response to ethanol that is believed to occur via conserved, ethanol-sensitive neurobiological mechanisms, but it is currently unknown whether this response is conserved among arthropod species or is idiosyncratic to D. melanogaster. The current experiments surveyed locomotor responses to ethanol in a phylogenetically diverse panel of insects and other arthropod species. A clear ethanol-induced locomotor stimulant response was seen in 9 of 13 Drosophilidae species tested, in 8 of 10 other species of insects, and in an arachnid (wolf spider) and a myriapod (millipede) species. Given the diverse phylogenies of the species that showed the response, these experiments support the hypothesis that locomotor stimulation is a conserved behavioral response to ethanol among arthropod species. Further comparative studies are needed to determine whether the specific neurobiological mechanisms known to underlie the stimulant response in D. melanogaster are conserved among arthropod and vertebrate species. PMID:25721420

  16. Ethanol induces human red cell shape transformations and enhanced ligand-mediated agglutinability

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.S.; McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol concentrations are markedly elevated in rat stomach wall when ulcerogenic doses of 100 % ethanol (2 ml for 5 to 10 minutes) are instilled in rat gastric lumen. The authors observed that red cells in gastric mucosal postcapillary venules become spiculated and interadherent under these conditions. The authors have now studied this phenomenon in vitro using washing human red cells. Concentrations of high grade ethanol ranging from 2 to 10% (v/v) in physiological buffered saline (pH 7.3) without Ca/sup + +/ or Mg/sup + +/ at 25/sup 0/C rapidly transformed human red cells into spiculated forms. 2% ethanol transformed human red cells into disco-echinocytes in 15 min. whereas 10% ethanol transformed red blood cells into echinocytes within 3 min. Washing out of ethanol at 1 hour reverted the echinocytes into discocytes. However, following 3 hours of incubation in 10% ethanol washing out of ethanol produced stomatocytes. The ethanol-induced echinocytic shape transformations were accompanied by a dose-related increase in red cell agglutinability with poly-L-lysine or the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin. The enhanced agglutinability was reversed by restoring the red cell shape changes and alterations in surface properties may play a role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers.

  17. A Novel Antioxidant Multitarget Iron Chelator M30 Protects Hepatocytes against Ethanol-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yi; Lin, Bin; Tipoe, George L.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Xing, Feiyue; Liu, Yingxia

    2015-01-01

    The multitarget iron chelator, M30, is a novel antioxidant and protective agent against oxidative stress in a spectrum of diseases. However, there is no report regarding its role in liver diseases. Since oxidative stress is one of the major pathological events during the progression of alcoholic liver diseases, the protective effects and mechanisms of M30 on ethanol-induced hepatocyte injury were investigated in this study. Rat hepatocyte line BRL-3A was pretreated with M30 prior to ethanol treatment. Cell death, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were examined. Specific antagonists and agonists were applied to determine the involvements of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1?) and its upstream adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/HIF-1?/NOD-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway. We found that M30 significantly attenuated ethanol-induced cellular death, apoptosis, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secretion of inflammatory cytokines and inhibited activation of the AC/cAMP/PKA/HIF-1?/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway. Inhibition and activation of the AC/cAMP/PKA/HIF-1? pathway mimicked and abolished the effects of M30, respectively. In conclusion, inhibition of the AC/cAMP/PKA/HIF-1?/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway by M30 partially contributes to its attenuation of hepatocyte injury caused by ethanol exposure. PMID:25722794

  18. Hepatoprotective potential of Lavandula coronopifolia extracts against ethanol induced oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Farshori, Nida Nayyar; Al-Sheddi, Ebtsam S; Al-Oqail, Mai M; Hassan, Wafaa H B; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A

    2015-08-01

    The present investigations were carried out to study the protective potential of four extracts (namely petroleum ether extract (LCR), chloroform extract (LCM), ethyl acetate extract (LCE), and alcoholic extract (LCL)) of Lavandula coronopifolia on oxidative stress-mediated cell death induced by ethanol, a known hepatotoxin in human hapatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Cells were pretreated with LCR, LCM, LCE, and LCL extracts (10-50 ?g/ml) of L. coronopifolia for 24 h and then ethanol was added and incubated further for 24 h. After the exposure, cell viability using (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and neutral red uptake assays and morphological changes in HepG2 cells were studied. Pretreatment with various extracts of L. coronpifolia was found to be significantly effective in countering the cytotoxic responses of ethanol. Antioxidant properties of these L. coronopifolia extracts against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and glutathione (GSH) levels induced by ethanol were investigated. Results show that pretreatment with these extracts for 24 h significantly inhibited ROS generation and LPO induced and increased the GSH levels reduced by ethanol. The data from the study suggests that LCR, LCM, LCE, and LCL extracts of L. coronopifolia showed hepatoprotective activity against ethanol-induced damage in HepG2 cells. However, a comparative study revealed that the LCE extract was found to be the most effective and LCL the least effective. The hepatoprotective effects observed in the study could be associated with the antioxidant properties of these extracts of L. coronopifolia. PMID:23546397

  19. In Vivo Antioxidant and Antiulcer Activity of Parkia speciosa Ethanolic Leaf Extract against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al Batran, Rami; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Jamil Al-Obaidi, Mazen M.; Abdualkader, Abdualrahman Mohammed; Hadi, Hamid A.; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2013-01-01

    Background The current study was carried out to examine the gastroprotective effects of Parkia speciosa against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Sprague Dawley rats were separated into 7 groups. Groups 1–2 were orally challenged with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC); group 3 received 20 mg/kg omeprazole and groups 4–7 received 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of ethanolic leaf extract, respectively. After 1 h, CMC or absolute ethanol was given orally to groups 2–7. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. Then, the injuries to the gastric mucosa were estimated through assessment of the gastric wall mucus, the gross appearance of ulcer areas, histology, immunohistochemistry and enzymatic assays. Group 2 exhibited significant mucosal injuries, with reduced gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa, whereas reductions in mucosal injury were observed for groups 4–7. Groups 3–7 demonstrated a reversal in the decrease in Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining induced by ethanol. No symptoms of toxicity or death were observed during the acute toxicity tests. Conclusion Treatment with the extract led to the upregulation of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the downregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. Significant increases in the levels of the antioxidant defense enzymes glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the gastric mucosal homogenate were observed, whereas that of a lipid peroxidation marker (MDA) was significantly decreased. Significance was defined as p<0.05 compared to the ulcer control group (Group 2). PMID:23724090

  20. Gastroprotective activity of Annona muricata leaves against ethanol-induced gastric injury in rats via Hsp70/Bax involvement

    PubMed Central

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The popular fruit tree of Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), known as soursop and graviola, is a widely distributed plant in Central and South America and tropical countries. Leaves of A. muricata have been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, the gastroprotective effects of ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAM) were investigated against ethanol-induced gastric injury models in rats. The acute toxicity test of EEAM in rats, carried out in two doses of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg, showed the safety of this plant, even at the highest dose of 2 g/kg. The antiulcer study in rats (five groups, n=6) was performed with two doses of EEAM (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) and with omeprazole (20 mg/kg), as a standard antiulcer drug. Gross and histological features showed the antiulcerogenic characterizations of EEAM. There was significant suppression on the ulcer lesion index of rats pretreated with EEAM, which was comparable to the omeprazole effect in the omeprazole control group. Oral administration of EEAM to rats caused a significant increase in the level of nitric oxide and antioxidant activities, including catalase, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase associated with attenuation in gastric acidity, and compensatory effect on the loss of gastric wall mucus. In addition, pretreatment of rats with EEAM caused significant reduction in the level of malondialdehyde, as a marker for oxidative stress, associated with an increase in prostaglandin E2 activity. Immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated that EEAM induced the downregulation of Bax and upregulation of Hsp70 proteins after pretreatment. Collectively, the present results suggest that EEAM has a promising antiulcer potential, which could be attributed to its suppressive effect against oxidative damage and preservative effect toward gastric wall mucus. PMID:25378912

  1. Gastroprotective activity of Annona muricata leaves against ethanol-induced gastric injury in rats via Hsp70/Bax involvement.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The popular fruit tree of Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), known as soursop and graviola, is a widely distributed plant in Central and South America and tropical countries. Leaves of A. muricata have been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, the gastroprotective effects of ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAM) were investigated against ethanol-induced gastric injury models in rats. The acute toxicity test of EEAM in rats, carried out in two doses of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg, showed the safety of this plant, even at the highest dose of 2 g/kg. The antiulcer study in rats (five groups, n=6) was performed with two doses of EEAM (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) and with omeprazole (20 mg/kg), as a standard antiulcer drug. Gross and histological features showed the antiulcerogenic characterizations of EEAM. There was significant suppression on the ulcer lesion index of rats pretreated with EEAM, which was comparable to the omeprazole effect in the omeprazole control group. Oral administration of EEAM to rats caused a significant increase in the level of nitric oxide and antioxidant activities, including catalase, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase associated with attenuation in gastric acidity, and compensatory effect on the loss of gastric wall mucus. In addition, pretreatment of rats with EEAM caused significant reduction in the level of malondialdehyde, as a marker for oxidative stress, associated with an increase in prostaglandin E2 activity. Immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated that EEAM induced the downregulation of Bax and upregulation of Hsp70 proteins after pretreatment. Collectively, the present results suggest that EEAM has a promising antiulcer potential, which could be attributed to its suppressive effect against oxidative damage and preservative effect toward gastric wall mucus. PMID:25378912

  2. 14-Deoxyandrographolide alleviates ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Samir; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Bandhopadhyay, Sukdeb; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2014-03-01

    Andrographis paniculata (AP) is a traditional medicinal plant of Ayurveda. It grows widely in Asia and is prescribed in the treatment of liver diseases. Here we have investigated the beneficial role of 14-deoxyandrographolide (14-DAG), a bioactive diterpenoid from AP, against alcoholic steatosis in rats. 14-DAG was extracted from aerial parts (leaves and stems) of AP. Rats were fed with ethanol for 8 weeks. Animals were treated with 14-DAG during the last 4 weeks of ethanol treatment. In vitro studies were undertaken in a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line culture. Hepatosteatosis was assessed from histopathological studies of liver sections. Acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and triglyceride contents were determined using commercially available kits. Fatty acid synthesis was evaluated from incorporation of 1-(14)C acetate. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis were monitored with immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies. Ethanol exposure led to hepatotoxicity, as evident from the marked enhancement in the levels of AST and ALT. The values decreased almost to control levels in response to 14-DAG treatment. Results showed that ethanol feeding induced deactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that led to enhanced lipid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation, culminating in hepatic fat accumulation. Treatment with 14-DAG activated AMPK through induction of cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway. Activation of AMPK was followed by down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase, leading to suppression of lipogenesis. This was associated with up-regulation of sirtuin 1 and depletion of malonyl-CoA, in favor of increased fatty acid oxidation. 14-DAG controlled ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis by interfering with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our results indicated that 14-DAG was capable of preventing the development of fatty liver through AMPK-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism. This finding supported the hepatoprotective role of 14-DAG, which might serve as a therapeutic option to alleviate hepatosteatosis in chronic alcoholism. PMID:24507479

  3. SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY OF EMBRYONIC CELL POPULATIONS TO ETHANOL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ALCOHOL RELATED BIRTH DEFECTS AND NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The locations of cell death and resulting malformations in embryos following teratogen exposure vary depending on the teratogen used, the genotype of the conceptus, and the developmental stage of the embryo at time of exposure. To date, ethanol-induced cell death has been charac...

  4. LIMB DEFECTS INDUCED BY RETINOIC ACID SIGNALING ANTAGONISM AND SYNTHESIS INHIBITION ARE CONSISTENT WITH ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limb defects induced by retinoic acid signaling antagonism and synthesis inhibition are consistent with ethanol-induced limb defects

    Johnson CS1, Sulik KK1,2, Hunter, ES III3
    1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC....

  5. The role of endogenous dynorphin in ethanol-induced state-dependent CPP

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh; Tseng, Andy; Marquez, Paul; Hamid, Abdul; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the endogenous dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (DYN/KOP) system in ethanol-induced state-dependent conditioned place preference (CPP). To this end, mice lacking the pro-DYN gene and their wild-type littermates/controls were tested for baseline place preference on day 1, received 15-min morning and afternoon conditionings with saline or ethanol (2 g/kg) each day for three consecutive days and were then tested for CPP under a drug-free state on day 5 and following a saline or ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) challenge on day 8. Given that compensatory developmental changes may occur in knockout mice, the effect of nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI), a KOP antagonist, on state-dependent CPP induced by ethanol was also studied in wild-type mice. On day 1, mice were tested for baseline place preference and, 4 h later, treated with saline or nor-BNI (10 mg/kg). On days 2–4, mice received 15-min morning and afternoon conditionings and were tested for CPP under a drug-free state on day 5 and following an ethanol (1 g/kg) challenge on day 8. A comparable CPP was observed in mice lacking the pro-DYN gene and their wild-type littermates/controls as well as in wild-type mice treated with nor-BNI and their saline-treated controls. However, these mice compared to their respective controls exhibited a greater CPP response following an ethanol (1 g/kg) challenge, suggesting that the endogenous DYN/KOP system may negatively regulate ethanol-induced state-dependent CPP. PMID:22074899

  6. Ischemia reperfusion of the hepatic artery induces the functional damage of large bile ducts by changes in the expression of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Romina; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Carpino, Guido; Franchitto, Antonio; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Pannarale, Luigi; Venter, Julie; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Liver transplantation and cholangiocarcinoma induce biliary dysfunction following ischemia reperfusion (IR). The function of the intrahepatic biliary tree is regulated by both autocrine and paracrine factors. The aim of the study was to demonstrate that IR-induced damage of cholangiocytes is associated with altered expression of biliary angiogenic factors. Normal and bile duct ligation rats underwent 24-h sham or hepatic reperfusion after 30 min of transient occlusion of the hepatic artery (HAIR) or portal vein (PVIR) before collecting liver blocks and cholangiocyte RNA or protein. We evaluated liver histology, biliary apoptosis, proliferation and expression of VEGF-A/C, VEGFR-2/3, Ang-1/2, and Tie-1/2 in liver sections and isolated small and large cholangiocytes. Normal rat intrahepatic cholangiocyte cultures (NRICC) were maintained under standard conditions in normoxic or under a hypoxic atmosphere for 4 h and then transferred to normal conditions for selected times. Subsequently, we measured changes in biliary proliferation and apoptosis and the expression of VEGF-A/C and VEGFR-2/3. In vivo, HAIR (but not PVIR) induced damage of large bile ducts and decreased proliferation and secretin-stimulated cAMP levels. HAIR-induced damage of large bile ducts was associated with increased expression of VEGF-A/C, VEGFR-2/3, Ang-1/2, and Tie-1/2. In vitro, under hypoxic conditions, there was increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of NRICC concomitant with enhanced expression of VEGF-A/C and VEGFR-2/3. The functional damage of large bile ducts by HAIR and hypoxia is associated with increased expression of angiogenic factors in small cholangiocytes, presumably due to a compensatory mechanism in response to biliary damage. PMID:26451003

  7. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin 1? (IL-1?), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-?, and IL-1? in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus, these microspheres could be developed as a potential controlled release drug for treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:26640368

  8. Supplementation of coconut oil from different sources to the diet induces cellular damage and rapid changes in fatty acid composition of chick liver and hepatic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gil-Villarino, A; Torres, M I; Zafra, M F; García-Peregrín, E

    1997-07-01

    Supplementation of 20% coconut oil from two commercial sources pharmaceutical ("Pharmacy") and cooking ("Pastry") use, to the chick diet for 14 days produced a clear damage to the hepatic mitochondria, accompanied by an accumulation of glycogen and lipid droplets in the hepatocyte cytoplasm. These effects may be accounted for the high proportion of fat supplemented to the diets (20%). Pharmacy coconut oil induced a high percentage of cellular death when administered for 14 days. Fatty acid profiles in liver and hepatic mitochondria rapidly changed (24 hr) after both coconut oils supplementation to the diet. The accumulation of shorter chain fatty acids (12:0 and 14:0) was always higher after Pharmacy than after Pastry diet feeding. This fact may contribute, at least in part, to the cellular damage mentioned above especially after Pharmacy diet feeding. Mitochondrial ratios of saturated/unsaturated and saturated/polyunsaturated fatty acids rapidly changed in parallel to these ratios in both diets. Most of the mitochondrial parameters measured tend to recuperate the control values when diets were supplied for 5-14 days. Nevertheless, the maintenance of the mentioned ratios after 14-days Pharmacy diet feeding at significantly higher levels than those observed in control, seems to suggest the lack of the homeostatic mechanism in these membranes and could be also related with the high percentage of cellular death observed after this dietary manipulation. PMID:9297804

  9. Increased oxidative DNA damage and hepatocyte overexpression of specific cytochrome P450 isoforms in hepatitis of mice infected with Helicobacter hepaticus.

    PubMed Central

    Sipowicz, M. A.; Chomarat, P.; Diwan, B. A.; Anver, M. A.; Awasthi, Y. C.; Ward, J. M.; Rice, J. M.; Kasprzak, K. S.; Wild, C. P.; Anderson, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    A recently discovered bacterium, Helicobacter hepaticus, infects the intrahepatic bile canaliculi of mice, causing a severe chronic hepatitis culminating in liver cancer. Thus, it affords an animal model for study of bacteria-associated tumorigenesis including H. pylori-related gastric cancer. Reactive oxygen species are often postulated to contribute to this process. We now report that hepatitis of male mice infected with H. hepaticus show significant increases in the oxidatively damaged DNA deoxynucleoside 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, with the degree of damage increasing with progression of the disease. Perfusion of infected livers with nitro blue tetrazolium revealed that superoxide was produced in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, especially in association with plasmacytic infiltrates near portal triads. Contrary to expectations, Kupffer cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were rarely involved. However, levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms 1A2 and 2A5 in hepatocytes appeared to be greatly increased, as indicated by the number of cells positive in immunohistochemistry and the intensity of staining in many cells, concomitant with severe hepatitis. The CYP2A5 immunohistochemical staining co-localized with formazan deposits resulting from nitro blue tetrazolium reduction and occurred in nuclei as well as cytoplasm. These findings suggest that CYP2A5 contributes to the superoxide production and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine formation, although reactive oxygen species from an unknown source in the hepatocytes leading to CYP2A5 induction or coincidental occurrence of these events are also possibilities. Three glutathione S-transferase isoforms, mGSTP1-1 (pi), mGSTA1-1 (YaYa), and mGSTA4-4, also showed striking increases evidencing major oxidative stress in these livers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9327726

  10. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS) architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs) produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP) assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1) was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5) showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left parietal supramarginal gyrus and neuropsychological measures. Conclusions These results demonstrate that alcohol-induced changes in genes related to proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair are observable in the peripheral blood and may serve as a useful biomarker for CNS structural damage and functional performance deficits in human AUD subjects. PMID:23095216

  11. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get viral hepatitis vaccines? How long do the hepatitis A and B vaccines protect you? Is it safe ... of viral hepatitis in the United States are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. This fact sheet ...

  12. Involvement of hepatic stellate cell cytoglobin in acute hepatocyte damage through the regulation of CYP2E1-mediated xenobiotic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Yuga; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Krausz, Kristopher W; Le, Thi T T; Gonzalez, Frank J; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-05-01

    Oxygen (O2) is required for cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent drug metabolism. Cytoglobin (CYGB) is a unique globin expressed exclusively in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). However, its role in O2-dependent metabolism in neighboring hepatocytes remains unknown. This study provides evidence that CYGB in HSCs is involved in acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in wild-type mice than in Cygb-null mice. Wild-type mice exhibited more severe hepatocyte necrosis around the central vein area compared with Cygb-null mice, thus indicating that CYGB deficiency protects against APAP-induced liver damage. Although no difference in the hepatic expression of CYP2E1, a key enzyme involved in APAP toxicity, was observed between wild-type and Cygb-null mice, the serum levels of the APAP metabolites cysteinyl-APAP and N-acetyl-cysteinyl-APAP were decreased in Cygb-null mice, suggesting reduced APAP metabolism in the livers of Cygb-null mice. In primary cultures, APAP-induced hepatocyte damage was increased by co-culturing with wild-type HSCs but not with Cygb-null HSCs. In addition, cell damage was markedly alleviated under low O2 condition (5% O2), suggesting the requirement of O2 for APAP toxicity. Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury (CYP2E1-dependent), but not lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine-induced injury (CYP2E1-independent), was similarly alleviated in Cygb-null mice. Considering the function of CYGB as O2 carrier, these results strongly support the hypothesis that HSCs are involved in the CYP2E1-mediated xenobiotic activation by augmenting O2 supply to hepatocytes. In conclusion, CYGB in HSCs contributes to the CYP-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics in hepatocytes by supplying O2 for enzymatic oxidation. PMID:25686096

  13. Phage shock protein G, a novel ethanol-induced stress protein in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shoae Hassani, Alireza; Malekzadeh, Feridon; Amirmozafari, Nour; Hamdi, Kasra; Ordouzadeh, Negar; Ghaemi, Amir

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to ethanol is a stress condition that Salmonella typhimurium often encounters during its life cycle. Food, beverage, drugs, and cosmetics have a long history of using alcohols to control pathogens. Ethanol is also commonly used for disinfecting medical instruments. This study was conducted to evaluate the ethanol stress variations on the protein profile, cell structure, and serologic features of S. typhimurium. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the phage shock protein G (pspG), a new ethanol-induced stress protein in cells adapted to 10% ethanol. The result was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The maximum quantity of this 9.02-kDa protein was produced in 12.5% (v/v) of ethanol-treated cultures. Scanning electron microscopy has demonstrated new phenotypic characteristics in bacterial structure. The cells were unable to undergo binary fission. This phenomenon explains the tight attachment of bacteria in a colony. Overall, ethanol extreme stress induced expression of new proteins like PspG and repression of some other proteins in S. typhimurium. These induction and repression processes have inflicted dramatic changes on Salmonella behaviors. PMID:19018590

  14. Relation between ethanol induced changes in plasma catecholines during stress and voluntary ethanol preference

    SciTech Connect

    Pashko, S.

    1986-03-01

    N/NIH rats (N = 10) were implanted with venous catheters to permit stressless chronic, repeated blood withdrawal. Following surgical recovery, the rats were restrained to a lab counter top for 30 min after injection with saline or low dose (0.5 g/kg) ethanol. Blood was repeatedly withdrawn to determine AUC production of NE and E to assess the effect that low dose ethanol has on stress responsiveness. Between saline injection restraint and ethanol injection restraint conditions no differences in NE or E AUC were apparent. A 2- bottle preference test for ethanol was then performed over 21 days. Multiple regression analyses of NE saline restraint and ethanol restraint could predict ethanol consumption to the p = .02 level with R/sup 2/ = .681. Multiple regressions of E saline restraint and E ethanol restraint could predict ethanol consumption to the p = .01 level with R/sup 2/ = .746. These data suggest that ethanol induced increases in plasma NE and E during stress can predict later voluntary ethanol consumption between the ranges of .13 and 1.05 g ethanol/kg/day. This data seems to be more in line with an arousal or withdrawal relationship between ethanol consumption and stress than by a simple tension reduction formulation based on plasma NE or E.

  15. The Ethanol-Induced Stimulation of Rat Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Secretion In Vivo Is Critically Dependent on Luminal Cl–

    PubMed Central

    Sommansson, Anna; Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol may induce metabolic and functional changes in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, contributing to impaired mucosal barrier function. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) is a primary epithelial defense against gastric acid and also has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the juxtamucosal microenvironment. The aim in this study was to investigate the effects of the luminal perfusion of moderate concentrations of ethanol in vivo on epithelial DBS, fluid secretion and paracellular permeability. Under thiobarbiturate anesthesia, a ?30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum with an intact blood supply was perfused in situ in rats. The effects on DBS, duodenal transepithelial net fluid flux and the blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-EDTA were investigated. Perfusing the duodenum with isotonic solutions of 10% or 15% ethanol-by-volume for 30 min increased DBS in a concentration-dependent manner, while the net fluid flux did not change. Pre-treatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 (i.p. or i.v.) did not change the secretory response to ethanol, while removing Cl? from the luminal perfusate abolished the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. The administration of hexamethonium (i.v.) but not capsazepine significantly reduced the basal net fluid flux and the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. Perfusing the duodenum with a combination of 1.0 mM HCl and 15% ethanol induced significantly greater increases in DBS than 15% ethanol or 1.0 mM HCl alone but did not influence fluid flux. Our data demonstrate that ethanol induces increases in DBS through a mechanism that is critically dependent on luminal Cl? and partly dependent on enteric neural pathways involving nicotinic receptors. Ethanol and HCl appears to stimulate DBS via the activation of different bicarbonate transporting mechanisms. PMID:25033198

  16. Quetiapine mitigates the ethanol-induced oxidative stress in brain tissue, but not in the liver, of the rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hong; Tian, Hong-Zhao; Lian, Yang-Yang; Yu, Yi; Lu, Cheng-Biao; Li, Xin-Min; Zhang, Rui-Ling; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, has been employed to treat alcoholic patients with comorbid psychopathology. It was shown to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and to protect cultured cells from noxious effects of oxidative stress, a pathophysiological mechanism involved in the toxicity of alcohol. This study compared the redox status of the liver and the brain regions of prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated with or without ethanol and quetiapine. Ethanol administration for 1 week induced oxidative stress in the liver and decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) there. Coadministration of quetiapine did not protect glutathione peroxidase and TAC in the liver against the noxious effect of ethanol, thus was unable to mitigate the ethanol-induced oxidative stress there. The ethanol-induced alteration in the redox status in the prefrontal cortex is mild, whereas the hippocampus and cerebellum are more susceptible to ethanol intoxication. For all the examined brain regions, coadministration of quetiapine exerted effective protection on the antioxidants catalase and total superoxide dismutase and on the TAC, thus completely blocking the ethanol-induced oxidative stress in these brain regions. These protective effects may explain the clinical observations that quetiapine reduced psychiatric symptoms intensity and maintained a good level of tolerability in chronic alcoholism with comorbid psychopathology. PMID:26109862

  17. Antioxidant and antiulcer potential of aqueous leaf extract of Kigelia africana against ethanol-induced ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Matheus M; Olaleye, Mary T; Ineu, Rafael P; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Barbosa, Nilda BV; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Ethnobotanical claims regarding Kigelia africana reported antiulcer properties as part of its medicinal application. In this work, aqueous leaf extract from K. africana was investigated for its phytochemical constituents and antiulcer potential against ethanol-induced ulcer in rats. The participation of oxidative stress on ethanol-induced ulcer and the potential protective antioxidant activity of K. africana extracts were investigated by determining vitamin C and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) contents in the gastric mucosa of rats. The HPLC analysis showed the presence of gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and also the flavonoids rutin, quercetin and kaempferol in the aqueous plant extract. Oral treatment with K. africana extract (1.75; 3.5; 7 and 14 mg/kg) one hour after ulcer induction with ethanol decreased in a dose dependent manner the ulcer index. Ethanol increased significantly stomachal TBARS levels and decreased vitamin C content when compared to the control animals. K. africana blunted the ethanol-induced oxidative stress and restored vitamin C content to the control levels. The present results indicate that the aqueous leaf extract from K. africana possesses antiulcer potential. The presence of flavonoids in plant extract suggests that its antiulcerogenic potential is associated with antioxidant activity. Of particular therapeutic potential, K. africana was effective against ethanol even after the induction of ulcer, indicating that it can have protective and curative effects against gastric lesion. PMID:26417263

  18. Quetiapine mitigates the ethanol-induced oxidative stress in brain tissue, but not in the liver, of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-hong; Tian, Hong-zhao; Lian, Yang-yang; Yu, Yi; Lu, Cheng-biao; Li, Xin-min; Zhang, Rui-ling; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, has been employed to treat alcoholic patients with comorbid psychopathology. It was shown to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and to protect cultured cells from noxious effects of oxidative stress, a pathophysiological mechanism involved in the toxicity of alcohol. This study compared the redox status of the liver and the brain regions of prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated with or without ethanol and quetiapine. Ethanol administration for 1 week induced oxidative stress in the liver and decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) there. Coadministration of quetiapine did not protect glutathione peroxidase and TAC in the liver against the noxious effect of ethanol, thus was unable to mitigate the ethanol-induced oxidative stress there. The ethanol-induced alteration in the redox status in the prefrontal cortex is mild, whereas the hippocampus and cerebellum are more susceptible to ethanol intoxication. For all the examined brain regions, coadministration of quetiapine exerted effective protection on the antioxidants catalase and total superoxide dismutase and on the TAC, thus completely blocking the ethanol-induced oxidative stress in these brain regions. These protective effects may explain the clinical observations that quetiapine reduced psychiatric symptoms intensity and maintained a good level of tolerability in chronic alcoholism with comorbid psychopathology. PMID:26109862

  19. ROLE OF BILE ACIDS AND FARNESOID X RECEPTOR IN HEPATIC AUTOPHAGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN ETHANOL-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY

    E-print Network

    Manley, Sharon

    2014-12-31

    : deoxycholic acid; DQ-BSA: DQ- bovine serum albumin; E1: ubiquitin-activating enzyme; E2: ubiquitin carrier; E3: ubiquitin ligase; 4EBP1: translational initiation factor 4E binding protein-1; EBSS: Earle's Balanced Salt Solution; 6ECDCA: 6?... enzymes including several cytochrome P450s (CYPs). In the classic pathway, cholesterol is first converted into 7-?-hydroxycholesterol by CYP7A1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). 7-?-hydroxycholesterol is then primarily converted to cholic acid (CA...

  20. Oxidative stress mediated toxicity exerted by ethanol-inducible CYP2E1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Defeng; Cederbaum, Arthur I. . E-mail: arthur.cederbaum@mssm.edu

    2005-09-01

    Induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol is one of the central pathways by which ethanol generates a state of oxidative stress in hepatocytes. To study the biochemical and toxicological actions of CYP2E1, our laboratory established HepG2 cell lines which constitutively overexpress CYP2E1 and characterized these cells with respect to ethanol toxicity. Addition of ethanol or an unsaturated fatty acid such as arachidonic acid or iron was toxic to the CYP2E1-expressing cells but not control cells. This toxicity was associated with elevated lipid peroxidation and could be prevented by antioxidants and inhibitors of CYP2E1. Apoptosis occurred in the CYP2E1-expressing cells exposed to ethanol, arachidonic acid, or iron. Removal of GSH caused a loss of viability in the CYP2E1-expressing cells even in the absence of added toxin or pro-oxidant. This was associated with mitochondrial damage and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Low concentrations of iron and arachidonic acid synergistically interacted with CYP2E1 to produce cell toxicity, suggesting these nutrients may act as priming or sensitizing agents to alcohol-induced liver injury. Surprisingly, CYP2E1-expressing cells had elevated GSH levels, due to transcriptional activation of glutamate cysteine ligase. Similarly, levels of catalase, alpha-, and microsomal glutathione transferase were also increased, suggesting that upregulation of these antioxidant genes may reflect an adaptive mechanism to remove CYP2E1-derived oxidants. Using co-cultures, interaction between CYP2E1-derived diffusible mediators to activate collagen production in hepatic stellate cells was found. While it is likely that several mechanisms contribute to alcohol-induced liver injury, the linkage between CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress, mitochondrial injury, stellate cell activation, and GSH homeostasis may contribute to the toxic action of ethanol on the liver. HepG2 cell lines overexpressing CYP2E1 may be a valuable model to characterize the biochemical and toxicological properties of CYP2E1.

  1. Autoradiographic and histopathological studies of boric acid-mediated BNCT in hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits: Specific boron retention and damage in tumor and tumor vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Lin, Y T; Hung, Y H; Liao, J W; Peir, J J; Liu, H M; Lin, Y L; Liu, Y M; Chen, Y W; Chuang, K S; Chou, F I

    2015-12-01

    Hepatoma is a malignant tumor that responds poorly to conventional therapies. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) may provide a better way for hepatoma therapy. In this research, (10)B-enriched boric acid (BA, 99% (10)B) was used as the boron drug. A multifocal hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model was used to study the mechanisms of BA-mediated BNCT. Autoradiography demonstrated that BA was selectively targeted to tumors and tumor vessels. Histopathological examination revealed the radiation damage to tumor-bearing liver was concentrated in the tumor regions during BNCT treatment. The selective killing of tumor cells and the destruction of the blood vessels in tumor masses may be responsible for the success of BA-mediated BNCT for liver tumors. PMID:26372198

  2. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  3. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  4. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  5. Role of Oxidative Stress in Ethanol-induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Azam; Goudarzi, Iran; Lashkarboluki, Taghi; Ghorbanian, Mohammad Taghi; Abrari, Kataneh; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoudi

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s):The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress in Purkinje cell neurotoxicity of ethanol-treated rat. Materials and Methods:Male rat pups 4-day-old was used in this study. Ethanol was administered to rat pups at a dose of 6 g/kg from postnatal days (PDs) 4 to 5. Pups were killed 90 min after the second alcohol treatment on PD 5 by decapitation and the brain was immediately removed. The cerebellum was dissected for analyzing the oxidative stress parameters and histological study. The activities of several antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vermis of cerebellum were assayed. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels were also measured as a marker of lipid peroxidation. Results:Administration of ethanol significantly increased TBARS levels in the cerebellum compared to control pups (P< 0.01). The treated pups with ethanol exhibited a marked decrease in the GPx activity (P< 0.01) whereas, in spite of decrease in the activities of SOD and CAT, when compared to control, there were not significant differences. The spherical cell bodies of Purkinje cells in control rats are aligned nicely between the granular and molecular layers. In ethanol treated pups, Purkinje cells scattered within the Purkinje cell layer and shrinkage of the cell somata is seen. Conclusion:The results of the present work demonstrated that ethanol exposure during the vulnerable window could increase TBARS levels (lipid peroxidation) and decrease GPx levels in pup's cerebellum. Also, the results confirmed ethanol-induced microencephaly, cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. These findings suggest that Purkinje cell loss is, in part through decrease in the activity of GPx and increase of lipid peroxidation in the rat cerebellum. PMID:23493093

  6. Chemokines mediate ethanol-induced exacerbations of murine cockroach allergen asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, J C; Beal, D R; Kim, J; Vaickus, L J; Remick, D G

    2013-01-01

    Asthma imposes considerable patient and economic burdens, with the most severe cases causing the greatest affliction. Identifying stimuli that worsen asthma severity is an essential step to controlling both disease morbidity and the lessening economic impact. This study provides the first mechanistic investigation into how acute ethanol exposure will increase asthma severity in a murine model of mild cockroach allergen (CRA)-induced asthma. Outbred mice were sensitized to induce mild allergic asthma, with intratracheal CRA exposures on days 0 and 14. On day 21 mice were gavaged with water or 32% ethanol, and the third allergen exposure was given 30 min post-gavage. Asthmatic responses were measured at several time-points up to 42 h after the third allergen challenge. Ethanol-gavaged mice showed increased asthma severity within 90 min post-allergen challenge, with exacerbations lasting for 24 h. Ethanol caused greater airways obstruction, including an eightfold increase in epithelial cell mucin and increased mucus plugs, resulting in a 50% reduction in bronchiole patency. Ethanol gavage also induced significant increases in airways hyperreactivity. While T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines were not altered by ethanol gavage, pulmonary neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment were augmented. This increase was associated with increased chemokine production. Administration 2 h prior to ethanol gavage of a neutralizing antibody cocktail to keratinocyte-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 prevented ethanol-induced eosinophil recruitment and airways hyperreactivity. These data provide evidence that acute alcohol exposure immediately prior to a mild allergen-triggered asthmatic episode will exacerbate asthma severity mediated by increased production of chemokines. PMID:23574317

  7. Shuidouchi (Fermented Soybean) Fermented in Different Vessels Attenuates HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury.

    PubMed

    Suo, Huayi; Feng, Xia; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Cun; Zhao, Xin; Kan, Jianquan

    2015-01-01

    Shuidouchi (Natto) is a fermented soy product showing in vivo gastric injury preventive effects. The treatment effects of Shuidouchi fermented in different vessels on HCl/ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury mice through their antioxidant effect was determined. Shuidouchi contained isoflavones (daidzein and genistein), and GVFS (glass vessel fermented Shuidouchi) had the highest isoflavone levels among Shuidouchi samples fermented in different vessels. After treatment with GVFS, the gastric mucosal injury was reduced as compared to the control mice. The gastric secretion volume (0.47 mL) and pH of gastric juice (3.1) of GVFS treated gastric mucosal injury mice were close to those of ranitidine-treated mice and normal mice. Shuidouchi could decrease serum motilin (MTL), gastrin (Gas) level and increase somatostatin (SS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) level, and GVFS showed the strongest effects. GVFS showed lower IL-6, IL-12, TNF-? and IFN-? cytokine levels than other vessel fermented Shuidouchi samples, and these levels were higher than those of ranitidine-treated mice and normal mice. GVFS also had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in gastric tissues than other Shuidouchi samples. Shuidouchi could raise I?B-?, EGF, EGFR, nNOS, eNOS, Mn-SOD, Gu/Zn-SOD, CAT mRNA expressions and reduce NF-?B, COX-2, iNOS expressions as compared to the control mice. GVFS showed the best treatment effects for gastric mucosal injuries, suggesting that glass vessels could be used for Shuidouchi fermentation in functional food manufacturing. PMID:26540032

  8. Role of defective methylation reactions in ethanol-induced dysregulation of intestinal barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Thomes, Paul G; Osna, Natalia A; Bligh, Sarah M; Tuma, Dean J; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2015-07-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major healthcare challenge worldwide. Emerging evidence reveals that ethanol administration disrupts the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) complex; this defect allows for the paracellular translocation of gut-derived pathogenic molecules to reach the liver to cause inflammation and progressive liver injury. We have previously demonstrated a causative role of impairments in liver transmethylation reactions in the pathogenesis of ALD. We have further shown that treatment with betaine, a methylation agent that normalizes liver methylation potential, can attenuate ethanol-induced liver injury. Herein, we explored whether alterations in methylation reactions play a causative role in disrupting intestinal mucosal barrier function by employing an intestinal epithelial cell line. Monolayers of Caco-2 cells were exposed to ethanol or a-pan methylation reaction inhibitor, tubercidin, in the presence and absence of betaine. The structural and functional integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier was then examined. We observed that exposure to either ethanol or tubercidin disrupted TJ integrity and function by decreasing the localization of TJ protein occludin-1 to the intracellular junctions, reducing transepithelial electrical resistance and increasing dextran influx. All these detrimental effects of ethanol and tubercidin were attenuated by co-treatment with betaine. We further show that the mechanism of betaine protection was through BHMT-mediated catalysis. Collectively, our data suggest a novel mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness and identifies the importance of normal methylation reactions in maintaining TJ integrity. We also propose betaine as a potential therapeutic option for leaky gut in alcohol-consuming patients who are at the risk of developing ALD. PMID:25931143

  9. Ganoderma Lucidum Pharmacopuncture for Teating Ethanol-induced Chronic Gastric Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Heung; Jang, Kyung-Jun; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Hyun-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The stomach is a sensitive digestive organ that is susceptible to exogenous pathogens from the diet. In response to such pathogens, the stomach induces oxidative stress, which might be related to the development of both gastric organic disorders such as gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer, and functional disorders such as functional dyspepsia. This study was accomplished to investigate the effect of Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) on chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Methods: The rats were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: the normal, the control, the normal saline (NP) and the GLP groups. In this study, the modified ethanol gastritis model was used. The rats were administrated 56% ethanol orally every other day. The dose of ethanol was 8 g/kg body weight. The normal group received the same amount of normal saline instead of ethanol. The NP and the GLP groups were treated with injection of saline and GLP respectively. The control group received no treatment. Two local acupoints CV12 (??) and ST36 (???) were used. All laboratory rats underwent treatment for 15 days. On last day, the rats were sacrificed and their stomachs were immediately excised. Results: Ulcers of the gastric mucosa appeared as elongated bands of hemorrhagic lesions parallel to the long axis of the stomach. In the NP and GLP groups, the injuries to the gastric mucosal injuries were not as severe as they were in the control group. Wound healings of the chronic gastric ulcers was promoted by using GLP and significant alterations of the indices in the gastric mucosa were observed. Such protection was demonstrated by gross appearance, histology and immunehistochemistry staining for Bcl-2-associated X (BAX), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-?1). Conclusion: These results suggest that GLP at CV12 and ST36 can provide significant protection to the gastric mucosa against an ethanol induced chronic gastric ulcer. PMID:25830061

  10. Atorvastatin induced hepatic oxidative stress and apoptotic damage via MAPKs, mitochondria, calpain and caspase12 dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sankhadeep; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Shatadal; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Sil, Parames C

    2015-09-01

    Atorvastatin (ATO), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, is used widely for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Application of this drug has now been made somehow limited because of ATO associated several acute and chronic side effects. The present study has been carried out to investigate the dose-dependent hepatic tissue toxicity in ATO induced oxidative impairment and cell death in mice. Administration of ATO enhanced ALT, ALP level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and altered the pro oxidant-antioxidant status of liver by reducing intracellular GSH level, anti-oxidant enzymes activities and increasing intracellular lipid peroxidation. Our experimental evidence suggests that ATO markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, disturbed the Bcl-2 family protein balance, enhanced cytochrome c release in the cytosol, increased the levels of Apaf1, caspase-9, -3, cleaved PARP protein and ultimately led to apoptotic cell death. Besides, ATO distinctly increased the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs, enhanced Caspase12 and calpain level. Histological studies also support the dose-dependent toxic effect of ATO in these organs pathophysiology. These results reveal that ATO induces hepatic tissue toxicity via MAPKs, mitochondria and ER dependent signaling pathway, in which calcium ions and ROS act as the pivotal mediators of the apoptotic signaling. PMID:26051349

  11. Antioxidative Role of Hatikana (Leea macrophylla Roxb.) Partially Improves the Hepatic Damage Induced by CCl4 in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Samina; Rahman, Md. Atiar; Aklima, Jannatul; Hasan, Md. Rakibul; Hasan Chowdhury, J. M. Kamirul

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the protective role of Leea macrophylla extract on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in rats. Different fractions of Leea macrophylla (Roxb.) crude extract were subjected to analysis for antioxidative effects. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as normal control, hepatic control, and reference control (silymarin) group and treatment group. Evaluations were made for the effects of the fractions on serum enzymes and biochemical parameters of CCl4-induced albino rat. Histopathological screening was also performed to evaluate the changes of liver tissue before and after treatment. Different fractions of Leea macrophylla showed very potent 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging effect, FeCl3 reducing effect, superoxide scavenging effect, and iron chelating effect. Carbon tetrachloride induction increased the level of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and other biochemical parameters such as lipid profiles, total protein, and CK-MB. In contrast, treatment of Leea macrophylla reduced the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as biochemical parameters activities. L. macrophylla partially restored the lipid profiles, total protein, and CK-MB. Histopathology showed the treated liver towards restoration. Results evidenced that L. macrophylla can be prospective source of hepatic management in liver injury. PMID:26221590

  12. Correlations of Gut Microbial Community Shift with Hepatic Damage and Growth Inhibition of Carassius auratus Induced by Pentachlorophenol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Kan, Haifeng; Zhao, Fuzheng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ren, Hongqiang; Gao, Shixiang

    2015-10-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) were exposed to 0-100 ?g/L pentachlorophenol (PCP) for 28 days to investigate the correlations of fish gut microbial community shift with the induced toxicological effects. PCP exposure caused accumulation of PCP in the fish intestinal tract in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while hepatic PCP reached the maximal level after a 21 day exposure. Under the relatively higher PCP stress, the fish body weight and liver weight were reduced and hepatic CAT and SOD activities were inhibited, demonstrating negative correlations with the PCP levels in liver and gut content (R < -0.5 and P < 0.05 each). Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that PCP exposure increased the abundance of Bacteroidetes in the fish gut. Within the Bacteroidetes phylum, the Bacteroides genus had the highest abundance, which was significantly correlated with PCP exposure dosage and duration (R > 0.5 and P < 0.05 each). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Bacteroides showed quantitatively negative correlations with Chryseobacterium, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, and Legionella in the fish gut, and the Bacteroidetes abundance, Bacteroides abundance, and Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio played crucial roles in the reduction of body weight and liver weight under PCP stress. The results may extend our knowledge regarding the roles of gut microbiota in ecotoxicology. PMID:26378342

  13. MiR-125b protects against ethanol-induced apoptosis in neural crest cells and mouse embryos by targeting Bak 1 and PUMA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopan; Liu, Jie; Feng, Wen-ke; Wu, Xiaoyang; Chen, Shao-yu

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs that have been implicated in regulation of a broad range of cellular and physiologic processes, including apoptosis. The objective of this study is to elucidate the roles of miR-125b in modulating ethanol-induced apoptosis in neural crest cells (NCCs) and mouse embryos. We found that treatment with ethanol resulted in a significant decrease in miR-125b expression in NCCs and in mouse embryos. We also validated that Bcl-2 antagonist killer 1 (Bak1) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) are the direct targets of miR-125b in NCCs. In addition, over-expression of miR-125b significantly reduced ethanol-induced increase in Bak1 and PUMA protein expression, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis in NCCs, indicating that miR-125b can modulate ethanol-induced apoptosis by the regulation of Bcl-2 and p53 pathways. Furthermore, microinjection of miR-125b mimic resulted in a significant increase in miR-125b expression and a decrease in the protein expression of Bak1 and PUMA in ethanol-exposed mouse embryos. Up-regulation of miR-125b also significantly reduced ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation and diminished ethanol-induced growth retardation in mouse embryos. This is the first demonstration that miR-125b can prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis and that microinjection of miRNA mimic can prevent ethanol-induced embryotoxicity. PMID:26024858

  14. Protective effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid ameliorates ethanol-induced oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shaktipal; Tawari, Santosh; Mundhada, Dharmendra; Nadeem, Sayyed

    2015-09-01

    Memory impairment induced by ethanol in rats is a consequence of changes in the CNS that are secondary to impaired oxidative stress and cholinergic dysfunction. Treatment with antioxidants and cholinergic agonists are reported to produce beneficial effects in this model. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid is reported to exhibit antioxidant effect and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor activity. However, no report is available on the influence of berberine on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Therefore, we tested its influence against cognitive dysfunction in ethanol-induced rats using Morris water maze paradigm. Lipid peroxidation and glutathione levels as parameter of oxidative stress and cholinesterase (ChE) activity as a marker of cholinergic function were assessed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Forty five days after ethanol treated rats showed a severe deficit in learning and memory associated with increased lipid peroxidation, decreased glutathione, and elevated ChE activity. In contrast, chronic treatment with berberine (25-100mg/kg, p.o., once a day for 45days) improved cognitive performance, and lowered oxidative stress and ChE activity in ethanol treated rats. In another set of experiments, berberine (100mg/kg) treatment during training trials also improved learning and memory, and lowered oxidative stress and ChE activity. Chronic treatment (45days) with vitamin C, and donepezil during training trials also improved ethanol-induced memory impairment and reduced oxidative stress and/or cholinesterase activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that treatment with berberine prevents the changes in oxidative stress and ChE activity, and consequently memory impairment in ethanol treated rats. PMID:26159088

  15. Effect of juice and fermented vinegar from Hovenia dulcis peduncles on chronically alcohol-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinle; Zhu, Wenxue; Li, Zhixi; Ling, Shengbao

    2012-06-01

    The protective effects of juice and fermented vinegar from Hovenia dulcis peduncles on chronically ethanol-induced biochemical changes in male mice were investigated. Administration of ethanol (50%, v/v, 10 mL kg?¹) to mice for 6 weeks induced liver damage with a significant increase (P < 0.01) of the liver index, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transferase (?-GT) in the serum and the hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. In contrast, administration of juice or fermented vinegar from Hovenia dulcis peduncles (10 mL kg?¹ bw) along with alcohol significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the activities of the enzymes (AST, ALT and ?-GT), liver index, concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TCH) in the serum and the hepatic TG and LPO levels. Mice treated with juice or fermented vinegar from Hovenia dulcis peduncles showed better profiles of the antioxidant systems with relatively higher glutathione (GSH) content, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. All these results were accompanied by histological observations in liver. The results demonstrate that both of the juice and fermented vinegar from Hovenia dulcis peduncles have beneficial effects in reducing the adverse effect of alcohol. PMID:22648047

  16. Protective effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Wen; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Zi-Yi; Chen, Guo-Wei; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Studies have suggested the role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in protecting intestinal barrier function from injuries induced by multiple reagents. Vitamin D deficiency was reported to be associated with poor prognosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This study is designed to investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms utilizing Caco-2 cell monolayers and a mouse model with acute ethanol injury. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol significantly increased monolayer permeability, disrupted TJ distribution, increased phosphorylation level of MLC, and induced generation of ROS compared with controls. However, pre-treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 greatly ameliorated the ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption, phosphorylation level of MLC, and generation of ROS compared with ethanol-exposed monolayers. Mice fed with vitamin d-sufficient diet had a higher plasma level of 25(OH)D3 and were more resistant to ethanol-induced acute intestinal barrier injury compared with the vitamin d-deficient group. These results suggest that the suppression of generation of ROS and increased phosphorylation level of MLC might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury and provide evidence for the application of vitamin D as therapeutic factors against ethanol-induced gut leakiness. PMID:26068064

  17. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... few months and usually recover completely without lasting liver damage. Although rare, Hepatitis A can cause liver failure ... with chronic hepatitis develop serious liver conditions, including liver damage, cirrhosis, liver failure, and even liver cancer. What ...

  18. Assessing the Effect of Leptin on Liver Damage in Case of Hepatic Injury Associated with Paracetamol Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Murat; Cerrah, Serkan; Albayrak, Bulent; Ipek, Serkan; Yilmaz, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Background Aim. In case of high-dose acetaminophen intake, the active metabolite can not bind to the glutathione, thereby inducing cellular necrosis through binding to the cytosol proteins. This trial was performed to histologically and biochemically investigate whether leptin was protective against liver damage induced by paracetamol at toxic doses. Material and Method. In our trial, 30 female rats, divided into 5 groups, were used. IP leptin administration was performed after an hour in the group of rats, in which paracetamol poisoning was induced. The groups were as follows: Group 1: the control group, Group 2: 20?µg/kg leptin, Group 3: 2?g/kg paracetamol, Group 4: 2?g/kg paracetamol + 10?µg/kg leptin, and Group 5: 2?g/kg paracetamol + 20?µg/kg leptin. Results. The most significant increase was observed in the PARA 2?g/kg group, while the best improvement among the treatment groups occurred in the PARA 2?g/kg + LEP 10?µg/kg group (p < 0.05). While the most significant glutathione (GSH) reduction was observed in the PARA 2?g/kg group, the best improvement was in the PARA 2?g/kg + LEP 10?µg/kg group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Liver damage occurring upon paracetamol poisoning manifests with hepatocyte breakdown occurring as a result of inflammation and oxidative stress. Leptin can prevent this damage thanks to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. PMID:26697061

  19. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis A Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can ... well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child ...

  20. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hepatitis B? Hepatitis B can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. Hepatitis B is incurable. A safe, ... can lead to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), liver cancer, and even death.Hepatitis A can cause varying ...

  1. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0–24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. PMID:26096275

  2. Phytochemical, antioxidant and protective effect of Rhus tripartitum root bark extract against ethanol-induced ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Hichem; Mbarki, Sakhria; Barka, Zeineb B; Feriani, Anwer; Bouoni, Zouhour; Hfaeidh, Najla; Sakly, Mohsen; Tebourbi, Olfa; Rhouma, Khémais B

    2013-03-01

    Rhus tripartitum (sumac) is an Anacardiaceae tree with a wide phytotherapeutic application including the use of its roots in the management of gastric ulcer. In the present study the Rhus tripartitum root barks extract (RTE) was phytochemical studied, in vitro tested for their potential antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and reducing power assay and in vivo evaluated for its ability to prevent ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The RTE was rich in phenolics, flavonoids, tannins and polysaccharide contents and exhibited a low but not weak in vitro antioxidant activity when compared with (+)-catechin. Pre-treatment with RTE at oral doses 50, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight was found to provide a dose-dependent protection against ethanol-induced ulcer by averting the deep ulcer lesions of the gastric epithelium, by reducing gastric juice and acid output, by enhancing gastric mucus production by preserving normal antioxidant enzymes activities, and inhibiting the lipid peroxidation. The antiulcerogenic activity of RTE might be due to a possible synergistic antioxidant and antisecretory effects. PMID:23531841

  3. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-06-01

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0-24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. PMID:26096275

  4. Hepatoprotective Activity of Methanolic Extract of Bauhinia purpurea Leaves against Paracetamol-Induced Hepatic Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, F.; Mamat, S. S.; Kamarolzaman, M. F. F.; Seyedan, A. A.; Jakius, K. F.; Mahmood, N. D.; Shahril, M. S.; Suhaili, Z.; Mohtarrudin, N.; Susanti, D.; Somchit, M. N.; Teh, L. K.; Salleh, M. Z.; Zakaria, Z. A.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to further establish the pharmacological properties of Bauhinia purpurea (Fabaceae), hepatoprotective potential of methanol extract of B. purpurea leaves (MEBP) was investigated using the paracetamol- (PCM-) induced liver toxicity in rats. Five groups of rats (n = 6) were used and administered orally once daily with 10% DMSO (negative control), 200?mg/kg silymarin (positive control), or MEBP (50, 250, and 500?mg/kg) for 7 days, followed by the hepatotoxicity induction using paracetamol (PCM). The blood samples and livers were collected and subjected to biochemical and microscopical analysis. The extract was also subjected to antioxidant study using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay with the total phenolic content (TPC) also determined. From the histological observation, lymphocyte infiltration and marked necrosis were observed in PCM-treated groups (negative control), whereas maintenance of the normal hepatic structural was observed in group pretreated with silymarin and MEBP. Hepatotoxic rats pretreated with silymarin or MEBP exhibited significant decrease (P < 0.05) in ALT and AST enzyme level. Moreover, the extract also exhibited antioxidant activity and contained high TPC. In conclusion, MEBP exerts potential hepatoprotective activity that could be partly attributed to its antioxidant activity and high phenolic content and thus warrants further investigation. PMID:23853662

  5. The involvement of Nrf2 in the protective effects of diallyl disulfide on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory response in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Chul; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Baek, Hyung-Seon; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Yun-Bae; Shin, In-Sik; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential effect of diallyl disulfide (DADS) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative hepatic damage and inflammatory response in rat liver. DADS at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg/day was administered orally once daily for 5 days, prior to CCl4 administration. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated CCl4-induced elevated serum transaminase activities and histopathological alterations in liver. It prevented the hepatocellular apoptotic changes with induction of Bcl-2-associated X (Bax), cytochrome c, and caspase-3 caused by CCl4. An increase in the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) and phosphorylation of I kappaB alpha (I?B?) was observed in the livers of CCl4-treated rats that coincided with induction of inflammatory mediators or cytokines. In contrast, DADS inhibited NF-?B translocation and I?B? phosphorylation, and that subsequently decreased inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, DADS prevented CCl4-induced depletion of cytosolic nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and suppression of nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which, in turn, up-regulated phase II/antioxidant enzyme activities. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DADS increases the expression of phase II/antioxidant enzymes and simultaneously decreases the expression of inflammatory mediators in CCl4-induced liver injury. These findings indicate that DADS induces antioxidant defense mechanism by activating Nrf2 pathway and reduces inflammatory response by inhibiting NF-?B activation. PMID:24246655

  6. Supplementation of Citrus maxima Peel Powder Prevented Oxidative Stress, Fibrosis, and Hepatic Damage in Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Riaz Hasan; Sagor, Md Abu Taher; Tabassum, Nabila; Potol, Md Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Citrus maxima peel is rich in natural phenolic compounds and has a long use in the traditional medicine. HPLC-DAD analysis on Citrus maxima peel powder exhibited the presence of various phenolic compounds such as caffeic acid and (?)-epicatechin. To determine the plausible hepatoprotective activity of Citrus maxima peel powder, we used carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treated rat model. Liver damage in rats was confirmed by measuring the AST, ALT, and ALP enzyme activities. In addition, lipid peroxidation products (MDA), nitric oxide, advanced protein oxidation products level (APOP), and catalase activities were also analyzed along with the histological profiling for the inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen, and iron deposition in liver. Dietary supplementation of Citrus maxima peel powder exhibited significant reduction of serum AST, ALT, and ALP activities in carbon tetrachloride treated rats. Moreover, Citrus maxima peel powder also showed a significant reduction of the oxidative stress markers (MDA, NO, and APOP level) and restored the catalase activity in CCl4 treated rats. Histological examination of the liver section revealed reduced inflammatory cells infiltration, collagen, and iron deposition in CCl4 treated rats. The results from this study demonstrated that Citrus maxima peel powder produced significant hepatoprotective action in CCl4 administered rats. PMID:26106435

  7. Supplementation of Citrus maxima Peel Powder Prevented Oxidative Stress, Fibrosis, and Hepatic Damage in Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Riaz Hasan; Sagor, Md Abu Taher; Tabassum, Nabila; Potol, Md Abdullah; Hossain, Hemayet; Alam, Md Ashraful

    2015-01-01

    Citrus maxima peel is rich in natural phenolic compounds and has a long use in the traditional medicine. HPLC-DAD analysis on Citrus maxima peel powder exhibited the presence of various phenolic compounds such as caffeic acid and (-)-epicatechin. To determine the plausible hepatoprotective activity of Citrus maxima peel powder, we used carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treated rat model. Liver damage in rats was confirmed by measuring the AST, ALT, and ALP enzyme activities. In addition, lipid peroxidation products (MDA), nitric oxide, advanced protein oxidation products level (APOP), and catalase activities were also analyzed along with the histological profiling for the inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen, and iron deposition in liver. Dietary supplementation of Citrus maxima peel powder exhibited significant reduction of serum AST, ALT, and ALP activities in carbon tetrachloride treated rats. Moreover, Citrus maxima peel powder also showed a significant reduction of the oxidative stress markers (MDA, NO, and APOP level) and restored the catalase activity in CCl4 treated rats. Histological examination of the liver section revealed reduced inflammatory cells infiltration, collagen, and iron deposition in CCl4 treated rats. The results from this study demonstrated that Citrus maxima peel powder produced significant hepatoprotective action in CCl4 administered rats. PMID:26106435

  8. Ethanol-induced differential gene expression and acetyl-CoA metabolism in a longevity model of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Steven

    Ethanol-induced differential gene expression and acetyl-CoA metabolism in a longevity model, decreased fertility, and reduced longevity. On the contrary, lower concentrations of ethanol (0.86­68 m longevity. Therefore, we used biochemical assays and next generation mRNA sequencing to identify genes

  9. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  10. A role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. In females, the skeletal response to ethanol varies depending on physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be a key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the c...

  11. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through Inhibition of Wnt / Beta-catenin Signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain largely unclear. Especially in females, skeletal response to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event le...

  12. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female skeletal responses to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the current study, we chronically infused EtOH-containing liquid diets ...

  13. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A, a novel gastroprotective compound from Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, against ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amir, Junaidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Teh, Xinsheng; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Rahmani, Mawardi; Mohan, Syam

    2013-07-15

    Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (PA), a xanthone derived from the Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, belongs to the Moraceae family which is native to the tropical forest of Malaysia. In this study, the efficacy of PA as a gastroprotective compound was examined against ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. The rats were pretreated with PA and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol. The ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological analysis, glutathione (GSH) levels, malondialdehyde level (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NP-SH) contents were evaluated in vivo. The activities of PA as anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and free radical scavenger were also investigated in vitro. The results showed that the oral administration of PA protects gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced gastric lesions. PA pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) restored the depleted GSH, NP-SH and NO levels in the gastric homogenate. Moreover, PA significantly (p<0.05) reduced the elevated MDA level due to ethanol administration. The gastroprotective effect of PA was associated with an over expression of HSP70 and suppression of Bax proteins in the ulcerated tissue. In addition, PA exhibited a potent FRAP value and significant COX-2 inhibition. It also showed a significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori bacterium. The efficacy of PA was accomplished safely without the presence of any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the gastroprotective effect of PA might contribute to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as the anti-apoptotic mechanism and antibacterial action against Helicobacter pylori. PMID:23570997

  14. Alterations in Ethanol-Induced Behaviors and Consumption in Knock-In Mice Expressing Ethanol-Resistant NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Beckley, Jacob T.; Smothers, Thetford C.; Lench, Daniel H.; Holseberg, Zack L.; Fedarovich, Hleb; Gilstrap, Meghin J.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Woodward, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol's action on the brain likely reflects altered function of key ion channels such as glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In this study, we determined how expression of a mutant GluN1 subunit (F639A) that reduces ethanol inhibition of NMDARs affects ethanol-induced behaviors in mice. Mice homozygous for the F639A allele died prematurely while heterozygous knock-in mice grew and bred normally. Ethanol (44 mM; ?0.2 g/dl) significantly inhibited NMDA-mediated EPSCs in wild-type mice but had little effect on responses in knock-in mice. Knock-in mice had normal expression of GluN1 and GluN2B protein across different brain regions and a small reduction in levels of GluN2A in medial prefrontal cortex. Ethanol (0.75–2.0 g/kg; IP) increased locomotor activity in wild-type mice but had no effect on knock-in mice while MK-801 enhanced activity to the same extent in both groups. Ethanol (2.0 g/kg) reduced rotarod performance equally in both groups but knock-in mice recovered faster following a higher dose (2.5 g/kg). In the elevated zero maze, knock-in mice had a blunted anxiolytic response to ethanol (1.25 g/kg) as compared to wild-type animals. No differences were noted between wild-type and knock-in mice for ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex, sleep time, hypothermia or ethanol metabolism. Knock-in mice consumed less ethanol than wild-type mice during daily limited-access sessions but drank more in an intermittent 24 h access paradigm with no change in taste reactivity or conditioned taste aversion. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are important in regulating a specific constellation of effects following exposure to ethanol. PMID:24244696

  15. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  16. Oxytocin prevents ethanol actions at ? subunit-containing GABAA receptors and attenuates ethanol-induced motor impairment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Michael T.; Peters, Sebastian T.; Absalom, Nathan; Chebib, Mary; Neumann, Inga D.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2015-01-01

    Even moderate doses of alcohol cause considerable impairment of motor coordination, an effect that substantially involves potentiation of GABAergic activity at ? subunit-containing GABAA receptors (?-GABAARs). Here, we demonstrate that oxytocin selectively attenuates ethanol-induced motor impairment and ethanol-induced increases in GABAergic activity at ?-GABAARs and that this effect does not involve the oxytocin receptor. Specifically, oxytocin (1 µg i.c.v.) given before ethanol (1.5 g/kg i.p.) attenuated the sedation and ataxia induced by ethanol in the open-field locomotor test, wire-hanging test, and righting-reflex test in male rats. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes, oxytocin was found to completely block ethanol-enhanced activity at ?4?1? and ?4?3? recombinant GABAARs. Conversely, ethanol had no effect when applied to ?4?1 or ?4?3 cells, demonstrating the critical presence of the ? subunit in this effect. Oxytocin had no effect on the motor impairment or in vitro effects induced by the ?-selective GABAAR agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, which binds at a different site on ?-GABAARs than ethanol. Vasopressin, which is a nonapeptide with substantial structural similarity to oxytocin, did not alter ethanol effects at ?-GABAARs. This pattern of results confirms the specificity of the interaction between oxytocin and ethanol at ?-GABAARs. Finally, our in vitro constructs did not express any oxytocin receptors, meaning that the observed interactions occur directly at ?-GABAARs. The profound and direct interaction observed between oxytocin and ethanol at the behavioral and cellular level may have relevance for the development of novel therapeutics for alcohol intoxication and dependence. PMID:25713389

  17. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent. PMID:24113767

  18. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins. PMID:24275171

  19. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver from the hepatitis A virus. ... The hepatitis A virus is found mostly in the stools and blood of an infected person. The virus is present ...

  20. Defining hepatic dysfunction parameters in two models of fatty liver disease in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzo(mbtps1) mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  1. Defining Hepatic Dysfunction Parameters in Two Models of Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzombtps1 mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  2. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections? Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are serious infections that affect the liver. Both diseases ... term illness. What extra risks are caused by hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections during pregnancy? Not only ...

  3. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H; Patel, Kaushal S; Mulholland, Patrick J; Becker, Howard C; Banik, Naren L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60%), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40% proteolipid protein, 25%) and enzyme (2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, 21-55%) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 ?g/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against EtOH associated CNS degeneration. PMID:26100335

  4. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H.; Patel, Kaushal S.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Becker, Howard C.; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60 %), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40 % proteolipid protein, 25 %) and enzyme (2?, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide 3?-phosphodiesterase, 21-55 %) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 ?g/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against EtOH associated CNS degeneration. PMID:26100335

  5. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the ... related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C AND HIV About 25% of people living with ...

  6. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePLUS

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  7. Lead Intoxication Synergies of the Ethanol-Induced Toxic Responses in Neuronal Cells-PC12.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Tripathi, V K; Jahan, S; Agrawal, M; Pandey, A; Khanna, V K; Pant, A B

    2015-12-01

    Lead (Pb)-induced neurodegeneration and its link with widespread neurobehavioral changes are well documented. Experimental evidences suggest that ethanol could enhance the absorption of metals in the body, and alcohol consumption may increase the susceptibility to metal intoxication in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of ethanol action in affecting metal toxicity in brain cells is poorly understood. Thus, an attempt was made to investigate the modulatory effect of ethanol on Pb intoxication in PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma. Cells were co-exposed to biological safe doses of Pb (10 ?M) and ethanol (200 mM), and data were compared to the response of cells which received independent exposure to these chemicals at similar doses. Ethanol (200 mM) exposure significantly aggravated the Pb-induced alterations in the end points associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. The finding confirms the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress, and impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, which subsequently facilitate the translocation of triggering proteins between cytoplasm and mitochondria. We further confirmed the apoptotic changes due to induction of mitochondria-mediated caspase cascade. These cellular changes were found to recover significantly, if the cells are exposed to N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a known antioxidant. Our data suggest that ethanol may potentiate Pb-induced cellular damage in brain cells, but such damaging effects could be recovered by inhibition of ROS generation. These results open up further possibilities for the design of new therapeutics based on antioxidants to prevent neurodegeneration and associated health problems. PMID:25367877

  8. Protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer: A pharmacological assessment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaccob, Ausama Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Since there is an increasing need for gastric ulcer therapies with optimum benefit-risk profile. This study was conducted to investigate gastro-protective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer models in mice. Materials and Methods: A total of 41 mice were allocated into six groups consisted of 7 mice each. Groups 1 (normal control) and 2 (ulcer control) received distilled water at a dose of 10 ml/kg, groups 3, 4 and 5 were given NAC at doses 100, 300 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, and the 6th group received ranitidine (50 mg/kg). All drugs administered orally once daily for 7 days, on the 8th day absolute ethanol (7 ml/kg) was administrated orally to all mice to induce the acute ulcer except normal control group. Then 3 h after, all animals were sacrificed then consequently the stomachs were excised for examination. Results: NAC administration at the tested doses showed a dose-related potent gastro-protective effect with significant increase in curative ratio, PH of gastric juice and mucus content viscosity seen with the highest dose of NAC and it is comparable with that observed in ranitidine group. Conclusion: The present findings demonstrate that, oral NAC shows significant gastro-protective effects comparable to ranitidine confirmed by anti-secretory, cytoprotective, histological and biochemical data, but the molecular mechanisms behind such protection are complex. PMID:26401392

  9. Biochanin A Gastroprotective Effects in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Ulceration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajrezaie, Maryam; Salehen, NurAin; Karimian, Hamed; Zahedifard, Maryam; Shams, Keivan; Batran, Rami Al; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; El-Seedi, Hesham; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2015-01-01

    Background Biochanin A notable bioactive compound which is found in so many traditional medicinal plant. In vivo study was conducted to assess the protective effect of biochanin A on the gastric wall of Spraguedawley rats` stomachs. Methodology The experimental set included different animal groups. Specifically, four groups with gastric mucosal lesions were receiving either a) Ulcer control group treated with absolute ethanol (5 ml/kg), b) 20 mg/kg of omeprazole as reference group, c) 25 of biochanin A, d) 50 mg/kg of biochanin A. Histopathological sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry staining were undertaken to evaluate the influence of the different treatments on gastric wall mucosal layer. The gastric secretions were collected in the form of homogenate and exposed to superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide enzyme (NO) and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein content were measured. Ulceration and patchy haemorrhage were clearly observed by light microscopy. The morphology of the gastric wall as confirmed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent microscopic observations, exhibited sever deformity with notable thickness, oedematous and complete loss of the mucosal coverage however the biochanin-pretreated animals, similar to the omeprazole-pretreated animals, showed less damage compared to the ulcer control group. Moreover, up-regulation of Hsp70 protein and down-regulation of Bax protein were detected in the biochanin A pre-treated groups and the gastric glandular mucosa was positively stained with Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and the Leucocytes infiltration was commonly seen. Biochanin A displayed a great increase in SOD and NO levels and decreased the release of MDA. Conclusions This gastroprotective effect of biochanin A could be attributed to the enhancement of cellular metabolic cycles perceived as an increase in the SOD, NO activity, and decrease in the level of MDA, and also decrease in level of Bax expression and increase the Hsp70 expression level. PMID:25811625

  10. More on hepatic granulomas.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Yemisen, Mucahit; Balkan, Ilker Inanc

    2015-01-01

    We have read the case report of Nihon-Yanagi et al. The patient they described developed hepatic granuloma two times and the granulomatous lesion was surrounding metal staples/clips suggesting that the granuloma was due to surgical staples/clips.Hepatic granulomas (HGs) are reported in around 5 % of patient who undergo a liver biopsy and caused by several diseases including sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, hydatid cyst, brucellosis, typhoid fever, chronic hepatitis B and C and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Chronic hepatitis B and C infections are the most common and serious causes of liver damage in patient with renal failure. Their prevalence is a higher than people without renal failure. We have previously reported that the prevalences of HGs in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C are 1.5 and 1.3 % respectively. The described patient was on hemodialysis for 12 years. The other causes of HG seem excluded; however hepatitis B and C infections and PBC should have been tested and excluded before ascribing the HGs to surgical staples/clipping material. PMID:26586239

  11. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... commonly used with viral hepatitis and related conditions. Web Resources American Liver Foundation A national nonprofit organization ... other liver diseases through research, education, and advocacy. Web site features a database directory of hepatitis clinical ...

  12. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  14. Hepatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Kaul; Friedenberg; Rothstein

    2000-12-01

    Treatment of hepatic cysts should be considered only for those patients who are symptomatic. For simple cysts, percutaneous aspiration invariably leads to recurrence; laparoscopic deroofing is usually curative. Open deroofing (fenestration) should be reserved for cysts inaccessible by laparoscopy. Percutaneous instillation of sclerosing agents (ethanol, iophendylate, minocycline) into nonbiliary and nonparasitic cysts is an alternative therapeutic option in certain cases. Due to increased morbidity, hepatic resection should be reserved for polycystic liver disease, diffuse hepatic involvement, or recurrence after a deroofing procedure. Patients with congenital fibropolycystic disorders (eg, congenital hepatic fibrosis) with evidence of hepatic decompensation, should be considered for liver transplantation. For hepatic hydatid cysts, simple cystectomy or the PAIR (puncture, aspirate, inject, and reaspirate) technique with albendazole treatment have been shown to be equally successful. In the case of alveolar echinococcosis, hepatic resection and liver transplantation are the only effective modalities for localized and extensive hepatic disease, respectively. PMID:11096603

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  16. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  17. Prophylactic effect of aqueous extract of Sesamum indicum seeds on ethanol-induced toxicity in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Nwozo, S.O.; Amah, G.H.; Awoyinka, A.O.; Ojo, O.A; Ajiboye, B.O.; Tijani, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is vulnerable to alcohol-related injury because it is the primary site of alcohol metabolism. Additionally, a number of potentially dangerous by-products are generated as alcohol is broken down in the liver. However, dietary supplements may prevent or relieve some of alcohol's deleterious effects. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effect of aqueous extract of Sesamum indicum (SI) on ethanol induced toxicity in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, ethanol, pre-treatment, simultaneous and post-treatment groups. In the prophylactic experiment, Sesamum indicum, (200 mg/kg body weight) was administered by oral gavage for 28 days; two hours before, simultaneously with or two hours after ethanol exposure. Toxicity was induced by administering 45% ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw) by oral gavage. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and gluthathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were then determined in the liver, serum triglyceride (TG) levels, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were monitored and histological examination was carried out. The results revealed that ethanol administration led to significant elevation of TBARS level while depleting in the level of GSH as well as CAT, GPx, SOD and GST activities. Similarly, TG level and ALT and AST activities were elevated. The SI pre-treated group significantly inhibited TBARS, restored GSH level, enhanced CAT, GPx, SOD and GST activities and significantly decreased the elevated level of serum TG, ALT and AST activities. SI treatment (simultaneously with ethanol) exhibited similar effects to those of the SI pre-treated groups, while the SI post-treated group did not show the same protection as the Pre-treated group. S. indicum possesses antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties, that eliminate the deleterious effects of toxic metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24611106

  18. Anandamide-CB1 Receptor Signaling Contributes to Postnatal Ethanol-Induced Neonatal Neurodegeneration, Adult Synaptic and Memory Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Shivakumar, Madhu; Psychoyos, Delphine; Xie, Shan; Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2013-01-01

    The transient exposure of immature rodents to ethanol during postnatal day 7 (P7), which is comparable to the third trimester human pregnancy, induces synaptic dysfunctions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions are still poorly understood. Although the endocannabinoid system has been shown to be an important modulator of ethanol sensitivity in adult mice, its potential role in synaptic dysfunctions in mice exposed to ethanol during early brain development is not examined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of endocannabinoids and the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) in neonatal neurodegeneration and adult synaptic dysfunctions in mice exposed to ethanol at P7. Ethanol treatment at P7, which induces neurodegeneration, increased anandamide (AEA) but not 2-arachidonylglycerol biosynthesis and CB1R protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex, two brain areas that are important for memory formation and storage, respectively. N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD), glycerophosphodiesterase (GDE1) and CB1Rs protein expression were enhanced by transcriptional activation of the genes encoding NAPE-PLD, GDE1 and CB1R proteins respectively. In addition, ethanol inhibited ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. The blockade of CB1Rs prior to ethanol treatment at P7 relieved ERK1/2 but not AKT phosphorylation and prevented neurodegeneration. CB1R knockout mice exhibited no ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and inhibition of ERK1/2-phosphorylation. The protective effects of CB1R blockade through pharmacological or genetic deletion resulted in normal adult synaptic plasticity and novel object recognition memory in mice exposed to ethanol at P7. The AEA/CB1R/pERK1/2 signaling pathway may be directly responsible for the synaptic and memory deficits associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:23575834

  19. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  20. Hepatoprotective Activity of Elephantopus scaber on Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Abdul Rahim, Raha; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    Elephantopus scaber has been traditionally used as liver tonic. However, the protective effect of E. scaber on ethanol-induced liver damage is still unclear. In this study, we have compared the in vivo hepatoprotective effect of E. scaber with Phyllanthus niruri on the ethanol-induced liver damage in mice. The total phenolic and total flavanoid content of E. scaber ethanol extract were determined in this study. Accelerating serum biochemical profiles (including AST, ALT, ALP, triglyceride, and total bilirubin) associated with fat drop and necrotic body in the liver section were observed in the mice treated with ethanol. Low concentration of E. scaber was able to reduce serum biochemical profiles and the fat accumulation in the liver. Furthermore, high concentration of E. scaber and positive control P. niruri were able to revert the liver damage, which is comparable to the normal control. Added to this, E. scaber did not possess any oral acute toxicity on mice. These results suggest the potential effect of this extract as a hepatoprotective agent towards-ethanol induced liver damage without any oral acute toxicity effect. These activities might be contributed, or at least in part, by its high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. PMID:22973401

  1. Polymorphism of UGT1A1*28 (TA)7 and liver damage in hepatitis B virus-positive patients in Albania.

    PubMed

    Marku, E; Maltese, P E; Koni, M; Capodicasa, N; Qendro, I S; Rigoni, E; Cecchin, S; Bertelli, M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the infectious agent of both acute and chronic hepatitis. HBV exists in multiple genotypic variants that differ in their capacity to become persistent chronic infections and in their clinical manifestations, including hepatocellular carcinoma. The 8 genotypes (A-H) of HBV show a specific worldwide geographic distribution and are correlated with different disease course, severity, and response to therapy. We isolated DNA from 75 HBV-positive blood donors, chosen randomly from the database of the National Blood Bank in Tirana, to specifically analyze the UGT1A1 polymorphism to determine its correlations with bilirubin levels and liver function. The large number of subjects who were HBV-positive carriers of heterozygosis or homozygosis for the UGT1A1*28 (TA)7 polymorphism suggests that these individuals may be more susceptible to cancer and should follow a strict regime of prevention. PMID:26125716

  2. Hepatic damage caused by coxsackievirus B3 is dependent on age-related tissue tropisms associated with the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Yen; Wang, Shih-Min; Chen, I-Chun; Yu, Chun-Keung; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2013-07-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are important causes of severe enteroviral diseases in neonates or young children in Taiwan. CVB can cause fulminant hepatitis, myocarditis or meningoencephalitis. This study was designed to explore the role of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) in the pathogenesis of CVB3-infected hepatocytes via in vitro and mice studies. CVB3 (CVB3/2630) was isolated from liver tissue of a neonate with fulminant hepatitis. Cell lines A549, HeLa, HEp2 and Huh-7 were maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Mice progeny 1 or 7 days old were used in the experiments. Viremia was noted in 7-day-old ICR mice 2 h after intraperitoneal injection. The highest viral titers were detected in blood, liver and spleen. Histopathological studies of the liver demonstrated polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, massive hepatic cell necrosis and apoptosis. CAR was expressed more in liver than in other tissues. Expression of CAR decreased with mouse age. Anti-CAR monoclonal antibody prevented infection of Huh-7 cells from CVB3. Furthermore, anti-CAR monoclonal antibody pretreatment can reduce mortality and decrease the level of liver enzymes in CVB3-infected mice. These findings indicate that CAR plays an important role in the initiation of CVB infections and is closely associated with hepatotropism and age-specific susceptibility. PMID:23620416

  3. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. ETHANOL INDUCES AND INSULIN INHIBITS ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE CLASS 1 IN FGC-4 CELLS: BOTH APPEAR TO WORK THROUGH SREBP-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported that chronic feeding of alcohol-containing diets (via intragastric infusion) to Sprague-Dawley rats induces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) Class 1 by interfering with signaling via the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1). We have studied the effects ...

  5. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  7. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... Blood (serology) tests are used to check for antibodies to each of the hepatitis viruses.

  8. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  9. Severe biliary complications after hepatic artery embolization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Qiang; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Duan, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Nin-Xing; Feng, Yu-Quan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism and treatment of severe biliary complications arising from hepatic artery embolization (HAE). METHODS: Of seven cases of intra- and extrahepatic biliary damage resulting from hepatic artery embolization reported since 1987 , 6 patients suffered from hepatic haemangioma, the other case was due to injection of TH compound into the hepatic artery during operation. The hepatic artery was injected with ethanol so as to evaluate the liver damage in experimental rats. RESULTS: All the cases were found to have destructive damage of intra- and extrahepatic bile duct at the hilum with biliary hepatocirrhosis. Experimental results revealed necrosis of the liver parenchyma, especially around the portal tract and obliteration of intrahepatic bile duct. CONCLUSIONS: To prevent the severe biliary complications of HAE, the use of HAE for hepatic haemangioma which was widely practiced in China, should be re-evaluated. Hepatic arterial embolization of hepatic haemangioma may resulte in severe destructive biliary damages and its indiscriminate use should be prohibited. PMID:11833085

  10. Anti-Ulcerogenic Properties of Lycium chinense Mill Extracts against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesion in Animal Models and Its Active Constituents.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Chen, Hongxia; Zhou, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the gastroprotective properties of the aerial part of Lycium chinense Mill (LCA) against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa lesions in mice models. Administration of LCA at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol consumption dose dependently inhibited gastric ulcers. The gastric mucosal injury was analyzed by gastric juice acidity, glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. Furthermore, the levels of the inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) in serum were also analyzed using ELISA. Pathological changes were also observed with the aid of hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Our results indicated that LCA significantly reduced the levels of MPO, MDA and increased SOD and GSH activities. Furthermore, LCA also significantly inhibited the levels of TNF-?, IL-6, and IL-1? in the serum of ulcerated mice in a dose dependent manner. Immunohistological analysis indicated that LCA also significantly attenuated the overexpression of nuclear factor-?B in pretreated mice models. This findings suggests Lycium chinense Mill possesses gastroprotective properties against ethanol-induced gastric injury and could be a possible therapeutic intervention in the treatment and management of gastric ulcers. PMID:26694339

  11. Korean Red Ginseng attenuates ethanol-induced steatosis and oxidative stress via AMPK/Sirt1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae Yun; Lee, Sangkyu; Yang, Ji Hye; Kim, Sunju; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Mi Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcoholic steatosis is the earliest and most common liver disease, and may precede the onset of more severe forms of liver injury. Methods The effect of Korean Red Ginseng extract (RGE) was tested in two murine models of ethanol (EtOH)-feeding and EtOH-treated hepatocytes. Results Blood biochemistry analysis demonstrated that RGE treatment improved liver function. Histopathology and measurement of hepatic triglyceride content verified the ability of RGE to inhibit fat accumulation. Consistent with this, RGE administration downregulated hepatic lipogenic gene induction and restored hepatic lipolytic gene repression by EtOH. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases is well established. Treatment with RGE attenuated EtOH-induced cytochrome P450 2E1, 4-hydroxynonenal, and nitrotyrosine levels. Alcohol consumption also decreased phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which was restored by RGE. Moreover, RGE markedly inhibited fat accumulation in EtOH-treated hepatocytes, which correlated with a decrease in sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and a commensurate increase in sirtuin 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? expression. Interestingly, the ginsenosides Rb2 and Rd, but not Rb1, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in hepatocytes. Conclusion These results demonstrate that RGE and its ginsenoside components inhibit alcoholic steatosis and liver injury by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/sirtuin 1 activation both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that RGE may have a potential to treat alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26045683

  12. EFFECT OF THE SELECTIVE NMDA NR2B ANTAGONIST, IFENPRODIL, ON ACUTE TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL-INDUCED MOTOR IMPAIRMENT IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R. Liane; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent rats have been observed to be less sensitive than adults to a number of acute ethanol effects, including ethanol-induced motor impairment. These adolescent insensitivities may be related in part to the more rapid emergence of within session (acute) tolerance in adolescents than adults. Adolescent-related alterations in neural systems that serve as ethanol target sites, including changes in NMDA receptor subunit expression, may influence the responsiveness of adolescents to acute ethanol effects. The present study explored the role of NMDA NR2B receptors in the development of acute tolerance to ethanol-induced motor impairment in male adolescent (postnatal day [P]28–30), and adult (P68-70) Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Motor impairing effects of ethanol on the stationary inclined plane and blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) were examined following challenge at each age with a functionally equivalent ethanol dose (adolescents: 2.25 g/kg; adults: 1.5 g/kg). Data were collected at two post-injection intervals (10 or 60 min) to compare rate of recovery from ethanol intoxication with BEC declines using the Radlow approach (Radlow, 1994) and changes in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time for assessing acute tolerance. Results Both vehicle-treated adolescent and adult animals showed similar acute tolerance development to the motor-impairing effects of ethanol at these functionally equivalent doses on the stationary inclined plane, as indexed by an increasing time-dependent dissociation between BECs and ethanol-induced motor impairment, with motor impairment declining faster than BECs, as well as by significant declines in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time. Acute tolerance development was reliably blocked by administration of the NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, (5.0 mg/kg), in adult rats, whereas adolescents were affected by a higher dose (10.0 mg/kg). Conclusions These data support the suggestion that alterations in NMDA receptor systems occurring during adolescence may contribute to reduced sensitivity to ethanol by enhancing the expression of acute tolerance development in adolescents relative to adults. PMID:21352242

  13. The effects of nocloprost, nileprost, iloprost and (15 S)-15-methyl-PGE2 on gastric mucosal damage induced by stress, indomethacin and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zengil, H; Ercan, Z S; Onuk, E; Turker, R K

    1990-05-01

    The preventive effects of nocloprost, nileprost, iloprost and (15S)-15-Methyl-prostaglandin E2 were studied in the rat gastric mucosal damage induced by restraint-cold stress, indomethacin and ethanol. Nocloprost was found to be the most potent orally active compound against rat mucosal damage induced by all noxious stimuli used in this study. Both nocloprost and iloprost were more effective on stress-induced ulcers than on those induced by indomethacin and ethanol. Nocloprost and 15-methyl prostaglandin E2 were also more active on ethanol-induced mucosal damage than on induced by indomethacin. No significant differences were obtained with iloprost and nileprost on indomethacin and ethanol-induced mucosal injury. These results indicate a more potent oral antiulcer activity of nocloprost. PMID:1697972

  14. Alcohol Induced Hepatic Degeneration in a Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for ?-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-?1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-?1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection. PMID:24608925

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  16. Unlocking the Sporicidal Potential of Ethanol: Induced Sporicidal Activity of Ethanol against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus Spores under Altered Physical and Chemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Sunkesula, Venkata C. K.; C., Thriveen Sankar; Setlow, Peter; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to their efficacy and convenience, alcohol-based hand sanitizers have been widely adopted as the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings. However, alcohols lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We hypothesized that sporicidal activity could be induced in alcohols through alteration of physical or chemical conditions that have been shown to degrade or allow penetration of spore coats. Principal Findings Acidification, alkalinization, and heating of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C. difficile, and to a lesser extent Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis. The sporicidal activity of acidified ethanol was enhanced by increasing ionic strength and mild elevations in temperature. On skin, sporicidal ethanol formulations were as effective as soap and water hand washing in reducing levels of C. difficile spores. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that novel ethanol-based sporicidal hand hygiene formulations can be developed through alteration of physical and chemical conditions. PMID:26177038

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  18. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain Nausea or vomiting Fever Loss of appetite Dark urine Joint pain Diagnosis Healthcare providers review symptoms ... risk behaviors associated with hepatitis D superinfection, including Sex with an infected partner Contact with the blood ...

  19. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who had hepatitis C Received a tattoo or acupuncture with needles that were not disinfected properly after ... have a tattoo license or permit or an acupuncture license) Received an organ transplant from a donor ...

  20. Take Action against Hepatitis C (for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction Attention treatment providers in behavioral health ... damaged. Untreated hepatitis C can result in severe illness or death. It’s a silent disease—many people ...

  1. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2015 Q: What is hepatitis? A: Hepatitis is an inflammation ... urine, extreme fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Q: What are the different hepatitis viruses? A: Scientists ...

  2. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the following tests: Anti-delta agent antibody Liver biopsy Liver enzymes (blood test) ... against hepatitis B. Adults who are at high risk for hepatitis B ... If you do not get Hepatitis B, you cannot get Hepatitis D.

  3. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  4. Organ Damage and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) after Feed-Borne Exposure to the Mycotoxin, Deoxynivalenol (DON)

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Constanze; Schulz, Carsten; Rovira, Pere; Kloas, Werner; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) frequently contaminates animal feed, including fish feed used in aquaculture. This study intends to further investigate the effects of DON on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) at concentrations representative for commercial fish feeds. Experimental feeding with 352, 619 or 953 ?g DON kg?1 feed resulted in unaltered growth performance of fish during six weeks of experimentation, but increased lipid peroxidation was observed in liver, head kidney and spleen after feeding of fish with the highest DON concentration. These effects of DON were mostly reversible by two weeks of feeding the uncontaminated control diet. Histopathological scoring revealed increased liver damage in DON-treated fish, which persisted even after the recovery phase. At the highest DON concentration, significantly more fat, and consequently, increased energy content, was found in whole fish body homogenates. This suggests that DON affects nutrient metabolism in carp. Changes of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in kidneys and muscle and high lactate levels in serum indicate an effect of DON on anaerobic metabolism. Serum albumin was reduced by feeding the medium and a high dosage of DON, probably due to the ribotoxic action of DON. Thus, the present study provides evidence of the effects of DON on liver function and metabolism. PMID:24566729

  5. Fatty acid ethyl ester synthase inhibition ameliorates ethanol-induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Booth, David M; Cane, Matthew C; Chvanov, Michael; Javed, Muhammad A; Elliott, Victoria L; Armstrong, Jane A; Dingsdale, Hayley; Cash, Nicole; Li, Yan; Greenhalf, William; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Jaffar, Mohammed; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Sutton, Robert; Criddle, David N

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol (NOME) produces fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) via carboxylester lipase (CEL) and other enzyme action implicated in mitochondrial injury and acute pancreatitis (AP). This study investigated the relative importance of oxidative and non-oxidative pathways in mitochondrial dysfunction, pancreatic damage and development of alcoholic AP, and whether deleterious effects of NOME are preventable. Design Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]C), NAD(P)H, mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways were examined in isolated pancreatic acinar cells in response to ethanol and/or palmitoleic acid (POA) in the presence or absence of 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) to inhibit oxidative metabolism. A novel in vivo model of alcoholic AP induced by intraperitoneal administration of ethanol and POA was developed to assess the effects of manipulating alcohol metabolism. Results Inhibition of OME with 4-MP converted predominantly transient [Ca2+]C rises induced by low ethanol/POA combination to sustained elevations, with concurrent mitochondrial depolarisation, fall of NAD(P)H and cellular necrosis in vitro. All effects were prevented by 3-benzyl-6-chloro-2-pyrone (3-BCP), a CEL inhibitor. 3-BCP also significantly inhibited rises of pancreatic FAEE in vivo and ameliorated acute pancreatic damage and inflammation induced by administration of ethanol and POA to mice. Conclusions A combination of low ethanol and fatty acid that did not exert deleterious effects per se became toxic when oxidative metabolism was inhibited. The in vitro and in vivo damage was markedly inhibited by blockade of CEL, indicating the potential for development of specific therapy for treatment of alcoholic AP via inhibition of FAEE generation. PMID:24162590

  6. Immunochemical evidence for an ethanol-inducible form of liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 in rodents and primates

    SciTech Connect

    Lasker, J.M.; Ardies, C.M.; Bloswick, B.P.; Lieber, C.S.

    1986-05-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against cytochrome P-450-4, a major liver microsomal P-450 isozyme purified from ethanol (E)-treated hamsters, were used to probe for immunochemically-related hemeproteins in other species. Liver microsomes (LM) were obtained from naive and E-treated rats, deermice, hamsters, and baboons. Baboon liver 9000 x g supernatant (S-9) was prepared from needle biopsy samples. LM and S-9 proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE, then transferred to nylon membranes. Immunodetection was performed on the Western blots using rabbit anti P-450-4 IgG, anti-rabbit IgG-alk. phos., and an appropriate chromagen. Control LM from all species contained a cross-reacting protein of mol. wt. similar to P-450-4 (54k). The amount of this cross-reacting protein as reflected by staining intensity, was much higher in LM from E-treated animals. This protein was also detected in S-9 from E-treated baboons. In contrast, no increase in phenobarbital-inducible P-450-2 related LM protein (assessed using anti P-450-2) was observed after E treatment. Increased P-450-4 related protein in LM from E-treated animals was associated with enhanced oxidation of ethanol and aniline by these LM when compared to controls. In conclusion, LM from rats, deermice, and baboons contain a protein immunochemically homologous to hamster liver P-450-4. As observed in hamsters, the amount of this hepatic protein increases in these other species after E treatment.

  7. Hepatic artery bridging lessens temporary ischemic injury to bile canaliculi

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jin-Long; Lu, Le; Zhang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Hong-Wei; Li, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study whether transfer of blood between the right gastroepiploic artery and gastroduodenal artery could lessens the damage to bile canaliculi. METHODS: Forty male Bama miniature pigs were divided into four groups as follows: a control group, two hepatic artery ischemia groups (1 h and 2 h), and a hepatic artery bridging group. The hemodynamics of the hepatic artery in the hepatic artery bridging group was measured using color Doppler ultrasound. Morphological changes in the bile canaliculus were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Cofilin, heat shock protein 27 and F-actin expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling method was used to evaluate liver injury. RESULTS: The hemodynamics was not changed in the hepatic artery bridging group. The microvilli in the bile canaliculus were impaired in the two hepatic artery ischemia groups. The down-regulation of cofilin and F-actin and up-regulation of heat shock protein 27 were observed in the two hepatic artery ischemia groups, while there were no significant differences between the control group and hepatic artery bridging group. CONCLUSION: Hepatic artery ischemia aggravates damage to bile canaliculi, and this damage can be diminished by a hepatic artery bridging duct. PMID:26401076

  8. Ethanol induces upregulation of the nerve growth factor receptor CD271 in human melanoma cells via nuclear factor-?B activation

    PubMed Central

    RAPPA, GERMANA; ANZANELLO, FABIO; LORICO, AURELIO

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is one of the most important, and potentially avoidable, risk factors of human cancer, accounting for 3.6% of all types of cancer worldwide. In a recent meta-analysis, a 20% increased risk of melanoma was linked with regular alcohol consumption. In the present study, the effect of ethanol exposure on the expression of the nerve growth factor receptor, CD271, in human FEMX-I melanoma cells was investigated. Consistent with the derivation of melanocytes from the neural crest, the majority of melanomas express CD271, a protein that is crucial for maintaining the melanoma stem cell properties, including the capacity of self-renewal and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Analysis of CD271-sorted subpopulations and clones of FEMX-I cells indicated no hierarchical organization of CD271+ and CD271? cells. In addition, CD271 expression was lost upon growth of FEMX-I melanoma cells in cancer stem cell-like conditions, while it was greatly increased upon CD133 knockdown or exposure to ethanol. After 24-h exposure to 100, 200 and 400 mM ethanol, the percentage of CD271+ cells increased from 14% in control cells to 24, 35 and 88%, respectively. An increase in the percentage of CD271+ cells was already evident 8 h after ethanol exposure and reached a maximum at 48 h. Ethanol-induced upregulation of CD271 was mediated by nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B). In fact, exposure of FEMX-I cells to 100–400 mM ethanol for 24 h resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent increase in NF-?B activity, up to 900% that of control cells. NF-?B activation was due to a decrease in p50 homodimers, which occupy the NF-?B binding site, blocking transactivation. No effects of ethanol on 9 additional signaling pathways of FEMX-I cells were observed. In the presence of CD271 blocking antibodies, NF-?B activation was not prevented, indicating that ethanol did not target CD271 directly. These data demonstrate that ethanol induces expression of CD271 in FEMX-I cells via NF-?B activation and indicate a possible molecular link between ethanol exposure and melanoma formation.

  9. Liver damage due to perhexiline maleate.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, G B; Rake, M O; Taylor, D J

    1979-01-01

    Two middle-aged men, who had received perhexiline in recommended dosage, showed clinical and histological evidence of severe hepatic damage, and one of them died. Histological study of the livers showed a striking resemblance to alcoholic hepatitis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:536463

  10. Effects of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 and 4 on serum activins and follistatin in treatment naïve patients and their correlations with interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-?, viral load and liver damage.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Bassem; Ashshi, Ahmed Mohammed; El-Shemi, Adel Galal; AlZanbagi, Adnan

    2015-08-01

    The importance of activins and follistatin in liver diseases has recently emerged. The aim of the present study was to measure the influence of chronic infection with viral hepatitis C (CHC) genotype 1 and 4 on serum levels of activin-A, activin-B and follistatin, and to determine their correlations with viral load, liver damage, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-?. Sera samples collected from 20 male and 20 female treatment naïve CHC genotype 1 and 4 Saudi patients (ten males and ten females for each genotype), and 40 gender- and age-matched healthy participants were analysed for activin-A, activin-B and follistatin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and their levels were correlated with IL-6, TNF-?, viral load and AST platelet ratio index (APRI). Serum activin-A, activin-B, IL-6 and TNF-? were significantly increased, while serum follistatin was significantly decreased, in both genders of CHC patients compared with control subjects, In both viral genotypes, activin-A was strongly and positively correlated with the viral load, APRI, IL-6 and TNF-?, and negatively with albumin (P < 0.01). Activin-B showed the same correlations of activin-A only in CHC genotype 1 patients, but it was weaker than activin-A. No correlation was detected with follistatin. Serum activins, particularly activin-A, and follistatin are significantly altered by CHC genotype 1 and 4. This dysregulation of activins/follistatin axis may be associated with viral replication, host immune response and liver injury. Further studies are needed to illustrate the definite role(s) and clinical value of activins and follistatin in CHC. PMID:24925642

  11. Hepatitis E

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with safe water, particularly before handling food; avoiding drinking water and/or ice of unknown purity; adhering to WHO safe food practices. In 2011, the first vaccine to prevent hepatitis E infection was registered in China. Although it is not available globally, it could ...

  12. Hepatitis C: progress and problems.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis. HCV isolates differ in nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Nucleotide changes are concentrated in hypervariable regions and may be related to immune selection. In most immunocompetent persons, HCV infection is diagnosed serologically, using antigens from conserved regions. Amplification of RNA may be necessary to detect infection in immunosuppressed patients. Transmission by known parenteral routes is frequent; other means of spread are less common and may represent inapparent, percutaneous dissemination. Infection can lead to classical acute hepatitis, but most infected persons have no history of acute disease. Once infected, most individuals apparently remain carriers of the virus, with varying degrees of hepatocyte damage and fibrosis ensuing. Chronic hepatitis may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, disease progression varies widely, from less than 2 years to cirrhosis in some patients to more than 30 years with only chronic hepatitis in others. Determinants important in deciding outcome are unknown. Alpha interferon, which results in sustained remission in selected patients, is the only available therapy. Long-term benefits from such therapy have not been demonstrated. Prevention of HCV infection by vaccination is likely to be challenging if ongoing viral mutation results in escape from neutralization and clearance. PMID:7834603

  13. Ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in isolated rat hepatocytes: Time course of impairments and recovery after ethanol withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    Chronic ethanol administration markedly impairs the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) of a representative asialoglycoprotein, asialoorosomucoid (ASOR), by the liver. In this study, we further characterized these impairments by identifying the time of onset for ethanol-induced changes in RME as well as establishing the time course for recovery to normal endocytotic values after ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol administration for 3 days did not alter any aspect of endocytosis examined in this study. After feeding ethanol to rats for 7 days, however, significant decreases in amounts of ligand bound, internalized, and degraded were apparent. These impairments persisted throughout the 5-week feeding study although the effects were somewhat attenuated with more prolonged ethanol feeding. In addition, an accumulation of intracellular receptors was observed in ethanol-fed animals relative to controls after 7 days of ethanol feeding. In all cases, recovery of endocytotic values to control levels was partially completed after 2 to 3 days of refeeding control diet and was fully completed after 7 days of refeeding. These results indicate that ethanol feeding for as little as 7 days profoundly impairs the process of RME by the liver. These impairments can be reversed after refeeding control diet for 7 days.

  14. Mechanisms of Gastroprotective Effects of Ethanolic Leaf Extract of Jasminum sambac against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    AlRashdi, Ahmed S.; Salama, Suzy M.; Alkiyumi, Salim S.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Abdelwahab, Siddig I.; Taha, Manal M.; Hussiani, Jamal; Asykin, Nur

    2012-01-01

    Jasminum sambac is used in folk medicine as the treatment of many diseases. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extracts of J. sambac leaves against acidified ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Seven groups of rats were orally pre-treated with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) as normal group, CMC as ulcer group, 20?mg/kg of omeprazole as positive group, 62.5, 125, 250, and 500?mg/kg of extract as the experimental groups, respectively. An hour later, CMC was given orally to normal group and acidified ethanol solution was given orally to the ulcer control, positive control, and the experimental groups. The rats were sacrificed after an hour later. Acidity of gastric content, the gastric wall mucus, ulcer areas, and histology and immunohistochemistry of the gastric wall were assessed. Gastric homogenates were determined for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), superoxide dismutase (SOD), andmalondialdehyde (MDA) content. Ulcer group exhibited significantly severe mucosal injury as compared with omeprazole or extract which shows significant protection towards gastric mucosal injury the plant promotes ulcer protection as it shows significant reduction of ulcer area grossly, and histology showed marked reduction of edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer compared with ulcer group. Immunohistochemistry showed overexpression of Hsp70 protein and downexpression of Bax protein in rats pretreated with extract. Significant increased in the pH, mucus of gastric content and high levels of PGE2, SOD and reduced amount of MDA was observed. PMID:22550543

  15. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  16. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... URL - Redirecting ... Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & ...

  17. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a new liver. Several different viruses—named the hepatitis A, B, C, D and E viruses—can cause ... it. Different hepatitis viruses spread in different ways. Hepatitis A, the most common, is spread through food or ...

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an autoimmune disease in which people cannot tolerate gluten because it damages the lining of their small ... or osteomalacia thinning of the hair and skin acne diabetes high blood pressure cataracts, a clouding in ...

  19. Role of AP-1 in ethanol-induced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit gene up-regulation in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2005-12-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) has been reported to regulate the gene expression in a wide variety of cellular processes in response to stimuli. In this study, we investigated the DNA-protein binding activities and promoter activity in the N-methyl-D-aspartate R2B (NR2B) gene AP-1 site in normal and ethanol-treated cultured neurons. The identity of the AP-1 site as the functional binding factor is suggested by the specific binding of nuclear extract derived from cultured cortical neurons to the labeled probes and the specific antibody-induced supershift. Mutations in the core sequence resulted in a significantly reduced promoter activity and the ability to compete for the binding. Moreover, treatment of the cultured neuron with 75 mm ethanol for 5 days caused a significant increase in the AP-1 binding activity and promoter activity. The AP-1 DNA-binding complex in control and ethanol-treated nuclear extract was composed of c-Fos, FosB, c-Jun, JunD, and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB). Western blot analysis showed that p-CREB and FosB significantly increased, whereas c-Jun decreased. The DNA affinity precipitation assay indicated that FosB, p-CREB, and c-Jun increased in the AP-1 complex following ethanol treatment. These results suggest that AP-1 is an active regulator of the NR2B transcription and ethanol-induced changes may result at multiple levels in the regulation including AP-1 proteins expression, CREB phosphorylation and perhaps reorganization of dimmers. PMID:16313514

  20. The novel non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonist DL77 reduces voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Sadek, Bassem; Nurulain, Syed M; ?a?ewska, Dorota; Kie?-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    It has become clear that histamine H3 receptors (H3R) have been implicated in modulating ethanol intake and preference in laboratory animals. The novel non-imidazole H3R antagonist DL77 with excellent selectivity profile shows high in-vivo potency as well as in-vitro antagonist affinity with ED50 of 2.1 ± 0.2 mg/kg and pKi=8.08, respectively. In the present study, and applying an unlimited access two-bottle choice procedure, the anti-alcohol effects of the H3R antagonist, DL77 (0, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg; i.p.), were investigated in adult mice. In this C57BL/6 line, effects of DL77 on voluntary alcohol intake and preference, as well as on total fluid intake were evaluated. Results have shown that DL77, dose-dependently, reduced both ethanol intake and preference. These effects were very selective as both saccharin and quinine, used to control for taste sensitivity, and intakes were not affected following DL77 pre-application. More importantly, systemic administration of DL77 (10 mg/kg) during acquisition inhibited ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference (EtOH-CPP) as measured using an unbiased protocol. The anti-alcohol activity observed for DL77 was abrogated when mice were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(?)-methyl-histamine (RAMH) (10 mg/kg), or with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10mg/kg). These results suggest that DL77 has a predominant role in two in vivo effects of ethanol. Therefore, signaling via H3R is essential for ethanol-related consumption and conditioned reward and may represent a novel therapeutic pharmacological target to tackle ethanol abuse and alcoholism. PMID:26169446

  1. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Copper (II) Complex against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; A. Hadi, A. Hamid; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Majid, Nazia; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential element in various metabolisms. The investigation was carried out to evaluate acute gastroprotective effects of the Copper (II) complex against ethanol-induced superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Rats were divided into 7 groups. Groups 1 and 2 were orally administered with Tween 20 (10% v/v). Group 3 was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (10% Tween 20). Groups 4–7 received 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg of the complex (10% Tween 20), respectively. Tween 20 (10% v/v) was given orally to group 1 and absolute ethanol was given orally to groups 2–7, respectively. Rats were sacrificed after 1 h. Group 2 exhibited severe superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Gastric wall mucus was significantly preserved by the pre-treatment complex. The results showed a significant increase in glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activities and a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Histology showed marked reduction of hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in groups 4–7. Immunohistochemical staining showed up-regulation of Hsp70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. PAS staining of groups 4–7 showed intense stain uptake of gastric mucosa. The acute toxicity revealed the non-toxic nature of the compound. Conclusions/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the Copper (II) complex may possibly be due to preservation of gastric wall mucus; increase in PGE2 synthesis; GSH, SOD, and NO up-regulation of Hsp70 protein; decrease in MDA level; and down-regulation of Bax protein. PMID:23251568

  2. Regulation of Extrasynaptic GABAA ?4 Receptors by Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase A, but Not Protein Kinase C Activation in Cultured Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephen L; Bohnsack, J Peyton; Patel, Vraj; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol produces changes in GABAA receptor trafficking and function that contribute to ethanol dependence symptomatology. Extrasynaptic ?-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAA-R) mediate inhibitory tonic current and are of particular interest because they are potentiated by physiologically relevant doses of ethanol. Here, we isolate GABAA ?4? receptors by western blotting in subsynaptic fractions to investigate protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) modulation of ethanol-induced receptor trafficking, while extrasynaptic receptor function is determined by measurement of tonic inhibition and responses evoked by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). Rat cerebral cortical neurons were grown for 18 days in vitro and exposed to ethanol and/or PKA/PKC modulators. Ethanol exposure (1 hour) did not alter GABAA ?4 receptor abundance, but it increased tonic current amplitude, an effect that was prevented by inhibiting PKA, but not PKC. Direct activation of PKA, but not PKC, increased the abundance and tonic current of extrasynaptic ?4? receptors. In contrast, prolonged ethanol exposure (4 hours) reduced ?4? receptor abundance as well as tonic current, and this effect was also PKA dependent. Finally, PKC activation by ethanol or phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PdBu) had no effect on extrasynaptic ?4? subunit abundance or activity. We conclude that ethanol alters extrasynaptic ?4? receptor function and expression in cortical neurons in a PKA-dependent manner, but ethanol activation of PKC does not influence these receptors. These results could have clinical relevance for therapeutic strategies to restore normal GABAergic functioning for the treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:26483396

  3. Cerebroprotective effect of isolated harmine alkaloids extracts of seeds of Peganum harmala L. on sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia and ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in young mice.

    PubMed

    Biradar, S M; Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Tarak, K C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate the harmine alkaloids from the seeds of Peganum harmala (TAPH) and its cerebroprotective effect on cognitive deficit mice. The tested doses of TAPH were screened for Sodium nitrite induced hypoxia and Ethanol induced neurodegeneration using behavioral models. The TAPH was found to be non-neurotoxic and Psychoactive by preventing the motor impairment and increasing the locomotion activity of animals in Rota rod and Actophotometer respectively. TAPH (5, 2.5 and 1.25 mg kg(-1) p.o.) significantly (p < 0.001) protected the Sodium nitrite induced memory impairment by decreasing the time require to find the water bottle in special water bottle case model. In Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) and Passive Shock Avoidance paradigm (PSA) the TAPH shown improved acquisition and retention memory significantly (p < 0.001) by decreasing the Transverse Latency Time (TLT) and increasing the Step Down Latency (SDL), respectively in dose dependent manner. The results were well supported by biochemical parameters, by inhibiting the Acetylcholinestrase (p < 0.01) activity, increasing the GSH (p < 0.001) level and decreasing the TBARS (p < 0.001) level of whole brain. Moreover TAPH has shown the significant Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibition action (p < 0.001), hence it reduces the metabolism of epinephrine, 5-HT and other monoamines and enhances the action of these neurotransmitters indirectly; this adrenergic system plays an important role in learning and memory. Further, TAPH (5 mg kg(-1)) protect the DNA fragmentation of frontotemporal cortex of the brain from hypoxic effect induced by Sodium nitrite in Gel Electrophoresis studies. The results were comparable to their respective standards. Hence, harmine alkaloids are potential enough to utilize in the management of Neurodegenerative disorders of the type Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:24506035

  4. Modulatory influence of noscapine on the ethanol-altered hepatic biotransformation system enzymes, glutathione content and lipid peroxidation in vivo in rats.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Ritu; Katyal, Anju; Chandra, Ramesh

    2004-01-01

    The modulatory potential of noscapine, an opium alkaloid was assessed on the ethanol-induced changes in hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme systems, glutathione content and microsomal lipid peroxidation. Noscapine was administered orally to male Wistar rats at a dose level of 200 mg/kg bw alone as well as in combination with 50% ethanol (v/v) for 5 days. Noscapine administration was associated with a approximately 91% decrease in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 content. A decline of approximately 36% was observed in the NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity on noscapine administration. The lowering of cytochrome P-450 levels on noscapine administration was accompanied by a concomitant increase in heme oxygenase activity as well as serum bilirubin levels. Our results indicate that the combination dosage of noscapine and ethanol antagonised the ethanol-induced elevation of cytochrome P-450 levels. Noscapine fed rats had decreased glutathione (GSH) content and enhanced lipid peroxidation compared to control rats as indexed by MDA method. Further, noscapine and ethanol coexposure produced a more pronounced elevation in lipid peroxidation and the glutathione levels also decreased significantly. We speculate on the basis of our results that the significant enhancement of lipid peroxidation on combination dosage of noscapine and ethanol is a consequence of depletion of glutathione to certain critical levels. The inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as well as lowering of cytochrome P-450 suggests that the biotransformation of noscapine and ethanol is significantly altered following acute coexposures. PMID:15537167

  5. Management of hepatic vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Plessier, Aurélie; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Primary damage to hepatic vessels is rare. (i) Hepatic arterial disorders, related mostly to iatrogenic injury and occasionally to systemic diseases, lead to ischemic cholangiopathy. (ii) Hepatic vein or inferior vena cava thrombosis, causing primary Budd-Chiari syndrome, is related typically to a combination of underlying prothrombotic conditions, particularly myeloproliferative neoplasms, factor V Leiden, and oral contraceptive use. The outcome of Budd-Chiari syndrome has markedly improved with anticoagulation therapy and, when needed, angioplasty, stenting, TIPS, or liver transplantation. (iii) Extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis is related to local causes (advanced cirrhosis, surgery, malignant or inflammatory conditions), or general prothrombotic conditions (mostly myeloproliferative neoplasms or factor II gene mutation), often in combination. Anticoagulation at the early stage prevents thrombus extension and, in 40% of the cases, allows for recanalization. At the late stage, gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension can be prevented in the same way as in cirrhosis. (iv) Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (or venoocclusive disease), caused by agents toxic to bone marrow progenitors and to sinusoidal endothelial cells, induces portal hypertension and liver dysfunction. Decreasing the intensity of myeloablative regimens reduces the incidence of sinusoidal toxicity. (v) Obstruction of intrahepatic portal veins (obliterative portal venopathy) can be associated with autoimmune diseases, prothrombotic conditions, or HIV infection. The disease can eventually be complicated with end-stage liver disease. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is common. Anticoagulation should be considered. (vi) Nodular regenerative hyperplasia is induced by the uneven perfusion due to obstructed sinusoids, or portal or hepatic venules. It causes pure portal hypertension. PMID:22300463

  6. Curcumin attenuates chronic ethanol-induced liver injury by inhibition of oxidative stress via mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhang E; Dong, Wei Guo; Wang, Bao Ying; Tong, Qiao Yun; Li, Zhong Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on chronic ethanol-induced liver injury in mice and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-exposed Balb/c mice were simultaneously treated with curcumin for 6 weeks. Liver injury was evaluated by biochemical and histopathological examination. Lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant activities were measured by spectrophotometric method. Anti-oxidative genes expression such as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the phosphorylation states of specific proteins central to intracellular signaling cascades were measured by western blotting. Results: Curcumin treatment protected liver from chronic ethanol-induced injury through reducing serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, improving liver histological architecture, and reversing lipid disorders indicated by decrease of triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and increase of High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. Meanwhile, curcumin administration attenuated oxidative stress via up-regulating SOD and glutathione peroxidase activities, leading to a reduction of lipid hydroperoxide production. In addition, curcumin increased Nrf2 activation and anti-oxidative genes expressions such as NQO1, HO-1, and SOD through inducing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 phosphorylation. Conclusion: Our data suggested that curcumin protected the liver from chronic-ethanol induced injury through attenuating oxidative stress, at least partially, through ERK/p38/Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidant signaling pathways. PMID:26600714

  7. The influence of the new enkephalin derivative, cyclo[N(?),N(?)-carbonyl-d-Lys(2),Dap(5)] enkephalinamide (cUENK6), on reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Gawel, Kinga; Witkowska, Ewa; Izdebski, Jan; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether a new cyclic analog of enkephalin, cyclo[N(?),N(?)-carbonyl-d-Lys(2),Dap(5)] enkephalinamide (cUENK6), a preferential ?-(MORs), and, to a lower extent, a ?-opioid receptor (DORs) agonist in vitro, could reinstate ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). In our work, male Wistar rats were first conditioned either with ethanol (10% w/v, 0.5g/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or 0.9% NaCl in a biased CPP procedure. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of DORs antagonist (naltrindole, 2.5 and 5nmol) or MORs antagonist (?-funaltrexamine, 5 and 10nmol), but not the ? opioid receptor (KORs) antagonist (norbinaltorphimine, 5 and 10nmol) was then administered and inhibited the expression of ethanol-induced CPP. After the extinction session, i.c.v. administration of cUENK6 at the dose of 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5nmol occurred, and was found to reinstate the ethanol-induced CPP similar to that of the priming injection of ethanol. However, the reinstated effect of cUENK6 (0.25nmol) was strongly abolished by administration of naltrindole and, to lesser extent, by ?-funaltrexamine. Furthermore, the preferential MORs agonist-morphine (13nmol, i.c.v.) and the DORs agonist-[Leu(5)]-enkephalin (2.7 and 5.4nmol, i.c.v.) also reinstated the ethanol-induced CPP. cUENK6 given alone at the dose of 0.25nmol before the testing phase had no effect in animals that received 0.9% NaCl during the conditioning phase and also did not influence their locomotor activity. These data suggest that the effects of cUENK6 did not have an impact on the results obtained in the reinstatement procedure of CPP. Overall, the data support the idea that both MORs and DORs are normally involved in the expression and reinstatement of ethanol conditioned seeking behavior - as indexed by CPP in rats. PMID:25817357

  8. [Extra-hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Causse, X; Germanaud, J; Legoux, A; Legoux, J L

    1995-01-15

    A variety of prodromal symptoms of viral hepatitis (urticaria, fever, arthralgias, headache, polyradiculonevritis) are attributed to A, B, C, D or E hepatitis only when jaundice appears, and because they disappear with it. Spectacular extrahepatic symptoms (polyarteritis nodosa, cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, marrow aplasia...) may be associated with B or C hepatitis without any liver symptom. Some of the extrahepatic symptoms observed during chronic hepatitis C therapy with interferon (thyroid dysfunctions, cutaneo-mucous lichen) may be related to the immunomodulatory effects of interferon rather than to virus C itself. PMID:7725020

  9. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health issues. PMID:18331700

  10. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  11. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  12. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  13. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  14. Protective and therapeutic effects of an extract mixture of alder tree, labiate herb, milk thistle green bean-rice bran fermentation, and turnip against ethanol-induced toxicity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Min-Won; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Lee, Hui-Young; Kim, Dong Jae; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Ahn, Young-Tae; Lim, Kwang-Sei; Huh, Chul-Sung

    2008-01-01

    An herbal extract mixture and yogurt added to the herbal extract mixture were tested for their protective and therapeutic effects on ethanol-induced liver injury. The herbal extract mixture, yogurt and commercial drugs were used for treatment for two weeks prior to administering a single oral dose of ethanol (3 g/kg body weight). The herbal extract mixture and yogurt added to the herbal extract mixture were found to provide protection against ethanol-induced toxicity comparable to the commercial drug treatment, according to the serum and histopathological analysis. It was also shown that co-treatment with herbal extract mixture and yogurt against a triple oral dose of ethanol (2 g/kg body weight, over one week) provided protection against ethanol toxicity. After the initial set of experiments, the herbal extract mixture and yogurt treatments were extended for three more weeks. When compared to the positive control, further treatment with both the herbal extract and yogurt significantly reduced liver injury and resulted in a lower grade of lipid deposition. PMID:18296886

  15. Acute and chronic ethanol consumption differentially impact pathways limiting hepatic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Karinch, Anne M.; Martin, Jonathan H.; Vary, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    This review identifies the various pathways responsible for modulating hepatic protein synthesis following acute and chronic alcohol intoxication and describes the mechanism(s) responsible for these changes. Alcohol intoxication induces a defect in global protein synthetic rates that is localized to impaired translation of mRNA at the level of peptide-chain initiation. Translation initiation is regulated at two steps: formation of the 43S preinitiation complex [controlled by eukaryotic initiation factors 2 (eIF2) and 2B (eIF2B)] and the binding of mRNA to the 40S ribosome (controlled by the eIF4F complex). To date, alcohol-induced alterations in eIF2 and eIF2B content and activity are best investigated. Ethanol decreases eIF2B activity when ingested either acutely or chronically. The reduced eIF2B activity most likely is a consequence of twofold increased phosphorylation of the ?-subunit of eIF2 on Ser51 following acute intoxication. The increase in eIF2? phosphorylation after chronic alcohol consumption is the same as that induced by acute ethanol intoxication, and protein synthesis is not further reduced by long-term alcohol ingestion despite additional reduced expression of initiation factors and elongation factors. eIF2? phosphorylation alone appears sufficient to maximally inhibit hepatic protein synthesis. Indeed, pretreatment with Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2?(P) phosphatase, before ethanol treatment does not further inhibit protein synthesis or increase eIF2? phosphorylation, suggesting that acute ethanol intoxication causes maximal eIF2? phosphorylation elevation and hepatic protein synthesis inhibition. Ethanol-induced inhibition of hepatic protein synthesis is not rapidly reversed by cessation of ethanol consumption. In conclusion, sustained eIF2? phosphorylation is a hallmark of excessive alcohol intake leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2? represents a unique response of liver to alcohol intoxication, because the ethanol-induced elevation of eIF2?(P) is not observed in skeletal muscle or heart. PMID:18334613

  16. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. From Hollywood's "Walk of Stars" to Main Street, USA, people from all walks ... that includes many well-known names: Legendary television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C ...

  17. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor regulates the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit gene in basal and ethanol-induced gene expression in fetal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Rani, C S Sheela; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2005-06-01

    Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) is a transcriptional repressor of multiple neuronal genes. This study addressed the role of NRSF in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B promoter activity and the molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced NR2B up-regulation in fetal cortical neurons. The 5'-flanking region of the NR2B gene contains five NRSE-like elements. Functional analysis of the upstream regions of the NR2B gene by transient transfection of neurons revealed that neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) motifs located between base pair -1407 and -2741 represses transcription of the gene. Analysis by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter gene assay identified NRSE2 and 3 as responsible for repressing NR2B gene transcription. The identity of NRSF as the functional binding factor is suggested by the specific binding of in vitro synthesized NRSF or cell lysate to the labeled probes and the specific antibody-induced supershift. Furthermore, whereas mutations of NRSE2 and 3 motifs increased the promoter activity, overexpression of NRSF reduced it significantly. The pattern of NRSF expression during development was investigated and demonstrated that the highest expression is on embryonic day 14 with moderate expression on postnatal day 0, reflecting a possible role of NRSF as a regulator during development. Treatment of cultured cortical neurons with 100 mM ethanol for 5 days caused a significant decrease in the NRSF mRNA and protein levels, NRSF/NRSE binding activity, and an increase in the promoter activity. Therefore, our studies suggest that NRSF is a negative regulator of NR2B expression and may contribute to the ethanol-induced up-regulation of the NR2B gene in fetal cortical neurons. PMID:15755907

  18. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. Methods DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. Results DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. Conclusions The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect. PMID:23866830

  19. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis B can be spread through sharing needles, syringes, or other injection equipment. In addition, the hepatitis ... devices or other diabetes-care equipment such as syringes or insulin pens. How infectious is the hepatitis ...

  20. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Udoh, Uduak S; Swain, Telisha M; Filiano, Ashley N; Gamble, Karen L; Young, Martin E; Bailey, Shannon M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  1. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  2. Non-primate hepacivirus infection with apparent hepatitis in a horse - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Gábor; Maza, Norbert; Pankovics, Péter; Boros, Akos

    2014-09-01

    Non-primate hepacivirus (NPHV) is a recently identified hepacivirus (family Flaviviridae) in dog and horse; however, the disease associations remain unknown. This study reports the detection of natural NPHV infection in a horse with apparent hepatitis, liver damage and high-level viraemia. NPHV could be hepatotropic and associated with hepatitis in horses. PMID:25038950

  3. A copper-complex reduced gastric damage caused by acetylsalicylic acid and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Velo, G P

    1996-05-01

    We investigated the effect of oral administration of CuNSN, a bis(2-benzimidazolyl) thioether (see structure 1) on gastric lesions induced in rats by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or ethanol. The involvement of endogenous eicosanoids and nitric oxide in protection by CuNSN was evaluated with indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), inhibitors of prostaglandin and NO synthesis respectively. L-arginine and its enantiomer D-arginine were also used. Pretreatment with graded doses of CuNSN inhibited ASA- and ethanol-induced mucosal injury. CuNSN increased PGE2 output in rat ex vivo gastric mucosal pieces after administration of 100 mg/kg of ASA. Pretreatment with indomethacin only partially counteracted the protective activity of CuNSN against ethanol-induced damage. L-NNA did not attenuate the protection by CuNSN, which was reduced but not prevented by indomethacin, suggesting that prostanoids contribute to the CuNSN protective effect, together with some mechanism(s) other than NO synthesis. PMID:8792443

  4. [Hepatic artery embolization for primary hepatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ye, W J

    1989-03-01

    Twenty patients with primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) treated by hepatic arterial embolization in our department from Dec. 1986 to Mar. 1987 are reported. There were 15 males and 5 females. The ages ranged from 34 to 75 years with an average of 50.7. Preoperative diagnosis and localization of the tumor were done by AFP, B-us, CT and angiography (right lobe 15 cases, left lobe 1 case, both lobes 4 cases). Celiac and superior mesenteric angiography was carried out by femoral artery approach and then highly selective hepatic catheterization was utilized for hepatic arterial embolization. Antitumor agent (5-Fu, adriamycin), iophendylate and foamy gel sponge were used for peripheral and proximal embolization. Manifestations were improved in most of the patients after embolization, such as relief of abdominal pain, improvement of appetite, decrease of tumor size. Total necrosis of the tumor was found in 2 patients who underwent surgery 1 month after embolization. The side effects of the posthepatic embolization such as, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever could be relieved by symptomatic treatment. No severe complications, such as gangrene of the gall bladder, hepatic failure, liver abscess, intestinal necrosis or pulmonary embolization were found except 3 patients who died of renal failure after the procedure. The liver dys-function returned to normal within 2 weeks. Hepatic arterial embolization provides an alternative treatment for the patients with PHC who has compensated liver function without severe systemic diseases, especially renal endocrine problems and severe portal hypertension. They should have patent portal system as proved by angiography. The authors considered that this therapeutic embolization with hepatic chemotherapy infusion is safe and effective in the management of PHC. It may increase the resectability and provide palliative means for the advanced and terminal cases. PMID:2553366

  5. Erythropoietic and hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Hoffmann, G F; Doss, M O

    2000-11-01

    Porphyrias are divided into erythropoietic and hepatic manifestations. Erythropoietic porphyrias are characterized by cutaneous symptoms and appear in early childhood. Erythropoietic protoporphyria is complicated by cholestatic liver cirrhosis and progressive hepatic failure in 10%, of patients. Acute hepatic porphyrias (delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) are characterized by variable extrahepatic gastrointestinal, neurological-psychiatric and cardiovascular manifestations requiring early diagnosis to avoid life-threatening complications. Acute hepatic porphyrias are pharmacogenetic and molecular regulatory diseases (without porphyrin accumulation) mainly induced by drugs, sex hormones, fasting or alcohol. The disease process depends on the derepression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase following haem depletion. In contrast to the acute porphyrias, nonacute, chronic hepatic porphyrias such as porphyria cutanea tarda are porphyrin accumulation disorders leading to cutaneous symptoms associated with liver disease, especially caused by alcohol or viral hepatitis. Alcohol, oestrogens, haemodialysis, hepatitis C and AIDS are triggering factors. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common porphyria, followed by acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The molecular genetics of the porphyrias is very heterogenous. Nearly every family has its own mutation. The mutations identified account for the corresponding enzymatic deficiencies, which may remain clinically silent throughout life. Thus, the recognition of the overt disorder with extrahepatic manifestations depends on the demonstration of biochemical abnormalities due to these primary defects and compensatory hepatic overexpression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase in the acute porphyrias. Consequently, haem precursors are synthesized in excess. The increased metabolites upstream of the enzymatic defect are excreted into urine and faeces. The diagnosis is based on their evaluation. Primary enzymatic or molecular analyses are noncontributary and may be misleading. Acute polysymptomatic exacerbations accompany a high excretory constellation of porphyrin precursors delta-aminolaevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. Homozygous or compound heterozygous variants of acute hepatic porphyrias may already manifest in childhood. PMID:11117426

  6. Therapy of Delta Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yurdaydin, Cihan; Idilman, Ramazan

    2015-10-01

    Delta hepatitis is the less frequently encountered but most severe form of viral hepatitis. Acute delta hepatitis, as a result of coinfection with hepatitis B and hepatitis delta, is rare, but may lead to fulminant hepatitis, and no therapy exists for this form. Chronic delta hepatitis (CDH) mostly develops as a result of superinfection of a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier with hepatitis delta virus (HDV). In general, HDV is the dominant virus. However, a dynamic shift of the dominant virus may occur with time in rare instances, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may become the dominant virus, at which time nucleos(t)ide analog therapy may be indicated. Otherwise, the only established management of CDH consists of conventional or pegylated interferon therapy, which has to be administered at doses used for hepatitis B for a duration of at least 1 year. Posttreatment week-24 virologic response is the most widely used surrogate marker of treatment efficacy, but it does not represent a sustained virologic response, and late relapse can occur. As an easy-to-use simple serological test, anti-HDV-immunoglobulin M (IgM) correlates with histological inflammatory activity and clinical long-term outcome; however, it is not as sensitive as HDV RNA in assessing treatment response. No evidence-based rules for treating CDH exist, and treatment duration needs to be individualized based on virologic response at end of treatment or end of follow-up. Effective treatment may decrease liver-related complications, such as decompensation or liver-related mortality. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, interferons are contraindicated and liver transplantation has to be considered. Alternative treatment options are an urgent need in CDH. New treatment strategies targeting different steps of the HDV life cycle, such as hepatocyte entry inhibitors or prenylation inhibitors, are emerging and provide hope for the future. PMID:26253093

  7. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  8. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  9. Relationship between hepatitis B DNA viral load in the liver and its histology in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Tahmineh; Yahyapour, Yousef; Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Taheri, Hasan; Ranaei, Mohammad; Bayani, Masomeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serial measurement of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels in the liver and its relation with liver damage and serum HBV DNA levels are guide to begin and/or end a treatment course. This study evaluated the relationship between liver hepatitis B DNA viral load with liver histology in patients with chronic hepatitis B (HBV). Methods: Thirty patients with chronic anti-Hbe positive hepatitis B, with liver enzymes ? 2 times of the upper limit of normal and positive HBV DNA of any amount were entered in the study. They underwent percutaneous liver biopsy. Liver and serum viral load were determined using real time polymerase chain reaction method (RT-PCR). Liver function tests and liver histology for all cases were recorded. The amount of viral load in the liver and histological grading and staging were recorded. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32.8±10 years and 24 (80%) patients were males. Ten (33.3%) patients had HBV viral load levels less than 20000 IU/mL. There was a significant correlation between liver viral load levels with staging or grading of liver damage. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed a strong correlation between liver viral load and liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  10. [Treatment of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Miguet, J; Hrusovský, S

    1995-09-01

    Chronic forms of viral B,C and D hepatitis and fulminant hepatitis represent a serious healthcare problem. The study deals with the changes in the strategy in treating these diseases. During the chronic active hepatitis caused by the B hepatitis virus, the main aim of treatment is to cease multiplication of viruses, eliminate the clinical symptoms, prevent the development of cirrhosis, or the origin of hepatocellular carcinoma. The authors analyze the possibilities of the application of corticosteroids, viricidal drugs (vidarabin and interferons) and other medicaments (acyclovir, zidovudin, duramin, gancyclovir, chinacrin, and others) besides corticosteroids, interleukin 2 and tymozin from the group of immunomodulators were tested. The testing included the factor stimulating the colonies of granulocytes and myeloblasts and other substances. The therapy of acute protracted B hepatitis by means of interferon still requires controlled studies. Superinfection by D virus in chronic carriers of HBsAG causes chronic hepatitis which quickly leads to the development of cirrhosis. The therapy on basis of alpha interferon decreases the RNA virus D hepatitis serum level and leads to an improvement in the development of chronic hepatitis in half of the patients. Therapy of chronic C hepatitis on basis of corticosteroids is ineffective, and can be dangerous. Acyclovir is proved to be ineffective as well. The open study indicated certain positive results in application of interferon. The fulminant hepatitis can be defined as a development of encephalopathy and a decrease of the prothrombin time to less than 50% in the course of acute hepatitis. The break-point in the therapy of fulminant hepatitis took place in association with the performance of the transplantation of the liver. Impossibility to transplant the liver means that the effect of therapy of fulminant hepatitis is merely of supportive value. Majority of patients die due to neurologic complications, namely unmanageable oedema of the brain. But still, neither the antioedema therapy, e.g. on basis of manitol, as well as by means of corticosteroids, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, plasmapheresis and hemoperfusion, nor the treatment on basis of E1 prostaglandine improved the survival of patients. (Tab. 2, Ref. 82). PMID:8556359

  11. Clinicopathological study on TTV infection in hepatitis of unknown etiology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhong-Jie; Lang, Zhen-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Sen; Yan, Hui-Ping; Huang, De-Zhuang; Chen, Wan-Rong; Luo, Zhao-Xia

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the state of infection, replication site, pathogenicity and clinical significance of transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) in patients with hepatitis, especially in patients of unknown etiology. METHODS: Liver tissues taken from 136 cases of non-A non-G hepatitis were tested for TT virus antigen and nucleic acid by in situ hybridization (ISH) and nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among them, TT virus genome and its complemental strand were also detected in 24 cases of autopsy liver and extrahepatic tissues with ISH. Meanwhile, TTV DNA was detected in the sera of 187 hepatitis patients by nested-PCR. The pathological and clinical data of the cases infected with TTV only were analyzed. RESULTS: In liver, the total positive rate of TTV DNA was 32.4% and the positive signals were located in the nuclei of hepatocytes. In serus, TTV DNA was detected in 21.4% cases of hepatitis A-G, 34.4% of non-A non-G hepatitis and 15% of healthy donors. The correspondence rate of TTV DNA detection between liver tissue with ISH and sera with PCR was 63.2% and 89.3% in the same liver tissues by ISH and by PCR, respectively. Using double-strand probes and single-strand probes designed to detect TTV genome, the correspondence rate of TTV DNA detected in liver and extrahepatic tissues was 85.7%. Using single-strand probes, TTV genome could be detected in liver and extrahepatic tissues by PCR, but its complemental strands (replication strands) could be observed only in livers. The liver function of most cases infected with TTV alone was abnormal and the liver tissues had different pathological damage such as ballooning, acidophilia degeneration, formation of apoptosis bodies and focus of necrosis, but the inflammation in the lobule and portal area was mild. CONCLUSION: The positive rate of TTV DNA among cases of hepatitis was higher than that of donors, especially in patients with non-A non-G hepatitis, but most of them were coinfected with other hepatitis viruses. TTV can infect not only hepatocytes, but also extrahepatic tissues. However, the chief replication place may be liver. The infection of TTV may have some pathogenicity. Although the pathogenicity is comparatively weak, it can still damage the liver tissues. The lesions in acute hepatitis (AH) and chronic hepatitis (CH) are mild, but in severe hepatitis (SH), it can be very serious and cause liver function failure, therefore, we should pay more attention to TTV when studying the possible pathogens of so-called “Liver hepatitis of unknown etiology”. PMID:11925609

  12. Stimulation of rat hepatic amino acid transport by burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, R; Souba, W W; Zakrzewski, K; Bode, B P

    1998-05-01

    Burn injury accelerates hepatic amino acid metabolism, but the role of transmembrane substrate delivery in this response has not been investigated. We therefore studied the effects of cutaneous scald injury on the Na+-dependent transport of glutamine and alanine in isolated rat liver plasma membrane vesicles. Scald injury resulted in liver damage and a 1.4- to 2.3-fold and 1.5- to 2.8-fold stimulation of hepatic transport rates for glutamine and alanine, respectively, proportional to the total burned surface area (TBSA) after 24 hours. Enhanced uptake of glutamine and alanine was attributable to increases in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of system N and system A activities, respectively. Hepatic amino acid transport activity remained elevated in vesicles from burned animals after 72 hours, but the degree of stimulation (1.3- to 1.7-fold for glutamine and 1.3- to 1.6-fold for alanine) was less than that observed 24 hours after thermal injury. Liver function tests returned to control values after 72 hours as well, indicating rectification of hepatic damage. In contrast to the induction of hepatic system A and system N activity in catabolic states such as cancer and endotoxemia, further studies showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) failed to play a significant role in burn-stimulated amino acid transport rates. When combined with plasma liver enzyme profiles, early transient hepatic amino acid transporter stimulation may support amino acid-dependent pathways involved in the repair of burn-dependent hepatic damage. PMID:9591755

  13. Sexually acquired hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess current knowledge of sexually transmitted viral hepatitis in relation to epidemiology, clinical presentation, management, and diagnosis with particular reference to resource-poor settings. Method: A search of published literature identified through Medline from 1966 to October 2001, the Cochrane Library, and reference lists taken from each article obtained. Textword and MeSH searches for hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, G, delta, GB virus, GBV-C, and TT virus were linked to searches under the textword terms sex$, prevent$, and MeSH subheadings, microbiology, complications, drug therapy, therapy, diagnosis, epidemiology, transmission, and prevention and control. Conclusions: In heterosexual relationships, hepatitis B is readily transmitted sexually and hepatitis C and D less so, with no evidence for sexual transmission of hepatitis A. Hepatitis types A‘D are all transmissible sexually in male homosexual relationships under certain conditions. In resource-poor countries sexual transmission is generally only a significant route of transmission for hepatitis B. PMID:12181458

  14. ALLYLISOPROPYLACETAMIDE INDUCES RAT HEPATIC ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylisopropylacetamide (AIA) did not cause DNA damage in rat liver. The porphyrinogenic research drug did strongly induce the activity (25-fold) of rat hepatic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). By either the oral or the subcutaneous route AIA produced a long lasting inductio...

  15. Inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis by ethanol. Relation to hepatic and testicular acetaldehyde, ketone bodies and cytosolic redox state in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, C J; Widenius, T V; Ylikahri, R H; Härkönen, M; Leinonen, P

    1983-01-01

    In experiments in which liver and testis freeze-stops were performed on pentobarbital-anaesthetized rats, ethanol (1.5 g/kg body wt.) reduced plasma testosterone concentration from 13.1 to 3.2 nmol/litre. 4-Methylpyrazole abolished the ethanol-induced hepatic and testicular increase in the lactate/pyruvate ratio, and the testicular acetaldehyde level, but did not diminish the reduction in plasma testosterone concentration. In testes, but not in liver, ethanol decreased the 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio, and 4-methylpyrazole did not prevent this effect. In experiments in which freeze-stop was performed after cervical dislocation, ethanol decreased the testis testosterone concentration from 590 to 220 pmol per g wet wt. The effects of ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole on testis acetaldehyde, lactate/pyruvate and 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratios were the same as found during anaesthesia. The NAD+-dependent ethanol oxidation capacity in testis ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mumol/min per g wet wt. and seemed to be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole both in vivo and in vitro. In additional experiments, ethanol doses between 0.3 and 0.9 g/kg body wt. did not alter the plasma testosterone concentration in rats treated, or not treated, with cyanamide, which induced elevated acetaldehyde levels in blood and testes. The results suggest that ethanol-induced inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis was not caused by extratesticular redox increases, or by extra- or intra-testicular acetaldehyde per se. The inhibition is accompanied by changes in testicular ketone-body metabolism. PMID:6847648

  16. Moderate, chronic ethanol feeding exacerbates carbon tetrachloride–induced hepatic fibrosis via hepatocyte-specific hypoxia-inducible factor 1?

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Chiang, Dian J; McMullen, Megan R; Nagy, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia-sensing transcriptional factor HIF1? is implicated in a variety of hepato-pathological conditions; however, the contribution of hepatocyte-derived HIF1? during progression of alcoholic liver injury is still controversial. HIF1? induces a variety of genes including those involved in apoptosis via p53 activation. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis is critical for progression of liver inflammation, stellate cell activation, and fibrosis. Using hepatocyte-specific HIF1?-deficient mice (?HepHIF1??/?), here we investigated the contribution of HIF1? to ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and its role in amplification of fibrosis after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) exposure. Moderate ethanol feeding (11% of kcal) induced accumulation of hypoxia-sensitive pimonidazole adducts and HIF1? expression in the liver within 4 days of ethanol feeding. Chronic CCl4 treatment increased M30-positive cells, a marker of hepatocyte apoptosis in pair-fed control mice. Concomitant ethanol feeding (11% of kcal) amplified CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in livers of wild-type mice, associated with elevated p53K386 acetylation, PUMA expression, and Ly6c+ cell infiltration. Subsequent to increased apoptosis, ethanol-enhanced induction of profibrotic markers, including stellate cell activation, collagen 1 expression, and extracellular matrix deposition following CCl4 exposure. Ethanol-induced exacerbation of hepatocyte apoptosis, p53K386 acetylation, and PUMA expression following CCl4 exposure was attenuated in livers of ?HepHIF1??/? mice. This protection was also associated with a reduction in Ly6c+ cell infiltration and decreased fibrosis in livers of ?HepHIF1??/? mice. In summary, these results indicate that moderate ethanol exposure leads to hypoxia/HIF1?-mediated signaling in hepatocytes and induction of p53-dependent apoptosis of hepatocytes, resulting in increased hepatic fibrosis during chronic CCl4 exposure. PMID:25089199

  17. Hepatitis D virus coinfection and superinfection.

    PubMed

    Negro, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    HDV is a defective RNA pathogen requiring the simultaneous presence of HBV to complete its life cycle. Two major specific patterns of infection have been described: the coinfection with HDV and HBV of a susceptible, anti-HBs-negative individual, or the HDV superinfection of a chronic HBV carrier. Coinfection mostly leads to the eradication of both agents, whereas the majority of patients with HDV superinfection evolve to chronic HDV infection and hepatitis. Chronic HDV infection worsens the preexisting HBV-related liver damage. HDV-associated chronic liver disease (chronic hepatitis D) is characterized by necroinflammation and the relentless deposition of collagen culminating, within a few decades, into the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25368018

  18. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis E

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by hepatitis E virus (HEV), a single-stranded, RNA virus belonging to the Hepeviridae family. TRANSMISSION HEV ... HEV IgM and IgG in serum. Detecting HEV RNA in serum or stools further confirms the serologic ...

  19. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About the Division of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  20. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chronic hepatitis B: update of recommendations. Hepatology. 2004 Mar;39(3):857–61. Mariano A, Mele A, ... age-specific HBsAg seroprevalence and endemicity. Vaccine. 2012 Mar 9;30(12):2212–9. Sagliocca L, Stroffolini ...

  1. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nutrients in the food you eat into muscles, energy, hormones, blood clotting factors and immune factors. ImageT4 ... GIVES Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Hepatitis Foundation ...

  2. Know More Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft ... February 11, 2015 Page last updated: March 5, 2015 Content source: Division of Viral Hepatitis and ...

  3. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  4. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the time the procedure takes place. To ensure immunity, it is important for individuals to complete the ... great majority of those vaccinated will devel- op immunity to the hepatitis B virus. The vaccine causes ...

  5. Hepatitis D Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2015-01-01

    This work reviews specific related aspects of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) reproduction, including virion structure, the RNA genome, the mode of genome replication, the delta antigens, and the assembly of HDV using the envelope proteins of its helper virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV). These topics are considered with perspectives ranging from a history of discovery through to still-unsolved problems. HDV evolution, virus entry, and associated pathogenic potential and treatment of infections are considered in other articles in this collection. PMID:26525452

  6. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  7. Mangafodipir Protects against Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Leconte, Mahaut; Kavian, Niloufar; Bedda, Sassia; Nicco, Carole; Chereau, Christiane; Goulvestre, Claire; Weill, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aim Mangafodipir is a contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging that concentrates in the liver and displays pleiotropic antioxidant properties. Since reactive oxygen species are involved in ischemia-reperfusion damages, we hypothesized that the use of mangafodipir could prevent liver lesions in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. Mangafodipir (MnDPDP) was compared to ischemic preconditioning and intermittent inflow occlusion for the prevention of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in the mouse. Methods Mice were subjected to 70% hepatic ischemia (continuous ischemia) for 90 min. Thirty minutes before the ischemic period, either mangafodipir (10 mg/kg) or saline was injected intraperitoneally. Those experimental groups were compared with one group of mice preconditioned by 10 minutes' ischemia followed by 15 minutes' reperfusion, and one group with intermittent inflow occlusion. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury was evaluated by measurement of serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) activity, histologic analysis of the livers, and determination of hepatocyte apoptosis (cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activity). The effect of mangafodipir on the survival rate of mice was studied in a model of total hepatic ischemia. Results Mangafodipir prevented experimental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the mouse as indicated by a reduction in serum ASAT activity (P<0.01), in liver tissue damages, in markers of apoptosis (P<0.01), and by higher rates of survival in treated than in untreated animals (P<0.001). The level of protection by mangafodipir was similar to that observed following intermittent inflow occlusion and higher than after ischemic preconditioning. Conclusions Mangafodipir is a potential new preventive treatment for hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22073237

  8. Classical and Modern Approaches Used for Viral Hepatitis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Viral hepatitis diagnosis is an important issue in the treatment procedure of this infection. Late diagnosis and delayed treatment of viral hepatitis infections can lead to irreversible liver damages and occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A variety of laboratory methods including old and new technologies are being applied to detect hepatitis viruses. Here we have tried to review, categorize, compare and illustrate the classical and modern approaches used for diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Evidence Acquisition: In order to achieve a comprehensive aspect in viral hepatitis detection methods, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized and summarized in different sections. Results: Analyzing of collected data resulted in the wrapping up the hepatitis virus detection methods in separate sections including 1) immunological methods such as enzyme immunoassay (EIA), radio-immunoassay (RIA) immuno-chromatographic assay (ICA), and immuno-chemiluminescence 2) molecular approaches including non-amplification and amplification based methods, and finally 3) advanced biosensors such as mass-sensitive, electrical, electrochemical and optical based biosensors and also new generation of detection methods. Conclusions: Detection procedures in the clinical laboratories possess a large diversity; each has their individual advantages and facilities' differences. PMID:24829586

  9. Detection of serum TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Yan; Wang, Xue-Lian; Liu, Pei

    1999-01-01

    AIM To assess the possible roles of cytokines (TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6 and IL-8) in liver damage of hepatitis B. METHODS The serum TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected by ELISA in 66 patients with hepatitis B and 20 healthy blood donors. RESULTS TNF-? and IL-6 in all types of clinical hepatitis B were significantly higher than those in healthy blood donors (P < 0.05 ); meanwhile the levels of TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6 and IL-8 in the patients with fulminant hepatitis B were much higher than those in the patients with acute hepatitis B(P < 0.05); the level of TNF-? was positively correlated with the levels of IFN-?, Il-6 and IL-8 in all types of hepatitis B (rIFN = 0.24, rIL-6 = 0.35, rIL-8 = 0.44) and the TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-6 and IL-8 were positively correlated with serum bilirubin (P < 0.05). Dynamic changes of these cytokines were observed in the course of acute and fulminant hepatitis. The level of IFN-? peaked in the initial period of acute hepatitis and early stage of hepatic coma in fulminant hepatitis; TNF?, IL-6 and IL-8 increased with exacer-bation, and reached a peak when the liver da-mage was most serious, then decreased when patient conditions were improved. CONCLUSION The increased cytokines were re-lated to the inflamm ation of liver cells and multi-ple factors may play certain roles in liver dam-age. PMID:11819382

  10. The Anticancer Drug Ellipticine Activated with Cytochrome P450 Mediates DNA Damage Determining Its Pharmacological Efficiencies: Studies with Rats, Hepatic Cytochrome P450 Reductase Null (HRN™) Mice and Pure Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stiborová, Marie; ?erná, V?ra; Moserová, Michaela; Mrízová, Iveta; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Ellipticine is a DNA-damaging agent acting as a prodrug whose pharmacological efficiencies and genotoxic side effects are dictated by activation with cytochrome P450 (CYP). Over the last decade we have gained extensive experience in using pure enzymes and various animal models that helped to identify CYPs metabolizing ellipticine. In this review we focus on comparison between the in vitro and in vivo studies and show a necessity of both approaches to obtain valid information on CYP enzymes contributing to ellipticine metabolism. Discrepancies were found between the CYP enzymes activating ellipticine to 13-hydroxy- and 12-hydroxyellipticine generating covalent DNA adducts and those detoxifying this drug to 9-hydroxy- and 7-hydroellipticine in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, formation of ellipticine-DNA adducts is dependent not only on expression levels of CYP3A, catalyzing ellipticine activation in vitro, but also on those of CYP1A that oxidize ellipticine in vitro mainly to the detoxification products. The finding showing that cytochrome b5 alters the ratio of ellipticine metabolites generated by CYP1A1/2 and 3A4 explained this paradox. Whereas the detoxification of ellipticine by CYP1A and 3A is either decreased or not changed by cytochrome b5, activation leading to ellipticine-DNA adducts increased considerably. We show that (I) the pharmacological effects of ellipticine mediated by covalent ellipticine-derived DNA adducts are dictated by expression levels of CYP1A, 3A and cytochrome b5, and its own potency to induce these enzymes in tumor tissues, (II) animal models, where levels of CYPs are either knocked out or induced are appropriate to identify CYPs metabolizing ellipticine in vivo, and (III) extrapolation from in vitro data to the situation in vivo is not always possible, confirming the need for these animal models. PMID:25547492

  11. Diagnosing and treating hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Olivia; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Cook, Nicola A; Crossey, Mary Me; Dhanjal, Novraj S; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex condition. This article considers the efficacy of the methods used in its diagnosis and management and discusses the impact of minimal hepatic encephalopathy on patients and the ethics of its treatment. PMID:26551495

  12. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  13. Role of occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Onorato, Lorenzo; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensitive assays to detect small amounts of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA has favored the identification of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), a virological condition characterized by a low level of HBV replication with detectable levels of HBV DNA in liver tissue but an absence of detectable surface antigen of HBV (HBsAg) in serum. The gold standard to diagnose OBI is the detection of HBV DNA in the hepatocytes by highly sensitive and specific techniques, a diagnostic procedure requiring liver tissue to be tested and the use of non-standardized non-commercially available techniques. Consequently, in everyday clinical practice, the detection of anti-hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) in serum of HBsAg-negative subjects is used as a surrogate marker to identify patients with OBI. In patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), OBI has been identified in nearly one-third of these cases. Considerable data suggest that OBI favors the increase of liver damage and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with CHC. The data from other studies, however, indicate no influence of OBI on the natural history of CHC, particularly regarding the risk of developing HCC. PMID:26576082

  14. Hepatic hemangioma -review-

    PubMed Central

    Bajenaru, N; Balaban, V; S?vulescu, F; Campeanu, I; Patrascu, T

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic hemangiomas are benign tumors of the liver consisting of clusters of blood-filled cavities, lined by endothelial cells, fed by the hepatic artery. The vast majority of HH are asymptomatic, most often being discovered incidentally during imaging investigations for various unrelated pathologies. Typical hemangiomas, the so-called capillary hemangiomas, range from a few mm to 3 cm, do not increase in size over time and therefore are unlikely to generate future symptomatology. Small (mm-3 cm) and medium (3 cm-10 cm) hemangiomas are well-defined lesions, requiring no active treatment beside regular follow-ups. However, the so-called giant liver hemangiomas, of up to 10 cm (most commonly) and even 20+ cm in size (according to occasional reports) can, and usually will develop symptoms and complications that require prompt surgical intervention or other kind of therapy. HH belong to the class of hepatic “incidentalomas”, so-called because they are diagnosed incidentally, on imaging studies performed as routine examinations or for other reasons than the evaluation of a possible liver mass. Less than half of HH present with overt clinical symptoms, consisting, most often, of upper abdominal pain (this is usually the case for large lesions, which cause the distension of Glisson’s capsule). Hepatic hemangiomas require a careful diagnosis to differentiate from other focal hepatic lesions, co-occurring diagnoses are also possible. PMID:26361504

  15. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 ; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  16. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and swelling of the liver. You should take steps to ... All children should get the hepatitis B vaccine. Babies should get a ... B vaccine at birth. They should have all three shots in ...

  17. Prevention and Management of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Ghali, Peter; Deschenes, Marc; Wong, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects an estimated 370 million people worldwide. HBV is endemic throughout the world, and insidiously causes liver damage over years and decades without any warning symptoms or signs. Up to 25–35% of infected individuals eventually die due to complications of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) induced by HBV. Screening those individuals at risk of acquiring hepatitis B, and universal vaccination for prevention, would help in limiting the spread and public health repercussions of the virus. Although many new antiviral therapies have been developed for the management of hepatitis B, they still do not offer the possibility of cure. Most individuals who begin oral suppressive therapy will be indefinitely treated. Continuous suppression of HBV replication in individuals with advanced liver disease prolongs life, decreases the need for liver transplantation, and potentially reduces the risk for HCC. In this clinical review, we present a practical approach to prevention of HBV, its natural history and life cycle, as well as its management.

  18. Hepatitis G virus: is it a hepatitis virus?

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, R C; Keeffe, E B; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV) and GB virus C (GBV-C) are two newly discovered viral agents, different isolates of a positive-sense RNA virus that represents a new genus of Flaviviridae. The purpose of this review is to analyze new data that have recently been published on the epidemiology and associations between HGV and liver diseases such as posttransfusion hepatitis, acute and chronic non-A-E hepatitis, fulminant hepatitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of HGV in coinfection with other hepatitis viruses, the response to antiviral therapy, and the impact of HGV on liver transplantation are also discussed. HGV is a transmissible blood-borne viral agent that frequently occurs as a coinfection with other hepatitis viruses due to common modes of transmission. The prevalence of HGV ranges from 0.9 to 10% among blood donors throughout the world and is found in 1.7% of volunteer blood donors in the United States. The majority of patients infected with HGV by blood transfusion do not develop chronic hepatitis, but hepatitis G viremia frequently persists without biochemical evidence of hepatitis. Serum HGV RNA has been found in 0 to 50% of patients with fulminant hepatitis of unknown etiology and 14 to 36% of patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis. The association between HGV and chronic non-A-E hepatitis remains unclear. Although HGV appears to be a hepatotrophic virus, its role in independently causing acute and chronic liver diseases remains uncertain. PMID:9265860

  19. Potential role of cAMP response element-binding protein in ethanol-induced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit gene transcription in fetal mouse cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Rani, C S Sheela; Qiang, Mei; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2005-06-01

    We have shown previously that long-term ethanol treatment causes an up-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 2B subunit (NR2B) number and function in cultured fetal mouse cortical neurons. To examine the intracellular signaling pathways involved in this NR2B gene transcription, we have subjected fetal cortical neurons to long-term treatment with ethanol and studied its effect on cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) levels by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We find a significant increase in phosphorylated CREB, without change in total CREB protein, in cells treated with ethanol for 5 days. Long-term ethanol treatment did not increase levels of both total and phospho-ERK in serum-free medium, whereas it did increase ERK phosphorylation in medium containing serum, without affecting total ERK levels. CREB phosphorylation was increased by ethanol treatment in both media, irrespective of the presence of serum. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using a 25-base pair (bp) double-stranded DNA fragment containing the cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-like sequence of the NR2B promoter as (32)P-labeled probe, showed an increase in specific CRE binding to nuclear proteins isolated from cells undergoing long-term ethanol treatment. A 467-bp DNA fragment of the NR2B promoter containing the CRE sequence cloned into the luciferase vector exhibited high reporter activity in transient cotransfection assay of mouse cortical neurons, and ethanol treatment increased this activity. Introducing site-directed mutation in the CRE sequence significantly reduced the reporter activity relative to the wild-type construct, and it also abolished the stimulatory effect by ethanol. Our results indicate that CREB is probably involved in mediating ethanol-induced up-regulation of NR2B gene. PMID:15774772

  20. The effects of Insulin Pre-Administration in Mice Exposed to Ethanol: Alleviating Hepatic Oxidative Injury through Anti-Oxidative, Anti-Apoptotic Activities and Deteriorating Hepatic Steatosis through SRBEP-1c Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Peng, Zhengwu; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Hao; Yu, Weihua; Kong, Deqing; Liu, Ying; Bai, Hua; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodi; Hai, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has become an important liver disease hazard to public and personal health. Oxidative stress is believed to be responsible for the pathological changes in ALD. Previous studies have showed that insulin, a classic regulator of glucose metabolism, has significant anti-oxidative function and plays an important role in maintaining the redox balance. For addressing the effects and mechanisms of insulin pre-administration on ethanol-induced liver oxidative injury, we investigated histopathology, inflammatory factors, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, antioxidant defense system, ethanol metabolic enzymes and lipid disorder in liver of ethanol-exposed mice pretreatment with insulin or not. There are several novel findings in our study. First, we found insulin pre-administration alleviated acute ethanol exposure-induced liver injury and inflammation reflected by the decrease of serum AST and ALT activities, the improvement of pathological alteration and the inhibition of TNF-? and IL-6 expressions. Second, insulin pre-administration could significantly reduce apoptosis and ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in liver of mice exposed to ethanol, supporting by decreasing caspases-3 activities and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, increasing mitochondrial viability and mitochondrial oxygen consumption, inhibition of the decline of ATP levels and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Third, insulin pre-administration prevented ethanol-mediated oxidative stress and enhance antioxidant defense system, which is evaluated by the decline of MDA levels and the rise of GSH/GSSG, the up-regulations of antioxidant enzymes CAT, SOD, GR through Nrf-2 dependent pathway. Forth, the modification of ethanol metabolism pathway such as the inhibition of CYP2E1, the activation of ALDH might be involved in the anti-oxidative and protective effects exerted by insulin pre-administration against acute ethanol exposure in mice. Finally, insulin pre-administration deteriorated hepatic steatosis in mice exposed to ethanol might be through SRBEP-1c activation. In summary, these results indicated that insulin pre-administration effectively alleviated liver oxidative injury through anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities but also deteriorated hepatic steatosis through SRBEP-1c activation in mice exposed to ethanol. Our study provided novel insight about the effects and mechanisms of insulin on ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:25892964

  1. Pharmacologic modulation of experimental postischemic hepatic function.

    PubMed Central

    Ontell, S J; Makowka, L; Trager, J; Mazzaferro, V; Ove, P; Starzl, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the effects of SRI 63-441, a potent platelet activating factor antagonist, superoxide dismutase (SOD), an oxygen free radical scavenger, and ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor on hepatic function after 90 minutes of warm ischemia. After warm ischemia, livers were harvested and underwent 90 minutes of warm, oxygenated, sanguinous perfusion on an isolated liver perfusion apparatus. Pretreatment of donor animals with 20 mg/kg intravenous (I.V.) SRI 63-441 5 minutes before induction of total hepatic ischemia resulted in significantly increased bile production, a significant decrease in transaminase release, and a higher tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content when compared with ischemic nontreated controls. SOD resulted in improved bile production and decreased transaminase liberation only when present in the perfusate at the time of in vitro reperfusion. Ibuprofen did not improve postischemic hepatic function in this model. Electron microscopy revealed patchy hepatocellular vacuolization with an intact sinusoidal endothelium in all ischemic livers. However, the degree of damage was less severe in the livers from those rats pretreated with 20 mg/kg SRI 63-441. This study demonstrates that SRI 63-441 pretreatment significantly reduces hepatic warm ischemic injury, and in the present model, appears superior to two other agents that have been advanced in the treatment of ischemic injury. The use of such agents singly or in combinations have important implications as regards gaining a better understanding of the basic mechanisms in organ ischemia, and moreover, for therapeutic applications in organ ischemia and preservation. Images Fig. 3. Figs. 6A-C. Figs. 6A-C. Fig. 7. Figs. 8A-C. Figs. 8A-C. PMID:2916864

  2. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Maggiore, Giuseppe; Nastasio, Silvia; Sciveres, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis (JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific and organ-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoantibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature. PMID:25067998

  3. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  4. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis B Vaccine

    E-print Network

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis B Vaccine What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information stuck with a used needle. Hepatitis B vaccine: Why get 2 vaccinated? Hepatitis B vaccine can prevent. Hepatitis B vaccine may be given by itself or in the same shot with other vaccines. Routine hepatitis B

  5. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis A Vaccine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis A Vaccine What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information 1,000 cases). Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A. 2 Who should get hepatitis A vaccine and when? WHO? Some people should be routinely vaccinated with hepatitis A vaccine: · All children between

  6. Durchbruch bei der Therapie der Hepatitis C

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Durchbruch bei der Therapie der Hepatitis C: Segen für die Patienten ­ Albtraum für die Behandler -Virushepatitis Oktober 2012 #12;H. Wedemeyer -Virushepatitis Oktober 2012 Hepatitisviren Hepatitis A Feinstone 1973 RNA Hepatitis B Blumberg 1965 DNA Hepatitis C Houghton 1988 RNA Hepatitis D Rizzetto 1977 RNA

  7. Hepatitis A Also Known As Hep A

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A it may be linked to food related outbreaks ...

  8. Hepatic oxidative stress in an animal model of sleep apnoea: effects of different duration of exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Repeated apnoea events cause intermittent hypoxia (IH), which alters the function of various systems and produces free radicals and oxidative stress. Methods We investigated hepatic oxidative stress in adult mice subjected to intermittent hypoxia, simulating sleep apnoea. Three groups were submitted to 21 days of IH (IH-21), 35 days of IH (IH-35), or 35 days of sham IH. We assessed the oxidative damage to lipids by TBARS and to DNA by comet assay; hepatic tissue inflammation was assessed in HE-stained slides. Antioxidants were gauged by catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activity and by total glutathione. Results After IH-21, no significant change was observed in hepatic oxidative stress. After IH-35, significant oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and reduction of endogenous antioxidants were detected. Conclusions In an animal model of sleep apnoea, intermittent hypoxia causes liver damage due to oxidative stress after 35 days, but not after 21 days. PMID:21729291

  9. Serum Fibronectin Levels in Acute and Chronic Viral Hepatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    ERTURK, Ayse; CURE, Erkan; OZKURT, Zulal; PARLAK, Emine; CURE, Medine Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the serum fibronectin (FN) levels and liver enzyme activities in patients with acute hepatitis (A, B, C) and chronic viral hepatitis (B, C); determine whether the virus types correlated with disease severity; and assess whether FN could be used as a marker of virus type or disease severity in patients. Methods: A total of 60 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 20 patients with acute hepatitis (A, B, C), 20 with chronic hepatitis (B, C), and 20 healthy controls. Serum fibronectin (FN), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and albumin were measured in all patients from blood samples. Results: Serum FN levels were significantly lower in acute (122.9 ?g/mL (SD 43.1), P < 0.001) and chronic hepatitis patients (135.7 ?g/mL (SD 46.0), P < 0 .001) compared to controls 221.4 ?g/mL (SD 32.5). A negative correlation was found between serum FN and AST (r2 = 0.528, P < 0.001), ALT (r2 = 0.425, P < 0.001), and GGT (r2 = 0.339, P < 0.001). Additionally, high serum GGT levels (? = –0.375, P = 0.010), and low serum albumin levels (? = –0.305, P = 0.008) were associated with low serum FN levels. Conclusion: Serum FN levels were lower in both acute and chronic hepatitis patients, and an inverse relationship between serum FN and serum AST, ALT, and GGT levels was found. A decrease in serum FN levels may indicate hepatitis severity as AST and ALT represent hepatocyte damage. PMID:24639609

  10. Iron Deficiency Impairs Intra-Hepatic Lymphocyte Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Juan José; Martinez-Picola, Marta; Kodela, Elisavet; Mas-Malavila, Roser; Bruguera, Miquel; Collins, Helen L.; Hider, Robert C.; Martinez-Llordella, Marc; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic expression of iron homeostasis genes and serum iron parameters predict the success of immunosuppression withdrawal following clinical liver transplantation, a phenomenon known as spontaneous operational tolerance. In experimental animal models, spontaneous liver allograft tolerance is established through a process that requires intra-hepatic lymphocyte activation and deletion. Our aim was to determine if changes in systemic iron status regulate intra-hepatic lymphocyte responses. We used a murine model of lymphocyte-mediated acute liver inflammation induced by Concanavalin A (ConA) injection employing mice fed with an iron-deficient (IrDef) or an iron-balanced diet (IrRepl). While the mild iron deficiency induced by the IrDef diet did not significantly modify the steady state immune cell repertoire and systemic cytokine levels, it significantly dampened inflammatory liver damage after ConA challenge. These findings were associated with a marked decrease in T cell and NKT cell activation following ConA injection in IrDef mice. The decreased liver injury observed in IrDef mice was independent from changes in the gut microflora, and was replicated employing an iron specific chelator that did not modify intra-hepatic hepcidin secretion. Furthermore, low-dose iron chelation markedly impaired the activation of isolated T cells in vitro. All together, these results suggest that small changes in iron homeostasis can have a major effect in the regulation of intra-hepatic lymphocyte mediated responses. PMID:26287688

  11. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Primary Hepatic Angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T.; Aisien, Efe; Mba, Benjamin; Chennuri, Rohini; Sekosan, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare and aggressive tumor that often presents at an advanced stage with nonspecific symptoms. Objective. To report a case of primary hepatic angiosarcoma in an otherwise healthy man with normal liver function tests two months prior to presenting with a short period of jaundice that progressed to fulminant hepatic failure. Methods. Case report and review of literature. Conclusion. This case illustrates the rapidity of progression to death after the onset of symptoms in a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma. Research on early diagnostic strategies and newer therapies are needed to improve prognosis in this rare and poorly understood malignancy with limited treatment options. PMID:25815217

  12. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased.

  13. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stinton, Laura M; Jayakumar, Saumya

    2013-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis of MHE has traditionally been achieved through neuropsychological examination, psychometric tests or the newer critical flicker frequency test. A new smartphone application (EncephalApp Stroop Test) may serve to function as a screening tool for patients requiring further testing. In addition to physician reporting and driving restrictions, medical treatment for MHE includes non-absorbable disaccharides (eg, lactulose), probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not result in reversal of the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. PMID:24106728

  14. [Primary hepatic carcinoid].

    PubMed

    Plásek, J; Vybíralová, M; Dvorácková, J; Petrusková, A; Sagan, J; Golián, M; Hrabovský, V; Petejová, N; Martínek, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid (PHC) is considered to be particularly sporadic diagnosis; in current world literature about 60 cases have been reported. Most of the patients present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, icterus, flush, weight loss or respiratory disease; even though the course of the disease might stay asymptomatic for a long time. An illuminating case of at presentation oligosymptomatic 72-year-old patient, which was after extensive examination based on OctreoScan and histological verification diagnosed to have generalized PHC, is reported. Paliative therapy with somatostatine analogues followed. At autopsy 8 months later the clinical diagnosis of PHC was confirmed. PHC is difficult to diagnose both due to radiological similarity to other hepatic lesions and demanding exclusion of other primary foci. The diagnosis of PHC is based on negative imaging techniques result in other possible localizations. Minimal symptomatology in stage of generalization, atypical primary localization and rapid progression is of interest in current case. PMID:21751545

  15. Testing for the Hepatitis C Virus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Summary – Sept. 13, 2013 Testing for the Hepatitis C Virus Formats View PDF (PDF) 999 kB Download ... this summary. Understanding the Condition What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a disease caused by a ...

  16. Hepatic vein obstruction (Budd-Chiari)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatic vein obstruction is a blockage of the hepatic vein, which carries blood away from the liver. ... Hepatic vein obstruction prevents blood from flowing out of the liver and back to the heart. This blockage can ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research studies PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Congenital hepatic fibrosis On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed January 2012 What is congenital hepatic fibrosis? Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the ...

  18. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells of different developmental stages from early progenitors to matured hepatocytes can be acquired in the appropriate order based on sequential induction with VPA and cytokines. PMID:19891015

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  20. Hepatitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ?????? ????? ???????? - ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (????) Viral Hepatitis ????? - ???? (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (????) Viral Hepatitis ????? - ???? (Chinese - ...

  1. Association between Hepatitis G and Unknown Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Soleiman-Meigooni, Saeed; Asgari, Ali; Hoseini-Shokouh, Seyyed Javad; Rajabi, Jalil; Kazemi-Galougahi, Mohammad Hassan; Moshtaghi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a hepatotrope virus with unknown importance. The genome of the virus has been detected in patients with acute or chronic non-A-E hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine the association between hepatitis G and unknown chronic hepatitis. Methods: This case-control study was performed in Ebne-Sina military hospital in Hamadan, Iran. The cases were 35 military staff with unknown chronic hepatitis. The control group consisted of 59 healthy subjects who had normal levels of serum alanine aminoteransferase (ALT). The data were analyzed by SPSS, version18, using Fisher’s exact test, the Student’s t-test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Only one patient in the case group (2.9%) tested positive for HGV antibodies, and no one was infected in the control group. There was no association between HGV infection and unknown chronic hepatitis in our study (P=0.37). A significant association was found between the male gender and unknown chronic hepatitis (OR=14.9, P=0.01). Conclusion: No association between HGV infection and unknown chronic hepatitis was found in our study, so it was not necessary to evaluate these patients for HGV infection. PMID:26052409

  2. Hepatitis C virus associated glomerulopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Yildiz, Alaattin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a systemic disorder which is often associated with a number of extrahepatic manifestations including glomerulopathies. Patients with HCV infection were found to have a higher risk of end-stage renal disease. HCV positivity has also been linked to lower graft and patient survivals after kidney transplantation. Various histological types of renal diseases are reported in association with HCV infection including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, fibrillary glomerulonephritis, immunotactoid glomerulopathy, IgA nephropathy, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, vasculitic renal involvement and interstitial nephritis. The most common type of HCV associated glomerulopathy is type?I?MPGN associated with type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. Clinically, typical renal manifestations in HCV-infected patients include proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, hypertension, acute nephritis and nephrotic syndrome. Three approaches may be suggested for the treatment of HCV-associated glomerulopathies and cryoglobulinemic renal disease: (1) antiviral therapy to prevent the further direct damage of HCV on kidneys and synthesis of immune-complexes; (2) B-cell depletion therapy to prevent formation of immune-complexes and cryoglobulins; and (3) nonspecific immunosuppressive therapy targeting inflammatory cells to prevent the synthesis of immune-complexes and to treat cryoglobulin associated vasculitis. In patients with moderate proteinuria and stable renal functions, anti-HCV therapy is advised to be started as pegylated interferon-? plus ribavirin. However in patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria and/or progressive kidney injury and other serious extra-renal manifestations, immunosuppressive therapy with cyclophosphamide, rituximab, steroid pulses and plasmapheresis should be administrated. PMID:24976695

  3. Immune Components of Liver Damage Associated with Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serov, Youri A.; Alazmi, Mansour; Baba, Kamaldeen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are associated with liver abnormalities and often have overlapping pathological and clinical manifestations. As a result, they can present great clinical challenges and evoke questions about diagnostic criteria for liver diseases. Moreover, discriminating between liver involvement as a manifestation of connective tissue disease and primary liver disease can be challenging since they share a similar immunological mechanism. Most patients with connective tissue diseases exhibit liver test abnormalities that likely result from coexisting, primary liver diseases, such as fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and drug-related liver toxicity. Liver damage can be progressive, leading to cirrhosis, complications of portal hypertension, and liver-related death, and, therefore, must be accurately identified. In this review, we highlight the challenges facing the diagnosis of liver damage associated with connective tissue disease and identify immune mechanisms involved in liver damage associated with connective tissue diseases. PMID:26357616

  4. Hepatitis E, the neglected one.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, Hélène; Abravanel, Florence; Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Péron, Jean Marie

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. It is the first cause of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million cases every year and 56 000 deaths. In developing countries, hepatitis E is a waterborne infection. In these countries, HEV genotypes 1 and 2 cause large outbreaks and affect young subjects with a significant mortality rate in pregnant women and patients with cirrhosis. In the developed countries, HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are responsible for autochthonous, sporadic hepatitis and transmission is zoonotic. HEV can cause neurological disorders and in immunocompromised patients, chronic infections. The progression of acute hepatitis E is most often mild and resolves spontaneously. Diagnostic tools include anti-HEV IgM antibodies in serum and/or viral RNA in the blood or stools by PCR. Ribavirin is used to treat chronic infection. A vaccine has been developed in China. PMID:26725910

  5. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-11-14

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  6. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  7. Hepatic radiation injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Mariano, M.S.; Jackson, K.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The whole livers of rats were exposed intraoperatively to graded doses (0 to 75 Gy) of {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation. At various times (0 to 155 days) after liver irradiation, minimally invasive, nondestructive tests (rose bengal retention and plasma alkaline phosphatase, glutamic-oxaloacetic acid transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase) were performed on at least half the surviving animals in each dose group to assess developing liver injury. Liver histology was done on animals sacrificed 96 to 100 days after irradiation. Radiation damage to the stomach killed approximately 50% of the animals 30 to 60 days after exposure to doses of 25 Gy or higher. These deaths were significantly reduced when care was taken to shield the stomach during irradiation. Stomach injury did not, however, appreciably affect liver function as measured by rose bengal retention. Whole-liver irradiation to 15 Gy resulted in reduced liver size and minimal histological changes, but did not result in increased rose bengal retention or plasma alkaline phosphatase concentration. The next highest dose group studied (25 Gy) showed significant histological abnormalities and liver injury as measured by increased rose bengal retention and liver enzymes. The latent period for development of hepatic injury, as measured by increased rose bengal retention, was 35 to 42 days and was relatively invariant over the 25- to 75-Gy dose range. Hepatic vein lesions and cellular necrosis were the most prominent histological lesions observed in 25-Gy-irradiated liver.

  8. Hepatic oxidative stress, genotoxicity and vascular dysfunction in lean or obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Løhr, Mille; Folkmann, Janne K; Sheykhzade, Majid; Jensen, Lars J; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which could be related to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the associations between hepatic oxidative stress and vascular function in pressurized mesenteric arteries from lean and obese Zucker rats at 14, 24 and 37 weeks of age. Obese Zucker rats had more hepatic fat accumulation than their lean counterparts. Nevertheless, the obese rats had unaltered age-related level of hepatic oxidatively damaged DNA in terms of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) or human oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) sensitive sites as measured by the comet assay. There were decreasing levels of oxidatively damaged DNA with age in the liver of lean rats, which occurred concurrently with increased expression of Ogg1. The 37 week old lean rats also had higher expression level of Hmox1 and elevated levels of DNA strand breaks in the liver. Still, both strain of rats had increased protein level of HMOX-1 in the liver at 37 weeks. The external and lumen diameters of mesenteric arteries increased with age in obese Zucker rats with no change in media cross-sectional area, indicating outward re-modelling without hypertrophy of the vascular wall. There was increased maximal response to acetylcholine-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in both strains of rats. Collectively, the results indicate that obese Zucker rats only displayed a modest mesenteric vascular dysfunction, with no increase in hepatic oxidative stress-generated DNA damage despite substantial hepatic steatosis. PMID:25738756

  9. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  10. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    E-print Network

    Hulshof, Joost

    How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus Maria Xiridou1 *, Barbara Borkent Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection

  11. Regulatory Mechanisms of Injury and Repair after Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lentsch, Alex B.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury is an important complication of liver surgery and transplantation. The mechanisms of this injury as well as the subsequent reparative and regenerative processes have been the subject of thorough study. In this paper, we discuss the complex and coordinated responses leading to parenchymal damage after liver ischemia/reperfusion as well as the manner in which the liver clears damaged cells and regenerates functional mass. PMID:24278708

  12. [THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND CHEMOKINES IN LABORATORY DIAGNOSTIC OF CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS C].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Arsentieva, N A; Lubimova, N E; Tulienev, S V; Basina, V V; Esaulenko, E V; Totolyan, A A

    2015-08-01

    The chronic viral hepatitis C is widely prevalent disease with prolonged persistence of virus and obliterated clinical picture. The present techniques of diagnostic of degree of fibrosis of liver and prognosis of course of disease have particular shortcomings. Hence, search of safe low invasive methods based on blood biomarkers is an actual task. The cytokines/chemokines (mediators of chronic inflammation) directly involved into immunopathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis C can act in the capacity of biomarkers. The study was carried out to comprehensively analyze content of cytokines/chemokines in peripheral blood of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C at various stages of disease and infected by different genotypes of virus of hepatitis C. The concentration of cytokines/chemokines was identified in blood plasma of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C (n = 73) and conditionally healthy donors (n =3 7): IFN?, IFN?, IFN?/IL28?, TNF?, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-l?, CCL4/MIP-l?, CCL5/RANTES, CCL8/MCP-2, CCL20/AIP-3?, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/P-10, CXCLII/ITAC. The multiplex analysis using technology xMAP was applied. The increasing of level of TNF?, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/ MIP-l, CCL8/ACP-2, CCL20/MIP-3?, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10, CXCL11/ITA C was established in blood plasma of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C as compared with control group. The levels of analyzed interferons IFN?, IFN?, IFN?/IL28? had no difference in studied groups. As far as chronic viral hepatitis C progresses and fibrosis of hepatic tissue develops the concentrations of TNF?, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL20/MIP-3?, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-l0, CXCL11/ITAC increased significantly. The concentrations of chemokine CXCL11/IT4 C can be used as informative indicator for differentiating diagnostic of early stages of liver fibrosis. Depending on genotype of virus of hepatitis C, in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C change in content of CCL8/MCP-2 was established. Hence, detection in blood plasma of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C concentration of particular cytokines/chemokines using multiplex analysis technique permit analyzing additional information concerning degree of liver fibrosis, activity of process of damage of hepatic tissue under chronic viral hepatitis C that indicates indirectly on genotype of virus of hepatitis C. PMID:26596048

  13. Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2013-12-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

  14. Hepatitis D and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam; Abbas, Sarim; Shazi, Lubna

    2015-04-18

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a defective circular shape single stranded HDV RNA virus with two types of viral proteins, small and large hepatitis D antigens, surrounded by hepatitis B surface antigen. Superinfection with HDV in chronic hepatitis B is associated with a more threatening form of liver disease leading to rapid progression to cirrhosis. In spite of some controversy in the epidemiological studies, HDV infection does increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) monoinfection. Hepatic decompensation, rather than development of HCC, is the first usual clinical endpoint during the course of HDV infection. Oxidative stress as a result of severe necroinflammation may progress to HCC. The large hepatitis D antigen is a regulator of various cellular functions and an activator of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Another proposed epigenetic mechanism by which HCC may form is the aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA Methyltransferases. HDV antigens have also been associated with increased histone H3 acetylation of the clusterin promoter. This enhances the expression of clusterin in infected cells, increasing cell survival potential. Any contribution of HBV DNA integration with chromosomes of infected hepatocytes is not clear at this stage. The targeted inhibition of STAT3 and cyclophilin, and augmentation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? have a potential therapeutic role in HCC. PMID:25914778

  15. Primer for Teachers: Quick and Easy Liver Wellness, Hepatitis B and Substance Abuse Prevention Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Thelma King

    This guide provides information for teachers to use in teaching about liver wellness, hepatitis B, and substance abuse. The guide includes effective motivational techniques to help students understand how valuable their liver is to their health and well being. It also provides basic information to help students avoid liver damaging behaviors, such…

  16. Intercellular calcium waves mediate preferential cell growth toward the wound edge in polarized hepatic cells

    E-print Network

    Lin, Chi-Hung

    During liver regeneration, hepatocytes sense the damage and initiate proliferation of the quiescent cells be fundamentally similar to liver regeneration [1,2] and the development of hepatic fibrosis (cirrhosis) [1]. Tradition- ally, the study of liver regeneration is mainly performed on either partially resected (e

  17. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  18. Complete dissection of a hepatic segment after blunt abdominal injury successfully treated by anatomical hepatic lobectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Kawashita, Yujo; Kawahara, Daisuke; Kuba, Sayaka; Kawahara, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Toru; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old male patient was transferred to the emergency room of our hospital after suffering seat belt abdominal injury in a traffic accident. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a massive hematoma in the abdominal cavity associated with deep hepatic lacerations in the right lobe. The presence of a solid tissue possibly containing pneumobilia was observed above the greater omentum. These findings were consistent with a tentative diagnosis of hepatic laceration due to blunt trauma; therefore, this prompted us to perform emergency laparotomy. The operative findings revealed a massive hematoma and pulsatile bleeding from the lacerated liver and a retroperitoneal hepatoma, which was most likely due to subcapsular injury of the right kidney. In accordance with the preoperative imaging studies, a pale liver fragment on the greater omentum was observed, which was morphologically consistent with the defect in the posterior segment of the liver. Since the damaged area of the liver broadly followed the course of the middle hepatic vein, we carefully inspected and isolated the inflow vessels and eventually performed a right hepatic lobectomy. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he was doing well at 10 months after surgery. PMID:21512618

  19. Natural History of Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Lingala, Shilpa; Ghany, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C infection is a common cause of cirrhosis and indication for liver transplantation in the United States. The incidence of chronic hepatitis C has been declining, but rates of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are projected to increase. The outcome of chronic hepatitis C is variable. It is estimated that 20% to 25% will develop cirrhosis over a 25-year to 30-year period. The rate of disease progression is influenced by many host, viral, and environmental factors. Few can be modified. PMID:26600216

  20. The hepatoprotective effect of aqueous extracts of Penthorum chinense Pursh against acute alcohol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic steatosis and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Wei; Jiang, Yun; Zhang, Da-Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Li, Peng; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Penthorum chinense Pursh (PCP), a health food and folk medicine, against acute alcohol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with an aqueous extract of PCP (5.2 and 10.3 g per kg BW) once daily for 7 consecutive days prior to ethanol gavage (4.7 g kg(-1)) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Pretreatment with PCP significantly decreased the elevations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and hepatic triglyceride after the last ethanol administration. PCP suppressed the elevation of the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, restored the glutathione (GSH) level and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in both the serum and liver, which were associated with the inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). In addition, alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) through up-regulating protein expressions of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL), and enhancing the fatty acid uptake capacity in the liver by elevated hepatic CD36 expression, which were attenuated by PCP treatment. These data demonstrated that pre-treatment with PCP protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly by reducing CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress and ameliorating dysfunctional WAT derived-fatty acid influx to the liver. Our findings suggest that PCP might be a promising agent for the prevention of acute alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:25820653

  1. The hepatic-arterial/portal-venous scintiangiogram in alcoholic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.; Sakimura, I.; Siegel, M.E.; Harley, H.; Lee, K.

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to identify abnormalities in the hepatic-arterial/portal-venous scintiangiogram (SA) in alcoholic hepatitis (AH). SA's were performed in 35 patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), 8; acute alcoholic hepatitis superimposed on cirrhosis (A/C), 14; and cirrhosis (C), 13. Posterior flows were done with a bolus of 10 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid with computer time-activity curves over the liver and left kidney. Curves were analyzed for per cent of hepatic arterial (HA) and portal venous contribution using the slope ratio method. Hepatic arterialization was estimated from the angle of the HA component of the curve. Reversal of the relative contribution of the hepatic and portal components of total flow were seen in all groups. Although quite severe in AH, the degree of reversal could not be used to differentiate among the groups. The average HA angle in AAH was 48.3 +- 8.1, in A/C 41.5 +- 10.6, and in C 30.4 +- 12.1. In reviewing the data of only those in the acute clinical phase of AH and not the recovery phase (1 AAH, 3 A/C) and those without other causes of alteration in hepatic arterialization (1 hepatoma, 1 portalcaval shunt, 6 renal failure), the average HA angle in AAH was 50.1 +- 6.6, 45.4 +- 8.2 in A/C, and 23.2 +- 4.2 in C. In 6 with renal failure (2 C, 2AAH, 2 A/C) the HA angle ws 52.7 +- 5.7. In all cases cirrhosis could be differentiated from both A/C (P=.05) and AAH (P<.01) using the HA angle. In absence of renal failure, portal shunt, or hepatoma, P was <.01 in both comparisons.

  2. Hepatic encephalopathy: historical remarks.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero

    2015-03-01

    The history of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is briefly reviewed since the beginning of western medicine by Hippocrates. For about 2000 years the main evidence was the mere association between jaundice, fever and delirium. A clear link between delirium and cirrhosis was proven in the 17th century by Morgagni. In subsequent times the focus was manly the descriptions of symptoms and the only pathophysiological improvement was the evidence that jaundice, per se, does not alter brain function. Only at the end of the 19th century Hann et al proved the role of portal-systemic shunt and pf nitrogenous derivates in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. A terrific development of knowledge occurred in the last 60 years, after the works of Sherlock in London. Nowadays some consensus about HE was reached, so that new developments will likely occur. PMID:26041956

  3. [Chronic hepatitis B therapy].

    PubMed

    Morovi?, Miro; Troselj-Vuki?, Biserka; Klarin, Ivo; Hrsti?, Irena; Ostoji?, Rajko

    2009-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is associated with the development of cirrhosis in more than one third of patients and in a large proportion of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Current standard treatment includes pegylated interferon alfa-2a and five oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues: entecavir, tenofovir, adefovir, telbivudine and lamivudine (listed according to antiviral efficacy). The advantage of interferon treatment is the possibility of long-term remission in one third of carefully selected HbeAg+ patients without development of resistance. However, interferon treatment is not efficient in the majority of patients. The advantage of treatment with nucleoside and nucleotide analogues is the possibility to suppress HBV DNA to undetectable levels in 70%-90% of patients. However, analogue treatment is a long-term treatment (possibly life-long) and is associated with the development of resistance. PMID:20198897

  4. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. PMID:24480288

  5. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  6. Hepatitis E infection during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Shahnaz A.; Verma, Natasha; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question Many of my patients are from Southeast Asia where hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is quite common. What precautions can I suggest they take before traveling to these areas and what is the risk of contracting HEV during pregnancy? Answer Hepatitis E is a water-borne pathogen transmitted by the fecal-oral route. To reduce the risk of contracting HEV while traveling to endemic areas, it is important to maintain hygienic practices such as hand washing with safe water, particularly before handling food, avoiding drinking water or using ice cubes of unknown purity, and avoiding eating unpeeled fruits and vegetables. Currently there is no vaccine available in Canada for HEV. Hepatitis E infection during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester, is characterized by a more severe infection that sometimes results in fulminant hepatitis, increasing maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26175368

  7. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  8. Resveratrol improves hepatic insulin signaling and reduces the inflammatory response in streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Pekta?, Mehmet Bilgehan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Tosun, Murat; Koca, Tulay

    2015-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous metabolic disorder essentially characterized by deficiency of insulin secretion, insulin receptor or post-receptor events. This study aims to investigate the effects of resveratrol administration on the metabolic characteristics, hepatic functions, histopathological features and insulin signaling pathway components in streptozotocin induced diabetes. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control/vehicle; (2) control/20mg/kg resveratrol; (3) diabetic/vehicle; and (4) diabetic/20mg/kg resveratrol. Histopathological examinations were carried out to reveal hepatic tissue damage and inflammation. In addition to hepatic glucose, lipid, insulin, ALT, AST, resistin and XOD contents, gene and protein expressions of insulin signaling pathway components such as insulin R?, IRS-1, IRS-2, eNOS, PI3K, Akt, and FOXO3a were analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. The rats in the diabetes group had significantly lower terminal body weight and hepatic insulin level, but significantly higher hepatic glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride and resistin concentrations. Diabetes triggered the inflammatory process in the liver tissues that was evidenced by histopathological deformations and increase in the hepatic ALT and AST levels. Hepatic inflammation was considerably associated with insulin signaling pathway ever since a significant down-regulation of insulin signaling components; IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3K, Akt and mTOR have been identified in the diabetic group. To some extent, resveratrol treatment reversed the diabetes-induced changes in the liver tissues. Taken together, resveratrol partly improved hepatic dysfunction induced by diabetes. This may be due to the healing activity of resveratrol on insulin signaling pathway, resistin levels and hepatic glucose-lipid contents. PMID:26071184

  9. [Therapeutic update in hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Devesa, María José; Cuenca, Francisca; Izquierdo, Sonia; Sánchez-Pobre, Pilar; Ladero, José María; López-Alonso, Gustavo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; Rey, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is a major health burden affecting 130-170 million people worldwide. Approximately 10-30% of those with chronic hepatitis C will progress to cirrhosis over 20-30 years. The development of new direct-acting antivirals has changed the management of the disease, allowing efficacious Interferon-free therapies superior to prior treatment regimens with minimal side effects, even in some subgroups previously thought to be difficult to cure such as cirrhotic patients. PMID:26365735

  10. Gastroprotective Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Byoung Hwan; Seo, Pyoung Ju; Kang, Jung Mook; Jo, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The major compounds of Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) include momordica saponins. We report that the gastroprotective effect of SK-MS10 in an ethanol-induced gastric damage rat model is mediated by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and downregulating cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study, we evaluated the gastroprotective effects of SK-MS10 in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage rat model. Methods The pretreatment effect of SK-MS10 was evaluated in the NSAID-induced gastric damage rat model using aspirin, indomethacin, and diclofenac in 7-week-old rats. Gastric damage was evaluated based on the gross ulcer index by gastroenterologists, and the damage area (%) was measured using the MetaMorph 7.0 video image analysis system. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting was used to analyze the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, cPLA2, and 5-LOX. Results All NSAIDs induced gastric damage based on the gross ulcer index and damage area (p<0.05). Gastric damage was significantly attenuated by SK-MS10 pretreatment compared with NSAID treatment alone (p<0.05). The SK-MS10 pretreatment group exhibited lower MPO levels than the diclofenac group. The expression of cPLA2 and 5-LOX was decreased by SK-MS10 pretreatment in each of the three NSAID treatment groups. Conclusions SK-MS10 exhibited a gastroprotective effect against NSAID-induced acute gastric damage in rats. However, its protective mechanism may be different across the three types of NSAID-induced gastric damage models in rats. PMID:24516701

  11. Activation of ?2 adrenoceptor attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing-Hui; Yu, Gao-Feng; Jin, Shang-Yi; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Lei, Dong-Xu; Zhou, Shao-Li; Song, Xing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis induces hepatic injury but whether alpha-2 adrenoceptor (?2-AR) modulates the severity of sepsis-induced liver damage remains unclear. The present study used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce hepatic injury and applied ?2-AR agonist dexmedetomidine (DEX) and/or antagonist yohimbine to investigate the contribution of ?2-AR in LPS-induced liver injury. Our results showed that LPS resulted in histological and functional abnormality of liver tissue (ALT and AST transaminases, lactate), higher mortality, an increase in proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6 & TNF-?), as well as a change in oxidative stress (MDA, SOD). Activation of ?2-AR by dexmedetomidine (DEX) attenuated LPS-induced deleterious effects on the liver and block of ?2-AR by yohimbine aggravated LPS-induced liver damage. Our data suggest that ?2-AR plays an important role in sepsis-induced liver damage and activation of ?2-AR with DEX could be a novel therapeutic avenue to protect the liver against sepsis-induced injury.

  12. Current research of hepatic cirrhosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xi-Xian; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Yao, Dong-Mei

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is a common disease that poses a serious threat to public health, and is characterized by chronic, progressive and diffuse hepatic lesions preceded by hepatic fibrosis regardless of the exact etiologies. In recent years, considerable achievements have been made in China in research of the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and especially the treatment of hepatic fibrosis, resulting in much improved prognosis of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. In this paper, the authors review the current status of research in hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and their major complications. PMID:15655809

  13. Effect of N-desulfated heparin on hepatic/renal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Chen, Jin-Lian; Song, Wei; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Ni, Pei-Hua; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of N-desulfated heparin on hepatic/renal ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. METHODS: Using rat models of 60 min hepatic or renal ischemia followed by 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h reperfusion, animals were randomly divided into following groups, the sham operated controls, ischemic group receiving only normal saline, and treated group receiving N-desulfated heparin at a dose of 12 mg/kg at 5 min before reperfusion. P-selectin expression was detected in hepatic/renal tissues with immunohistochemistry method. RESULTS: P-selectin expression, serum ALT, AST, BUN and Cr levels were significantly increased during 60 minute ischemia and 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h reperfusion, while the increment was significantly inhibited, and hepatic/renal pathology observed by light microscopy was remarkably improved by treatment with the N-desulfated heparin. Furthermore, the heparin was found no effects on PT and KPTT. CONCLUSION: P-selectin might mediate neutrophil infiltration and contribute to hepatic/renal ischemia and reperfusion. The N-desulfated heparin might prevent hepatic/renal damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion injury without significant anticoagulant activity. PMID:12378638

  14. An overview of triple infection with hepatitis B, C and D viruses.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Mehwish; Idrees, Muhamad; Kanwal, Hifza; Kabir, Firoz

    2011-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is one of the major health problems worldwide, particularly in South East Asian countries including Pakistan where hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are highly endemic. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is also not uncommon world-wide. HCV, HBV, and HDV share parallel routes of transmission due to which dual or triple viral infection can occur in a proportion of patients at the same time. HBV and HCV are important factors in the development of liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition to LC and HCC, chronic HDV infection also plays an important role in liver damage with oncogenic potential.The current article reviews the available literature about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, transmission, symptoms, diagnosis, replication, disease outcome, treatment and preventive measures of triple hepatitis infection by using key words; epidemiology of triple infection, risk factors, awareness status, treatment and replication cycle in PubMed, PakMediNet, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Google Scholar. Total data from 74 different studies published from 1983 to 2010 on triple hepatitis infections were reviewed and included in this study. The present article briefly describes triple infection with HCV, HBV and HDV. PMID:21791115

  15. Hepatic abscesses after adhesiolysis

    PubMed Central

    Antonsen, J.; Balachandran, R.; Helgstrand, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hematogenous spread of bacteria from the bowel due to bacterial translocation has been postulated in animal and trauma studies. This case presents a patient with possible hematogenous bacterial spreading after acute laparotomy. Case presentation A 57-year old woman was admitted with abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed mechanical small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy was performed showing no contamination, and no bowel resection was performed. The patient was not given any antibiotics during this time. The patient was re-admitted 24 h after discharge with fever, elevated white count and abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed newly developed intrahepatic abscesses. These were treated with antibiotics, and the patient was discharged with follow-up ultrasound showing diminished abscesses. Discussion This case discusses the possible pathophysiology behind the development of intrahepatic abscesses after small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Febrilia and pain in upper right quadrant of the abdomen days after a simple operation for bowel obstruction could be caused by translocation of intestinal bacteria and subsequent formation of hepatic abscesses. PMID:26410805

  16. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A be prevented? The hepatitis A vaccine offers immunity to adults and children older than age 1. ... Treatment with immune globulin can provide short-term immunity to hepatitis A when given before exposure or ...

  17. Hepatitis A - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Thai (???????) Turkish (Türkçe) Vietnamese (Tiê?ng Viê?t) Arabic (???????) Hepatitis A ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Turkish (Türkçe) Hepatitis A Vaccine English Hepatit A A?isi - ...

  18. Hepatitis B - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Laotian (Lao) Portuguese (português) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Turkish (Türkçe) Vietnamese (Tiê?ng Viê?t) Amharic (amarunya) Hepatitis: Type ... Tagalog (Tagalog) PDF Stanford University, Asian Liver Center Turkish (Türkçe) Hepatitis B Vaccine English Hepatit B A?isi - ...

  19. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2012

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed. PMID:26675364

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-12-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed. PMID:26675364

  2. Inflammatory status in human hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Esparza, María; Tristán-Manzano, María; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2015-11-01

    This review focuses on new findings about the inflammatory status involved in the development of human liver cirrhosis induced by the two main causes, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and chronic alcohol abuse, avoiding results obtained from animal models. When liver is faced to a persistent and/or intense local damage the maintained inflammatory response gives rise to a progressive replacement of normal hepatic tissue by non-functional fibrotic scar. The imbalance between tissue regeneration and fibrosis will determine the outcome toward health recovery or hepatic cirrhosis. In all cases progression toward liver cirrhosis is caused by a dysregulation of mechanisms that govern the balance between activation/homeostasis of the immune system. Detecting differences between the inflammatory status in HCV-induced vs alcohol-induced cirrhosis could be useful to identify specific targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention in each case. Thus, although survival of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis seems to be similar to that of patients with HCV-related cirrhosis (HCV-C), there are important differences in the altered cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in the progression toward human liver cirrhosis. The predominant features of HCV-C are more related with those that allow viral evasion of the immune defenses, especially although not exclusively, inhibition of interferons secretion, natural killer cells activation and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. On the contrary, the inflammatory status of alcohol-induced cirrhosis is determined by the combined effect of direct hepatotoxicity of ethanol metabolites and increases of the intestinal permeability, allowing bacteria and bacterial products translocation, into the portal circulation, mesenteric lymph nodes and peritoneal cavity. This phenomenon generates a stronger pro-inflammatory response compared with HCV-related cirrhosis. Hence, therapeutic intervention in HCV-related cirrhosis must be mainly focused to counteract HCV-immune system evasion, while in the case of alcohol-induced cirrhosis it must try to break the inflammatory loop established at the gut-mesenteric lymph nodes-peritoneal-systemic axis. PMID:26556984

  3. Inflammatory status in human hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Esparza, María; Tristán-Manzano, María; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on new findings about the inflammatory status involved in the development of human liver cirrhosis induced by the two main causes, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and chronic alcohol abuse, avoiding results obtained from animal models. When liver is faced to a persistent and/or intense local damage the maintained inflammatory response gives rise to a progressive replacement of normal hepatic tissue by non-functional fibrotic scar. The imbalance between tissue regeneration and fibrosis will determine the outcome toward health recovery or hepatic cirrhosis. In all cases progression toward liver cirrhosis is caused by a dysregulation of mechanisms that govern the balance between activation/homeostasis of the immune system. Detecting differences between the inflammatory status in HCV-induced vs alcohol-induced cirrhosis could be useful to identify specific targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention in each case. Thus, although survival of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis seems to be similar to that of patients with HCV-related cirrhosis (HCV-C), there are important differences in the altered cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in the progression toward human liver cirrhosis. The predominant features of HCV-C are more related with those that allow viral evasion of the immune defenses, especially although not exclusively, inhibition of interferons secretion, natural killer cells activation and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. On the contrary, the inflammatory status of alcohol-induced cirrhosis is determined by the combined effect of direct hepatotoxicity of ethanol metabolites and increases of the intestinal permeability, allowing bacteria and bacterial products translocation, into the portal circulation, mesenteric lymph nodes and peritoneal cavity. This phenomenon generates a stronger pro-inflammatory response compared with HCV-related cirrhosis. Hence, therapeutic intervention in HCV-related cirrhosis must be mainly focused to counteract HCV-immune system evasion, while in the case of alcohol-induced cirrhosis it must try to break the inflammatory loop established at the gut-mesenteric lymph nodes-peritoneal-systemic axis. PMID:26556984

  4. Ontogeny of rat hepatic adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    McMillian, M.K.; Schanberg, S.M.; Kuhn, C.M.

    1983-10-01

    Hepatic alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-2 adrenoceptors were characterized during development of the rat through Scatchard analysis of (3H)prazosin, (3H)rauwolscine and (125I)pindolol binding to liver membrane preparations. Major changes in adrenoceptor numbers occur shortly before birth at weaning. The fetal rat liver is characterized by a large number of alpha-2 adrenoceptors, which falls 10-fold by birth. The number of hepatic beta-2 adrenoceptors decreases gradually during development, and is lower at all times than the number of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors. The developmental profile of the hepatic alpha-1 adrenoceptor is biphasic: there is a 2 to 3-fold fall in alpha-1 adrenoceptor number at birth and a 3- to 5-fold rise at weaning. While absolute numbers of alpha-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors do not correlate precisely with reported actions of epinephrine and norepinephrine on hepatic metabolism during ontogeny, the increasing ratio of alpha-1/beta-2 hepatic adrenoceptors may contribute to the conversion from predominantly beta effects of catecholamines reported in fetal and suckling rat liver to the predominantly alpha-1 effects that are well documented in the adult male rat.

  5. Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Heymans, Anja; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Chaudhari, Umesh; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery

    2016-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (hHEP), human HepaRG and HepG2 cell lines are the most used human liver-based in vitro models for hepatotoxicity testing, including screening of drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-inducing compounds. hHEP are the reference hepatic in vitro system, but their availability is limited and the cells available for toxicology studies are often of poor quality. Hepatic cell lines on the other hand are highly proliferative and represent an inexhaustible hepatic cell source. However, these hepatoma-derived cells do not represent the population diversity and display reduced hepatic metabolism. Alternatively, stem cell-derived hepatic cells, which can be produced in high numbers and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are also being evaluated as a cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity studies. Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are post-natal stem cells that, after conversion towards hepatic cells (hSKP-HPC), respond to hepatotoxic compounds in a comparable way as hHEP. In the current study, four different human hepatic cell systems (hSKP-HPC, hHEP, HepaRG and HepG2) are evaluated for their capacity to predict hepatic toxicity. Their hepatotoxic response to acetaminophen (APAP) exposure is compared to data obtained from patients suffering from APAP-induced acute liver failure (ALF). The results indicate that hHEP, HepaRG and hSKP-HPC identify comparable APAP-induced hepatotoxic functions and that HepG2 cells show the slightest hepatotoxic response. Pathway analyses further points out that HepaRG cells show the highest predicted activation of the functional genes related to 'damage of liver', followed by hSKP-HPC and hHEP cells that generated similar results. HepG2 did not show any activation of this function. PMID:26497421

  6. Hepatitis B reactivation and timing for prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Nazan; Karabay, Oguz

    2015-01-01

    It is known that immunotherapy and cancer chemotherapy may cause hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen carriers and inactive chronic hepatitis B patients. Guidelines recommend antiviral prophylaxis regardless of HBV DNA levels to prevent reactivation. We read from the article written by Liu et al that Lamivudine was given inadequate time for antiviral prophylaxis. PMID:25717269

  7. RELATED ARTICLES Pricey Hepatitis C Drug Draws

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    /AIDS. Hepatitis B and C are most well known and justifiably feared because they cause chronic liver cirrhosis the future burden of Hepatitis B so they do not develop chronic Hepatitis and subsequent liver cirrhosis is as simple as a pill a day and, like HIV, you can prevent disease progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer

  8. 77 FR 45895 - World Hepatitis Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...Proclamation 8845 of July 27, 2012 World Hepatitis Day, 2012 By the President of the United...in twelve people is living with viral hepatitis--a disease that threatens the health...of their infection status. On World Hepatitis Day, we call attention to this...

  9. 78 FR 46247 - World Hepatitis Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ...Proclamation 9001 of July 25, 2013 World Hepatitis Day, 2013 By the President of the United...Proclamation Each year, we mark World Hepatitis Day to bring attention to a disease that...one in twelve people worldwide. Viral hepatitis is a major cause of liver cancer...

  10. 76 FR 46181 - World Hepatitis Day, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...Proclamation 8696--World Hepatitis Day, 2011 Presidential Documents Federal...Proclamation 8696 of July 27, 2011 World Hepatitis Day, 2011 By the President of the United...millions of Americans are living with viral hepatitis. As many as three-fourths of...

  11. Hepatitis A infection during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Shahnaz A.; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Question Many of my patients are from Southeast Asia, where hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is quite common. What precautions can I suggest my pregnant patients take before traveling to these areas and what is the risk of contracting HAV during pregnancy? Answer Hepatitis A virus is a water-borne pathogen transmitted by the fecal-oral route. To reduce the risk of contracting HAV while traveling to endemic areas, it is important to maintain hygienic practices such as hand washing with safe water, particularly before handling food, avoiding drinking water or using ice cubes of unknown purity, and avoiding eating unpeeled fruits and vegetables. An HAV vaccine is available and can be administered before traveling to endemic countries. Hepatitis A virus infection has a largely favourable expected outcome even during pregnancy. Infection occurring in the second or third trimester has been reported to be associated with preterm labour.

  12. Medical Officer -Hepatitis Treatment, Global Hepatitis Programme The WHO Global Hepatitis Programme (GHP) secretariat is located in the HIV/TB/Malaria (HTM)

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Medical Officer - Hepatitis Treatment, Global Hepatitis Programme The WHO Global Hepatitis structure. The Global Hepatitis Programme (GHP) is structured along the four axes of the Framework for Global Action for the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis (GAPCVH). The Department provides

  13. Strategic Information Officer -Hepatitis, Global Hepatitis Programme The WHO Global Hepatitis Programme (GHP) secretariat is located in the HIV/TB/Malaria (HTM)

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Strategic Information Officer - Hepatitis, Global Hepatitis Programme The WHO Global Hepatitis structure. The Global Hepatitis Programme (GHP) is structured along the four axes of the Framework for Global Action for the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis (GAPCVH). The Department provides

  14. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and traumatic brain injury (TBI). How are cognitive-communication problems following right hemisphere brain damage diagnosed? A ... examined. The nature and severity of the cognitive-communication problem will depend on the extent of damage ...

  15. Current Knowledge on Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; García, Mario; Suay, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Although only a single serotype of hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, has been identified, there is great genetic variation among the different HEV isolates reported. There are at least four major recognized genotypes of HEV: genotypes 1 and 2 are mainly restricted to humans and linked to epidemic outbreaks in nonindustrialized countries, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic in both developing and industrialized countries. Besides human strains, genotype 3 and 4 strains of HEV have been genetically characterized from swine, sika deer, mongooses, sheep, and rabbits. Currently, there are approximately 11,000 human and animal sequences of HEV available at the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. HEV is the major cause of waterborne outbreaks of hepatitis in areas of poor sanitation. Additionally, it is responsible for sporadic cases of viral hepatitis in not only endemic but industrialized countries as well. Transmission of HEV occurs predominantly by the fecal-oral route, although parenteral and perinatal routes have been reported. HEV infection develops in most individuals as a self-limiting, acute, icteric hepatitis; with mortality rates around 1%. However, some affected individuals will develop fulminant hepatic failure, a serious condition that is frequently fatal without a liver transplant. This complication is particularly common when the infection occurs in pregnant women, where mortality rates rise dramatically to up to 25%. Among the preventive measures available to avoid HEV infection, two separate subunit vaccines containing recombinant truncated capsid proteins of HEV have been shown to be highly effective in the prevention of disease. One of them, HEV 239, was approved in China, and its commercialization by Innovax began in November 2012 under the name Hecolin®. PMID:26355220

  16. Hepatitis C, stigma and cure

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Rui Tato; Barreira, David Pires

    2013-01-01

    The infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most important global chronic viral infections worldwide. It is estimated to affect around 3% of the world population, about 170-200 million people. Great part of the infections are asymptomatic, the patient can be a chronic carrier for decades without knowing it. The most severe consequences of the chronic infection are liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, which appears in 20%-40% of the patients, leading to hepatic failure and death. The HCV was discovered 25 years ago in 1989, is a RNA virus and classified by the World Health Organization as an oncogenic one. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most important cancers, the fifth worldwide in terms of mortality. It has been increasing in the Ocidental world, mainly due to chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is not only a liver disease and a cause of cirrhosis, but also a mental, psychological, familiar, and social disease. The stigma that the infected person sometimes carries is tremendous having multiple consequences. The main cause is lack of adequate information, even in the health professionals setting. But, besides the “drama” of being infected, health professionals, family, society and the infected patients, must be aware of the chance of real cure and total and definitive elimination of the virus. The treatment for hepatitis C has begun in the last 80´s with a percentage of cure of 6%. Step by step the efficacy of the therapy for hepatitis C is rapidly increasing and nowadays with the very new medications, the so called Direct Antiviral Agents-DAAs of new generation, is around 80%-90%. PMID:24187444

  17. Generation of functional hepatic cells from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songyan; Bourdon, Alice; Hamou, Wissam; Dziedzic, Noelle; Goldman, Orit; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Liver diseases affect millions of people worldwide, especially in developing country. According to the American Liver Foundation, nearly 1 in every 10 Americans suffers from some form of liver disease. Even though, the liver has great ability to self-repair, in end-stage liver diseases including fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer induced by viral hepatitis and drugs, the liver regenerative capacity is exhausted. The only successful treatment for chronic liver failure is the whole liver transplantation. More recently, some clinical trials using hepatocyte transplantation have shown some clinical improvement for metabolic liver diseases and acute liver failure. However, the shortage of donor livers remains a life-threatening challenge in liver disease patients. To overcome the scarcity of donor livers, hepatocytes generated from embryonic stem cell or induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation cultures could provide an unlimited supply of such cells for transplantation. This review provides an updated summary of hepatic differentiation protocols published so far, with a characterization of the hepatic cells generated in vitro and their ability to regenerate damaged livers in vivo following transplantation in pre-clinical liver deficient mouse models. PMID:25364624

  18. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tarocchi, Mirko; Polvani, Simone; Marroncini, Giada; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem with approximately 2 billion people that have been exposed to the virus. HBV is a member of a family of small, enveloped DNA viruses called hepadnaviruses, and has a preferential tropism for hepatocytes of mammals and birds. Epidemiological studies have proved a strong correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC is the fifth most common malignancy with about 700000 new cases each year, and more than 50% of them arise in HBV carriers. A large number of studies describe the way in which HBV can contribute to HCC development. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, including the accumulation of genetic damage due to immune-mediated hepatic inflammation and the induction of oxidative stress. There is evidence of the direct effects of the viral proteins HBx and HBs on the cell biology. Integration of HBV-DNA into the human genome is considered an early event in the carcinogenic process and can induce, through insertional mutagenesis, the alteration of gene expression and chromosomal instability. HBV has also epigenetic effects through the modification of the genomic methylation status. Furthermore, the virus plays an important role in the regulation of microRNA expression. This review will summarize the many mechanisms involved in HBV-related liver carcinogenesis. PMID:25206269

  19. Hepatitis C: Issues in Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine K; Jonas, Maureen M

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C infection is a global health problem. Most infected children have not been identified. Perinatal transmission is the most common mode of acquisition. Liver disease owing to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection progresses slowly in individuals infected early in life. Serious complications rarely affect patients during childhood. Successful treatment of HCV in adults has improved and recommendations have changed. Treatment in children should be deferred until direct-acting antivirals and interferon-free regimens are available to this population. If treatment cannot be deferred, regimens including peginterferon and ribavirin can be given to children with compensated liver disease. PMID:26600227

  20. Hepatitis C and liver transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert S.

    2005-08-01

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapy to correct liver failure, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma arising from hepatitis C infection. But despite the successful use of living donors and improvements in immunosuppression and antiviral therapy, organ demand continues to outstrip supply and recurrent hepatitis C with accelerated progression to cirrhosis of the graft is a frequent cause of graft loss and the need for retransplantation. Appropriate selection of candidates and timing of transplantation, coupled with better pre- and post-transplant antiviral therapy, are needed to improve outcomes.

  1. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. PMID:25742731

  2. Hepatic lipase deficiency produces glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Blasco, Irene; Herrero-Cervera, Andrea; Vinué, Ángela; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Piqueras, Laura; Sanz, María Jesús; Burks, Deborah Jane; González-Navarro, Herminia

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus constitute a major problem to global health, and their incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which affects up to 90% of obese people and nearly 70% of the overweight, is commonly associated with MetS characteristics such as obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. In the present study, we demonstrate that hepatic lipase (HL)-inactivation in mice fed with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet produced dyslipidemia including hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and increased non-esterified fatty acid levels. These changes were accompanied by glucose intolerance, pancreatic and hepatic inflammation and steatosis. In addition, compared with WT mice, HL(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced circulating MCP1 levels, monocytosis and higher percentage of CD4+Th17+ cells. Consistent with increased inflammation, livers from HL(-/-) mice had augmented activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways compared with the activation levels of the kinases in livers from WT mice. Analysis of HL(-/-) and WT mice fed regular chow diet showed dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance in HL(-/-) mice without any other changes in inflammation or hepatic steatosis. Altogether, these results indicate that dyslipidemia induced by HL-deficiency in combination with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation in mice which are, at least in part, mediated by the activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways. Future studies are warranted to asses the viability of therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of these kinases to reduce hepatic steatosis associated to lipase dysfunction. PMID:26423094

  3. Access to hepatitis C medicines

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Delphi GM; Prasad, Tara L; Rook, Laurien A; Iyer, Jayasree K

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis C is a global epidemic. Worldwide, 185 million people are estimated to be infected, most of whom live in low- and middle-income countries. Recent advances in the development of antiviral drugs have produced therapies that are more effective, safer and better tolerated than existing treatments for the disease. These therapies present an opportunity to curb the epidemic, provided that they are affordable, that generic production of these medicines is scaled up and that awareness and screening programmes are strengthened. Pharmaceutical companies have a central role to play. We examined the marketed products, pipelines and access to medicine strategies of 20 of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies. Six of these companies are developing medicines for hepatitis C: AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & Co. and Roche. These companies employ a range of approaches to supporting hepatitis C treatment, including pricing strategies, voluntary licensing, capacity building and drug donations. We give an overview of the engagement of these companies in addressing access to hepatitis C products. We suggest actions companies can take to play a greater role in curbing this epidemic: (i) prioritizing affordability assessments; (ii) developing access strategies early in the product lifecycle; and (iii) licensing to manufacturers of generic medicines. PMID:26549908

  4. Lactobacillus fermentum ZYL0401 Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Hepatic TNF-? Expression and Liver Injury via an IL-10- and PGE2-EP4-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Longxian; Yang, Jianzhuan; Lu, Haifeng; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has essential role in the pathogenesis of D-galactosamine-sensitized animal models and alcoholic liver diseases of humans, by stimulating release of pro-inflammatory mediators that cause hepatic damage and intestinal barrier impairment. Oral pretreatment of probiotics has been shown to attenuate LPS-induced hepatic injury, but it is unclear whether the effect is direct or due to improvement in the intestinal barrier. The present study tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with probiotics enables the liver to withstand directly LPS-induced hepatic injury and inflammation. In a mouse model of LPS-induced hepatic injury, the levels of hepatic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of mice with depleted intestinal commensal bacteria were not significantly different from that of the control models. Pre-feeding mice for 10 days with Lactobacillus fermentum ZYL0401 (LF41), significantly alleviated LPS-induced hepatic TNF-? expression and liver damage. After LF41 pretreatment, mice had dramatically more L.fermentum-specific DNA in the ileum, significantly higher levels of ileal cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and interleukin 10 (IL-10) and hepatic prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, hepatic COX-1, COX-2, and IL-10 protein levels were not changed after the pretreatment. There were also higher hepatic IL-10 protein levels after LPS challenge in LF41-pretreaed mice than in the control mice. Attenuation of hepatic TNF-? was mediated via the PGE2/E prostanoid 4 (EP4) pathway, and serum ALT levels were attenuated in an IL-10-dependent manner. A COX-2 blockade abolished the increase in hepatic PGE2 and IL-10 associated with LF41. In LF41-pretreated mice, a blockade of IL-10 caused COX-2-dependent promotion of hepatic PGE2, without affecting hepatic COX-2levels. In LF41-pretreated mice, COX2 prevented enhancing TNF-? expression in both hepatic mononuclear cells and the ileum, and averted TNF-?-mediated increase in intestinal permeability. Together, we demonstrated that LF41 pre-feeding enabled the liver to alleviate LPS-induced hepatic TNF-? expression and injury via a PGE2-EP4- and IL-10-dependent mechanism. PMID:25978374

  5. Hepatitis A: Old and New

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The hepatitis A virus (HAV), a picornavirus, is a common cause of hepatitis worldwide. Spread of infection is generally person to person or by oral intake after fecal contamination of skin or mucous membranes; less commonly, there is fecal contamination of food or water. Hepatitis A is endemic in developing countries, and most residents are exposed in childhood. In contrast, the adult population in developed countries demonstrates falling rates of exposure with improvements in hygiene and sanitation. The export of food that cannot be sterilized, from countries of high endemicity to areas with low rates of infection, is a potentially important source of infection. After ingestion and uptake from the gastrointestinal tract, the virus replicates in the liver and is excreted into the bile. Cellular immune responses to the virus lead to destruction of infected hepatocytes with consequent development of symptoms and signs of disease. Humoral immune responses are the basis for diagnostic serologic assays. Acute HAV infection is clinically indistinguishable from other causes of acute viral hepatitis. In young children the disease is often asymptomatic, whereas in older children and adults there may be a range of clinical manifestations from mild, anicteric infection to fulminant hepatic failure. Clinical variants include prolonged, relapsing, and cholestatic forms. Management of the acute illness is supportive, and complete recovery without sequelae is the usual outcome. Research efforts during World War II led to the development of passive immunoprophylaxis. Pooled immune serum globulin is efficacious in the prevention and attenuation of disease in exposed individuals. More recently, active immunoprophylaxis by vaccination has been accomplished. Future eradication of this disease can now be contemplated. PMID:11148002

  6. Metformin Treatment Prevents Sedentariness Related Damages in Mice.

    PubMed

    Senesi, Pamela; Montesano, Anna; Luzi, Livio; Codella, Roberto; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Metformin (METF), historical antihyperglycemic drug, is a likely candidate for lifespan extension, treatment and prevention of sedentariness damages, insulin resistance, and obesity. Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, capable of hypertrophy response to resistance training and of regeneration after damage. Aims of this work were to investigate METF ability to prevent sedentariness damage and to enhance skeletal muscle function. Sedentary 12-week-old C57BL/6 mice were treated with METF (250?mg/kg per day, in drinking water) for 60 days. METF role on skeletal muscle differentiation was studied in vitro using murine C2C12 myoblasts. Muscular performance evaluation revealed that METF enhanced mice physical performance (Estimated VO2max). Biochemical analyses of hepatic and muscular tissues indicated that in liver METF increased AMPK and CAMKII signaling. In contrast, METF inactivated ERKs, the principal kinases involved in hepatic stress. In skeletal muscle, METF activated AKT, key kinase in skeletal muscle mass maintenance. In in vitro studies, METF did not modify the C2C12 proliferation capacity, while it positively influenced the differentiation process and myotube maturation. In conclusion, our novel results suggest that METF has a positive action not only on the promotion of healthy aging but also on the prevention of sedentariness damages. PMID:26697506

  7. Metformin Treatment Prevents Sedentariness Related Damages in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Senesi, Pamela; Montesano, Anna; Luzi, Livio; Codella, Roberto; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Metformin (METF), historical antihyperglycemic drug, is a likely candidate for lifespan extension, treatment and prevention of sedentariness damages, insulin resistance, and obesity. Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, capable of hypertrophy response to resistance training and of regeneration after damage. Aims of this work were to investigate METF ability to prevent sedentariness damage and to enhance skeletal muscle function. Sedentary 12-week-old C57BL/6 mice were treated with METF (250?mg/kg per day, in drinking water) for 60 days. METF role on skeletal muscle differentiation was studied in vitro using murine C2C12 myoblasts. Muscular performance evaluation revealed that METF enhanced mice physical performance (Estimated VO2max). Biochemical analyses of hepatic and muscular tissues indicated that in liver METF increased AMPK and CAMKII signaling. In contrast, METF inactivated ERKs, the principal kinases involved in hepatic stress. In skeletal muscle, METF activated AKT, key kinase in skeletal muscle mass maintenance. In in vitro studies, METF did not modify the C2C12 proliferation capacity, while it positively influenced the differentiation process and myotube maturation. In conclusion, our novel results suggest that METF has a positive action not only on the promotion of healthy aging but also on the prevention of sedentariness damages. PMID:26697506

  8. Hepatitis C: What to Expect When Getting Tested

    MedlinePLUS

    HEPATITIS C What to Expect When Getting Tested Getting tested for Hepatitis C • A blood test, called a Hepatitis C Antibody Test, is used to find out if someone has ever been infected with Hepatitis C. • The Hepatitis C Antibody Test, sometimes called the ...

  9. Tributyltin promoted hepatic steatosis in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the molecular pathogenesis involved.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiliang; Sun, Ping; Kong, Tao; Yang, Fan; Guan, Wenchao

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptor effects of tributyltin (TBT) are well established in fish. However, the adverse effects on lipid metabolism are less well understood. Since the liver is the predominant site of de novo synthesis of lipids, the present study uses zebrafish (Danio rerio) to examine lipid accumulation in the livers and hepatic gene expression associated with lipid metabolism pathways. After exposure for 90 days, we found that the livers in fish exposed to TBT were yellowish in appearance and with accumulation of lipid droplet, which is consistent with the specific pathological features of steatosis. Molecular analysis revealed that TBT induced hepatic steatosis by increasing the gene expression associated with lipid transport, lipid storage, lipiogenic enzymes and lipiogenic factors in the livers. Moreover, TBT enhanced hepatic caspase-3 activity and up-regulated genes related to apoptosis and cell-death, which indicated steatotic livers of fish exposed to TBT and the subsequent liver damage were likely due to accelerated hepatocyte apoptosis or cell stress. In short, TBT can produce multiple and complex alterations in transcriptional activity of lipid metabolism and cell damage, which provides potential molecular evidence of TBT on hepatic steatosis. PMID:26674369

  10. Histamine protects against the acute phase of experimentally-induced hepatic ischemia/re-perfusion.

    PubMed

    El-Mahdy, Nageh A; El-Sisi, Alaa E; Dewidar, Bedair I; El-Desouky, Karima I

    2013-01-01

    Histamine, involved in many inflammatory reactions and immune responses, is reported to suppress--via H4R stimulation--injury concomitant with the late phase of warm hepatic ischemia/re-perfusion (I/R). The current study investigated the possible effects of histamine on the acute phase of hepatic I/R injury, and the possible underlying mechanisms like oxidative stress and release of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? nd interleukin [IL]-12). Rats were divided into naïve, sham-operated, and I/R groups. The I/R group was divided into sub-groups and pre-treated with histaminergic ligands before induction of ischemia. Anesthetized rats were subjected to warm ischemia for 30 min by occlusion of the portal vein and hepatic artery, then re-perfused for 90 min. Rats in the control I/R group showed significant increases in hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), TNF?, and IL-12 contents, and in plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels, along with significant decreases in hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) content and marked diffuse histopathologic damage. Pre-treatment with histamine resulted in significant mitigation of each of these end-points. The protective effect of histamine was not antagonized by pre-treatment with mepyramine (H1R antagonist) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist) and completely reversed by pre-treatment with thioperamide (H3R and H4R antagonist). In addition, the histamine protective effect was mimicked by pre-treatment of rats with clozapine (H4R agonist). These observations strongly suggested that histamine has a protective effect against hepatic I/R-mediated tissue injury during the acute phase, and this effect was mediated through an H4R stimulation that led to a decrease in IL-12 and TNF? production--outcomes that consequently decreased localized oxidative stress and afforded hepatic protection in general. PMID:22793375

  11. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  12. Intestinal flora translocation and overgrowth in upper gastrointestinal tract induced by hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Ni, Ruo-Yu; Luo, Duan-De; Li, Shu-Li

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between endoinfection caused by intestinal flora translocation and multiple organ dysfunction in hepatic failure. METHODS: By using the quantitative bacteria culture, bacteria colony was counted in GI tract, bile duct and mesenteric lymphonodus in rat hepatic failure model. RESULTS: Intestinal flora migrated up to the upper GI tract and overgrew in stomach and jejunum in rats with hepatic failure. The number of bacteria colonies in the specimens of stomach, jejunum and ileum were 4.7 × 104/m L, 2.1 × 105/mL, 5.5 × 106/mL in experiment group and 4.6 × 102/mL, 6.1 × 101/mL, 2.4 × 103/mL in control group respectively (P < 0.05). Bacteria in bile duct and mesenteric lymphonodus of hepatic failure rats were also cultured. Extensive damages of gastrointestinal mucosa caused by bacterial overgrowth were observed. CONCLUSION: Intestinal flora translocation and overgrowth in stomach and jejunum formed an endoinfectious source and caused obvious pathologic al injury of gastrointestinal mucosa, which play a very important role in developing abdominal distension, toxic intestinal expansion, alimentary tract haemorrh age and endotoxemia in patients with hepatic failure. PMID:11819459

  13. Comparison of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative stress, injury and fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, Mohamed E.; Zalata, Khaled R.; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Shiha, Gamal E.; Ibrahim, Tarek M.

    2011-04-15

    Effective and well-tolerated anti-fibrotic drugs are currently lacking. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the potential anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin on established hepatic fibrosis in the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) rat model. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of CCl{sub 4} twice weekly for 8 weeks, as well as daily intraperitoneal treatments of imatinib (10 and 20 mg/kg), nilotinib (10 and 20 mg/kg) and silymarin (100 mg/kg) during the last 4 weeks of CCl{sub 4}-intoxication. At the end of the study, hepatic damage was evaluated by analysis of liver function tests and hepatic oxidative stress parameters. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology and morphometry, as well as collagen and 4-hydroxyproline contents. Nilotinib (20 mg/kg) was the most effective treatment to counteract CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic injury as indicated by liver function tests and histopathology. Nilotinib (10 mg/kg), nilotinib (20 mg/kg) and silymarin (100 mg/kg) treatments reduced the mean score of hepatic fibrosis by 31%, 68% and 47%, respectively, and hepatic collagen content by 47%, 49% and 18%, respectively in CCl{sub 4}-treated rats. Hepatic morphometric evaluation and 4-hydroxyproline content revealed that CCl{sub 4}-induced fibrosis was ameliorated significantly by nilotinib (20 mg/kg) and imatinib (20 mg/kg). Unlike nilotinib, imatinib (20 mg/kg) showed some sort of hepatic injury evidenced by elevation of serum aminotransferases and total bilirubin levels, and hepatic total nitrate/nitrite content, as well as characteristic anisonucleosis visualized with the hematoxylin-eosin staining. In conclusion, this study provides the evidence that nilotinib exerts anti-fibrotic activity and suggests that it may be valuable in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis in humans. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: > The anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin were compared. > These effects were evaluated on CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. > Nilotinib was found to possess potent anti-fibrotic activity. > In addition, nilotinib did not show any signs of hepatotoxicity. > Thus, nilotinib may be valuable in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis in humans.

  14. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  15. The Hepatitis B Virus Receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhui

    2015-11-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects 240 million people worldwide. A liver-specific bile acid transporter named the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been identified as the cellular receptor for HBV and its satellite, the hepatitis D virus (HDV). NTCP likely acts as a major determinant for the liver tropism and species specificity of HBV and HDV at the entry level. NTCP-mediated HBV entry interferes with bile acid transport in cell cultures and has been linked with alterations in bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in vivo. The human liver carcinoma cell line HepG2, complemented with NTCP, now provides a valuable platform for studying the basic biology of the viruses and developing treatments for HBV infection. This review summarizes critical findings regarding NTCP's role as a viral receptor for HBV and HDV and discusses important questions that remain unanswered. PMID:26436705

  16. Redox regulation of hepatitis C in nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver

    E-print Network

    Seronello, Scott; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.; Choi, Jinah

    2007-01-01

    borne non-A, non-B viral hepatitis genome. Science 244(than hepatitis B virus (HBV) [27], which also causes viralviral effects on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has been shown to negatively regulate hepatitis B

  17. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section...DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name...

  18. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section...DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name...

  19. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section...DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name...

  20. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section...DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name...

  1. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section...DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name...

  2. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup ?}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup ?} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup ?} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup ?} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup ?} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup ?} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were also mildly increased in ADH{sup ?} deer mice fed 1 or 2% ethanol. Only small increases were observed for allylic and diallylic protons, FAMEs and unsaturations in ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls. PCA of NMR data showed increased clustering by gradual separation of ethanol-fed ADH{sup ?} deer mice groups from their respective pair-fed control groups and corresponding ethanol-fed ADH{sup +} deer mice groups. Our data indicate that dose of ethanol and hepatic ADH deficiency are two key factors involved in initiation and progression of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Further studies on characterization of individual lipid entities and associated metabolic pathways altered in our deer mouse model after different durations of ethanol feeding could be important to delineate mechanism(s) and identify potential biomarker candidate(s) of early stage ALD. -- Highlights: ? Dose-dependent ethanol-induced fatty liver was studied in deer mouse model. ? A NMR-based lipidomic approach with histology and dry lipid weights was used. ? We used principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze the NMR lipidomic data. ? Dose-dependent clustering patterns by PCA were compared among the groups.

  3. Hepatitis B therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Kurbegov, Amethyst C; Sokol, Ronald J

    2009-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver disease throughout the world, leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in many individuals. Children are more likely to develop chronic HBV infection as they demonstrate greater immunotolerance to the virus, and response to therapy in children remains disappointing. Three therapeutic agents for chronic HBV infection in children have been approved in the USA, including standard IFN-alpha, lamivudine and adefovir. IFN-alpha has been the most effective ( approximately 30% hepatitis B e antigen [HBeAg] seroconversion; 10% hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] seroconversion), although benefits are primarily observed in children with alanine aminotransferase levels over two-times the upper limit of normal and must be weighed against significant side effects. Studies comparing the long-term outcome of chronic hepatitis B in children treated with IFN-alpha and in untreated controls show that the rate of anti-HBeAb seroconversion tends to overlap in treated and untreated patients within a few years of follow-up, suggesting that IFN-alpha simply accelerates a spontaneous event. Lamivudine's virologic response rates mirror those of IFN-alpha (23-31% HBeAg seroconversion) with easier administration and a better safety profile but lower HBsAg seroconversion (2-3%) and high rates of drug resistance. Adefovir data show low rates of resistance and a good safety profile, but virologic response was limited to adolescent patients and was lower than that of lamivudine (16% HBeAg seroconversion; <1% HBsAg seroconversion). Entecavir and tenofovir, both approved therapies for adults with chronic HBV infection, are in trials for use in children. Future therapies will probably include these agents as well as combined therapies. Finally, watchful waiting of children is an option since current therapies are only 30% effective at best, although the long-term impact of therapy in childhood on rates of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. PMID:19210112

  4. Hepatic Angiomyolipoma Mimicking Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Ping; Li, Hong-Yan; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Chang-Chun; Liu, Shu-Hong; Gao, Xu-Dong; Qu, Jian-Hui; Liu, Ze; Chang, Xiu-Juan; Lu, Yin-Ying; Zeng, Zhen; Lou, Min; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic angiomyolipoma (HAML) is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the liver with marked histological diversity. The present study was to review the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical pathological features of HAML resembling hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nine patients who underwent surgical resection and had pathological diagnosis of HAML were retrospectively analyzed. All of 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) had a solitary hepatic mass with a median size of 4?cm (from 1.4?cm to 15.3?cm). Seven cases were identified as incidental liver tumors during health screening and 2 patients were diagnosed for hepatic mass when visited hospitals with unspecific abdominal discomfort. Before resection, 6 cases were diagnosed as HCC on MRI. MRI on chemical shift imagings showed a large amount of lipids in 5 cases. The enhancement pattern of MRI was classified into 2 types: in 2 cases, lesions with small or no vessels that demonstrated prolonged enhancement (1 mixed subtype and 1 myomatous subtype) and in 7 cases, lesions with abundant central vessels that show rapid washout (3 mixed subtypes and 4 myomatous subtypes) in the portal venous/delayed phase. All patients underwent resection of hepatic tumor and no recurrence was observed during follow-up (range: 2–24 months) of median 10 months. By immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells demonstrated positive immunostaining for human melanoma black-45, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. In conclusion, all of 9 patients with HAML presented with none or nonspecific clinical manifestations. The diagnosis of HAML relies on disease and immunohistochemistry, but not MRI due to its resemblance to HCC. PMID:25526436

  5. CT of hepatic schistosomiasis mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.; El Magdy, W.; Al-Ansari, A.G.; Hanna, R.

    1985-07-01

    Schistosomal periportal fibrosis produced a typical pattern on computed tomography in five patients. Low-density periportal tissue, present throughout the liver, enhanced strongly after the administration of contrast medium. While rounded in cross section, the thickened periportal tissue produced linear and branching patterns when imaged in longitudinal section. In all cases, the sonographic features were typical of schistosomal periportal fibrosis. A lack of awareness of the distinctive features of periportal fibrosis may result in a mistaken diagnosis of hepatic metastases.

  6. [Drug (statine)-induced hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Zvenigorodskaia, L A; Khomeriki, S G; Efremov, L I; Cherkashova, E A

    2009-01-01

    In the article is presented the case of development of medicinal hepatitis as result of irrational use of statin treatment at patient with Ischemic heart disease and nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease against morbid obesity. The clinical observation reflects the necessity of usage of liver protectors in prevention of possible side effects of hypolipidemic statin treatment and emphasizes the advantage of double cholesterol inhibition. PMID:19938288

  7. Hepatitis C in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Marinaki, Smaragdi; Boletis, John N; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Delladetsima, Ioanna K

    2015-01-01

    Despite reduction of hepatitis C prevalence after recognition of the virus and testing of blood products, hemodialysis (HD) patients still comprise a high risk group. The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in dialysis is not fully understood while the clinical outcome differs from that of the general population. HD patients show a milder liver disease with lower aminotransferase and viral levels depicted by milder histological features on liver biopsy. Furthermore, the “silent” clinical course is consistent with a slower disease progression and a lower frequency of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Potential explanations for the “beneficial” impact of uremia and hemodialysis on chronic HCV infection are impaired immunosurveillance leading to a less aggressive host response to the virus and intradialytic release of “hepatoprotective” cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-? and hepatocyte growth factor. However, chronic hepatitis C is associated with a higher liver disease related cardiovascular and all-cause mortality of HD patients. Therapy is indicated in selected patients groups including younger patients with low comorbidity burden and especially renal transplant candidates, preferably after performance of a liver biopsy. According to current recommendations, choice of treatment is IFN or pegylated interferon with a reported sustained viral response at 30%-40% and a withdrawal rate ranging from 17% to 30%. New data regarding combination therapy with low doses of ribavirin which provide higher standard variable rates and good safety results, offer another therapeutic option. The new protease inhibitors may be the future for HCV infected HD patients, though data are still lacking. PMID:25848478

  8. [Hepatic pseudotumor in acute fascioliasis].

    PubMed

    Castillo Contreras, Ofelia Brisaida; Frisancho Velarde, Oscar

    2013-03-01

    We report a 61-year-old woman who was hospitalized because of abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant related to a liver tumor (ultrasound and tomographic findings). A collection of blood was obtained by a biopsy and there were no tumor cells. With the suspicion of acute fascioliasis (liver stage), due to severe eosinophilia and recent travel to endemic area of Fasciola hepatica, arc II and ELISA Fas 2 we carried out and were positive. Parasitological stool examinations were negative. During hospitalization a hepatic subcapsular hematoma presented as a complication and the patient developed fever because of cholangiolitic microabscesses in the left hepatic lobe. Percutaneous drainage was performed and positive cultures of secretions were obtained She received antibiotic coverage with vancomycin and imipenem. Treatment for Fasciola hepatica was initiated with nitaxozanida but it was discontinued due to oral intolerance. Later, she received a single dose of 250 mg triclabendazole with clinical and laboratory improvement. We presented this case because it is an unusual pseudotumoral presentation in acute hepatic fascioliasis. This parasitic disease is an emerging zoonosis in Perú. PMID:23650836

  9. Guest Editorial: Laser Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

    2012-12-01

    Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

  10. Hepatic histology in hepatitis C virus carriers coinfected with hepatitis G virus

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, J; Guella, L; Wight, D; Pearson, G; Hinton, J; Parker, H; Allain, J; Alexander, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—A novel flavivirus has been described recently and designated hepatitis G virus (HGV). The virus is transmitted by the parenteral route but it is uncertain whether it is associated with chronic liver disease because liver biopsy is difficult to justify in this group. ?Aims—To examine histological features of liver biopsy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) according to the presence or absence of HCV and HGV RNA. ?Methods—One hundred and thirty one consecutive HCV carriers undergoing staging liver biopsy were studied retrospectively. In each, HCV RNA and HGV RNA were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on serum samples collected at the time of biopsy. The presence of each RNA was correlated with histological features blind to the RNA results; individual histological features of inflammation or fibrosis were scored separately. ?Results—Nineteen patients were positive for both HGV and HCV RNA in serum, 91 were positive for HCV RNA alone, two were positive for HGV RNA alone, and 19 were negative for both RNA species. Neither age nor sex differed between the groups; a greater proportion of intravenous drug users were HGV RNA positive, but this was not statistically significant. There was no effect of HGV coinfection on the stage of fibrosis or any other histological parameter except steatosis; patients with HCV and HGV RNA had a higher mean score for fat than those patients with HCV RNA alone (p<0.05). ?Conclusions—HGV coinfection has no important effects on histological features in chronic HCV carriers. It is unlikely that HGV infection causes chronic liver disease. ?? Keywords: hepatitis C virus; hepatitis G virus; RNA; histology PMID:9505894

  11. Yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine: efficacy with hepatitis B immune globulin in prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Tong, M.J.; Toy, P.T.; Vyas, G.N.; Nair, P.V.; Weissman, J.Y.; Krugman, S.

    1987-05-15

    A yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was licensed recently by the Food and Drug administration and is now available. To assess the efficacy of the yeast-recombinant vaccine, the authors administered the vaccine in combination with hepatitis B immune globulin to high-risk newborns. If infants whose mothers were positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen receive no immunoprophylaxis, 70% to 90% become infected with the virus, and almost all become chronic carriers. Among infants in this study who received hepatitis B immune globulin at birth and three 5-/sup +/g doses of yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, only 4.8% became chronic carriers, a better than 90% level of protection and a rate that is comparable with that seen with immune globulin and plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis surface antigen and antibodies were detected by radioimmunoassay. These data suggest that, in this high-risk setting, the yeast-recombinant vaccine is as effective as the plasma-derived vaccine in preventing hepatitis B virus infection and the chronic carrier state.

  12. Ipilimumab-associated Hepatitis: Clinicopathologic Characterization in a Series of 11 Cases.

    PubMed

    Johncilla, Melanie; Misdraji, Joseph; Pratt, Daniel S; Agoston, Agoston T; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Srivastava, Amitabh; Doyle, Leona A

    2015-08-01

    Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the CTLA4 receptor on cytotoxic T lymphocytes, resulting in immune-mediated tumor cell death. Ipilimumab is most often used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, and rarely liver toxicity necessitating cessation of treatment occurs. The aim of this study was to characterize the histologic features and clinical course of ipilimumab-associated hepatitis. Eleven patients with clinical suspicion of ipilimumab-induced hepatitis, due to the development of abnormal liver function tests (LFTs) while receiving treatment, and who underwent liver biopsy, were identified over a 6-year period. Ten patients were male and 1 female (median age 58 y), and all received 1 to 4 doses of ipilimumab. None had known preexisting liver disease. Two patients were obese, and another had a history of alcohol abuse. Viral and autoimmune serologies were negative in all patients except 1 who had a mildly elevated ANA titer. Nine biopsies showed active hepatitis with 2 distinct histologic patterns: panlobular hepatitis in 6 cases and zone 3 hepatitis in 3. The inflammatory infiltrate was similar in composition in both patterns, composed predominantly of CD8+ T lymphocytes, admixed histiocytes, scattered plasma cells, and eosinophils. Prominent histiocytic sinusoidal infiltrates were present in 7 cases and frequently formed loose histiocytic aggregates. Central vein endothelialitis was present in 8 cases. Patients in this group tended to have markedly elevated ALT, AST, and total bilirubin. Two cases did not fit into the above 2 histologic groups: 1 showed portal inflammation with cholangitis, and the other showed morphologic features indistinguishable from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Discontinuation of ipilimumab and administration of immunosuppressives resulted in resolution or marked improvement of LFTs in all patients within 3 months of presentation. Ipilimumab may potentially unmask previously subclinical liver disease, for example, fatty liver disease, and the diagnosis of ipilimumab-induced liver injury may only be recognized with certainty after cessation of the drug leads to normalization of LFTs. Overall, ipilimumab-associated hepatitis most often presents with a panlobular active hepatitis that resembles autoimmune hepatitis. Prominent sinusoidal histiocytic infiltrates and central vein damage with endothelialitis may be helpful histologic clues to the diagnosis of ipilimumab-associated hepatitis. PMID:26034866

  13. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  14. ALLYLISOPROPYLACETAMIDE INDUCES RAT HEPATIC ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In rat liver, allylisopropylacetamide (AIA) treatment strongly induced (25-fold) the activity of rat hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). y either the oral or the subcutaneous routes, AIA produced a long-lasting induction (30 to 4O hours) of hepatic ODC activity. hree analogs o...

  15. Hepatitis” – Prevention and management in dental practice

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Sharma, Varun; Kaur, Saravpreet

    2015-01-01

    Today, viral hepatitis has become a silent epidemic worldwide. It is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct or indirect contact with blood, oral fluids, droplet splatter, aerosols, etc. The aim of the present review is to increase the awareness among dental practitioners, so as to reduce the burden of hepatitis in their community. Electronic databases like PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, etc. were searched using the keywords hepatitis, dentist, liver disease, and infection control. Manual search of various journals and books was also carried out. Only highly relevant articles from English literature were considered for the present review. The results revealed that the dentists were among the high-risk groups for hepatitis, and they have little information on the factors associated with adherence to hepatitis B vaccination. A dentist can play a major role in the prevention of hepatitis by considering each and every patient as a potential carrier of hepatitis. Proper infection control, sterilization, and prophylactic vaccination protocols should be followed in order to reduce the risk of hepatitis. PMID:26097847

  16. 78 FR 46247 - World Hepatitis Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9001 of July 25, 2013 World Hepatitis Day, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each year, we mark World Hepatitis Day to bring attention to...

  17. 76 FR 46181 - World Hepatitis Day, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... August 1, 2011 Part VI The President Proclamation 8696--World Hepatitis Day, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Hepatitis Day, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across our...

  18. 77 FR 45895 - World Hepatitis Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ....) [FR Doc. 2012-18974 Filed 8-1-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8845 of July 27, 2012 World Hepatitis Day... Americans who are chronically infected are unaware of their infection status. On World Hepatitis Day,...

  19. Autochthonous hepatitis E in southwest England.

    PubMed

    Dalton, H R; Thurairajah, P H; Fellows, H J; Hussaini, H S; Mitchell, J; Bendall, R; Banks, M; Ijaz, S; Teo, C-G; Levine, D F

    2007-05-01

    Although autochthonous hepatitis E has been reported in developed countries, its extent and nature in the United Kingdom are unclear. The aim of the present study was to report the natural history, lifestyle risk factors and molecular epidemiology of autochthonous hepatitis E infection in southwest England. Three hundred and thirty-three patients with unexplained hepatitis were tested for markers of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection over a 7-year period. HEV RNA isolated from the cases was amplified and characterized. Of the 333 patients, 21 had autochthonous hepatitis E. Patients were middle-aged or elderly and males were more commonly affected. Clinical manifestations ranged from asymptomatic infection to severe hepatitis. Of the 21 patients, 20 recovered within 6 weeks. None of the cases had travelled to an area endemic for HEV. None of the patients were vegetarian and all ate pork. Of the 21 cases, 20 occurred in the spring, summer and autumn months. All polymerase-chain-reaction-confirmed cases carried HEV genotype 3, which bore close sequence homology to HEV circulating in UK pigs. In the United Kingdom, autochthonous hepatitis E may be more common than previously recognized. Although the mode of transmission remains to be determined, it may be a zoonosis with pigs as a reservoir. Hepatitis E should be considered a public health issue in the United Kingdom. PMID:17439519

  20. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  1. New developments in hepatitis A control.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, L.

    1995-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine for hepatitis A was recently licensed in Canada. This is the first important development in control of the disease in 50 years. This article presents new information about the vaccine and about the groups who might benefit from it. It also provides a review of the clinical and epidemiological aspects of hepatitis A. PMID:7647625

  2. An epoxysuccinic acid derivative(loxistatin)-induced hepatic injury in rats and hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, K.; Arai, M.; Kohno, Y.; Suwa, T.; Satoh, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Loxistatin is a possible therapeutic agent of muscular dystrophy. A single oral administration of loxistatin to male rats caused focal necrosis of the liver with inflammatory cell infiltration. The severity of the lesions was dose-dependent up to 200 mg/kg and also manifest by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels decreased with a maximum 20% depletion within 5 hr after the oral administration of loxistatin. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate did not potentiate the loxistatin-induced hepatic injury. On the other hand, the hepatoprotective effect of cysteamine was observed when cysteamine was administered 24 hr before loxistatin dosing, but the effect was not observed when the antidote was administered concomitantly with loxistatin. Pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital or trans-stilbene oxide provided partial protection against the hepatotoxic effect of loxistatin. Pretreatment with SKF-525A resulted in increased hepatic injury, while pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide, cimetidine, or 3-methylcholanthrene had no effect on hepatic damage by loxistatin. Five hours after (14C)loxistatin administration to rats, the covalent binding of the radioactivity to proteins was greatest in the liver, followed by the kidney, then muscle and blood to a lesser extent. (14C)Loxistatin acid, the pharmacologically active form of loxistatin, irreversibly bound to rat liver microsomal proteins; more binding occurred when the NADPH-generating system was omitted and when the microsomes were boiled first. GSH did not alter the extent of irreversible binding, whereas N-ethylmaleimide decreased the binding of (14C)loxistatin acid to rat liver microsomal proteins by 75%. Unlike the rat, administration of loxistatin to hamsters caused neither hepatic injury nor hepatic GSH depletion.

  3. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    PubMed Central

    Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; Maddern, G. J.; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499). The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217). Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units) compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units); (p = .023). Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished. PMID:8387808

  4. Chronic hepatitis E: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Arvind R; Kotwal, Vikram; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E viral infection has traditionally been considered an acute, self-limited, water borne disease similar to hepatitis A, endemic to developing countries. However, over the past decade, zoonotic transmission and progression to chronicity in human patients has been identified, resulting in persistently elevated transaminase levels, progressive liver injury and cirrhosis. In addition to liver injury, neurological, renal and rheumatological manifestations have also been reported. Chronic hepatitis E occurs mainly in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, human immunodeficiency virus patients with low CD4 counts and in patients with hematological malignancies receiving chemotherapy. Diagnosis is established by persistent elevation of hepatitis E virus RNA in the stool or serum. This population often requires treatment with antiviral agents, particularly ribavirin, as spontaneous clearance with reduction in immunosuppression occurs only in about a third of the patients. The purpose of this review, is to further discuss the clinical presentation, and recent advances in diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of chronic hepatitis E. PMID:26380044

  5. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome. PMID:24659873

  6. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  7. Controlling Armadillo Damage 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Armadillos are beneficial because they eat insects and other invertebrates, but they can damage lawns, gardens and structural foundations. They also are believed to transmit leprosy to humans. This leaflet focuses on control methods such as trapping...

  8. Controlling Pocket Gopher Damage 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Pocket gophers can seriously damage cultivated farming areas, rangelands, orchards, tree farms and lawns. Mechanical control by probing and chemical control by hand baiting and using fumigants are explained....

  9. Northridge, CA Earthquake Damage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The person in this image was a USGS employee at the time this was taken. Collection of USGS still images taken after the January 17, 1994 Northridge earthquake highlighting the damage to buildings and infrastructure....

  10. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  11. Pharmacotherapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Rouabhia, Samir; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute form of alcohol induced liver disease with a poor prognosis that is seen in the patients who consume large quantities of alcohol. The diagnosis of AH is based on the appropriate alcohol intake history and is supported with clinical and histological features, and several scoring systems. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay for treating severe AH with pentoxifylline used as an alternative to steroids in addition to total alcohol abstinence. Liver transplantation is a possible therapeutic option for severe AH. Among the anti-craving medications able to improve abstinence rate, baclofen seems to be effective and safe in the alcoholic patients affected by severe liver damage. PMID:24605014

  12. Serum Levels of Annexin A2 as a Candidate Biomarker for Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kolgelier, Servet; Demir, Nazlim Aktug; Inkaya, Ahmet Cagkan; Sumer, Sua; Ozcimen, Serap; Demir, Lutfi Saltuk; Pehlivan, Fatma Seher; Arslan, Mahmure; Arpaci, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatologists have studied serologic markers of liver injury for decades. Annexins are a prominent group of such markers and annexin A2 (AnxA2) is one of the best characterized annexins. AnxA2 inhibits HBV polymerase among other functions. Its expression is up-regulated in regenerative hepatocytes. Objectives: To determine if serum AnxA2 level has a role in estimating liver damage in chronic HBV infection and investigate whether AnxA2 levels correlate with hepatic fibrosis. Patients and Methods: This study included 173 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 51 healthy controls. Liver fibrosis was graded histologically on liver biopsy samples. Blood samples were taken from patients during biopsy and serum AnxA2 levels were measured with ELISA. Results: In a group of adult patients with CHB, AnxA2 values were far higher than those of the control group (P = 0.001). When we assessed AnxA2 levels based on fibrosis stages, serum AnxA2 levels of patients with early stage fibrosis (stages 1 - 3) were significantly higher than those of patients with advanced stage fibrosis (stages 4 - 5; P = 0.001). Conclusions: AnxA2 is a useful biomarker for early stage fibrosis in patients with CHB. PMID:26587036

  13. [Steatosis and fibrosis: first stage of liver damage induced by chronic alcoholism. Our experience in 100 cases].

    PubMed

    Mancinella, A

    1991-04-15

    Having briefly analyzed the metabolism of ethanol in man, the author describes hepatocellular damage induced by alcohol abuse and histological, clinical and biohumoral features of steatosis and fibrosis. One hundred clinical cases of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis are also illustrated, studied and observed during five years. PMID:1828726

  14. Effect of Liverubin™ on hepatic biochemical profile in patients of alcoholic liver disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Nanda, V; Gupta, V; Sharma, S N; Pasricha, A; Karmakar, A Kumar; Patel, A; Bhatt, V M; Kantroo, B L; Kumar, B; Paul, N K Ketar; Attam, R

    2014-12-01

    Liverubin™ is an available drug in the Indian market that contains silymarin, the major active complex extracted from the medicinal plant milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.). The study retrospectively tracked and analyzed the data of 602 patients, out of which 230 were alcohol induced; 131 with alcohol-induced liver damage (ALD), 13 with liver cirrhosis, and 86 with fatty liver; to assess the effects of water soluble Silymarin (Liverubin™) on important hepatic biochemical parameters. The data was collected from 32 major cities treated by 72 physicians across India who were observed for the specified treatment duration of 11 months. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics. At the end of the treatment the hepatic biochemical profile was appreciably improved: the mean % of change in the levels of important hepatic biochemical parameters was observed as follows: total bilirubin 63.48% (direct bilirubin: 64.96%; indirect bilirubin: 61.63%). The serum SGOT and SGPT changed at a mean % of 65.43 and 69.31 respectively while serum alkaline phosphatase was changed at a mean % rate of 39.81. Liverubin™ proved to be safe & well-tolerated among the studied population and no significant treatment related adverse events were reported during the study. Liverubin™ treatment is found to bring about effective lowering of abnormally elevated hepatic biochemical parameters. Liverubin™, water soluble active Silymarin, in the popularly prescribed doses of 140-mg tid is observed to be a promising safe and effective drug in cases of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26076375

  15. Altered metal metabolism in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marano, Massimo; Vespasiani Gentilucci, Umberto; Altamura, Claudia; Siotto, Mariacristina; Squitti, Rosanna; Bucossi, Serena; Quintiliani, Livia; Migliore, Simone; Greco, Federico; Scarciolla, Laura; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Picardi, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional metal homeostasis contributes to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. These have been implicated in hepatic encephalopathy pathogenesis. To investigate whether altered metal metabolism is associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Twenty-one controls and 34 HCV-cirrhotic patients (ENC/NEC patients according to presence/absence of previous overt episodes of hepatic encephalopathy) and a control group were studied. Serum iron, copper, ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin activity, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined. Neuropsychological tests were performed by the repeatable battery of neuropsychological status. Magnetic resonance assessed basal ganglia volumes and metal deposition (pallidal index and T2*). Cirrhotic patients performed worse than controls at cognitive tests, especially ENC patients,. At biochemical analysis copper concentrations, ceruloplasmin activity and transferrin levels were lower in ENC than in NEC patients and controls (p?hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:26307419

  16. Effect of growth hormone on hepatic energy metabolism in normal rabbit liver.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, F; Takada, Y; Yamaguchi, T; Mori, K; Shimahara, Y; Morimoto, T; Yamaoka, Y; Ozawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), which is well known as an anabolic agent in systemic protein metabolism but has catabolic effects on the carbohydrate metabolism in the liver, was administered to normal rabbit to investigate its effects on the hepatic energy metabolism. The changes in arterial ketone body ratio (AKBR: acetoacetate/3-hydroxybutyrate), which reflects the hepatic mitochondrial redox state ([NAD+]/[NADH]), after GH injection was studied as an indicator of the hepatic energy metabolism. GH was administered to normal rabbit at the doses of 50 micrograms/kg (GH-50 group), 100 micrograms/kg (GH-100 group) and 200 micrograms/kg (GH-200 group) by intravenous bolus injection. In the GH-50, GH-100 and GH-200 groups, AKBR decreased significantly from 1.40 +/- 0.09 to 0.94 +/- 0.05, from 1.19 +/- 0.11 to 0.83 +/- 0.14, and from 1.19 +/- 0.08 to 0.71 +/- 0.15 at 90 min, respectively. The energy charge of the liver decreased significantly 90 min after 200 micrograms/kg GH injection from 0.872 +/- 0.003 to 0.836 +/- 0.012 (p < 0.05). These results suggest that GH is associated with the deterioration of the hepatic energy metabolism, and that the administration of GH should be carefully weighed up in cases of damaged liver. PMID:7781649

  17. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  18. Hepatic microcirculatory perfusion failure is a determinant of liver dysfunction in warm ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, B.; Glasz, J.; Leiderer, R.; Post, S.; Menger, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is characterized by circulatory and metabolic derangements, liver dysfunction, and tissue damage. However, little is known about the causative role of I/R-induced microcirculatory disturbance on the manifestation of postischemic reperfusion injury. Therefore, the intention of the study was to assess changes of hepatic microvascular perfusion (intravital fluorescence microscopy) as related to hepatic morphology (light/electron microscopy), hepatocellular integrity (serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities), and excretory function (bile flow). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 20 minutes (group B, n = 9) and 60 minutes (group C, n = 9) of left hepatic lobar ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. Sham-operated animals without ischemia served as controls (group A, n = 10). Lobar ischemia for 20 minutes followed by reperfusion resulted in a significant reduction of sinusoidal perfusion rate (93.9 +/- 1.4%; P < 0.05) and a decrease in erythrocyte flux (90.0 +/- 5.6%) when compared with controls (99.4 +/- 0.2 and 97.9 +/- 2.7%). This was accompanied by a significant increase of serum AST and ALT activities (P < 0.05) and a reduction of bile flow (P < 0.05). Prolongation of lobar ischemia (group C, 60 minutes) aggravated postischemic reperfusion injury (sinusoidal perfusion rate: 87.4 +/- 2.9%; erythrocyte flux: 62.1 +/- 8.4%) and was paralleled by severed hepatocellular damage. Electron microscopy of postischemic tissue demonstrated alteration of nonparenchymal cells (swelling of sinusoidal lining cells and widening of Disse's space) and substantial parenchymal cell damage (swelling of mitochondria, disarrangement of rough endoplasmatic reticulum, vacuolization, complete cytoplasmic degeneration). Initial postischemic increase in serum AST and ALT activities and reduction of bile flow directly correlated with the extent of microcirculatory failure (P < 0.01), ie, impairment of sinusoidal perfusion and decrease of erythrocyte flux, indicating the decisive role of microvascular perfusion failure for the manifestation of hepatic tissue damage and liver dysfunction. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7992845

  19. Indirect identification of damage functions from damage records

    E-print Network

    Steinhäuser, J Micha; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess future damage caused by natural disasters, it is desirable to estimate the damage caused by single events. So called damage functions provide -- for a natural disaster of certain magnitude -- a specific damage value. However, in general, the functional form of such damage functions is unknown. We study the distributions of recorded flood damages on extended scales and deduce which damage functions lead to such distributions when the floods obey Generalized Extreme Value statistics and follow Generalized Pareto distributions. Based on the finding of broad damage distributions we investigate two possible functional forms to characterize the data. In the case of Gumbel distributed extreme events, (i) a power-law distribution density with an exponent close to 2 (Zipf's law) implies an exponential damage function; (ii) stretched exponential distribution densities imply power-law damage functions. In the case of Weibull (Frechet) distributed extreme events we find correspondingly steeper (less st...

  20. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Protects Hepatocytes from Type I Interferon-Driven Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anannya; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Kosack, Lindsay; Cupovic, Jovana; Kandasamy, Richard K; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Merkler, Doron; Kühl, Anja A; Vilagos, Bojan; Schliehe, Christopher; Panse, Isabel; Khamina, Kseniya; Baazim, Hatoon; Arnold, Isabelle; Flatz, Lukas; Xu, Haifeng C; Lang, Philipp A; Aderem, Alan; Takaoka, Akinori; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Ludewig, Burkhard; Löhning, Max; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2015-11-17

    Tissue damage caused by viral hepatitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Using a mouse model of viral hepatitis, we identified virus-induced early transcriptional changes in the redox pathways in the liver, including downregulation of superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Sod1(-/-) mice exhibited increased inflammation and aggravated liver damage upon viral infection, which was independent of T and NK cells and could be ameliorated by antioxidant treatment. Type I interferon (IFN-I) led to a downregulation of Sod1 and caused oxidative liver damage in Sod1(-/-) and wild-type mice. Genetic and pharmacological ablation of the IFN-I signaling pathway protected against virus-induced liver damage. These results delineate IFN-I mediated oxidative stress as a key mediator of virus-induced liver damage and describe a mechanism of innate-immunity-driven pathology, linking IFN-I signaling with antioxidant host defense and infection-associated tissue damage. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26588782

  1. Hepatic effects of halothane, isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Topal, A; Gül, N; Ilçöl, Y; Görgül, O S

    2003-12-01

    The effects of halothane, isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia on hepatic function and hepatocellular damage were investigated in dogs, comparing the activity of hepatic enzymes and bilirubin concentration in serum. An experimental study was designed. Twenty-one clinically normal mongrel dogs were divided into three groups and accordingly anaesthetized with halothane (n = 7), isoflurane (n = 7) and sevoflurane (n = 7). The dogs were 1-4 years old, and weighed between 13.5 and 27 kg (18.4 +/- 3.9). Xylazine HCI (1-2 mg/kg) i.m. was used as pre-anaesthetic medication. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol 2 mg/kg i.v. The trachea was intubated and anaesthesia maintained with halothane, isoflurane or sevoflurane in oxygen at concentrations of 1.35, 2 and 3%, respectively. Intermittent positive pressure ventilation (tidal volume, 15 ml/kg; respiration rate, 12-14/min) was started immediately after intubation and the anaesthesia lasted for 60 min. Venous blood samples were collected before pre-medication, 24 and 48 h, and 7 and 14 days after anaesthesia. Serum level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH GGT) activities and bilirubin concentration were measured. Serum AST, ALT and GGT activities increased after anaesthesia in all groups. In the halothane group, serum AST and ALT activities significantly increased all the time after anaesthesia compared with baseline activities. But in the isoflurane group AST and ALT activities increased only between 2 and 7 days, and in the sevoflurane group 7 days after anaesthesia. GGT activity was increased in the halothane group between 2 and 7 days, and in the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups 7 days after anaesthesia. All dogs recovered from anaesthesia without complications and none developed clinical signs of hepatic damage within 14 days. The results suggest that the use of halothane anaesthesia induces an elevation of serum activities of liver enzymes more frequently than isoflurane or sevoflurane from 2 to 14 days after anaesthesia in dogs. The effects of isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia on the liver in dogs is safer than halothane anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:15157022

  2. Hepatic immune tolerance induced by hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Hung, Chien-Hui; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2015-11-14

    The liver, which is a metabolic organ, plays a pivotal role in tolerance induction. Hepatic stellate cells (HpSCs), which are unique non-parenchymal cells, exert potent immunoregulatory activity during cotransplantation with allogeneic islets effectively protecting the islet allografts from rejection. Multiple mechanisms participate in the immune tolerance induced by HpSCs, including the marked expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), attenuation of effector T cell functions and augmentation of regulatory T cells. HpSC conditioned MDSC-based immunotherapy has been conducted in mice with autoimmune disease and the results show that this technique may be promising. This article demonstrates how HpSCs orchestrate both innate immunity and adaptive immunity to build a negative network that leads to immune tolerance. PMID:26576077

  3. Hepatic immune tolerance induced by hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Hung, Chien-Hui; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2015-01-01

    The liver, which is a metabolic organ, plays a pivotal role in tolerance induction. Hepatic stellate cells (HpSCs), which are unique non-parenchymal cells, exert potent immunoregulatory activity during cotransplantation with allogeneic islets effectively protecting the islet allografts from rejection. Multiple mechanisms participate in the immune tolerance induced by HpSCs, including the marked expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), attenuation of effector T cell functions and augmentation of regulatory T cells. HpSC conditioned MDSC-based immunotherapy has been conducted in mice with autoimmune disease and the results show that this technique may be promising. This article demonstrates how HpSCs orchestrate both innate immunity and adaptive immunity to build a negative network that leads to immune tolerance. PMID:26576077

  4. Clinical features of ischemic hepatitis caused by shock with four different types: a retrospective study of 328 cases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Xian-Zheng; Su, Li-Jie; Yang, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of ischemic hepatitis due to shock with four different types (allergic shock, hypovolemic shock, septic shock, and cardiogenic shock). A total of 328 patients (200 males, 128 females, mean age, 65.84 ± 15.21 years old, range, 15-94 years) diagnosed with shock in Tongji Hospital were retrospectively investigated from Jun 2008 to Feb 2010. The parameters of liver function test, including alanine aminotransferanse (ALT), aspartate aminotransferanse (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total bilirubin (TB), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ?-glutamyltransferase (?-GT), were recorded and analyzed. Besides, the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were also measured and relevant correlation analysis was conducted. Among all the cases, 242 (73.8%) patients developed ischemic hepatitis. The mortality of shock patients combined with ischemic hepatitis was significantly higher than the total mortality (26.0% vs 23.8%, P < 0.05). The incidence of hepatic damage was highest in the septic shock (87.5%), while the lowest in thehypovolemic shock (49.4%). The sensitivity of ALT elevation was higher than that of AST. In addition, CRP was positively correlated with the levels of liver function parameters in the septic shock and BNP was positively correlated with that in the cardiogenic shock. Ischemic hepatitis is a common complication of shock, increasing the mortality of shock patients. The septic shock is the most common cause of hepatic damage in shock patients. CRP may be a useful predictor for septic shock, while BNP may be a useful predictor for cardiogenic shock. PMID:26629201

  5. Hepatic and renal effects of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Di Tomasso, Nora; Monaco, Fabrizio; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Although associated with low morbidity and mortality, cardiopulmonary bypass remains a "non-physiologic" device that carries a set of complications. Hepatic and renal impairment are associated with a poor outcome. The knowledge of pathophysiology, risk factors and therapeutic interventions can help the anaesthesiologist in preventing these complications in daily practice. The present narrative review provides an update of the literature on the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on hepatic and renal functions, focussing on markers of hepatic and renal injuries, perioperative strategies in preserving organ function and replacement therapies. PMID:26060027

  6. Hepatic regeneration from hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Austin, Timothy W; Lagasse, Eric

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, numerous investigators have reported novel cellular fates of multipotent stem or progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss the unexpected observations that hematopoietic stem cells can contribute to the hepatocyte lineage in humans and in rodent models of liver disease and regeneration. A key unresolved issue regarding hepatic regeneration from hematopoietic stem cells is whether the mechanism occurs through transdetermination, cell fusion, or other processes. A better understanding of the various stem or progenitor cells of the hepatic lineage may facilitate cellular transplantation approaches for the correction of hepatic function in patients with end-stage liver disease. PMID:12490303

  7. [Skin manifestations related to hepatitis C viruses].

    PubMed

    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Beylot-Barry, M; Couzigou, P; Beylot, J

    1995-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus causes both hepatic and extrahepatic disorders, particularly as regards dermatology. The link between essential mixed cryoglobulinemias and the C virus infection has been clearly evidenced., whereas its frequency seems low in other systemic vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa. Similarly, the link between C virus hepatopathy and porphyria cutanea tarda is now proven. Lichen planus is also described as being associated with this virus, but further epidemiological studies are required to determine the exact prevalence of lichen in C virus hepatopathy cases. Finally, various cutaneous disorders, such as urticaria, erythema multiforme, dermo-hypodermitis, etc, occasionally arise during acute or chronic hepatitis C. PMID:7481154

  8. CT and MR imaging of radiation hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, E.C.; Lee, J.K.; Weyman, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The authors describe two cases of radiation hepatitis evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and CT with CT angiography (CTA) additionally performed in one patient. On CT the radiation hepatitis appeared as sharply demarcated region of lower attenuation than the adjacent normal liver. The region of radiation hepatitis demonstrated decreased perfusion in the portal venous phase of CTA, and 4 min delayed images following CTA showed increased density or relative increased accumulation of contrast. Magnetic resonance in both cases showed that the area of low density on CT had high signal on the T2-weighted image and had increased water content as determined by proton spectroscopic imaging method.

  9. Immunopathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus infection remains a major global health issue with 3 to 4 million incident cases and 170 million prevalent chronic infections. Complex, partially understood, host-virus interactions determine whether an acute infection with hepatitis C resolves, as occurs in approximately 30% of cases, or generates a persistent hepatic infection, as occurs in the remainder. Once chronic infection is established, the velocity of hepatocyte injury and resultant fibrosis is significantly modulated by immunologic as well as environmental factors. Immunomodulation has been the backbone of antiviral therapy despite poor understanding of its mechanism of action. PMID:26600217

  10. Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, transfusions and risk of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Akbar, N; Basuki, B; Mulyanto; Garabrant, D H; Sulaiman, A; Noer, H M

    1997-11-01

    This study identifies the risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and measures the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis C (anti-HCV) in the general population of Jakarta. A population-based sample of 985 people aged 15 and above was surveyed. Risk factors were identified through questionnaires and home visits. Serum was analysed for HBsAg, antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), anti-HCV, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The seroprevalence was: 4.0% (39/985) for HBsAg, 17.2% (170/985) for anti-HBs, and 3.9% (38/985) for anti-HCV. The risk factors for hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection had little in common. Low socioeconomic status was a strong risk factor for HBsAg (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 18.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.35-139.50). In addition, the Chinese group has 2.97 higher risk of having HBV infection compared with the Malayan ethnic group (adjusted OR 2.97; 95% CI 1.22-7.83). There was moderate positive trend between family size and risk of HBsAg positivity (P = 0.130). Age over 50 (adjusted OR 14.72; 95% CI 4.35-49.89) and history of transfusion were significant risk factors for hepatitis C (adjusted OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.25-7.33). Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections have different risk factors in Jakarta, a high risk in population for both diseases. Hepatitis B transmission is associated with low socioeconomic status, Chinese ethnic group and large family size, while hepatitis C is associated with an older age and a history of transfusions. PMID:9430042

  11. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  12. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of glucose (sugar). It's like a meter! It helps regulate the levels of medicine you are taking. (Before some medicines can work, the liver has to start them up.) It also regulates hormones in your body. It's ...

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fever, fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, jaundice and dark urine.These symptoms can last up to five ... fever, fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Acute symptoms can last several months, during ...

  14. Hepatic fatty acid composition differs between chronic hepatitis C patients with and without steatosis.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Bianca M; Mohammed, Saira S; Aghdassi, Elaheh; Prayitno, Nita R; Ma, David W L; Nguyen, Augustin; Guindi, Maha; Sherman, Morris; Heathcote, E Jenny; Allard, Johane P

    2009-04-01

    Hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition may influence steatosis development in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In a cross-sectional study, we compared the hepatic FA profile in hepatitis C patients with (n = 9) and without (n = 33) steatosis (> or =5% of hepatocytes involved). FA composition of hepatic and RBC total lipids was measured by gas chromatography. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in liver and plasma, blood biochemistry, and nutritional status were also assessed. Patients with steatosis had more fibrosis, higher necroinflammatory activity of their hepatitis C infection, were more often infected with genotype 3, and had lower serum cholesterol. Monounsaturated FA in the liver were higher and trans FA were lower in patients with steatosis. Lower stearic acid and higher oleic acid in hepatic total lipids suggested higher Delta9-desaturase activity. alpha-Linolenic acid in the liver was higher and the ratios of long-chain PUFA:essential FA precursors were lower for (n-3) and (n-6) PUFA. Plasma vitamin C was lower in steatosis, but RBC FA composition and other parameters did not differ. We conclude that hepatic FA composition is altered in patients with hepatitis C and steatosis, probably due to modulation of enzymatic elongation and desaturation. Oxidative stress or nutritional status does not seem to play a predominant role for development of steatosis in CHC. PMID:19211827

  15. Phenylbutazone and chromosomal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Price Evans, A; Benn, P A; Littler, T R; Halliday, L D

    1975-01-01

    Investigation of 44 paired test and control patients, all suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, following exposure to phenylbutazone (PBZ) and/or oxyphenbutazone (OPB), suggests that there is no significant increase in the level of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes. The control subjects comprised two series, one previously exposed to PBZ and/or OPB, but not for at least 1-5 years, and the other never exposed to PBZ or OPB. No significant difference in the level of chromosome damage was found between patients never exposed, previously exposed, or now receiving PBZ and/or OPB. PMID:769706

  16. Melatonin attenuates (-)-epigallocatehin-3-gallate-triggered hepatotoxicity without compromising its downregulation of hepatic gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxu; Wei, Yaqing; Wang, Taotao; Wan, Xiaochun; Yang, Chung S; Reiter, Russel J; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    (-)-Epigallocatehin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of green tea, can ameliorate metabolic syndrome at least in part through reducing gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Green tea extracts, of which EGCG is a key constituent, have been used for weight loss in humans. A potential adverse effect of high-dose EGCG or green tea extracts is hepatotoxicity. Melatonin, an endogenous antioxidant with a high safety profile, is effective in preventing various types of tissue damage. The current study investigated the influence of melatonin on EGCG-triggered hepatotoxicity and EGCG-downregulated hepatic genes responsible for gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis in mice. We found that (i) melatonin extended survival time of mice intoxicated with lethal doses of EGCG; (ii) melatonin ameliorated acute liver damage and associated hepatic Nrf2 suppression caused by a nonlethal toxic dose of EGCG; (iii) melatonin reduced subacute liver injury and hepatic Nrf2 activation caused by lower toxic doses of EGCG; and (iv) melatonin did not compromise the action of pharmacological doses of EGCG in downregulating a battery of hepatic genes responsible for gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, including G6Pc, PEPCK, FOXO1?, SCD1, Fasn, leptin, ACC?, ACC?, GAPT, and Srebp-1. Taken together, these results suggest that the combination of EGCG and melatonin is an effective approach for preventing potential adverse effects of EGCG as a dietary supplement for metabolic syndrome alleviation and body weight reduction. PMID:26426126

  17. Treatment of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Norman L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined by an altered mental status in the setting of portosystemic shunting, with or without cirrhosis. The basis of HE is probably multi-factorial, but increased ammonia delivery to the brain is thought to play a pivotal role. Medical therapies have typically focused on reducing blood ammonia concentrations. These measures are moderately effective, but further improvements will require identification of new therapeutic targets. Two medications, lactulose and rifaximin, are currently approved for the treatment of HE in the USA - new compounds are available off-label, and are in clinical trials. The presence of HE is associated with a higher risk of death in cirrhotic patients. Liver transplantation typically cures HE, but HE does not increase the MELD score, and therefore does not contribute to the likelihood of liver transplantation. PMID:26195208

  18. Alcoholic Hepatitis: Steroids vs. Pentoxifylline

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Laura; Gobejishvili, Leila; Crittenden, Neil; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) remains a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States and is actually increasing in certain areas of Europe. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies/approaches. Major barriers for reducing morbidity, mortality, and costs of care include: lack of translational animal and human studies of new therapies for AH; limited trials of combination therapies in AH targeted at specific disease mechanisms (e.g., gut permeability, cytokines, oxidative stress); limited studies on non-invasive, non-mortality end points; few studies on mechanisms of steroid non-responsiveness; and inadequate prognostic indicators, to name only a few. In spite of these gaps, we have made major advances in understanding mechanisms for AH and appropriate therapies for AH. This article reviews mechanisms and rationale for use of steroids and pentoxifylline in AH and future directions in therapy. PMID:23750115

  19. Irreversible Electroporation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Froud, Tatiana; Suthar, Rekhaben; Barbery, Katuska

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide problem of epidemic proportions, best treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Major advances have been made in all specialties that manage patients with HCC, with surgical options at one end of the spectrum and palliative chemotherapy on the other, and the vast majority of patients require the involvement and expertise of interventional oncology. Several ablative and transarterial technologies are currently available. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new ablative technology that uses high-voltage, low-energy DC current to create nanopores in the cell membrane, disrupting the homeostasis mechanism and inducing cell death by initiating apoptosis. This article discusses the evolution of IRE as well as its safety and efficacy in the context of other ablative therapies in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. PMID:24436519

  20. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nation's largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  1. Detecting Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy in an Endemic Country for Hepatitis B: The Role of Psychometrics and Serum IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Fen; Chu, Chi-Jen; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Wang, Yen-Po; Liu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims It remains unknown what the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is in Taiwan, a highly endemic country for chronic viral hepatitis infection. It is also unclear whether abnormal serum cytokine levels can be indicative of the presence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy. We aimed to standardize the tests of psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score and predictive value of proinflammatory cytokines in minimal hepatic encephalopathy in Taiwan. Methods 180 healthy subjects and 94 cirrhotic patients without a history of overt hepatic encephalopathy from a tertiary center were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Blood sampling for determination of serum levels of interleukin 6 and 18 and tumor necrosis factor-? was performed. Based on the normogram of psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score from healthy volunteers, patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy were identified from the cirrhotic patients using the criterion of a psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score less than ?4. Results In the healthy subjects, age and education were predictors of subtests of psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy was identified in 27 (29%) cirrhotic patients. Serum interleukin 6 level (OR = 6.50, 95% CI = 1.64–25.76, P = 0.008) was predictive of the presence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy after multivariate analysis. Conclusions The psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score can be a useful tool for detecting patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy in Taiwan and around one third of cirrhotic outpatients fulfill this diagnosis. A high serum interleukin 6 level is predictive of the presence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:26039496

  2. Morphometric study of the hepatic lesions experimentally induced in hamsters by Entamoeba dispar and E. histolytica.

    PubMed

    Costa, C A X; Brito, K N O; Gomes, M A; Caliari, M V

    2007-12-01

    Evolution of experimental hepatic lesions produced in hamsters with Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively through morphometry and immunohistochemistry. Animals infected with E. dispar developed hepatic lesions quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those produced by E. histolytica on the first three days of infection. On the 6th and 8th days of infection, E. histolytica produced larger tissue damage than E. dispar. A gradual decrease was observed in the number of trophozoites along the infection. A negative correlation was observed between the reduced number of trophozoites and the larger area of necrosis in both groups, confirming the importance of trophozoites killed in the lesion genesis. Regarding the genetic similarity between E. histolytica and E. dispar, comparison strategy between lesions produced by these species may culminate in identifying virulence factors of E. histolytica. PMID:18225422

  3. Arsenic-induced hepatic mitochondrial toxicity in rats and its amelioration by dietary phosphate.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sangita; Karmakar, Subhra; Maiti, Anasuya; Choudhury, Monalisa; Ghosh, Aniruddha; Das, Asankur Sekhar; Mitra, Chandan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed to test the hypothesis that inorganic phosphate may reduce arsenic toxicity by decreasing its intestinal transference. Co-administration of inorganic phosphate (6.56 M) and arsenic (6.07 mM) in the intestinal loops of rats, in situ, caused significant reduction of arsenic transference. Short-term arsenic exposure (3mg/kg body weight/day for 30 days) caused liver damage evidenced by activities of liver enzymes and necroinflammatory changes. These effects of arsenic were coupled with enhanced mitochondrial swelling, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, a decrease in mitochondrial calcium content, changes in indices of hepatic mitochondrial oxidative stress and iNOS expression. Arsenic also increased hepatic caspase 3 activity and DNA fragmentation. All these apoptosis-related molecular changes caused by arsenic could be alleviated by supplementation with inorganic phosphate, which likely suggests a protective role of phosphate against arsenic-induced hepatotoxic changes. PMID:21787675

  4. Down-regulation of hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Enoki, Kanako; Horie, Toshiharu

    2008-03-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are down-regulated during inflammation. In this study, an animal model of inflammatory bowel disease was subjected to characterization of hepatic P450 expression under inflammatory conditions. Rats were treated intracolonically with 100 mg/kg trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) dissolved in 30% ethanol, and homogenates of colonic mucosa and hepatic microsomes of the rats were prepared. The colitis was accompanied by appearance of higher levels of portal endotoxin, interleukin-6, and nitric oxide metabolites and decreases in contents and activities for hepatic CYP3A2, CYP2C11, and, to a lesser extent, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1. Nimesulide, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor, protected rats with TNBS-induced colitis (TNBS-colitis) against the down-regulation of hepatic CYP3A2. Polymyxin B, which neutralizes endotoxin, curcumin, which has anti-inflammatory properties, and gadolinium chloride, which inactivates macrophages, attenuated the down-regulation of CYP3A2. Similar effects were observed in other P450s such as CYP2C11, but the agents were less effective in attenuating the down-regulation. Our data suggest that endogenous substances leaked from damaged colon in the rats with TNBS-colitis activate Kupffer cells, leading to down-regulation of hepatic P450s with differential susceptibility to the inflammatory stimuli. The colitis model, instead of exogenous administration of lipopolysaccharide or cytokines, could be applied to the study on mechanisms for altered hepatic P450 expression and other liver functions under mild inflammatory conditions. PMID:18079364

  5. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) functions as a critical regulator in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?-induced hepatic insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongye; Huang, Xiuqing; Jiao, Juan; Zhang, Hangxiang; Liu, Jin; Qin, Weiwei; Meng, Xiangyu; Shen, Tao; Lin, Yajun; Chu, Jiaojiao; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) was shown to participate in multiple cellular processes, including DNA damage response, cell cycle and embryo development. Recent studies demonstrated a looming role of PP4 in glucose metabolism. However, whether PP4 is involved in hepatic insulin resistance remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to estimate the role of PP4 in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?-induced hepatic insulin resistance. db/db mice and TNF-?-treated C57BL/6J mice were used as hepatic insulin resistance animal models. In vitro models were established in both HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes by TNF-? treatment. We found that increased expression and activity of PP4 occurred in the livers of db/db mice and TNF-?-induced hepatic insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. Actually, PP4 silencing and suppression of PP4 activity ameliorated TNF-?-induced hepatic insulin resistance, whereas over-expression of PP4 caused insulin resistance. We then further investigated the prodiabetic mechanism of PP4 in TNF-?-induced insulin resistance. We found that PP4 formed a complex with IRS-1 to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 on serine 307 via JNK activation and reduce the expression of IRS-1. Thus, PP4 is an important regulator in inflammatory related insulin resistance. PMID:26666849

  6. HEPATITIS B INFORMATION & VACCINATION WAIVER Hepatitis B is a serious infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    by a virus that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause life-long infection that may lead to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, or death. There is no cure for hepatitis B

  7. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation Downregulate miR-29: miR-29 Overexpression Reduces Hepatitis C Viral Abundance in Culture

    E-print Network

    Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha

    Background.?Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)–induced liver fibrosis involves upregulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)–? and subsequent hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate HCV infection ...

  8. Selecting a path against Hepatitis C Virus 

    E-print Network

    Simeon, Rudo Lyndon

    2013-12-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) currently affects ~5% of the world’s population and has relatively limited treatment options for infected patients. Genetic suppressor elements (GSE) derived from a gene or genome of interest can act as transdominant...

  9. 78 FR 46247 - World Hepatitis Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... infection, as well as hepatitis B screenings for pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. After...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury and repair 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Neil C

    In this thesis I examined molecular mechanisms involved in acute and chronic liver injury, and also studied basic pathways mediating tumour promotion. Acute hepatic failure secondary to paracetamol poisoning is associated ...

  11. STAPLE copy of Hepatitis B Surface

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    STAPLE copy of Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (anti-HBs) titer lab results here! Department and complete the bottom portion of the page. Section A: HEPATITIS IMMUNIZATION RECORD Hepatitis B Surface ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Section B: HEPATITIS B VACCINATION DECLINATION I understand that due to my chance of occupational exposure

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Hepatic lipase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affects the body's ability to break down fats (lipids). People with this disorder have increased amounts of ... It is unclear what effect this change in lipid levels has on people with hepatic lipase deficiency. ...

  13. Sinkhole Activity Damages Home.

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Cracking along exterior walls is a sign of subsidence activity. Such severe structural damage from sinkholes can destroy homes and other structures. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-sett...

  14. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  15. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  16. Damaged Hospital Wing

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This two story hospital wing in Cauquenes, Chile suffered severe damage to the wall of the first floor as a result of the M 8.8 earthquake on Feb. 27, 2010. This building must be torn down. All patients were successfully evacuated at 3:34 AM after the earthquake shaking started....

  17. CT of radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Quivey, J.M.; Federle, M.P.; Wara, W.M.

    1980-09-01

    The CT findings in three patients with radiation-induced hepatic injury are discussed. In each patient a sharply defined band of low density was identified within the liver in an area of prior radiation. The low density bands resolved on follow-up examination. Computed tomography is useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with suspected radiation hepatitis and in differentiating radiation change from metastatic disease.

  18. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  19. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-12-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  20. TCDD, dietary iron and hepatic iron distribution in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bayati, Z.A.F.; Stohs, S.J.; Al-Turk, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a prototype for a large group of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, and is the most potent of these compounds. TCDD is an environmental pollutant with exceptional toxicity for certain mammalian and avian species. The liver is one of the principal target organs affected by TCDD in the rat and other laboratory species. TCDD induces many functional, biochemical and pathological changes, including altered lipid metabolism in the liver. Ferrous iron plays an important role in the initiation of lipid peroxidation. A proposed mechanism for the production of liver injury in chronic iron overload is that organelle damage leading to cell death occurs as a result of membrane lipid peroxidation initiated and promoted by intracellular iron. The presence of iron in subcellular fractions in vitro may catalyze lipid peroxidation and produce membrane damage. There is evidence for the occurrence of hepatic lipid peroxidation after TCDD administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if TCDD induced lipid peroxidation was associated with an increase in the iron content of liver and its subcellular fractions. The effect of TCDD administration on the iron content of whole homogenate, microsomes, mitochondria, and cytosol of livers of female rats fed defined diets containing deficient, normal and excessive levels of iron for 17, 24 and 31 days was investigated.

  1. Differential expression of stress-inducible proteins in chronic hepatic iron overload

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kyle E. Broadhurst, Kimberly A.; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Weydert, Jamie

    2007-09-01

    Introduction:: Oxidative stress can trigger a cellular stress response characterized by induction of antioxidants, acute phase reactants (APRs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are presumed to play a role in limiting tissue damage. In rodents, hepatic iron overload causes oxidative stress that results in upregulation of antioxidant defenses with minimal progressive liver injury. The aim of this study was to determine whether iron overload modulates expression of other stress-responsive proteins such as APRs and HSPs that may confer protection against iron-induced damage in rodent liver. Methods:: Male rats received repeated injections of iron dextran or dextran alone over a 6-month period. Hepatic transcript levels for a panel of APRs and HSPs were quantitated by real-time PCR and protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results:: Hepatic iron concentrations were increased > 50-fold in the iron-loaded rats compared to controls. Iron loading resulted in striking increases in mRNAs for Hsp32 (heme oxygenase-1; 12-fold increase vs. controls) and metallothionein-1 and -2 (both increased {approx} 6-fold). Transcripts for {alpha}1-acid glycoprotein, the major rat APR, were increased {approx} 3-fold, while expression of other classical APRs was unaltered. Surprisingly, although mRNA levels for the HSPs were not altered by iron, the abundance of Hsp25, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins was uniformly reduced in the iron-loaded livers, as were levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, an Hsp70 client protein. Conclusions:: Chronic iron administration elicits a unique pattern of stress protein expression. These alterations may modulate hepatic responses to iron overload, as well as other injury processes.

  2. Hepatitis B vaccination in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, F.; Lee, P.; Lee, C.; Huang, L.; Chang, L.; Liu, S.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the immunogenicity and safety of existing recommendations for hepatitis B vaccination in preterm infants.?METHODS—Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (H-B-VAX II, 5 µg per dose) was given to 85 preterm infants divided into two groups, using two different schedules. Forty four group A infants with birthweights of < 2000 g received three doses at 1, 2, and 7 months of age. Forty one group B infants with birthweights of ?2000 g received three doses at 0, 1, and 6 months of age.?RESULTS—After vaccination, 42 infants from group A (95%) and 37 infants from group B (90%) developed protective levels of antibody. The final seropositive rate and the geometric mean concentration of hepatitis B surface antibody between the two groups were not significantly different. The immune response of preterm infants to hepatitis B vaccines was similar to that of term infants in a previous study.?CONCLUSIONS—Preterm infants can be given hepatitis B vaccines using one of the above two different schedules, at a cutoff birthweight of 2000 g.?? Keywords: hepatitis B vaccine, prematurity, antibodies PMID:9377137

  3. Glycyrrhizin ameliorates metabolic syndrome-induced liver damage in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Sil, Rajarshi; Ray, Doel; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2015-11-01

    Glycyrrhizin, a major constituent of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, has been reported to ameliorate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and obesity in rats with metabolic syndrome. Liver dysfunction is associated with this syndrome. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizin treatment on metabolic syndrome-induced liver damage. After induction of metabolic syndrome in rats by high fructose (60 %) diet for 6 weeks, the rats were treated with glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight, single intra-peritoneal injection). After 2 weeks of treatment, rats were sacrificed to collect blood samples and liver tissues. Compared to normal, elevated activities of serum alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate transaminase, increased levels of liver advanced glycation end products, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl, protein kinase C?, NADPH oxidase-2, and decreased glutathione cycle components established liver damage and oxidative stress in fructose-fed rats. Activation of nuclear factor ?B, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as signals from mitochondria were found to be involved in liver cell apoptosis. Increased levels of cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-12 proteins suggested hepatic inflammation. Metabolic syndrome caused hepatic DNA damage and poly-ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting using annexin V/propidium iodide staining confirmed the apoptotic hepatic cell death. Histology of liver tissue also supported the experimental findings. Treatment with glycyrrhizin reduced oxidative stress, hepatic inflammation, and apoptotic cell death in fructose-fed rats. The results suggest that glycyrrhizin possesses therapeutic potential against hepatocellular damage in metabolic syndrome. PMID:26400710

  4. The Path to a Cure for Hepatitis C in People With HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research The Path to a Cure for Hepatitis C in People With HIV Related Links Hepatitis Mycobacteria ... such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, hepatitis C, hepatitis, B, Pneumocystis carinii , cryptococci, fungi, and human ...

  5. A case of anastrazole-related drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Wright, Gavin; Tanner, Peter; Lucas, Robert

    2014-10-01

    An otherwise asymptomatic 66-year-old British Caucasian female with a history of breast cancer was referred by the oncologists due to progressively abnormal liver function tests (LFTs). After undergoing wide local excision and axillary dissection she was started on the anti-oestrogen drug Arimidex (anastrozole) as the tumour cells were oestrogen receptor positive. With a background of normal LFTs, an absence of risk factors for chronic liver disease and otherwise good health, 6 months after starting Arimidex the oncology team noted deranged LFTs. Her hepatitis screening including hepatitis A-C, HSV, HIV, CMV and EBV serology and metabolic screening was negative. Liver ultrasound was essentially normal.The autoimmune screening was positive for ANA (1:160) and weakly positive for anti-smooth muscle antibody (1:80). A liver biopsy demonstrated heavy portal tract inflammation, associated interface hepatitis, and numerous necroinflammatory foci throughout the liver parenchyma. There was also a moderate to marked mixed inflammatory infiltrate of mainly plasma cells and lymphocytes with scattered eosinophils and neutrophils, which best reflects drug-induced liver injury (DILI), although potentially could also correspond with autoimmune hepatitis.The exact mechanism of liver injury from anastrazole is not very clear, but metabolic and immune-mediated damage and individual susceptibility are likely involved in what are often idiosyncratic reactions. The type of cellular immune recruitment (e.g., T-helper cells) reflects the chronicity of injury, with the potential to prolonged liver derangement months or years beyond the period of drug exposure such that DILI may mimic and/or cause drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:26184021

  6. Zinc might prevent heat-induced hepatic injury by activating the Nrf2-antioxidant in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Li, Y; Cao, Y; Li, C

    2015-05-01

    Zinc (Zn) is generally known to be an essential trace element with growth-promoting and antioxidant activities. The present study was performed to clarify the role of Zn in the livers of heat-treated mice. Eight-week-old male mice were divided into control (Con), heat treatment (HT) and heat treatment plus zinc groups (HT?+?Zn) and were fed diets containing 60, 60, or 300 mg/kg Zn (zinc sulfate), respectively. After 30 days of feeding on their respective diets, the control group was maintained at a controlled temperature (25 °C), whereas the HT and HT?+?Zn groups were exposed to an elevated ambient temperature (40-42 °C) for 2 h each day. After heat exposure for seven consecutive days, sera and liver tissues were collected. The mice in the HT group exhibited reduced liver weights and lower hepatosomatic indices. Histological findings revealed that the hepatocytes of the HT group were subjected to serious damage and exhibited irregular arrangements and nuclear pyknosis. Moreover, in the HT group, the hepatic malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased, while the serum alkaline phosphatase levels, hepatic copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly reduced compared to those of the control group. However, in the HT?+?Zn group, the histomorphology of the liver was restored, the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level was significantly decreased, and the hepatic CuZn-SOD activity was significantly increased compared to the HT group. Furthermore, expressions of the hepatic Nrf2 protein and Nrf2, Keap1, and NQO1 genes in the HT?+?Zn group were not only higher than the HT group but also higher than the control group. Zn might alleviate heat-induced hepatic injury as revealed by restored histomorphology and AST level. Our results further suggest that Zn might exert its protective effects via the activation of the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway. PMID:25586622

  7. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2015-08-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  8. A nutrient mixture prevents acetaminophen hepatic and renal toxicity in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Roomi, M W; Kalinovsky, T; Ivanov, V; Rath, M; Niedzwiecki, A

    2008-03-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is often fatal, leading to fulminant hepatic and renal tubular necrosis in humans and animals. We studied the effect of a nutrient mixture (NM) containing, among other nutrients, lysine, proline, ascorbic acid, N-acetyl cysteine, and green tea extract, which has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a broad spectrum of therapeutic properties on APAP-induced hepatic and renal damage in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice. Seven-week-old male ICR mice were divided into four groups (A-D) of five animals each. Groups A and C mice were fed a regular diet for 2 weeks, while groups B and D mice were supplemented with 0.5% NM (w/w) during that period. Groups A and B received saline i.p., while groups C and D received APAP (600 mg/kg) i.p. All animals were killed 24 h after APAP administration, serum was collected to assess the liver and kidney functions, and the livers and kidneys were excised for histology. Mean serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen), creatinine, and BUN/creatinine ratios were comparable in groups A and B, increased markedly in group C and significantly lower in group D compared with group C. APAP caused significant centrilobular necrosis and glomerular damage in unsupplemented animals, while NM prevented these alterations. The results indicate that NM has potential to protect against APAP-induced liver and kidney damage. PMID:18650254

  9. Primary hepatic tuberculosis mimicking intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic tuberculosis (TB) is usually associated with pulmonary or miliary TB, but primary hepatic TB is very uncommon even in countries with high prevalence of TB. The clinical manifestation of primary hepatic TB is atypical and imaging modalities are unhelpful for differential diagnosis of the liver mass. Image-guided needle biopsy is the best diagnostic method for primary hepatic TB. In the cases presented here, we did not perform liver biopsy because we believed the liver masses were cholangiocarcinoma, but primary hepatic TB was ultimately confirmed by postoperative pathology. Here we report two cases of patients who were diagnosed with primary hepatic TB mimicking mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26236700

  10. HEPATITIS B VACCINE DECLARATION FORM Please submit this completed Hepatitis B Vaccine Form to

    E-print Network

    HEPATITIS B VACCINE DECLARATION FORM Please submit this completed Hepatitis B Vaccine Form and students not engaged in employment or research activity may not be eligible for free vaccination. . Please VACCINE" Please contact me at the above phone number to schedule. Employee Signature Date: II. "I DECLINE

  11. Action of histamine on endothelial cells of guinea-pig isolated hepatic portal vein and its modification by indomethacin or removal of calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Northover, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    Methods are described for preparing guinea-pig hepatic portal vein endothelium for light microscopy and electron microscopy. Histamine (100 mug/ml) caused damage to the endothelium which was visible with both the light and electron microscopes. The damage was reduced in the absence of calcium. The reduction was more apparent with the electron microscope than with the light microscope. Indomethacin (100 mug/ml) protected the endothelial cells against the damaging effects of histamine. Possible modes of action of histamine and indomethacin are discussed. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-7 Figs. 8-9 PMID:1106749

  12. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  13. Ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic attenuation rate for quantifying liver fat content

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Ding, Fang; Chen, Tian; Xia, Liang-Hua; Qian, Juan; Lv, Guo-Yi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To establish and validate a simple quantitative assessment method for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on a combination of the ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic attenuation rate. METHODS: A total of 170 subjects were enrolled in this study. All subjects were examined by ultrasound and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) on the same day. The ultrasound hepatic/renal echo-intensity ratio and ultrasound hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate were obtained from ordinary ultrasound images using the MATLAB program. RESULTS: Correlation analysis revealed that the ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate were significantly correlated with 1H-MRS liver fat content (ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio: r = 0.952, P = 0.000; hepatic echo-intensity attenuation r = 0.850, P = 0.000). The equation for predicting liver fat content by ultrasound (quantitative ultrasound model) is: liver fat content (%) = 61.519 × ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio + 167.701 × hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate -26.736. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the liver fat content ratio of the quantitative ultrasound model was positively correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and triglyceride, but negatively correlated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the optimal point for diagnosing fatty liver was 9.15% in the quantitative ultrasound model. Furthermore, in the quantitative ultrasound model, fatty liver diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 94.7% and 100.0%, respectively, showing that the quantitative ultrasound model was better than conventional ultrasound methods or the combined ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate. If the 1H-MRS liver fat content had a value < 15%, the sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound quantitative model would be 81.4% and 100%, which still shows that using the model is better than the other methods. CONCLUSION: The quantitative ultrasound model is a simple, low-cost, and sensitive tool that can accurately assess hepatic fat content in clinical practice. It provides an easy and effective parameter for the early diagnosis of mild hepatic steatosis and evaluation of the efficacy of NAFLD treatment. PMID:25548498

  14. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma represents one of the most-rapidly spreading cancers in the world. In the majority of cases, an inflammation-driven fibrosis or cirrhosis precedes the development of the tumor. During malignant transformation, the tumor microenvironment undergoes qualitative and quantitative changes that modulate the behavior of the malignant cells. A key constituent for the hepatic microenvironment is the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin, known to interfere with cellular events of tumorigenesis mainly by blocking various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) such as EGFR, Met, IGF-IR, PDGFR and VEGFR2. In this study, we characterized cell signaling events evoked by decorin deficiency in two experimental models of hepatocarcinogenesis using thioacetamide or diethyl nitrosamine as carcinogens. Genetic ablation of decorin led to enhanced tumor occurrence as compared to wild-type animals. These findings correlated with decreased levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) and a concurrent elevation in retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation via cyclin dependent kinase 4. Decreased steady state p21(Waf1/Cip1) levels correlated with enhanced expression of transcription factor AP4, a known transcriptional repressor of p21(Waf1/Cip1), and enhanced c-Myc protein levels. In addition, translocation of ?-catenin was a typical event in diethyl nitrosamine-evoked tumors. In parallel, decreased phosphorylation of both c-Myc and ?-catenin was observed in Dcn(-/-) livers likely due to the hindered GSK3?-mediated targeting of these proteins to proteasomal degradation. We discovered that in a genetic background lacking decorin, four RTKs were constitutively activated (phosphorylated), including three known targets of decorin such as PDGFR?, EGFR, IGF-IR, and a novel RTK MSPR/RON. Our findings provide powerful genetic evidence for a crucial in vivo role of decorin during hepatocarcinogenesis as lack of decorin in the liver and hepatic stroma facilitates experimental carcinogenesis by providing an environment devoid of this potent pan-RTK inhibitor. Thus, our results support future utilization of decorin as an antitumor agent in liver cancer. PMID:24361483

  15. Rock Weathering and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, G. D.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    Weathering of rock surfaces is often associated with a surface dissolution process. Chemical interactions occur on grain boundaries where diffusion is the controlling process. A dissolution boundary layer (rind) develops adjacent to the weathering surface. We quantify the extent of dissolution by introducing a damage variable f; f = 0 for pristine rock and when f = f0, the rock disintegrates. We assume that the variations of the damage variable are given by the diffusion equation. We solve two problems. The first is for the structure of the transient dissolution boundary layer prior to surface disintegration. We find an incubation time ti before active weathering (disintegration) begins. The second is the solution for steady-state weathering with a constant weathering velocity vw. Our results are entirely consistent with weathering studies on Carrera marble gravestones in the United Kingdom.

  16. Weathering and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, Gregory D.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2002-10-01

    Weathering of rock surfaces is often associated with a surface dissolution process. Chemical interactions occur on grain boundaries and diffusion is the controlling process. A dissolution boundary layer (rind) develops adjacent to the weathering surface. We quantify the extent of dissolution by introducing a damage variable f, f = 0 for pristine rock, and when f = f0 the rock disintegrates. We assume that the variations of the damage variable are given by the diffusion equation. We solve two problems. The first is for the structure of the transient dissolution boundary layer prior to surface disintegration. We find an incubation time ti before active weathering (disintegration) begins. The second is the solution for steady state weathering with a constant weathering velocity vw. Our results are entirely consistent with weathering studies on Carrera marble gravestones in the United Kingdom.

  17. Hepatic lesions in 90 captive nondomestic felids presented for autopsy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, J M; Newkirk, K M; McRee, A E; Whittemore, J C; Ramsay, E C

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic lesions in nondomestic felids are poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hepatic lesions in 90 captive, nondomestic felids including tigers, cougars, and lions. Hepatic lesions were histologically characterized as vacuolar change (lipidosis or glycogenosis), biliary cysts, biliary hyperplasia, hepatitis, necrosis, neoplasia, fibrosis, veno-occlusive disease, cholestasis, hematoma, congestion, or hemorrhage. Stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed for vacuolar change, benign biliary lesions, hepatitis, lipogranulomas, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic stellate cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with species as the outcome variable. Ninety cats met the inclusion criteria. Seventy livers (78%) contained 1 or more lesions. Hepatocellular vacuolar change (41/90 [46%]) was the most common lesion overall. Extramedullary hematopoiesis, lipogranulomas, and hepatic stellate cell hyperplasia were also common. One snow leopard had veno-occlusive disease. Tigers were more likely than other felids to have no significant hepatic histologic lesions (odds ratio [OR], 12.687; P = .002), and lions were more likely to have biliary cysts (OR, 5.97; P = .021). Six animals (7%) died of hepatic disease: cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 2) and 1 each of hepatic lipidosis, hepatocellular necrosis, pyogranulomatous hepatitis, and suppurative cholecystitis. Hepatocellular iron and copper accumulations were present in 72 of 90 (80%) and 10 of 90 (11%) sections, respectively. Sinusoidal fibrosis was common (74/90 [82%]) and primarily centrilobular (65/74 [88%]). Hepatocellular iron, copper, and fibrosis were not significantly associated with hepatic lesions. Primary hepatic disease was not a common cause of death in nondomestic felids in this study. PMID:24788521

  18. Tornado damage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, T.A.; Ellingwood, B.

    1982-09-01

    Several proposed models were evaluated for predicting tornado wind speed probabilities at nuclear plant sites as part of a program to develop statistical data on tornadoes needed for probability-based load combination analysis. A unified model was developed which synthesized the desired aspects of tornado occurrence and damage potential. The sensitivity of wind speed probability estimates to various tornado modeling assumptions are examined, and the probability distributions of tornado wind speed that are needed for load combination studies are presented.

  19. Prevention of Perinatal Hepatitis B Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Noele P.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the most common form of chronic hepatitis worldwide, is a major public health problem affecting an estimated 360 million people globally. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is responsible for more than one third of chronic HBV infections worldwide. An estimated 15%–40% of persons chronically infected develop HBV-related complications, such as cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma, and 25% die from these complications. MTCT can occur during pregnancy or during delivery. Screening pregnant women for HBV infection, providing infant postexposure prophylaxis, and maternal treatment with antiviral medications are strategies for reducing MTCT transmission rates and the global burden of new chronic HBV infections. Administration of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine within 24 hours of birth, followed by completion of the vaccine series, is 85%–95% efficacious for prevention of MTCT. Despite timely post-exposure prophylaxis, MTCT occurs in 5%–15% of infants. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) positive mothers with HBV DNA level ?106 copies/mL (>200 000 IU/mL) are at greatest risk of transmitting HBV to their infants. Consensus recommendations and evidence-based guidelines for management of chronic HBV infection and screening of pregnant women have been developed. The safety and efficacy of antiviral drug use during pregnancy are areas of ongoing research. Substantial advances have been achieved globally in reducing MTCT, but MTCT remains an ongoing health problem. Attaining a better understanding of the mechanisms of MTCT, implementing existing policies on maternal screening and infant follow-up, and addressing research gaps are critical for further reductions in MTCT transmission. PMID:25232477

  20. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.