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Sample records for euclidean correlators volume

  1. A Vector Approach to Euclidean Geometry: Inner Product Spaces, Euclidean Geometry and Trigonometry, Volume 2. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Herbert E.; Szabo, Steven

    This is the teacher's edition of a text for the second year of a two-year high school geometry course. The course bases plane and solid geometry and trigonometry on the fact that the translations of a Euclidean space constitute a vector space which has an inner product. Congruence is a geometric topic reserved for Volume 2. Volume 2 opens with an…

  2. A Vector Approach to Euclidean Geometry: Vector Spaces and Affine Geometry, Volume 1. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Herbert E.; Szabo, Steven

    This is the teacher's edition of a text for the first year of a two-year high school geometry course. The course bases plane and solid geometry and trigonometry on the fact that the translations of a Euclidean space constitute a vector space which has an inner product. Volume 1 deals largely with affine geometry, and the notion of dimension is…

  3. Studies in Mathematics, Volume II. Euclidean Geometry Based on Ruler and Protractor Axioms. Second Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Charles W.; And Others

    These materials were developed to help high school teachers to become familiar with the approach to tenth-grade Euclidean geometry which was adopted by the School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG). It is emphasized that the materials are unsuitable as a high school textbook. Each document contains material too difficult for most high school students.…

  4. Study on very high speed Reed-Solomon decoders using modified euclidean algorithm for volume holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Xie, Changsheng; Liu, ZhaoBin

    2003-04-01

    Volume holography is currently the subject of widespread interest as a fast-readout-rate, high-capacity digital data-storage technology. However, due to the effect of cross-talk noise, scattering noise, noise gratings formed during a multiple exposure schedule, it brings a lot of burst errors and random errors in the system. Reed-Solomon error-correction codes have been widely used to protect digital data against errors. This paper presents VLSI implementations of an 16 errors correcting (255,223) Reed-Solomon decoder architecture for volume holographic storage. We describe the Reed-Solomon decoders using modified Euclidean algorithms which are regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementations. We design the speedily multiplication for GF(28) and pipeline structure to solve hardware complexity and high data processing rate for the Reed-Solomon decoders. We adopt high speed FPGA and have a data processing rate of 200 Mbit/s.

  5. The Development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Cosmologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses early Euclidean cosmologies, inadequacies in classical Euclidean cosmology, and the development of non-Euclidean cosmologies. Explains the present state of the theory of cosmology including the work of Dirac, Sandage, and Gott. (CP)

  6. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  7. Observables of Euclidean Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, Ion V.

    1997-10-01

    The set of constraints under which the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can play the role of the dynamical variables for Euclidean supergravity is derived. These constraints arise when the gauge invariance of the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator is imposed. They impose conditions which restrict the eigenspinors of the Dirac operator.

  8. Euclidean supergravity in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Wafic A.; Vaughan, Owen

    2016-09-01

    We construct a 5D, N = 2 Euclidean theory of supergravity coupled to vector multiplets. Upon reducing this theory over a circle we recover the action of 4D, N = 2 Euclidean supergravity coupled to vector multiplets.

  9. Enjoyment of Euclidean Planar Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ?ABC is a right angle…

  10. Parton physics on a Euclidean lattice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiangdong

    2013-06-28

    I show that the parton physics related to correlations of quarks and gluons on the light cone can be studied through the matrix elements of frame-dependent, equal-time correlators in the large momentum limit. This observation allows practical calculations of parton properties on a Euclidean lattice. As an example, I demonstrate how to recover the leading-twist quark distribution by boosting an equal-time correlator to a large momentum. PMID:23848864

  11. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    SciTech Connect

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling techniques; And certain spectral functions and also the heavy quark diffusion constant have been calculated in the strongly coupled limit of the N = 4 super-symmetric Yang Mills theory.

  12. Correlations estimate volume distilled using gravity, boiling point

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.; Consuelo Perez de Alba, M. del; Manriquez, L.; Guardia Mendoz, P. de la

    1995-10-23

    Mathematical nd graphic correlations have been developed for estimating cumulative volume distilled as a function of crude API gravity and true boiling point (TBP). The correlations can be used for crudes with gravities of 21--34{degree} API and boiling points of 150--540 C. In distillation predictions for several mexican and Iraqi crude oils, the correlations have exhibited accuracy comparable to that of laboratory measurements. The paper discusses the need for such a correlation and the testing of the correlation.

  13. High resolution MRI evaluation of meniscal volume and anthropometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Asami, Danny K; Solomon, Thomas C; Burke, Wendy S; Colletti, Patrick M; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to digitally determine meniscal volumes, and compare them with linear and surface area anthropometric measurements to evaluate these measurements for meniscal allograft sizing. Eighteen subjects (10 male and 8 female; mean age 37.5 years) underwent 3.0 T knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the dominant leg. The following morphometric measurements were evaluated: medial meniscal volume (MMV), lateral meniscal volume (LMV), tibial plateau width (TPW), width of the femoral condyles (WFC), and tibial plateau surface area (TPSA). MMV and LMV were compared to TPW, WFC, and TPSA. Meniscal volume and TPW were correlated to height and body-mass index (BMI) and stratified by gender. Statistical analysis included coefficient of determination (r(2)) between MRI-based MMV, LMV, TPW, TPSA, WFC, height, BMI, and gender. Significance was set at the P = 0.05 level. The mean MMV was 2275 mm(3) and the mean LMV was 2102 mm(3). TPW correlated well with meniscal volumes (r(2) > 0.62). WFC and TPSA correlated with meniscal volumes in the range of 0.40 < r(2) < 0.61. Height, BMI, and gender correlated poorly with total meniscal volume and TPW with values of r(2) < 0.44. Medial and lateral menisci have statistically similar volumes. TPW had the greatest utility for volumetric meniscal sizing. MRI-based TPW can be considered as a statistically accurate measurement for determining meniscal volumes and meniscal size. PMID:26118625

  14. Euclidean Epstein-Glaser renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kai J.

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory recently developed by Brunetti, Duetsch, and Fredenhagen (http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2038) I give a general construction of so-called Euclidean time-ordered products, i.e., algebraic versions of the Schwinger functions, for scalar quantum field theories on spaces of Euclidean signature. This is done by generalizing the recursive construction of time-ordered products by Epstein and Glaser, originally formulated for quantum field theories on Minkowski space [Epstein and Glaser, Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare 19, 211 (1973)]. An essential input of Epstein-Glaser renormalization is the causal structure of Minkowski space. The absence of this causal structure in the Euclidean framework makes it necessary to modify the original construction of Epstein and Glaser at two points. First, the whole construction has to be performed with an only partially defined product on (interaction) functionals. This is due to the fact that the fundamental solutions of the Helmholtz operator (-{delta}+m{sup 2}) of Euclidean quantum field theory have a unique singularity structure, i.e., they are unique up to a smooth part. Second, one needs to (re)introduce a (rather natural) 'Euclidean causality' condition for the recursion of Epstein and Glaser to be applicable.

  15. Euclidean Epstein-Glaser renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kai J.

    2009-10-01

    In the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory recently developed by Brunetti, Dütsch, and Fredenhagen (http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2038) I give a general construction of so-called Euclidean time-ordered products, i.e., algebraic versions of the Schwinger functions, for scalar quantum field theories on spaces of Euclidean signature. This is done by generalizing the recursive construction of time-ordered products by Epstein and Glaser, originally formulated for quantum field theories on Minkowski space [Epstein and Glaser, Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare 19, 211 (1973)]. An essential input of Epstein-Glaser renormalization is the causal structure of Minkowski space. The absence of this causal structure in the Euclidean framework makes it necessary to modify the original construction of Epstein and Glaser at two points. First, the whole construction has to be performed with an only partially defined product on (interaction) functionals. This is due to the fact that the fundamental solutions of the Helmholtz operator (-Δ+m2) of Euclidean quantum field theory have a unique singularity structure, i.e., they are unique up to a smooth part. Second, one needs to (re)introduce a (rather natural) "Euclidean causality" condition for the recursion of Epstein and Glaser to be applicable.

  16. Non-Euclidean classification of medically imaged objects via s-reps.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junpyo; Vicory, Jared; Schulz, Jörn; Styner, Martin; Marron, J S; Pizer, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Classifying medically imaged objects, e.g., into diseased and normal classes, has been one of the important goals in medical imaging. We propose a novel classification scheme that uses a skeletal representation to provide rich non-Euclidean geometric object properties. Our statistical method combines distance weighted discrimination (DWD) with a carefully chosen Euclideanization which takes full advantage of the geometry of the manifold on which these non-Euclidean geometric object properties (GOPs) live. Our method is evaluated via the task of classifying 3D hippocampi between schizophrenics and healthy controls. We address three central questions. 1) Does adding shape features increase discriminative power over the more standard classification based only on global volume? 2) If so, does our skeletal representation provide greater discriminative power than a conventional boundary point distribution model (PDM)? 3) Especially, is Euclideanization of non-Euclidean shape properties important in achieving high discriminative power? Measuring the capability of a method in terms of area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, we show that our proposed method achieves strongly better classification than both the classification method based on global volume alone and the s-rep-based classification method without proper Euclideanization of non-Euclidean GOPs. We show classification using Euclideanized s-reps is also superior to classification using PDMs, whether the PDMs are first Euclideanized or not. We also show improved performance with Euclideanized boundary PDMs over non-linear boundary PDMs. This demonstrates the benefit that proper Euclideanization of non-Euclidean GOPs brings not only to s-rep-based classification but also to PDM-based classification. PMID:26963609

  17. Euclidean, Spherical, and Hyperbolic Shadows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Many classical problems in elementary calculus use Euclidean geometry. This article takes such a problem and solves it in hyperbolic and in spherical geometry instead. The solution requires only the ability to compute distances and intersections of points in these geometries. The dramatically different results we obtain illustrate the effect…

  18. Enjoyment of Euclidean planar triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-09-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar ?, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar ? are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ? is a right angle with the two remaining angles as acute angles. It is said to be obtuse angled at the vertex B if ? is an obtuse angle, with the two remaining angles as acute angles. In spite of the availability of numerous text books that contain our human knowledge of Euclidean plane geometry, softwares can offer newer insights about the characterizations of planar geometrical objects. The author's characterizations of triangles involve points like the centroid G, the orthocentre H of the ?, the circumcentre S of the ?, the centre N of the nine-point circle of the ?. Also the radical centre rc of three involved diameter circles of the sides BC, AC and AB of the ? provides a reformulation of the orthocentre, resulting in an interesting theorem, dubbed by the author as 'Three Circles Theorem'. This provides a special result for a right-angled ?, again dubbed by the author as 'The Four Circles Theorem'. Apart from providing various inter connections between the geometrical points, the relationships between shapes of the triangle and the behaviour of the points are reasonably explored in this article. Most of these results will be useful to students that take courses in Euclidean Geometry at the college level and the high school level. This article will be useful to teachers in mathematics at the high school level and the college level.

  19. Duality in physiological time: Euclidean and fractal.

    PubMed

    Günther, B; Morgado, E

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to differentiate two modalities of intrinsic time scales: i- the geometric or Euclidean modality, which is based on the constant speed of mass transport or of wave transmission in cylindrical structures (arteries, veins, nerves), whose allometric exponent (TE = aMb) is b = 0.33, where M is body mass (kg) and a the mass coefficient; ii- the fractal time scale (TF), which is characteristic of organs with self-similar branching structures and with volume-specific flows, whose allometric exponent is b = 0.25. The proposed dichotomy could be confirmed by means of the statistical analysis of empirical allometric exponents (b). Our findings demonstrate the need to separate the chronology of bulk transport at long distances (inter-organic) which follows an Euclidean geometry (cylinders), from the fractal time scale, which operates at short distances (intra-organic) and is represented by a self-similar branching system which determines both the morphometric and physiometric characteristics within each organ. PMID:9278701

  20. Read-only high accuracy volume holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tian; Li, Jingming; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-10-01

    A read-only volume holographic correlator (VHC) is proposed. After the recording of all of the correlation database pages by angular multiplexing, a stand-alone read-only high accuracy VHC will be separated from the VHC recording facilities which include the high-power laser and the angular multiplexing system. The stand-alone VHC has its own low power readout laser and very compact and simple structure. Since there are two lasers that are employed for recording and readout, respectively, the optical alignment tolerance of the laser illumination on the SLM is very sensitive. The twodimensional angular tolerance is analyzed based on the theoretical model of the volume holographic correlator. The experimental demonstration of the proposed read-only VHC is introduced and discussed.

  1. Cross-correlations between volume change and price change.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2009-12-29

    In finance, one usually deals not with prices but with growth rates R, defined as the difference in logarithm between two consecutive prices. Here we consider not the trading volume, but rather the volume growth rate R, the difference in logarithm between two consecutive values of trading volume. To this end, we use several methods to analyze the properties of volume changes |R|, and their relationship to price changes |R|. We analyze 14,981 daily recordings of the Standard and Poor's (S & P) 500 Index over the 59-year period 1950-2009, and find power-law cross-correlations between |R| and |R| by using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA). We introduce a joint stochastic process that models these cross-correlations. Motivated by the relationship between |R| and |R|, we estimate the tail exponent alpha of the probability density function P(|R|) approximately |R|(-1-alpha) for both the S & P 500 Index as well as the collection of 1819 constituents of the New York Stock Exchange Composite Index on 17 July 2009. As a new method to estimate alpha, we calculate the time intervals tau(q) between events where R > q. We demonstrate that tau(q), the average of tau(q), obeys tau(q) approximately q(alpha). We find alpha approximately 3. Furthermore, by aggregating all tau(q) values of 28 global financial indices, we also observe an approximate inverse cubic law. PMID:20018772

  2. Weak correlation of starch and volume in synchronized photosynthetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rading, M. Michael; Sandmann, Michael; Steup, Martin; Chiarugi, Davide; Valleriani, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    In cultures of unicellular algae, features of single cells, such as cellular volume and starch content, are thought to be the result of carefully balanced growth and division processes. Single-cell analyses of synchronized photoautotrophic cultures of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveal, however, that the cellular volume and starch content are only weakly correlated. Likewise, other cell parameters, e.g., the chlorophyll content per cell, are only weakly correlated with cell size. We derive the cell size distributions at the beginning of each synchronization cycle considering growth, timing of cell division and daughter cell release, and the uneven division of cell volume. Furthermore, we investigate the link between cell volume growth and starch accumulation. This work presents evidence that, under the experimental conditions of light-dark synchronized cultures, the weak correlation between both cell features is a result of a cumulative process rather than due to asymmetric partition of biomolecules during cell division. This cumulative process necessarily limits cellular similarities within a synchronized cell population.

  3. Does Variability in Cognitive Performance Correlate with Frontal Brain Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Lövdén, Martin; Schmiedek, Florian; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Lindenberger, Ulman; Raz, Naftali

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the neural correlates of within-person variability in cognitive performance. We investigated associations between regional brain volumes and trial-to-trial, block-to-block, and day-to-day variability in choice-reaction time, and episodic and working memory accuracy. Healthy younger (n = 25) and older (n = 18) adults underwent 101 daily assessments of cognitive performance, and their regional brain volumes were measured manually on magnetic resonance images. Results showed that smaller prefrontal white matter volumes were associated with higher block-to-block variability in choice-reaction time performance, with a stronger association observed among older adults. Smaller volumes of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex covaried with higher block-to-block variability in episodic memory (number-word pair) performance. This association was stronger for younger adults. The observed associations between variability and brain volume were not due to individual differences in mean performance. Trial-to-trial and day-to-day variability in cognitive performance were unrelated to regional brain volume. We thus report novel findings demonstrating that block-by-block variability in cognitive performance is associated with integrity of the prefrontal regions and that between-person differences in different measures of variability of cognitive performance reflect different age-related constellations of behavioral and neural antecedents. PMID:23000256

  4. Putamen volume correlates with obsessive compulsive characteristics in healthy population.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasutaka; Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sawada, Reiko; Sakihama, Morimitsu; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-03-30

    Obsessions and compulsions (OCs) are frequent in healthy subjects; however neural backgrounds of the subclinical OCs were largely unknown. Results from recent studies suggested involvement of the putamen in the OC traits. To investigate this issue, 49 healthy subjects were assessed using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (MOCI). Anatomical delineation on MRI yielded the global volume and local shape of the putamen. Other striatal structures (the caudate nucleus and globus pallidus) were also examined for exploratory purpose. The relationship between volume/shape of each structures and MOCI measure was analyzed, with sex, age, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and full-scale Intelligence Quotient regressed out. The volume analysis revealed a positive relationship between the MOCI total score and the bilateral putamen volumes. The shape analysis demonstrated associations between the higher MOCI total score and hypertrophy of the anterior putamen in both hemispheres. The present study firstly revealed that the volume changes of the putamen correlated with the manifestation of subclinical OC traits. The dysfunctional cortico-anterior striatum networks seemed to be one of the neuronal subsystems underlying the subclinical OC traits. PMID:26849956

  5. Cross-correlations between volume change and price change

    PubMed Central

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-01-01

    In finance, one usually deals not with prices but with growth rates R, defined as the difference in logarithm between two consecutive prices. Here we consider not the trading volume, but rather the volume growth rate R̃, the difference in logarithm between two consecutive values of trading volume. To this end, we use several methods to analyze the properties of volume changes |R̃|, and their relationship to price changes |R|. We analyze 14,981 daily recordings of the Standard and Poor's (S & P) 500 Index over the 59-year period 1950–2009, and find power-law cross-correlations between |R| and |R̃| by using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA). We introduce a joint stochastic process that models these cross-correlations. Motivated by the relationship between |R| and |R̃|, we estimate the tail exponent α̃ of the probability density function P(|R̃|) ∼ |R̃|−1−α̃ for both the S & P 500 Index as well as the collection of 1819 constituents of the New York Stock Exchange Composite Index on 17 July 2009. As a new method to estimate α̃, we calculate the time intervals τq between events where R̃ > q. We demonstrate that τ̃q, the average of τq, obeys τ̃q ∼ qα̃. We find α̃ ≈ 3. Furthermore, by aggregating all τq values of 28 global financial indices, we also observe an approximate inverse cubic law. PMID:20018772

  6. Self-duality in Euclidean supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, G. M.; Tchrakian, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The compatibility conditions for curvatures satisfying self-duality (Hawking, 1978) and double-duality (Hehl et al., 1978) ansaetze in the theory of vacuum (Euclidean) supergravity and for the double-duality ansatz in Minkowski theory are investigated theoretically. It is found that the equations of motion of Euclidean supergravity admit solutions with self-dual curvature which correspond to nontrivial field configurations, and that the double-duality ansatz leads to nontrival configurations in both Euclidean and Minkowski cases.

  7. Effects of pore volume-transmissivity correlation on transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunati, Ivan; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Sørensen, Ivan

    2003-12-01

    The relevant velocity that describes transport phenomena in a porous medium is the pore velocity. For this reason, one needs not only to describe the variability of transmissivity, which fully determines the Darcy velocity field for given source terms and boundary conditions, but also any variability of the pore volume. We demonstrate that hydraulically equivalent media with exactly the same transmissivity field can produce dramatic differences in the displacement of a solute if they have different pore volume distributions. In particular, we demonstrate that correlation between pore volume and transmissivity leads to a much smoother and more homogeneous solute distribution. This was observed in a laboratory experiment performed in artificial fractures made of two plexiglass plates into which a space-dependent aperture distribution was milled. Using visualization by a light transmission technique, we observe that the solute behaviour is much smoother and more regular after the fractures are filled with glass powder, which plays the role of a homogeneous fault gouge material. This is due to a perfect correlation between pore volume and transmissivity that causes pore velocity to be not directly dependent on the transmissivity, but only indirectly through the hydraulic gradient, which is a much smoother function due to the diffusive behaviour of the flow equation acting as a filter. This smoothing property of the pore volume-transmissivity correlation is also supported by numerical simulations of tracer tests in a dipole flow field. Three different conceptual models are used: an empty fracture, a rough-walled fracture filled with a homogeneous material and a parallel-plate fracture with a heterogeneous fault gouge. All three models are hydraulically equivalent, yet they have a different pore volume distribution. Even if piezometric heads and specific flow rates are exactly the same at any point of the domain, the transport process differs dramatically. These

  8. Recording of incoherent reflective volume Fourier holograms for optical correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2007-01-01

    The scheme of recording of reflective volume Fourier holograms in monochromatic light with partial spatial coherence is presented. The scheme contains posed on one optical axis an illuminated or self-luminous object, Fourier-objective, photosensitive medium and concave mirror. The light is proposed to be monochromatic with partial spatial coherence. The object is located in a front focal plane of the Fourier-objective. Photosensitive medium is placed in a back focal plane of the Fourier-objective, and the mirror is posed on a double focal length of the mirror from photosensitive medium. The light from input object is focused by the Fourier-objective in a volume of photosensitive medium, shaping a far field diffraction pattern of input object. This pattern is partial coherent analog of Fourier transform of input object. The light transmitted through the medium falls on the concave mirror and is reflected back, thus the mirror shapes the second copy of far field diffraction pattern of input object in the volume of photosensitive medium. Thus, these two light waves, propagating in the opposite directions, form the interference pattern in photosensitive medium, and a reflective volume Fourier hologram is recorded by monochromatic light with partial spatial coherence. The experiments on recording of these holograms and image reconstruction were realized. Patent by Russian Federation No2176099 on the device of recording of reflective volume holographic Fourier-filter in light with partial spatial coherence was taken out. Described reflective volume Fourier-holograms can be used in optical correlators as the spatial filters and spectral selectors at image recognition both in monochromatic and polychromatic light.

  9. Heavy quark correlations and the effective volume for quarkonia production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Using the Boltzmann transport approach, we study the effect of initial spatial and momentum correlations between a heavy quark pair, such as that produced from a p +p collision, on their collision rate in a partonic medium, which is relevant for their thermalization and the production of quarkonium from regeneration. Characterizing this effect by an effective volume given by the inverse of the ratio of their collision rate to the collision rate of a thermally equilibrated and spatially uniformly distributed heavy quark pair in a unit volume, we find that the effective volume is finite and depends sensitively on the momentum of the heavy quark and the temperature of the medium. Generally, it increases linearly with time t at the very beginning, thus an enhanced collision rate, and the increase then becomes slower due to multiple scattering, and finally it increases as t3 /2. We further find that the momentum distribution of the colliding heavy quark pair approaches a thermal distribution after about 5 fm /c with an effective temperature similar to that of the medium even though their transverse momentum spectra initially have a δ -like distribution.

  10. Amniotic fluid index: correlation with amniotic fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, I A; McGovern, P G; Ordorica, S A; Frieden, F J; Young, B K

    1992-01-01

    We calculated the amniotic fluid indexes (AFIs) of 310 women on 459 occasions. Normative data were analyzed and compared with data in several high-risk groups. In the normal gestations there was a progressive increase in AFI with advancing gestation until 32 weeks, after which there was a decline. The mean AFIs in abnormal gestations varied with the clinical diagnoses. These values were compared to those obtained by assessing amniotic fluid volume (AFV), that is a pocket more than 2 cm. There were 51 patients with abnormal AFVs. Forty-two had decreased fluid, six also had decreased AFIs; nine had increased AFVs and five (all with diabetes) also had increased AFIs. Thus, AFIs in normal pregnancies showed an orderly pattern of change with gestational age, and there was no accurate correlation between AFI and AFV. Thus, using AFV alone may lead to false interpretations of amniotic fluid status. PMID:1418123

  11. Zero energy scattering calculation in Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, J.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the scattering amplitude in the limit of zero incident energy can be transformed into a purely Euclidean form, as it is the case for the bound states. The decoupling between Euclidean and Minkowski amplitudes is only possible for zero energy scattering observables and allows determining the scattering length from the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude. Such a possibility strongly simplifies the numerical solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and suggests an alternative way to compute the scattering length in Lattice Euclidean calculations without using the Luscher formalism. The derivations contained in this work were performed for scalar particles and one-boson exchange kernel. They can be generalized to the fermion case and more involved interactions.

  12. Non-Euclidean-normed Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-03-01

    This analysis introduces a possible generalization of Statistical Mechanics within the framework of non-Euclidean metrics induced by the Lp norms. The internal energy is interpreted by the non-Euclidean Lp-normed expectation value of a given energy spectrum. The presented non-Euclidean adaptation of Statistical Mechanics involves finding the stationary probability distribution in the Canonical Ensemble by maximizing the Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis entropy under the constraint of internal energy. The derived non-Euclidean Canonical probability distributions are respectively given by an exponential, and by a q-deformed exponential, of a power-law dependence on energy states. The case of the continuous energy spectrum is thoroughly examined. The Canonical probability distribution is analytically calculated for a power-law density of energy. The relevant non-Euclidean-normed kappa distribution is also derived. This analysis exposes the possible values of the q- or κ-indices, which are strictly limited to certain ranges, depending on the given Lp-norm. The equipartition of energy in each degree of freedom and the extensivity of the internal energy, are also shown. Surprisingly, the physical temperature coincides with the kinetically defined temperature, similar to the Euclidean case. Finally, the connection with thermodynamics arises through the well-known standard classical formalisms.

  13. Subvoxel accurate graph search using non-Euclidean graph space.

    PubMed

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Wu, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyungmoo; Tang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Graph search is attractive for the quantitative analysis of volumetric medical images, and especially for layered tissues, because it allows globally optimal solutions in low-order polynomial time. However, because nodes of graphs typically encode evenly distributed voxels of the volume with arcs connecting orthogonally sampled voxels in Euclidean space, segmentation cannot achieve greater precision than a single unit, i.e. the distance between two adjoining nodes, and partial volume effects are ignored. We generalize the graph to non-Euclidean space by allowing non-equidistant spacing between nodes, so that subvoxel accurate segmentation is achievable. Because the number of nodes and edges in the graph remains the same, running time and memory use are similar, while all the advantages of graph search, including global optimality and computational efficiency, are retained. A deformation field calculated from the volume data adaptively changes regional node density so that node density varies with the inverse of the expected cost. We validated our approach using optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the retina and 3-D MR of the arterial wall, and achieved statistically significant increased accuracy. Our approach allows improved accuracy in volume data acquired with the same hardware, and also, preserved accuracy with lower resolution, more cost-effective, image acquisition equipment. The method is not limited to any specific imaging modality and readily extensible to higher dimensions. PMID:25314272

  14. Anomalously soft non-Euclidean spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ido; Sharon, Eran

    In this work we study the mechanical properties of a frustrated elastic ribbon spring - the non-Euclidean minimal spring. This spring belongs to the family of non-Euclidean plates: it has no spontaneous curvature, but its lateral intrinsic geometry is described by a non-Euclidean reference metric. The reference metric of the minimal spring is hyperbolic, and can be embedded as a minimal surface. We argue that the existence of a continuous set of such isometric minimal surfaces with different extensions leads to a complete degeneracy of the bulk elastic energy of the minimal spring under elongation. This degeneracy is removed only by boundary layer effects. As a result, the mechanical properties of the minimal spring are unusual: the spring is ultra-soft with rigidity that depends on the thickness, t , as t raise 0 . 7 ex 7 7 2 lower 0 . 7 ex 2, and does not explicitly depend on the ribbon's width. These predictions are confirmed by a numerical study of a constrained spring. This work is the first to address the unusual mechanical properties of constrained non-Euclidean elastic objects. We also present a novel experimental system that is capable of constructing such objects, along with many other non-Euclidean plates.

  15. Euclideanization of Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Daniel Alan

    We quantize the theory of electromagnetism in 2 + 1-spacetime dimensions with the addition of the topological Chern-Simons term using an indefinite metric formalism. In the process, we also quantize the Proca and pure Maxwell theories, which are shown to be related to the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory. Next, we Euclideanize these three theories, obtaining path space formulae and investigating Osterwalder-Schrader positivity in each case. Finally, we obtain a characterization of those Euclidean states that correspond to physical states in the relativistic theories.

  16. Information metric and Euclidean Janus correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum information metric of a family of CFTs perturbed by an exactly marginal operator, which has the dual description of the Euclidean Janus geometries. We first clarify its two dimensional case dual to the three dimensional Janus geometry, which recently appeared in arxiv:arXiv:1507.07555[2]. We generalize this correspondence to higher dimensions and get a precise agreement between the both sides. We also show that the mixed-state information metric of the same family of CFTs has a dual description in the Euclidean version of the Janus time-dependent black hole geometry.

  17. A new method for determination of postmortem left ventricular volumes: clinico-pathologic correlations.

    PubMed

    Wissler, R W; Lichtig, C; Hughes, R; Al-Sadir, J; Glagov, S

    1975-05-01

    A description is presented of a new and simple procedure for ventricular volume determination by means of pressure fixation of the heart and preparation of plastic molds of the ventricles which can be used to displace water in a graduated cylinder to determine the volume of the mold. Correlations between postmortem ventricular volume as measured by this method and antemortem stroke volume or clinical cardiac status indicate that a large left ventricular volume is often correlated with a low cardiac output and cardiogenic shock. PMID:1119371

  18. Anomalously Soft Non-Euclidean Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ido; Sharon, Eran

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the mechanical properties of a frustrated elastic ribbon spring—the non-Euclidean minimal spring. This spring belongs to the family of non-Euclidean plates: it has no spontaneous curvature, but its lateral intrinsic geometry is described by a non-Euclidean reference metric. The reference metric of the minimal spring is hyperbolic, and can be embedded as a minimal surface. We argue that the existence of a continuous set of such isometric minimal surfaces with different extensions leads to a complete degeneracy of the bulk elastic energy of the minimal spring under elongation. This degeneracy is removed only by boundary layer effects. As a result, the mechanical properties of the minimal spring are unusual: the spring is ultrasoft with a rigidity that depends on the thickness t as t7 /2 and does not explicitly depend on the ribbon's width. Moreover, we show that as the ribbon is widened, the rigidity may even decrease. These predictions are confirmed by a numerical study of a constrained spring. This work is the first to address the unusual mechanical properties of constrained non-Euclidean elastic objects.

  19. Making Euclidean Geometry Compulsory: Are We Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Putten, Sonja; Howie, Sarah; Stols, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the attitude towards, as well as the level of understanding of Euclidean geometry in pre-service mathematics education (PME) students. In order to do so, a case study was undertaken within which a one group pre-post-test procedure was conducted around a geometry module, and a representative group of students was interviewed…

  20. MEDOF - MINIMUM EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE OPTIMAL FILTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter program, MEDOF, generates filters for use in optical correlators. The algorithm implemented in MEDOF follows theory put forth by Richard D. Juday of NASA/JSC. This program analytically optimizes filters on arbitrary spatial light modulators such as coupled, binary, full complex, and fractional 2pi phase. MEDOF optimizes these modulators on a number of metrics including: correlation peak intensity at the origin for the centered appearance of the reference image in the input plane, signal to noise ratio including the correlation detector noise as well as the colored additive input noise, peak to correlation energy defined as the fraction of the signal energy passed by the filter that shows up in the correlation spot, and the peak to total energy which is a generalization of PCE that adds the passed colored input noise to the input image's passed energy. The user of MEDOF supplies the functions that describe the following quantities: 1) the reference signal, 2) the realizable complex encodings of both the input and filter SLM, 3) the noise model, possibly colored, as it adds at the reference image and at the correlation detection plane, and 4) the metric to analyze, here taken to be one of the analytical ones like SNR (signal to noise ratio) or PCE (peak to correlation energy) rather than peak to secondary ratio. MEDOF calculates filters for arbitrary modulators and a wide range of metrics as described above. MEDOF examines the statistics of the encoded input image's noise (if SNR or PCE is selected) and the filter SLM's (Spatial Light Modulator) available values. These statistics are used as the basis of a range for searching for the magnitude and phase of k, a pragmatically based complex constant for computing the filter transmittance from the electric field. The filter is produced for the mesh points in those ranges and the value of the metric that results from these points is computed. When the search is concluded, the

  1. Preterm Infant Hippocampal Volumes Correlate with Later Working Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Miriam H.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Howard, Kelly; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Children born preterm exhibit working memory deficits. These deficits may be associated with structural brain changes observed in the neonatal period. In this study, the relationship between neonatal regional brain volumes and working memory deficits at age 2 years were investigated, with a particular interest in the dorsolateral prefrontal…

  2. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  3. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  4. The Euclidean distribution of fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, Niels; Connor, Liam D.; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-09-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/Vmax-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.

  5. Spatial Implications Associated with Using Euclidean Distance Measurements and Geographic Centroid Imputation in Health Care Research

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen G; Ashby, Avery J; Momin, Soyal R; Naidoo, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of using Euclidean measurements and zip-code centroid geo-imputation versus more precise spatial analytical techniques in health care research. Data Sources Commercially insured members from a southeastern managed care organization. Study Design Distance from admitting inpatient facility to member's home and zip-code centroid (geographic placement) was compared using Euclidean straight-line and shortest-path drive distances (measurement technique). Data Collection Administrative claims from October 2005 to September 2006. Principal Findings Measurement technique had a greater impact on distance values compared with geographic placement. Drive distance from the geocoded address was highly correlated (r=0.99) with the Euclidean distance from the zip-code centroid. Conclusions Actual differences were relatively small. Researchers without capabilities to produce drive distance measurements and/or address geocoding techniques could rely on simple linear regressions to estimate correction factors with a high degree of confidence. PMID:19780852

  6. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables

    PubMed Central

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Grecula, John C.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Methods and Materials Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45–54 Gy in 3–5 fractions) in the year of 2011–2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. Results All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). Conclusions We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained

  7. Cross-correlations between price and volume in Chinese gold markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qingsong; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Guofeng

    2016-06-01

    We apply the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA) method to investigate the cross-correlation behaviors between price and volume in Chinese gold spot and futures markets. Qualitatively, we find that the price and volume series are significantly cross-correlated using the cross-correlation test statistics Qcc(m) and the ρDCCA coefficients. Quantitatively, by employing the MF-DCCA analysis, we find that there is a power-law cross-correlation and significant multifractal features between price and volume in gold spot and futures markets. Furthermore, by comparing the multifractality of the original series to the shuffled and surrogated series, we find that, for the gold spot market, the main contribution of multifractality is fat-tail distribution; for the gold futures market, both long-range correlations and fat-tail distributions play important roles in the contribution of multifractality. Finally, by employing the method of rolling windows, we undertake further investigation into the time-varying features of the cross-correlations between price and volume. We find that for both spot and futures markets, the cross-correlations are anti-persistent in general. In the short term, the cross-correlation shows obvious fluctuations due to exogenous shocks while, in the long term, the relationship tends to be at a metastable level due to the dynamic mechanism.

  8. Prediction of free-volume-type correlations in glassy chalcogenides from positron annihilation lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Filipecki, J.

    2014-11-01

    A newly modified correlation equation between defect-related positron lifetime determined within two-state trapping model and radius of corresponding free-volume-type defects was proposed to describe compositional variations in atomic-deficient structure of covalent-bonded chalcogenides like binary As-S/Se glasses. Specific chemical environment of free-volume voids around neighboring network-forming polyhedrons was shown to play a decisive role in this correlation, leading to systematically enhanced volumes in comparison with typical molecular substrates, such as polymers.

  9. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  10. Robin conditions on the Euclidean ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, J. S.

    1996-04-01

    Techniques are presented for calculating directly the scalar functional determinant on the Euclidean d-ball. General formulae are given for Dirichlet and Robin boundary conditions when d is even and the field is massless. The method involves a large mass asymptotic limit which is carried out in detail for d = 2 as an exercise, incidentally producing some specific summations and identities. Extensive use is made of the Watson - Kober summation formula. The calculation of the finite-mass determinant is also briefly considered.

  11. Broadband invisibility by non-Euclidean cloaking.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    Invisibility and negative refraction are both applications of transformation optics where the material of a device performs a coordinate transformation for electromagnetic fields. The device creates the illusion that light propagates through empty flat space, whereas in physical space, light is bent around a hidden interior or seems to run backward in space or time. All of the previous proposals for invisibility require materials with extreme properties. Here we show that transformation optics of a curved, non-Euclidean space (such as the surface of a virtual sphere) relax these requirements and can lead to invisibility in a broad band of the spectrum. PMID:19023043

  12. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Intelligence in Healthy Young Adults: The Role of Basal Ganglia Volume

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Cosima; Mühle, Christiane; Richter-Schmidinger, Tanja; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Doerfler, Arnd; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuropsychiatric diseases with basal ganglia involvement, higher cognitive functions are often impaired. In this exploratory study, we examined healthy young adults to gain detailed insight into the relationship between basal ganglia volume and cognitive abilities under non-pathological conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated 137 healthy adults that were between the ages of 21 and 35 years with similar educational backgrounds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and volumes of basal ganglia nuclei in both hemispheres were calculated using FreeSurfer software. The cognitive assessment consisted of verbal, numeric and figural aspects of intelligence for either the fluid or the crystallised intelligence factor using the intelligence test Intelligenz-Struktur-Test (I-S-T 2000 R). Our data revealed significant correlations of the caudate nucleus and pallidum volumes with figural and numeric aspects of intelligence, but not with verbal intelligence. Interestingly, figural intelligence associations were dependent on sex and intelligence factor; in females, the pallidum volumes were correlated with crystallised figural intelligence (r = 0.372, p = 0.01), whereas in males, the caudate volumes were correlated with fluid figural intelligence (r = 0.507, p = 0.01). Numeric intelligence was correlated with right-lateralised caudate nucleus volumes for both females and males, but only for crystallised intelligence (r = 0.306, p = 0.04 and r = 0.459, p = 0.04, respectively). The associations were not mediated by prefrontal cortical subfield volumes when controlling with partial correlation analyses. Conclusions/Significance The findings of our exploratory analysis indicate that figural and numeric intelligence aspects, but not verbal aspects, are strongly associated with basal ganglia volumes. Unlike numeric intelligence, the type of figural intelligence appears to be related to distinct basal ganglia

  13. Scattering in the Euclidean formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzou, Wayne

    2013-10-01

    Euclidean relativistic quantum mechanics is a formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics based on the Osterwalder-Schrader reconstruction theorem that exploits the logical independence of locality from the rest of the axioms of Euclidean field theory. I discuss the properties of Euclidean Green functions necessary for the existence of Møller wave operators and the construction of these wave operators in this formalism. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Grant - DE-AC02-81ER40038.

  14. Log-Euclidean free-form deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modat, Marc; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Daga, Pankaj; Cardoso, M. J.; Hawkes, David J.; Ashburner, John; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2011-03-01

    The Free-Form Deformation (FFD) algorithm is a widely used method for non-rigid registration. Modifications have previously been proposed to ensure topology preservation and invertibility within this framework. However, in practice, none of these yield the inverse transformation itself, and one loses the parsimonious B-spline parametrisation. We present a novel log-Euclidean FFD approach in which a spline model of a stationary velocity field is exponentiated to yield a diffeomorphism, using an efficient scaling-and-squaring algorithm. The log-Euclidean framework allows easy computation of a consistent inverse transformation, and offers advantages in group-wise atlas building and statistical analysis. We optimise the Normalised Mutual Information plus a regularisation term based on the Jacobian determinant of the transformation, and we present a novel analytical gradient of the latter. The proposed method has been assessed against a fast FFD implementation (F3D) using simulated T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance brain images. The overlap measures between propagated grey matter tissue probability maps used in the simulations show similar results for both approaches; however, our new method obtains more reasonable Jacobian values, and yields inverse transformations.

  15. Founding Gravitation in 4D Euclidean Space-Time Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Franz-Guenter

    2010-11-24

    The Euclidean interpretation of special relativity which has been suggested by the author is a formulation of special relativity in ordinary 4D Euclidean space-time geometry. The natural and geometrically intuitive generalization of this view involves variations of the speed of light (depending on location and direction) and a Euclidean principle of general covariance. In this article, a gravitation model by Jan Broekaert, which implements a view of relativity theory in the spirit of Lorentz and Poincare, is reconstructed and shown to fulfill the principles of the Euclidean approach after an appropriate reinterpretation.

  16. Correlated Variability in the Breathing Pattern and End-Expiratory Lung Volumes in Conscious Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dellaca, Raffaele L.; Aliverti, Andrea; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Pedotti, Antonio; Suki, Bela

    2015-01-01

    In order to characterize the variability and correlation properties of spontaneous breathing in humans, the breathing pattern of 16 seated healthy subjects was studied during 40 min of quiet breathing using opto-electronic plethysmography, a contactless technology that measures total and compartmental chest wall volumes without interfering with the subjects breathing. From these signals, tidal volume (VT), respiratory time (TTOT) and the other breathing pattern parameters were computed breath-by-breath together with the end-expiratory total and compartmental (pulmonary rib cage and abdomen) chest wall volume changes. The correlation properties of these variables were quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis, computing the scaling exponentα. VT, TTOT and the other breathing pattern variables showed α values between 0.60 (for minute ventilation) to 0.71 (for respiratory rate), all significantly lower than the ones obtained for end-expiratory volumes, that ranged between 1.05 (for rib cage) and 1.13 (for abdomen) with no significant differences between compartments. The much stronger long-range correlations of the end expiratory volumes were interpreted by a neuromechanical network model consisting of five neuron groups in the brain respiratory center coupled with the mechanical properties of the respiratory system modeled as a simple Kelvin body. The model-based α for VT is 0.57, similar to the experimental data. While the α for TTOT was slightly lower than the experimental values, the model correctly predicted α for end-expiratory lung volumes (1.045). In conclusion, we propose that the correlations in the timing and amplitude of the physiological variables originate from the brain with the exception of end-expiratory lung volume, which shows the strongest correlations largely due to the contribution of the viscoelastic properties of the tissues. This cycle-by-cycle variability may have a significant impact on the functioning of adherent cells in the

  17. Ultrasonographic assessment of splenic volume and its correlation with body parameters in a Jordanian population

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Darwish H.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.; Al-Hadidi, Maher T.; Shatarat, Amjad T.; Tarawneh, Emad S.; Hadidy, Azmy M.; Mahafza, Waleed S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate normal linear dimensions and volume of spleen in Jordanians using ultrasonography, and to correlate splenic volume with age and body parameters: height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A prospective pilot study was conducted on 205 volunteers (115 males and 90 females) not known to have any conditions likely to be associated with splenomegaly. The study was performed at the Radiology Department, Jordanian University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, between December 2013 and August 2014. All linear dimensions of spleen were measured, and splenic volume (index) was calculated using the standard prolate ellipsoid formula (length × width × depth × 0.523). The splenic volume was then analyzed with age and body parameters using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: The mean (± SD) splenic dimensions were 10.72±1.37 cm in length, 7.40±1.52 cm in width, 4.40±1.47 cm in depth, and 184.15±79.56 cm3 in volume. Men had larger spleens than women (p<0.0001). Age had no significant effect on spleen volume (r=0.11, p=0.12). There was a significant moderate positive correlation (p<0.0001), using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, between the spleen volume, and other parameters (height, weight, BSA, and BMI), with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.3. Conclusion: A local reference of spleen dimensions was established with a different range of values reported previously. PMID:26219448

  18. The hippocampus and exercise: histological correlates of MR-detected volume changes.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Sarah V; Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Auer, Matthias K; Dormann, Christof; Falfán-Melgoza, Claudia; Ende, Gabriele; Gass, Peter; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that physical exercise increases hippocampal volume. This has consistently been shown in mice and men using magnetic resonance imaging. On the other hand, histological studies have reported profound alterations on a cellular level including increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis after exercise. A combined investigation of both phenomena has not been documented so far although a causal role of adult neurogenesis for increased hippocampal volume has been suggested before. We investigated 20 voluntary wheel running and 20 sedentary mice after a period of 2 month voluntary wheel running. Half of each group received focalized hippocampal irradiation to inhibit neurogenesis prior to wheel running. Structural MRI and histological investigations concerning newborn neurons (DCX), glial cells (GFAP), microglia, proliferating and pyknotic cells, neuronal activation, as well as blood vessel density and arborisation were performed. In a regression model, neurogenesis was the marker best explaining hippocampal gray matter volume. Individual analyses showed a positive correlation of gray matter volume with DCX-positive newborn neurons in the subgroups, too. GFAP-positive cells significantly interacted with gray matter volume with a positive correlation in sham-irradiated mice and no correlation in irradiated mice. Although neurogenesis appears to be an important marker of higher hippocampal gray matter volume, a monocausal relationship was not indicated, requesting further investigations. PMID:25550000

  19. Disgust and happiness recognition correlate with anteroventral insula and amygdala volume respectively in preclinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kipps, C M; Duggins, A J; McCusker, E A; Calder, A J

    2007-07-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) can show disproportionate impairments in recognizing facial signals of disgust, but the neural basis of this deficit remains unclear. Functional imaging studies have implicated the anterior insula in the ability to recognize disgust, but have identified other structures as well, including the basal ganglia. In view of variable insula and basal ganglia volume changes in HD, we used voxel-based morphometry to map regional variations in gray matter (GM) volume in participants carrying the mutation for HD, and correlated this with their performance on a test of facial emotion recognition for six basic emotions (disgust, fear, anger, happiness, sadness, surprise). The volume of the anteroventral insula was strongly correlated with performance on the disgust recognition task. The amygdala volume (bilaterally) correlated with the ability to recognize happy facial expressions. There was marked specificity of the regional correlations for the emotion involved. Recognition of other emotion expressions, or more general cognitive or motor performance as measured by a standardized rating scale, did not correlate with regional brain volume in this group. Control participants showed no effect for any measure. The strong linear correlations for disgust and happiness recognition imply direct involvement of the anterior insula in disgust appreciation, and a similar role for the amygdala in recognizing happy facial expressions. The absence of a significant correlation with the basal ganglia suggests a less critical role for these structures in disgust recognition than has previously been suggested. The findings also highlight the role of neurodegenerative diseases combined with statistical imaging techniques in elucidating the brain basis of behavior and cognition. PMID:17583995

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging correlates with lesion volume in cerebral hemisphere infarctions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Both a large lesion volume and abnormalities in diffusion tensor imaging are independently associated with a poor prognosis after cerebral infarctions. Therefore, we assume that they are associated. This study assessed the associations between lesion volumes and diffusion tensor imaging in patients with a right-sided cerebral infarction. Methods The lesion volumes of 33 patients (age 65.9 ± 8.7, 26 males and 7 females) were imaged using computed tomography (CT) in the acute phase (within 3-4 hours) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the chronic phase (follow-up at 12 months, with a range of 8-27 months). The chronic-phase fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were measured at the site of the infarct and selected white matter tracts. Neurological tests in both the acute and chronic phases, and DTI lateralization were assessed with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The effects of thrombolytic therapy (n = 10) were assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test. The correlations between the measured parameters were analysed with Spearman's rho correlation. Bonferroni post-hoc correction was used to compensate for the familywise error rate in multiple comparisons. Results Several MD values in the right hemisphere correlated positively and FA values negatively with the lesion volumes. These correlations included both lesion area and healthy tissue. The results of the mini-mental state examination and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale also correlated with the lesion volume. Conclusions A larger infarct volume is associated with more pronounced tissue modifications in the chronic stage as observed with the MD and FA alterations. PMID:20849612

  1. Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  2. Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  3. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual. Volume 4, Models and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I presents modeling theory and associated numerical schemes; Volume II details instructions for code application and input data preparation; Volume III presents the results of developmental assessment cases that demonstrate and verify the models used in the code; Volume IV discusses in detail RELAP5 models and correlations; Volume V presents guidelines that have evolved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code; Volume VI discusses the numerical scheme used in RELAP5; and Volume VII presents a collection of independent assessment calculations.

  4. Supersymmetric solutions to Euclidean Romans supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Fluder, Martin; Gregory, Carolina Matte; Richmond, Paul; Sparks, James

    2016-02-01

    We study Euclidean Romans supergravity in six dimensions with a non-trivial Abelian R-symmetry gauge field. We show that supersymmetric solutions are in one-to-one correspondence with solutions to a set of differential constraints on an SU(2) structure. As an application of our results we (i) show that this structure reduces at a conformal boundary to the five-dimensional rigid supersymmetric geometry previously studied by the authors, (ii) find a general expression for the holographic dual of the VEV of a BPS Wilson loop, matching an exact field theory computation, (iii) construct holographic duals to squashed Sasaki-Einstein backgrounds, again matching to a field theory computation, and (iv) find new analytic solutions.

  5. Euclidean supergravity in terms of Dirac eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, Ion V.

    1998-08-01

    It has been recently shown that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can be considered as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator might play the same role in the case of supergravity. It is shown that for this purpose some primary constraints on covariant phase space as well as secondary constraints on the eigenspinors must be imposed. The validity of primary constraints under covariant transport is further analyzed. It is shown that in this case restrictions on the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of spacetime arise. The form of these restrictions is determined under some simplifying assumptions. It is also shown that manifolds with flat curvature of tangent bundle and spinor bundle satisfy these restrictions and thus they support the Dirac eigenvalues as global observables.

  6. Shape Selection in Non-Euclidean Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Venkataramani, Shankar

    2010-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of free non-Euclidean plates with a disc geometry and a prescribed metric that corresponds to a constant negative Gaussian curvature. We take the equilibrium configuration taken by the these sheets to be a minimum of a F"oppel Von-Kàrmàn type functional in which configurations free of any in plane stretching correspond to isometric embeddings of the metric. We show for all radii there exists low bending energy configurations free of any in plane stretching that obtain a periodic profile. The number of periods in these configurations is set by the condition that the principle curvatures of the surface remain finite and grows approximately exponentially with the radius of the disc.

  7. Straight monotonic embedding of data sets in Euclidean spaces.

    PubMed

    Courrieu, Pierre

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents a fast incremental algorithm for embedding data sets belonging to various topological spaces in Euclidean spaces. This is useful for networks whose input consists of non-Euclidean (possibly non-numerical) data, for the on-line computation of spatial maps in autonomous agent navigation problems, and for building internal representations from empirical similarity data. PMID:12425437

  8. Semi-Euclidean quasi-elliptic planar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekar, Murat; Yayli, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the algebra of split semi-quaternions with their basic properties. Also, the results of the Euclidean planar motion given by Blaschke and Grünwald is generalized to semi-Euclidean planar motion by using the algebra of split semi-quaternions.

  9. Scattering asymptotic conditions in Euclidean relativistic quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Gordon J.; Polyzou, W. N.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the formulation of the scattering asymptotic condition as a strong limit in Euclidean quantum theories satisfying the Osterwalder-Schrader axioms. When used with the invariance principle this provides a constructive method to compute scattering observables directly in the Euclidean formulation of the theory, without an explicit analytic continuation.

  10. Deductive Systems: Finite and Non-Euclidean Geometries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runion, Garth E.; Lockwood, James R.

    The study of the non-Euclidean geometries resulting from changes in the Euclidean parallel postulate often strengthens an individual's awareness and understanding of the deductive systems of mathematics in general. Students at both the high school and college levels are frequently fascinated by the study of deductive systems such as the two…

  11. Structure preserving transformations in hyperkähler Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The definition and structure of hyperkähler structure preserving transformations (invariance group) for quaternionic structures have been recently studied and some preliminary results on the Euclidean case discussed. In this work we present the whole structure of the invariance Lie algebra in the Euclidean case for any dimension.

  12. Correlation between Changes in Seismicity Rates and Well Injection Volumes in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Baker, J.; Walsh, R.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a statistical approach to establish correlations between locations with seismicity increase in Oklahoma and nearby well injection volumes. Seismicity rates in the state have significantly increased since approximately 2008. Fluid injection into deep wells has been theorized to be the cause of this seismicity, but the increase occurred significantly after the start of injection activities in the region. Further, injection-induced earthquakes depend on the presence and orientation of basement faults and the stress state in the region. Because of these complexities, it has been difficult to directly correlate fluid injection with seismicity. Here we show that a statistical correlation between increase in seismicity and injection volumes can be established in Oklahoma. We first employ a change point method to locate the regions where a change in seismicity rates has occurred. We then use a logistic regression model to relate the injection volumes in a region with the presence or absence of seismicity change in the region. This model is further used to evaluate the relative contribution of cumulative injection volumes and monthly injection rates to seismicity. The model can be used to identify "seismically sensitive regions" where seismicity increase has been observed with little fluid injection, and "seismically stable regions" where seismicity changes have not been observed even with high fluid injection. This information can be combined with geological information in a region, and used to make decisions about acceptable volumes for injection and to identify lower-risk regions for injection.

  13. Correlation between Gray/White Matter Volume and Cognition in Healthy Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    This study applied volumetric analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images to assess whether correlations exist between global and regional gray/white matter volume and the cognitive functions of semantic memory and short-term memory, which are relatively well preserved with aging, using MR image data from 109…

  14. Mimicking within Euclidean space a cosmological time dilation of gamma-ray burst durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    If gamma-ray burst sources are cosmological in origin, then the time dilation at large z can correlate a burst's duration with its peak flux. Detection of this effect is thought by many to be strong evidence for a cosmological burst origin. In this Letter I show that an apparent time distortion--either a dilation or contraction--is generally expected for an ensemble of bursts that is spatially limited within Euclidean space. The appearance of this effect is correlated with the falling away of the log N-log P curve from a -3/2 slope line. An example of this effect is provided by the relativistic bulk motion model, which produces a strong time dilation when spatially limited in Euclidean space. As a consequence, envidence that weak bursts have longer durations than strong bursts is not evidence of a cosmological burst origin.

  15. Improving the clinical correlation of multiple sclerosis black hole volume change by paired-scan analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Roger C; Traboulsee, Anthony; Riddehough, Andrew; Li, David K B

    2012-01-01

    The change in T 1-hypointense lesion ("black hole") volume is an important marker of pathological progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Black hole boundaries often have low contrast and are difficult to determine accurately and most (semi-)automated segmentation methods first compute the T 2-hyperintense lesions, which are a superset of the black holes and are typically more distinct, to form a search space for the T 1w lesions. Two main potential sources of measurement noise in longitudinal black hole volume computation are partial volume and variability in the T 2w lesion segmentation. A paired analysis approach is proposed herein that uses registration to equalize partial volume and lesion mask processing to combine T 2w lesion segmentations across time. The scans of 247 MS patients are used to compare a selected black hole computation method with an enhanced version incorporating paired analysis, using rank correlation to a clinical variable (MS functional composite) as the primary outcome measure. The comparison is done at nine different levels of intensity as a previous study suggests that darker black holes may yield stronger correlations. The results demonstrate that paired analysis can strongly improve longitudinal correlation (from -0.148 to -0.303 in this sample) and may produce segmentations that are more sensitive to clinically relevant changes. PMID:24179734

  16. Correlation between T-Wave Alternans and Cardiac Volume Status via Intrathoracic Impedance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Jose'; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of T-wave alternans (TWA) has been shown to correlate with a higher risk for sudden cardiac death. The mechanism of TWA may be related to abnormalities in intracellular calcium handling, which is a mechanism in heart failure and associated arrhythmias as well. However, an association between TWA and cardiac volume status has not been demonstrated. Methods Used. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy who had a biventricular defibrillator system implanted with intrathoracic impedance measurement capability. We performed baseline TWA testing, which was normal and was associated with normal clinical status and normal intrathoracic impedance. We followed intrathoracic impedance measurements, and when the measurement suggested volume overload eight months later, we repeated the TWA test. TWA was grossly positive, and volume overload was corroborated with clinical heart failure. The patient was diuresed, and when clinical status and intrathoracic impedance returned to normal a month later, we repeated TWA, which was again negative. Conclusion. This case demonstrates a correlation between cardiac volume status, as measured by intrathoracic impedance measurements, and TWA status. This data suggests that conditions of volume overload such as heart failure could be causally related to increased TWA, perhaps by the common mechanism of altered intracellular calcium handling. PMID:24826235

  17. Correlation between T-Wave Alternans and Cardiac Volume Status via Intrathoracic Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, Jose'; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of T-wave alternans (TWA) has been shown to correlate with a higher risk for sudden cardiac death. The mechanism of TWA may be related to abnormalities in intracellular calcium handling, which is a mechanism in heart failure and associated arrhythmias as well. However, an association between TWA and cardiac volume status has not been demonstrated. Methods Used. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy who had a biventricular defibrillator system implanted with intrathoracic impedance measurement capability. We performed baseline TWA testing, which was normal and was associated with normal clinical status and normal intrathoracic impedance. We followed intrathoracic impedance measurements, and when the measurement suggested volume overload eight months later, we repeated the TWA test. TWA was grossly positive, and volume overload was corroborated with clinical heart failure. The patient was diuresed, and when clinical status and intrathoracic impedance returned to normal a month later, we repeated TWA, which was again negative. Conclusion. This case demonstrates a correlation between cardiac volume status, as measured by intrathoracic impedance measurements, and TWA status. This data suggests that conditions of volume overload such as heart failure could be causally related to increased TWA, perhaps by the common mechanism of altered intracellular calcium handling. PMID:24826235

  18. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems. PMID:25282329

  19. A Euclidean Perspective on the Unfolding of Azurin: Spatial Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the stability to structural perturbation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin using a previously developed geometric model. Our analysis considers Ru(2,2′,6′,2″-terpyridine)(1,10-phenanthroline)(His83)-labeled wild-type azurin and five variants with mutations to Cu-ligating residues. We find that in the early stages of unfolding, the β-strands exhibit the most structural stability. The conserved residues comprising the hydrophobic core are dislocated only after nearly complete unfolding of the β-barrel. Attachment of the Ru-complex at His83 does not destabilize the protein fold, despite causing some degree of structural rearrangement. Notably, replacing the Cys112 and/or Met121 Cu ligands does not affect the conformational integrity of the protein. Notably, these results are in accord with experimental evidence, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the denaturation of azurin. PMID:23853392

  20. Action with Acceleration i: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Path Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2013-10-01

    An action having an acceleration term in addition to the usual velocity term is analyzed. The quantum mechanical system is directly defined for Euclidean time using the path integral. The Euclidean Hamiltonian is shown to yield the acceleration Lagrangian and the path integral with the correct boundary conditions. Due to the acceleration term, the state space depends on both position and velocity — and hence the Euclidean Hamiltonian depends on two degrees of freedom. The Hamiltonian for the acceleration system is non-Hermitian and can be mapped to a Hermitian Hamiltonian using a similarity transformation; the matrix elements of the similarity transformation are explicitly evaluated.

  1. Rate of quantum ergodicity in Euclidean billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, A.; Schubert, R.; Stifter, P.

    1998-05-01

    For a large class of quantized ergodic flows the quantum ergodicity theorem states that almost all eigenfunctions become equidistributed in the semiclassical limit. In this work we give a short introduction to the formulation of the quantum ergodicity theorem for general observables in terms of pseudodifferential operators and show that it is equivalent to the semiclassical eigenfunction hypothesis for the Wigner function in the case of ergodic systems. Of great importance is the rate by which the quantum-mechanical expectation values of an observable tend to their mean value. This is studied numerically for three Euclidean billiards (stadium, cosine, and cardioid billiard) using up to 6000 eigenfunctions. We find that in configuration space the rate of quantum ergodicity is strongly influenced by localized eigenfunctions such as bouncing-ball modes or scarred eigenfunctions. We give a detailed discussion and explanation of these effects using a simple but powerful model. For the rate of quantum ergodicity in momentum space we observe a slower decay. We also study the suitably normalized fluctuations of the expectation values around their mean and find good agreement with a Gaussian distribution.

  2. Voxel-based morphometry in eating disorders: correlation of psychopathology with grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Joos, Andreas; Klöppel, Stefan; Hartmann, Armin; Glauche, Volkmar; Tüscher, Oliver; Perlov, Evgeniy; Saum, Barbara; Freyer, Tobias; Zeeck, Almut; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2010-05-30

    Twenty-nine adult female patients with eating disorders (17 with bulimia nervosa, 12 with restrictive anorexia nervosa) were compared with 18 age-matched female healthy controls, using voxel-based morphometry. Restrictive anorexia nervosa patients showed a decrease of grey matter, particularly affecting the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, temporoparietal regions and the precuneus. By contrast, patients with bulimia nervosa did not differ from healthy controls. A positive correlation of "drive for thinness" and grey matter volume of the right inferior parietal lobe was found for both eating disorder groups. The strong reduction of grey matter volume in adult patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa is in line with results of adolescent patients. Contrary to other studies, this first voxel-based morphometry report of bulimic patients did not find any structural abnormalities. The inferior parietal cortex is a critical region for sensory integration of body and spatial perception, and the correlation of "drive for thinness" with grey matter volume of this region points to a neural correlate of this core psychopathological feature of eating disorders. PMID:20400273

  3. Brain tissue volume changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlation with lesion load.

    PubMed

    Quarantelli, Mario; Ciarmiello, Andrea; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia; Orefice, Giuseppe; Larobina, Michele; Lanzillo, Roberta; Schiavone, Vittorio; Salvatore, Elena; Alfano, Bruno; Brunetti, Arturo

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to simultaneously measure in vivo volumes of gray matter (GM), normal white matter (WM), abnormal white matter (aWM), and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and to assess their relationship in 50 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) (age range, 21-59; mean EDSS, 2.5; mean disease duration, 9.9 years), using an unsupervised multiparametric segmentation procedure applied to brain MR studies. Tissue volumes were normalized to total intracranial volume providing corresponding fractional volumes (fGM, faWM, fWM, and fCSF), subsequently corrected for aWM-related segmentation inaccuracies and adjusted to mean patients' age according to age-related changes measured in 54 normal volunteers (NV) (age range 16-70). In MS patients aWM was 23.8 +/- 29.8 ml (range 0.4-138.8). A significant decrease in fGM was present in MS patients as compared to NV (49.5 +/- 3.2% vs 53.3 +/- 2.1%; P < 0.0001), with a corresponding increase in fCSF (13.0 +/- 3.8% vs 9.1 +/- 2.4%; P < 0.0001). No difference could be detected between the two groups for fWM (37.5 +/- 2.6% vs 37.6 +/- 2.2%). faWM correlated inversely with fGM (R = -0.434, P < 0.001 at regression analysis), and directly with fCSF (R = 0.473, P < 0.001), but not with fWM. There was a significant correlation between disease duration and EDSS, while no relationship was found between EDSS or disease duration and fractional volumes. Brain atrophy in RR-MS is mainly related to GM loss, which correlates with faWM. Both measures do not appear to significantly affect EDSS, which correlates to disease duration. PMID:12595189

  4. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  5. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  6. Characteristic free volumes of bulk metallic glasses: Measurement and their correlation with glass-forming ability

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Qiang; Zeng Xierong; Fu, M. W.

    2011-03-01

    A convenient method is proposed for the measurement of the characteristic free volumes, viz., the amount of excess free volume annihilation in structural relaxation V{sub f-sr} and the amount of new free volume production in glass transition V{sub f-gt} of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by thermal dilation (DIL) test. Through the DIL tests, the characteristic free volumes are found to be sensitive to the change of glass forming ability (GFA). The Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} BMG has a quite small V{sub f-sr}. For a series of Fe-Cr-Mo-C-B-(Er) BMGs, Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 2} with the largest GFA is identified to have the largest V{sub f-gt} and smallest V{sub f-sr}. The correlation between V{sub f-sr} and the squares of critical diameters of these iron-based BMGs can be fitted as a negative exponential function with high accuracy.

  7. Self-reported impulsivity is negatively correlated with amygdalar volumes in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Mei, Songli; Xu, Jiansong; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-08-30

    Although impulsivity has been associated with cocaine dependence and other addictive behaviors, the biological factors underlying impulsivity have yet to be precisely determined. This study aimed to examine relationships between impulsivity and volumes of the amygdala and hippocampus in cocaine-dependent and healthy comparison individuals. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. FreeSurfer was used to assess amygdalar and hippocampal volumes from high-resolution structural magnetic resonance images. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, cocaine-dependent individuals scored higher on all three subscales of BIS-11 but did not differ from healthy comparison subjects in amygdalar or hippocampal volumes. Cocaine-dependent individuals showed significant negative correlations between amygdalar volumes and scores on the BIS-11 Attentional subscale, and this relationship differed significantly from the non-significant relationship in healthy comparison subjects. As individual differences in amygdalar structure may contribute to the high impulsivity observed in cocaine-dependent individuals, the findings suggest that future studies should assess the extent to which therapies that target impulsivity in cocaine dependence may operate through the amygdala or alter its structure or function. PMID:26187551

  8. Correlation of neurocognitive function and brain parenchyma volumes in children surviving cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; White, Holly A.; Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-04-01

    This research builds on our hypothesis that white matter damage and associated neurocognitive symptoms, in children treated for cancer with cranial spinal irradiation, spans a continuum of severity that can be reliably probed using non-invasive MR technology. Quantitative volumetric assessments of MR imaging and psychological assessments were obtained in 40 long-term survivors of malignant brain tumors treated with cranial irradiation. Neurocognitive assessments included a test of intellect (Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (Conner's Continuous Performance Test), and memory (California Verbal Learning Test). One-sample t-tests were conducted to evaluate test performance of survivors against age-adjusted scores from the test norms; these analyses revealed significant impairments in all apriori selected measures of intelligence, attention, and memory. Partial correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationships between brain tissues volumes (normal appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter, and CSF) and neurocognitive function. Global intelligence (r = 0.32, p = 0.05) and global attentional (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) were significantly positively correlated with NAWM volumes, whereas global memory was significantly positively correlated with overall brain parenchyma (r = 0.38, p = 0.04). We conclude that quantitative assessment of MR examinations in survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial irradiation reveal that loss of NAWM is associated with decreased intellectual and attentional deficits, whereas overall parenchyma loss, as reflected by increased CSF and decreased white matter, is associated with memory-related deficits.

  9. Use of PCA in Tephra Correlation and Importance of Thickness Values for Volume Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursik, M. I.; Pouget, S.; Cortes, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Discontinuous tephra layers were discovered at Burney Spring Mountain, northern California, USA. Stratigraphic relationships suggest that they are two distinct primary fall deposits. Geochemistry of the tephras from electron probe microanalysis was compared with geochemistry of known layers found in the region, to test for potential correlations, first using traditional binary plots and standard similarity coefficients. Then, using principal component analysis, we were able to bound our uncertainty in the correlation of the two tephra layers. After removal of outliers, within the 95% prediction interval, we can say that the lower tephra layer is likely the Rockland tephra, aged 565-610 ka, and the upper layer is likely from Mt Mazama, the Trego Hot Springs tephra, aged ~ 29 ka, based on the majority of the glass shards. The results were used to estimate the erupted volumes of the two deposits, by using the new thickness measurement together with others in the literature. The volume of the Rockland tephra was estimated to be 150-250 cu km, and of the Trego Hot Springs tephra, 10-50 cu km. It was found, however, that reported thickness measurements are not always detailed, and some reworked material is often included in measurements. As a result, the erupted volumes may be greatly over-estimated. Checking measured thickness against expected (model) thickness as a function of isopach area can provide useful information about potential redeposition. This would avoid an over-estimation of primary fall deposit volume, by giving an indication about locations where the original description should be studied in detailed and new thickness measurements made, if possible.

  10. Hippocampal volume correlates with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms irrespective of antidepressant medication

    PubMed Central

    Bernasconi, Raffaele; Smieskova, Renata; Schmidt, André; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Raschle, Nora Maria; Lenz, Claudia; Walter, Anna; Simon, Andor; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E.; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) often suffer from depressive and anxiety symptoms, which are clinically similar to the negative symptomatology described for psychosis. Thus, many ARMS individuals are already being treated with antidepressant medication. Objectives To investigate clinical and structural differences between psychosis high-risk individuals with or without antidepressants. Methods We compared ARMS individuals currently receiving antidepressants (ARMS-AD; n = 18), ARMS individuals not receiving antidepressants (ARMS-nonAD; n = 31) and healthy subjects (HC; n = 24), in terms of brain structure abnormalities, using voxel-based morphometry. We also performed region of interest analysis for the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala and precuneus. Results The ARMS-AD had higher ‘depression’ and lower ‘motor hyperactivity’ scores than the ARMS-nonAD. Compared to HC, there was significantly less GMV in the middle frontal gyrus in the whole ARMS cohort and in the superior frontal gyrus in the ARMS-AD subgroup. Compared to ARMS-nonAD, the ARMS-AD group showed more gray matter volume (GMV) in the left superior parietal lobe, but less GMV in the left hippocampus and the right precuneus. We found a significant negative correlation between attenuated negative symptoms and hippocampal volume in the whole ARMS cohort. Conclusion Reduced GMV in the hippocampus and precuneus is associated with short-term antidepressant medication and more severe depressive symptoms. Hippocampal volume is further negatively correlated with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to distinguish whether hippocampal volume deficits in the ARMS are related to attenuated negative psychotic symptoms or to antidepressant action. PMID:26110110

  11. The Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex Encode the Path and Euclidean Distances to Goals during Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Lorelei R.; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Yu, Yichao; Mill, Ravi D.; Morrison, Laura C.; Knight, Rebecca; Loftus, Michelle M.; Staskute, Laura; Spiers, Hugo J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Despite decades of research on spatial memory, we know surprisingly little about how the brain guides navigation to goals. While some models argue that vectors are represented for navigational guidance, other models postulate that the future path is computed. Although the hippocampal formation has been implicated in processing spatial goal information, it remains unclear whether this region processes path- or vector-related information. Results We report neuroimaging data collected from subjects navigating London’s Soho district; these data reveal that both the path distance and the Euclidean distance to the goal are encoded by the medial temporal lobe during navigation. While activity in the posterior hippocampus was sensitive to the distance along the path, activity in the entorhinal cortex was correlated with the Euclidean distance component of a vector to the goal. During travel periods, posterior hippocampal activity increased as the path to the goal became longer, but at decision points, activity in this region increased as the path to the goal became closer and more direct. Importantly, sensitivity to the distance was abolished in these brain areas when travel was guided by external cues. Conclusions The results indicate that the hippocampal formation contains representations of both the Euclidean distance and the path distance to goals during navigation. These findings argue that the hippocampal formation houses a flexible guidance system that changes how it represents distance to the goal depending on the fluctuating demands of navigation. PMID:24909328

  12. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Cleva, Roberto; de Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C.; Filho, Wilson Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 56±13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6±0.6 L) and FVC (2.0±0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8±0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p = 0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery. PMID:25029580

  13. Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation revisited: is the phase transition really 1st order?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias; de Forcrand, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The transition between the two phases of 4D Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation [1] was long believed to be of second order until in 1996 first order behavior was found for sufficiently large systems [5, 9]. However, one may wonder if this finding was affected by the numerical methods used: to control volume fluctuations, in both studies [5, 9] an artificial harmonic potential was added to the action and in [9] measurements were taken after a fixed number of accepted instead of attempted moves which introduces an additional error. Finally the simulations suffer from strong critical slowing down which may have been underestimated.

  14. Finite volume and asymptotic methods for stochastic neuron models with correlated inputs.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Marpeau, Fabien; Ma, Jianfu; Barua, Aditya; Josić, Krešimir

    2012-07-01

    We consider a pair of stochastic integrate and fire neurons receiving correlated stochastic inputs. The evolution of this system can be described by the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation with non-trivial boundary conditions resulting from the refractory period and firing threshold. We propose a finite volume method that is orders of magnitude faster than the Monte Carlo methods traditionally used to model such systems. The resulting numerical approximations are proved to be accurate, nonnegative and integrate to 1. We also approximate the transient evolution of the system using an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and use the result to examine the properties of the joint output of cell pairs. The results suggests that the joint output of a cell pair is most sensitive to changes in input variance, and less sensitive to changes in input mean and correlation. PMID:21717104

  15. Flexible intuitions of Euclidean geometry in an Amazonian indigene group.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; Pica, Pierre; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2011-06-14

    Kant argued that Euclidean geometry is synthesized on the basis of an a priori intuition of space. This proposal inspired much behavioral research probing whether spatial navigation in humans and animals conforms to the predictions of Euclidean geometry. However, Euclidean geometry also includes concepts that transcend the perceptible, such as objects that are infinitely small or infinitely large, or statements of necessity and impossibility. We tested the hypothesis that certain aspects of nonperceptible Euclidian geometry map onto intuitions of space that are present in all humans, even in the absence of formal mathematical education. Our tests probed intuitions of points, lines, and surfaces in participants from an indigene group in the Amazon, the Mundurucu, as well as adults and age-matched children controls from the United States and France and younger US children without education in geometry. The responses of Mundurucu adults and children converged with that of mathematically educated adults and children and revealed an intuitive understanding of essential properties of Euclidean geometry. For instance, on a surface described to them as perfectly planar, the Mundurucu's estimations of the internal angles of triangles added up to ~180 degrees, and when asked explicitly, they stated that there exists one single parallel line to any given line through a given point. These intuitions were also partially in place in the group of younger US participants. We conclude that, during childhood, humans develop geometrical intuitions that spontaneously accord with the principles of Euclidean geometry, even in the absence of training in mathematics. PMID:21606377

  16. Nonnegative least-correlated component analysis for separation of dependent sources by volume maximization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa-Yu; Chi, Chong-Yung; Chan, Tsung-Han; Wang, Yue

    2010-05-01

    Although significant efforts have been made in developing nonnegative blind source separation techniques, accurate separation of positive yet dependent sources remains a challenging task. In this paper, a joint correlation function of multiple signals is proposed to reveal and confirm that the observations after nonnegative mixing would have higher joint correlation than the original unknown sources. Accordingly, a new nonnegative least-correlated component analysis (n/LCA) method is proposed to design the unmixing matrix by minimizing the joint correlation function among the estimated nonnegative sources. In addition to a closed-form solution for unmixing two mixtures of two sources, the general algorithm of n/LCA for the multisource case is developed based on an iterative volume maximization (IVM) principle and linear programming. The source identifiability and required conditions are discussed and proven. The proposed n/LCA algorithm, denoted by n/LCA-IVM, is evaluated with both simulation data and real biomedical data to demonstrate its superior performance over several existing benchmark methods. PMID:20299711

  17. Equivalence between Euclidean and in-in formalisms in de Sitter QFT

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Atsushi; Marolf, Donald; Morrison, Ian A.

    2011-04-15

    We study the relation between two sets of correlators in interacting quantum field theory on de Sitter space. The first are correlators computed using in-in perturbation theory in the expanding cosmological patch of de Sitter space (also known as the conformal patch, or the Poincare patch), and for which the free propagators are taken to be those of the free Euclidean vacuum. The second are correlators obtained by analytic continuation from Euclidean de Sitter; i.e., they are correlators in the fully interacting Hartle-Hawking state. We give an analytic argument that these correlators coincide for interacting massive scalar fields with any m{sup 2}>0. We also verify this result via direct calculation in simple examples. The correspondence holds diagram by diagram, and at any finite value of an appropriate Pauli-Villars regulator mass M. Along the way, we note interesting connections between various prescriptions for perturbation theory in general static spacetimes with bifurcate Killing horizons.

  18. Bacterial spore heat resistance correlated with water content, wet density, and protoplast/sporoplast volume ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, T C; Greenamyre, J T; Corner, T R; Pankratz, H S; Gerhardt, P

    1982-01-01

    Five types of dormant Bacillus spores, between and within species, were selected representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The wet and dry density and the solids and water content of the entire spore and isolated integument of each type were determined directly from gram masses of material, with correction for interstitial water. The ratio between the volume occupied by the protoplast (the structures bounded by the inner pericytoplasm membrane) and the volume occupied by the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was calculated from measurements made on electron micrographs of medially thin-sectioned spores. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated directly with the wet density and inversely with the water content and with the protoplast/sporoplast volume ratio. Altogether with results supported a hypothesis that the extent of heat resistance is based in whole or in part on the extent of dehydration and diminution of the protoplast in the dormant spore, without implications about physiological mechanisms for attaining this state. Images PMID:6802802

  19. Serotonergic, brain volume and attentional correlates of trait anxiety in primates.

    PubMed

    Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Shiba, Yoshiro; Sawiak, Stephen; Braesicke, Katrin; Cockcroft, Gemma; Clarke, Hannah; Roberts, Angela C

    2015-05-01

    Trait anxiety is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of affective disorders, and insights into the underlying brain mechanisms are vital for improving treatment and prevention strategies. Translational studies in non-human primates, where targeted neurochemical and genetic manipulations can be made, are critical in view of their close neuroanatomical similarity to humans in brain regions implicated in trait anxiety. Thus, we characterised the serotonergic and regional brain volume correlates of trait-like anxiety in the marmoset monkey. Low- and high-anxious animals were identified by behavioral responses to a human intruder (HI) that are known to be sensitive to anxiolytic drug treatment. Extracellular serotonin levels within the amygdala were measured with in vivo microdialysis, at baseline and in response to challenge with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. Regional brain volume was assessed by structural magnetic resonance imaging. Anxious individuals showed persistent, long-term fearful responses to both a HI and a model snake, alongside sustained attention (vigilance) to novel cues in a context associated with unpredictable threat. Neurally, high-anxious marmosets showed reduced amygdala serotonin levels, and smaller volumes in a closely connected prefrontal region, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight behavioral and neural similarities between trait-like anxiety in marmosets and humans, and set the stage for further investigation of the processes contributing to vulnerability and resilience to affective disorders. PMID:25586542

  20. GSTM1 Gene Expression Correlates to Leiomyoma Volume Regression in Response to Mifepristone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engman, Mikael; Varghese, Suby; Lagerstedt Robinson, Kristina; Malmgren, Helena; Hammarsjö, Anna; Byström, Birgitta; L Lalitkumar, Parameswaran Grace; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor modulators, such as mifepristone are useful and well tolerated in reducing leiomyoma volume although with large individual variation. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular basis for the observed leiomyoma volume reduction, in response to mifepristone treatment and explore a possible molecular marker for the selective usage of mifepristone in leiomyoma patients. Premenopausal women (N = 14) were treated with mifepristone 50 mg, every other day for 12 weeks prior to surgery. Women were arbitrarily sub-grouped as good (N = 4), poor (N = 4) responders to treatment or intermediate respondents (N = 3). Total RNA was extracted from leiomyoma tissue, after surgical removal of the tumour and the differential expression of genes were analysed by microarray. The results were analysed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. The glutathione pathway was the most significantly altered canonical pathway in which the glutathione-s transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) gene was significantly over expressed (+8.03 folds) among the good responders compared to non responders. This was further confirmed by Real time PCR (p = 0.024). Correlation of immunoreactive scores (IRS) for GSTM1 accumulation in leiomyoma tissue was seen with base line volume change of leiomyoma R = −0.8 (p = 0.011). Furthermore the accumulation of protein GSTM1 analysed by Western Blot correlated significantly with the percentual leiomyoma volume change R = −0.82 (p = 0.004). Deletion of the GSTM1 gene in leiomyoma biopsies was found in 50% of the mifepristone treated cases, with lower presence of the GSTM1 protein. The findings support a significant role for GSTM1 in leiomyoma volume reduction induced by mifepristone and explain the observed individual variation in this response. Furthermore the finding could be useful to further explore GSTM1 as a biomarker for tailoring medical treatment of uterine leiomyomas for optimizing the response

  1. Gray matter volume and executive functioning correlate with time since injury following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Singh, Prabhjyot; Kipman, Maia; Pisner, Derek; Fridman, Andrew; Weber, Mareen

    2016-01-26

    Most people who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) will recover to baseline functioning within a period of several days to weeks. A substantial minority of patients, however, will show persistent symptoms and mild cognitive complaints for much longer. To more clearly delineate how the duration of time since injury (TSI) is associated with neuroplastic cortical volume changes and cognitive recovery, we employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and select neuropsychological measures in a cross-sectional sample of 26 patients with mTBI assessed at either two-weeks, one-month, three-months, six-months, or one-year post injury, and a sample of 12 healthy controls. Longer duration of TSI was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and right fusiform gyrus, and better neurocognitive performance on measures of visuospatial design fluency and emotional functioning. In particular, volume within the vmPFC was positively correlated with design fluency and negatively correlated with symptoms of anxiety, whereas GMV of the fusiform gyrus was associated with greater design fluency and sustained visual psychomotor vigilance performance. Moreover, the larger GMV seen among the more chronic individuals was significantly greater than healthy controls, suggesting possible enlargement of these regions with time since injury. These findings are interpreted in light of burgeoning evidence suggesting that cortical regions often exhibit structural changes following experience or practice, and suggest that with greater time since an mTBI, the brain displays compensatory remodeling of cortical regions involved in emotional regulation, which may reduce distractibility during attention demanding visuo-motor tasks. PMID:26711488

  2. Discontinuous automorphisms of the proper Galilei and Euclidean groups

    SciTech Connect

    Adeleke, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    The author shows that there are numerous discontinuous automorphisms of the three-dimensional Euclidean group and thus of the Galilei group, as numerous as the subsets of the real numbers, 2{sup aleph-null}, to be exact. These automorphisms arise from the derivations of the field of real numbers. Tits gave an example of a discontinuous automorphism for the semidirect product of the general linear group GL{sub n}(K) in n dimensions with the additive group of n {times} n matrices. He observes that if one uses the quaternion representation of the rotations and the form of Tits example, one obtains discontinuous automorphisms of the Euclidean group in three dimensions. He shows that all automorphisms of the Euclidean group in higher dimensions are continuous.

  3. Modeling of Euclidean braided fiber architectures to optimize composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong-Carroll, E.; Pastore, C.; Ko, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional braided fiber reinforcements are a very effective toughening mechanism for composite materials. The integral yarn path inherent to this fiber architecture allows for effective multidirectional dispersion of strain energy and negates delamination problems. In this paper a geometric model of Euclidean braid fiber architectures is presented. This information is used to determine the degree of geometric isotropy in the braids. This information, when combined with candidate material properties, can be used to quickly generate an estimate of the available load-carrying capacity of Euclidean braids at any arbitrary angle.

  4. A candidate for a classical lump in four euclidean dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchrakian, D. H.

    1985-05-01

    A generalisation of the Yang-Mills-Maxwell-Higgs (YMMH) system is proposed. This system is the residual theory obtained from the dimensional reduction characterized by M8 = E4 × S2 × S2, of a gauge theory which has finite action field configurations in eight euclidean dimensions. The resulting system reduces to YMMH for a small radius of compactification (η-1 and η2- and is put forward as a possible classical lump in four euclidean dimensions. Mailing address during 1984-1985: School of Theoretical Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4, Ireland.

  5. The Correlation Between Age and Bleeding Volume in Haemorrhagic Stroke Using Multi Slice CT at District Hospitals in Jakarta.

    PubMed

    Saefudin, Tatan; Apriantoro, Nursama Heru; Hidayat, Ekaputra Syarif; Purnamawati, Schandra

    2016-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Stroke is a common disease in Indonesia. The best imaging modality for this disease is Multi Slice Computed Tomography Scanning (MSCT), as it may help strengthening the diagnosis as well as determining the brain bleeding volume. This study aimed to show correlation between bleeding volume of the brain and patient's age using cross-sectional approach. The 68 samples in this study were taken from secondary data from Head CT Scan of Haemorrhagic Stroke cases.  Brain bleeding volume is the dependent variable, obtained through slice thickness of 5 mm and ABC/2 method with software measurement in MSCT Scan device. The independent variable of this study is the patient's age. The result of the study was the average brain's bleeding volume of 21.76 ml ± 2.48 ml (range of 1.04 ml to 94.73 ml).The slice thickness using ABC/2 method, has a significant correlation with brain's bleeding volume in MSCT Scan examination, with correlation coefficient value r of 0.79. Brain bleeding volume in patients who have ages lower than 50 years and more or equal to 50 years were (18.93 ± 3.26) ml and (23.53 ± 3.47) ml respectively. There is no correlation between age and brain's bleeding volume in haemorrhagic stroke cases, with p value of 0.18, r = 0.19. PMID:26573030

  6. The Correlation Between Age and Bleeding Volume in Haemorrhagic Stroke Using Multi Slice CT at District Hospitals in Jakarta

    PubMed Central

    Saefudin, Tatan; Apriantoro, Nursama Heru; Hidayat, Ekaputra Syarif; Purnamawati, Schandra

    2016-01-01

    Haemorrhagic Stroke is a common disease in Indonesia. The best imaging modality for this disease is Multi Slice Computed Tomography Scanning (MSCT), as it may help strengthening the diagnosis as well as determining the brain bleeding volume. This study aimed to show correlation between bleeding volume of the brain and patient’s age using cross-sectional approach. The 68 samples in this study were taken from secondary data from Head CT Scan of Haemorrhagic Stroke cases. Brain bleeding volume is the dependent variable, obtained through slice thickness of 5 mm and ABC/2 method with software measurement in MSCT Scan device. The independent variable of this study is the patient’s age. The result of the study was the average brain’s bleeding volume of 21.76 ml ± 2.48 ml (range of 1.04 ml to 94.73 ml). The slice thickness using ABC/2 method, has a significant correlation with brain’s bleeding volume in MSCT Scan examination, with correlation coefficient value r of 0.79. Brain bleeding volume in patients who have ages lower than 50 years and more or equal to 50 years were (18.93 ± 3.26) ml and (23.53 ± 3.47) ml respectively. There is no correlation between age and brain’s bleeding volume in haemorrhagic stroke cases, with p value of 0.18, r = 0.19. PMID:26573030

  7. Correlation between gall bladder fasting volume and postprandial emptying in patients with gall stones and healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Pauletzki, J; Cicala, M; Holl, J; Sauerbruch, T; Schafmayer, A; Paumgartner, G

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate whether the extent of postprandial gall bladder emptying is correlated with gall bladder fasting volume, gall bladder motility was studied in 56 patients with cholesterol gall stone and 19 control patients. Gall bladder volumes were determined sonographically, while cholecystokinin plasma values were measured radioimmunologically. Twenty three per cent of gall stone patients were classified as pathological contractors (residual fraction > mean +2SD of controls) and 77% as normal contractors. Normal but not pathological contractor patients exhibited larger gall bladder fasting volumes (mean (SEM)) (24.7 (1.7) ml) than controls (15.3 (1.2) ml, p < 0.001). In normal contractor patients and controls fasting volume was closely related with ejection volume (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) and residual volume (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Although ejection volume was enlarged in normal contractor patients it did not compensate the increase in fasting volume. Thus, residual volumes were considerably increased not only in pathological contractors (12.7 (2.5) ml, p < 0.001) but also in normal contractor patients (7.0 (0.5) v 4.6 (0.6) ml, p < 0.001). Postprandial cholecystokinin secretion did not differ between patients and controls. It is concluded, that in normal contractor patients gall bladder fasting volume is closely correlated with ejection and residual volume. Thus, fasting volume may be an essential factor affecting postprandial gall bladder emptying. Large fasting volumes in cholesterol gall stone disease could thereby contribute to bile retention, which facilitates gall stone growth. PMID:8244118

  8. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  9. Changes in thymus volume in adult HIV-infected patients under HAART: correlation with the T-cell repopulation

    PubMed Central

    RUBIO, A; MARTÍNEZ-MOYA, M; LEAL, M; FRANCO, J M; RUIZ-MATEOS, E; MERCHANTE, E; SÁNCHEZ-QUIJANO, A; LISSEN, E

    2002-01-01

    An important thymus role has been suggested in T-cell repopulation after HAART in adult HIV-1 infected patients. Thymus volume increase after treatment has been described in HIV-1 infected children but not in adult patients. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of HAART on the thymic volume of adult HIV-1 infected patients and its relation with the T-cell repopulation. Twenty-one adult patients following 24 weeks under HAART were included in the study. All patients underwent a thoracic computed tomography (CT) evaluation for the measurement of thymic volumes at weeks 0, 12 and 24. Baseline thymus volume showed a significant correlation with the patient's age. Thymic volume significantly increased after 24 weeks of HAART. Besides, a significant correlation between changes in the thymus volume and changes in both total and naïve CD4+ cell counts was found. Only patients with increases ≥100 CD4+ cell counts after treatment significantly increased the thymic volume. These data show the first evidence of an early change in thymic volume of adult HIV-1 infected patients under HAART. This increase was related to the rise of both total and naïve CD4+ cell counts suggesting a functional role of thymic volume increase. PMID:12296862

  10. Testicular volume is inversely correlated with nurturing-related brain activity in human fathers.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Jennifer S; Hackett, Patrick D; Rilling, James K

    2013-09-24

    Despite the well-documented benefits afforded the children of invested fathers in modern Western societies, some fathers choose not to invest in their children. Why do some men make this choice? Life History Theory offers an explanation for variation in parental investment by positing a trade-off between mating and parenting effort, which may explain some of the observed variance in human fathers' parenting behavior. We tested this hypothesis by measuring aspects of reproductive biology related to mating effort, as well as paternal nurturing behavior and the brain activity related to it. Both plasma testosterone levels and testes volume were independently inversely correlated with paternal caregiving. In response to viewing pictures of one's own child, activity in the ventral tegmental area--a key component of the mesolimbic dopamine reward and motivation system--predicted paternal caregiving and was negatively related to testes volume. Our results suggest that the biology of human males reflects a trade-off between mating effort and parenting effort, as indexed by testicular size and nurturing-related brain function, respectively. PMID:24019499

  11. The correlation between gray matter volume and perceived social support: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Che, XianWei; Wei, DongTao; Li, WenFu; Li, HaiJiang; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, QingLin; Liu, YiJun

    2014-01-01

    Social support refers to interpersonal exchanges that include the combinations of aid, affirmation and affection. Perceived social support is a kind of subjective judgment of one's availability of social support. In spite of the importance of perceived social support to health, however, its neural substrate remains unknown. To address this question, voxel-based morphometry was employed to investigate the neural bases of individual differences in responses to the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS) in healthy volunteers (144 men and 203 women; mean age = 19.9; SD = 1.33, age range : 17-27). As a result, multiple regression analysis revealed that the PSSS scores were significantly and positively correlated with gray matter volume in a cluster that mainly included areas in posterior parts of posterior cingulate cortex, bilateral lingual cortex, left occipital lobe and cuneus. Highly-supported individuals had larger gray matter volume in these brain regions, implying a relatively high level of ability to engage in self-referential processes and social cognition. Our results provide a biological basis for exploring perceived social support particularly in relationship to various health parameters and outcomes. PMID:24397344

  12. A Gilbert-Varshamov type bound for Euclidean packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebe, Gabriele; Xing, Chaoping

    2008-12-01

    This paper develops a method to obtain a Gilbert-Varshamov type bound for dense packings in the Euclidean spaces using suitable lattices. For the Leech lattice the obtained bounds are quite reasonable for large dimensions, better than the Minkowski-Hlawka bound, but not as good as the lower bound given by Keith Ball in 1992.

  13. From geometry to algebra: the Euclidean way with technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarello, Daniela; Flavia Mammana, Maria; Pennisi, Mario

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an experimental classroom activity, history-based with a phylogenetic approach, to achieve algebra properties through geometry. In particular, we used Euclidean propositions, processed them by a dynamic geometry system and translate them into algebraic special products.

  14. The Role of Structure in Learning Non-Euclidean Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmuth, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    How do people learn novel mathematical information that contradicts prior knowledge? The focus of this thesis is the role of structure in the acquisition of knowledge about hyperbolic geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry. In a series of three experiments, I contrast a more holistic structure--training based on closed figures--with a mathematically…

  15. White matter volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia: a VBM-DARTEL study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the white matter (WM) volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia using voxel-based morphometry. A total of 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. MR image data were processed using SPM8 software with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through an exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. The patients with schizophrenia showed significant decreases (P=0.042) in the WM volumes of the temporal lobe and superior frontal gyrus compared with the healthy controls. The WM volumes of the middle temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with the scores of both the Positive Subscale (Pearson's ρ=-0.68, P=0.001) and the Negative Subscale (ρ=-0.71, P=0.0005) in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. In addition, the scores of the General Psychopathology Subscale were negatively correlated with the WM volumes of the superior frontal gyrus (ρ=-0.68, P=0.0009). This study evaluated the WM volume of patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls using DARTEI-based voxel-based morphometry and also assessed the correlation of the localized WM volume changes with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. These findings will be useful to understand the neuropathology associated with WM abnormality in schizophrenia. PMID:26485094

  16. [Correlation between the regional blood volume and epileptic seizures in Papio papio].

    PubMed

    Ancri, D; Naquet, R; Basset, J Y; Ménini, C; Lonchampt, M F; Meldrum, B S; Stutzmann, J M

    1979-07-16

    The method of labelling red cells with technetium-99m was used to measured regional blood volume auring different types of epileptic seizures induced in the Baboon Papio papio. During seizures the cerebral blood volume increases and there is simultaneously a decrease of blood volume in nasal and hepatic regions, and a transitory increase of blood volume in the forepaws. PMID:117933

  17. Euclidean geometry explains why lengths allow precise body mass estimates in terrestrial invertebrates: the case of oribatid mites.

    PubMed

    Caruso, T; Migliorini, M

    2009-02-01

    Indirect measures of soil invertebrate body mass M based on equations relating the latter to body length (l) are becoming increasingly used due to the required painstaking laboratory work and the technical difficulties involved in obtaining some thousands of reliable weight estimates for animals that can be very small. The implicit assumption of such equations is that dM/dV=delta, where V is body volume and delta is a constant density value. Classical Euclidean scaling implies that V is proportional to l(3) proportional to M. One may thus derive M from l when the latter can provide a good estimate of V and the assumption of a constant delta is respected. In invertebrates, equations relating weight to length indicate that the power model always provides the best fit. However, authors only focused on the empirical estimation of slopes linking the body mass to the length measure variables, sometimes fitting exponential and linear models that are not theoretically grounded. This paper explicates how power laws derive from fundamental Euclidean scaling and describes the expected allometric exponents under the above assumptions. Based on the classical Euclidean scaling theory, an equivalent sphere is defined as a theoretical sphere with a volume equal to that of the organism whose body mass must be estimated. The illustrated application to a data set on soil oribatid mites helps clarify all these issues. Lastly, a general procedure for more precise estimation of M from V and delta is suggested. PMID:18977363

  18. Korn's inequality and Donati's theorem for the conformal Killing operator on pseudo-Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2008-09-01

    We prove the Korn's inequality for the conformal Killing operator on pseudo-Euclidean space , and an existence theorem for solutions to the non-homogeneous conformal Killing equation, which is a pseudo-Euclidean conformal generalization of Donati's theorem for Euclidean Killing operator.

  19. Biharmonic Submanifolds with Parallel Mean Curvature Vector in Pseudo-Euclidean Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate biharmonic submanifolds in pseudo-Euclidean spaces with arbitrary index and dimension. We give a complete classification of biharmonic spacelike submanifolds with parallel mean curvature vector in pseudo-Euclidean spaces. We also determine all biharmonic Lorentzian surfaces with parallel mean curvature vector field in pseudo-Euclidean spaces.

  20. Striatal Volume Increases in Active Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals and Correlation with Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Reem K.; Lin, Joanne C.; Miles, Sylvester W.; Kydd, Rob R.; Russell, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of methamphetamine (MA) dependence on the structure of the human brain has not been extensively studied, especially in active users. Previous studies reported cortical deficits and striatal gains in grey matter (GM) volume of abstinent MA abusers compared with control participants. This study aimed to investigate structural GM changes in the brains of 17 active MA-dependent participants compared with 20 control participants aged 18–46 years using voxel-based morphometry and region of interest volumetric analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging data, and whether these changes might be associated with cognitive performance. Significant volume increases were observed in the right and left putamen and left nucleus accumbens of MA-dependent compared to control participants. The volumetric gain in the right putamen remained significant after Bonferroni correction, and was inversely correlated with the number of errors (standardised z-scores) on the Go/No-go task. MA-dependent participants exhibited cortical GM deficits in the left superior frontal and precentral gyri in comparison to control participants, although these findings did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, consistent with findings from previous studies of abstinent users, active chronic MA-dependent participants showed significant striatal enlargement which was associated with improved performance on the Go/No-go, a cognitive task of response inhibition and impulsivity. Striatal enlargement may reflect the involvement of neurotrophic effects, inflammation or microgliosis. However, since it was associated with improved cognitive function, it is likely to reflect a compensatory response to MA-induced neurotoxicity in the striatum, in order to maintain cognitive function. Follow-up studies are recommended to ascertain whether this effect continues to be present following abstinence. Several factors may have contributed to the lack of more substantial cortical and

  1. Bayesian Approach to Spectral Function Reconstruction for Euclidean Quantum Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33TC.

  2. Differences in and correlations between cognitive abilities and brain volumes in healthy control, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer disease groups.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Baek, Ji-Hye; Gim, Seon-Young; Choi, Young Chil; Lee, Beob-Yi; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Boseong

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in and correlations between cognitive abilities and brain volumes in healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) groups. The Korean Version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD-K), which is used to diagnose AD, was used to measure the cognitive abilities of the study subjects, and the volumes of typical brain components related to AD diagnosis-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM)-were acquired. Of the CERAD-K subtests, the Boston Naming Test distinguished significantly among the HC, MCI, and AD groups. GM and WM volumes differed significantly among the three groups. There was a significant positive correlation between Boston Naming Test scores and GM and WM volumes. In conclusion, the Boston Naming Test and GM and WM brain volumes differentiated the three tested groups accurately, and there were strong correlations between Boston Naming Test scores and GM and WM volumes. These results will help to establish a test method that differentiates the three groups accurately and is economically feasible. Clin. Anat. 29:473-480, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26710236

  3. Pose Estimation using 1D Fourier Transform and Euclidean Distance Matching of CAD Model and Inspected Model Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkoffli, Zuliani; Abu Bakar, Elmi

    2016-02-01

    This paper present pose estimation relation of CAD model object and Projection Real Object (PRI). Image sequence of PRI and CAD model rotate on z axis at 10 degree interval in simulation and real scene used in this experiment. All this image is go through preprocessing stage to rescale object size and image size and transform all the image into silhouette. Correlation of CAD and PRI image is going through in this stage. Magnitude spectrum shows a reliable value in range 0.99 to 1.00 and Phase spectrum correlation shows a fluctuate graph in range 0.56 - 0.97. Euclidean distance correlation graph for CAD and PRI shows 2 zone of similar value due to almost symmetrical object shape. Processing stage of retrieval inspected PRI image in CAD database was carried out using range phase spectrum and maximum magnitude spectrum value within ±10% tolerance. Additional processing stage of retrieval inspected PRI image using Euclidean distance within ±5% tolerance also carried out. Euclidean matching shows a reliable result compared to range phase spectrum and maximum magnitude spectrum value by sacrificing more than 5 times processing time.

  4. Power-law correlations in finance-related Google searches, and their cross-correlations with volatility and traded volume: Evidence from the Dow Jones Industrial components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2015-06-01

    We study power-law correlations properties of the Google search queries for Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) component stocks. Examining the daily data of the searched terms with a combination of the rescaled range and rescaled variance tests together with the detrended fluctuation analysis, we show that the searches are in fact power-law correlated with Hurst exponents between 0.8 and 1.1. The general interest in the DJIA stocks is thus strongly persistent. We further reinvestigate the cross-correlation structure between the searches, traded volume and volatility of the component stocks using the detrended cross-correlation and detrending moving-average cross-correlation coefficients. Contrary to the universal power-law correlations structure of the related Google searches, the results suggest that there is no universal relationship between the online search queries and the analyzed financial measures. Even though we confirm positive correlation for a majority of pairs, there are several pairs with insignificant or even negative correlations. In addition, the correlations vary quite strongly across scales.

  5. SPDC correlated photon source filtered for narrowed bandwidth using volume Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Oliver; Kuo, Paulina; Kim, Yong-Su; Ma, Lijun; Tang, Xiao

    2012-10-01

    A Volume Bragg Grating (VBG) can be used to efficiently extract a narrow bandwidth, highly collimated beam from an otherwise broad spectrum beam. We use a VBG to extract a narrow bandwidth of signal spectrum from a broadband Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion source to optimally match the narrow detection bandwidth of our idler upconversion detector. Improved coincidence count rates and visibility can be achieved when limiting signal-spectrum detection to the narrow signal bandwidth whose photons are correlated with a narrow idler-spectrum bandwidth that has been selected by the up-conversion detector. We compare coincidence count rate and visibility for when the entire signal spectrum is detected and when the spectrum has been filtered by the VBG. We further relax the collection techniques and show that following the VBG, the coincidence count rate improves with minimal loss in visibility compared to when the entire spectrum is detected. We introduce our initial efforts at using the VBG to further narrow the signal spectrum by placing it inside a multipass cavity. Additionally, we further adapt the single photon level up-conversion spectrometer, previously developed for idler spectrum measurement, to indirectly measure the single photon level signal spectrum. We verify its capability for several different wavelength and linewidth selections.

  6. Primordial scalar power spectrum from the Euclidean big bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schander, Susanne; Barrau, Aurélien; Bolliet, Boris; Linsefors, Linda; Mielczarek, Jakub; Grain, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In effective models of loop quantum cosmology, the holonomy corrections are associated with deformations of space-time symmetries. The most evident manifestation of the deformations is the emergence of a Euclidean phase accompanying the nonsingular bouncing dynamics of the scale factor. In this article, we compute the power spectrum of scalar perturbations generated in this model, with a massive scalar field as the matter content. Instantaneous and adiabatic vacuum-type initial conditions for scalar perturbations are imposed in the contracting phase. The evolution through the Euclidean region is calculated based on the extrapolation of the time direction pointed by the vectors normal to the Cauchy hypersurface in the Lorentzian domains. The obtained power spectrum is characterized by a suppression in the IR regime and oscillations in the intermediate energy range. Furthermore, the speculative extension of the analysis in the UV reveals a specific rise of the power leading to results incompatible with the data.

  7. Tackling higher derivative ghosts with the Euclidean path integral

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanini, Michele; Trodden, Mark

    2011-05-15

    An alternative to the effective field theory approach to treat ghosts in higher derivative theories is to attempt to integrate them out via the Euclidean path integral formalism. It has been suggested that this method could provide a consistent framework within which we might tolerate the ghost degrees of freedom that plague, among other theories, the higher derivative gravity models that have been proposed to explain cosmic acceleration. We consider the extension of this idea to treating a class of terms with order six derivatives, and find that for a general term the Euclidean path integral approach works in the most trivial background, Minkowski. Moreover we see that even in de Sitter background, despite some difficulties, it is possible to define a probability distribution for tensorial perturbations of the metric.

  8. Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms and their Fueter subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Guersey, F.; Jiang, W. )

    1992-02-01

    Holomorphic Fueter functions of the position quaternion form a subgroup of Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms. An {ital O}(4) covariant treatment of such mappings is presented with the quaternionic argument {ital x} being replaced by either {ital {bar p}x} or {ital x{bar p}} involving self-dual and anti-self-dual structures and {ital p} denoting an arbitrary Euclidean time direction. An infinite group (the quasiconformal group) is exhibited that admits the conformal group SO(5,1) as a subgroup, in analogy to the two-dimensional case in which the Moebius group SO(3,1) is a subgroup of the infinite Virasoro group. The ensuing (3+1) covariant decomposition of diffeomorphisms suggests covariant gauges that throw the metric and the stress tensors in standard forms suitable for canonical quantization, leading to improved'' energy-momentum tensors. Other possible applications to current algebra and gravity will be mentioned.

  9. Optimal recovery of linear operators in non-Euclidean metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, K Yu

    2014-10-31

    The paper looks at problems concerning the recovery of operators from noisy information in non-Euclidean metrics. A number of general theorems are proved and applied to recovery problems for functions and their derivatives from the noisy Fourier transform. In some cases, a family of optimal methods is found, from which the methods requiring the least amount of original information are singled out. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  10. General Nth order integrals of motion in the Euclidean plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, S.; Winternitz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The general form of an integral of motion that is a polynomial of order N in the momenta is presented for a Hamiltonian system in two-dimensional Euclidean space. The classical and the quantum cases are treated separately, emphasizing both the similarities and the differences between the two. The main application will be to study Nth order superintegrable systems that allow separation of variables in the Hamilton-Jacobi and Schrödinger equations, respectively.

  11. SU-E-J-249: Correlation of Mean Lung Ventilation Value with Ratio of Total Lung Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, N; Qu, H; Xia, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lung ventilation function measured from 4D-CT and from breathing correlated CT images is a novel concept to incorporate the lung physiologic function into treatment planning of radiotherapy. The calculated ventilation functions may vary from different breathing patterns, affecting evaluation of the treatment plans. The purpose of this study is to correlate the mean lung ventilation value with the ratio of the total lung volumes obtained from the relevant CTs. Methods: A ventilation map was calculated from the variations of voxel-to-voxel CT densities from two breathing phases from either 4D-CT or breathing correlated CTs. An open source image registration tool of Plastimatch was used to deform the inhale phase images to the exhale phase images. To calculate the ventilation map inside lung, the whole lung was delineated and the tissue outside the lung was masked out. With a software tool developed in house, the 3D ventilation map was then converted in the DICOM format associated with the planning CT images. The ventilation map was analyzed on a clinical workstation. To correlate ventilation map thus calculated with lung volume change, the total lung volume change was compared the mean ventilation from our method. Results: Twenty two patients who underwent stereotactic body irradiation for lung cancer was selected for this retrospective study. For this group of patients, the ratio of lung volumes for the inhale (Vin ) and exhale phase (Vex ) was shown to be linearly related to the mean of the local ventilation (Vent), Vin/Vex=1.+0.49*Vent (R2=0.93, p<0.01). Conclusion: The total lung volume change is highly correlated with the mean of local ventilation. The mean of local ventilation may be useful to assess the patient's lung capacity.

  12. Path integration and perturbation theory with complex Euclidean actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexanian, Garnik; MacKenzie, R.; Paranjape, M. B.; Ruel, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    The Euclidean path integral quite often involves an action that is not completely real, i.e. a complex action. This occurs when the Minkowski action contains t-odd CP-violating terms. This usually consists of topological terms, such as the Chern-Simons term in odd dimensions, the Wess-Zumino term, the θ term or Chern character in 4-dimensional gauge theories, or other topological densities. Analytic continuation to Euclidean time yields an imaginary term in the Euclidean action. It also occurs when the action contains fermions, the fermion path integral being in general a sum over positive and negative real numbers. Negative numbers correspond to the exponential of iπ and hence indicate the presence of an imaginary term in the action. In the presence of imaginary terms in the Euclidean action, the usual method of perturbative quantization can fail. Here the action is expanded about its critical points, the quadratic part serving to define the Gaussian free theory and the higher order terms defining the perturbative interactions. For a complex action, the critical points are generically obtained at complex field configurations. Hence the contour of path integration does not pass through the critical points and the perturbative paradigm cannot be directly implemented. The contour of path integration has to be deformed to pass through the complex critical point using a generalized method of steepest descent, in order to do so. Typically, this procedure is not followed. Rather, only the real part of the Euclidean action is considered, and its critical points are used to define the perturbation theory, a procedure that can lead to incorrect results. In this article we present a simple example to illustrate this point. The example consists of N scalar fields in 0+1 dimensions interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the presence of a Chern-Simons term. In this example the path integral can be done exactly, the procedure of deformation of the contour of path integration

  13. Early visual processing for low spatial frequency fearful face is correlated with cortical volume in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Suk; Park, Gewnhi; Song, Myeong Ju; Choi, Kee-Hong; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia present with dysfunction of the magnocellular pathway, which might impair their early visual processing. We explored the relationship between functional abnormality of early visual processing and brain volumetric changes in schizophrenia. Eighteen patients and 16 healthy controls underwent electroencephalographic recordings and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. During electroencephalographic recordings, participants passively viewed neutral or fearful faces with broad, high, or low spatial frequency characteristics. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to investigate brain volume correlates of visual processing deficits. Event related potential analysis suggested that patients with schizophrenia had relatively impaired P100 processing of low spatial frequency fearful face stimuli compared with healthy controls; patients' gray-matter volumes in the dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortices positively correlated with this amplitude. In addition, patients' gray-matter volume in the right cuneus positively correlated with the P100 amplitude in the left hemisphere for the high spatial frequency neutral face condition and that in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex negatively correlated with the negative score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. No significant correlations were observed in healthy controls. This study suggests that the cuneus and prefrontal cortex are significantly involved with the early visual processing of magnocellular input in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26730192

  14. Detrended cross-correlations between returns, volatility, trading activity, and volume traded for the stock market companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Rafał; Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł

    2015-11-01

    We consider a few quantities that characterize trading on a stock market in a fixed time interval: logarithmic returns, volatility, trading activity (i.e., the number of transactions), and volume traded. We search for the power-law cross-correlations among these quantities aggregated over different time units from 1 min to 10 min. Our study is based on empirical data from the American stock market consisting of tick-by-tick recordings of 31 stocks listed in Dow Jones Industrial Average during the years 2008-2011. Since all the considered quantities except the returns show strong daily patterns related to the variable trading activity in different parts of a day, which are the most evident in the autocorrelation function, we remove these patterns by detrending before we proceed further with our study. We apply the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis with sign preserving (MFCCA) and show that the strongest power-law cross-correlations exist between trading activity and volume traded, while the weakest ones exist (or even do not exist) between the returns and the remaining quantities. We also show that the strongest cross-correlations are carried by those parts of the signals that are characterized by large and medium variance. Our observation that the most convincing power-law cross-correlations occur between trading activity and volume traded reveals the existence of strong fractal-like coupling between these quantities.

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded. PMID:26123375

  16. Correcting Correlations When Predicting Success in College. IR Applications. Volume 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saupe, Joe L.; Eimers, Mardy T.

    2011-01-01

    Critics of testing for admission purposes cite the moderate correlations of admissions test scores with success in college. In response, this study applies formulas from classical measurement theory to observed correlations to correct for restricted variances in predictor and success variables. Estimates of the correlations in the population of…

  17. Determination of correlation between backflow volume and mitral valve leaflet young modulus from two dimensional echocardiogram images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, Rudiyanto P.; Osman, Kahar; Adib, M. Azrul Hisham M.

    2012-06-01

    Mitral valve prolapse without proper monitoring might lead to a severe mitral valve failure which eventually leads to a sudden death. Additional information on the mitral valve leaflet condition against the backflow volume would be an added advantage to the medical practitioner for their decision on the patients' treatment. A study on two dimensional echocardiography images has been conducted and the correlations between the backflow volume of the mitral regurgitation and mitral valve leaflet Young modulus have been obtained. Echocardiogram images were analyzed on the aspect of backflow volume percentage and mitral valve leaflet dimensions on different rates of backflow volume. Young modulus values for the mitral valve leaflet were obtained by using the principle of elastic deflection and deformation on the mitral valve leaflet. The results show that the backflow volume increased with the decrease of the mitral valve leaflet Young modulus which also indicate the condition of the mitral valve leaflet approaching failure at high backflow volumes. Mitral valve leaflet Young modulus values obtained in this study agreed with the healthy mitral valve leaflet Young modulus from the literature. This is an initial overview of the trend on the prediction of the behaviour between the fluid and the structure of the blood and the mitral valve which is extendable to a larger system of prediction on the mitral valve leaflet condition based on the available echocardiogram images.

  18. Predictability and Market Efficiency in Agricultural Futures Markets: a Perspective from Price-Volume Correlation Based on Wavelet Coherency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ling-Yun; Wen, Xing-Chun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we use a time-frequency domain technique, namely, wavelet squared coherency, to examine the associations between the trading volumes of three agricultural futures and three different forms of these futures' daily closing prices, i.e. prices, returns and volatilities, over the past several years. These agricultural futures markets are selected from China as a typical case of the emerging countries, and from the US as a representative of the developed economies. We investigate correlations and lead-lag relationships between the trading volumes and the prices to detect the predictability and efficiency of these futures markets. The results suggest that the information contained in the trading volumes of the three agricultural futures markets in China can be applied to predict the prices or returns, while that in US has extremely weak predictive power for prices or returns. We also conduct the wavelet analysis on the relationships between the volumes and returns or volatilities to examine the existence of the two "stylized facts" proposed by Karpoff [J. M. Karpoff, The relation between price changes and trading volume: A survey, J. Financ. Quant. Anal.22(1) (1987) 109-126]. Different markets in the two countries perform differently in reproducing the two stylized facts. As the wavelet tools can decode nonlinear regularities and hidden patterns behind price-volume relationship in time-frequency space, different from the conventional econometric framework, this paper offers a new perspective into the market predictability and efficiency.

  19. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    PubMed

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models. PMID:26082007

  20. Fake Instability in the Euclidean Formalism of Quantum Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, H.; Harano, T.; Sato, M.; Kikuchi, H.; Wada, S.

    1997-11-01

    The Euclidean path-integral formalism is studied for the system without any unstable state. While the usual bounce calculation yields a fake complex energy spectrum, proper account of the global structure of the functional space is shown to lead to the real eigenvalues. For this purpose, the valley instanton is constructed by the proper valley method and the dilute-gas approximation is carried out. This establishes a general imaginary-time formalism, unifying the instanton and the bounce method. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Stable hypersurfaces with zero scalar curvature in Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, Hilário; do Carmo, Manfredo; Neto, Gregório Silva

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we prove some results concerning stability of hypersurfaces in the four dimensional Euclidean space with zero scalar curvature. First we prove there is no complete stable hypersurface with zero scalar curvature, polynomial growth of integral of the mean curvature, and with the Gauss-Kronecker curvature bounded away from zero. We conclude this paper giving a sufficient condition for a regular domain to be stable in terms of the mean and the Gauss-Kronecker curvatures of the hypersurface and the radius of the smallest extrinsic ball which contains the domain.

  2. Multi-stability in folded shells: non-Euclidean origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    Both natural and man-made structures benefit from having multiple mechanically stable states, from the quick snapping motion of hummingbird beaks to micro-textured surfaces with tunable roughness. Rather than discuss special fabrication techniques for creating bi-stability through material anisotropy, in this talk I will present several examples of how folding a structure can modify the energy landscape and thus lead to multiple stable states. Using ideas from origami and differential geometry, I will discuss how deforming a non-Euclidean surface can be done either continuously or discontinuously, and explore the effects that global constraints have on the ultimate stability of the surface.

  3. On cohomogeneity one biharmonic hypersurfaces into the Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, S.; Oniciuc, C.; Ratto, A.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to prove that there exists no cohomogeneity one G-invariant proper biharmonic hypersurface into the Euclidean space Rn, where G denotes a transformation group which acts on Rn by isometries, with codimension two principal orbits. This result may be considered in the context of the Chen conjecture, since this family of hypersurfaces includes examples with up to seven distinct principal curvatures. The paper uses the methods of equivariant differential geometry. In particular, the technique of proof provides a unified treatment for all these G-actions.

  4. Direct correlation between free volume and dielectric constant in a fluorine-containing polyimide blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Amarendra, G.; Alam, S.

    2015-06-01

    The dielectric constant of fluorinated polyimides and their blends is known to decrease with increase in free volume due to decrease in the number of polarizable groups per unit volume. Interestingly, we report here a polyimide which when blended with a fluoro- polymer showed a positive deviation of dielectric constant with free volume. In our experiment, we have used a blend of poly(ether imide) and poly(vinylidene fluorine-co-hexafluoropropylene) and the interaction between them was studied using FTIR, XRD, TGA and SEM. The blend was investigated by PALS, DB and DEA. Surprisingly, with the increase in the free volume content in this blend, the dielectric constant also increases. This change is attributed to additional space available for the polarizable groups to orient themselves to the applied electric field.

  5. Correlation of the Peach Springs Tuff, a large-volume Miocene ignimbrite sheet in California and Arizona ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Nielson, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Miller, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Peach Springs Tuff is a distinctive early Miocene ignimbrite deposit that was first recognized in western Arizona. Recent field studies and phenocryst analyses indicate that adjacent outcrops of similar tuff in the central and eastern Mojave Desert may be correlative. This proposed correlation implies that outcrops of the tuff are scattered over an area of at least 35 000 km2 from the western Colorado Plateau to Barstow, California, and that the erupted volume, allowing for posteruption crustal extension, was at least several hundred cubic kilometres. Thus, the Peach Springs Tuff may be a regional stratigraphic marker, useful for determining regional paleogeography and the time and extent of Tertiary crustal extension. -Authors

  6. Volume overload correlates with cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Peng, Ching-Hsiu; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Lien, Yu-Chung; Wang, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-03-01

    Volume overload is a predictor of mortality in dialysis patients. However, the fluid status of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but not yet on dialysis has not been accurately characterized. We used the Body Composition Monitor, a multifrequency bioimpedance device, to measure the level of overhydration in CKD patients, focusing on the association between overhydration and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Overhydration was the difference between the amount of extracellular water measured by the Body Composition Monitor and the amount of water predicted under healthy euvolemic conditions. Volume overload was defined as an overhydration value at and above the 90th percentile for the normal population. Of the 338 patients with stages 3-5 CKD, only 48% were euvolemic. Patients with volume overload were found to use significantly more antihypertensive medications and diuretics but had higher systolic blood pressures and an increased arterial stiffness than patients without volume overload. In a multivariate analysis, male sex, diabetes, pre-existing cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure, serum albumin, TNF-α, and proteinuria were independently all associated with overhydration. Thus, volume overload is strongly associated with both traditional and novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Bioimpedance devices may aid in clinical assessment by helping to identify a high-risk group with volume overload among stages 3-5 CKD patients. PMID:24025647

  7. Dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampus volume: Evaluation of aberrant neurodevelopmental markers in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Gautham, S; Arasappa, Rashmi; Jose, Dania A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, B N

    2015-10-30

    Schizophrenia is a disorder of aberrant neurodevelopment is marked by abnormalities in brain structure and dermatoglyphic traits. However, the link between these two (i.e. dermatoglyphic parameters and brain structure) which share ectodermal origin and common developmental window has not been explored extensively. The current study examined dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampal volume in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients in comparison with matched healthy controls. Ridge counts and asymmetry measures for palmar inter-digital areas (a-b, b-c, c-d) were obtained using high resolution digital scans of palms from 89 schizophrenia patients [M:F=48:41] and 48 healthy controls [M:F=30:18]. Brain scans were obtained for subset of subjects including 26 antipsychotic-naïve patients [M:F=13:13] and 29 healthy controls [M:F=19:10] using 3 T-MRI. Hippocampal volume and palmar ridge counts were measured by blinded raters with good inter-rater reliability using valid methods. Directional asymmetry (DA) of b-c and bilateral hippocampal volume were significantly lower in patients than controls. Significant positive correlation was found between DA and ridge count of b-c with bilateral anterior hippocampal volume. Study demonstrates the utility of dermatoglyphic markers in identifying structural changes in the brain which may form the basis for neurodevelopmental pathogenesis in schizophrenia. PMID:26385539

  8. Measurement of lacunar bone strains and crack formation during tensile loading by digital volume correlation of second harmonic generation images.

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Scott; Nesbitt, Robert Sterling; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of healthy bone tissue depends upon the ability of osteocytes to respond to mechanical cues on the cellular level. The combination of digital volume correlation and second harmonic generation microscopy offers the opportunity to investigate the mechanical microenvironment of intact bone on the scale of individual osteocytes. Adult human femurs were imaged under tensile loads of 5 and 15MPa and volumes of approximately 492×429×31μm(3) were analyzed, along with an image of a bone microcrack under the same loading conditions. Principal strains were significantly higher in three-dimensional digital volume correlation when compared to two-dimensional digital image correlation. The average maximum principal strain magnitude was 5.06-fold greater than the applied global strain, with peak strains of up to 23.14-fold over global strains measured at the borders of osteocyte lacunae. Finally, a microcrack that initiated at an osteocyte lacunae had its greatest tensile strain magnitudes at the crack expansion front in the direction of a second lacunae, but strain at the crack border was reduced to background strain magnitudes upon breaching the second lacunae. This serveed to demonstrate the role of lacunae in initiating, mediating and terminating microcrack growth. PMID:26807766

  9. Electrophysiological Correlates of Emotional Content and Volume Level in Spoken Word Processing

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Annika; Bayer, Mareike; Schacht, Annekathrin

    2016-01-01

    For visual stimuli of emotional content as pictures and written words, stimulus size has been shown to increase emotion effects in the early posterior negativity (EPN), a component of event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing attention allocation during visual sensory encoding. In the present study, we addressed the question whether this enhanced relevance of larger (visual) stimuli might generalize to the auditory domain and whether auditory emotion effects are modulated by volume. Therefore, subjects were listening to spoken words with emotional or neutral content, played at two different volume levels, while ERPs were recorded. Negative emotional content led to an increased frontal positivity and parieto-occipital negativity—a scalp distribution similar to the EPN—between ~370 and 530 ms. Importantly, this emotion-related ERP component was not modulated by differences in volume level, which impacted early auditory processing, as reflected in increased amplitudes of the N1 (80–130 ms) and P2 (130–265 ms) components as hypothesized. However, contrary to effects of stimulus size in the visual domain, volume level did not influence later ERP components. These findings indicate modality-specific and functionally independent processing triggered by emotional content of spoken words and volume level. PMID:27458359

  10. Non-Euclidean geometry of twisted filament bundle packing

    PubMed Central

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Densely packed and twisted assemblies of filaments are crucial structural motifs in macroscopic materials (cables, ropes, and textiles) as well as synthetic and biological nanomaterials (fibrous proteins). We study the unique and nontrivial packing geometry of this universal material design from two perspectives. First, we show that the problem of twisted bundle packing can be mapped exactly onto the problem of disc packing on a curved surface, the geometry of which has a positive, spherical curvature close to the center of rotation and approaches the intrinsically flat geometry of a cylinder far from the bundle center. From this mapping, we find the packing of any twisted bundle is geometrically frustrated, as it makes the sixfold geometry of filament close packing impossible at the core of the fiber. This geometrical equivalence leads to a spectrum of close-packed fiber geometries, whose low symmetry (five-, four-, three-, and twofold) reflect non-Euclidean packing constraints at the bundle core. Second, we explore the ground-state structure of twisted filament assemblies formed under the influence of adhesive interactions by a computational model. Here, we find that the underlying non-Euclidean geometry of twisted fiber packing disrupts the regular lattice packing of filaments above a critical radius, proportional to the helical pitch. Above this critical radius, the ground-state packing includes the presence of between one and six excess fivefold disclinations in the cross-sectional order. PMID:22711799

  11. Scaled norm-based Euclidean projection for sparse speaker adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younggwan; Kim, Myung Jong; Kim, Hoirin

    2015-12-01

    To reduce data storage for speaker adaptive (SA) models, in our previous work, we proposed a sparse speaker adaptation method which can efficiently reduce the number of adapted parameters by using Euclidean projection onto the L 1-ball (EPL1) while maintaining recognition performance comparable to maximum a posteriori (MAP) adaptation. In the EPL1-based sparse speaker adaptation framework, however, the adapted Gaussian mean vectors are mostly concentrated on dimensions having large variances because of assuming unit variance for all dimensions. To make EPL1 more flexible, in this paper, we propose scaled norm-based Euclidean projection (SNEP) which can consider dimension-specific variances. By using SNEP, we also propose a new sparse speaker adaptation method which can consider the variances of a speaker-independent model. Our experiments show that the adapted components of mean vectors are evenly distributed in all dimensions, and we can obtain sparsely adapted models with no loss of phone recognition performance from the proposed method compared with MAP adaptation.

  12. Modelflow Estimates of Stroke Volume Do Not Correlate With Doppler Ultrasound Estimates During Upright Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Connor R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Laurie, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance affects 60-80% of astronauts returning from long-duration missions, representing a significant risk to completing mission-critical tasks. While likely multifactorial, a reduction in stroke volume (SV) represents one factor contributing to orthostatic intolerance during stand and head up tilt (HUT) tests. Current measures of SV during stand or HUT tests use Doppler ultrasound and require a trained operator and specialized equipment, restricting its use in the field. BeatScope (Finapres Medical Systems BV, The Netherlands) uses a modelflow algorithm to estimate SV from continuous blood pressure waveforms in supine subjects; however, evidence supporting the use of Modelflow to estimate SV in subjects completing stand or HUT tests remain scarce. Furthermore, because the blood pressure device is held extended at heart level during HUT tests, but allowed to rest at the side during stand tests, changes in the finger arterial pressure waveform resulting from arm positioning could alter modelflow estimated SV. The purpose of this project was to compare Doppler ultrasound and BeatScope estimations of SV to determine if BeatScope can be used during stand or HUT tests. Finger photoplethysmography was used to acquire arterial pressure waveforms corrected for hydrostatic finger-to-heart height using the Finometer (FM) and Portapres (PP) arterial pressure devices in 10 subjects (5 men and 5 women) during a stand test while simultaneous estimates of SV were collected using Doppler ultrasound. Measures were made after 5 minutes of supine rest and while subjects stood for 5 minutes. Next, SV estimates were reacquired while each arm was independently raised to heart level, a position similar to tilt testing. Supine SV estimates were not significantly different between all three devices (FM: 68+/-20, PP: 71+/-21, US: 73+/-21 ml/beat). Upon standing, the change in SV estimated by FM (-18+/-8 ml) was not different from PP (-21+/-12), but both were significantly

  13. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 4: Correlation analysis software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The software utilized for image correction accuracy measurement is described. The correlation analysis program is written to allow the user various tools to analyze different correlation algorithms. The algorithms were tested using LANDSAT imagery in two different spectral bands. Three classification algorithms are implemented.

  14. Creatine Kinase Activity Weakly Correlates to Volume Completed Following Upper Body Resistance Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Marco; Willardson, Jeffrey M.; Silva, Dailson P.; Frigulha, Italo C.; Koch, Alexander J.; Souza, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the relationship between serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following upper body resistance exercise with a 1- or 3-min rest between sets. Twenty men performed two sessions, each consisting of four sets with a 10-repetition maximum load. The results demonstrated significantly greater volume for the 3-min…

  15. Mapping soil deformation around plant roots using in vivo 4D X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S D; Gillard, F; Soper, N; Mavrogordato, M N; Sinclair, I; Roose, T

    2016-06-14

    The mechanical impedance of soils inhibits the growth of plant roots, often being the most significant physical limitation to root system development. Non-invasive imaging techniques have recently been used to investigate the development of root system architecture over time, but the relationship with soil deformation is usually neglected. Correlative mapping approaches parameterised using 2D and 3D image data have recently gained prominence for quantifying physical deformation in composite materials including fibre-reinforced polymers and trabecular bone. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) are computational techniques which use the inherent material texture of surfaces and volumes, captured using imaging techniques, to map full-field deformation components in samples during physical loading. Here we develop an experimental assay and methodology for four-dimensional, in vivo X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) and apply a Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) approach to the data to quantify deformation. The method is validated for a field-derived soil under conditions of uniaxial compression, and a calibration study is used to quantify thresholds of displacement and strain measurement. The validated and calibrated approach is then demonstrated for an in vivo test case in which an extending maize root in field-derived soil was imaged hourly using XCT over a growth period of 19h. This allowed full-field soil deformation data and 3D root tip dynamics to be quantified in parallel for the first time. This fusion of methods paves the way for comparative studies of contrasting soils and plant genotypes, improving our understanding of the fundamental mechanical processes which influence root system development. PMID:27155747

  16. Correlation between Peripheral Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Hippocampal Volume in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lauxen Peruzzolo, Tatiana; Anes, Mauricio; Kohmann, Andre de Moura; Souza, Ana Claudia Mércio Loredo; Rodrigues, Ramiro Borges; Brun, Juliana Basso; Peters, Roberta; de Aguiar, Bianca Wollenhaupt; Kapczinski, Flavio; Tramontina, Silzá; Rohde, Luis Augusto Paim; Zeni, Cristian Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) is a serious mental disorder that affects the development and emotional growth of affected patients. The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is recognized as one of the possible markers of the framework and its evolution. Abnormalities in BDNF signaling in the hippocampus could explain the cognitive decline seen in patients with TB. Our aim with this study was to evaluate possible changes in hippocampal volume in children and adolescents with BD and associate them to serum BDNF. Subjects included 30 patients aged seven to seventeen years from the ProCAB (Program for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder). We observed mean right and left hippocampal volumes of 41910.55 and 41747.96 mm(3), respectively. No statistically significant correlations between peripheral BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes were found. We believe that the lack of correlation observed in this study is due to the short time of evolution of BD in children and adolescents. Besides studies with larger sample sizes to confirm the present findings and longitudinal assessments, addressing brain development versus a control group and including drug-naive patients in different mood states may help clarify the role of BDNF in the brain changes consequent upon BD. PMID:26075097

  17. Spatial resolution and measurement uncertainty of strains in bone and bone-cement interface using digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Qing-Hang; Lupton, Colin; Tong, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The measurement uncertainty of strains has been assessed in a bone analogue (sawbone), bovine trabecular bone and bone-cement interface specimens under zero load using the Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) method. The effects of sub-volume size, sample constraint and preload on the measured strain uncertainty have been examined. There is generally a trade-off between the measurement uncertainty and the spatial resolution. Suitable sub-volume sizes have been be selected based on a compromise between the measurement uncertainty and the spatial resolution of the cases considered. A ratio of sub-volume size to a microstructure characteristic (Tb.Sp) was introduced to reflect a suitable spatial resolution, and the measurement uncertainty associated was assessed. Specifically, ratios between 1.6 and 4 appear to give rise to standard deviations in the measured strains between 166 and 620 με in all the cases considered, which would seem to suffice for strain analysis in pre as well as post yield loading regimes. A microscale finite element (μFE) model was built from the CT images of the sawbone, and the results from the μFE model and a continuum FE model were compared with those from the DVC. The strain results were found to differ significantly between the two methods at tissue level, consistent in trend with the results found in human bones, indicating mainly a limitation of the current DVC method in mapping strains at this level. PMID:26741534

  18. Effects of excluded volume and correlated molecular orientations on Förster resonance energy transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mino

    2014-04-14

    Förster theory for the survival probability of excited chromophores is generalized to include the effects of excluded volume and orientation correlation in the molecular distribution. An analytical expression for survival probability was derived and written in terms of a few simple elementary functions. Because of the excluded volume, the survival probability exhibits exponential decay at early times and stretched exponential decay at later times. Experimental schemes to determine the size of the molecular excluded volume are suggested. With the present generalization of theory, we analyzed vibrational resonance energy transfer kinetics in neat water. Excluded volume effects prove to be important and slow down the kinetics at early times. The majority of intermolecular resonance energy transfer was found to occur with exponential kinetics, as opposed to the stretched exponential behavior predicted by Förster theory. Quantum yields of intra-molecular vibrational relaxation, intra-, and intermolecular energy transfer were calculated to be 0.413, 0.167, and 0.420, respectively.

  19. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-12-01

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d = 4 N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, d = 3 N = 2 super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and d = 3 N = 6 Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  20. On the Euclidean version of the photon number integral

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijsenaars, S.; Stodolsky, L.

    2008-02-15

    We reconsider the Euclidean version of the photon number integral introduced by Stodolsky [Acta Phys. Pol. B 33, 2659 (2002), e-print hep-th/02053131].This integral is well defined for any smooth non-self-intersecting curve in R{sup N}. Besides studying general features of this integral (including its conformal invariance), we evaluate it explicitly for the ellipse. The result is n{sub ellipse}=({xi}{sup -1}+{xi}){pi}{sup 2}, where {xi} is the ratio of the minor and major axes. This is in agreement with the previous result n{sub circle}=2{pi}{sup 2} and also with the conjecture that the minimum value of n for any plane curve occurs for the circle.

  1. Human face recognition by Euclidean distance and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornpanomchai, Chomtip; Inkuna, Chittrapol

    2010-02-01

    The idea of this project development is to improve the concept of human face recognition that has been studied in order to apply it for a more precise and effective recognition of human faces, and offered an alternative to agencies with respect to their access-departure control system. To accomplish this, a technique of calculation of distances between face features, including efficient face recognition though a neural network, is used. The system uses a technique of image processing consisting of 3 major processes: 1) preprocessing or preparation of images, 2) feature extraction from images of eyes, ears, nose and mouth, used for a calculation of Euclidean distances between each organ; and 3) face recognition using a neural network method. Based on the experimental results from reading image of a total of 200 images from 100 human faces, the system can correctly recognize 96 % with average access time of 3.304 sec per image.

  2. On the high-density expansion for Euclidean random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigera, T. S.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Parisi, G.; Urbani, P.; Verrocchio, P.

    2011-02-01

    Diagrammatic techniques to compute perturbatively the spectral properties of Euclidean random matrices (ERM) in the high-density regime are introduced and discussed in detail. Such techniques are developed in two alternative and very different formulations of the mathematical problem and are shown to give identical results up to second order in the perturbative expansion. One method, based on writing the so-called resolvent function as a Taylor series, allows us to group the diagrams into a small number of topological classes, providing a simple way to determine the infrared (small momenta) behaviour of the theory up to third order, which is of interest for the comparison with experiments. The other method, which reformulates the problem as a field theory, can instead be used to study the infrared behaviour at any perturbative order.

  3. Entropic Force and its Fluctuation in Euclidean Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue

    In this paper, we study the idea about gravity as entropic force proposed by Verlinde. By interpreting Euclidean gravity in the language of thermodynamic quantities on holographic screen, we find the gravitational force can be calculated from the change of entropy on the screen. We show that normal gravity calculation can be reinterpreted in the language of thermodynamic variables. We also study the fluctuation of the force and find the fluctuation acting on the point-like particle can never be larger than the expectation value of the force. For a black hole in AdS space, by gauge/gravity duality, the fluctuation may be interpreted as arising from thermal fluctuation in the boundary description. And for a black hole in flat space, the ratio between fluctuation and force goes to a constant (T)/(m) at infinity.

  4. Defects and boundary layers in non-Euclidean plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, J. A.; Venkataramani, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the behaviour of non-Euclidean plates with constant negative Gaussian curvature using the Föppl-von Kármán reduced theory of elasticity. Motivated by recent experimental results, we focus on annuli with a periodic profile. We prove rigorous upper and lower bounds for the elastic energy that scales like the thickness squared. In particular we show that are only two types of global minimizers—deformations that remain flat and saddle shaped deformations with isolated regions of stretching near the edge of the annulus. We also show that there exist local minimizers with a periodic profile that have additional boundary layers near their lines of inflection. These additional boundary layers are a new phenomenon in thin elastic sheets and are necessary to regularize jump discontinuities in the azimuthal curvature across lines of inflection. We rigorously derive scaling laws for the width of these boundary layers as a function of the thickness of the sheet.

  5. Action with Acceleration II: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Jordan Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2013-10-01

    The Euclidean action with acceleration has been analyzed in Ref. 1, and referred to henceforth as Paper I, for its Hamiltonian and path integral. In this paper, the state space of the Hamiltonian is analyzed for the case when it is pseudo-Hermitian (equivalent to a Hermitian Hamiltonian), as well as the case when it is inequivalent. The propagator is computed using both creation and destruction operators as well as the path integral. A state space calculation of the propagator shows the crucial role played by the dual state vectors that yields a result impossible to obtain from a Hermitian Hamiltonian. When it is not pseudo-Hermitian, the Hamiltonian is shown to be a direct sum of Jordan blocks.

  6. Quantum Anomalies for Generalized Euclidean Taub-Newman Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinescu, Mihai; Visinescu, Anca

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational and axial anomalies with regard to quadratic constants of motion for the Euclidean Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino (Taub-NUT) space and its generalizations as was done by Iwai and Katayama. The generalized Taub-NUT metrics exhibit in general gravitational anomalies. This is in contrast with the fact that the standard Taub-NUT metric does not exhibit gravitational anomalies, which is a consequence of the fact that it admits Killing-Yano tensors forming Stäckel-Killing tensors as products. For the axial anomaly, interpreted as the index of the Dirac operator, the role of Killing-Yano tensors is irrelevant. We compute the index of the Dirac operator for the generalized Taub-NUT metrics with the APS boundary conditions and find these metrics do not contribute to the axial anomaly for not too large deformations of the standard Taub-NUT metric.

  7. Self-dual solutions of Yang-Mills theory on Euclidean AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Sarioglu, Oezguer; Tekin, Bayram

    2009-05-15

    We find nontrivial, time-dependent solutions of the (anti) self-dual Yang-Mills equations in the four-dimensional Euclidean anti-de Sitter space. In contrast to the Euclidean flat space, the action depends on the moduli parameters and the charge can take any noninteger value.

  8. Shape Selection in the non-Euclidean Model of Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John

    In this dissertation we investigate the behavior of radially symmetric non-Euclidean plates of thickness t with constant negative Gaussian curvature. We present a complete study of these plates using the Foppl-von Karman and Kirchhoff reduced theories of elasticity. Motivated by experimental results, we focus on deformations with a periodic profile. For the Foppl-von Karman model, we prove rigorously that minimizers of the elastic energy converge to saddle shaped isometric immersions. In studying this convergence, we prove rigorous upper and lower bounds for the energy that scale like the thickness t squared. Furthermore, for deformation with n-waves we prove that the lower bound scales like nt2 while the upper bound scales like n2t2. We also investigate the scaling with thickness of boundary layers where the stretching energy is concentrated with decreasing thickness. For the Kichhoff model, we investigate isometric immersions of disks with constant negative curvature into R2, and the minimizers for the bending energy, i.e. the L2 norm of the principal curvatures over the class of W2,2 isometric immersions. We show the existence of smooth immersions of arbitrarily large geodesic balls in the hyperbolic plane into Euclidean space. In elucidating the connection between these immersions and the non-existence/singularity results of Hilbert and Amsler, we obtain a lower bound for the L infinity norm of the principal curvatures for such smooth isometric immersions. We also construct piecewise smooth isometric immersions that have a periodic profile, are globally W2,2, and numerically have lower bending energy than their smooth counterparts. The number of periods in these configurations is set by the condition that the principal curvatures of the surface remain finite and grow approximately exponentially with the radius of the disc.

  9. Bayesian approach to spectral function reconstruction for Euclidean quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33T(C). PMID:24237510

  10. Geostatistical analysis of groundwater level using Euclidean and non-Euclidean distance metrics and variable variogram fitting criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, Panagiota G.; Karatzas, George P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Corzo Perez, Gerald A.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater level is an important information in hydrological modelling. Geostatistical methods are often employed to map the free surface of an aquifer. In geostatistical analysis using Kriging techniques the selection of the optimal variogram model is very important for the optimal method performance. This work compares three different criteria, the least squares sum method, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Cressie's Indicator, to assess the theoretical variogram that fits to the experimental one and investigates the impact on the prediction results. Moreover, five different distance functions (Euclidean, Minkowski, Manhattan, Canberra, and Bray-Curtis) are applied to calculate the distance between observations that affects both the variogram calculation and the Kriging estimator. Cross validation analysis in terms of Ordinary Kriging is applied by using sequentially a different distance metric and the above three variogram fitting criteria. The spatial dependence of the observations in the tested dataset is studied by fitting classical variogram models and the Matérn model. The proposed comparison analysis performed for a data set of two hundred fifty hydraulic head measurements distributed over an alluvial aquifer that covers an area of 210 km2. The study area is located in the Prefecture of Drama, which belongs to the Water District of East Macedonia (Greece). This area was selected in terms of hydro-geological data availability and geological homogeneity. The analysis showed that a combination of the Akaike information Criterion for the variogram fitting assessment and the Brays-Curtis distance metric provided the most accurate cross-validation results. The Power-law variogram model provided the best fit to the experimental data. The aforementioned approach for the specific dataset in terms of the Ordinary Kriging method improves the prediction efficiency in comparison to the classical Euclidean distance metric. Therefore, maps of the spatial

  11. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Noha M.; El-Gendy, Heba A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status. PMID:27034823

  12. Free volume hole size of Cyanate ester resin/Epoxy resin interpenetrating networks and its correlations with physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Minfeng; Lu, Cuiyun; Wang, Baoyi; Qi, Chenze

    2010-09-01

    Cyanate ester (CE) resin was blended with epoxy resin (EP) at different mass ratios (CE/EP: 100/0, 90/10, 70/30, 50/50, 30/70, 10/90, and 0/100). The curing process of the blend system was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Examination of the mechanical properties, thermal stability, and morphology of the blend systems showed that addition of epoxy resin resulted in improved toughness but a little sacrifice in thermal stability when compared with neat CE. The free volume size of the blend system determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) decreased with the epoxy resin content, which is consistent with the chemical structure changes for the copolymerization between CE and EP. The crosslinking units of curing products (oxazoline, oxazolidinone, and polyether network) of the blends are all smaller in size than those of triazine ring structure from neat CE. Therefore, the free volume size of the blends decreases with increase of EP content. The correlations between the free volume properties and other physical properties (thermal stability and mechanical properties) have also been discussed.

  13. A Critical Examination of Relative Concentrations of Volume-correlated and Surface-correlated Submicron Globules of Pure Fe-0 in Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, A.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    Impacts on lunar soils produce melt and vapor in an approximate proportion of 7:1. The melt scavenges soil grains of diverse size, quenches and forms agglutinates, thereby converting surface correlated components of soil grains as volume correlated components; simultaneously, parts of the vapor may condense or escape. Cumulative small impacts increase the maturity of the soils, increase the abundance of agglutinates, and increase the concentration of vapor condensated material. Since the discovery of vapor deposited crystalline Fe-0 in vugs of regolith breccias and the theoretical anticipation of amorphous vapor deposits of diverse composition coating lunar soils grains, empirical evidence is gathering in support of such deposits, now commonly called vapor deposited patina (VDP). In addition, submicron globules of Fe-0 are seen to be ubiquitous in VDP. The amorphous VDP lowers the albedo of lunar soils, affects magnetic properties of soils, changes the slopes of uv-vis-ir reflectance spectra, and potentially also alters the gamma and x-ray spectra of lunar soils, compromising compositional inferences from remote sensing.

  14. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses - whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas - to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8-13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317

  15. The cosmic X-ray background-IRAS galaxy correlation and the local X-ray volume emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lahav, Ofer; Jahoda, Keith; Boldt, Elihu

    1994-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the galaxies from the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey sample and the 0.7 Jy projected sample with the all-sky cosmic X-ray background (CXB) map obtained from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 A-2 experiment. We have detected a significant correlation signal between surface density of IRAS galaxies and the X-ray background intensity, with W(sub xg) = (mean value of ((delta I)(delta N)))/(mean value of I)(mean value of N)) of several times 10(exp -3). While this correlation signal has a significant implication for the contribution of the local universe to the hard (E greater than 2 keV) X-ray background, its interpretation is model-dependent. We have developed a formulation to model the cross-correlation between CXB surface brightness and galaxy counts. This includes the effects of source clustering and the X-ray-far-infrared luminosity correlation. Using an X-ray flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which has IRAS 60 micrometer measurements, we have estimated the contribution of the AGN component to the observed CXB-IRAS galaxy count correlations in order to see whether there is an excess component, i.e., contribution from low X-ray luminosity sources. We have applied both the analytical approach and Monte Carlo simulations for the estimations. Our estimate of the local X-ray volume emissivity in the 2-10 keV band is rho(sub x) approximately = (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc, consistent with the value expected from the luminosity function of AGNs alone. This sets a limit to the local volume emissivity from lower luminosity sources (e.g., star-forming galaxies, low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs)) to rho(sub x) less than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc.

  16. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% {+-} 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p <.05). When the TVRR was categorized into three groups (<60%, 60-80%, and >80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of {>=}60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  17. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 5; Analytical and Experimental Data Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, W. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study presented in this volume is to present the results and data analysis of in-duct transmission loss measurements. Transmission loss testing was performed on full-scale, 1/2-scale, and 115-scale treatment panel samples. The objective of the study was to compare predicted and measured transmission loss for full-scale and subscale panels in an attempt to evaluate the variations in suppression between full- and subscale panels which were ostensibly of equivalent design. Generally, the results indicated an unsatisfactory agreement between measurement and prediction, even for full-scale. This was attributable to difficulties encountered in obtaining sufficiently accurate test results, even with extraordinary care in calibrating the instrumentation and performing the test. Test difficulties precluded the ability to make measurements at frequencies high enough to be representative of subscale liners. It is concluded that transmission loss measurements without ducts and data acquisition facilities specifically designed to operate with the precision and complexity required for high subscale frequency ranges are inadequate for evaluation of subscale treatment effects.

  18. Fast Encoding Method for Image Vector Quantization Based on Multiple Appropriate Features to Estimate Euclidean Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhibin; Kotani, Koji; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    The encoding process of finding the best-matched codeword (winner) for a certain input vector in image vector quantization (VQ) is computationally very expensive due to a lot of k-dimensional Euclidean distance computations. In order to speed up the VQ encoding process, it is beneficial to firstly estimate how large the Euclidean distance is between the input vector and a candidate codeword by using appropriate low dimensional features of a vector instead of an immediate Euclidean distance computation. If the estimated Euclidean distance is large enough, it implies that the current candidate codeword could not be a winner so that it can be rejected safely and thus avoid actual Euclidean distance computation. Sum (1-D), L2 norm (1-D) and partial sums (2-D) of a vector are used together as the appropriate features in this paper because they are the first three simplest features. Then, four estimations of Euclidean distance between the input vector and a codeword are connected to each other by the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality to realize codeword rejection. For typical standard images with very different details (Lena, F-16, Pepper and Baboon), the final remaining must-do actual Euclidean distance computations can be eliminated obviously and the total computational cost including all overhead can also be reduced obviously compared to the state-of-the-art EEENNS method meanwhile keeping a full search (FS) equivalent PSNR.

  19. On the complexity of some quadratic Euclidean 2-clustering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Pyatkin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Some problems of partitioning a finite set of points of Euclidean space into two clusters are considered. In these problems, the following criteria are minimized: (1) the sum over both clusters of the sums of squared pairwise distances between the elements of the cluster and (2) the sum of the (multiplied by the cardinalities of the clusters) sums of squared distances from the elements of the cluster to its geometric center, where the geometric center (or centroid) of a cluster is defined as the mean value of the elements in that cluster. Additionally, another problem close to (2) is considered, where the desired center of one of the clusters is given as input, while the center of the other cluster is unknown (is the variable to be optimized) as in problem (2). Two variants of the problems are analyzed, in which the cardinalities of the clusters are (1) parts of the input or (2) optimization variables. It is proved that all the considered problems are strongly NP-hard and that, in general, there is no fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for them (unless P = NP).

  20. Percolation thresholds on planar Euclidean relative-neighborhood graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, O.

    2013-04-01

    In the present article, statistical properties regarding the topology and standard percolation on relative neighborhood graphs (RNGs) for planar sets of points, considering the Euclidean metric, are put under scrutiny. RNGs belong to the family of “proximity graphs”; i.e., their edgeset encodes proximity information regarding the close neighbors for the terminal nodes of a given edge. Therefore they are, e.g., discussed in the context of the construction of backbones for wireless ad hoc networks that guarantee connectedness of all underlying nodes. Here, by means of numerical simulations, we determine the asymptotic degree and diameter of RNGs and we estimate their bond and site percolation thresholds, which were previously conjectured to be nontrivial. We compare the results to regular 2D graphs for which the degree is close to that of the RNG. Finally, we deduce the common percolation critical exponents from the RNG data to verify that the associated universality class is that of standard 2D percolation.

  1. Generating Triangulated Macromolecular Surfaces by Euclidean Distance Transform

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Macromolecular surfaces are fundamental representations of their three-dimensional geometric shape. Accurate calculation of protein surfaces is of critical importance in the protein structural and functional studies including ligand-protein docking and virtual screening. In contrast to analytical or parametric representation of macromolecular surfaces, triangulated mesh surfaces have been proved to be easy to describe, visualize and manipulate by computer programs. Here, we develop a new algorithm of EDTSurf for generating three major macromolecular surfaces of van der Waals surface, solvent-accessible surface and molecular surface, using the technique of fast Euclidean Distance Transform (EDT). The triangulated surfaces are constructed directly from volumetric solids by a Vertex-Connected Marching Cube algorithm that forms triangles from grid points. Compared to the analytical result, the relative error of the surface calculations by EDTSurf is <2–4% depending on the grid resolution, which is 1.5–4 times lower than the methods in the literature; and yet, the algorithm is faster and costs less computer memory than the comparative methods. The improvements in both accuracy and speed of the macromolecular surface determination should make EDTSurf a useful tool for the detailed study of protein docking and structure predictions. Both source code and the executable program of EDTSurf are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/EDTSurf. PMID:19956577

  2. Quantifying uncertainty in soot volume fraction estimates using Bayesian inference of auto-correlated laser-induced incandescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwin, Paul J.; Sipkens, T. A.; Thomson, K. A.; Liu, F.; Daun, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Auto-correlated laser-induced incandescence (AC-LII) infers the soot volume fraction (SVF) of soot particles by comparing the spectral incandescence from laser-energized particles to the pyrometrically inferred peak soot temperature. This calculation requires detailed knowledge of model parameters such as the absorption function of soot, which may vary with combustion chemistry, soot age, and the internal structure of the soot. This work presents a Bayesian methodology to quantify such uncertainties. This technique treats the additional "nuisance" model parameters, including the soot absorption function, as stochastic variables and incorporates the current state of knowledge of these parameters into the inference process through maximum entropy priors. While standard AC-LII analysis provides a point estimate of the SVF, Bayesian techniques infer the posterior probability density, which will allow scientists and engineers to better assess the reliability of AC-LII inferred SVFs in the context of environmental regulations and competing diagnostics.

  3. Determining the Total Volume of the 2.05 Ga Bushveld Magmatic Event: Correlation of the Molopo Farms Complex, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Gates, M.; Pitcavage, E.; Bybee, G. M.; Feineman, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC) in South Africa, erupted 2.05 billion years ago, is the world's largest layered intrusion in the range of 710-1060 x 103 km3 conservatively. However, the total volume of the magmatic event that produced the BIC remains poorly known. Several other intrusions occurred approximately contemporaneously with the BIC, but a clear relationship between these multiple intrusions is yet to be determined. The Molopo Farms Complex (MFC) is a layered igneous complex of similar age 2.044 Ga ­± 24 Ma located in Botswana, 200km west of the far western limb of the BIC, with a total volume of 1300 km2. Using trace element analysis, this study makes an attempt to find a correlation between the magma that emplaced the Molopo Farms Complex with the Bushveld Igneous Complex. The MFC is related to the BIC and is located under approximately 200m of Kalahari sands, which prevents any direct sampling or observation. Unlike the BIC, the MFC is poorly studied creating a lack of information for the complex. Drill core samples from the MFC were analyzed to determine the trace element composition using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Using previously reported values for the BIC; a comparison can be made on both complexes to find possible correlations. The comparison of trace element schematics in the MFC and the BIC suggest that both complexes are derived from the same parental magma, often referred to as the "B1" magma. These comparisons allow for an assumption that the initial parental magma of the BIC may have also emplaced the MFC.

  4. Ion-ion correlation, solvent excluded volume and pH effects on physicochemical properties of spherical oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Aljzmi, Amal; Almusaynid, Manal; Khan, Asrar; Valderrama, Esteban; Nash, Kelly L; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-15

    One major source of complexity in the implementation of nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes arises from the strong influence that biological environments has on their physicochemical properties. A key parameter for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles is the formation of the surface charge density. In this article, we present an efficient and accurate approach that combines a recently introduced classical solvation density functional theory for spherical electrical double layers with a surface complexation model to account for ion-ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical nanoparticles. We apply the proposed computational approach to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms on the surface chemistry of spherical silica (SiO2) nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, as well as pH level and electrolyte concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge density and Zeta potential. We validate our predictions for 580Å and 200Å nanoparticles immersed in acid, neutral and alkaline mono-valent aqueous electrolyte solutions against experimental data. Our results on mono-valent electrolyte show that the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations contribute significantly to the surface charge density and Zeta potential of the nanoparticle at high electrolyte concentration and pH levels, where the solvent crowding effects and electrostatic screening have shown a profound influence on the protonation/deprotonation reactions at the liquid/solute interface. The success of this approach in describing physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles supports its broader application to study other spherical metal oxide nanoparticles. PMID:26476201

  5. Direct observation of spatiotemporal dependence of anomalous diffusion in inhomogeneous fluid by sampling-volume-controlled fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Akiko; Ushida, Kiminori; Okamoto, Takayuki

    2005-12-01

    The direct observation of a spatiotemporal behavior of anomalous diffusion in aqueous polymer [hyaluronan (HA)] solution was achieved by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) using a modified instrument, enabling continuous change of the confocal volume of a microscope, namely, sampling-volume-controlled (SVC) FCS (SVC-FCS). Since HA chains form a mesh structure with a pore size of about 10-40nm , the observed diffusion coefficient (Dobs) is markedly dependent on the diffusion distance (L) . By SVC-FCS, the curve of the distance dependence of diffusion coefficient was directly obtained as a continuous profile in L=245-600nm showing evidence of anomalous diffusion. On plotting Dobs against either of the sampling time (τobs) or the diffusion distance (L) , Dobs turnover was observed near the anomalous diffusion area. The appearance of this turnover is attributed to the nonuniform mesh structure that can be observed only by a fast observation and that should be dynamically averaged by polymer motions with large τobs . This behavior is similar to that revealed in glass, colloidal systems, and gel solutions using dynamic light scattering, neutron scattering, and other techniques.

  6. Scattering Solutions of Bethe-Salpeter Equation in Minkowski and Euclidean Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, J.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We shortly review different methods to obtain the scattering solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in Minkowski space. We emphasize the possibility to obtain the zero energy observables in terms of the Euclidean scattering amplitude.

  7. Scattering Solutions of Bethe-Salpeter Equation in Minkowski and Euclidean Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, J.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    We shortly review different methods to obtain the scattering solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in Minkowski space. We emphasize the possibility to obtain the zero energy observables in terms of the Euclidean scattering amplitude.

  8. The Euclidean quantisation of Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Hörzinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We study the family of Einstein-Maxwell instantons associated with the Kerr-Newman metrics with a positive cosmological constant. This leads to a quantisation condition on the masses, charges, and angular momentum parameters of the resulting Euclidean solutions.

  9. Euclidean wormhole solutions of Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in diverse dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Hirenzaki, S. ); Shiraishi, K. )

    1990-09-15

    We solve the Euclidean Einstein equations with non-Abelian gauge fields of sufficiently large symmetry in various dimensions. In higher-dimensional spaces, we find the solutions which are similar to so-called scalar wormholes. In four-dimensional space-time, we find singular wormhole solutions with infinite Euclidean action. Wormhole solutions in the three-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills theory with a Chern-Simons term are also constructed.

  10. Measuring local volume fraction, long-wavelength correlations, and fractionation in a phase-separating polydisperse fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J. J.; Evans, R. M. L.

    2014-10-28

    We dynamically simulate fractionation (partitioning of particle species) during spinodal gas-liquid separation of a size-polydisperse colloid, using polydispersity up to ∼40% and a skewed parent size distribution. We introduce a novel coarse-grained Voronoi method to minimise size bias in measuring local volume fraction, along with a variety of spatial correlation functions which detect fractionation without requiring a clear distinction between the phases. These can be applied whether or not a system is phase separated, to determine structural correlations in particle size, and generalise easily to other kinds of polydispersity (charge, shape, etc.). We measure fractionation in both mean size and polydispersity between the phases, its direction differing between model interaction potentials which are identical in the monodisperse case. These qualitative features are predicted by a perturbative theory requiring only a monodisperse reference as input. The results show that intricate fractionation takes place almost from the start of phase separation, so can play a role even in nonequilibrium arrested states. The methods for characterisation of inhomogeneous polydisperse systems could in principle be applied to experiment as well as modelling.

  11. Quantifying Bulk Electrode Strain and Material Displacement within Lithium Batteries via High‐Speed Operando Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Finegan, Donal P.; Tudisco, Erika; Scheel, Mario; Robinson, James B.; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O.; Eastwood, David S.; Lee, Peter D.; Di Michiel, Marco; Bay, Brian; Hall, Stephen A.; Hinds, Gareth; Brett, Dan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Tracking the dynamic morphology of active materials during operation of lithium batteries is essential for identifying causes of performance loss. Digital volume correlation (DVC) is applied to high‐speed operando synchrotron X‐ray computed tomography of a commercial Li/MnO2 primary battery during discharge. Real‐time electrode material displacement is captured in 3D allowing degradation mechanisms such as delamination of the electrode from the current collector and electrode crack formation to be identified. Continuum DVC of consecutive images during discharge is used to quantify local displacements and strains in 3D throughout discharge, facilitating tracking of the progression of swelling due to lithiation within the electrode material in a commercial, spiral‐wound battery during normal operation. Displacement of the rigid current collector and cell materials contribute to severe electrode detachment and crack formation during discharge, which is monitored by a separate DVC approach. Use of time‐lapse X‐ray computed tomography coupled with DVC is thus demonstrated as an effective diagnostic technique to identify causes of performance loss within commercial lithium batteries; this novel approach is expected to guide the development of more effective commercial cell designs. PMID:27610334

  12. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: Theory, simulations, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O.; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Mónica; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-12-01

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models.

  13. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: Theory, simulations, and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Marucho, Marcelo; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O.; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Mónica

    2014-12-14

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models.

  14. Correlation of intracystic pressure with cyst volume, length of common channel, biochemical changes in bile and histopathological changes in liver in choledochal cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitin; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Srinivas, M.; Agarwala, Sandeep; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to establish correlation between intracholedochal cystic pressure (ICCP) with biochemical changes in bile, liver histology, cyst wall histology, length of common channel, and cyst volume. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, ICCP was measured after surgical access before any mobilization by direct cyst cannulation. Bile was then aspirated for biochemical estimation (bilirubin, amylase, lipase, pH, and electrolytes). Common channel length and cyst volume were determined by preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Liver histology was assessed under parenchymal, bile duct, and portal parameters. Cyst wall was examined for ulceration, inflammation, fibrosis, and metaplasia. Results: ICCP was recorded in 31 patients; mean and median ICCP were 15.64 and 14 mmHg, respectively (range = 6-30 mmHg). Cases with median ICCP < 14 had median cyst volume of 48 cc (range = 36-115) and amylase 2052 IU/L (range = 190-5052) whereas those with ICCP ≥ 15 had volume of 20 cc (range = 10-100) (P = 0.004) and amylase 36 IU/L (range = 0-2806) (P = 0.0004) suggesting inverse correlation. No significant correlation was found with bilirubin and electrolytes. ICCP directly correlated with parenchymal changes like hepatocellular damage (P = 0.002) and cholestasis (P = 0.001). It also correlated with bile duct changes. ICCP inversely correlated with cyst wall changes (P = 0.003, 0.0001, 0.023, 0.0013, respectively). High pressure cysts had normal pancreaticobiliary junction. Conclusion: High-pressure cysts tend to be smaller but have more severe backpressure changes in liver parenchyma. Low-pressure cysts have high volume and higher levels of amylase and lipase and therefore have more severe cyst wall changes. PMID:24604978

  15. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods. PMID:26906674

  16. Log-Euclidean metrics for fast and simple calculus on diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Arsigny, Vincent; Fillard, Pierre; Pennec, Xavier; Ayache, Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DT-MRI or DTI) is an emerging imaging modality whose importance has been growing considerably. However, the processing of this type of data (i.e., symmetric positive-definite matrices), called "tensors" here, has proved difficult in recent years. Usual Euclidean operations on matrices suffer from many defects on tensors, which have led to the use of many ad hoc methods. Recently, affine-invariant Riemannian metrics have been proposed as a rigorous and general framework in which these defects are corrected. These metrics have excellent theoretical properties and provide powerful processing tools, but also lead in practice to complex and slow algorithms. To remedy this limitation, a new family of Riemannian metrics called Log-Euclidean is proposed in this article. They also have excellent theoretical properties and yield similar results in practice, but with much simpler and faster computations. This new approach is based on a novel vector space structure for tensors. In this framework, Riemannian computations can be converted into Euclidean ones once tensors have been transformed into their matrix logarithms. Theoretical aspects are presented and the Euclidean, affine-invariant, and Log-Euclidean frameworks are compared experimentally. The comparison is carried out on interpolation and regularization tasks on synthetic and clinical 3D DTI data. PMID:16788917

  17. Correlations between magnetic switching volume and magnetic and nanostructural properties of CoSm//Cr films (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Z. S.; Malhotra, S. S.; Zhang, Y. B.; Liou, S. H.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    1997-04-01

    CoSm films with a Cr underlayer (CoSm//Cr) are promising as future high density recording media.1 It was pointed out that the grain size in media affects the media noise and thermal stability significantly. However, if small grains are exchange coupled to form larger "magnetic grains," the size of these magnetic clusters will be important in noise considerations. Our previous works23 indicated that for CoSm film with Cr underlayer the magnetic grain size is much larger than the 50 Å nanocrystallites and is about the same size as the Cr grain of ˜240 Å in dimension. In the present work, we report our systematic studies of magnetic switching volume and its correlation with magnetic and nanostructural properties for CoSm films. Switching volumes V* were measured with the "field sweep-rate dependence of coercivity Hc," interactions among the magnetic grains were estimated with the so-called ΔM method, and the nanostructures were investigated with atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The thickness of CoSm layers, which were sputtered in an Ar pressure PAr=25 mT, is 300 Å for all samples. It is found that as the Cr underlayer thickness dCr increases from 0 Å (without a Cr underlayer) to 200 Å, the V* and ΔMmax decrease (Hc increases) rapidly, i.e., from V* from 9.3×10-18 to 5.7×10-18 cm3, ΔMmax from 1.3 to 0.5 (Hc from 1.4 to 2.3 kOe), respectively, and then gradually as dCr approaches 800 Å. As Ar pressure PAr of the deposition of the Cr underlayer varies from 5 to 30 mT, the V* and ΔMmax have their minima (anisotropy Ku has its maximum) at PAr≃9.5 mT. V* shows minima at dCr and PAr values where Hc and Ku have their maxima and ΔMmax has a small value. This behavior can be interpreted with a thermal activation model including interactions between magnetic grains. The relationship between crystallite grain size, magnetic grain V*, and media noise will be discussed.

  18. Euclidean Complex Relativistic Mechanics: A New Special Relativity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossos, Spyridon; Vossos, Elias

    2015-09-01

    Relativity Theory (RT) was fundamental for the development of Quantum Mechanics (QMs). Special Relativity (SR), as is applied until now, cancels the transitive attribute in parallelism, when three observers are related, because Lorentz Boost (LB) is not closed transformation. In this presentation, considering Linear Spacetime Transformation (LSTT), we demand the maintenance of Minkowski Spacetime Interval (S2). In addition, we demand this LSTT to be closed, so there is no need for axes rotation. The solution is the Vossos Matrix (ΛB) containing real and imaginary numbers. As a result, space becomes complex, but time remains real. Thus, the transitive attribute in parallelism, which is equivalent to the Euclidean Request (ER), is also valid for moving observers. Choosing real spacetime for the unmoved observer (O), all the natural sizes are real, too. Using Vossos Transformation (VT) for moving observers, the four-vectors’ zeroth component (such as energy) is real, in contrast with spatial components that are complex, but their norm is real. It is proved that moving (relative to O) human O' meter length, according to Lorentz Boost (LB). In addition, we find Rotation Matrix Vossos-Lorentz (RBL) that turns natural sizes’ complex components to real. We also prove that Speed of Light in Vacuum (c) is invariant, when complex components are used and VT is closed for three sequential observers. After, we find out the connection between two moving (relative to O) observers: X"= ΛLO"(o) ΛLO(O') X', using Lorentz Matrix (ΛL). We applied this theory, finding relations between natural sizes, that are the same as these extracted by Classic Relativity (CR), when two observers are related (i.e. relativistic Doppler shift is the same). But, the results are different, when more than two observers are related. VT of Electromagnetic Tensor (Fμv), leads to Complex Electromagnetic Fields (CEMFs) for a moving observer. When the unmoved observer O and a moving observer O' are

  19. Correlations of Metabolic Components with Prostate Volume in Middle-Aged Men Receiving Health Check-Up

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Ju; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Hsieh, Ju-Ton; Huang, Kuo-How

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of metabolic components and body composition indices on prostate volume (PV) in a population of middle-aged men receiving health check-ups. Methods Six hundred and sixteen men receiving health assessments were stratified to large and small prostates based on the cut-off of median PV. Their demographic data, health history, and international prostate symptoms scores (IPSS) were collected. Metabolic components and body composition indices were compared between subjects with large and small prostates. Moreover, the correlations between these parameters and PV were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results The median PV was 27 mL and mean age was 54.8 years. Subjects with large PV were older (56.5 vs. 52.7 years) and had higher serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (1.73 vs. 0.96 ng/mL), higher IPSS score (8.37 vs. 6.16), and higher body fat, body mass, and waist circumference (all p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, age (OR, 2.45; 95%CI, 1.74–3.45), serum PSA (OR, 2.75; 95%CI, 1.96–3.86), waist circumference (OR, 1.45; 95%CI, 1.02–2.07), fatness (OR, 1.47; 95%CI, 1.04–2.09), and body fat mass (OR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.00–2.03) were significantly correlated with PV of study subjects. In subgroup analysis, raised waist circumference (OR, 1.89; 95%CI, 1.00–3.59) was the independent predictor of PV in subjects with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. Conclusions Several metabolic components and body composition indices are significantly associated with PV of middle-aged men, including raised waist circumference, fatness, and body fat mass. Raised waist circumference is the only independent predictor of PV in middle-aged men with bothersome LUTS. PMID:26731481

  20. Increasing the Accuracy of Volume and ADC Delineation for Heterogeneous Tumor on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Correlation with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Nan-Jie; Wong, Chun-Sing; Chu, Yiu-Ching; Guo, Hua; Huang, Bingsheng; Chan, Queenie

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a method based on thresholding both the b0 images and the ADC maps. Methods and Materials: In 21 heterogeneous lesions from patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), gross lesion were manually contoured, and corresponding volumes and ADCs were denoted as gross tumor volume (GTV) and gross ADC (ADC{sub g}), respectively. Using a k-means clustering algorithm, the probable high-cellularity tumor tissues were selected based on b0 images and ADC maps. ADC and volume of the tissues selected using the proposed method were denoted as thresholded ADC (ADC{sub thr}) and high-cellularity tumor volume (HCTV), respectively. The metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) was measured using 40% maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the lower threshold, and corresponding mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) was also measured. Results: HCTV had excellent concordance with MTV according to Pearson's correlation (r=0.984, P<.001) and linear regression (slope = 1.085, intercept = −4.731). In contrast, GTV overestimated the volume and differed significantly from MTV (P=.005). ADC{sub thr} correlated significantly and strongly with SUV{sub mean} (r=−0.807, P<.001) and SUV{sub max} (r=−0.843, P<.001); both were stronger than those of ADC{sub g}. Conclusions: The proposed lesion-adaptive semiautomatic method can help segment high-cellularity tissues that match hypermetabolic tissues in PET/CT and enables more accurate volume and ADC delineation on diffusion-weighted MR images of GIST.

  1. Generalized Thomson problem in arbitrary dimensions and non-euclidean geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Bagdasaryan, Armen; Abdel-Aty, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-06-01

    Systems of identical particles with equal charge are studied under a special type of confinement. These classical particles are free to move inside some convex region S and on the boundary of it Ω (the S d - 1 -sphere, in our case). We shall show how particles arrange themselves under the sole action of the Coulomb repulsion in many dimensions in the usual Euclidean space, therefore generalizing the so called Thomson problem to many dimensions. Also, we explore how the problem varies when non-Euclidean geometries are considered. We shall see that optimal configurations in all cases possess a high degree of symmetry, regardless of the concomitant dimension or geometry.

  2. 10D to 4D Euclidean supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Wafic A.; Vaughan, Owen

    2016-01-01

    We dimensionally reduce the bosonic sector of 10D Euclidean type IIA supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold. The resulting theory describes the bosonic sector of 4D, {N}=2 Euclidean supergravity coupled to vector- and hyper-multiplets. We show that the scalar target manifold of the vector-multiplets is projective special para-Kähler, and is therefore of split signature, whereas the target manifold of the hyper-multiplets is (positive-definite) quaternionic Kähler.

  3. Linear and curvilinear correlations of brain gray matter volume and density with age using voxel-based morphometry with the Akaike information criterion in 291 healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Thyreau, Benjamin; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Wu, Kai; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-08-01

    We examined linear and curvilinear correlations of gray matter volume and density in cortical and subcortical gray matter with age using magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a large number of healthy children. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses with the Akaike information criterion (AIC), which was used to determine the best-fit model by selecting which predictor terms should be included. We collected data on brain structural MRI in 291 healthy children aged 5-18 years. Structural MRI data were segmented and normalized using a custom template by applying the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) procedure. Next, we analyzed the correlations of gray matter volume and density with age in VBM with AIC by estimating linear, quadratic, and cubic polynomial functions. Several regions such as the prefrontal cortex, the precentral gyrus, and cerebellum showed significant linear or curvilinear correlations between gray matter volume and age on an increasing trajectory, and between gray matter density and age on a decreasing trajectory in VBM and ROI analyses with AIC. Because the trajectory of gray matter volume and density with age suggests the progress of brain maturation, our results may contribute to clarifying brain maturation in healthy children from the viewpoint of brain structure. PMID:22505237

  4. 4D analysis of the microstructural evolution of Si-based electrodes during lithiation: Time-lapse X-ray imaging and digital volume correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Garcia, J. M.; Taiwo, O. O.; Tudisco, E.; Finegan, D. P.; Shearing, P. R.; Brett, D. J. L.; Hall, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon is a promising candidate to substitute or complement graphite as anode material in Li-ion batteries due, mainly, to its high energy density. However, the lithiation/delithiation processes of silicon particles are inherently related to drastic volume changes which, within a battery's physically constrained case, can induce significant deformation of the fundamental components of the battery that can eventually cause it to fail. In this work, we use non-destructive time-lapse X-ray imaging techniques to study the coupled electrochemo-mechanical phenomena in Li-ion batteries. We present X-ray computed tomography data acquired at different times during the first lithiation of custom-built silicon-lithium battery cells. Microstructural volume changes have been quantified using full 3D strain field measurements from digital volume correlation analysis. Furthermore, the extent of lithiation of silicon particles has been quantified in 3D from the grey-scale of the tomography images. Correlation of the volume expansion and grey-scale changes over the silicon-based electrode volume indicates that the process of lithiation is kinetically affected by the reaction at the Si/LixSi interface.

  5. Differences in cognitive ability and hippocampal volume between Alzheimer's disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and healthy control groups, and their correlation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Woo-Ram; Mun, Kyung-Ryul; Tack, Gye-Rae; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Young Chil; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Hong, Seung Hwa; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2016-05-01

    The study investigated differences in cognitive ability and hippocampal volume between groups of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and healthy control (HC) subjects, and explored the relationship between cognitive ability and hippocampal volume. Among the sub-tests of Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD-K), the Boston naming test score decreased in the order HC, aMCI, and AD. The hippocampal volumes of subjects with AD and aMCI were relatively smaller than those of HC individuals. There were strongly positive correlations between hippocampal volume and the scores for the Boston naming test. Discriminant analysis identified the Boston naming test as having the highest level of discrimination among the variables used to differentiate the three groups (89.9%). In conclusion, the Boston naming test accurately differentiated the three groups and was correlated with hippocampal volume. These results will be helpful for choosing an accurate and economically feasible test method that efficiently differentiates the three groups. PMID:27019036

  6. Apoptotic markers in cultured fibroblasts correlate with brain metabolites and regional brain volume in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Batalla, A; Bargalló, N; Gassó, P; Molina, O; Pareto, D; Mas, S; Roca, J M; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A; Parellada, E

    2015-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from first-episode schizophrenia patients (FES) have shown increased susceptibility to apoptosis, which may be related to glutamate dysfunction and progressive neuroanatomical changes. Here we determine whether apoptotic markers obtained from cultured fibroblasts in FES and controls correlate with changes in brain glutamate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and regional brain volumes. Eleven antipsychotic-naive FES and seven age- and gender-matched controls underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Glutamate plus glutamine (Glx) and NAA levels were measured in the anterior cingulate (AC) and the left thalamus (LT). Hallmarks of apoptotic susceptibility (caspase-3-baseline activity, phosphatidylserine externalization and chromatin condensation) were measured in fibroblast cultures obtained from skin biopsies after inducing apoptosis with staurosporine (STS) at doses of 0.25 and 0.5 μM. Apoptotic biomarkers were correlated to brain metabolites and regional brain volume. FES and controls showed a negative correlation in the AC between Glx levels and percentages of cells with condensed chromatin (CC) after both apoptosis inductions (STS 0.5 μM: r = -0.90; P = 0.001; STS 0.25 μM: r = -0.73; P = 0.003), and between NAA and cells with CC (STS 0.5 μM induction r = -0.76; P = 0.002; STS 0.25 μM r = -0.62; P = 0.01). In addition, we found a negative correlation between percentages of cells with CC and regional brain volume in the right supratemporal cortex and post-central region (STS 0.25 and 0.5 μM; P < 0.05 family-wise error corrected (FWEc)). We reveal for the first time that peripheral markers of apoptotic susceptibility may correlate with brain metabolites, Glx and NAA, and regional brain volume in FES and controls, which is consistent with the neuroprogressive theories around the onset of the schizophrenia illness. PMID:26305477

  7. Constraints on Space-Time Manifold in Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuhu, C.; Vancea, Ion V.

    We generalize a previous work on Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean supergravity. The most general set of constraints on the curvatures of the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of the space-time manifold, under which space-time admits Dirac eigenvalues as observables, are derived.

  8. Thinking Outside the Euclidean Box: Riemannian Geometry and Inter-Temporal Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Mishra, Arul

    2016-01-01

    Inter-temporal decisions involves assigning values to various payoffs occurring at different temporal distances. Past research has used different approaches to study these decisions made by humans and animals. For instance, considering that people discount future payoffs at a constant rate (e.g., exponential discounting) or at variable rate (e.g., hyperbolic discounting). In this research, we question the widely assumed, but seldom questioned, notion across many of the existing approaches that the decision space, where the decision-maker perceives time and monetary payoffs, is a Euclidean space. By relaxing the rigid assumption of Euclidean space, we propose that the decision space is a more flexible Riemannian space of Constant Negative Curvature. We test our proposal by deriving a discount function, which uses the distance in the Negative Curvature space instead of Euclidean temporal distance. The distance function includes both perceived values of time as well as money, unlike past work which has considered just time. By doing so we are able to explain many of the empirical findings in inter-temporal decision-making literature. We provide converging evidence for our proposal by estimating the curvature of the decision space utilizing manifold learning algorithm and showing that the characteristics (i.e., metric properties) of the decision space resembles those of the Negative Curvature space rather than the Euclidean space. We conclude by presenting new theoretical predictions derived from our proposal and implications for how non-normative behavior is defined. PMID:27018787

  9. Thinking Outside the Euclidean Box: Riemannian Geometry and Inter-Temporal Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inter-temporal decisions involves assigning values to various payoffs occurring at different temporal distances. Past research has used different approaches to study these decisions made by humans and animals. For instance, considering that people discount future payoffs at a constant rate (e.g., exponential discounting) or at variable rate (e.g., hyperbolic discounting). In this research, we question the widely assumed, but seldom questioned, notion across many of the existing approaches that the decision space, where the decision-maker perceives time and monetary payoffs, is a Euclidean space. By relaxing the rigid assumption of Euclidean space, we propose that the decision space is a more flexible Riemannian space of Constant Negative Curvature. We test our proposal by deriving a discount function, which uses the distance in the Negative Curvature space instead of Euclidean temporal distance. The distance function includes both perceived values of time as well as money, unlike past work which has considered just time. By doing so we are able to explain many of the empirical findings in inter-temporal decision-making literature. We provide converging evidence for our proposal by estimating the curvature of the decision space utilizing manifold learning algorithm and showing that the characteristics (i.e., metric properties) of the decision space resembles those of the Negative Curvature space rather than the Euclidean space. We conclude by presenting new theoretical predictions derived from our proposal and implications for how non-normative behavior is defined. PMID:27018787

  10. The Twisted Euclidean GREEN’S Function in the Spacetime of a Cosmic String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linet, B.

    In a conical spacetime, we determine the twisted Euclidean Green’s function for a massive scalar field. In particular, we give a convenient form for studying the vacuum averages. We then derive an integral expression of the vacuum expectation value <Φ2(x)>. In the Minkowski spacetime, we express <Φ2(x)> in terms of elementary functions.

  11. Perceptual or Analytical Processing? Evidence from Children's and Adult's Performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Iris; Schactman, Alissa; Kadlec, Helena; Stege, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    The Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problem (E-TSP) is a useful task to study how humans optimize when faced with computational intractability. It has been found that humans are capable of finding high-quality solutions for E-TSP in a relatively short time and with seemingly little cognitive effort. This observation has led to two general…

  12. Ab-initio reconstruction of complex Euclidean networks in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujarathi, S. R.; Farrow, C. L.; Glosser, C.; Granlund, L.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of complex structures is an inverse problem arising in virtually all areas of science and technology, from protein structure determination to bulk heterostructure solar cells and the structure of nanoparticles. We cast this problem as a complex network problem where the edges in a network have weights equal to the Euclidean distance between their endpoints. We present a method for reconstruction of the locations of the nodes of the network given only the edge weights of the Euclidean network. The theoretical foundations of the method are based on rigidity theory, which enables derivation of a polynomial bound on its efficiency. An efficient implementation of the method is discussed and timing results indicate that the run time of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of nodes in the network. We have reconstructed Euclidean networks of about 1000 nodes in approximately 24 h on a desktop computer using this implementation. We also reconstruct Euclidean networks corresponding to polymer chains in two dimensions and planar graphene nanoparticles. We have also modified our base algorithm so that it can successfully solve random point sets when the input data are less precise.

  13. Ab-initio reconstruction of complex Euclidean networks in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gujarathi, S R; Farrow, C L; Glosser, C; Granlund, L; Duxbury, P M

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of complex structures is an inverse problem arising in virtually all areas of science and technology, from protein structure determination to bulk heterostructure solar cells and the structure of nanoparticles. We cast this problem as a complex network problem where the edges in a network have weights equal to the Euclidean distance between their endpoints. We present a method for reconstruction of the locations of the nodes of the network given only the edge weights of the Euclidean network. The theoretical foundations of the method are based on rigidity theory, which enables derivation of a polynomial bound on its efficiency. An efficient implementation of the method is discussed and timing results indicate that the run time of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of nodes in the network. We have reconstructed Euclidean networks of about 1000 nodes in approximately 24 h on a desktop computer using this implementation. We also reconstruct Euclidean networks corresponding to polymer chains in two dimensions and planar graphene nanoparticles. We have also modified our base algorithm so that it can successfully solve random point sets when the input data are less precise. PMID:25353918

  14. An orbit analysis approach to the study of superintegrable systems in the Euclidean plane

    SciTech Connect

    Adlam, C. M. McLenaghan, R. G. Smirnov, R. G.

    2007-03-15

    We classify the superintegrable potentials in the Euclidean plane by means of an orbit analysis of the space of valence two Killing tensors under the action of the group of rigid motions. Our approach generalizes the classical approach of Winternitz and collaborators by considering pairs of Killing tensors that are not both in canonical form.

  15. On the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ related to extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Khairun Nisak; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2016-06-01

    The extended Euclidean Algorithm is a practical technique used in many cryptographic applications, where it computes the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ that always satisfy ri = si a+ tib. The integer ri is the remainder in the ith sequences. The sequences si and ti arising from the extended Euclidean algorithm are equal, up to sign, to the convergents of the continued fraction expansion of a/b. The values of (ri, si, ti) satisfy various properties which are used to solve the shortest vector problem in representing point multiplications in elliptic curves cryptography, namely the GLV (Gallant, Lambert & Vanstone) integer decomposition method and the ISD (integer sub decomposition) method. This paper is to extend the proof for each of the existing properties on (ri, si, ti). We also generate new properties which are relevant to the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ. The concepts of Euclidean algorithm, extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions are intertwined and the properties related to these concepts are proved. These properties together with the existing properties of the sequence (ri, si, ti) are regarded as part and parcel of the building blocks of a new generation of an efficient cryptographic protocol.

  16. k-Regular maps into Euclidean spaces and the Borsuk-Boltyanskii problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatyi, S A

    2002-02-28

    The Borsuk-Boltyanskii problem is solved for odd k, that is, the minimum dimension of a Euclidean space is determined into which any n-dimensional polyhedron (compactum) can be k-regularly embedded. A new lower bound is obtained for even k.

  17. System of Schwinger-Dyson equations and asymptotic behavior in the Euclidean region

    SciTech Connect

    Rochev, V. E.

    2015-05-15

    A system of Schwinger-Dyson equations for the model of scalar-field interaction is studied in a deep Euclidean region. It is shown that there exists a critical coupling constant that separates the weak-coupling region characterized by the asymptotically free behavior and the strong-coupling region, where the asymptotic behavior of field propagators becomes ultralocal.

  18. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  19. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  20. Free volume of mixed cation borosilicate glass sealants elucidated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and its correlation with glass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Prasanta K.; Rath, Sangram K.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Sudarshan, Kathi; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Chongdar, Tapas K.; Gokhale, Nitin M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of La+3/Sr+2 ratios, which is varied from 0.08 to 5.09, on density, molar volume, packing fraction, free volume, thermal and electrical properties in strontium lanthanum aluminoborosilicate based glass sealants intended for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications is evaluated. The studies reveal expansion of the glass network evident from increasing molar volume and decreasing packing fraction of glasses with progressive La+3 substitutions. The molecular origin of these macroscopic structural features can be accounted for by the free volume parameters measured from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The La+3 induced expanded glass networks show increased number of subnanoscopic voids with larger sizes, as revealed from the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime and its intensity. A remarkably direct correspondence between the molar volume and fractional free volume trend is established with progressive La2O3 substitution in the glasses. The effect of these structural changes on the glass transition temperature, softening temperature, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal stability as well as electrical conductivity has been studied.

  1. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Permutation asymmetry of the relativistic velocity addition law and non-Euclidean geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritus, V. I.

    2008-07-01

    The asymmetry of the relativistic addition law for noncollinear velocities under the velocity permutation leads to two modified triangles on a Euclidean plane depicting the addition of unpermuted and permuted velocities and the appearance of a nonzero angle ω between two resulting velocities. A particle spin rotates through the same angle ω under a Lorentz boost with a velocity noncollinear to the particle velocity. Three mutually connected three-parameter representations of the angle ω, obtained by the author earlier, express the three-parameter symmetry of the sides and angles of two Euclidean triangles identical to the sine and cosine theorems for the sides and angles of a single geodesic triangle on the surface of a pseudosphere. Namely, all three representations of the angle ω, after a transformation of one of them, coincide with the representations of the area of a pseudospherical triangle expressed in terms of any two of its sides and the angle between them. The angle ω is also symmetrically expressed in terms of three angles or three sides of a geodesic triangle, and therefore it is an invariant of the group of triangle motions over the pseudo-sphere surface, the group that includes the Lorentz group. Although the pseudospheres in Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces are locally isometric, only the latter is isometric to the entire Lobachevsky plane and forms a homogeneous isotropic curved 4-velocity space in the flat Minkowski space. In this connection, relativistic physical processes that may be related to the pseudosphere in Euclidean space are especially interesting.

  2. Retro-Nasal Aroma Release Is Correlated with Variations in the In-Mouth Air Cavity Volume after Empty Deglutition

    PubMed Central

    Mishellany-Dutour, Anne; Woda, Alain; Labouré, Hélène; Bourdiol, Pierre; Lachaze, Pauline; Guichard, Elisabeth; Feron, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC) toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62) that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04) that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H) and low (L). The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition. PMID:22815986

  3. Neural correlates of the ‘good life’: eudaimonic well-being is associated with insular cortex volume

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Ryota; Rees, Geraint; Bates, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Eudaimonic well-being reflects traits concerned with personal growth, self-acceptance, purpose in life and autonomy (among others) and is a substantial predictor of life events, including health. Although interest in the aetiology of eudaimonic well-being has blossomed in recent years, little is known of the underlying neural substrates of this construct. To address this gap in our knowledge, here we examined whether regional gray matter (GM) volume was associated with eudaimonic well-being. Structural magnetic resonance images from 70 young, healthy adults who also completed Ryff’s 42-item measure of the six core facets of eudaimonia, were analysed with voxel-based morphometry techniques. We found that eudaimonic well-being was positively associated with right insular cortex GM volume. This association was also reflected in three of the sub-scales of eudaimonia: personal growth, positive relations and purpose in life. Positive relations also showed a significant association with left insula volume. No other significant associations were observed, although personal growth was marginally associated with left insula, and purpose in life exhibited a marginally significant negative association with middle temporal gyrus GM volume. These findings are the first to our knowledge linking eudaimonic well-being with regional brain structure. PMID:23512932

  4. Dyslexia and Voxel-Based Morphometry: Correlations between Five Behavioural Measures of Dyslexia and Gray and White Matter Volumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboer, Peter; Scholte, H. Steven; Vorst, Harrie C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In voxel-based morphometry studies of dyslexia, the relation between causal theories of dyslexia and gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations is still under debate. Some alterations are consistently reported, but others failed to reach significance. We investigated GM alterations in a large sample of Dutch students (37 dyslexics…

  5. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins.

  6. Apoptotic markers in cultured fibroblasts correlate with brain metabolites and regional brain volume in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Batalla, A; Bargalló, N; Gassó, P; Molina, O; Pareto, D; Mas, S; Roca, J M; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A; Parellada, E

    2015-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from first-episode schizophrenia patients (FES) have shown increased susceptibility to apoptosis, which may be related to glutamate dysfunction and progressive neuroanatomical changes. Here we determine whether apoptotic markers obtained from cultured fibroblasts in FES and controls correlate with changes in brain glutamate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and regional brain volumes. Eleven antipsychotic-naive FES and seven age- and gender-matched controls underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Glutamate plus glutamine (Glx) and NAA levels were measured in the anterior cingulate (AC) and the left thalamus (LT). Hallmarks of apoptotic susceptibility (caspase-3-baseline activity, phosphatidylserine externalization and chromatin condensation) were measured in fibroblast cultures obtained from skin biopsies after inducing apoptosis with staurosporine (STS) at doses of 0.25 and 0.5 μM. Apoptotic biomarkers were correlated to brain metabolites and regional brain volume. FES and controls showed a negative correlation in the AC between Glx levels and percentages of cells with condensed chromatin (CC) after both apoptosis inductions (STS 0.5 μM: r=−0.90; P=0.001; STS 0.25 μM: r=−0.73; P=0.003), and between NAA and cells with CC (STS 0.5 μM induction r=−0.76; P=0.002; STS 0.25 μM r=−0.62; P=0.01). In addition, we found a negative correlation between percentages of cells with CC and regional brain volume in the right supratemporal cortex and post-central region (STS 0.25 and 0.5 μM; P<0.05 family-wise error corrected (FWEc)). We reveal for the first time that peripheral markers of apoptotic susceptibility may correlate with brain metabolites, Glx and NAA, and regional brain volume in FES and controls, which is consistent with the neuroprogressive theories around the onset of the schizophrenia illness. PMID:26305477

  7. Inverting the Nakanishi Integral Relation for a Bound State Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederico, T.; Carbonell, J.; Gigante, V.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The extraction of the weight function g of the Nakanishi integral representation of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude is investigated. We studied the numerical inversion of the discretized Nakanishi kernel in the case of an Euclidean bound state. The discretized kernel is regularized by adding the identity operator times a small regularisation parameter {\\varepsilon} to avoid numerically unstabilities. We have found that the weight function g as well as the associated light-front valence wave function are unstable against variation of {\\varepsilon}. These results suggest that the extraction of the Nakanishi weight function from an Euclidean amplitude, is an ill-defined problem. Without further assumptions on the solution or/and without developing more elaborate methods, the Nakanishi weight function, as well as the corresponding light-front valence wave function, cannot be safely determined.

  8. A Low-Complexity Euclidean Orthogonal LDPC Architecture for Low Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Revathy, M; Saravanan, R

    2015-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes have been implemented in latest digital video broadcasting, broadband wireless access (WiMax), and fourth generation of wireless standards. In this paper, we have proposed a high efficient low-density parity-check code (LDPC) decoder architecture for low power applications. This study also considers the design and analysis of check node and variable node units and Euclidean orthogonal generator in LDPC decoder architecture. The Euclidean orthogonal generator is used to reduce the error rate of the proposed LDPC architecture, which can be incorporated between check and variable node architecture. This proposed decoder design is synthesized on Xilinx 9.2i platform and simulated using Modelsim, which is targeted to 45 nm devices. Synthesis report proves that the proposed architecture greatly reduces the power consumption and hardware utilizations on comparing with different conventional architectures. PMID:26065017

  9. A Low-Complexity Euclidean Orthogonal LDPC Architecture for Low Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Revathy, M.; Saravanan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes have been implemented in latest digital video broadcasting, broadband wireless access (WiMax), and fourth generation of wireless standards. In this paper, we have proposed a high efficient low-density parity-check code (LDPC) decoder architecture for low power applications. This study also considers the design and analysis of check node and variable node units and Euclidean orthogonal generator in LDPC decoder architecture. The Euclidean orthogonal generator is used to reduce the error rate of the proposed LDPC architecture, which can be incorporated between check and variable node architecture. This proposed decoder design is synthesized on Xilinx 9.2i platform and simulated using Modelsim, which is targeted to 45 nm devices. Synthesis report proves that the proposed architecture greatly reduces the power consumption and hardware utilizations on comparing with different conventional architectures. PMID:26065017

  10. Inverting the Nakanishi Integral Relation for a Bound State Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederico, T.; Carbonell, J.; Gigante, V.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    The extraction of the weight function g of the Nakanishi integral representation of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude is investigated. We studied the numerical inversion of the discretized Nakanishi kernel in the case of an Euclidean bound state. The discretized kernel is regularized by adding the identity operator times a small regularisation parameter {\\varepsilon} to avoid numerically unstabilities. We have found that the weight function g as well as the associated light-front valence wave function are unstable against variation of {\\varepsilon} . These results suggest that the extraction of the Nakanishi weight function from an Euclidean amplitude, is an ill-defined problem. Without further assumptions on the solution or/and without developing more elaborate methods, the Nakanishi weight function, as well as the corresponding light-front valence wave function, cannot be safely determined.

  11. Recursive Double-Size Modular Multiplications from Euclidean and Montgomery Multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masayuki; Okeya, Katsuyuki; Vuillaume, Camille

    A technique for computing the quotient (⌊ ab/n ⌋) of Euclidean divisions from the difference of two remainders (ab (mod n) - ab (mod n+1)) was proposed by Fischer and Seifert. The technique allows a 2l-bit modular multiplication to work on most l-bit modular multipliers. However, the cost of the quotient computation rises sharply when computing modular multiplications larger than 2l bits with a recursive approach. This paper addresses the computation cost and improves on previous 2l-bit modular multiplication algorithms to return not only the remainder but also the quotient, resulting in an higher performance in the recursive approach, which becomes twice faster in the quadrupling case and four times faster in the octupling case. In addition to Euclidean multiplication, this paper proposes a new 2l-bit Montgomery multiplication algorithm to return both of the remainder and the quotient.

  12. The evaluation of carotid intima-media thickness and mean platelet volume values and correlation with cardiac functions in obese children

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Khosroshahi, Hashem E; Serin, Halil İbrahim; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuba; Kılıç, Mahmut; Ekim, Meral; Geçit, U Aliye; Domur, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with many risk factors, such as hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension and leads to early atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of the mean platelet volume (MPV) and the carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) on cardiac functions among obese children. Materials and Methods: Sixty obese children, with body mass index percentile were >95% and forty eight healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), thyroid function tests, hemoglobin, white blood cell, MPV and insulin resistance were evaluated. CIMT was measured by using high-resolution ultrasound and echocardiography was performed to all individuals. Results: MPV and CIMT values were found significantly higher in obese children than controls. There was positive correlation between CIMT and age, body surface area (BSA), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular meridional end-systolic wall stress (ESWSm), myocardial fiber stress (MFS), stroke volume (SV) and insulin and negative correlation with left ventricle end-systolic elastance by single beat technique (Ees(sb)) and arterial elastance (Ea). There was no correlation between LVM, cardiac risk profiles and CIMT. Multiple stepwise regression analyses revealed that ESWSm (β=0.337, P=0.049) was only independent factor on CIMT. MPV values showed negative correlation with ALT, AST, Free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone and positive correlation with age and BSA. Conclusion: Current study showed that obesity has an independent impact on CIMT and MPV values in children. Increased CIMT in obese children leads significant increase in ESWSm and decrease in Ea and Ees(sb). PMID:26885242

  13. Geometric properties of the magnetic Laplacian on the Euclidean 4-space

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierowski, Dominique; Zinoun, Azzouz; Intissar, Ahmed

    2010-12-15

    When the four-dimensional Euclidean space is endowed with a covariant derivative that is either self-dual or antiself-dual and of constant curvature, the corresponding magnetic Laplacian is closely related to the sub-Laplacian of the quaternionic Heisenberg group. Some geometric properties of this operator are studied. In particular, it is proved that there exists a canonical orthogonal complex structure which provides a factorization in the sense of Schroedinger.

  14. A functional technique based on the Euclidean algorithm with applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We built, based on the Euclidean algorithm, a functional technique, which allows to discover a direct proof of Chinese Remainder Theorem. Afterwards, by using this functional approach, we present some applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers. The novelty of the method is their functional algorithmic character, which improves ideas, as well as, other results of the author and his collaborators in a previous work.

  15. The generalized Weierstrass system inducing surfaces of constant and nonconstant mean curvature in Euclidean three space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The generalized Weierstrass (GW) system is introduced and its correspondence with the associated two-dimensional nonlinear sigma model is reviewed. The method of symmetry reduction is systematically applied to derive several classes of invariant solutions for the GW system. The solutions can be used to induce constant mean curvature surfaces in Euclidean three space. Some properties of the system for the case of nonconstant mean curvature are introduced as well.

  16. Novel computational approach for studying ph effects, excluded volume and ion-ion correlations in electrical double layers around polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven

    Highly charged cylindrical and spherical objects (macroions) are probably the simplest structures for modeling nucleic acids, proteins and nanoparticles. Their ubiquitous presence within biophysical systems ensures that Coulomb forces are among the most important interactions that regulate the behavior of these systems. In these systems, ions position themselves in a strongly correlated manner near the surface of a macroion and form electrical double layers (EDLs). These EDLs play an important role in many biophysical and biochemical processes. For instance, the macroion's net charge can change due to the binding of many multivalent ions to its surface. Thus, proper description of EDLs near the surface of a macroion may reveal a counter-intuitive charge inversion behavior, which can generate attraction between like-charged objects. This is relevant for the variety of fields such as self-assembly of DNA and RNA folding, as well as for protein aggregation and neurodegenerative diseases. Certainly, the key factors that contribute to these phenomena cannot be properly understood without an accurate solvation model. With recent advancements in computer technologies, the possibility to use computational tools for fundamental understanding of the role of EDLs around biomolecules and nanoparticles on their physical and chemical properties is becoming more feasible. Establishing the impact of the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations, ionic strength and pH of the electrolyte on the EDL around biomolecules and nanoparticles, and how changes in these properties consequently affect the Zeta potential and surface charge density are still not well understood. Thus, modeling and understanding the role of these properties on EDLs will provide more insights on the stability, adsorption, binding and function of biomolecules and nanoparticles. Existing mean-field theories such as Poisson Boltzmann (PB) often neglect the ion-ion correlations, solvent and ion excluded volume effects

  17. Novel computational approach for studying ph effects, excluded volume and ion-ion correlations in electrical double layers around polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven

    Highly charged cylindrical and spherical objects (macroions) are probably the simplest structures for modeling nucleic acids, proteins and nanoparticles. Their ubiquitous presence within biophysical systems ensures that Coulomb forces are among the most important interactions that regulate the behavior of these systems. In these systems, ions position themselves in a strongly correlated manner near the surface of a macroion and form electrical double layers (EDLs). These EDLs play an important role in many biophysical and biochemical processes. For instance, the macroion's net charge can change due to the binding of many multivalent ions to its surface. Thus, proper description of EDLs near the surface of a macroion may reveal a counter-intuitive charge inversion behavior, which can generate attraction between like-charged objects. This is relevant for the variety of fields such as self-assembly of DNA and RNA folding, as well as for protein aggregation and neurodegenerative diseases. Certainly, the key factors that contribute to these phenomena cannot be properly understood without an accurate solvation model. With recent advancements in computer technologies, the possibility to use computational tools for fundamental understanding of the role of EDLs around biomolecules and nanoparticles on their physical and chemical properties is becoming more feasible. Establishing the impact of the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations, ionic strength and pH of the electrolyte on the EDL around biomolecules and nanoparticles, and how changes in these properties consequently affect the Zeta potential and surface charge density are still not well understood. Thus, modeling and understanding the role of these properties on EDLs will provide more insights on the stability, adsorption, binding and function of biomolecules and nanoparticles. Existing mean-field theories such as Poisson Boltzmann (PB) often neglect the ion-ion correlations, solvent and ion excluded volume effects

  18. Time and dark matter from the conformal symmetries of Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazboun, Jeffrey S.; Wheeler, James T.

    2014-11-01

    Starting with the conformal symmetries of Euclidean space, we construct a manifold where time manifests as a part of the geometry. Though there is no matter present in the geometry studied here, geometric terms analogous to dark energy and dark matter appear when we write down the Einstein tensor. Specifically, the quotient of the conformal group of Euclidean four-space by its Weyl subgroup results in a geometry possessing many of the properties of relativistic phase space, including both a natural symplectic form and non-degenerate Killing metric. We show that the general solution posesses orthogonal Lagrangian submanifolds, with the induced metric and the spin connection on the submanifolds necessarily Lorentzian, despite the Euclidean starting point. Using an orthonormal frame adapted to the phase space properties, we also find two new tensor fields not present in Riemannian geometry. The first is a combination of the Weyl vector with the scale factor on the metric, and determines the timelike directions on the submanifolds. The second comes from the components of the spin connection, symmetric with respect to the new metric. Though this field comes from the spin connection, it transforms homogeneously. Finally, we show that in the absence of Cartan curvature and sources, the configuration space has geometric terms equivalent to a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant.

  19. Euclidean Wilson loops and minimal area surfaces in lorentzian AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, Andrew; Kruczenski, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence relates Wilson loops in N=4 SYM theory to minimal area surfaces in AdS 5 × S 5 space. If the Wilson loop is Euclidean and confined to a plane ( t, x) then the dual surface is Euclidean and lives in Lorentzian AdS 3 ⊂ AdS 5. In this paper we study such minimal area surfaces generalizing previous results obtained in the Euclidean case. Since the surfaces we consider have the topology of a disk, the holonomy of the flat current vanishes which is equivalent to the condition that a certain boundary Schrödinger equation has all its solutions anti-periodic. If the potential for that Schrödinger equation is found then reconstructing the surface and finding the area become simpler. In particular we write a formula for the Area in terms of the Schwarzian derivative of the contour. Finally an infinite parameter family of analytical solutions using Riemann Theta functions is described. In this case, both the area and the shape of the surface are given analytically and used to check the previous results.

  20. Correlation of physical properties with molecular structure for some dicyclic hydrocarbons having high thermal-energy release per unit volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, P H; Serijan, K T; Goodman, I A

    1951-01-01

    As part of a program to study the correlation between molecular structure and physical properties of high-density hydrocarbons, the net heats of combustion, melting points, boiling points, densities, and kinematic viscosities of some hydrocarbons in the 2-n-alkylbiphenyl, 1,1-diphenylalkane, diphenylalkane, 1,1-dicyclohexylalkane, and dicyclohexylalkane series are presented.

  1. On the Dirac eigenvalues as observables of the on-shell N = 2 D = 4 Euclidean supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, Ion Vasile

    2008-12-01

    We generalize previous works on the Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity and N =1 D = 4 supergravity to on-shell N = 2 D = 4 Euclidean supergravity. The covariant phase space of the theory is defined as the space of the solutions of the equations of motion modulo the on-shell gauge transformations. In this space we define the Poisson brackets and compute their value for the Dirac eigenvalues.

  2. On the Dirac eigenvalues as observables of the on-shell N = 2D = 4 Euclidean supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, Ion

    2008-12-01

    We generalize previous works on the Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity and N =1 D = 4 supergravity to on-shell N = 2 D = 4 Euclidean supergravity. The covariant phase space of the theory is defined as the space of the solutions of the equations of motion modulo the on-shell gauge transformations. In this space we define the Poisson brackets and compute their value for the Dirac eigenvalues.

  3. Data correlation and analysis of arc tunnel and wind tunnel tests of RSI joints and gaps. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Kipp, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Heat transfer data measured in gaps typical of those under consideration for joints in space shuttle reusable surface insulation protection systems have been assimilated, analyzed and correlated. The data were obtained in four NASA facilities. Several types of gaps were investigated with emphasis on simple butt joints. Gap widths ranged from 0.07 to 0.7 cm and depths ranged from 1 to 6 cm. Laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layer flows over the gap opening were investigated. Three-dimensional heating variations were observed within gaps in the absence of external flow pressure gradients. Heat transfer correlation equations were obtained for several of the tests. Thermal protection system performance with and without gaps was compared for a representative shuttle entry trajectory.

  4. Data correlation and analysis of arc tunnel and wind tunnel tests of RSI joints and gaps. Volume 2: Data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Kipp, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic heating created by gaps in the reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system (TPS) for the space shuttle. The effects of various parameters of the RSI on convective heating characteristics are described. The wind tunnel tests provided a data base for accurate assessment of gap heating. Analysis and correlation of the data provide methods for predicting heating in the RSI gaps on the space shuttle.

  5. Spherical roller bearing analysis. SKF computer program SPHERBEAN. Volume 3: Program correlation with full scale hardware tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Rosenlieb, J. W.; Dyba, G.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a series of full scale hardware tests comparing predictions of the SPHERBEAN computer program with measured data are presented. The SPHERBEAN program predicts the thermomechanical performance characteristics of high speed lubricated double row spherical roller bearings. The degree of correlation between performance predicted by SPHERBEAN and measured data is demonstrated. Experimental and calculated performance data is compared over a range in speed up to 19,400 rpm (0.8 MDN) under pure radial, pure axial, and combined loads.

  6. Viscosity of concentrated solutions and of human erythrocyte cytoplasm determined from NMR measurement of molecular correlation times. The dependence of viscosity on cell volume.

    PubMed

    Endre, Z H; Kuchel, P W

    1986-08-01

    Metabolically active human erythrocytes were incubated with [alpha-13C]glycine which led to the specific enrichment of intracellular glutathione. The cells were then studied using 13C-NMR in which the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of the free glycine and glutathione were measured. The T1 values of labelled glycine were also determined in various-concentration solutions of bovine serum albumin and glycerol and also of the natural abundance 13C of glycerol in glycerol solutions. From the T1 estimates the rotational correlation time (tau r) was calculated using a formula based on a model of an isotropic spherical rotor or that of a symmetrical ellipsoidal rotor; for glycine the differences in estimates of tau r obtained using the two models were not significant. From the correlation times and by use of the Stokes-Einstein equations viscosity and translational diffusion coefficients were calculated; thus comment can be made on the likelihood of diffusion control of certain enzyme-catalysed reactions in the erythrocyte. Bulk viscosities of the erythrocyte cytoplasm and the above-mentioned solutions were measured using Ostwald capillary viscometry. Large differences existed between the latter viscosity estimates and those based upon NMR-T1 measurements. We derived an equation from the theory of the viscosity of concentrated solutions which contains two phenomenological interaction parameters, a 'shape' factor and a 'volume' factor; it was fitted to data relating to the concentration dependence of viscosity measured by both methods. We showed, by using the equation and interaction-parameter estimates for a particular probe molecule in a particular solution, that it was possible to correlate NMR viscosity and bulk viscosity; in other words, given an estimate of the bulk viscosity, it was possible to calculate the NMR 'micro' viscosity or vice versa. However, the values of the interaction parameters depend upon the relative sizes of

  7. Correlation of Stroke Volume Measurement between Sonosite Portable Echocardiogram and Edwards Flotrac Sensor-Vigileo Monitor in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Behnia, Mehrdad; Powell, Sherry; Fallen, Linda; Tamaddon, Houman; Behnia, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stroke volume (SV) is a parameter that is being recognized as an endpoint in fluid resuscitation algorithms. Its role is now being realized as an important variable in hemodynamic assessment in various clinical scenarios such as septic and cardiogenic shocks. Direct measurement of stroke volume (SV) and its novel corollary, stroke volume variation (SVV) derived by proprietary software, are preferred over mean cardiac output (CO) measurements because they render a more accurate reflection of hemodynamic status independent of heart rate. Flotrac-Vigileo monitor (FTV) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) is a system that uses a complex algorithm analyzing arterial waveform to calculate SV, SVV, and CO. We assessed the feasibility of obtaining SV measurements with a portable echocardiogram and validated its accuracy with the FTV system in mechanically ventilated patients in our intensive care unit (ICU). Furthermore, we emphasized the importance of hemodynamic measurements and familiarity with critical care echocardiography for the intensivists. Methods Ten patients who were on mechanical ventilation were studied. A femoral arterial line was connected to the FTV system monitoring SV and CO. A portable echocardiogram (M-Turbo; Sonosite, Bothell, WA) was used to measure SV. CO was calculated by multiplying SV by heart rate. No patient had arrhythmia. We used biplane Simpson’s method of discs to calculate SV in which subtraction of end-systolic volume from end-diastolic volume yields the SV. Results The comparison of simultaneous SV and CO measurements by echocardiography with FTV showed a strong correlation between the 2. (For SV, y = 0.9545x + 3.3, R2 = 0.98 and for CO, y = 0.9104x + 7.7074, R2 = 0.97). Conclusions In our small cohort, the SV and CO measured by a portable echocardiogram (Sonosite M-Turbo) appears to be closely correlated with their respective values measured by FTV. Portable echocardiography is a reliable noninvasive tool for the

  8. Correlation of {sup 18}F-FDG Avid Volumes on Pre–Radiation Therapy and Post–Radiation Therapy FDG PET Scans in Recurrent Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shusharina, Nadya Cho, Joseph; Sharp, Gregory C.; Choi, Noah C.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the spatial correlation between high uptake regions of 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) before and after therapy in recurrent lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 106 patients with inoperable lung cancer into a prospective study whose primary objectives were to determine first, the earliest time point when the maximum decrease in FDG uptake representing the maximum metabolic response (MMR) is attainable and second, the optimum cutoff value of MMR based on its predicted tumor control probability, sensitivity, and specificity. Of those patients, 61 completed the required 4 serial {sup 18}F-FDG PET examinations after therapy. Nineteen of 61 patients experienced local recurrence at the primary tumor and underwent analysis. The volumes of interest (VOI) on pretherapy FDG-PET were defined by use of an isocontour at ≥50% of maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) (≥50% of SUV{sub max}) with correction for heterogeneity. The VOI on posttherapy images were defined at ≥80% of SUV{sub max}. The VOI of pretherapy and posttherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET images were correlated for the extent of overlap. Results: The size of VOI at pretherapy images was on average 25.7% (range, 8.8%-56.3%) of the pretherapy primary gross tumor volume (GTV), and their overlap fractions were 0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7-0.9), 0.63 (95% CI: 0.49-0.77), and 0.38 (95% CI: 0.19-0.57) of VOI of posttherapy FDG PET images at 10 days, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The residual uptake originated from the pretherapy VOI in 15 of 17 cases. Conclusions: VOI defined by the SUV{sub max}-≥50% isocontour may be a biological target volume for escalated radiation dose.

  9. Ultrasonographic evaluation of parathyroid hyperplasia in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Positive correlation between parathyroid volume and circulating parathyroid hormone concentration.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Megumi; Takeshita, Akira; Miura, Daishu; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    There are few reports on parathyroid ultrasonography of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). This study investigated the ultrasonographic features of parathyroid glands in 10 patients with MEN1 who underwent preoperative neck ultrasonography and parathyroidectomy between 2006 and 2010 at Toranomon Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed clinical features, laboratory and ultrasonographic data, and pathological diagnosis. A total of 38 parathyroid glands were surgically removed (three to five glands from each patient). All removed parathyroids were pathologically diagnosed as hyperplasia. Seven cases (70.0 %) had adenomatous thyroid nodules. Twenty-five enlarged parathyroid glands (65.8 %) were detected by preoperative ultrasonography with a detection rate of 81.8 % (9/11) and 59.3 % (16/27) for patients without and with adenomatous nodules, respectively. Total parathyroid gland weight and potentially predictable total parathyroid volume by preoperative ultrasonography were significantly correlated with preoperative serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentration (R = 0.97, P < 0.001 and R = 0.96, P < 0.001, respectively). The equation used for prediction of the total volume by ultrasonography was 15 × iPTH (pg/ml) - 1,000 and that for total weight was 20 × iPTH (pg/ml) - 1,400. Although adenomatous nodules often coexisted with MEN1 and made identification of enlarged parathyroid glands by ultrasonography difficult, the positive correlation between the predictable parathyroid volume by ultrasonography and serum iPTH suggests that their measurement is useful in the preoperative detection and localization of enlarged parathyroid glands in patients with MEN1. Furthermore, the presence of parathyroid glands that should be resected can be predicted before surgery using the equation proposed here. PMID:25227285

  10. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  11. Correlation between tumor size and blood volume in lung tumors: a prospective study on dual-energy gemstone spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and blood volume for patients with lung tumors, using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and a gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) viewer. During the period from March 2011 to March 2013, 50 patients with 57 medically inoperable lung tumors underwent DECT before stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 50–60 Gy in 5–6 fractions. DECT was taken for pretreatment evaluation. The region-of-interest for a given spatial placement of the tumors was set, and averages for CT value, water density and iodine density were compared with tumor size. The average values for iodine density in tumors of ≤2 cm, 2–3 cm, and >3 cm maximum diameter were 24.7, 19.6 and 16.0 (100 µg/cm3), respectively. The average value of the iodine density was significantly lower in larger tumors. No significant correlation was detected between tumor size and average CT value or between tumor size and average water density. Both the average water density and the average CT value were affected by the amount of air in the tumor, but the average iodine density was not affected by air in the tumor. The average water density and the average CT value were significantly correlated, but the average iodine density and the average CT value showed no significant correlation. The blood volume of tumors can be indicated by the average iodine density more accurately than it can by the average CT value. The average iodine density as assessed by DECT might be a non-invasive and quantitative assessment of the radio-resistance ascribable to the hypoxic cell population in a tumor. PMID:24829253

  12. Correlation between tumor size and blood volume in lung tumors: a prospective study on dual-energy gemstone spectral CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and blood volume for patients with lung tumors, using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and a gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) viewer. During the period from March 2011 to March 2013, 50 patients with 57 medically inoperable lung tumors underwent DECT before stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 50-60 Gy in 5-6 fractions. DECT was taken for pretreatment evaluation. The region-of-interest for a given spatial placement of the tumors was set, and averages for CT value, water density and iodine density were compared with tumor size. The average values for iodine density in tumors of ≤ 2 cm, 2-3 cm, and >3 cm maximum diameter were 24.7, 19.6 and 16.0 (100 µg/cm(3)), respectively. The average value of the iodine density was significantly lower in larger tumors. No significant correlation was detected between tumor size and average CT value or between tumor size and average water density. Both the average water density and the average CT value were affected by the amount of air in the tumor, but the average iodine density was not affected by air in the tumor. The average water density and the average CT value were significantly correlated, but the average iodine density and the average CT value showed no significant correlation. The blood volume of tumors can be indicated by the average iodine density more accurately than it can by the average CT value. The average iodine density as assessed by DECT might be a non-invasive and quantitative assessment of the radio-resistance ascribable to the hypoxic cell population in a tumor. PMID:24829253

  13. Right ventricular infarction: identification by hemodynamic measurements before and after volume loading and correlation with noninvasive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Italia, L.J.; Starling, M.R.; Crawford, M.H.; Boros, B.L.; Chaudhuri, T.K.; O'Rourke, R.A.

    1984-11-01

    To evaluate the potential occurrence of right ventricular infarction, 53 patients with acute inferior transmural myocardial infarction were studied within 36 hours of symptoms by right heart catheterization, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and two-dimensional echocardiography. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy was performed 3 days after the onset of symptoms. The hemodynamic standard for right ventricular infarction was defined as both a right atrial pressure of 10 mm Hg or more and a right atrial/pulmonary artery wedge pressure ratio of 0.8 or more. Eight (15%) of the 53 patients had hemodynamic measurements at rest characteristic of right ventricular infarction, and 6 (11%) additional patients met these criteria after volume loading. Nineteen (37%) of the 51 patients who had radionuclide angiography had right ventricular dysfunction manifested by both a reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 40%) and right ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities (akinesia or dyskinesia). An abnormal radionuclide angiogram was observed in 12 of 13 patients with hemodynamic measurements indicating right ventricular infarction. In 12 patients with an abnormal radionuclide angiographic study, right ventricular ejection fraction improved 6 to 12 weeks after infarction. Twenty-two (49%) of the 45 patients with adequate two-dimensional echocardiograms had a right ventricular regional wall motion abnormality. An abnormal two-dimensional echocardiogram was seen in 9 of 11 patients with hemodynamic measurements characteristic of right ventricular infarction. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was positive for right ventricular infarction in 3 of 12 patients who had hemodynamic measurements indicating right ventricular infarction.

  14. Correlation of the internal microviscosity of human erythrocytes to the cell volume and the viscosity of hemoglobin solutions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, A; Müller, P

    1986-01-23

    The microviscosity of the cytoplasm of human erythrocytes as well as of membrane-free hemoglobin solutions was investigated measuring the rotation of the small spin-label molecule, Tempone. The dependence of the intracellular microviscosity on the extracellular pH and osmotic pressure which was varied by NaCl or sucrose was sufficiently explained on the basis of alterations of the red blood cell volume. The intracellular microviscosity depended exclusively on the hemoglobin concentration. It did not differ from that of comparable membrane-free hemoglobin solutions. It was not necessary to take into account long-range interactions between hemoglobin molecules. The conclusion therefore was that the intracellular viscosity is not modified by cytoplasmic structures or the cell membrane. Above a hemoglobin concentration of 6 mM the viscosity of hemoglobin solutions increased much faster than the microviscosity. From measurements obtained with different spin-labels it followed that also the charge of these molecules is of importance. PMID:3002490

  15. White and Gray Matter Volume Changes and Correlation with Visual Evoked Potential in Patients with Optic Neuritis: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Pei-Hong; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Rong; Xu, Ting-Ting; Shao, Yi; fMRI Study Group, And Oculopathy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate potential morphological alterations of gray and white matter in patients with optic neuritis (ON) and their relationship with behavioral performance, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twelve (4 males, 8 females) patients with ON and 12 (4 males, 8 females) age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging data were analyzed using two-sample t tests to identify group differences in gray and white matter volume (GMV, WMV). Correlation analysis was used to explore relationships between observed GMV and WMV of different areas and visual evoked potential (VEP) in ON. RESULTS Compared with HCs, ON patients had: significantly decreased GMV in the left postcentral gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate, left and right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule; decreased WMV in the left middle frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule; and increased WMV in the left fusiform gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule. VEP latency of the right eye in ON correlated positively with WMV signal value of the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.726, p=0.008), and negatively with GMV signal value of the right inferior parietal lobule (r=-0.611, p=0.035). Duration of ON correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the right superior frontal gyrus (r=-0.662, p=0.019), while best-corrected visual acuity (VA) of the right eye correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus (r=-0.704, p=0.011). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest significant brain involvement in ON, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism. Correlational results demonstrate that VEP in ON is closely associated with WMV and GMV atrophy in many brain regions. PMID:27045330

  16. White and Gray Matter Volume Changes and Correlation with Visual Evoked Potential in Patients with Optic Neuritis: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Pei-Hong; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Rong; Xu, Ting-Ting; Shao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate potential morphological alterations of gray and white matter in patients with optic neuritis (ON) and their relationship with behavioral performance, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Material/Methods Twelve (4 males, 8 females) patients with ON and 12 (4 males, 8 females) age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging data were analyzed using two-sample t tests to identify group differences in gray and white matter volume (GMV, WMV). Correlation analysis was used to explore relationships between observed GMV and WMV of different areas and visual evoked potential (VEP) in ON. Results Compared with HCs, ON patients had: significantly decreased GMV in the left postcentral gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate, left and right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule; decreased WMV in the left middle frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule; and increased WMV in the left fusiform gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule. VEP latency of the right eye in ON correlated positively with WMV signal value of the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.726, p=0.008), and negatively with GMV signal value of the right inferior parietal lobule (r=−0.611, p=0.035). Duration of ON correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the right superior frontal gyrus (r=−0.662, p=0.019), while best-corrected visual acuity (VA) of the right eye correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus (r=−0.704, p=0.011). Conclusions These results suggest significant brain involvement in ON, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism. Correlational results demonstrate that VEP in ON is closely associated with WMV and GMV atrophy in many brain regions. PMID:27045330

  17. Blood pressure levels, left ventricular mass and function are correlated with left atrial volume in mild to moderate hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Milan, A; Caserta, M A; Dematteis, A; Naso, D; Pertusio, A; Magnino, C; Puglisi, E; Rabbia, F; Pandian, N G; Mulatero, P; Veglio, F

    2009-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), and leads to a pronounced increase in morbidity and mortality. Left atrial volume (LAV) is an important prognostic marker in the older populations. The aim of our study was to identify the clinical and echocardiographic determinants of LAV in middle-aged (<70 years old) essential hypertensive patients.We evaluated cardiac structure and function in 458 patients, 394 treated and untreated mild to moderate essential hypertensives patients (mean+/-s.d. age 48.4+/-11.1 years) with no associated clinical condition and 64 normotensive control participants (age 45.7+/-12.8 years; P=0.12). A multivariate analysis was performed to calculate the relative weight of each of the variables considered able to predict LAV. The LAV index (LAVi) was significantly increased in the essential hypertensive group vs the control group and was significantly dependent on blood pressure levels (SBP and DBP, P<0.05 for both) and body mass index (BMI) (P<0.0001). Considering the left ventricular (LV) variables, the LV mass index (LVMI) (R(2)=0.19, P<0.001) and LAV were increased in essential hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and patients with enlarged LAV showed lower systolic and diastolic function and an increased LVMI. The LAVi is dependent on blood pressure levels and anthropometric variables (age and BMI). Further structural (LVMI) and functional (systolic and diastolic) variables are related to the LAVi; LVMI is the most important variable associated with LAV in mild to moderate essential hypertensive adult patients. These findings highlight the importance of left atrium evaluation in adult, relatively young, essential hypertensive patients. PMID:19262581

  18. Relation between Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames in Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Amine; Özyilmaz, Emin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we investigate relationships between Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames in Euclidean space. Then, we obtain the geodesic curvature of the spherical image curve of the Darboux vector of the type-2 Bishop frame. Also, we give transition matrix between the Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames of the type-2 Bishop frames of the spherical images of the edges N→1,N→2 and b→. Finally, we express some interesting relations and illustrate of the examples by the aid Maple programe.

  19. On Local Constraints of D=4 Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauna, N.; Vancea, Ion V.

    It has recently been shown that in order to have Dirac eigenvalues as observables of Euclidean supergravity, certain constraints should be imposed on the covariant phase space as well as on Dirac eigenspinors. We investigate the relationships among the constraints in the first set and argue that these relationships are not linear. We also derive a set of equations that should be satisfied by some arbitrary functions that enter as coefficients in the equation expressing the linear dependency of the constraints in order that the second set of constraints be linearly independent.

  20. Dynamics of Euclideanized Einstein-Yang-Mills systems with arbitrary gauge groups

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, O.; Picken, R.F. ); Maurao, J.M. ); Volobujev, I.P. )

    1991-09-30

    This paper describes the dynamics of euclideanized SO(4)-symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) systems with arbitrary compact gauge groups K. For the case of SO(n) and SU(n) gauge groups and simple embeddings of the isotropy group in K, the authors show that in the resulting dynamical system, the Friedmann equation decouples from the Yang-Mills equations. Furthermore, the latter can be reduced to a system of two second-order differential equations. This allows the authors to find a broad class of instanton (wormhole) solutions of the EYM equations. These solutions are not afflicted by the giant-wormhole catastrophe.

  1. Emergence of Euclidean dynamical symmetry as a consequence of shape phase mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, R.; Budaca, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid model which combines γ-stable and γ-rigid collective conditions through a rigidity parameter, is used to study the critical point of the phase transition between spherical and axially symmetric shapes. The model in the equally mixed case, called X (4), exhibits properties of the Euclidean symmetry in four dimensions. The spectral properties of the new model are investigated in connection to the exact symmetry. Experimental realisation of the X (4) model is found in two N = 90 nuclei and two Pt isotopes in vicinity of experimentally observed critical point.

  2. On the measure of conformal difference between Euclidean and Lobachevsky spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorich, Vladimir A.

    2011-12-01

    Euclidean space R^n and Lobachevsky space H^n are known to be not equivalent either conformally or quasiconformally. In this work we give exact asymptotics of the critical order of growth at infinity for the quasiconformality coefficient of a diffeomorphism f\\colon R^n\\to H^n for which such a mapping f is possible. We also consider the general case of immersions f\\colon M^n\\to N^n of conformally parabolic Riemannian manifolds. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  3. Spontaneous PT-Symmetry Breaking for Systems of Noncommutative Euclidean Lie Algebraic Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sanjib; Fring, Andreas; Mathanaranjan, Thilagarajah

    2015-11-01

    We propose a noncommutative version of the Euclidean Lie algebra E 2. Several types of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems expressed in terms of generic combinations of the generators of this algebra are investigated. Using the breakdown of the explicitly constructed Dyson maps as a criterium, we identify the domains in the parameter space in which the Hamiltonians have real energy spectra and determine the exceptional points signifying the crossover into the different types of spontaneously broken PT-symmetric regions with pairs of complex conjugate eigenvalues. We find exceptional points which remain invariant under the deformation as well as exceptional points becoming dependent on the deformation parameter of the algebra.

  4. Correlation between mesopore volume of carbon supports and the immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor for the decolorization of Acid Orange 7.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Montoya, Luis A; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Montes-Morán, Miguel A; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    Immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor was carried out using carbon supports prepared from different lignocellulosic wastes. Enzymes were immobilized by physical adsorption. Taguchi methodology was selected for the design of experiments regarding the preparation of the carbon materials, which included the use of activating agents for the promotion of mesoporosity. A good correlation between the mesopore volumes of the carbon supports and the corresponding laccase loadings attained was observed. Specifically, the chemical activation of pecan nut shell with FeCl3 led to a highly mesoporous material that also behaved as the most efficient support for the immobilization of laccase. This particular laccase/carbon support system was used as biocatalyst for the decolorization of aqueous solutions containing Acid Orange 7. Mass spectrometry coupled to a liquid chromatograph allowed us to identify the products of the dye degradation. PMID:26241936

  5. Noise exposure modulates cochlear inner hair cell ribbon volumes, correlating with changes in auditory measures in the FVB/nJ mouse.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stephen T; Gilels, Felicia; White, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear neuropathy resulting from unsafe noise exposure is a life altering condition that affects many people. This hearing dysfunction follows a conserved mechanism where inner hair cell synapses are lost, termed cochlear synaptopathy. Here we investigate cochlear synaptopathy in the FVB/nJ mouse strain as a prelude for the investigation of candidate genetic mutations for noise damage susceptibility. We used measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) to assess hearing recovery in FVB/nJ mice exposed to two different noise levels. We also utilized confocal fluorescence microscopy in mapped whole mount cochlear tissue, in conjunction with deconvolution and three-dimensional modeling, to analyze numbers, volumes and positions of paired synaptic components. We find evidence for significant synapse reorganization in response to both synaptopathic and sub-synaptopathic noise exposures in FVB/nJ. Specifically, we find that the modulation in volume of very small synaptic ribbons correlates with the presence of reduced ABR peak one amplitudes in both levels of noise exposures. These experiments define the use of FVB/nJ mice for further genetic investigations into the mechanisms of noise damage. They further suggest that in the cochlea, neuronal-inner hair cell connections may dynamically reshape as part of the noise response. PMID:27162161

  6. Noise exposure modulates cochlear inner hair cell ribbon volumes, correlating with changes in auditory measures in the FVB/nJ mouse

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Stephen T.; Gilels, Felicia; White, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear neuropathy resulting from unsafe noise exposure is a life altering condition that affects many people. This hearing dysfunction follows a conserved mechanism where inner hair cell synapses are lost, termed cochlear synaptopathy. Here we investigate cochlear synaptopathy in the FVB/nJ mouse strain as a prelude for the investigation of candidate genetic mutations for noise damage susceptibility. We used measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) to assess hearing recovery in FVB/nJ mice exposed to two different noise levels. We also utilized confocal fluorescence microscopy in mapped whole mount cochlear tissue, in conjunction with deconvolution and three-dimensional modeling, to analyze numbers, volumes and positions of paired synaptic components. We find evidence for significant synapse reorganization in response to both synaptopathic and sub-synaptopathic noise exposures in FVB/nJ. Specifically, we find that the modulation in volume of very small synaptic ribbons correlates with the presence of reduced ABR peak one amplitudes in both levels of noise exposures. These experiments define the use of FVB/nJ mice for further genetic investigations into the mechanisms of noise damage. They further suggest that in the cochlea, neuronal-inner hair cell connections may dynamically reshape as part of the noise response. PMID:27162161

  7. Facial expression recognition based on image Euclidean distance-supervised neighborhood preserving embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Li, Yingjie; Li, Haibin

    2014-11-01

    High-dimensional data often lie on relatively low-dimensional manifold, while the nonlinear geometry of that manifold is often embedded in the similarities between the data points. These similar structures are captured by Neighborhood Preserving Embedding (NPE) effectively. But NPE as an unsupervised method can't utilize class information to guide the procedure of nonlinear dimensionality reduction. They ignore the geometrical structure information of local data points and the spatial information of pixels, which leads to the failure of classification. For this problem, a feature extraction method based on Image Euclidean Distance-Supervised NPE (IED-SNPE) is proposed, and is applied to facial expression recognition. Firstly, it employs Image Euclidean Distance (IED) to characterize the dissimilarity of data points. And then the neighborhood graph of the input data is constructed according to a certain kind of dissimilarity between data points. Finally, it fuses prior nonlinear facial expression manifold of facial expression images and class-label information to extract discriminative features for expression recognition. In the classification experiments on JAFFE facial expression database, IED-SNPE is used for feature extraction and compared with NPE, SNPE, and IED-NPE. The results reveal that IED-SNPE not only the local structure of expression manifold preserves well but also explicitly considers the spatial relationships among pixels in the images. So it excels NPE in feature extraction and is highly competitive with those well-known feature extraction methods.

  8. A simplified procedure for correcting both errors and erasures of a Reed-Solomon code using the Euclidean algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Eastman, W. L.; Reed, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that the Euclidean algorithm or its equivalent, continued fractions, can be used to find the error locator polynomial and the error evaluator polynomial in Berlekamp's key equation needed to decode a Reed-Solomon (RS) code. A simplified procedure is developed and proved to correct erasures as well as errors by replacing the initial condition of the Euclidean algorithm by the erasure locator polynomial and the Forney syndrome polynomial. By this means, the errata locator polynomial and the errata evaluator polynomial can be obtained, simultaneously and simply, by the Euclidean algorithm only. With this improved technique the complexity of time domain RS decoders for correcting both errors and erasures is reduced substantially from previous approaches. As a consequence, decoders for correcting both errors and erasures of RS codes can be made more modular, regular, simple, and naturally suitable for both VLSI and software implementation. An example illustrating this modified decoding procedure is given for a (15, 9) RS code.

  9. The correlation between the psoriasis area severity index and ischemia-modified albumin, mean platelet volume levels in patients with psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Işik, Selda; Öğretmen, Zerrin; Çakır, Dilek Ülker; Türkön, Hakan; Cevizci, Sibel; Hız, Meliha Merve

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), a novel ischemia marker, and mean platelet volume (MPV), a determinant of platelet activation, have been reported as elevated markers in cardiovascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, and dyslipidemia. As psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease having comorbidities, IMA and MPV can help determine the risk factors for psoriasis. Aim To investigate the correlation between the psoriasis area severity index (PASI), IMA and MPV levels in patients with psoriasis. Material and methods This cross-sectional, case-control study was performed between January 2014 and December 2014 at the University hospital in Çanakkale, Turkey. Forty-five patients with psoriasis and 44 healthy volunteers over 18 years of age were included in the study. In the psoriasis patient group, clinical features and PASI scores were recorded. Serum IMA and MPV concentrations were evaluated in both groups. Results The mean IMA values were 0.85 ±0.15 and 0.79 ±0.09 (in the psoriasis patients and control groups, respectively), and there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.048). Ischemia-modified albumin levels were not correlated with PASI scores (r = 0.024; p = 0.889) but were correlated with disease duration (r = 0.323; p = 0.048). There was no statistically significant difference between the MPV values of the two groups (8.98 ±1.14 and 9.19 ±1.28 in the psoriasis patients and control groups, respectively) (p = 0.435). Conclusions Ischemia-modified albumin may be used as a marker for detecting oxidative stress in patients with psoriasis, especially those with a long disease duration. PMID:27605901

  10. Digital volume correlation and micro-CT: An in-vitro technique for measuring full-field interface micromotion around polyethylene implants.

    PubMed

    Sukjamsri, Chamaiporn; Geraldes, Diogo M; Gregory, Thomas; Ahmed, Farah; Hollis, David; Schenk, Samuel; Amis, Andrew; Emery, Roger; Hansen, Ulrich

    2015-09-18

    Micromotion around implants is commonly measured using displacement-sensor techniques. Due to the limitations of these techniques, an alternative approach (DVC-μCT) using digital volume correlation (DVC) and micro-CT (μCT) was developed in this study. The validation consisted of evaluating DVC-μCT based micromotion against known micromotions (40, 100 and 150 μm) in a simplified experiment. Subsequently, a more clinically realistic experiment in which a glenoid component was implanted into a porcine scapula was carried out and the DVC-μCT measurements during a single load cycle (duration 20 min due to scanning time) was correlated with the manual tracking of micromotion at 12 discrete points across the implant interface. In this same experiment the full-field DVC-μCT micromotion was compared to the full-field micromotion predicted by a parallel finite element analysis (FEA). It was found that DVC-μCT micromotion matched the known micromotion of the simplified experiment (average/peak error=1.4/1.7 μm, regression line slope=0.999) and correlated with the micromotion at the 12 points tracked manually during the realistic experiment (R(2)=0.96). The DVC-μCT full-field micromotion matched the pattern of the full-field FEA predicted micromotion. This study showed that the DVC-μCT technique provides sensible estimates of micromotion. The main advantages of this technique are that it does not damage important parts of the specimen to gain access to the bone-implant interface, and it provides a full-field evaluation of micromotion as opposed to the micromotion at just a few discrete points. In conclusion the DVC-μCT technique provides a useful tool for investigations of micromotion around plastic implants. PMID:26113290

  11. Quantum deformations of D = 4 Euclidean, Lorentz, Kleinian and quaternionic o⋆ (4) symmetries in unified o (4 ; C) setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, A.; Lukierski, J.; Tolstoy, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    We employ new calculational technique and present complete list of classical r-matrices for D = 4 complex homogeneous orthogonal Lie algebra o (4 ; C), the rotational symmetry of four-dimensional complex space-time. Further applying reality conditions we obtain the classical r-matrices for all possible real forms of o (4 ; C): Euclidean o (4), Lorentz o (3 , 1), Kleinian o (2 , 2) and quaternionic o⋆ (4) Lie algebras. For o (3 , 1) we get known four classical D = 4 Lorentz r-matrices, but for other real Lie algebras (Euclidean, Kleinian, quaternionic) we provide new results and mention some applications.

  12. Correlation of magnetic resonance signal characteristics and perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact on lesion characterization

    PubMed Central

    Grözinger, Gerd; Bitzer, Michael; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Lauer, Ulrich; Horger, Marius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find out if magnetic resonance (MR)-signal characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) correlate with perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). METHODS From October 2009 to January 2014, 26 (mean age, 69.3 years) patients with 36 HCC lesions who underwent both VPCT and MR liver imaging were analysed. We compared signal intensity in the T1w- and T2w-images and wash-in/wash-out kinetics on post-contrast MR images with mean values of blood flow (BF, mL/100 mL per minute), blood volume (BV, mL/100 mL), k-trans (mL/100 mL per minute), arterial liver perfusion (mL/100 mL per minute), portal venous perfusion and hepatic perfusion index (HPI, %) obtained by VPCT. Signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was classified hyper/iso/hypointense compared with surrounding liver parenchyma. RESULTS Signal intensity on native T1w- and T2w-images was hyper/iso/hypo in 4/16/16 and 21/14/1 lesions, respectively. Wash-in and wash-out contrast kinetics were found on MRI in 33 of 36 lesions (91.7%) and 25 of 36 lesions (69.4%), respectively. The latter was observed significantly more often in higher graded lesions (P < 0.005). HPI was 94.7% ± 6.5%. There was no significant relationship between lesion’s MR-signal intensity, MR signal combinations, size and any of the VPCT-perfusion parameters. However HPI was constantly high in all HCC lesions. CONCLUSION VPCT parameters add limited value to MR-lesion characterization. However in HCC lesions with atypical MR signal characteristics HPI can add a parameter to ensure HCC diagnosis. PMID:27551338

  13. Three-frame generalized phase-shifting interferometry by a Euclidean matrix norm algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yawei; Ji, Ying; Han, Hao; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-09-01

    Generalized phase-shifting interferometry (GPSI) is one of the most effective techniques in imaging of a phase object, in which phase retrieval is an essential and important procedure. In this paper, a simple and rapid algorithm for retrieval of the unknown phase shifts in three-frame GPSI is proposed. Using this algorithm, the value of phase shift can be calculated by a determinate formula consisting of three different Euclidean matrix norms of the intensity difference between two phase shifted interferograms, and then the phase can be retrieved easily. The algorithm has the advantages of freeing from the background elimination and less computation, since it only needs three phase-shifted interferograms without no extra measurements, the iterative procedure or the integral transformation. The reliability and accuracy of this algorithm were demonstrated by simulation and experimental results.

  14. Clear evidence of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, H. S.; Horata, S.; Yukawa, T.

    2002-03-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) simplicial quantum gravity coupled to both scalar fields ( NX) and gauge fields ( NA) has been studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. The matter dependence of the string susceptibility exponent γ (4) is estimated. Furthermore, we compare our numerical results with Background-Metric-Indepenent (BMI) formulation conjectured to describe the quantum field theory of gravity in 4D. The numerical results suggest that the 4D simplicial quantum gravity is related to the conformal gravity in 4D. Therefore, we propose a phase structure in detail with adding both scalar and gauge fields and discuss the possibility and the property of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity.

  15. Clear evidence of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, H. S.; Horata, S.; Yukawa, T.

    Four-dimensional (4D) simplicial quantum gravity coupled to both scalar fields (NX) and gauge fields (NA) has been studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. The matter dependence of the string susceptibility exponent γ(4) is estimated. Furthermore, we compare our numerical results with Background-Metric-Indepenent (BMI) formulation conjectured to describe the quantum field theory of gravity in 4D. The numerical results suggest that the 4D simplicial quantum gravity is related to the conformal gravity in 4D. Therefore, we propose a phase structure in detail with adding both scalar and gauge fields and discuss the possibility and the property of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity.

  16. Application of Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis for gene identification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Antara; Barman, Soma

    2016-06-01

    Gene systems are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and noisy in nature. Many statistical tools which are used to extract relevant feature from genes provide fuzzy and ambiguous information. High-dimensional gene expression database available in public domain usually contains thousands of genes. Efficient prediction method is demanding nowadays for accurate identification of such database. Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis methods are applied on such databases to identify the genes. In both methods, prediction algorithm is based on homology search approach. Digital Signal Processing technique along with statistical method is used for analysis of genes in both cases. A two-level decision logic is used for gene classification as healthy or cancerous. This binary logic minimizes the prediction error and improves prediction accuracy. Superiority of the method is judged by receiver operating characteristic curve. PMID:26877227

  17. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  18. A Log-Euclidean polyaffine registration for articulated structures in medical images.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Miguel Angel; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Log-Euclidean polyaffine registration framework of Arsigny et al. to deal with articulated structures. This framework has very useful properties as it guarantees the invertibility of smooth geometric transformations. In articulated registration a skeleton model is defined for rigid structures such as bones. The final transformation is affine for the bones and elastic for other tissues in the image. We extend the Arsigny el al.'s method to deal with locally-affine registration of pairs of wires. This enables the possibility of using this registration framework to deal with articulated structures. In this context, the design of the weighting functions, which merge the affine transformations defined for each pair of wires, has a great impact not only on the final result of the registration algorithm, but also on the invertibility of the global elastic transformation. Several experiments, using both synthetic images and hand radiographs, are also presented. PMID:20425983

  19. Finite Size and Dimensional Dependence in the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percus, Allon G.; Martin, Olivier C.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the Euclidean traveling salesman problem for N cities randomly distributed in the unit d-dimensional hypercube, and investigate the finite size scaling of the mean optimal tour length LE. With toroidal boundary conditions we find, motivated by a remarkable universality in the kth nearest neighbor distribution, that LE\\(d = 2\\) = \\(0.7120+/-0.0002\\) N1/2 [1+O\\(1/N\\)] and LE\\(d = 3\\) = \\(0.6979+/-0.0002\\) N2/3[1+O\\(1/N\\)]. We then consider a mean-field approach in the limit N-->∞ which we find to be a good approximation (the error being less than 2.1% at d = 1,2, and 3), and which suggests that LE\\(d\\) = N1-1/dd/2πe \\(πd\\)1/2d[1+O\\(1/d\\)] at large d.

  20. Isospectral drums in {\\bb R}^2 , involution graphs and Euclidean TI-domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thas, Koen

    2007-06-01

    The widely investigated question 'Can one hear the shape of a drum?' which Kac posed in his published lecture (Kac 1966 Am. Math. Mon. 73 1-23) was eventually answered negatively in Gordon et al (1992 Invent. Math. 110 1-22) by construction of isospectral pairs in {\\bb R}^2 . Up to present, all known planar counter examples are constructed by a certain tiling method, and in this communication, we call such examples isospectral Euclidean TI-domains. From counter examples of this type, one can construct a pair of (finite) involution graphs. In this communication, we address the question as to how the isospectrality of the domains for the Laplacian influences the cospectrality of the involution graphs.

  1. ILP, the Blind, and the Elephant: Euclidean Embedding of Co-proven Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hannes; Kersting, Kristian; Karwath, Andreas

    Relational data is complex. This complexity makes one of the basic steps of ILP difficult: understanding the data and results. If the user cannot easily understand it, he draws incomplete conclusions. The situation is very much as in the parable of the blind men and the elephant that appears in many cultures. In this tale the blind work independently and with quite different pieces of information, thereby drawing very different conclusions about the nature of the beast. In contrast, visual representations make it easy to shift from one perspective to another while exploring and analyzing data. This paper describes a method for embedding interpretations and queries into a single, common Euclidean space based on their co-proven statistics. We demonstrate our method on real-world datasets showing that ILP results can indeed be captured at a glance.

  2. Artificial immune system via Euclidean Distance Minimization for anomaly detection in bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montechiesi, L.; Cocconcelli, M.; Rubini, R.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years new diagnostics methodologies have emerged, with particular interest into machinery operating in non-stationary conditions. In fact continuous speed changes and variable loads make non-trivial the spectrum analysis. A variable speed means a variable characteristic fault frequency related to the damage that is no more recognizable in the spectrum. To overcome this problem the scientific community proposed different approaches listed in two main categories: model-based approaches and expert systems. In this context the paper aims to present a simple expert system derived from the mechanisms of the immune system called Euclidean Distance Minimization, and its application in a real case of bearing faults recognition. The proposed method is a simplification of the original process, adapted by the class of Artificial Immune Systems, which proved to be useful and promising in different application fields. Comparative results are provided, with a complete explanation of the algorithm and its functioning aspects.

  3. Estimating the chromatic numbers of Euclidean space by convex minimization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gorskaya, Elena S; Mitricheva, Irina M; Protasov, Vladimir Yu; Raigorodskii, Andrei M

    2009-06-30

    The chromatic numbers of the Euclidean space R{sup n} with k forbidden distances are investigated (that is, the minimum numbers of colours necessary to colour all points in R{sup n} so that no two points of the same colour lie at a forbidden distance from each other). Estimates for the growth exponents of the chromatic numbers as n{yields}{infinity} are obtained. The so-called linear algebra method which has been developed is used for this. It reduces the problem of estimating the chromatic numbers to an extremal problem. To solve this latter problem a fundamentally new approach is used, which is based on the theory of convex extremal problems and convex analysis. This allows the required estimates to be found for any k. For k{<=}20 these estimates are found explicitly; they are the best possible ones in the framework of the method mentioned above. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  4. Preservice Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions of Using a Web 2.0 Technology as a Supportive Teaching-Learning Tool in a College Euclidean Geometry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Md. Mokter

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined preservice secondary mathematics teachers' perceptions of a blogging activity used as a supportive teaching-learning tool in a college Euclidean Geometry course. The effect of a 12-week blogging activity that was a standard component of a college Euclidean Geometry course offered for preservice secondary…

  5. Analysis of ochratoxin A in dried blood spots - Correlation between venous and finger-prick blood, the influence of hematocrit and spotted volume.

    PubMed

    Osteresch, Bernd; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We report the improvement of a method for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) and its thermal degradation product 2'R-ochratoxin A in dried blood spots (DBS) by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The DBS technique was advanced for the analysis of these two compounds in DBS with unknown amounts of blood as well as varying hematocrit values. Furthermore the comparability of venous vs. capillary blood was investigated. Human whole blood samples were spotted, dried, and extracted with a solvent consisting of acetone, acetonitrile and water for analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. Quantification was carried out by stable isotope labelled internal standards. Blood samples of volunteers (n=50) were used to further optimize and simplify the procedure. Ochratoxin A and 2'R-ochratoxin A concentrations found in the entire spots (approx. 100 μL blood) were compared with punched DBS discs of 8.8mm size containing approximately 20 μL blood. As a result the amounts of both toxins in a punched 8.8mm disc correlate well with the entire DBS. Also the use of capillary blood from finger-pricks versus venous blood was evaluated. The analyte levels correlate as well indicating that the less invasive finger-prick sampling gives also reliable results. The influence of hematocrit was investigated in a range of 25-55% according to the hematocrit in the used real blood samples (34-46% hematocrit). However no significant hematocrit effect was observed for the utilized real blood samples. Moreover different blood volumes were spotted and punched as a minimal spot size is usually recommended for accurate analysis. In this experiment finger-prick samples typically consist of about 90 μL blood. Therefore spots of 75, 100 and 125 μL blood were prepared and analyzed. Similar to the hematocrit effect, no considerable influence was observed. PMID:27046696

  6. Quasi-minimal Lorentz surfaces with pointwise 1-type Gauss map in pseudo-Euclidean 4-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milousheva, Velichka; Turgay, Nurettin Cenk

    2016-08-01

    A Lorentz surface in the four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space with neutral metric is called quasi-minimal if its mean curvature vector is lightlike at each point. In the present paper we obtain the complete classification of quasi-minimal Lorentz surfaces with pointwise 1-type Gauss map.

  7. Histologically Proven Radiation-Induced Brainstem Glioma 93 Months After External Beam Radiotherapy for Pituitary Macroadenoma: Radiation Treatment Dose and Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Salim E; Wolansky, Leo J; Manjila, Sunil V; Lo, Simon S; Arafah, Baha M; Selman, Warren R; Couce, Marta E; Rogers, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Patient is a 29-year-old with a history of recurrent growth hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma diagnosed 12 years prior to presentation. Eight years prior to current presentation, the patient underwent re-resection and received 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy each. Serial postradiation MRIs demonstrated regression in pituitary tumor size. Patient presented with new headaches 7.5 years after completing EBRT. Brain MRI demonstrated new FLAIR hyperintensity and contrast enhancement within the pons and medulla, corresponding to the 36 Gy isodose line of each radiation dose fraction. Differential diagnosis included radiation necrosis and radiation-induced glioma (RIG). The patient's neurologic exam worsened over the following 4 months. MRI showed progressive increase in mass effect, extent of FLAIR hyperintensity, and contrast enhancement in the brainstem. Stereotactic-assisted biopsy showed infiltrating astrocytoma with moderate atypia. A PubMed search showed this is the first case of histologically verified brainstem RIG correlated with 3-dimensional conformational radiation therapy dose and volume planning following EBRT for a pituitary adenoma. The rare occurrence of brainstem RIG after radiation therapy for pituitary tumor supports the need for long-term imaging monitoring of such patients. PMID:25345677

  8. Hierarchical clustering using correlation metric and spatial continuity constraint

    DOEpatents

    Stork, Christopher L.; Brewer, Luke N.

    2012-10-02

    Large data sets are analyzed by hierarchical clustering using correlation as a similarity measure. This provides results that are superior to those obtained using a Euclidean distance similarity measure. A spatial continuity constraint may be applied in hierarchical clustering analysis of images.

  9. Correlation of Hsp70 Serum Levels with Gross Tumor Volume and Composition of Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Patients with Squamous Cell and Adeno Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Sophie; Ostheimer, Christian; Stangl, Stefan; Specht, Hanno M; Mozes, Petra; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Vordermark, Dirk; Combs, Stephanie E; Peltz, Friedhelm; Jung, Max P; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently found on the plasma membrane of a large number of malignant tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and gets released into the blood circulation in lipid vesicles. On the one hand, a membrane (m)Hsp70-positive phenotype correlates with a high aggressiveness of the tumor; on the other hand, mHsp70 serves as a target for natural killer (NK) cells that had been pre-stimulated with Hsp70-peptide TKD plus low-dose interleukin-2 (TKD/IL-2). Following activation, NK cells show an up-regulated expression of activatory C-type lectin receptors, such as CD94/NKG2C, NKG2D, and natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs; NKp44, NKp46, and NKp30) and thereby gain the capacity to kill mHsp70-positive tumor cells. With respect to these results, the efficacy of ex vivo TKD/IL-2 stimulated, autologous NK cells is currently tested in a proof-of-concept phase II clinical trial in patients with squamous cell NSCLC after radiochemotherapy (RCT) at the TUM. Inclusion criteria are histological proven, non-resectable NSCLC in stage IIIA/IIIB, clinical responses to RCT and a mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype. The mHsp70 status is determined in the serum of patients using the lipHsp70 ELISA test, which enables the quantification of liposomal and free Hsp70. Squamous cell and adeno NSCLC patients had significantly higher serum Hsp70 levels than healthy controls. A significant correlation of serum Hsp70 levels with the gross tumor volume was shown for adeno and squamous cell NSCLC. However, significantly elevated ratios of activated CD69(+)/CD94(+) NK cells that are associated with low serum Hsp70 levels were observed only in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. These data might provide a first hint that squamous cell NSCLC is more immunogenic than adeno NSCLC. PMID:26579130

  10. Correlation of Hsp70 Serum Levels with Gross Tumor Volume and Composition of Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Patients with Squamous Cell and Adeno Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Sophie; Ostheimer, Christian; Stangl, Stefan; Specht, Hanno M.; Mozes, Petra; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Vordermark, Dirk; Combs, Stephanie E.; Peltz, Friedhelm; Jung, Max P.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently found on the plasma membrane of a large number of malignant tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and gets released into the blood circulation in lipid vesicles. On the one hand, a membrane (m)Hsp70-positive phenotype correlates with a high aggressiveness of the tumor; on the other hand, mHsp70 serves as a target for natural killer (NK) cells that had been pre-stimulated with Hsp70-peptide TKD plus low-dose interleukin-2 (TKD/IL-2). Following activation, NK cells show an up-regulated expression of activatory C-type lectin receptors, such as CD94/NKG2C, NKG2D, and natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs; NKp44, NKp46, and NKp30) and thereby gain the capacity to kill mHsp70-positive tumor cells. With respect to these results, the efficacy of ex vivo TKD/IL-2 stimulated, autologous NK cells is currently tested in a proof-of-concept phase II clinical trial in patients with squamous cell NSCLC after radiochemotherapy (RCT) at the TUM. Inclusion criteria are histological proven, non-resectable NSCLC in stage IIIA/IIIB, clinical responses to RCT and a mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype. The mHsp70 status is determined in the serum of patients using the lipHsp70 ELISA test, which enables the quantification of liposomal and free Hsp70. Squamous cell and adeno NSCLC patients had significantly higher serum Hsp70 levels than healthy controls. A significant correlation of serum Hsp70 levels with the gross tumor volume was shown for adeno and squamous cell NSCLC. However, significantly elevated ratios of activated CD69+/CD94+ NK cells that are associated with low serum Hsp70 levels were observed only in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. These data might provide a first hint that squamous cell NSCLC is more immunogenic than adeno NSCLC. PMID:26579130

  11. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene‐targeted strains of the OR‐IRES‐marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, “count every cell” strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain‐specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17‐fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene‐targeted strains. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:199–209, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100963

  12. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona; Mombaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene-targeted strains of the OR-IRES-marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, "count every cell" strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain-specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17-fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene-targeted strains. PMID:26100963

  13. Determination of lung segments in computed tomography images using the Euclidean distance to the pulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stoecker, Christina; Moltz, Jan H.; Lassen, Bianca; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Welter, Stefan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) imaging is the modality of choice for lung cancer diagnostics. With the increasing number of lung interventions on sublobar level in recent years, determining and visualizing pulmonary segments in CT images and, in oncological cases, reliable segment-related information about the location of tumors has become increasingly desirable. Computer-assisted identification of lung segments in CT images is subject of this work.Methods: The authors present a new interactive approach for the segmentation of lung segments that uses the Euclidean distance of each point in the lung to the segmental branches of the pulmonary artery. The aim is to analyze the potential of the method. Detailed manual pulmonary artery segmentations are used to achieve the best possible segment approximation results. A detailed description of the method and its evaluation on 11 CT scans from clinical routine are given.Results: An accuracy of 2–3 mm is measured for the segment boundaries computed by the pulmonary artery-based method. On average, maximum deviations of 8 mm are observed. 135 intersegmental pulmonary veins detected in the 11 test CT scans serve as reference data. Furthermore, a comparison of the presented pulmonary artery-based approach to a similar approach that uses the Euclidean distance to the segmental branches of the bronchial tree is presented. It shows a significantly higher accuracy for the pulmonary artery-based approach in lung regions at least 30 mm distal to the lung hilum.Conclusions: A pulmonary artery-based determination of lung segments in CT images is promising. In the tests, the pulmonary artery-based determination has been shown to be superior to the bronchial tree-based determination. The suitability of the segment approximation method for application in the planning of segment resections in clinical practice has already been verified in experimental cases. However, automation of the method accompanied by an evaluation on a larger

  14. Pearson's Correlation between Three Variables; Using Students' Basic Knowledge of Geometry for an Exercise in Mathematical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    When studying correlations, how do the three bivariate correlation coefficients between three variables relate? After transforming Pearson's correlation coefficient r into a Euclidean distance, undergraduate students can tackle this problem using their secondary school knowledge of geometry (Pythagoras' theorem and similarity of triangles).…

  15. Optimization of the Multi-Spectral Euclidean Distance Calculation for FPGA-based Spaceborne Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cristo, Alejandro; Fisher, Kevin; Perez, Rosa M.; Martinez, Pablo; Gualtieri, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the high quantity of operations that spaceborne processing systems must carry out in space, new methodologies and techniques are being presented as good alternatives in order to free the main processor from work and improve the overall performance. These include the development of ancillary dedicated hardware circuits that carry out the more redundant and computationally expensive operations in a faster way, leaving the main processor free to carry out other tasks while waiting for the result. One of these devices is SpaceCube, a FPGA-based system designed by NASA. The opportunity to use FPGA reconfigurable architectures in space allows not only the optimization of the mission operations with hardware-level solutions, but also the ability to create new and improved versions of the circuits, including error corrections, once the satellite is already in orbit. In this work, we propose the optimization of a common operation in remote sensing: the Multi-Spectral Euclidean Distance calculation. For that, two different hardware architectures have been designed and implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA, the same model of FPGAs used by SpaceCube. Previous results have shown that the communications between the embedded processor and the circuit create a bottleneck that affects the overall performance in a negative way. In order to avoid this, advanced methods including memory sharing, Native Port Interface (NPI) connections and Data Burst Transfers have been used.

  16. Multi-resolutional brain network filtering and analysis via wavelets on non-Euclidean space.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Adluru, Nagesh; Chung, Moo K; Charchut, Sylvia; GadElkarim, Johnson J; Altshuler, Lori; Moody, Teena; Kumar, Anand; Singh, Vikas; Leow, Alex D

    2013-01-01

    Advances in resting state fMRI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) have led to much interest in studies that evaluate hypotheses focused on how brain connectivity networks show variations across clinically disparate groups. However, various sources of error (e.g., tractography errors, magnetic field distortion, and motion artifacts) leak into the data, and make downstream statistical analysis problematic. In small sample size studies, such noise have an unfortunate effect that the differential signal may not be identifiable and so the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Traditionally, smoothing is often used to filter out noise. But the construction of convolving with a Gaussian kernel is not well understood on arbitrarily connected graphs. Furthermore, there are no direct analogues of scale-space theory for graphs--ones which allow to view the signal at multiple resolutions. We provide rigorous frameworks for performing 'multi-resolutional' analysis on brain connectivity graphs. These are based on the recent theory of non-Euclidean wavelets. We provide strong evidence, on brain connectivity data from a network analysis study (structural connectivity differences in adult euthymic bipolar subjects), that the proposed algorithm allows identifying statistically significant network variations, which are clinically meaningful, where classical statistical tests, if applied directly, fail. PMID:24505816

  17. Robust Automatic Pectoral Muscle Segmentation from Mammograms Using Texture Gradient and Euclidean Distance Regression.

    PubMed

    Bora, Vibha Bafna; Kothari, Ashwin G; Keskar, Avinash G

    2016-02-01

    In computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of mediolateral oblique (MLO) view of mammogram, the accuracy of tissue segmentation highly depends on the exclusion of pectoral muscle. Robust methods for such exclusions are essential as the normal presence of pectoral muscle can bias the decision of CAD. In this paper, a novel texture gradient-based approach for automatic segmentation of pectoral muscle is proposed. The pectoral edge is initially approximated to a straight line by applying Hough transform on Probable Texture Gradient (PTG) map of the mammogram followed by block averaging with the aid of approximated line. Furthermore, a smooth pectoral muscle curve is achieved with proposed Euclidean Distance Regression (EDR) technique and polynomial modeling. The algorithm is robust to texture and overlapping fibro glandular tissues. The method is validated with 340 MLO views from three databases-including 200 randomly selected scanned film images from miniMIAS, 100 computed radiography images and 40 full-field digital mammogram images. Qualitatively, 96.75 % of the pectoral muscles are segmented with an acceptable pectoral score index. The proposed method not only outperforms state-of-the-art approaches but also accurately quantifies the pectoral edge. Thus, its high accuracy and relatively quick processing time clearly justify its suitability for CAD. PMID:26259521

  18. Failure mode and effects analysis using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; Liu, Long; Li, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has shown its effectiveness in examining potential failures in products, process, designs or services and has been extensively used for safety and reliability analysis in a wide range of industries. However, its approach to prioritise failure modes through a crisp risk priority number (RPN) has been criticised as having several shortcomings. The aim of this paper is to develop an efficient and comprehensive risk assessment methodology using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance (IFHWED) operator to overcome the limitations and improve the effectiveness of the traditional FMEA. The diversified and uncertain assessments given by FMEA team members are treated as linguistic terms expressed in intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs). Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA) operator is used to aggregate the FMEA team members' individual assessments into a group assessment. IFHWED operator is applied thereafter to the prioritisation and selection of failure modes. Particularly, both subjective and objective weights of risk factors are considered during the risk evaluation process. A numerical example for risk assessment is given to illustrate the proposed method finally.

  19. Confidence analysis of standard deviational ellipse and its extension into higher dimensional euclidean space.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shi, Wenzhong; Miao, Zelang

    2015-01-01

    Standard deviational ellipse (SDE) has long served as a versatile GIS tool for delineating the geographic distribution of concerned features. This paper firstly summarizes two existing models of calculating SDE, and then proposes a novel approach to constructing the same SDE based on spectral decomposition of the sample covariance, by which the SDE concept is naturally generalized into higher dimensional Euclidean space, named standard deviational hyper-ellipsoid (SDHE). Then, rigorous recursion formulas are derived for calculating the confidence levels of scaled SDHE with arbitrary magnification ratios in any dimensional space. Besides, an inexact-newton method based iterative algorithm is also proposed for solving the corresponding magnification ratio of a scaled SDHE when the confidence probability and space dimensionality are pre-specified. These results provide an efficient manner to supersede the traditional table lookup of tabulated chi-square distribution. Finally, synthetic data is employed to generate the 1-3 multiple SDEs and SDHEs. And exploratory analysis by means of SDEs and SDHEs are also conducted for measuring the spread concentrations of Hong Kong's H1N1 in 2009. PMID:25769048

  20. Random Coulomb antiferromagnets: From diluted spin liquids to Euclidean random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, J.; Sen, Arnab; Andreanov, A.; Damle, Kedar; Moessner, R.; Scardicchio, A.

    2015-08-01

    We study a disordered classical Heisenberg magnet with uniformly antiferromagnetic interactions which are frustrated on account of their long-range Coulomb form, i.e., J (r )˜-A lnr in d =2 and J (r )˜A /r in d =3 . This arises naturally as the T →0 limit of the emergent interactions between vacancy-induced degrees of freedom in a class of diluted Coulomb spin liquids (including the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets in checkerboard, SCGO, and pyrochlore lattices) and presents a novel variant of a disordered long-range spin Hamiltonian. Using detailed analytical and numerical studies we establish that this model exhibits a very broad paramagnetic regime that extends to very large values of A in both d =2 and d =3 . In d =2 , using the lattice-Green-function-based finite-size regularization of the Coulomb potential (which corresponds naturally to the underlying low-temperature limit of the emergent interactions between orphans), we find evidence that freezing into a glassy state occurs only in the limit of strong coupling, A =∞ , while no such transition seems to exist in d =3 . We also demonstrate the presence and importance of screening for such a magnet. We analyze the spectrum of the Euclidean random matrices describing a Gaussian version of this problem and identify a corresponding quantum mechanical scattering problem.

  1. a Euclidean Formulation of Interior Orientation Costraints Imposed by the Fundamental Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperakis, I.; Karras, G.; Petsa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Epipolar geometry of a stereopair can be expressed either in 3D, as the relative orientation (i.e. translation and rotation) of two bundles of optical rays in case of calibrated cameras or, in case of unclalibrated cameras, in 2D as the position of the epipoles on the image planes and a projective transformation that maps points in one image to corresponding epipolar lines on the other. The typical coplanarity equation describes the first case; the Fundamental matrix describes the second. It has also been proven in the Computer Vision literature that 2D epipolar geometry imposes two independent constraints on the parameters of camera interior orientation. In this contribution these constraints are expressed directly in 3D Euclidean space by imposing the equality of the dihedral angle of epipolar planes defined by the optical axes of the two cameras or by suitably chosen corresponding epipolar lines. By means of these constraints, new closed form algorithms are proposed for the estimation of a variable or common camera constant value given the fundamental matrix and the principal point position of a stereopair.

  2. Programs for kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation with locally varying anisotropy using non-Euclidean distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Jeff B.; Deutsch, Clayton V.

    2011-04-01

    Geological deposits display nonlinear features such as veins, channels or folds that result in complex spatial anisotropies that are difficult to model with currently available geostatistical techniques. The methodology presented in this paper for incorporating locally varying anisotropy in kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation is based on modifying how locations in space are related. Normally, the straight line path is used; however, when nonlinear features exist the appropriate path between locations follows along the features. The Dijkstra algorithm is used to determine the shortest path/distance between locations and a conventional covariance or variogram function is used. This nonlinear path is a non-Euclidean distance metric and positive definiteness of the resulting kriging system of equations is not guaranteed. Multidimensional scaling (landmark isometric mapping) is used to ensure positive definiteness. In addition to the variogram, the only parameters required for the implementation of kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation with locally varying anisotropy are (1) the local orientation and magnitude of anisotropy and (2) the number of dimensions required for multidimensional scaling. This paper presents a suite of programs that can be used to krige or simulate practically sized geostatistical models with locally varying anisotropy. The programs kt3d_LVA, SGS_LVA and gamv_LVA are provided.

  3. Limit theorems for minimum-weight triangulations, other euclidean functionals, and probabilistic recurrence relations

    SciTech Connect

    Golin, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Let MWT(n) be the weight of a minimum-weight triangulation of n points chosen independently from the uniform distribution over [0, 1]{sup 2}. Previous work has shown that E(MWT(n)) = {Theta} ({radical}n). In this paper we develop techniques for proving that MWT(n)/{radical}n actually converges to a constant in both expectation and in probability. An immediate consequence is the development of an O(n{sup 2}) time algorithm that finds a triangulation whose competive ratio with the MWT is, in a probabilistic sense, exactly one. The techniques developed to prove the above results are quite general and can also prove the convergence of certain types of probabilistic recurrence equations and other Euclidean Functionals. This is illustrated by using them to prove the convergence of the weight of MWTs of random points in higher dimensions and a sketch of how to use them to prove the convergence of the degree probabilities for Delaunay triangulations in {Re}{sup 2}.

  4. Euclidean distance and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analyses of multi-day auditory event-related potentials: a longitudinal stability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durato, M. V.; Albano, A. M.; Rapp, P. E.; Nawang, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    The validity of ERPs as indices of stable neurophysiological traits is partially dependent on their stability over time. Previous studies on ERP stability, however, have reported diverse stability estimates despite using the same component scoring methods. This present study explores a novel approach in investigating the longitudinal stability of average ERPs—that is, by treating the ERP waveform as a time series and then applying Euclidean Distance and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analyses to evaluate the similarity or dissimilarity between the ERP time series of different sessions or run pairs. Nonlinear dynamical analysis show that in the absence of a change in medical condition, the average ERPs of healthy human adults are highly longitudinally stable—as evaluated by both the Euclidean distance and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.

  5. A High-Speed Pipelined Degree-Computationless Modified Euclidean Algorithm Architecture for Reed-Solomon Decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungbeom; Lee, Hanho

    This paper presents a novel high-speed low-complexity pipelined degree-computationless modified Euclidean (pDCME) algorithm architecture for high-speed RS decoders. The pDCME algorithm allows elimination of the degree-computation so as to reduce hardware complexity and obtain high-speed processing. A high-speed RS decoder based on the pDCME algorithm has been designed and implemented with 0.13-μm CMOS standard cell technology in a supply voltage of 1.1V. The proposed RS decoder operates at a clock frequency of 660MHz and has a throughput of 5.3Gb/s. The proposed architecture requires approximately 15% fewer gate counts and a simpler control logic than architectures based on the popular modified Euclidean algorithm.

  6. The Specific Volumes and Viscosities of the Ni-Zr Liquid Alloys and their Correlation with the Glass Formability of the Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Chung, S. K.; Rhim, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    The specific volumes and viscosities of the Ni-Zr liquid alloys as a function of temperature are determined by employing a digitizing technique and numeric analysis methods applied to the optical images of the electrostatically levitated liquid alloys.

  7. Eleven fetal echocardiographic planes using 4-dimensional ultrasound with spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): a logical approach to fetal heart volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Theoretically, a cross-sectional image of any cardiac planes can be obtained from a STIC fetal heart volume dataset. We described a method to display 11 fetal echocardiographic planes from STIC volumes. Methods Fetal heart volume datasets were acquired by transverse acquisition from 200 normal fetuses at 15 to 40 weeks of gestation. Analysis of the volume datasets using the described technique to display 11 echocardiographic planes in the multiplanar display mode were performed offline. Results Volume datasets from 18 fetuses were excluded due to poor image resolution. The mean visualization rates for all echocardiographic planes at 15-17, 18-22, 23-27, 28-32 and 33-40 weeks of gestation fetuses were 85.6% (range 45.2-96.8%, N = 31), 92.9% (range 64.0-100%, N = 64), 93.4% (range 51.4-100%, N = 37), 88.7%(range 54.5-100%, N = 33) and 81.8% (range 23.5-100%, N = 17) respectively. Conclusions Overall, the applied technique can favorably display the pertinent echocardiographic planes. Description of the presented method provides a logical approach to explore the fetal heart volumes. PMID:20843340

  8. New family of tilings of three-dimensional Euclidean space by tetrahedra and octahedra.

    PubMed

    Conway, John H; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that two regular tetrahedra can be combined with a single regular octahedron to tile (complete fill) three-dimensional Euclidean space . This structure was called the "octet truss" by Buckminster Fuller. It was believed that such a tiling, which is the Delaunay tessellation of the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice, and its closely related stacking variants, are the only tessellations of that involve two different regular polyhedra. Here we identify and analyze a unique family comprised of a noncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of whose smallest repeat tiling unit consists of one regular octahedron and six smaller regular tetrahedra. We first derive an extreme member of this unique tiling family by showing that the "holes" in the optimal lattice packing of octahedra, obtained by Minkowski over a century ago, are congruent tetrahedra. This tiling has 694 distinct concave (i.e., nonconvex) repeat units, 24 of which possess central symmetry, and hence is distinctly different and combinatorically richer than the fcc tetrahedra-octahedra tiling, which only has two distinct tiling units. Then we construct a one-parameter family of octahedron packings that continuously spans from the fcc to the optimal lattice packing of octahedra. We show that the "holes" in these packings, except for the two extreme cases, are tetrahedra of two sizes, leading to a family of periodic tilings with units composed four small tetrahedra and two large tetrahedra that contact an octahedron. These tilings generally possess 2,068 distinct concave tiling units, 62 of which are centrally symmetric. PMID:21690370

  9. New family of tilings of three-dimensional Euclidean space by tetrahedra and octahedra

    PubMed Central

    Conway, John H.; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that two regular tetrahedra can be combined with a single regular octahedron to tile (complete fill) three-dimensional Euclidean space . This structure was called the “octet truss” by Buckminster Fuller. It was believed that such a tiling, which is the Delaunay tessellation of the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice, and its closely related stacking variants, are the only tessellations of that involve two different regular polyhedra. Here we identify and analyze a unique family comprised of a noncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of whose smallest repeat tiling unit consists of one regular octahedron and six smaller regular tetrahedra. We first derive an extreme member of this unique tiling family by showing that the “holes” in the optimal lattice packing of octahedra, obtained by Minkowski over a century ago, are congruent tetrahedra. This tiling has 694 distinct concave (i.e., nonconvex) repeat units, 24 of which possess central symmetry, and hence is distinctly different and combinatorically richer than the fcc tetrahedra-octahedra tiling, which only has two distinct tiling units. Then we construct a one-parameter family of octahedron packings that continuously spans from the fcc to the optimal lattice packing of octahedra. We show that the “holes” in these packings, except for the two extreme cases, are tetrahedra of two sizes, leading to a family of periodic tilings with units composed four small tetrahedra and two large tetrahedra that contact an octahedron. These tilings generally possess 2,068 distinct concave tiling units, 62 of which are centrally symmetric. PMID:21690370

  10. Parallel algorithms for arbitrary dimensional Euclidean distance transforms with applications on arrays with reconfigurable optical buses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuh-Rau; Horng, Shi-Jinn

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for computing the Euclidean distance transform (EDT) of a binary image on the array with reconfigurable optical buses (AROB). First, we develop a parallel algorithm termed as Algorithm Expander which can be implemented in O(1) time on an AROB with N x Ndelta processors, where delta = 1/k, k is a constant and a positive integer. Algorithm Expander is designed to compute a higher dimensional EDT based on the computed lower dimensional EDT. It functions as a general EDT expander for us to expand EDT from a lower dimension to a higher dimension. We then develop parallel algorithms for the two-dimensional (2-D)_EDT of a binary image array of size N x N in O(1) time on an AROB with N x N x Ndelta processors and for the three-dimensional (3-D)_EDT of a binary image of size N x N x N in O(1) time on an AROB with N x N x N x Ndelta processors. To the best of our knowledge, all results derived above are the best O(1) time algorithms known. We then extend it to compute the nD_EDT of a binary image of size Nn in O(n) time on an AROB with Nn+delta processors. We also apply our parallel EDT algorithms to build Voronoi diagram and Voronoi polyhetra (polygons), to find all maximal empty spheres and the largest empty sphere, and to compute the medial axis transform. All of these applications can be solved in the same time complexity on an AROB with the same number of processors as needed for solving the EDT problems in the same dimensions. PMID:15369089

  11. Multipartite entanglement arising from dense Euclidean lattices in dimensions 4-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel

    2012-02-01

    The group of automorphisms of Euclidean (embedded in {R}^n ) dense lattices such as the root lattices D4 and E8, the Barnes-Wall lattice BW16, the unimodular lattice D12+ and the Leech lattice Λ24 may be generated by entangled quantum gates of the corresponding dimension. These (real) gates/lattices are useful for quantum error correction: for instance, the two- and four-qubit real Clifford groups are the automorphism groups of the lattices D4 and BW16, respectively, and the three-qubit real Clifford group is maximal in the Weyl group W(E8). Technically, the automorphism group Aut(Λ) of the lattice Λ is the set of orthogonal matrices B such that, following the conjugation action by the generating matrix of the lattice, the output matrix is unimodular (of determinant ±1, with integer entries). When the degree n is equal to the number of basis elements of Λ, Aut(Λ) also acts on basis vectors and is generated with matrices B such that the sum of squared entries in a row is 1, i.e. B may be seen as a quantum gate. For the dense lattices listed above, maximal multipartite entanglement arises. In particular, one finds a balanced tripartite entanglement in E8 (the two- and three-tangles have the same magnitude 1/4) and a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type entanglement in BW16. In this paper, we also investigate the entangled gates from D12+ and Λ24, by seeing them as systems coupling a qutrit to two- and three-qubits, respectively. In addition to quantum computing, the work may be related to particle physics in the spirit of Planat et al (2011 Rep. Math. Phys. 66 39-51).

  12. Lithium-Induced Gray Matter Volume Increase As a Neural Correlate of Treatment Response in Bipolar Disorder: A Longitudinal Brain Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Lyoo, In Kyoon; Dager, Stephen R; Kim, Jieun E; Yoon, Sujung J; Friedman, Seth D; Dunner, David L; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that lithium may exert neurotrophic effects that counteract pathological processes in the brain of patients with bipolar disorder (BD). To describe and compare the course and magnitude of gray matter volume changes in patients with BD who are treated with lithium or valproic acid (VPA) compared to healthy comparison subjects, and to assess clinical relationships to gray matter volume changes induced by lithium in patients with BD, we conducted longitudinal brain imaging and clinical evaluations of treatment response in 22 mood-stabilizing and antipsychotic medications-naive patients with BD who were randomly assigned to either lithium or VPA treatment after baseline assessment. Fourteen healthy comparison subjects did not take any psychotropic medications during follow-up. Longitudinal data analyses of 93 serial magnetic resonance images revealed lithium-induced increases in gray matter volume, which peaked at week 10–12 and were maintained through 16 weeks of treatment. This increase was associated with positive clinical response. In contrast, VPA-treated patients with BD or healthy comparison subjects did not show gray matter volume changes over time. Results suggest that lithium induces sustained increases in cerebral gray matter volume in patients with BD and that these changes are related to the therapeutic efficacy of lithium. PMID:20357761

  13. Dynamic virtual fixture on the Euclidean group for admittance-type manipulator in deforming environments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a deforming anatomic environment, the motion of an instrument suffers from complex geometrical and dynamic constraints, robot assisted minimally invasive surgery therefore requires more sophisticated skills for surgeons. This paper proposes a novel dynamic virtual fixture (DVF) to enhance the surgical operation accuracy of admittance-type medical robotics in the deforming environment. Methods A framework for DVF on the Euclidean Group SE(3) is presented, which unites rotation and translation in a compact form. First, we constructed the holonomic/non-holonomic constraints, and then searched for the corresponded reference to make a distinction between preferred and non-preferred directions. Second, different control strategies are employed to deal with the tasks along the distinguished directions. The desired spatial compliance matrix is synthesized from an allowable motion screw set to filter out the task unrelated components from manual input, the operator has complete control over the preferred directions; while the relative motion between the surgical instrument and the anatomy structures is actively tracked and cancelled, the deviation relative to the reference is compensated jointly by the operator and DVF controllers. The operator, haptic device, admittance-type proxy and virtual deforming environment are involved in a hardware-in-the-loop experiment, human-robot cooperation with the assistance of DVF controller is carried out on a deforming sphere to simulate beating heart surgery, performance of the proposed DVF on admittance-type proxy is evaluated, and both human factors and control parameters are analyzed. Results The DVF can improve the dynamic properties of human-robot cooperation in a low-frequency (0 ~ 40 rad/sec) deforming environment, and maintain synergy of orientation and translation during the operation. Statistical analysis reveals that the operator has intuitive control over the preferred directions, human and the DVF

  14. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AG-1G helicopter. Volume 2: Correlation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AG-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, furl, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the NASTRAN FEM correlations are given.

  15. Multi-resolutional shape features via non-Euclidean wavelets: Applications to statistical analysis of cortical thickness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Hwa; Singh, Vikas; Chung, Moo K.; Hinrichs, Chris; Pachauri, Deepti; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical analysis on arbitrary surface meshes such as the cortical surface is an important approach to understanding brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Surface analysis may be able to identify specific cortical patterns that relate to certain disease characteristics or exhibit differences between groups. Our goal in this paper is to make group analysis of signals on surfaces more sensitive. To do this, we derive multi-scale shape descriptors that characterize the signal around each mesh vertex, i.e., its local context, at varying levels of resolution. In order to define such a shape descriptor, we make use of recent results from harmonic analysis that extend traditional continuous wavelet theory from the Euclidean to a non-Euclidean setting (i.e., a graph, mesh or network). Using this descriptor, we conduct experiments on two different datasets, the Alzheimer’s Disease NeuroImaging Initiative (ADNI) data and images acquired at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (W-ADRC), focusing on individuals labeled as having Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls. In particular, we contrast traditional univariate methods with our multi-resolution approach which show increased sensitivity and improved statistical power to detect a group-level effects. We also provide an open source implementation. PMID:24614060

  16. Wavelet-Based 3D Reconstruction of Microcalcification Clusters from Two Mammographic Views: New Evidence That Fractal Tumors Are Malignant and Euclidean Tumors Are Benign

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Kendra A.; Tanenbaum, Aaron B.; Albert, Seth; Guimond, Lyne; Kestener, Pierre; Arneodo, Alain; Khalil, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The 2D Wavelet-Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) method was used to detect microcalcifications (MC) in human breast tissue seen in mammograms and to characterize the fractal geometry of benign and malignant MC clusters. This was done in the context of a preliminary analysis of a small dataset, via a novel way to partition the wavelet-transform space-scale skeleton. For the first time, the estimated 3D fractal structure of a breast lesion was inferred by pairing the information from two separate 2D projected mammographic views of the same breast, i.e. the cranial-caudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views. As a novelty, we define the “CC-MLO fractal dimension plot”, where a “fractal zone” and “Euclidean zones” (non-fractal) are defined. 118 images (59 cases, 25 malignant and 34 benign) obtained from a digital databank of mammograms with known radiologist diagnostics were analyzed to determine which cases would be plotted in the fractal zone and which cases would fall in the Euclidean zones. 92% of malignant breast lesions studied (23 out of 25 cases) were in the fractal zone while 88% of the benign lesions were in the Euclidean zones (30 out of 34 cases). Furthermore, a Bayesian statistical analysis shows that, with 95% credibility, the probability that fractal breast lesions are malignant is between 74% and 98%. Alternatively, with 95% credibility, the probability that Euclidean breast lesions are benign is between 76% and 96%. These results support the notion that the fractal structure of malignant tumors is more likely to be associated with an invasive behavior into the surrounding tissue compared to the less invasive, Euclidean structure of benign tumors. Finally, based on indirect 3D reconstructions from the 2D views, we conjecture that all breast tumors considered in this study, benign and malignant, fractal or Euclidean, restrict their growth to 2-dimensional manifolds within the breast tissue. PMID:25222610

  17. Improved target volume definition for precision radiotherapy planning of meningiomas by correlation of CT and dynamic, Gd-DTPA-enhanced FLASH MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Schad, L R; Blüml, S; Debus, J; Scharf, J; Lorenz, W J

    1994-10-01

    In this methodological paper the authors report a fast, T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (FLASH) for dynamic, Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of meningiomas and its application in precision radiotherapy planning. Indications for radiotherapy included unresected tumors, tumor remaining after surgery, and recurrences. The patient's head was fixed in a stereotactic localization system which is usable at the CT, MR and the linear accelerator installations. By phantom measurements different materials (steel, aluminum, titanium, plastic, wood, ceramics) used for the stereotactic system were tested for mechanical stability and geometric MR image distortion. All metallic stereotactic rings (closed rings made of massive metal) led to a more or less dramatic geometric distortion and signal cancellation in the MR images. The best properties--nearly no distortion and high mechanic stability--are provided by a ceramic ring. If necessary, the remaining geometric MR image distortion can be 'corrected' (reducing displacements to the size of a pixel) by calculations based on modeling the distortion as a fourth order two-dimensional polynomial. The target volume was defined in dynamic, T1-weighted FLASH MR images, which were measured before, during, and after the controlled intravenous infusion of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight Gd-DTPA. The stereotactic localization technique allows the precise transfer of the target volume information from MR onto CT data to provide a map of the radiation attenuation coefficient for dose calculation. In genera, the superior soft tissue contrast of MR showed an excellent tumor delineation, especially in regions, such as the base of the skull, where the target often was obscured in CT images.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7878213

  18. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy in an inhomogeneous object: local viscoelastic spectra from ultrasound-assisted measurement of correlation decay arising from the ultrasound focal volume.

    PubMed

    Chandran, R Sriram; Sarkar, Saikat; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS) in a localized region of a viscoelastically inhomogeneous object by measurement of the intensity autocorrelation [g(2)(τ)] that captures only the decay introduced by the temperature-induced Brownian motion in the region. The region is roughly specified by the focal volume of an ultrasound transducer which introduces region specific mechanical vibration owing to insonification. Essential characteristics of the localized non-Markovian dynamics are contained in the decay of the modulation depth [M(τ)], introduced by the ultrasound forcing in the focal volume selected, on g(2)(τ). The modulation depth M(τ(i)) at any delay time τ(i) can be measured by short-time Fourier transform of g(2)(τ) and measurement of the magnitude of the spectrum at the ultrasound drive frequency. By following the established theoretical framework of DWS, we are able to connect the decay in M(τ) to the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of scattering centers and the MSD to G*(ω), the complex viscoelastic spectrum. A two-region composite polyvinyl alcohol phantom with different viscoelastic properties is selected for demonstrating local DWS-based recovery of G*(ω) corresponding to these regions from the measured region specific M(τ(i))vsτ(i). The ultrasound-assisted measurement of MSD is verified by simulating, using a generalized Langevin equation (GLE), the dynamics of the particles in the region selected as well as by the usual DWS experiment without the ultrasound. It is shown that whereas the MSD obtained by solving the GLE without the ultrasound forcing agreed with its experimental counterpart covering small and large values of τ, the match was good only in the initial transients in regard to experimental measurements with ultrasound. PMID:25122299

  19. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy in an inhomogeneous object: Local viscoelastic spectra from ultrasound-assisted measurement of correlation decay arising from the ultrasound focal volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, R. Sriram; Sarkar, Saikat; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS) in a localized region of a viscoelastically inhomogeneous object by measurement of the intensity autocorrelation [g2(τ)] that captures only the decay introduced by the temperature-induced Brownian motion in the region. The region is roughly specified by the focal volume of an ultrasound transducer which introduces region specific mechanical vibration owing to insonification. Essential characteristics of the localized non-Markovian dynamics are contained in the decay of the modulation depth [M(τ)], introduced by the ultrasound forcing in the focal volume selected, on g2(τ). The modulation depth M (τi) at any delay time τi can be measured by short-time Fourier transform of g2(τ) and measurement of the magnitude of the spectrum at the ultrasound drive frequency. By following the established theoretical framework of DWS, we are able to connect the decay in M (τ) to the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of scattering centers and the MSD to G*(ω), the complex viscoelastic spectrum. A two-region composite polyvinyl alcohol phantom with different viscoelastic properties is selected for demonstrating local DWS-based recovery of G*(ω) corresponding to these regions from the measured region specific M (τi)vsτi. The ultrasound-assisted measurement of MSD is verified by simulating, using a generalized Langevin equation (GLE), the dynamics of the particles in the region selected as well as by the usual DWS experiment without the ultrasound. It is shown that whereas the MSD obtained by solving the GLE without the ultrasound forcing agreed with its experimental counterpart covering small and large values of τ, the match was good only in the initial transients in regard to experimental measurements with ultrasound.

  20. Bivalve fouling of nuclear power plant service-water systems. Volume 1. Correlation of bivalve biological characteristics and raw-water system design

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Johnson, K.I.; Page, T.L.; Young, J.S.; Daling, P.M.

    1984-12-01

    Fouling of raw-water systems in nuclear power plants in the US can affect the safe operation of a power plant. This report describes correlations between the biology of bivalve organisms and the design and operation of power plants that allow bivalves to enter and reside in nuclear power plants. Discussions are focused on safety-related raw-water systems subject to fouling by the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Score sheets to rate fouling potential of power plant systems and components are provided.

  1. A walk through energy, discrepancy, numerical integration and group invariant measures on measurable subsets of euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damelin, S.

    2008-07-01

    (A) The celebrated Gaussian quadrature formula on finite intervals tells us that the Gauss nodes are the zeros of the unique solution of an extremal problem. We announce recent results of Damelin, Grabner, Levesley, Ragozin and Sun which derive quadrature estimates on compact, homogenous manifolds embedded in Euclidean spaces, via energy functionals associated with a class of group-invariant kernels which are generalizations of zonal kernels on the spheres or radial kernels in euclidean spaces. Our results apply, in particular, to weighted Riesz kernels defined on spheres and certain projective spaces. Our energy functionals describe both uniform and perturbed uniform distribution of quadrature point sets. (B) Given , some measurable subset of Euclidean space, one sometimes wants to construct, a design, a finite set of points, , with a small energy or discrepancy. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that these two measures of quality are equivalent when they are defined via positive definite kernels . The error of approximating the integral by the sample average of f over has a tight upper bound in terms the energy or discrepancy of . The tightness of this error bound follows by requiring f to lie in the Hilbert space with reproducing kernel K. The theory presented here provides an interpretation of the best design for numerical integration as one with minimum energy, provided that the μ defining the integration problem is the equilibrium measure or charge distribution corresponding to the energy kernel, K. (C) Let be the orbit of a compact, possibly non Abelian group, , acting as measurable transformations of and the kernel K is invariant under the group action. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that the equilibrium measure is the normalized measure on induced by Haar measure on . This allows us to calculate explicit representations of equilibrium measures. There is an

  2. Critical probability of percolation over bounded region in N-dimensional Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubin, Emmanuel; Colliat, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Following Tomita and Murakami (Research of Pattern Formation ed R Takaki (Tokyo: KTK Scientific Publishers) pp 197-203) we propose an analytical model to predict the critical probability of percolation. It is based on the excursion set theory which allows us to consider N-dimensional bounded regions. Details are given for the three-dimensional (3D) case and statistically representative volume elements are calculated. Finally, generalisation to the N-dimensional case is made.

  3. Data correlation and analysis of arc tunnel and wind tunnel tests of RSI joints and gaps, phase 2. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cristensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Heat transfer data measured in gaps representative of those being employed for joints in the space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection systems (TPS) were assimilated, analyzed, and correlated. Several types of gap were investigated with emphasis on simple butt joints. Gap widths ranged from 0.0 to 0.76 cm and depths ranged from 1 to 6 cm. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layer flows over the gap opening were investigated. The angle between gap axis and external flow was varied between 0 and pi/2 radians. The contoured cross section gap performed significantly better than all other wide gaps and slightly better than all other narrow gap geometries. Three dimensional heating variations were observed within gaps in the absence of external flow pressure gradients. Interactions between heating within gaps and heating of adjacent top tile surfaces were observed. Gaps aligned with the flow were observed to promote boundary layer transition. Heat transfer correlation equations were obtained for many of the tests. The TPS thickness requirements with and without gaps were computed for a current shuttle entry trajectory. Experimental data employed in the study are summarized. A description of each test facility, run schedule and test conditions, model descriptive information, and heat flux data are included.

  4. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  5. Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: do good neuropsychological and seizure outcomes correlate with hippocampal volume reduction?

    PubMed

    Malikova, Hana; Kramska, Lenka; Liscak, Roman; Vojtech, Zdenek; Prochazka, Tomas; Mareckova, Iva; Lukavsky, Jiri; Druga, Rastislav

    2012-11-01

    Temporal lobe surgery bears the risk of a decline of neuropsychological functions. Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE) represents an alternative to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) surgery. This study compared neuropsychological results with MRI volumetry of the residual hippocampus. We included 35 patients with drug-resistant MTLE treated by SAHE. MRI volumetry and neuropsychological examinations were performed before and 1 year after SAHE. Each year after SAHE clinical seizure outcome was assessed. One year after SAHE 77% of patients were assessed as Engel Class I, 14% of patients was classified as Engel II and in 9% of patients treatment failed. Two years after SAHE 76% of subjects were classified as Engel Class I, 15% of patients was assessed as Engel II and in 9% of patients treatment failed. Hippocampal volume reduction was 58±17% on the left and 54 ± 27% on the right side. One year after SAHE, intelligence quotients of treated patients increased. Patients showed significant improvement in verbal memory (p=0.039) and the semantic long-term memory subtest (LTM) (p=0.003). Patients treated on the right side improved in verbal memory, delayed recall and LTM. No changes in memory were found in patients treated on the left side. There was a trend between the larger extent of the hippocampal reduction and improvement in visual memory in speech-side operated. PMID:22591753

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of liver tumours: post-treatment MRI correlates well with intra-operative estimates of treatment volume

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, T; Ritchie, R; Illing, R; Ter Haar, G; Phillips, R; Middleton, M; Bch, BM; Wu, F; Cranston, D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the safety and feasibility of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumours and to determine whether post-operative MRI correlates with intra-operative imaging. Methods 31 patients were recruited into two ethically approved clinical trials (median age 64; mean BMI 26 kg m−2). Patients with liver tumours (primary or metastatic) underwent a single HIFU treatment monitored using intra-operative B-mode ultrasound. Follow-up consisted of radiology and histology (surgical trial) or radiology alone (radiology trial). Radiological follow-up was digital subtraction contrast-enhanced MRI. Results Treatment according to protocol was possible in 30 of 31 patients. One treatment was abandoned because of equipment failure. Transient pain and superficial skin burns were seen in 81% (25/31) and 39% (12/31) of patients, respectively. One moderate skin burn occurred. One patient died prior to radiological follow-up. Radiological evidence of ablation was seen in 93% (27/29) of patients. Ablation accuracy was good in 89% (24/27) of patients. In three patients the zone of ablation lay ≤2 mm outside the tumour. The median cross-sectional area (CSA) of the zone of ablation was 5.0 and 5.1 cm2 using intra-operative and post-operative imaging, respectively. The mean MRI:B-mode CSA ratio was 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.57–2.71]. There was positive correlation between MRI and B-mode CSA (Spearman's r=0.48; 95% CI 0.11–0.73; p=0.011) and the slope of linear regression was significantly non-zero (1.23; 95% CI=0.68–1.77; p<0.0001). Conclusions HIFU ablation of liver tumours is safe and feasible. HIFU treatment is accurate, and intra-operative assessment of treatment provides an accurate measure of the zone of ablation and correlates well with MRI follow-up. PMID:22700259

  7. Fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for a special case of a quadratic Euclidean 2-clustering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Khandeev, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The strongly NP-hard problem of partitioning a finite set of points of Euclidean space into two clusters of given sizes (cardinalities) minimizing the sum (over both clusters) of the intracluster sums of squared distances from the elements of the clusters to their centers is considered. It is assumed that the center of one of the sought clusters is specified at the desired (arbitrary) point of space (without loss of generality, at the origin), while the center of the other one is unknown and determined as the mean value over all elements of this cluster. It is shown that unless P = NP, there is no fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for this problem, and such a scheme is substantiated in the case of a fixed space dimension.

  8. Automated detection and interpretation of spectral information using cross-correlation, millilitre volumes, pneumatic nebulization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry with photodiode array detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanassios, V.; Drouin, P. J.; Spiers, G. A.

    1998-08-01

    A method for automated detection and interpretation of spectral information from ˜230 nm spectral windows, millilitre volume samples for 15 elements is presented. The basic approach involves cross-correlation of a spectral pattern obtained by running laboratory prepared multi-element `unknowns' with a reference spectral pattern obtained by running a single element standard. From the resultant cross-correlogram, it can be decided whether or not the sought-for reference spectral pattern (and the corresponding element) are present in the unknown. Spectral patterns were acquired using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system equipped with a linear, 1024-element, photo-diode array (Leco, Plasmarray). Reference spectral patterns for Al, Au, Be, Cd, Cu, Ga, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pd, Si, Sc, Y, Sr and Zn were converted to noise-free and interference-free binary software masks and, subsequently, to analogue software masks. Cross-correlation of the analogue masks with spectral patterns acquired by running multi-element unknowns is discussed, an algorithm that does not rely on fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to calculate cross-correlations is presented and a context-sensitive, colour-coded and interrogatable periodic table graphical user-interface that presents the likely composition of an unknown on the computer screen is described in detail.

  9. Effects of Selected Filmic Coding Elements of TV on the Development of the Euclidean Concepts of Horizontality and Verticality in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Beth Eloise

    This study was conducted to determine whether the filmic coding elements of split screen, slow motion, generated line cues, the zoom of a camera, and rotation could aid in the development of the Euclidean space concepts of horizontality and verticality, and to explore presence and development of spatial skills involving these two concepts in…

  10. Asymptotic behaviour of the first moment of the number of steps in the by-excess and by-deficiency Euclidean algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolenkov, Dmitrii A.

    2012-02-01

    The first moments for the number of steps in different Euclidean algorithms are considered. For these moments asymptotic formulae with new remainder terms are obtained using refined estimates for sums of fractional parts and some ideas in Selberg's elementary proof of the prime number theorem. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  11. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  12. Correlative tomography.

    PubMed

    Burnett, T L; McDonald, S A; Gholinia, A; Geurts, R; Janus, M; Slater, T; Haigh, S J; Ornek, C; Almuaili, F; Engelberg, D L; Thompson, G E; Withers, P J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  13. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  14. Implementation and extension of the impulse transfer function method for future application to the space shuttle project. Volume 1: Analysis and correlation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantus, M.; Pardo, H.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programming, data processing, and a correlation study that employed data collected in the first phase test were used to demonstrate that standard test procedures and equipment could be used to collect a significant number of transfer functions from tests of the Lunar Module test article LTA-11. The testing consisted of suspending the vehicle from the apex fittings of the outrigger trusses through a set of air springs to simulate the free-free state. Impulsive loadings were delivered, one at a time, at each of the landing gear's attachment points, in three mutually perpendicular directions; thus a total of 36 impulses were applied to the vehicle. Time histories of each pulse were recorded on magnetic tape along with 40 channels of strain gage response and 28 channels of accelerometer response. Since an automated data processing system was not available, oscillograph playbacks were made of all 2400 time histories as a check on the validity of the data taken. In addition, one channel of instrumentation was processed to determine its response to a set of forcing functions from a prior LTA-11 drop test. This prediction was compared with drop test results as a first measure of accuracy.

  15. Improved target volume definition for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with intracranial meningiomas by correlation of CT, MRI, and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Henze, Marcus; Huber, Peter; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Hoess, Angelika; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Juergen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of {sup 68}-Ga-labeled DOTA ( )-D-Phe ({sup 1})-Tyr ({sup 3})-Octreotide positron emission tomography ([{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET) for target definition for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) as a complementary modality to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, somatostatin analogs such as DOTATOC offer the possibility of receptor-targeted imaging. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients received stereotactic CT, MRI, and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET as part of their treatment planning. Histology was: World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 61.5%, WHO Grade 2 7.7%, WHO Grade 3 3.9%, and undetermined 26.9%. Six patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment, 2 after subtotal resection; 17 patients were treated for recurrent disease. Dynamic PET scans were acquired before radiotherapy over 60 min after intravenous injection of 156 {+-} 29 MBq [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. These PET images were imported in the planning software for FSRT. Planning target volume (PTV)-I outlined on CT and contrast-enhanced MRI was compared with PTV-II outlined on PET. PTV-III was defined with CT, MRI, and PET and was actually used for radiotherapy treatment. Results: PTV-III was smaller than PTV-I in 9 patients, the same size in 7 patients, and larger in 10 patients. Median PTV-I was 49.6 cc, median PTV-III was 57.2 cc. In all patients [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET delivered additional information concerning tumor extension. PTV-III was significantly modified based on DOTATOC-PET data in 19 patients. In 1 patient no tumor was exactly identified on CT/MRI but was visible on PET. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET improves target definition for FSRT in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Radiation targeting with fused DOTATOC-PET, CT, and MRI resulted in significant alterations in target definition in 73%.

  16. Integrative Analysis of mRNA, microRNA, and Protein Correlates of Relative Cerebral Blood Volume Values in GBM Reveals the Role for Modulators of Angiogenesis and Tumor Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Arvind; Manyam, Ganiraju; Rao, Ganesh; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is routinely used to provide hemodynamic assessment of brain tumors as a diagnostic as well as a prognostic tool. Recently, it was shown that the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), obtained from the contrast-enhancing as well as -nonenhancing portion of glioblastoma (GBM), is strongly associated with overall survival. In this study, we aim to characterize the genomic correlates (microRNA, messenger RNA, and protein) of this vascular parameter. This study aims to provide a comprehensive radiogenomic and radioproteomic characterization of the hemodynamic phenotype of GBM using publicly available imaging and genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas GBM cohort. Based on this analysis, we identified pathways associated with angiogenesis and tumor proliferation underlying this hemodynamic parameter in GBM. PMID:27053917

  17. The perception of minimal structures: performance on open and closed versions of visually presented Euclidean travelling salesperson problems.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Douglas; Bovet, Pierre; Lee, Michael D; Hughes, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The planar Euclidean version of the travelling salesperson problem (TSP) requires finding a tour of minimal length through a two-dimensional set of nodes. Despite the computational intractability of the TSP, people can produce rapid, near-optimal solutions to visually presented versions of such problems. To explain this, MacGregor et al (1999, Perception 28 1417-1428) have suggested that people use a global-to-local process, based on a perceptual tendency to organise stimuli into convex figures. We review the evidence for this idea and propose an alternative, local-to-global hypothesis, based on the detection of least distances between the nodes in an array. We present the results of an experiment in which we examined the relationships between three objective measures and performance measures of optimality and response uncertainty in tasks requiring participants to construct a closed tour or an open path. The data are not well accounted for by a process based on the convex hull. In contrast, results are generally consistent with a locally focused process based initially on the detection of nearest-neighbour clusters. Individual differences are interpreted in terms of a hierarchical process of constructing solutions, and the findings are related to a more general analysis of the role of nearest neighbours in the perception of structure and motion. PMID:12974572

  18. Analytical properties of the quark propagator from a truncated Dyson-Schwinger equation in complex Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorkin, S. M.; Kaptari, L. P.; Hilger, T.; Kämpfer, B.

    2014-03-01

    In view of the mass spectrum of heavy mesons in vacuum, the analytical properties of the solutions of the truncated Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator within the rainbow approximation are analyzed in some detail. In Euclidean space, the quark propagator is not an analytical function possessing, in general, an infinite number of singularities (poles) which hamper solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. However, for light mesons (with masses Mqq ¯≤1 GeV) all singularities are located outside the region within which the Bethe-Salpeter equation is defined. With an increase of the considered meson masses this region enlarges and already at masses ≥1 GeV, the poles of propagators of u, d, and s quarks fall within the integration domain of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Nevertheless, it is established that for meson masses up to Mqq ¯≃3 GeV only the first, mutually complex conjugated poles contribute to the solution. We argue that, by knowing the position of the poles and their residues, a reliable parametrization of the quark propagators can be found and used in numerical procedures of solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Our analysis is directly related to the future physics program at FAIR with respect to open charm degrees of freedom.

  19. Constitutive secretion of soluble interleukin-2 receptor by human T cell lymphoma xenografted into SCID mice. Correlation of tumor volume with concentration of tumor-derived soluble interleukin-2 receptor in body fluids of the host mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, M. A.; Sioutos, N.; Tuttle, M.; Butmarc, J. R.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kadin, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Increased serum concentration of soluble alpha-chain receptor for interleukin-2 (sIL-2R) has been noted in patients with a variety of inflammatory conditions and lymphoid malignancies including T cell leukemia and lymphoma. Elevated sIL-2R serum levels seen in lymphoid malignancies appear to correlate with the clinical stage of disease. However, because sIL-2R is produced by normal activated lymphocytes, it has been uncertain whether serum sIL-2R in such conditions is derived from tumor cells or normal immune cells responding to the tumor. To address this question, we used a model of human (CD30+) anaplastic, large T cell lymphoma transplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tumor RNA showed that the tumor, designated mJB6, contains mRNA for alpha-chain of human IL-2R. Furthermore, 15 to 25% of tumor cells stained with anti-human IL-2R alpha-chain mAb. Solid phase ELISA analysis of serum samples from mice bearing mJB6 lymphoma showed high concentrations of human sIL-2R. None of the control mice without lymphoma or with human nonlymphoid tumors (prostatic carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and glioblastoma multiforme) showed detectable human sIL-2R. The sIL-2R serum titers of mJB6-bearing mice correlated strongly with tumor volume (P < 0.0001). Tumors as small as 0.4 to 0.8 mm3 could be detected by this method. The sensitivity of sIL-2R ELISA exceeded at least 150 times the sensitivity of conventional radioisotopic tumor detection. Total resection of mJB6 tumors resulted in complete clearance of sIL-2R from the murine serum within 48 hours with a half-life of 6 hours. Accordingly, partial resection led to a significant decrease in sIL-2R followed by gradual increase with tumor regrowth. sIL-2R was also detected in the urine of mJB6-transplanted mice. As in serum, urine concentrations of sIL-2R were proportional to tumor mass (P < 0.02). Based on these findings we postulate that malignant cells are a major source of serum

  20. Volumic visual perception: principally novel concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valery

    1996-01-01

    The general concept of volumic view (VV) as a universal property of space is introduced. VV exists in every point of the universe where electromagnetic (EM) waves can reach and a point or a quasi-point receiver (detector) of EM waves can be placed. Classification of receivers is given for the first time. They are classified into three main categories: biological, man-made non-biological, and mathematically specified hypothetical receivers. The principally novel concept of volumic perception is introduced. It differs chiefly from the traditional concept which traces back to Euclid and pre-Euclidean times and much later to Leonardo da Vinci and Giovanni Battista della Porta's discoveries and practical stereoscopy as introduced by C. Wheatstone. The basic idea of novel concept is that humans and animals acquire volumic visual data flows in series rather than in parallel. In this case the brain is free from extremely sophisticated real time parallel processing of two volumic visual data flows in order to combine them. Such procedure seems hardly probable even for humans who are unable to combine two primitive static stereoscopic images in one quicker than in a few seconds. Some people are unable to perform this procedure at all.

  1. Drug dosage in isolated limb perfusion: evaluation of a limb volume model for extremity volume calculation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exact drug dosing in isolated limb perfusion (ILP) and infusion (ILI) is essential. We developed and evaluated a model for calculating the volume of extremities and compared this model with body weight- and height-dependent parameters. Methods The extremity was modeled by a row of coupled truncated cones. The sizes of the truncated cone bases were derived from the circumference measurements of the extremity at predefined levels (5 cm). The resulting volumes were added. This extremity volume model was correlated to the computed tomography (CT) volume data of the extremity (total limb volume). The extremity volume was also correlated with the patient’s body weight, body mass index (BMI) and ideal body weight (IBW). The no-fat CT limb volume was correlated with the circumference-measured limb volume corrected by the ideal-body-weight to actual-body-weight ratio (IBW corrected-limb-volume). Results The correlation between the CT volume and the volume measured by the circumference was high and significant. There was no correlation between the limb volume and the bare body weight, BMI or IBW. The correlation between the no-fat CT volume and IBW-corrected limb volume was high and significant. Conclusions An appropriate drug dosing in ILP can be achieved by combining the limb volume with the simple circumference measurements and the IBW to body-weight ratio. PMID:24684972

  2. On complexity of the mixed volume of parallelograms

    SciTech Connect

    Gurvits, Leonid

    2009-01-01

    Let K = (K{sub 1}...K{sub n}) be a n-tuple of convex compact subsets in the Euclidean space R{sup n}, and let V({center_dot}) be the Euclidean volume in R{sup n}. It is well known Herman Minkowski result (see for instance 5), that the value of the V{sub K}({gamma}{sub 1}K{sub 1} + ... {gamma}{sub n}K{sub n}) is a homogeneous polynomial of degree n, called the Minkowski polynomial, in nonnegative variables {gamma}{sub 1}...{gamma}{sub n1}, where '+' denotes Minkowski sum, and {gamma}K denotes the dilatation of K with coefficient {gamma}. The coefficient V(K{sub 1}...K{sub n}) of {gamma}{sub 1}{center_dot}{gamma}{sub 2}...{center_dot}{gamma}{sub n} is called the mixed volume of K{sub 1}...K{sub n}. Alternatively, V(K{sub 1}...K{sub n}) = ({partial_derivative}{sup n} / {partial_derivative}{gamma}{sub 1}...{partial_derivative}{gamma}{sub n})V{sub K}({gamma}{sub 1}K{sub 1}+...{gamma}{sub n}K{sub n}).

  3. Euclidean time formulation for the superstring ensembles: Perturbative canonical ensemble with Neveu-Schwarz B -field backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Shyamoli

    2014-12-01

    We derive the Euclidean time formulation for the equilibrium canonical ensemble of the type IIA and type IIB superstrings, and the spin(32 )/Z2 heterotic string. We compactify on R8×T2 , and twist by the Neveu-Schwarz sector antisymmetric 2-form B -field potential, spontaneously breaking supersymmetry at low temperatures, while preserving the tachyon-free low-energy gravitational field theory limit. We verify that the super partners of the massless dilaton-graviton multiplet obtain a mass which is linear in the temperature. In addition, we show that the free energy for the superstring canonical ensemble at weak coupling is always strongly convergent in the ultraviolet, high-temperature, regime dominated by the highest mass level number states. We derive the precise form of the exponential suppression as a linear power of the mass level, which erases the exponential Hagedorn growth of the degeneracies as the square root of mass level number. Finally, we close a gap in previous research giving an unambiguous derivation of the normalization of the one-loop vacuum energy density of the spin(32 )/Z2 perturbative heterotic string theory. Invoking the O(32) type IB-heterotic strong-weak duality, we match the normalization of the one loop vacuum energy densities of the T -dual O(32) type IA open and closed string with that of the spin(32 )/Z2 heterotic string on R9×S1 , for values of the compactification radius, R[O (32 )] , RIB≫ α'1 /2 , with RIA<α'1 /2 . We show that the type IA thermal solitonic winding spectrum is a simple model for finite temperature pure QCD, transitioning above the critical duality phase transformation temperature to the deconfined ensemble of thermally excited IB gluons.

  4. Normalized gradient fields cross-correlation for automated detection of prostate in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Yin, Yin; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Cornud, François; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-02-01

    Fully automated prostate segmentation helps to address several problems in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: it can assist in objective evaluation of multiparametric MR imagery, provides a prostate contour for MR-ultrasound (or CT) image fusion for computer-assisted image-guided biopsy or therapy planning, may facilitate reporting and enables direct prostate volume calculation. Among the challenges in automated analysis of MR images of the prostate are the variations of overall image intensities across scanners, the presence of nonuniform multiplicative bias field within scans and differences in acquisition setup. Furthermore, images acquired with the presence of an endorectal coil suffer from localized high-intensity artifacts at the posterior part of the prostate. In this work, a three-dimensional method for fast automated prostate detection based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation, insensitive to intensity variations and coil-induced artifacts, is presented and evaluated. The components of the method, offline template learning and the localization algorithm, are described in detail. The method was validated on a dataset of 522 T2-weighted MR images acquired at the National Cancer Institute, USA that was split in two halves for development and testing. In addition, second dataset of 29 MR exams from Centre d'Imagerie Médicale Tourville, France were used to test the algorithm. The 95% confidence intervals for the mean Euclidean distance between automatically and manually identified prostate centroids were 4.06 +/- 0.33 mm and 3.10 +/- 0.43 mm for the first and second test datasets respectively. Moreover, the algorithm provided the centroid within the true prostate volume in 100% of images from both datasets. Obtained results demonstrate high utility of the detection method for a fully automated prostate segmentation.

  5. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  6. Two dimensional LDA using volume measure in face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jicheng; Feng, Li; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2007-11-01

    The classification criterion for the two dimensional LDA (2DLDA)-based face recognition methods has been little considered, while we almost pay all attention to the 2DLDA-based feature extraction. The typical classification measure used in 2DLDA-based face recognition is the sum of the Euclidean distance between two feature vectors in feature matrix, called traditional distance measure (TDM). However, this classification criterion does not match the high dimensional geometry space theory. So we apply the volume measure (VM), which is based on the high dimensional geometry theory, to the 2DLDA-based face recognition in this paper. To test its performance, experiments were performed on the YALE face databases. The experimental results show the volume measure (VM) is more efficient than the TDM in 2DLDA-based face recognition.

  7. An analysis of the probability distribution of spectral angle and Euclidean distance in hyperspectral remote sensing using microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.; Deloye, Christopher J.; Allen, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Determining the probability distribution of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data and of the results of algorithms applied to those data, is critical to understanding algorithm performance and for establishing performance metrics such as probability of detection, false alarm rate, and minimum detectable and identifiable quantities. The results of analyses of visible/near-infrared (VNIR; 400 nm to 900 nm) HSI microscopy data of small fragments (~1.25 cm in size) of minerals are presented. HSI microscopy, also known as microspectroscopy, is the acquisition of HSI data cubes of fields of view ranging from centimeters to millimeters in size. It is imaging spectrometry but at a small spatial scale. With HSI microspectroscopy, several thousand spectral signatures may be easily acquired of individual target materials—samples of which may be quite small. With such data, probability distributions may be very precisely determined. For faceted/irregularly shaped samples and mixtures (checkerboard, intimate, or microscopic), HSI microscopy data readily facilitate a detailed assessment of the contribution of the materials, their morphology, spectral mixing interactions, radiative transfer processes, view/illumination geometry contributions, etc., to the observed probability distribution(s) of the HSI data and of algorithm output. Here, spectral angle, the individual components of spectral angle (e.g., the inner product or numerator of the spectral angle equation), Euclidean distance, and L1 norm values are calculated. Regions of interest (ROI) on the fragments are easily defined that contain thousands of spectra far from the fragments' edges though translucency sometimes remains a factor impacting spectral signatures. The aforementioned metrics are derived for the spectra in an ROI of individual mineral fragments; across ROIs of different minerals; and with an ROI of an inert background. The resulting probability distributions of the various populations of the metrics are

  8. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  9. Estimation of myocardial volume at risk from CT angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liangjia; Gao, Yi; Mohan, Vandana; Stillman, Arthur; Faber, Tracy; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2011-03-01

    The determination of myocardial volume at risk distal to coronary stenosis provides important information for prognosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. In this paper, we present a novel computational framework for estimating the myocardial volume at risk in computed tomography angiography (CTA) imagery. Initially, epicardial and endocardial surfaces, and coronary arteries are extracted using an active contour method. Then, the extracted coronary arteries are projected onto the epicardial surface, and each point on this surface is associated with its closest coronary artery using the geodesic distance measurement. The likely myocardial region at risk on the epicardial surface caused by a stenosis is approximated by the region in which all its inner points are associated with the sub-branches distal to the stenosis on the coronary artery tree. Finally, the likely myocardial volume at risk is approximated by the volume in between the region at risk on the epicardial surface and its projection on the endocardial surface, which is expected to yield computational savings over risk volume estimation using the entire image volume. Furthermore, we expect increased accuracy since, as compared to prior work using the Euclidean distance, we employ the geodesic distance in this work. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach on pig heart CTA datasets.

  10. Validation of origins of tea samples using partial least squares analysis and Euclidean distance method with near-infrared spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Cheng, Hao; Wang, Liyuan; Wei, Kang; Wang, Weifeng; Li, Xinghui

    2012-02-01

    In today's global food markets, the ability to trace the origins of agricultural products is becoming increasingly important. We developed an efficient procedure for validating the authenticity and origin of tea samples where Partial Least Squares and Euclidean Distance methods, based on near-infrared spectroscopy data, were combined to classify tea samples from different tea producing areas. Four models for identification of authenticity of tea samples were constructed and utilized in our two-step procedure. High accuracy rates of 98.60%, 97.90%, 97.55%, and 99.83% for the calibration set, and 97.19%, 97.54%, 97.83%, 100% for test set, were achieved. After the first identification step, employing the four origin authenticity models, followed by the second step using the Euclidean Distance method, accuracy rates for specific origin identification were 98.43% in the calibration set and 96.84% in the test set. This method, employing two-step analysis of multi-origin model, accurately identified the origin of tea samples collected in four different areas. This study provided a potential reference method for the detection of "geographical indication" of agricultural products' and is available for use in traceability of origin studies.

  11. Mixmaster revisited: wormhole solutions to the Bianchi IX Wheeler-DeWitt equation using the Euclidean-signature semi-classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Joseph H.

    2015-04-01

    A modified semi-classical method is used to construct both ground and excited state solutions to the canonically quantized vacuum Bianchi IX (Mixmaster) cosmological models. Employing a modified form of the semi-classical Ansatz we solve the relevant Wheeler-DeWitt equation asymptotically by integrating a set of linear transport equations along the flow of a suitably chosen solution to the corresponding Euclidean-signature Hamilton-Jacobi equation. For the Moncrief-Ryan (or ‘wormhole’) Hamilton-Jacobi solution, we compute the ground state quantum correction term associated with operator ordering ambiguities and show how higher order correction terms can be computed. We also determine the explicit, leading order forms of a family of excited states and show how to compute their quantum corrections as smooth, globally defined functions on the Bianchi IX minisuperspace. These excited state solutions are peaked away from the minisuperspace origin and are labeled by a pair of positive integers that can be plausibly interpreted as graviton excitation numbers for the two independent anisotropy degrees of freedom. The Euclidean-signature semi-classical method used here is applicable to more general models, representing a significant progress in the Wheeler-DeWitt approach to quantum gravity.

  12. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  13. Validation of Planning Target Volume Margins by Analyzing Intrafractional Localization Errors for 14 Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Three-Dimensional Cross-Correlation between the Prostate Images of Planning CT and Intrafraction Cone-Beam CT during Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Futaguchi, Masahiko; Haga, Akihiro; Sakumi, Akira; Sasaki, Katsutake; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV) was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility. PMID:24977167

  14. Validation of planning target volume margins by analyzing intrafractional localization errors for 14 prostate cancer patients based on three-dimensional cross-correlation between the prostate images of planning CT and intrafraction cone-beam CT during volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Futaguchi, Masahiko; Haga, Akihiro; Sakumi, Akira; Sasaki, Katsutake; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV) was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility. PMID:24977167

  15. Analytical estimation of the correlation dimension of integer lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    Recently [L. Lacasa and J. Gómez-Gardeñes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 168703 (2013)], a fractal dimension has been proposed to characterize the geometric structure of networks. This measure is an extension to graphs of the so called correlation dimension, originally proposed by Grassberger and Procaccia to describe the geometry of strange attractors in dissipative chaotic systems. The calculation of the correlation dimension of a graph is based on the local information retrieved from a random walker navigating the network. In this contribution, we study such quantity for some limiting synthetic spatial networks and obtain analytical results on agreement with the previously reported numerics. In particular, we show that up to first order, the correlation dimension β of integer lattices ℤ{sup d} coincides with the Haussdorf dimension of their coarsely equivalent Euclidean spaces, β = d.

  16. Simulating the Euclidean time Schroedinger equations using an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube: Application to the t-J model of high-{Tc} superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, M.D.; Barnes, T. |

    1993-10-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo simulation of a dynamical fermion problem in two spatial dimensions on an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube. The problem studied is the determination of the dispersion relation of a dynamical hole in the t-J model of the high temperature superconductors. Since this problem involves the motion of many fermions in more than one spatial dimensions, it is representative of the class of systems that suffer from the ``minus sign problem`` of dynamical fermions which has made Monte Carlo simulation very difficult. We demonstrate that for small values of the hole hopping parameter one can extract the entire hole dispersion relation using the GRW Monte Carlo algorithm, which is a simulation of the Euclidean time Schroedinger equation, and present results on 4 {times} 4 and 6 {times} 6 lattices. Generalization to physical hopping parameter values wig only require use of an improved trial wavefunction for importance sampling.

  17. Superadditive correlation.

    PubMed

    Giraud, B G; Heumann, J M; Lapedes, A S

    1999-05-01

    The fact that correlation does not imply causation is well known. Correlation between variables at two sites does not imply that the two sites directly interact, because, e.g., correlation between distant sites may be induced by chaining of correlation between a set of intervening, directly interacting sites. Such "noncausal correlation" is well understood in statistical physics: an example is long-range order in spin systems, where spins which have only short-range direct interactions, e.g., the Ising model, display correlation at a distance. It is less well recognized that such long-range "noncausal" correlations can in fact be stronger than the magnitude of any causal correlation induced by direct interactions. We call this phenomenon superadditive correlation (SAC). We demonstrate this counterintuitive phenomenon by explicit examples in (i) a model spin system and (ii) a model continuous variable system, where both models are such that two variables have multiple intervening pathways of indirect interaction. We apply the technique known as decimation to explain SAC as an additive, constructive interference phenomenon between the multiple pathways of indirect interaction. We also explain the effect using a definition of the collective mode describing the intervening spin variables. Finally, we show that the SAC effect is mirrored in information theory, and is true for mutual information measures in addition to correlation measures. Generic complex systems typically exhibit multiple pathways of indirect interaction, making SAC a potentially widespread phenomenon. This affects, e.g., attempts to deduce interactions by examination of correlations, as well as, e.g., hierarchical approximation methods for multivariate probability distributions, which introduce parameters based on successive orders of correlation. PMID:11969452

  18. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  19. Cochlear labyrinth volume in Krapina Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Beals, Michaela E; Frayer, David W; Radovčić, Jakov; Hill, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Research with extant primate taxa suggests that cochlear labyrinth volume is functionally related to the range of audible frequencies. Specifically, cochlear volume is negatively correlated with both the high and low frequency limits of hearing so that the smaller the cochlea, the higher the normal range of audible frequencies. The close anatomical relationship between the membranous cochlea and the bony cochlear labyrinth allows for the determination of cochlear size from fossil specimens. This study compares Krapina Neandertal cochlear volumes to extant taxa cochlear volumes. Cochlear volumes were acquired from high-resolution computed tomography scans of temporal bones of Krapina Neandertals, chimpanzees, gorillas, and modern humans. We find that Krapina Neandertals' cochlear volumes are similar to modern Homo sapiens and are significantly larger than chimpanzee and gorilla cochlear volumes. The measured cochlear volume in Krapina Neandertals suggests they had a range of audible frequencies similar to the modern human range. PMID:26603101

  20. Washington Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David M.; Boboltz, David

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Washington Correlator for 2012. The Washington Correlator provides up to 80 hours of attended processing per week plus up to 40 hours of unattended operation, primarily supporting Earth Orientation and astrometric observations. In 2012, the major programs supported include the IVS-R4, IVS-INT, APSG, and CRF observing sessions.

  1. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  2. Optimizing multi-resolution segmentation scale using empirical methods: Exploring the sensitivity of the supervised discrepancy measure Euclidean distance 2 (ED2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witharana, Chandi; Civco, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiresolution segmentation (MRS) has proven to be one of the most successful image segmentation algorithms in the geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) framework. This algorithm is relatively complex and user-dependent; scale, shape, and compactness are the main parameters available to users for controlling the algorithm. Plurality of segmentation results is common because each parameter may take a range of values within its parameter space or different combinations of values among parameters. Finding optimal parameter values through a trial-and-error process is commonly practiced at the expense of time and labor, thus, several alternative supervised and unsupervised methods for supervised automatic parameter setting have been proposed and tested. In the case of supervised empirical assessments, discrepancy measures are employed for computing measures of dissimilarity between a reference polygon and an image object candidate. Evidently the reliability of the optimal-parameter prediction heavily relies on the sensitivity of the segmentation quality metric. The idea behind pursuing optimal parameter setting is that, for instance, a given scale setting provides image object candidates different from the other scale setting; thus, by design the supervised quality metric should capture this difference. In this exploratory study, we selected the Euclidean distance 2 (ED2) metric, a recently proposed supervised metric, whose main design goal is to optimize the geometrical discrepancy (potential segmentation error (PSE)) and arithmetic discrepancy between image objects and reference polygons (number-of segmentation ratio (NSR)) in two dimensional Euclidean space, as a candidate to investigate the validity and efficacy of empirical discrepancy measures for finding the optimal scale parameter setting of the MRS algorithm. We chose test image scenes from four different space-borne sensors with varying spatial resolutions and scene contents and systematically

  3. Long-Term Climatic Variations in the Almati Oblast in Central Asian Kazakhstan: Correlations between National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis II Results and Oblast Meteorological Station Data from 1949 to the Present. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, Jean E.; Au, Andrew Y.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger analysis of country systems described elsewhere, named a Crop Country Inventory, CCI, large variations in annual crop yield for selected climate sensitive agricultural regions or sub-regions within a country have been studied over extended periods in decades. These climate sensitive regions, principally responsible for large annual variations in an entire country s crop production, generally are characterized by distinctive patterns of atmospheric circulation and synoptic processes that result in large seasonal fluctuations in temperature, precipitation and soil moisture as well as other climate properties. The immediate region of interest is drought prone Kazakhstan in Central Asia, part of the Former Soviet Union, FSU. As a partial validation test in a dry southern region of Kazakhstan, the Almati Oblast was chosen. The Almati Oblast, a sub-region of Kazakhstan located in its southeast corner, is one of 14 oblasts within the Republic of Kazahstan. The climate data set used to characterize this region was taken from the results of the current maturely developed Global Climate Model, GCM. In this paper, the GCM results have been compared to the meteorological station data at the station locations, over various periods. If the empirical correlation of the data sets from both the GCM and station data is sufficiently significant, this would validate the use of the superior GCM profile mapping and integration for the climatic characterization of a sub-region. Precipitation values interpolated from NCEP Reanalysis II data, a global climate database spanning over 5 decades since 1949, have been statistically correlated with monthly-averaged station data from 1949 through 1993, and with daily station data from April through August, 1990 for the Almati Oblast in Kazakhstan. The resultant correlation is significant, which implies that the methodology may be extended to different regions globally for Crop Country Inventory studies.

  4. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  5. Morphological changes in gray matter volume correlate with catechol-O-methyl transferase gene Val158Met polymorphism in first-episode treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Li; Xiang, Bo; Li, Yin-Fei; Hu, Xun; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wan-Jun; Lei, Wei; Huang, Chao-Hua; Zhao, Lian-Sheng; Li, Na; Ren, Hong-Yan; Wang, Hui-Yao; Ma, Xiao-Hong; Deng, Wei; Li, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. A common functional polymorphism of this gene, Val158/158Met, has been proposed to influence gray matter volume (GMV). However, the effects of this polymorphism on cortical thickness/surface area in schizophrenic patients are less clear. In this study, we explored the relationship between the Val158Met polymorphism of the COMT gene and the GMV/cortical thickness/cortical surface area in 150 first-episode treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 100 healthy controls. Main effects of diagnosis were found for GMV in the cerebellum and the visual, medial temporal, parietal, and middle frontal cortex. Patients with schizophrenia showed reduced GMVs in these regions. And main effects of genotype were detected for GMV in the left superior frontal gyrus. Moreover, a diagnosis × genotype interaction was found for the GMV of the left precuneus, and the effect of the COMT gene on GMV was due mainly to cortical thickness rather than cortical surface area. In addition, a pattern of increased GMV in the precuneus with increasing Met dose found in healthy controls was lost in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that the COMTMet variant is associated with the disruption of dopaminergic influence on gray matter in schizophrenia, and the effect of the COMT gene on GMV in schizophrenia is mainly due to changes in cortical thickness rather than in cortical surface area. PMID:25564193

  6. Correaltion of full-scale drag predictions with flight measurements on the C-141A aircraft. Phase 2: Wind tunnel test, analysis, and prediction techniques. Volume 1: Drag predictions, wind tunnel data analysis and correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macwilkinson, D. G.; Blackerby, W. T.; Paterson, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The degree of cruise drag correlation on the C-141A aircraft is determined between predictions based on wind tunnel test data, and flight test results. An analysis of wind tunnel tests on a 0.0275 scale model at Reynolds number up to 3.05 x 1 million/MAC is reported. Model support interference corrections are evaluated through a series of tests, and fully corrected model data are analyzed to provide details on model component interference factors. It is shown that predicted minimum profile drag for the complete configuration agrees within 0.75% of flight test data, using a wind tunnel extrapolation method based on flat plate skin friction and component shape factors. An alternative method of extrapolation, based on computed profile drag from a subsonic viscous theory, results in a prediction four percent lower than flight test data.

  7. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  8. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 2: Biology and Ecology of Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with social settings and correlates of parenting, this volume, the second of four volumes on parenting deals specifically with the biology and the ecology of parenting. The volume consists of 12 chapters as follows: (1) "Hormonal Basis of Parenting in Mammals" (Jay S. Rosenblatt); (2) "Parenting in Primates" (Kim A. Bard); (3)…

  9. Prediction of calf volume during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Faghri, Pouran D; Du, Qing Yuan

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between calf volume changes and different intensities of maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of a lower limb performing plantar flexions. An electronic plethysmography instrument (EPI) was developed, and after testing for its reliability, it was used to measure calf volume changes. For EPI, the reliability correlation coefficients (r) to measure calf volume consistently were .98, .91, and .98 at 100% MVC, 80% MVC, and 60% MVC, respectively. There were also significant correlations between calf volume changes and the different intensities of MVC (MVC: r = .42, p < .011; 80% MVC: r = .41, p < .013; 60% MVC: r = .5, p < .002). The calf volume changes at different levels of muscle contractions also correlate significantly (upper calf: r = .55, p < .0002; middle calf: r = .58, p < .0007; and lower calf: r = .55, p < .002). The results indicated that EPI might be used as a reliable tool to predict the intensity of muscle contraction based on calf volume changes. Clinicians who use functional electrical stimulation to induce muscle contraction in people with muscle paralysis may use EPI to predict the volume changes during functional electrical stimulation-induced contractions and to deliver the proper amount of electrical stimulation, producing the desired level of contraction without undue stimulation or fatigue. PMID:16796241

  10. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  11. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  12. Interplay of the sign problem and the infinite volume limit: Gauge theories with a theta term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yiming; Cohen, Thomas; Goldbloom-Helzner, Ari; McPeak, Brian

    2016-06-01

    QCD and related gauge theories have a sign problem when a θ term is included; this complicates the extraction of physical information from Euclidean-space calculations as one would do in lattice studies. The sign problem arises in this system because the partition function for configurations with fixed topological charge Q , ZQ, are summed weighted by exp (i Q θ ) to obtain the partition function for fixed θ , Z (θ ). The sign problem gets exponentially worse numerically as the space-time volume is increased. Here it is shown that, apart from the practical numerical issues associated with large volumes, there are some interesting issues of principle. A key quantity is the energy density as a function of θ , ɛ (θ )=-log (Z (θ ) )/V . This is expected to be well defined in the large four-volume limit. Similarly, one expects the energy density for a fixed topological density ɛ ˜(Q /V )=-log (ZQ )/V to be well defined in the limit of large four volumes. Intuitively, one might expect that if one had the infinite volume expression for ɛ ˜(Q /V ) to arbitrary accuracy, then one could reconstruct ɛ (θ ) by directly summing over the topological sectors of the partition function. We show here that there are circumstances where this is not the case. In particular, this occurs in regions where the curvature of ɛ (θ ) is negative.

  13. An Exhaustive, Non-Euclidean, Non-Parametric Data Mining Tool for Unraveling the Complexity of Biological Systems – Novel Insights into Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Loucoubar, Cheikh; Paul, Richard; Bar-Hen, Avner; Huret, Augustin; Tall, Adama; Sokhna, Cheikh; Trape, Jean-François; Ly, Alioune Badara; Faye, Joseph; Badiane, Abdoulaye; Diakhaby, Gaoussou; Sarr, Fatoumata Diène; Diop, Aliou; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Bureau, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Complex, high-dimensional data sets pose significant analytical challenges in the post-genomic era. Such data sets are not exclusive to genetic analyses and are also pertinent to epidemiology. There has been considerable effort to develop hypothesis-free data mining and machine learning methodologies. However, current methodologies lack exhaustivity and general applicability. Here we use a novel non-parametric, non-euclidean data mining tool, HyperCube®, to explore exhaustively a complex epidemiological malaria data set by searching for over density of events in m-dimensional space. Hotspots of over density correspond to strings of variables, rules, that determine, in this case, the occurrence of Plasmodium falciparum clinical malaria episodes. The data set contained 46,837 outcome events from 1,653 individuals and 34 explanatory variables. The best predictive rule contained 1,689 events from 148 individuals and was defined as: individuals present during 1992–2003, aged 1–5 years old, having hemoglobin AA, and having had previous Plasmodium malariae malaria parasite infection ≤10 times. These individuals had 3.71 times more P. falciparum clinical malaria episodes than the general population. We validated the rule in two different cohorts. We compared and contrasted the HyperCube® rule with the rules using variables identified by both traditional statistical methods and non-parametric regression tree methods. In addition, we tried all possible sub-stratified quantitative variables. No other model with equal or greater representativity gave a higher Relative Risk. Although three of the four variables in the rule were intuitive, the effect of number of P. malariae episodes was not. HyperCube® efficiently sub-stratified quantitative variables to optimize the rule and was able to identify interactions among the variables, tasks not easy to perform using standard data mining methods. Search of local over density in m-dimensional space, explained by easily

  14. Supercritical Angle Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Verdes, Dorinel; Schwille, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We explore the potential of a supercritical angle (SA) objective for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This novel microscope objective combines tight focusing by an aspheric lens with strong axial confinement of supercritical angle fluorescence collection by a parabolic mirror lens, resulting in a small detection volume. The tiny axial extent of the detection volume features an excellent surface sensitivity, as is demonstrated by diffusion measurements in model membranes with an excess of free dye in solution. All SA-FCS measurements are directly compared to standard confocal FCS, demonstrating a clear advantage of SA-FCS, especially for diffusion measurements in membranes. We present an extensive theoretical framework that allows for accurate and quantitative evaluation of the SA-FCS correlation curves. PMID:17827221

  15. Correlation between spatial heterogeneity and local dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Ritwik; Medvedev, Grigori; Corti, David; Caruthers, James

    2003-03-01

    Spatially correlated dynamic heterogeneity has been observed in binary Lennard-Jones mixtures [1]; however, the properites that cause the dynamic heterogeneity are not completely understood. In order to investigate the origin of the dynamic heterogeneity, we have examined the correlation of various thermodynamic properties in the region surrounding the mobile particles. Specifically, the simulation box is divided into a number of sub-volumes and the autocorrelation functions of the density, potential energy and thermal energy are determioned for each sub-volume. A comparison of autocorrelation functions of the sub-volumes containing a large number of mobile particles to sub-volumes containing no mobile particles is reported. [1] Donati et. al., Phys Rev E. v60, n3, p3107, 1999.

  16. Volume strain within The Geysers geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul

    1999-12-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant strain within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume strain within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume strains in excess of 5×10-4 are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume strain. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume strain, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6×109 Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much suffer reservoir with K = 3.4 × 1010 Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume strain is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume strain rate.

  17. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of measured glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38), and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), there are distinct outliers in the dataset. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume, and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion, and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled dataset to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  18. Comparison of Coulter volumes with radiometrically determined intracellular water volumes for cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burres, N.S.; Cass, C.E.

    1989-05-01

    During methotrexate-induced differentiation of cultured human choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells, proliferation is inhibited, morphologic and biochemical changes occur, and giant, often multinucleated, cells form. We have used the increase in cell volume as a marker of the mature syncytiotrophoblastlike phenotype. Uninduced and differentiated BeWo cells are not spherical, and theoretical considerations suggested that deviations in shape could result in significant errors in Coulter volume. To determine if the values obtained by electrical pulse sizing reflected the actual mass of BeWo cells, we have evaluated the relationship between Coulter volumes and intracellular water volumes obtained using a shape-independent estimate for eight cell types. A close correlation (r2 = 0.97) was found, indicating that cell volume changes in populations of irregularly shaped cells can be accurately measured using a Coulter instrument.

  19. Using n-Dimensional Volumes for Mathematical Applications in Spectral Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.

    The ability to detect an object or activity -- such as a military vehicle, construction area, campsite, or vehicle tracks -- is highly important to both military and civilian applications. Sensors that process multi and hyperspectral images provide a medium for performing such tasks. Hyperspectral imaging is a technique for collecting and processing imagery at a large number of visible and non-visible wavelengths. Different materials exhibit different trends in their spectra, which can be used to analyze the image. For an image collected at n different wavelengths, the spectrum of each pixel can be mathematically represented as an n-element vector. The algorithm established in this work, the Simplex Volume Estimation algorithm (SVE), focuses specifically on change detection and large area search. In hyperspectral image analysis, a set of pixels constitutes a data cloud, with each pixel corresponding to a vector endpoint in Euclidean space. The SVE algorithm takes a geometrical approach to image analysis based on the linear mixture model, which describes each pixel in an image collected at n spectral bands as a linear combination of n+1 pure-material component spectra (known as endmembers). Iterative endmember identification is used to construct a volume function, where the Gram matrix is used to calculate the hypervolume of the data at each iteration as the endmembers are considered in Euclidean spaces of increasing dimensionality. Linear algebraic theory substantiates that the volume function accurately characterizes the inherent dimensionality of a set of data, and supports that the volume function provides a tool for identifying the subspace in which the magnitude of the spread of the data is the greatest. A metric is extracted from the volume function, and is used to quantify the relative complexity within a single image or the change in complexity across multiple images. The SVE algorithm was applied to hyperspectral images for the tasks of change detection

  20. Accuracy of radionuclide ventriculography for estimation of left ventricular volume changes and end-systolic pressure-volume relations

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, M.W.; Parrish, M.D.; Jenkins, D.W. Jr.; Sandler, M.P.; Friesinger, G.C.

    1985-11-01

    Estimation of left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relations depends on the accurate measurement of small changes in ventricular volume. To study the accuracy of radionuclide ventriculography, paired radionuclide and contrast ventriculograms were obtained in seven dogs during a control period and when blood pressure was increased in increments of 30 mm Hg by phenylephrine infusion. The heart rate was held constant by atropine infusion. The correlation between radionuclide and contrast ventriculography was excellent. The systolic pressure-volume relations were linear for both radionuclide and contrast ventriculography. The mean slope for radionuclide ventriculography was lower than the mean slope for contrast ventriculography; however, the slopes correlated well. The radionuclide-contrast volume relation was compared using background subtraction, attenuation correction, neither of these or both. By each method, radionuclide ventriculography was valid for measuring small changes in left ventricular volume and for defining end-systolic pressure-volume relations.

  1. Increased cerebellar volume and BDNF level following quadrato motor training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Venditti, Sabrina; Verdone, Loredana; Caserta, Micaela; Carducci, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Using whole-brain structural measures coupled to analysis of salivary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we demonstrate sensory motor training-induced plasticity, including cerebellar gray matter volume increment and increased BDNF level. The increase of cerebellar volume was positively correlated with the increase of BDNF level. PMID:25311848

  2. Reduced placental volume and flow in severe growth restricted fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Abulé, Renata Montes Dourado; Bernardes, Lisandra Stein; Doro, Giovana Farina; Miyadahira, Seizo; Francisco, Rossana Pulcinelli Vieira

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate placental volume and vascular indices in pregnancies with severe fetal growth restriction and determine their correlations to normal reference ranges and Doppler velocimetry results of uterine and umbilical arteries. METHODS: Twenty-seven fetuses with estimated weights below the 3rd percentile for gestational age were evaluated. Placental volume and vascular indices, including vascularization, flow, and vascularization flow indices, were measured by three-dimensional ultrasound using a rotational technique and compared to a previously described nomogram. The observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age and observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for fetal weight were calculated. Placental parameters correlated with the Doppler velocimetry results of uterine and umbilical arteries. RESULTS: The mean uterine artery pulsatility index was negatively correlated with the observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age, vascularization index and vascularization flow index. The observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age and observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for fetal weight and vascularization index were significantly lower in the group with a bilateral protodiastolic notch. No placental parameter correlated with the umbilical artery pulsatility index. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancies complicated by severe fetal growth restriction are associated with reduced placental volume and vascularization. These findings are related to changes in uterine artery Doppler velocimetry. Future studies on managing severe fetal growth restriction should focus on combined results of placental three-dimensional ultrasound and Doppler studies of uterine arteries. PMID:27438567

  3. Toward optimal organ at risk sparing in complex volumetric modulated arc therapy: An exponential trade-off with target volume dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Tol, Jim P. Dahele, Max; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiotherapy typically aims for homogenous dose in the planning target volume (PTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). The authors quantified and characterized the trade-off between PTV dose inhomogeneity (IH) and OAR sparing in complex head and neck volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Methods: Thirteen simultaneous integrated boost plans were created per patient, for ten patients. PTV boost{sub (B)}/elective{sub (E)} optimization priorities were systematically increased. IH{sub B} and IH{sub E}, defined as (100% − V95%) + V107%, were evaluated against the average of the mean dose to the combined composite swallowing and combined salivary organs (D-OAR{sub comp}). To investigate the influence of OAR size and position with respect to PTV{sub B/E}, OAR dose was evaluated against a modified Euclidean distance (DM{sub B}/DM{sub E}) between OAR and PTV. Results: Although the achievable D-OAR{sub comp} for a given level of PTV IH differed between patients, excellent logarithmic fits described the D-OAR{sub comp}/IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} relationship in all patients (mean R{sup 2} of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). Allowing an increase in average IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} over a clinically acceptable range, e.g., from 0.4% ± 0.5% to 2.0% ± 2.0% and 6.9% ± 2.8% to 14.8% ± 2.7%, respectively, corresponded to a decrease in average dose to the composite salivary and swallowing structures from 30.3 ± 6.5 to 23.6 ± 4.7 Gy and 32.5 ± 8.3 to 26.8 ± 9.3 Gy. The increase in PTV{sub E} IH was mainly accounted for by an increase in V107, by on average 5.9%, rather than a reduction in V95, which was on average only 2%. A linear correlation was found between the OAR dose to composite swallowing structures and contralateral parotid and submandibular gland, with DM{sub E} (R{sup 2} = 0.83, 0.88, 0.95). Only mean ipsilateral parotid dose correlated with DM{sub B} (R{sup 2} = 0.87). Conclusions: OAR sparing is highly dependent on the permitted PTV{sub B

  4. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38) and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), and indeed are auto-correlated, there are distinct outliers in the data set. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled data set to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  5. Sonographic pleural fluid volume estimation in cats.

    PubMed

    Shimali, Jerry; Cripps, Peter J; Newitt, Anna L M

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether a recently published study used to objectively monitor pleural fluid volumes in dogs could be successfully employed in cats and secondly to assess its accuracy. Eleven feline cadavers were selected. Using the trans-sternal view employed in dogs, linear measurements from the pleural surface of the midline of the sternebra at the centre of the heart to the furthest ventro-lateral point of both right and left lung edges were recorded. Isotonic saline was injected using ultrasound guidance into both right and left pleural spaces and the measurements were repeated using standard increments until 400 ml total volume was reached. The mean measurement increased in a linear relationship with the cube root of fluid volume for all cats individually. An equation was produced to predict the volume of fluid from the mean linear measurement for all cats combined: Volume=[-3.75+2.41(mean)](3)(P<0.001) but variability in the slope of the curve for individual cats limited the accuracy of the combined equation. Equations were derived to predict the constant and slope of the curve for individual cats using the thoracic measurements made, but the residual diagnostic graphs demonstrated considerable variability. As in dogs, good correlation was found between the ultrasonographic measurement and fluid volume within individual cats. An accurate equation to predict absolute pleural fluid volume was not identified. Further analysis with reference to thoracic measurements did not increase accuracy. In conclusion, this study does provide a method of estimating absolute pleural fluid volume in cats, which may be clinical useful for pleural fluid volume monitoring but this is yet to be validated in live cats. PMID:19744872

  6. The Stochastic Elastica and Excluded-Volume Perturbations of DNA Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    A coordinate-free Lie-group formulation for generating ensembles of DNA conformations in solution is presented. In this formulation, stochastic differential equations define sample paths on the Euclidean motion group. The ensemble of these paths exhibits the same behavior as solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation for the stochastically forced elastica. Longer chains for which the effects of excluded volume become important are handled by piecing together shorter chains and modeling their interactions. It is assumed that the final chain lengths of interest are long enough for excluded volume effects to become important, but not so long that the semi-flexible nature of the chain is lost. The effect of excluded volume is then taken into account by grouping short self-avoiding conformations into ‘bundles’ with common end constraints and computing average interaction effects between bundles. The accuracy of this approximation is shown to be good when using a numerically generated ensemble of self-avoiding sample paths as the baseline for comparison. PMID:20228889

  7. Unsteady flow volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

  8. Multifractal cross-correlation analysis in electricity spot market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qingju; Li, Dan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the multiscale cross-correlations between electricity price and trading volume in Czech market based on a newly developed algorithm, called Multifractal Cross-Correlation Analysis (MFCCA). The new algorithm is a natural multifractal generalization of the Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA), and is sensitive to cross-correlation structure and free from limitations of other algorithms. By considering the original sign of the cross-covariance, it allows us to properly quantify and detect the subtle characteristics of two simultaneous recorded time series. First, the multifractality and the long range anti-persistent auto-correlations of price return and trading volume variation are confirmed using Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA). Furthermore, we show that there exist long-range anti-persistent cross-correlations between price return and trading volume variation by MFCCA. And we also identify that the cross-correlations disappear on the level of relative small fluctuations. In order to obtain deeper insight into the dynamics of the electricity market, we analyze the relation between generalized Hurst exponent and the multifractal cross-correlation scaling exponent λq. We find that the difference between the generalized Hurst exponent and the multifractal cross-correlation scaling exponent is significantly different for smaller fluctuation, which indicates that the multifractal character of cross-correlations resembles more each other for electricity price and trading volume on the level of large fluctuations and weakens for the smaller ones.

  9. Variable-Volume Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Nallette, T. A.; Sansevero, F.

    1989-01-01

    Container holds bed of beads securely while accommodating sizable changes in volume and allowing gases to flow through bed. Developed for air-purifying system in which carbon dioxide is removed by solid amine beads.

  10. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  11. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  12. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  13. Free-volume hole relaxation in molecularly oriented glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Trexler, Morgana; Wu, Fei; Jean, Yan-Ching; Van Horn, J. David

    2014-02-01

    The free-volume hole relaxation in polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different levels of molecular orientation was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at variable pressures. The molecular orientation was achieved through a simple shear process performed at different temperatures and extrusion rates. It has been demonstrated that the β relaxation is largely responsible for the free-volume hole anisotropy after simple shear orientation. Upon the removal of mechanical force, the deformation of the free volume is mostly reversible at temperatures much lower than the glass transition. No strong correlation between macroscopic deformation and the free-volume hole deformation was found regardless of molecular orientation.

  14. Free-volume hole relaxation in molecularly oriented glassy polymers.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhiyong; Trexler, Morgana; Wu, Fei; Jean, Yan-Ching; Van Horn, J David

    2014-02-01

    The free-volume hole relaxation in polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different levels of molecular orientation was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at variable pressures. The molecular orientation was achieved through a simple shear process performed at different temperatures and extrusion rates. It has been demonstrated that the β relaxation is largely responsible for the free-volume hole anisotropy after simple shear orientation. Upon the removal of mechanical force, the deformation of the free volume is mostly reversible at temperatures much lower than the glass transition. No strong correlation between macroscopic deformation and the free-volume hole deformation was found regardless of molecular orientation. PMID:25353498

  15. Neural network predicts carrot volume with only three images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Federico; Sanchez, Sergio

    1998-09-01

    A mechanism turned a vision camera around a fixed carrot taking 100 images of it. A 3D reconstruction finite element algorithm reproduced the volume using finite area triangles and morphological operations to optimize memory utilization. Volume from several carrots were calculated and correlated against real volume achieving a 98% success rate. Three images 120 degrees apart were acquired and the main features extracted. A neural network system was trained using the features, increasing the measuring speed and obtaining together with a regression algorithm an accuracy of 95% in predicting the real volume.

  16. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  17. Direct volume editing.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Kai; Krüger, Jens; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present basic methodology for interactive volume editing on GPUs, and we demonstrate the use of these methods to achieve a number of different effects. We present fast techniques to modify the appearance and structure of volumetric scalar fields given on Cartesian grids. Similar to 2D circular brushes as used in surface painting we present 3D spherical brushes for intuitive coloring of particular structures in such fields. This paint metaphor is extended to allow the user to change the data itself, and the use of this functionality for interactive structure isolation, hole filling, and artefact removal is demonstrated. Building on previous work in the field we introduce high-resolution selection volumes, which can be seen as a resolution-based focus+context metaphor. By utilizing such volumes we present a novel approach to interactive volume editing at sub-voxel accuracy. Finally, we introduce a fast technique to paste textures onto iso-surfaces in a 3D scalar field. Since the texture resolution is independent of the volume resolution, this technique allows structure-aligned textures containing appearance properties or textual information to be used for volume augmentation and annotation. PMID:18988988

  18. Iterative method for the design of SLM realizable minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, P. Karivaratha; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1995-03-01

    Design of optical pattern recognition filters taking into account the nonideal characteristics of the spatial light modulators on which the filters are implemented is an important research problem. In this paper, an iterative method is developed for the design of SLM constrained minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filters. The algorithm uses a relaxation algorithm in conjunction with Juday's minimum euclidean distance (MED) mapping technique in an iterative manner. The performance of the filter designed using this method was evaluated using computer simulations and the results are compared with a constrained MACE filter designed using a software based on a simulated annealing technique. The new software requires much less computer time than the simulated annealing based software providing comparable response. The time taken by the new algorithm is more than that for the MED mapped design; but, the new algorithm provides less deviation from the specified response for training images than the MED mapped design.

  19. Structural Correlates of Taste and Smell Loss in Encephalitis Disseminata

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix Alexander; Goktas, Onder; Harms, Lutz; Bohner, Georg; Erb, Katharina; Dahlslett, Bettina; Fleiner, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Background Olfactory dysfunction in MS patients is reported in the literature. MRI of the olfactory bulb (OB) is discussed as a promising new testing method for measuring olfactory function (OF). Aim of this study was to explore reasons for and optimize the detection of olfactory dysfunction in MS patients with MRI. Materials and Methods OB and olfactory brain volume was assessed within 34 MS patients by manual segmentation. Olfactory function was tested using the Threshold-Discrimination-Identification-Test (TDI), gustatory function was tested using Taste Strips (TST). Results 41% of the MS patients displayed olfactory dysfunction (8% of the control group), 16% displayed gustatory dysfunction (5% of the control group). There was a correlation between the OB volume and the number and volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain. Olfactory brain volume correlated with the volume of lesions in the olfactory brain and the EDSS score. The TST score correlated with the number and volume of lesions in the olfactory brain. Conclusion The correlation between a higher number and volume of MS lesions with a decreased OB and olfactory brain volume could help to explain olfactory dysfunction. PMID:21611177

  20. TREATABILITY MANUAL. VOLUME V: SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatability Manual presents in five volumes an extensive survey of the effectiveness of various water pollution treatment processes when applied to particular industrial effluents. This volume summarizes volumes one through four and outlines their potential utility to Nation...

  1. Atomic polarizability, volume and ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politzer, Peter; Jin, Ping; Murray, Jane S.

    2002-11-01

    Our primary focus in this work has been upon the relationship between atomic polarizability and volume, although we also looked at the role of ionization energy. For approximating volumes in this context, we tried ten different measures of atomic radii, based upon both empirical and theoretical criteria. Our results confirm that the polarizability can be expressed, to good accuracy, as directly proportional to the volume alone, provided that an appropriate set of radii is used. Most effective for the present purpose are (a) the distances to the outermost maxima of the orbital radial densities and (b) outermost orbital values. Our data also support an earlier prediction that the correlation would be enhanced by the inclusion of a slowly varying periodic function of the nuclear charge.

  2. Structural Correlates of Prospective Memory

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Brian A; Shelton, Jill T; Bugg, Julie M; McDaniel, Mark A; Head, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) includes the encoding and maintenance of an intention, and the retrieval and execution of this intention at the proper moment in the future. The present study expands upon previous behavioral, electrophysiological, and functional work by examining the association between grey matter volume and PM. Estimates of grey matter volume in theoretically relevant regions of interest (prefrontal, parietal, and medial temporal) were obtained in conjunction with performance on two PM tasks in a sample of 39 cognitively normal and very mildly demented older adults. The first PM task, termed focal in the literature, is supported by spontaneous retrieval of the PM intention whereas the second, termed non-focal, relies on strategic monitoring processes for successful intention retrieval. A positive relationship was observed between medial temporal volume and accuracy on the focal PM task. An examination of medial temporal lobe subregions revealed that this relationship was strongest for the hippocampus, which is considered to support spontaneous memory retrieval. There were no significant structure-behavior associations for the non-focal PM task. These novel results confirm a relationship between behavior and underlying brain structure proposed by the multiprocess theory of PM, and extend findings on cognitive correlates of medial temporal lobe integrity. PMID:21982698

  3. Volume strain within the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul

    1999-12-10

    During the 1970s and 1980s. The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant strain within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume strain within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume strains in excess of 5x10{sup -4} are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume strain. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume strain, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6x10{sup 9} Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much stiffer reservoir with K=3.4x10{sup 10} Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume strain is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume strain rate. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  4. Cerebellum volume and eyeblink conditioning in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Chad R.; Newman, Sharlene; Bismark, Andrew; Skosnik, Patrick D.; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Shekhar, Anantha; Steinmetz, Joseph E.; Hetrick, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence suggests that cerebellar abnormalities may be linked to the symptoms and course of schizophrenia, few studies have related structural and functional indices of cerebellar integrity. The present study examined the relationship between the volume of specific subregions of the cerebellum and cerebellar function, as measured by eyeblink conditioning. Nine individuals with schizophrenia and six healthy comparison participants completed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and a delay eyeblink conditioning procedure. Volumetric measurements were taken for the whole brain, whole cerebellum, cerebellar anterior lobules I-V and posterior lobules VI-VII. The schizophrenia group had smaller cerebellar anterior lobes and exhibited impaired eyeblink conditioning compared to the comparison group. In the comparison group, larger anterior volume correlated with earlier conditioned response onset latencies and increased amplitudes of the unconditioned blink response during paired trials (i.e., when the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli co-occurred). The findings that smaller anterior cerebellar volumes and EBC impairments were associated with schizophrenia are consistent with non-human studies showing that anterior cerebellar abnormalities are associated with associative deficits in delay eyeblink conditioning. The lack of a significant correlation between indices of eyeblink conditioning and cerebellar volume within the schizophrenic group suggests an aberrant relationship between cerebellar structure and function. PMID:18222655

  5. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 2: Biology and Ecology of Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with social settings and correlates of parenting, this volume, the second of five volumes on parenting, deals specifically with the biological and the contextual influences on parenting. The volume consists of the following 12 chapters: (1) "The Evolution of Parenting and Evolutionary Approaches to Childrearing" (David F. Bjorklund,…

  6. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection by changes in left ventricular volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.K.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1988-11-01

    Sixteen patients underwent heart transplantation (11 orthotopic, five heterotopic). Monitoring for acute rejection was by both endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) and multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning with technetium 99m-labelled red blood cells. From the scans information was obtained on left ventricular volumes (stroke, end-diastolic, and end-systolic), ejection fraction, and heart rate. Studies (208) were made in the 16 patients. There was a highly significant correlation between the reduction in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume (and a less significant correlation in end-systolic volume) and increasing acute rejection seen on EMB. Heart rate and ejection fraction did not correlate with the development of acute rejection. Correlation of a combination of changes in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume with EMB showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 96%. Radionuclide scanning is therefore a useful noninvasive tool for monitoring acute rejection.

  7. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  8. Stochastic simulation of spatially correlated geo-processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, developments in the theory of stochastic simulation are discussed. The unifying element is the notion of Radon projection in Euclidean spaces. This notion provides a natural way of reconstructing the real process from a corresponding process observable on a reduced dimensionality space, where analysis is theoretically easier and computationally tractable. Within this framework, the concept of space transformation is defined and several of its properties, which are of significant importance within the context of spatially correlated processes, are explored. The turning bands operator is shown to follow from this. This strengthens considerably the theoretical background of the geostatistical method of simulation, and some new results are obtained in both the space and frequency domains. The inverse problem is solved generally and the applicability of the method is extended to anisotropic as well as integrated processes. Some ill-posed problems of the inverse operator are discussed. Effects of the measurement error and impulses at origin are examined. Important features of the simulated process as described by geomechanical laws, the morphology of the deposit, etc., may be incorporated in the analysis. The simulation may become a model-dependent procedure and this, in turn, may provide numerical solutions to spatial-temporal geologic models. Because the spatial simu??lation may be technically reduced to unidimensional simulations, various techniques of generating one-dimensional realizations are reviewed. To link theory and practice, an example is computed in detail. ?? 1987 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  9. Assessing volume status.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Mallemat, Haney

    2014-11-01

    Shock is a physiologic state associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The clinician has several tools available to evaluate volume status. Each modality has its benefits and limitations but, to date, no one test can indicate with 100% accuracy which patients will be truly volume responsive. Although the search for the Holy Grail of a perfect intravascular monitor continues, we must remember the importance of early, aggressive, and goal-directed interventions for patients in shock. Finally, there is no substitute for the most important intervention-the frequent presence of the physician at the patient's bedside. PMID:25441036

  10. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  11. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  12. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, p<.001), the Objective Structured Clinical Examination physical examination (r=.236, p=.011), and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination patient note (r=.238, p=.010). Breadth of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. PMID:26896906

  13. GREEK BASIC COURSE, VOLUME I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE GREEK LANGUAGE DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I OF THIS INTRODUCTORY COURSE FOR ADULTS IS THE "KATHOMILUMENI" VARIETY, THAT OF THE STANDARD SPEECH OF EDUCATED GREEKS. (VOLUME III OF THE COURSE INTRODUCES THE MORE FORMAL KATHAREVUSA VARIETY.) EACH VOLUME OF THE COURSE CONTAINS 25 UNITS PLUS FIVE REVIEW SECTIONS. A TYPICAL UNIT IN VOLUME I CONSISTS OF--(1)…

  14. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  15. Liter - Metric Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Diane

    This autoinstructional program, developed as part of a general science course, is offered for students in the middle schools. Mathematics of fractions and decimals is considered to be prerequisite knowledge. The behavioral objectives are directed toward mastery of determining volumes of solid objects using the water displacement method as well as…

  16. Overview of the Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Emslie, A. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23.

  17. Volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oele, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Chamber is designed to be airtight; it includes face mask for person to breathe outside air so that he does not disturb chamber environment. Chamber includes piston to vary air volume inside. Also included are two microphone transducers which record pressure information inside chamber.

  18. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  19. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  20. VOLUME AND SURFACE AREA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE (1) MEASURING VOLUMES OF RECTANGULAR SOLIDS, RIGHT RECTANGULAR…

  1. Negotiating Salaries, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume discusses specific strategy and tactics that can be employed in the effort to reach an agreement on salaries at the bargaining table. Although strategies and situations may vary from case to case, this report focuses on those principles and approaches that are essential to any good bargaining procedure. The discussion covers public vs.…

  2. Negotiating Salaries, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume deals with concepts important to the effective negotiation of salaries in public schools. The discussion covers the compensation patterns in education, the goals and pressures affecting reacher negotiators, salaries in relation to other benefits and proposals, extra pay for extra duties and merit pay, and the stance of the negotiators…

  3. Subcortical correlates of individual differences in aptitude.

    PubMed

    Jung, Rex E; Ryman, Sephira G; Vakhtin, Andrei A; Carrasco, Jessica; Wertz, Chris; Flores, Ranee A

    2014-01-01

    The study of individual differences encompasses broad constructs including intelligence, creativity, and personality. However, substantially less research is devoted to the study of specific aptitudes in spite of their importance to educational, occupational, and avocational success. We sought to determine subcortical brain structural correlates of several broad aptitudes including Math, Vocabulary, Foresight, Paper Folding, and Inductive Reasoning in a large (N = 107), healthy, young (age range  = 16-29) cohort. Subcortical volumes were measured using an automated technique (FreeSurfer) across structures including bilateral caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala, and five equal regions of the corpus callosum. We found that performance on measures of each aptitude was predicted by different subcortical structures: Math--higher right nucleus accumbens volume; Vocabulary--higher left hippocampus volume; Paper Folding--higher right thalamus volume; Foresight--lower right thalamus and higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume; Inductive Reasoning--higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume. Our results support general findings, within the cognitive neurosciences, showing lateralization of structure-function relationships, as well as more specific relationships between individual structures (e.g., left hippocampus) and functions relevant to particular aptitudes (e.g., Vocabulary). PMID:24586770

  4. Subcortical Correlates of Individual Differences in Aptitude

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Rex E.; Ryman, Sephira G.; Vakhtin, Andrei A.; Carrasco, Jessica; Wertz, Chris; Flores, Ranee A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of individual differences encompasses broad constructs including intelligence, creativity, and personality. However, substantially less research is devoted to the study of specific aptitudes in spite of their importance to educational, occupational, and avocational success. We sought to determine subcortical brain structural correlates of several broad aptitudes including Math, Vocabulary, Foresight, Paper Folding, and Inductive Reasoning in a large (N = 107), healthy, young (age range  = 16–29) cohort. Subcortical volumes were measured using an automated technique (FreeSurfer) across structures including bilateral caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala, and five equal regions of the corpus callosum. We found that performance on measures of each aptitude was predicted by different subcortical structures: Math – higher right nucleus accumbens volume; Vocabulary – higher left hippocampus volume; Paper Folding – higher right thalamus volume; Foresight – lower right thalamus and higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume; Inductive Reasoning – higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume. Our results support general findings, within the cognitive neurosciences, showing lateralization of structure-function relationships, as well as more specific relationships between individual structures (e.g., left hippocampus) and functions relevant to particular aptitudes (e.g., Vocabulary). PMID:24586770

  5. Increased Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex Volume in Chronic Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Winkelman, John W.; Plante, David T.; Schoerning, Laura; Benson, Kathleen; Buxton, Orfeu M.; O'Connor, Shawn P.; Jensen, J. Eric; Renshaw, Perry F.; Gonenc, Atilla

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent studies document alterations in cortical and subcortical volumes in patients with chronic primary insomnia (PI) in comparison with normal sleepers. We sought to confirm this observation in two previously studied PI cohorts. Methods: Two separate and independent groups of unmedicated patients who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for PI were compared with two separate, healthy control groups (Study 1: PI = 20, controls = 15; Study 2: PI = 21, controls = 20). Both studies included 2 weeks of sleep diaries supplemented by wrist actigraphy. The 3.0 T MRI-derived rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) volumes were measured with FreeSurfer image analysis suite (version 5.0) and results normalized to total intracranial volume (ICV). Unpaired t-tests (two-tailed) were used to compare rACC volumes between groups. Post hoc correlations of rACC volumes to insomnia severity measures were performed (uncorrected for multiplicity). Results: Both studies demonstrated increases in normalized rACC volume in PI compared with control patients (Study 1: right side P = 0.05, left side P = 0.03; Study 2: right side P = 0.03, left side P = 0.02). In PI patients from Study 1, right rACC volume was correlated with sleep onset latency (SOL) by both diary (r = 0.51, P = 0.02) and actigraphy (r = 0.50, P = 0.03), and with sleep efficiency by actigraphy (r = -0.57, P = 0.01); left rACC volume was correlated with SOL by diary (r = 0.48, P = 0.04), and wake after sleep onset (WASO) (r = 0.49, P = 0.03) and sleep efficiency (r = -0.49, P = 0.03) by actigraphy. In Study 2, right rACC volume was correlated with SOL by diary (r = 0.44, P = 0.05) in PI patients. Conclusions: Rostral ACC volumes are larger in patients with PI compared with control patients. Clinical severity measures in PI correlate with rACC volumes. These data may reflect a compensatory brain response to chronic insomnia and may represent a marker of

  6. Codes with special correlation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumert, L. D.

    1964-01-01

    Uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets

  7. Photoplethysmographic variability: spontaneous fluctuations in the tissue blood volume and in the systolic blood volume increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Babchenko, Anatoly; Turivnenko, Sergei; Khanokh, Boris

    1997-05-01

    Several parameters of the cardiovascular system such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure and blood flow fluctuate spontaneously due to the autonomic nervous system activity. In the current study, the low frequency fluctuations of the tissue blood volume and the blood volume pulse in the fingertips of healthy subjects were investigated using transmission photoplethysmography (PPG). The baseline of the PPG signal (BL) is inversely related to tissue blood volume so that the parameter BV, defined by: BV equals Const.-BL is directly related to the blood volume. The amplitude (AM) is directly related to the systolic blood volume increase. For most of the examinations BV and AM show positive correlation, which is expected since BV depends on the tissue blood volume and AM depends on the compliance of the blood vessels, both of which decrease during vasoconstriction, which is caused by higher activity of the sympathetic nervous system. The analysis of the PPG signal provides, therefore, a potential tool for study in the mechanism of the regulation of the microcirculation by the sympathetic nerves.

  8. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  9. Correlation in business networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souma, Wataru; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Kaizoji, Taisei

    2006-10-01

    This paper considers business networks. Through empirical study, we show that business networks display characteristics of small-world networks and scale-free networks. In this paper, we characterize firms as sales and bankruptcy probabilities. A correlation between sales and a correlation between bankruptcy probabilities in business networks are also considered. The results reveal that the correlation between sales depends strongly on the type of network, whereas the correlation between bankruptcy probabilities does so only weakly.

  10. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Amygdala Volumes and Risk for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Dager, Alecia D; McKay, D Reese; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Knowles, Emma; Sprooten, Emma; Göring, Harald HH; Dyer, Thomas D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Duggirala, Ravi; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence (alcohol use disorders, AUDs) are associated with brain shrinkage. Subcortical structures including the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal striatum, and thalamus subserve reward functioning and may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol-related damage. These structures may also show pre-existing deficits impacting the development and maintenance of AUD. It remains unclear whether there are common genetic features underlying both subcortical volumes and AUD. In this study, structural brain images were acquired from 872 Mexican-American individuals from extended pedigrees. Subcortical volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer, and quantitative genetic analyses were performed in SOLAR. We hypothesized the following: (1) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with lifetime AUD relative to unrelated controls; (2) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with current relative to past AUD; (3) in non-AUD individuals, reduced subcortical volumes in those with a family history of AUD compared to those without; and (4) evidence for common genetic underpinnings (pleiotropy) between AUD risk and subcortical volumes. Results showed that individuals with lifetime AUD showed larger ventricular and smaller amygdala volumes compared to non-AUD individuals. For the amygdala, there were no differences in volume between current vs past AUD, and non-AUD individuals with a family history of AUD demonstrated reductions compared to those with no such family history. Finally, amygdala volume was genetically correlated with the risk for AUD. Together, these results suggest that reduced amygdala volume reflects a pre-existing difference rather than alcohol-induced neurotoxic damage. Our genetic correlation analysis provides evidence for a common genetic factor underlying both reduced amygdala volumes and AUD risk. PMID:25079289

  11. What Is Strong Correlation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    Interpretation of correlation is often based on rules of thumb in which some boundary values are given to help decide whether correlation is non-important, weak, strong or very strong. This article shows that such rules of thumb may do more harm than good, and instead of supporting interpretation of correlation--which is their aim--they teach a…

  12. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  13. Constrained Canonical Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSarbo, Wayne S.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A variety of problems associated with the interpretation of traditional canonical correlation are discussed. A response surface approach is developed which allows for investigation of changes in the coefficients while maintaining an optimum canonical correlation value. Also, a discrete or constrained canonical correlation method is presented. (JKS)

  14. VLBI Correlators in Kashima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) is making use of two kinds of software correlators, the multi-channel K5/VSSP software correlator and the fast wide-band correlator 'GICO3,' for geodetic and R&D VLBI experiments. Overview of the activity and future plans are described in this paper.

  15. Correlates of Intellectual Ability with Morphology of the Hippocampus and Amygdala in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amat, Jose A.; Bansal, Ravi; Whiteman, Ronald; Haggerty, Rita; Royal, Jason; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    Several prior imaging studies of healthy adults have correlated volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala with measures of general intelligence (IQ), with variable results. In this study, we assessed correlations between volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala and full-scale IQ scores (FSIQ) using a method of image analysis that permits detailed…

  16. Evaluating volumes for magma chambers and magma withdrawn for caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, Nobuo; Ruch, Joel; Acocella, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    We develop an analytical model to infer the total volume of a magma chamber associated with caldera collapse and the critical volume of magma that must be withdrawn to induce caldera collapse. The diameter of caldera border fault, depth to the magma chamber, and volumes of magma erupted before the onset of collapse and of entire eruption are compiled for 14 representative calderas. The volume of erupted magma at the onset of collapse aligns between the total erupted volume of the other representative caldera-forming eruptions and the volume of eruptions without collapse during the post-caldera stage, correlating with the structural diameter of the calderas. The total volume of magma chamber is evaluated using a piston-cylinder collapse model, in which the competition between the decompression inside magma chamber and friction along the caldera fault controls the collapse. Estimated volumes of the magma chambers associated with caldera collapse are 3-10 km3 for Vesuvius 79 A.D. to 3000-10 500 km3 for Long Valley, correlating with the cube of caldera diameters. The estimated volumes of magma chamber are always larger than the total volume of erupted magma for caldera formation, suggesting that the magma chambers are never completely emptied by the caldera-forming eruptions. The minimum volumes of erupted magma to trigger collapse are calculated from the correlation between the caldera diameters and the evaluated volume of magma chambers. The minimum eruptive volume for the collapse correlates with the square of the caldera radius r and the square of the depth to the magma chamber h, and inversely correlates with the bulk modulus of magma, which is mainly controlled by the bubble fraction in the magma. A bubble fraction between 5 and 10% at the onset of collapse may explain the distribution of the erupted volumes at the onset of collapse of the calderas in nature.

  17. Correlations in Werner States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shun-Long; Li, Nan

    2008-02-01

    Werner states are paradigmatic examples of quantum states and play an innovative role in quantum information theory. In investigating the correlating capability of Werner states, we find the curious phenomenon that quantum correlations, as quantified by the entanglement of formation, may exceed the total correlations, as measured by the quantum mutual information. Consequently, though the entanglement of formation is so widely used in quantifying entanglement, it cannot be interpreted as a consistent measure of quantum correlations per se if we accept the folklore that total correlations are measured (or rather upper bounded) by the quantum mutual information.

  18. Complementarity and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Lorenzo; Bruß, Dagmar; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    We provide an interpretation of entanglement based on classical correlations between measurement outcomes of complementary properties: States that have correlations beyond a certain threshold are entangled. The reverse is not true, however. We also show that, surprisingly, all separable nonclassical states exhibit smaller correlations for complementary observables than some strictly classical states. We use mutual information as a measure of classical correlations, but we conjecture that the first result holds also for other measures (e.g., the Pearson correlation coefficient or the sum of conditional probabilities).

  19. Complementarity and correlations.

    PubMed

    Maccone, Lorenzo; Bruß, Dagmar; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    We provide an interpretation of entanglement based on classical correlations between measurement outcomes of complementary properties: States that have correlations beyond a certain threshold are entangled. The reverse is not true, however. We also show that, surprisingly, all separable nonclassical states exhibit smaller correlations for complementary observables than some strictly classical states. We use mutual information as a measure of classical correlations, but we conjecture that the first result holds also for other measures (e.g., the Pearson correlation coefficient or the sum of conditional probabilities). PMID:25884117

  20. Amniotic fluid volume and fetal swallowing rate in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoda, S.; Brace, R.A.; Longo, L.D.

    1985-07-01

    To investigate amniotic fluid (AF) dynamics and volume regulatory mechanisms, the authors measured the concentration of radioiodinated (/sup 125/I) serum albumin (RISA), /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cells (Cr-RBC), and /sup 103/Ru-labeled microspheres after injection into the amniotic cavity and determined AF volume and fetal swallowing rate in 22 singleton pregnant sheep. Under normal conditions 2-3 h were required for complete mixing of RISA and Cr-RBC within AF; however, when the fetus was dead only 3-5 h were required. AF volume of 17 sheep on the 5th postoperative day averaged 975 +/- 128 ml by RISA and 986 +/- 130 ml by Cr-RBC. AF volume determined with RISA and Cr-RBC correlated well. In contrast, AF volume measurement with microspheres produced erratic results. The disappearance rate of the labels in 17 ewes on the 5th postoperative day averaged 4.9 +/- 0.7%/h for RISA and 5.5 +/- 0.7 for Cr-RBC, and the calculated rates of fetal swallowing were 935 +/- 78 ml/day by RISA and 1,085 +/- 102 by Cr-RBC. In dead fetuses the disappearance rates were almost zero, suggesting that the labels disappear mainly by swallowing. Absolute volume swallowed and swallowed volume per fetal weight correlated with gestational age. AF volume correlated with fetal weight. Radiolabeled albumin or red blood cells may be used to simultaneously measure amniotic fluid volume and the rate of fetal swallowing. Furthermore it appears that fetal swallowing increases with gestational age.

  1. Change in Seroma Volume During Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rajiv; Spierer, Marnee Mutyala, Subhakar; Thawani, Nitika; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hong, Linda; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, a seroma often forms in the surgical cavity. If not drained, it may affect the volume of tumor bed requiring a boost after whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Our objective was to evaluate the change in seroma volume that occurs during WBRT, before boost planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of women receiving breast-conserving therapy with evidence of seroma at the time of WBRT planning. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed before WBRT and before the tumor bed boost. All patients received either a hypofractionated (42.4 Gy/16 fraction + 9.6 Gy/4 fraction boost) or standard fractionated (50.4 Gy/28 fraction + 10 Gy/5 fraction boost) regimen. Seroma volumes were contoured and compared on CT at the time of WBRT simulation and tumor bed boost planning. Results: Twenty-four patients with evidence of seroma were identified and all patients received WBRT without drainage of the seroma. Mean seroma volume before WBRT and at boost planning were significantly different at 65.7 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.5 cm{sup 3}) and 35.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 24.8 cm{sup 3}), respectively (p < 0.001). Mean and median reduction in seroma volume during radiation were 39.6% (SD, 23.8%) and 46.2% (range, 10.7-76.7%), respectively. Fractionation schedule was not correlated with change in seroma volume. Length of time from surgery to start of radiation therapy showed an inverse correlation with change in seroma volume (Pearson correlation r = -0.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The volume of seroma changes significantly during WBRT. Consequently, the accuracy of breast boost planning is likely affected, as is the volume of normal breast tissue irradiated. CT-based boost planning before boost irradiation is suggested to ensure appropriate coverage.

  2. Global bioconversions. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  3. Global bioconversions. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  4. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  5. Variable volume calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, R.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for determining the volume of a closed chamber. The apparatus includes a body having a cylindrical cavity therein including a threaded rear portion and a closed front end, and a piston having a threaded portion which mates with threaded rear portion of the cavity and which reciprocates in the cavity. A gas-impermeable seal, which is carried by the piston in one embodiment, forms a closed chamber in the front end of the cavity. A linear-movement indicator, attached to the rear end of the piston, measures the reciprocating movement of the piston in the cavity, while a pressure sensing device, connected to the front end of the cavity, determines the pressure in the closed system. In use, a vessel, having a volume enclosing experimental materials, is also connected to the front end of the cavity, and pressure and piston movement measurements are made which enable calculation of a volume change in the vessels. The design and operation of this instrument are presented. 7 figs.

  6. Anisotropic Ambient Volume Shading.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to compute anisotropic shading for direct volume rendering to improve the perception of the orientation and shape of surface-like structures. We determine the scale-aware anisotropy of a shading point by analyzing its ambient region. We sample adjacent points with similar scalar values to perform a principal component analysis by computing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In particular, we estimate the tangent directions, which serve as the tangent frame for anisotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. Moreover, we exploit the ratio of the eigenvalues to measure the magnitude of the anisotropy at each shading point. Altogether, this allows us to model a data-driven, smooth transition from isotropic to strongly anisotropic volume shading. In this way, the shape of volumetric features can be enhanced significantly by aligning specular highlights along the principal direction of anisotropy. Our algorithm is independent of the transfer function, which allows us to compute all shading parameters once and store them with the data set. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint. Our results demonstrate the benefit of anisotropic shading for visualization to achieve data-driven local illumination for improved perception compared to isotropic shading. PMID:26529745

  7. Combined study of the gluon and ghost condensates and <{epsilon}{sup abc}c{sup b}c{sup c}> in Euclidean SU(2) Yang-Mills theory in the Landau gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Capri, M.A.L.; Lemes, V.E.R.; Sobreiro, R.F.; Sorella, S.P.; Dudal, D.; Verschelde, H.; Gracey, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The ghost condensate <{epsilon}{sup abc}c{sup b}c{sup c}> is considered together with the gluon condensate in SU(2) Euclidean Yang-Mills theories quantized in the Landau gauge. The vacuum polarization ceases to be transverse due to the nonvanishing condensate <{epsilon}{sup abc}c{sup b}c{sup c}>. The gluon propagator itself remains transverse. By polarization effects, this ghost condensate induces then a splitting in the gluon mass parameter, which is dynamically generated through . The obtained effective masses are real when is included in the analysis. In the absence of , the already known result that the ghost condensate induces effective tachyonic masses is recovered. At the one-loop level, we find that the effective diagonal mass becomes smaller than the off-diagonal one. This might serve as an indication for some kind of Abelian dominance in the Landau gauge, similar to what happens in the maximal Abelian gauge.

  8. Modified non-Euclidean transformation on the SO(2N+2) U(N+1) Grassmannian and SO(2N + 1) random phase approximation for unified description of Bose and Fermi type collective excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Seiya; da Providência, João

    2016-02-01

    In a slight different way from the previous one, we propose a modified non-Euclidean transformation on the SO(2N+2) U(N+1) Grassmannian which gives the projected SO(2N+1) Tamm-Dancoff equation. We derive a classical time-dependent (TD) SO(2N + 1) Lagrangian which, through the Euler-Lagrange equation of motion for SO(2N+2) U(N+1) coset variables, brings another form of the previous extended-TD Hartree-Bogoliubov (HB) equation. The SO(2N + 1) random phase approximation (RPA) is derived using Dyson representation for paired and unpaired operators. In the SO(2N) HB case, one boson and two boson excited states are realized. We, however, stress non-existence of a higher RPA vacuum. An integrable system is given by a geometrical concept of zero-curvature, i.e. integrability condition of connection on the corresponding Lie group. From the group theoretical viewpoint, we show the existence of a symplectic two-form ω.

  9. Olfactory bulb volume predicts therapeutic outcome in major depression disorder.

    PubMed

    Negoias, Simona; Hummel, Thomas; Symmank, Anja; Schellong, Julia; Joraschky, Peter; Croy, Ilona

    2016-06-01

    The volume of the olfactory bulb (OB) is strongly reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and this group exhibits markedly decreased olfactory function. It has been suggested that olfactory input is important for maintaining balance in limbic neurocircuits. The aim of our study was to investigate whether reduced OB volume is associated with response to therapy in MDD. Twenty-four inpatients (all women, age 21-49 years, mean 38 ± 10 years SD) with MDD and 36 healthy controls (all women, age 20-52 years, mean 36 ± 10 years SD) underwent structural MRI. OB volume was compared between responders (N = 13) and non-responders (N = 11) to psychotherapy. Retest of OB volume was performed about 6 months after the end of therapy in nine of the patients. Therapy responders exhibited no significant difference in OB volume compared to healthy controls. However, average OB volume of non-responders was 23 % smaller compared to responders (p = .0011). Furthermore, OB volume was correlated with the change of depression severity (r = .46, p = .024). Volume of the OB did not change in the course of therapy. OB volume may be a biological vulnerability factor for the occurrence and/or maintenance of depression, at least in women. PMID:25977168

  10. High-resolution correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    In the basic correlation process a sequence of time-lag-indexed correlation coefficients are computed as the inner or dot product of segments of two signals. The time-lag(s) for which the magnitude of the correlation coefficient sequence is maximized is the estimated relative time delay of the two signals. For discrete sampled signals, the delay estimated in this manner is quantized with the same relative accuracy as the clock used in sampling the signals. In addition, the correlation coefficients are real if the input signals are real. There have been many methods proposed to estimate signal delay to more accuracy than the sample interval of the digitizer clock, with some success. These methods include interpolation of the correlation coefficients, estimation of the signal delay from the group delay function, and beam forming techniques, such as the MUSIC algorithm. For spectral estimation, techniques based on phase differentiation have been popular, but these techniques have apparently not been applied to the correlation problem . We propose a phase based delay estimation method (PBDEM) based on the phase of the correlation function that provides a significant improvement of the accuracy of time delay estimation. In the process, the standard correlation function is first calculated. A time lag error function is then calculated from the correlation phase and is used to interpolate the correlation function. The signal delay is shown to be accurately estimated as the zero crossing of the correlation phase near the index of the peak correlation magnitude. This process is nearly as fast as the conventional correlation function on which it is based. For real valued signals, a simple modification is provided, which results in the same correlation accuracy as is obtained for complex valued signals.

  11. Research Summary No. 36-6, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  12. Research Summary No. 36-5, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  13. Mapping gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two important indices widely used to detect neuropathological changes in brain structural magnetic resonance imaging. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) protocol and surface-based cortical thickness measure, this study comprehensively investigated the regional changes in cortical gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and fourteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that voxel-based gray matter volume and cortical thickness reductions were highly correlated in the temporal lobe and its medial structure in AD. Moreover significant reduced cortical regions of gray matter volume were obviously more than that of cortical thickness. These findings suggest that gray matter volume and cortical thickness, as two important imaging markers, are effective indices for detecting the neuroanatomical alterations and help us understand the neuropathology from different views in AD.

  14. High-speed Reed-Solomon decoder using reformulation inversionless Berlekamp-Massey architecture for volume holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Diqing; Xie, Changsheng

    2003-04-01

    Volume holography is currently the subject of widespread interest as a fast-readout-rate, high-capacity digital data-storage technology. However, due to the effect of cross-talk noise, scattering noise, noise gratings formed during a multiple exposure schedule, it brings a lot of burst errors and random errors in the system. Reed-Solomon error-correction codes have been widely used to defend digital data against errors, but the speed of Reed-Solomon decoder for volume holographic storage system application is a challenge. This paper presents a high-speed VLSI decoder architecture implementation for decoding (255,223) Reed-Solomon codes with the Modified Berlekamp-Massey algorithm for volume holographic storage. In contrast to conventional Berlekamp-Massey architectures, the speed bottleneck is eliminated via a series of algorithmic transformations that result in a fully systolic architecture in which a single array of processors computes both the error-locator and the error-evaluator polynomials. The proposed architecture requirs approximately 25% fewer multipliers and a simpler control structure than the architectures based on the popular extended Euclidean algorithm. By adopting high speed CPLD, a data processing rate over 200 Mbit/s is realized. Moreover, for block-interleaved Reed-Solomon codes, embedding the interleaver memory into the decoder results in a further increase of the throughput.

  15. Position-Sensitive Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Joseph P.; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells. PMID:15894645

  16. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  17. The determinants of transverse tubular volume in resting skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jingwei; Fraser, James A

    2014-01-01

    The transverse tubular (t)-system of skeletal muscle couples sarcolemmal electrical excitation with contraction deep within the fibre. Exercise, pathology and the composition of the extracellular fluid (ECF) can alter t-system volume (t-volume). T-volume changes are thought to contribute to fatigue, rhabdomyolysis and disruption of excitation–contraction coupling. However, mechanisms that underlie t-volume changes are poorly understood. A multicompartment, history-independent computer model of rat skeletal muscle was developed to define the minimum conditions for t-volume stability. It was found that the t-system tends to swell due to net ionic fluxes from the ECF across the access resistance. However, a stable t-volume is possible when this is offset by a net efflux from the t-system to the cell and thence to the ECF, forming a net ion cycle ECF→t-system→sarcoplasm→ECF that ultimately depends on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Membrane properties that maximize this circuit flux decrease t-volume, including PNa(t) > PNa(s), PK(t) < PK(s) and N(t) < N(s) [P, permeability; N, Na+/K+-ATPase density; (t), t-system membrane; (s), sarcolemma]. Hydrostatic pressures, fixed charges and/or osmoles in the t-system can influence the magnitude of t-volume changes that result from alterations in this circuit flux. Using a parameter set derived from literature values where possible, this novel theory of t-volume was tested against data from previous experiments where t-volume was measured during manipulations of ECF composition. Predicted t-volume changes correlated satisfactorily. The present work provides a robust, unifying theoretical framework for understanding the determinants of t-volume. PMID:25384782

  18. Spleen volume on CT and the effect of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Romero, Cinthia; Agarwal, Sheela; Abujudeh, Hani H; Thrall, James; Hahn, Peter F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the magnitude of change in spleen volume on CT in subjects sustaining blunt abdominal trauma without hemorrhage relative to patients without disease and how the spleen volumes are distributed. Sixty-seven subjects with blunt abdominal trauma and 101 control subjects were included in this retrospective single-center, IRB-approved, and HIPAA-compliant study. Patients with an injured spleen were excluded. Using a semiautomatic segmentation program, two readers computed spleen volumes from CT. Spleen volume distribution in male and female trauma and control cohorts were compared nonparametrically. Spleen volume plotted against height, weight, and age were analyzed by linear regression. The number of females and males are, respectively, 35 and 32 in trauma subjects and 69 and 32 among controls. Female trauma patients (49.6 years) were older than males (39.8 years) (p = 0.02). Distributions of spleen volume were not normal, skewed above their means, requiring a nonparametric comparison. Spleen volumes in trauma patients were smaller than those in controls with medians of 230 vs 294 mL in males(p < 0.006) and 163 vs 191 mL in females(p < 0.04). Spleen volume correlated positively with weight in females and with height in male controls, and negatively with age in male controls (p < 0.01). Variation in reproducibility and repeatability was acceptable at 1.5 and 4.9 %, respectively. Reader variation was 1.7 and 4.6 % for readers 1 and 2, respectively. The mean spleen volume in controls was 245 mL, the largest ever reported. Spleen volume decreases in response to blunt abdominal trauma. Spleen volumes are not normally distributed. Our population has the largest spleen volume reported in the literature, perhaps a consequence of the obesity epidemic. PMID:27166964

  19. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  20. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  1. The influence of trading volume on market efficiency: The DCCA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukpitak, Jessada; Hengpunya, Varagorn

    2016-09-01

    For a single market, the cross-correlation between market efficiency and trading volume, which is an indicator of market liquidity, is attentively analysed. The study begins with creating time series of market efficiency by applying time-varying Hurst exponent with one year sliding window to daily closing prices. The time series of trading volume corresponding to the same time period used for the market efficiency is derived from one year moving average of daily trading volume. Subsequently, the detrended cross-correlation coefficient is employed to quantify the degree of cross-correlation between the two time series. It was found that values of cross-correlation coefficient of all considered stock markets are close to 0 and are clearly out of range in which correlation being considered significant in almost every time scale. Obtained results show that the market liquidity in term of trading volume hardly has effect on the market efficiency.

  2. Fusiform Correlates of Facial Memory in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Trontel, Haley G.; Duffield, Tyler C.; Bigler, Erin D.; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly B.D.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Travers, Brittany G.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Alexander, Andrew; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that performance on standardized measures of memory in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is substantially reduced in comparison to matched typically developing controls (TDC). Given reported deficits in face processing in autism, the current study compared performance on an immediate and delayed facial memory task for individuals with ASD and TDC. In addition, we examined volumetric differences in classic facial memory regions of interest (ROI) between the two groups, including the fusiform, amygdala, and hippocampus. We then explored the relationship between ROI volume and facial memory performance. We found larger volumes in the autism group in the left amygdala and left hippocampus compared to TDC. In contrast, TDC had larger left fusiform gyrus volumes when compared with ASD. Interestingly, we also found significant negative correlations between delayed facial memory performance and volume of the left and right fusiform and the left hippocampus for the ASD group but not for TDC. The possibility of larger fusiform volume as a marker of abnormal connectivity and decreased facial memory is discussed. PMID:24761228

  3. BULGARIAN, BASIC COURSE, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HODGE, CARLETON T.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE IN BULGARIAN HAS BEEN PREPARED IN TWO VOLUMES. THIS VOLUME, VOLUME 1, IS DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS--BASIC SENTENCES, NOTES, AND DRILLS. AN ADDITIONAL PART INCLUDES READING PASSAGES. THE BASIC SENTENCES ARE NORMAL DIALOG MATERIAL, MEANT TO BE MEMORIZED. THE NOTES EXPLAIN THE GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE OF THE LANGUAGE AND ARE DIVIDED INTO…

  4. Calculus Students' Understanding of Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have documented difficulties that elementary school students have in understanding volume. Despite its importance in higher mathematics, we know little about college students' understanding of volume. This study investigated calculus students' understanding of volume. Clinical interview transcripts and written responses to volume…

  5. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  6. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  7. Reduced cardiac volumes in chronic fatigue syndrome associate with plasma volume but not length of disease: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Julia L; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Petrides, George; Frith, James; Hodgson, Tim; Maclachlan, Laura; MacGowan, Guy; Blamire, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore potential mechanisms that underpin the cardiac abnormalities seen in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) using non-invasive cardiac impedance, red cell mass and plasma volume measurements. Methods Cardiac MR (MR) examinations were performed using 3 T Philips Intera Achieva scanner (Best, NL) in participants with CFS (Fukuda; n=47) and matched case-by-case controls. Total volume (TV), red cell volume (RCV) and plasma volume (PV) measurements were performed (41 CFS and 10 controls) using the indicator dilution technique using simultaneous 51-chromium labelling of red blood cells and 125-iodine labelling of serum albumin. Results The CFS group length of history (mean±SD) was 14±10 years. Patients with CFS had significantly reduced end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes together with reduced end-diastolic wall masses (all p<0.0001). Mean±SD RCV was 1565±443 mL with 26/41 (63%) having values below 95% of expected. PV was 2659±529 mL with 13/41 (32%) <95% expected. There were strong positive correlations between TV, RCV and PV and cardiac end-diastolic wall mass (all p<0.0001; r2=0.5). Increasing fatigue severity correlated negatively with lower PV (p=0.04; r2=0.2). There were no relationships between any MR or volume measurements and length of history, suggesting that deconditioning was unlikely to be the cause of these abnormalities. Conclusions This study confirms an association between reduced cardiac volumes and blood volume in CFS. Lack of relationship between length of disease, cardiac and plasma volumes suggests findings are not secondary to deconditioning. The relationship between plasma volume and severity of fatigue symptoms suggests a potential therapeutic target in CFS. PMID:27403329

  8. New volume and inverse volume operators for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinsong; Ma, Yongge

    2016-08-01

    A new alternative volume operator is constructed for loop quantum gravity by using the so-called cotriad operators as building blocks. It is shown that the new volume operator shares the same qualitative properties with the standard volume operator. Moreover, a new alternative inverse volume operator is also constructed in the light of the construction of the alternative volume operator, which is possessed of the same qualitative properties as those of the alternative volume operator. The new inverse volume operator can be employed to construct the Hamiltonian operator of matter fields, which may lead to an anomaly-free on-shell quantum constraint algebra without any special restriction on the regularization procedure for gravity coupled to matter fields.

  9. Almost quantum correlations.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Guryanova, Yelena; Hoban, Matty J; Acín, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Quantum theory is not only successfully tested in laboratories every day but also constitutes a robust theoretical framework: small variations usually lead to implausible consequences, such as faster-than-light communication. It has even been argued that quantum theory may be special among possible theories. Here we report that, at the level of correlations among different systems, quantum theory is not so special. We define a set of correlations, dubbed 'almost quantum', and prove that it strictly contains the set of quantum correlations but satisfies all-but-one of the proposed principles to capture quantum correlations. We present numerical evidence that the remaining principle is satisfied too. PMID:25697645

  10. Local available quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundarain, Douglas F.; de Guevara, María L. Ladrón

    2015-12-01

    In this work, local available quantum correlations are studied. They are defined in terms of mutual information of bipartite local measurements done over an optimal local basis complementary to the local basis which defines the respective classical correlations. For two qubits, it is always possible to choose the basis of classical correlations as the set of eigenvectors of σ _z (the third Pauli matrix) and complementary bases become the sets of eigenvectors of the observables orthogonal to σ _z. It is shown that all states with zero local available quantum correlations are separable but not necessarily strictly classical; this fact puts this kind of correlations in the middle between discord and entanglement. Since in many cases it may suffice to know whether a given state has quantum correlations, the structure of the states with zero local available quantum correlations is presented. It is also shown that there is a close connection between local available quantum correlations and the protocol of entanglement activation developed by Piani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 106:220403, 2011). If a state satisfies the sufficient condition for the entanglement swapping associated with this protocol, this state has nonzero local available quantum correlations.

  11. Strong volume, stable prices

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This article is the September-October 1993 market report, providing trading volume and prices in the Uranium market. Activity was brisk, with 15 deals concluded. Six were in the spot concentrates market, with four of the six deals involving U.S. utilities and approximately 1.8M pounds of U3O8 equivalent. There were five conversion deals announced, with four of the five deals involving U.S. utilities. Four deals were concluded in the enrichment market, and the deals involving U.S. utilities were approximately 327k SWUs. On the horizon, there are deals for approximately 4.1M SWU.

  12. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  13. Reproducible Volume Restoration and Efficient Long-term Volume Retention after Point-of-care Standardized Cell-enhanced Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dos Anjos, Severiano; Matas-Palau, Aina; Mercader, Josep; Katz, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lipoaspirated fat grafts are used to reconstruct volume defects in breast surgery. Although intraoperative treatment decisions are influenced by volume changes observed immediately after grafting, clinical effect and patient satisfaction are dependent on volume retention over time. The study objectives were to determine how immediate breast volume changes correlate to implanted graft volumes, to understand long-term adipose graft volume changes, and to study the “dose” effect of adding autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to fat grafts on long-term volume retention. Methods: A total of 74 patients underwent 77 cell-enhanced fat grafting procedures to restore breast volume deficits associated with cosmetic and reconstructive indications. Although all procedures used standardized fat grafts, 21 of the fat grafts were enriched with a low dose of SVF cells and 56 were enriched with a high SVF cell dose. Three-dimensional imaging was used to quantify volume retention over time Results: For each milliliter of injected fat graft, immediate changes in breast volume were shown to be lower than the actual volume implanted for all methods and clinical indications treated. Long-term breast volume changes stabilize by 90–120 days after grafting. Final volume retention in the long-term was higher with high cell-enhanced fat grafts. Conclusions: Intraoperative immediate breast volume changes do not correspond with implanted fat graft volumes. In the early postoperative period (7–21 days), breast volume increases more than the implanted volume and then rapidly decreases in the subsequent 30–60 days. High-dose cell-enhanced fat grafts decrease early postsurgical breast edema and significantly improve long-term volume retention. PMID:26579353

  14. Is the difference in the volume of the pharyngeal space, as measured by acoustic pharyngometry, before and after tonsillectomy proportional to the volume of the excised tonsils?

    PubMed Central

    Di Francesco, Renata C.; Kreibich, Mariana Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenotonsillectomy is recognized as an effective therapy for snoring and sleep disorders in children. It is important to understand whether adenotonsillectomy significantly increases the volume of the pharyngeal space. The goal of this study was to evaluate the change in oropharyngeal volume after adenotonsillectomy and the correlation of this change with the objective volume of the tonsils and body mass index. METHODS: We included 27 subjects (14 males) with snoring caused by tonsil and adenoid hypertrophy. The mean age of the subjects was 7.92 (±2.52) years. Children with craniofacial malformations or neuromuscular diseases or syndromes were excluded. The parents/caregivers answered an adapted questionnaire regarding sleep-disordered breathing. All patients were subjected to weight and height measurements and body mass index was calculated. The subjects underwent pharyngometry before and after adenotonsillectomy and the volume of both excised tonsils together was measured in cm3 in the operating room. RESULTS: Pharyngometric analysis showed that the mean pharyngeal volume was 28.63 (±5.57) cm3 before surgery and 31.23 (±6.76) cm3 after surgery; the volume of the oropharynx was significantly increased post-surgery (p=0.015, Wilcoxon test). No correlation was found between the objective tonsil volume and the post-surgical volume increase (p=0.6885). There was a fair correlation between the oropharyngeal volume and body mass index (p=0.0224). CONCLUSION: Adenotonsillectomy increases the volume of the pharyngeal space, but this increase does not correlate with the objective tonsil size. Furthermore, greater BMI was associated with a smaller increase in the pharyngeal volume. Oropharyngeal structures and craniofacial morphology may also play a role in the increase in oropharyngeal volume. PMID:27276399

  15. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang, Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-01-01

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:22047363

  16. Acoustical correlates of performance on a dynamic range compression discrimination task

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Andrew T.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic range compression is widely used to reduce the difference between the most and least intense portions of a signal. Such compression distorts the shape of the amplitude envelope of a signal, but it is unclear to what extent such distortions are actually perceivable by listeners. Here, the ability to distinguish between compressed and uncompressed versions of a noise vocoded sentence was initially measured in listeners with normal hearing while varying the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters. This narrow condition was selected in order to characterize perception under the most favorable listening conditions. The average behavioral sensitivity to compression was highly correlated to several acoustical indices of modulation depth. In particular, performance was highly correlated to the Euclidean distance between the modulation spectra of the uncompressed and compressed signals. Suggesting that this relationship is not restricted to the initial test conditions, the correlation remained largely unchanged both (1) when listeners with normal hearing were tested using a time-compressed version of the original signal, and (2) when listeners with impaired hearing were tested using the original signal. If this relationship generalizes to more ecologically valid conditions, it will provide a straightforward method for predicting the detectability of compression-induced distortions. PMID:23967944

  17. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-11-15

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor.

  18. Transparent volume imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wixson, Steve E.

    1990-07-01

    Transparent Volume Imaging began with the stereo xray in 1895 and ended for most investigators when radiation safety concerns eliminated the second view. Today, similiar images can be generated by the computer without safety hazards providing improved perception and new means of image quantification. A volumetric workstation is under development based on an operational prototype. The workstation consists of multiple symbolic and numeric processors, binocular stereo color display generator with large image memory and liquid crystal shutter, voice input and output, a 3D pointer that uses projection lenses so that structures in 3 space can be touched directly, 3D hard copy using vectograph and lenticular printing, and presentation facilities using stereo 35mm slide and stereo video tape projection. Volumetric software includes a volume window manager, Mayo Clinic's Analyze program and our Digital Stereo Microscope (DSM) algorithms. The DSM uses stereo xray-like projections, rapidly oscillating motion and focal depth cues such that detail can be studied in the spatial context of the entire set of data. Focal depth cues are generated with a lens and apeture algorithm that generates a plane of sharp focus, and multiple stereo pairs each with a different plane of sharp focus are generated and stored in the large memory for interactive selection using a physical or symbolic depth selector. More recent work is studying non-linear focussing. Psychophysical studies are underway to understand how people perce ive images on a volumetric display and how accurately 3 dimensional structures can be quantitated from these displays.

  19. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  20. Sonographic estimation of pleural fluid volume in dogs.

    PubMed

    Newitt, Anna L M; Cripps, Peter J; Shimali, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find an ultrasonographic method to estimate pleural fluid volume in dogs. Nine canine cadavers of mixed breed were studied. Using a transsternal view, linear measurements from the pleural surface of the midline of the sternebra at the center of the heart to the furthest ventrolateral point of both right and left lung edges were recorded. Isotonic saline was injected using ultrasound guidance into both right and left pleural spaces and the measurements were repeated using standard increments until 1000 ml total volume was reached. No relationship was identified between mean distance and injected volume up to 100 ml. Thereafter, the mean distance increased in an approximately linear relationship with the cube root of fluid volume. There was a high correlation (r > or = 0.899) between the ultrasonographic measurement and fluid volume within individual dogs, but it was not possible to produce a useful equation to calculate absolute pleural fluid volume for new subjects. Nevertheless, ultrasonography may be used to semiquantitatively monitor pleural fluid volume, so that a decrease in the mean linear measurement obtained reflects a decrease in the total fluid volume. PMID:19241761

  1. Intravascular volume in cirrhosis. Reassessment using improved methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, W.G. Jr.; Ibarra, F.

    1988-04-01

    Previous studies of blood volume (BV) in cirrhosis have either not adjusted BV properly for body size; determined plasma volume from the dilution of labeled albumin 10-20 min postinjection, when some extravascular redistribution has already occurred; and/or not used the correct whole body-peripheral hematocrit ratio (0.82) in calculating whole BV from plasma volume and the peripheral hematocrit. We measured BV with attention to these considerations in 19 patients with cirrhosis and reexamined the determinants of vascular volume and the relationship between vascular volume and sodium retention. BV was calculated as plasma volume (determined from extrapolated plasma activity of intravenously injected (/sup 131/I)+albumin at time 0) divided by (peripheral hematocrit X 0.82). The result was expressed per kilogram dry body weight, determined by subtracting the mass of ascites (measured by isotope dilution; 1 liter = 1 kg) from the actual body weight of nonedematous patients. Measured and expressed in this way, BV correlated strongly with esophageal variceal size (r = 0.87, P less than 0.05), although not with net portal, right atrial, inferior vena caval, or arterial pressure, and was significantly greater in patients with sodium retention as compared to patients without sodium retention. The principal modifier of vascular volume in cirrhosis is vascular capacity, which is probably mainly determined by the extent of the portasystemic collateral circulation. Increased vascular volume in patients with sodium retention as compared to patients without sodium retention supports the overflow theory of ascites formation.

  2. Striatal volume predicts level of video game skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Boot, Walter R; Basak, Chandramallika; Neider, Mark B; Prakash, Ruchika S; Voss, Michelle W; Graybiel, Ann M; Simons, Daniel J; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-11-01

    Video game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks. PMID:20089946

  3. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  4. ALMA correlator computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Jim; Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    We present a design for the computer systems which control, configure, and monitor the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) correlator and process its output. Two distinct computer systems implement this functionality: a rack- mounted PC controls and monitors the correlator, and a cluster of 17 PCs process the correlator output into raw spectral results. The correlator computer systems interface to other ALMA computers via gigabit Ethernet networks utilizing CORBA and raw socket connections. ALMA Common Software provides the software infrastructure for this distributed computer environment. The control computer interfaces to the correlator via multiple CAN busses and the data processing computer cluster interfaces to the correlator via sixteen dedicated high speed data ports. An independent array-wide hardware timing bus connects to the computer systems and the correlator hardware ensuring synchronous behavior and imposing hard deadlines on the control and data processor computers. An aggregate correlator output of 1 gigabyte per second with 16 millisecond periods and computational data rates of approximately 1 billion floating point operations per second define other hard deadlines for the data processing computer cluster.

  5. Quantitative prediction of respiratory tidal volume based on the external torso volume change: a potential volumetric surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Arora, Naveen C.; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Citrin, Deborah; Kaushal, Aradhana; Zach, Leor; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2009-04-01

    An external respiratory surrogate that not only highly correlates with but also quantitatively predicts internal tidal volume should be useful in guiding four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), as well as 4D radiation therapy (4DRT). A volumetric surrogate should have advantages over external fiducial point(s) for monitoring respiration-induced motion of the torso, which deforms in synchronization with a patient-specific breathing pattern. This study establishes a linear relationship between the external torso volume change (TVC) and lung air volume change (AVC) by validating a proposed volume conservation hypothesis (TVC = AVC) throughout the respiratory cycle using 4DCT and spirometry. Fourteen patients' torso 4DCT images and corresponding spirometric tidal volumes were acquired to examine this hypothesis. The 4DCT images were acquired using dual surrogates in ciné mode and amplitude-based binning in 12 respiratory stages, minimizing residual motion artifacts. Torso and lung volumes were calculated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms and volume changes were calculated relative to the full-exhalation stage. The TVC and AVC, as functions of respiratory stages, were compared, showing a high correlation (r = 0.992 ± 0.005, p < 0.0001) as well as a linear relationship (slope = 1.027 ± 0.061, R2 = 0.980) without phase shift. The AVC was also compared to the spirometric tidal volumes, showing a similar linearity (slope = 1.030 ± 0.092, R2 = 0.947). In contrast, the thoracic and abdominal heights measured from 4DCT showed relatively low correlation (0.28 ± 0.44 and 0.82 ± 0.30, respectively) and location-dependent phase shifts. This novel approach establishes the foundation for developing an external volumetric respiratory surrogate.

  6. Harmonic electron correlation operator.

    PubMed

    Rassolov, Vitaly A

    2011-07-21

    An appealing way to model electron correlation within the single determinant wave function formalism is through the expectation value of a linear two-electron operator. For practical reasons, it is desirable for such an operator to be universal, i.e., not depend on the positions and types of nuclei in a molecule. We show how a perturbation theory applied to a hookium atom provides for a particular form of a correlation operator, hence called the harmonic correlation operator. The correlation operator approach is compared and contrasted to the traditional ways to describe electron correlation. To investigate the two-electron approximation of this operator, we apply it to many-electron hookium systems. To investigate the harmonic approximation, we apply it to the small atomic systems. Directions of future research are also discussed. PMID:21786991

  7. Strongly-correlated heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Electronic phase behavior in correlated-electron systems is a fundamental problem of condensed matter physics. The change in the phase behavior near surfaces and interfaces, i.e., {\\em electronic reconstruction}, is therefore the fundamental issue of the correlated-electron surface or interface science. In addition to basic science, understanding of such a phase behavior is of crucial importance for potential devices exploiting the novel properties of the correlated systems. In this article, we present a general overview of the field, and then discuss the recent theoretical progress mainly focusing on the correlation effects. We illustrate the general concept of {\\em electronic reconstruction} by studying model heterostructures consisting of strongly-correlated systems. Future directions for research are also discussed.

  8. Mean Platelet Volume in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hee Joo; Park, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mean platelet volume (MPV) has been thought as a useful index of platelet activation. It is supposed that MPV is also associated with several inflammatory and infectious diseases. Korea still has a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to investigate MPV as an inflammatory marker in TB patients. Materials and Methods. MPV were determined in 221 patients with TB and 143 individuals for control group. MPV was estimated by an Advia 2120 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results. In the TB patient group, a positive correlation was found between CRP and MPV. Age and MPV had a positive correlation in TB patient group. Conclusions. We conclude that there is a significant relation between MPV and inflammatory conditions. MPV can be an inflammatory marker to determine the disease activity in TB patients. PMID:27419136

  9. Price-volume multifractal analysis and its application in Chinese stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xin-tian; Liu, Zhi-ying

    2012-06-01

    An empirical research on Chinese stock markets is conducted using statistical tools. First, the multifractality of stock price return series, ri(ri=ln(Pt+1)-ln(Pt)) and trading volume variation series, vi(vi=ln(Vt+1)-ln(Vt)) is confirmed using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. Furthermore, a multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis between stock price return and trading volume variation in Chinese stock markets is also conducted. It is shown that the cross relationship between them is also found to be multifractal. Second, the cross-correlation between stock price Pi and trading volume Vi is empirically studied using cross-correlation function and detrended cross-correlation analysis. It is found that both Shanghai stock market and Shenzhen stock market show pronounced long-range cross-correlations between stock price and trading volume. Third, a composite index R based on price and trading volume is introduced. Compared with stock price return series ri and trading volume variation series vi, R variation series not only remain the characteristics of original series but also demonstrate the relative correlation between stock price and trading volume. Finally, we analyze the multifractal characteristics of R variation series before and after three financial events in China (namely, Price Limits, Reform of Non-tradable Shares and financial crisis in 2008) in the whole period of sample to study the changes of stock market fluctuation and financial risk. It is found that the empirical results verified the validity of R.

  10. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.; Isaacs, S.; Fraser, R.C.; Commerford, P.J.; Uys, C.J.; Rose, A.G.; Smith, J.A.; Barnard, C.N.

    1985-02-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts.

  11. Big-Brained People are Smarter: A Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between In Vivo Brain Volume and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between brain volume and intelligence has been a topic of a scientific debate since at least the 1830s. To address the debate, a meta-analysis of the relationship between in vivo brain volume and intelligence was conducted. Based on 37 samples across 1530 people, the population correlation was estimated at 0.33. The correlation is…

  12. Analysing body condition: mass, volume or density?

    PubMed

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi; Macías-Ordóñez, Rogelio; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Fernández-Montraveta, Carmen

    2008-11-01

    1. Body condition (defined as the relative amount of energy reserves in the body) is an animal trait with strong ecological implications. In some animal taxa (e.g. arthropods), the external volume of the body part in which most nutrients are stored (e.g. abdomen) is used interchangeably with body mass to estimate body condition, making the implicit assumption that abdomen residual volume is a good surrogate of residual mass. However, the degree of correlation between these two measures should largely depend on the density of the nutrients stored. 2. We simulated two food-supplemented experimental groups of animals, each storing a slightly different amount of lipids either in their abdomens or in their entire bodies, and explored (i) how different estimates of condition were able to detect fixed differences between the groups; and (ii) how the amount of lipids stored could affect the outcome of non-intrusive measures of condition on a dichotomous variable (e.g. survival, mating success). We found that density body condition (body mass statistically controlled for structural body size and body volume) has much greater power to detect differences between experimental groups or effects on binary response variables than do classic mass/size or volume/size condition indices. 3. Using data on Lycosa tarantula (L.), a burrowing wolf spider, we report dramatic differences among these three indices in their ability to detect sex differences in the effect of feeding treatment on body condition at maturity. In particular, a plot of residual mass against residual volume reflecting nutrient density suggests that poorly fed spiders are nutritionally unbalanced, since well-fed spiders invest in nutrients of very different density. 4. Furthermore, using data on Scathophaga stercoraria (L.), the yellow dung fly, we found that an index of density condition was better at distinguishing condition differences among three populations than were mass or volume condition estimates alone. 5

  13. Correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Soldatov, S.; Vowinkel, B.; Mueller, P.

    2010-11-15

    In high temperature fusion plasmas the transport of energy and particles is commonly believed to be driven by turbulence. Turbulence quantities as correlation length and decorrelation time are important for the confinement properties of a plasma. Besides other diagnostics, correlation reflectometry has proven to be a suitable tool for the measurement of turbulence properties. At the medium sized Toroidal EXperiment for Technical Oriented Research (TEXTOR) the existing correlation reflectometry has been recently upgraded. A new reflectometer based on a microwave synthesizer has been developed and installed for the investigation of turbulence properties in a fusion plasma. Together with the existing reflectometer the measurement of radial correlation length and decorrelation time becomes available. Both reflectometers are computer controlled and allow to program individual frequency sequences and the duration of each frequency step. With the existing poloidal antenna array at {theta}=0 deg. and on top of the vacuum vessel, the system allows the measurement of radial correlation and poloidal correlations at the same time. First experiments have been performed and the results on the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in a fusion plasma are presented.

  14. Nanoscale volume confinement and fluorescence enhancement with double nanohole aperture

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Raju; Al Balushi, Ahmed A.; Rigneault, Hervé; Gordon, Reuven; Wenger, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction ultimately limits the fluorescence collected from a single molecule, and sets an upper limit to the maximum concentration to isolate a single molecule in the detection volume. To overcome these limitations, we introduce here the use of a double nanohole structure with 25 nm gap, and report enhanced detection of single fluorescent molecules in concentrated solutions exceeding 20 micromolar. The nanometer gap concentrates the light into an apex volume down to 70 zeptoliter (10−21 L), 7000-fold below the diffraction-limited confocal volume. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated photon counting, we measure fluorescence enhancement up to 100-fold, together with local density of optical states (LDOS) enhancement of 30-fold. The distinctive features of double nanoholes combining high local field enhancement, efficient background screening and relative nanofabrication simplicity offer new strategies for real time investigation of biochemical events with single molecule resolution at high concentrations. PMID:26511149

  15. Increases in kidney volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be detected within 6 months.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Andreas D; Poster, Diane; Krauer, Fabienne; Weishaupt, Dominik; Raina, Shagun; Senn, Oliver; Binet, Isabelle; Spanaus, Katharina; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2009-01-01

    Kidney volume growth is considered the best surrogate marker predicting the decline of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. To assess the therapeutic benefit of new drugs more rapidly, changes in kidney volume need to be determined over a short time interval. Here we measured renal volume changes by manual segmentation volumetry applied to magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained with an optimized T1-weighted acquisition protocol without gadolinium-based contrast agents. One hundred young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function had a significant increase in total kidney volume by 2.71+/-4.82% in 6 months. Volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 1.000 for intra-observer and 0.996 for inter-observer agreement, with acceptable within-subject standard deviations. The change in renal volume correlated with baseline total kidney volume in all age subgroups. Total kidney volume positively correlated with male gender, hypertension, albuminuria and a history of macrohematuria but negatively with creatinine clearance. Albuminuria was associated with accelerated volume progression. Our study shows that increases in kidney volume can be reliably measured over a 6 month period in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences. PMID:18971924

  16. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltze, Andrew J.; Wong, Terrence S.; Harland, Karisa K.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system, and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Materials and Methods Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n=235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes ≤ 8 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Results Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag-valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg PBW (SD 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.015). ARDS was not associated with pre-hospital tidal volume (p = 0.840). Conclusions Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation, but was not associated with ARDS. PMID:25813548

  17. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  18. Haystack Observatory VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Mike; Cappallo, Roger; Corey, Brian; Dudevoir, Kevin; Niell, Arthur; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Haystack Correlator during 2012. Highlights include finding a solution to the DiFX InfiniBand timeout problem and other DiFX software development, conducting a DBE comparison test following the First International VLBI Technology Workshop, conducting a Mark IV and DiFX correlator comparison, more broadband delay experiments, more u- VLBI Galactic Center observations, and conversion of RDV session processing to the Mark IV/HOPS path. Non-real-time e-VLBI transfers and engineering support of other correlators continued.

  19. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging. PMID:27314718

  20. Entropic Nonsignaling Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Rafael; Budroni, Costantino

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the concept of entropic nonsignaling correlations, i.e., entropies arising from probabilistic theories that are compatible with the fact that we cannot transmit information instantaneously. We characterize and show the relevance of these entropic correlations in a variety of different scenarios, ranging from typical Bell experiments to more refined descriptions such as bilocality and information causality. In particular, we apply the framework to derive the first entropic inequality testing genuine tripartite nonlocality in quantum systems of arbitrary dimension and also prove the first known monogamy relation for entropic Bell inequalities. Further, within the context of complex Bell networks, we show that entropic nonlocal correlations can be activated.